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Sample records for non-specific abdominal pain

  1. A randomized, controlled trial of routine early abdominal computed tomography in patients presenting with non-specific acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, E.; Watson, C.J.E.; Beadsmoore, C.; Groot-Wassink, T.; Fanshawe, T.R.; Smith, J.C.; Bradley, A.; Palmer, C.R.; Shaw, A.; Dixon, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effect of an initial early computed tomography (CT) examination versus standard practice (SP) on the length of hospital stay, diagnostic accuracy, and mortality of adults presenting with acute abdominal pain. Materials and methods: Two hundred and five adults presenting with acute abdominal pain were randomized to undergo an early CT examination or current SP, which comprised supine abdominal and erect chest radiography. One hundred and ninety-eight patients (99 in each arm) were included in the analysis. The primary endpoint was the duration of inpatient stay; secondary endpoints were diagnostic certainty and mortality. Results: There was no significant difference in the length of hospital stay between the two arms (p = 0.20). At randomization 36% (35 of 96) of CT patients and 49% (48 of 98) of SP patients were correctly diagnosed; 24 h after randomization the correct diagnosis had been established in 84% of CT patients and 73% of SP patients. This refinement in diagnostic certainty was significantly better in the CT group (p < 0.001). There was no difference in mortality between the two trial arms (p = 0.31). Conclusion: Early abdominal CT in patients with acute abdominal pain improves diagnostic certainty, but does not reduce the length of hospital stay and 6 month mortality

  2. Comparison of Abdominal Muscles Thickness Changes Different Postures beween Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients and Healthy Males by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rasouli

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: Abdominal muscles respond to postural changes and these muscles are automatically targeted by decreasing the seated stability. In non–specific chronic low back pain patients, activity of Transvers Abdominis was decreased and activity of Rectus Abdominis was increased.

  3. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information and related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). Gastro Kids , a ...

  4. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  5. Theeffectivenessofginger compress on non-specific low back pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theeffectivenessofginger compress on non-specific low back pain. ... for a total of ten sessions and control group (n=7) did not received any treatment. ... in pain relief and reduces functional disability in patients with non-specific low back pain.

  6. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or pain in your chest Seek immediate medical attention Have someone drive you to urgent care or ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  7. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  8. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  9. Antidepressants for non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urquhart, D. M.; Hoving, J. L.; Assendelft, W. W. J. J.; Roland, M.; van Tulder, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressants are commonly used in the management of low-back pain. However, their use is controversial. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to determine whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo for the treatment of non-specific low-back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY:

  10. Risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szita, Julia; Boja, Sara; Szilagyi, Agnes; Somhegyi, Annamaria; Varga, Peter Pal; Lazary, Aron

    2018-05-01

    Non-specific spinal pain can occur at all ages and current evidence suggests that pediatric non-specific spinal pain is predictive for adult spinal conditions. A 5-year long, prospective cohort study was conducted to identify the lifestyle and environmental factors leading to non-specific spinal pain in childhood. Data were collected from school children aged 7-16 years, who were randomly selected from three different geographic regions in Hungary. The risk factors were measured with a newly developed patient-reported questionnaire (PRQ). The quality of the instrument was assessed by the reliability with the test-retest method. Test (N = 952) and validity (N = 897) datasets were randomly formed. Risk factors were identified with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models and the predictive performance of the final model was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. The final model was built up by seven risk factors for spinal pain for days; age > 12 years, learning or watching TV for more than 2 h/day, uncomfortable school-desk, sleeping problems, general discomfort and positive familiar medical history (χ 2  = 101.07; df = 8; p < 0.001). The probabilistic performance was confirmed with ROC analysis on the test and validation cohorts (AUC = 0.76; 0.71). A simplified risk scoring system showed increasing possibility for non-specific spinal pain depending on the number of the identified risk factors (χ 2  = 65.0; df = 4; p < 0.001). Seven significant risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood were identified using the new, easy to use and reliable PRQ which makes it possible to stratify the children according to their individual risk. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  11. Acute non-specific low back pain in primary care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of non-specific low back pain typically results in a significant improvement ... and the potential benefits and risks associated with drug treatment, have been ... South African Family Practice 2014; 56(6):10-14. Open Access article ...

  12. Association of hypovitaminosis Dwith persistent non-specific musculoskeletal pains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, H.M.A.; Kamran, M.; Rehman, S.U.; Khan, D.A.; Hussain, K.

    2017-01-01

    The study was conducted in Pakistani population to find association of vitamin D deficiency with persistent non-specific musculoskeletal pains by comparing with pain free controls. Study Design: Case control study. Material and Methods: Patients aged 12 years or more presenting to Medical OPD with persistent nonspecific musculoskeletal pains for more than 3 months were selected as cases, while healthy individuals served as controls Results: A total of 60 cases (patients with persistent non-specific pains) presenting to medical outpatients department at Military Hospital Rawalpindi and 60 controls were studied. Mean age of cases was 43.9 +- 14.0 years and amongst controls were 33.2 +- 17.8 years. Mean serum vitamin D level of 32.8 nmol/L was reported in cases whereas mean serum vitamin D level amongst controls was 26.7 +- 17.8 nmol/L. Hypovitaminosis D amongst cases and controls was 86.6% and 95% respectively. The proportion of vitamin D deficiency did not differ significantly as compared to controls. There was non-significant difference in proportion of deficiency amongst cases and controls. Conclusion: Overall there was no association between persistent non-specific musculoskeletal pains and vitamin D deficiency. (author)

  13. Functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Madhusudan; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a relatively less common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder defined by the presence of constant or frequently recurring abdominal pain that is not associated with eating, change in bowel habits, or menstrual periods (Drossman Gastroenterology 130:1377-1390, 2006), which points to a more centrally targeted (spinal and supraspinal) basis for the symptoms. However, FAPS is frequently confused with irritable bowel syndrome and other functional GI disorders in which abdominal pain is associated with eating and bowel movements. FAPS also differs from chronic abdominal pain associated with entities such as chronic pancreatitis or chronic inflammatory bowel disease, in which the pain is associated with peripherally acting factors (eg, gut inflammation or injury). Given the central contribution to the pain experience, concomitant psychosocial disturbances are common and strongly influence the clinical expression of FAPS, which also by definition is associated with loss of daily functioning. These factors make it critical to use a biopsychosocial construct to understand and manage FAPS, because gut-directed treatments are usually not successful in managing this condition.

  14. Hepatitis A - frequency in children with non-specific abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R.; Ghafoor, T.; Sarfraz, M.; Hasan, N.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of subclinical hepatitis 'A' in children having non-specific abdominal symptoms. Subjects and Methods: Three hundred and sixty children of either gender, < 12 years of age, presenting with vague abdominal symptoms and no jaundice were evaluated for hepatitis. Eighty-eight (24.4%) children meeting the inclusion criteria of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), twice the upper limits of normal (90 IU/L), and normal serum bilirubin were labeled as subclinical hepatitis. Results: A total of 360 children were evaluated for vague abdominal symptoms and 96 (26.7%) of them had hepatitis on laboratory profile. Eight patients developed early jaundice and were excluded from the study. Out of 88 (24.4%) cases of subclinical hepatitis, 82 (93.2%) had hepatitis-A, 03 (3.4%) had hepatitis-B, while no causative agent was found in 03 (3.4%) children. The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain/discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and fever. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly was documented in 56% and 43% cases respectively. A history of exposure to a patient with hepatitis was present in 14/88 (15.9%) cases whereas no child was vaccinated against HAV. Serum ALT level declined to normal limits within 4 weeks for 77/88 (87.5%) cases and within 6 weeks for 84/88 (95.4%). All cases recovered spontaneously with out any complication. Conclusion: Hepatitis-A was rampant in children presenting with vague abdominal symptoms in our series. (author)

  15. Hepatitis A--frequency in children with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rahat; Ghafoor, Tariq; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Hasan, Najmul

    2004-06-01

    To study the frequency of subclinical hepatitis 'A' in children having non-specific abdominal symptoms. A descriptive study. This study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital (CMH), Peshawar from June to December 2000. Three hundred and sixty children of either gender, hepatitis. Eighty eight (24.4%) children meeting the inclusion criteria of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), twice the upper limits of normal (90 IU/L), and normal serum bilirubin were labelled as subclinical hepatitis. A total of 360 children were evaluated for vague abdominal symptoms and 96 (26.7%) of them had hepatitis on laboratory profile. Eight patients developed early jaundice and were excluded from the study. Out of 88 (24.4%) cases of subclinical hepatitis, 82 (93.2%) had hepatitis-A, 03 (3.4%) had hepatitis-B, while no causative agent was found in 03 (3.4%) children. The common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain/discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and fever. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly was documented in 56% and 43% cases respectively. A history of exposure to a patient with hepatitis was present in 14/88 (15.9%) cases whereas no child was vaccinated against HAV. Serum ALT level declined to normal limits within 4 weeks for 77/88 (87.5%) cases and within 6 weeks for 84/88 (95.4%). All cases recovered spontaneously with out any complication. Hepatitis-A was rampant in children presenting with vague abdominal symptoms in our series.

  16. Functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Ray E; Mayer, Emeran A; Aziz, Qasim; Drossman, Douglas A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Mönnikes, Hubert; Naliboff, Bruce D

    2006-04-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) differs from the other functional bowel disorders; it is less common, symptoms largely are unrelated to food intake and defecation, and it has higher comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. The etiology and pathophysiology are incompletely understood. Because FAPS likely represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, peripheral neuropathic pain mechanisms, alterations in endogenous pain modulation systems, or both may be involved in any one patient. The diagnosis of FAPS is made on the basis of positive symptom criteria and a longstanding history of symptoms; in the absence of alarm symptoms, an extensive diagnostic evaluation is not required. Management is based on a therapeutic physician-patient relationship and empirical treatment algorithms using various classes of centrally acting drugs, including antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The choice, dose, and combination of drugs are influenced by psychiatric comorbidities. Psychological treatment options include psychotherapy, relaxation techniques, and hypnosis. Refractory FAPS patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary pain clinic approach.

  17. Yoga treatment for chronic non-specific low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Skoetz, Nicole; Pilkington, Karen; Vempati, Ramaprabhu; D’Adamo, Christopher R; Berman, Brian M

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. Objectives To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and four trials registers to 11 March 2016 without restriction of language or publication status. We screened reference lists and contacted experts in the field to identify additional studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials of yoga treatment in people with chronic non-specific low back pain. We included studies comparing yoga to any other intervention or to no intervention. We also included studies comparing yoga as an adjunct to other therapies, versus those other therapies alone. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened and selected studies, extracted outcome data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors to obtain missing or unclear information. We evaluated the overall certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 12 trials (1080 participants) carried out in the USA (seven trials), India (three trials), and the UK (two trials). Studies were unfunded (one trial), funded by a yoga institution (one trial), funded by non-profit or government sources (seven trials), or did not report on funding (three trials). Most trials used Iyengar, Hatha, or Viniyoga forms of yoga. The trials compared yoga to no intervention or a non-exercise intervention such as education (seven trials), an exercise intervention (three trials), or both exercise and non

  18. Yoga treatment for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L Susan; Skoetz, Nicole; Pilkington, Karen; Vempati, Ramaprabhu; D'Adamo, Christopher R; Berman, Brian M

    2017-01-12

    Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and four trials registers to 11 March 2016 without restriction of language or publication status. We screened reference lists and contacted experts in the field to identify additional studies. We included randomized controlled trials of yoga treatment in people with chronic non-specific low back pain. We included studies comparing yoga to any other intervention or to no intervention. We also included studies comparing yoga as an adjunct to other therapies, versus those other therapies alone. Two authors independently screened and selected studies, extracted outcome data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors to obtain missing or unclear information. We evaluated the overall certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 12 trials (1080 participants) carried out in the USA (seven trials), India (three trials), and the UK (two trials). Studies were unfunded (one trial), funded by a yoga institution (one trial), funded by non-profit or government sources (seven trials), or did not report on funding (three trials). Most trials used Iyengar, Hatha, or Viniyoga forms of yoga. The trials compared yoga to no intervention or a non-exercise intervention such as education (seven trials), an exercise intervention (three trials), or both exercise and non-exercise interventions (two trials). All trials were at high risk of performance and detection bias because

  19. Muscle Control and Non-specific Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marc; Deckers, Kristiaan; Eldabe, Sam; Kiesel, Kyle; Gilligan, Chris; Vieceli, John; Crosby, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is the most prevalent of the painful musculoskeletal conditions. CLBP is a heterogeneous condition with many causes and diagnoses, but there are few established therapies with strong evidence of effectiveness (or cost effectiveness). CLBP for which it is not possible to identify any specific cause is often referred to as non-specific chronic LBP (NSCLBP). One type of NSCLBP is continuing and recurrent primarily nociceptive CLBP due to vertebral joint overload subsequent to functional instability of the lumbar spine. This condition may occur due to disruption of the motor control system to the key stabilizing muscles in the lumbar spine, particularly the lumbar multifidus muscle (MF). This review presents the evidence for MF involvement in CLBP, mechanisms of action of disruption of control of the MF, and options for restoring control of the MF as a treatment for NSCLBP. Imaging assessment of motor control dysfunction of the MF in individual patients is fraught with difficulty. MRI or ultrasound imaging techniques, while reliable, have limited diagnostic or predictive utility. For some patients, restoration of motor control to the MF with specific exercises can be effective, but population results are not persuasive since most patients are unable to voluntarily contract the MF and may be inhibited from doing so due to arthrogenic muscle inhibition. Targeting MF control with restorative neurostimulation promises a new treatment option. © 2017 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  1. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  2. Non-specific low back pain: occupational or lifestyle consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stričević, Jadranka; Papež, Breda Jesenšek

    2015-12-01

    Nursing occupation was identified as a risk occupation for the development of low back pain (LBP). The aim of our study was to find out how much occupational factors influence the development of LBP in hospital nursing personnel. Non-experimental approach with a cross-sectional survey and statistical analysis. Nine hundred questionnaires were distributed among nursing personnel, 663 were returned and 659 (73.2 %) were considered for the analysis. Univariate and multivariate statistics for LBP risk was calculated by the binary logistic regression. The χ(2), influence factor, 95 % confidence interval and P value were calculated. Multivariate binary logistic regression was calculated by the Wald method to omit insignificant variables. Not performing exercises represented the highest risk for the development of LBP (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.7-4.4; p  10 kg (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.5-3.8; p focusing on mechanical causes and direct workload in the development of non-specific LBP, the complex approach to LBP including genetics, psychosocial environment, lifestyle and quality of life is coming more to the fore.

  3. Back Schools for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Patrícia; Heymans, Martijn W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Esmail, Rosmin; Koes, Bart W; Poquet, Nolwenn; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G

    2017-08-03

    Many people with low back pain (LBP) become frequent users of healthcare services in their attempt to find treatments that minimise the severity of their symptoms. Back School consists of a therapeutic programme given to groups of people that includes both education and exercise. However, the content of Back School has changed over time and appears to vary widely today. This review is an update of a Cochrane review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effectiveness of Back School. We split the Cochrane review into two reviews, one focusing on acute and subacute LBP, and one on chronic LBP. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the effect of Back School on pain and disability for adults with chronic non-specific LBP; we included adverse events as a secondary outcome. In trials that solely recruited workers, we also examined the effect on work status. We searched for trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, two other databases and two trials registers to 15 November 2016. We also searched the reference lists of eligible papers and consulted experts in the field of LBP management to identify any potentially relevant studies we may have missed. We placed no limitations on language or date of publication. We included only RCTs and quasi-RCTs evaluating pain, disability, and/or work status as outcomes. The primary outcomes for this update were pain and disability, and the secondary outcomes were work status and adverse events. Two review authors independently performed the 'Risk of bias' assessment of the included studies using the 'Risk of bias' assessment tool recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We summarised the results for the short-, intermediate-, and long-term follow-ups. We evaluated the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. For the outcome pain, at short-term follow-up, we found very low-quality evidence that Back School is more effective than no

  4. On the relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, René; Walker, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients with non-specific neck pain. While a linear relationship between pain intensity and postural sway has been described in low back pain patients, no such investigation has been conducted in adults with non-specific neck pain....

  5. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.I.; Aurangzeb; Khan, I.; Bhatti, A.M.; Khan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  6. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  7. Core outcome measurement instruments for clinical trials in non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Boers, Maarten; Deyo, Richard A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Corbin, Terry P; Costa, Leonardo O P; Foster, Nadine E; Grotle, Margreth; Koes, Bart W; Kovacs, Francisco M; Christine Lin, Chung-Wei; Maher, Chris G; Pearson, Adam M; Peul, Wilco C; Schoene, Mark L; Turk, Dennis C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Terwee, Caroline B; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2017-01-01

    To standardize outcome reporting in clinical trials of patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP), an international multidisciplinary panel recommended physical functioning, pain intensity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as core outcome domains. Given the lack of consensus on

  8. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, René; Walker, B.

    2012-01-01

    is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed......Background: Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship...... in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS 11). The patients received three manual interventions (e. g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. Results...

  9. Maintenance of Pain in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewski, Danita I; Self, Mariella M; Williams, Amy E; Weidler, Erica M; Blatz, Allison M; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of 3 methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (ie, diary, parent report, child report). Seventy-six children (7-10 years old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18 to 24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Children's baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. Children who, however, displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. The presence of IBS symptoms in school-age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, whereas anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not.

  10. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  11. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  12. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  13. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, R.; Walker, B.

    2011-01-01

    compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were......Background: Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between...... pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less) with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90...

  14. Managing patients with acute and chronic non-specific neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhusen, Simon Sidenius; Bussières, André; French, Simon David

    2017-01-01

    was mainly reserved for chronic patients. Danish chiropractors' compliance with guidelines for neck-pain patients was low, but is neither worse nor better than what is seen for other complaints or health disciplines. Our findings suggest a need for active knowledge translation strategies and robust......Background: Non-specific neck pain represents a quarter of all chiropractic patient visits in Denmark. Evidence informed practice can help ensure providers use best available treatment, speed up patient recovery rate and reduce healthcare utilization. It is generally believed that Danish...... chiropractors treat according to best practice, but we do not know if this is true for management of neck-pain. The objective of this study was to investigate how Danish chiropractors treat patients with acute and chronic non-specific neck pain and determine if management is compliant with recent Canadian...

  15. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory sys...

  16. Biological risk indicators for recurrent non-specific low back pain in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M A; Stratton, G; Reilly, T; Unnithan, V B

    2005-03-01

    A matched case-control study was carried out to evaluate biological risk indicators for recurrent non-specific low back pain in adolescents. Adolescents with recurrent non-specific low back pain (symptomatic; n = 28; mean (SD) age 14.9 (0.7) years) and matched controls (asymptomatic; n = 28; age 14.9 (0.7) years) with no history of non-specific low back pain participated. Measures of stature, mass, sitting height, sexual maturity (Tanner self assessment), lateral flexion of the spine, lumbar sagittal plane mobility (modified Schober), hip range of motion (Leighton flexometer), back and hamstring flexibility (sit and reach), and trunk muscle endurance (number of sit ups) were performed using standardised procedures with established reliability. Backward stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed, with the presence/absence of recurrent low back pain as the dependent variable and the biological measures as the independent variables. Hip range of motion, trunk muscle endurance, lumbar sagittal plane mobility, and lateral flexion of the spine were identified as significant risk indicators of recurrent low back pain (plow back pain in a group of adolescents. These risk indicators identify the potential for exercise as a primary or secondary prevention method.

  17. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejer René

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less with non-specific low back pain. Methods Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11, an equal number of patients (n = 11 was enrolled per pain score. Results Generally, our results confirmed increased postural instability in pain sufferers compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were reached with an incremental change in NRS scores of two to three points. Conclusions COP mean velocity and sway area are closely related to self-reported pain scores. This relationship may be of clinical use as an objective monitoring tool for patients under treatment or rehabilitation.

  18. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, René; Walker, Bruce

    2011-07-15

    Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less) with non-specific low back pain. Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11), an equal number of patients (n = 11) was enrolled per pain score. Generally, our results confirmed increased postural instability in pain sufferers compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were reached with an incremental change in NRS scores of two to three points. COP mean velocity and sway area are closely related to self-reported pain scores. This relationship may be of clinical use as an objective monitoring tool for patients under treatment or rehabilitation.

  19. Effect of thoracic mobilization on respiratory parameters in chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babina, R; Mohanty, P P; Pattnaik, M

    2016-02-19

    Altered respiratory function has been found to be associated with back pain. Limited chest excursion in subjects with chronic low back pain (CLBP) may be due to co-contraction or bracing of erector spinae and abdominal muscles; their flexed spinal posture; and/or their compromised spinal stability resulting from dysfunctional transversus abdominis. To check for the effects of thoracic mobilization on respiratory parameters in subjects with chronic non-specific low back pain. Sixty-two subjects (excluding 11 dropouts) with CLBP of age group 30-60 were randomly allocated to two groups. Both groups received individualized treatment for low back pain (LBP) and HEP (home exercise program) regime of breathing exercises. In addition, group 1 received Maitland's Central postero-anterior vertebral pressure for thoracic spine (T1-T8). Total treatment duration was 10 sessions in 2 weeks (5 sessions/week). Results showed significant improvement in respiratory parameters viz. Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Sustained Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (SMIP) and Chest Wall Expansion (CWE) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) in both groups (pchronic low back pain with or without radiation to lower limbs when treated with thoracic central PA mobilization, in addition to LBP specific treatment and breathing exercises, show an improvement in respiratory parameters and reduction in disability.

  20. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Zeevenhooven, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Perera, Bonaventure Jayasiri Crispus; Benninga, Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common problem in pediatric practice. The majority of cases fulfill the Rome IV criteria for functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). At times, these disorders may lead to rather serious repercussions. Area covered: We have attempted to cover current knowledge on

  1. Structural Changes of Lumbar Muscles in Non-specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Dorien; Oosterwijck, Jessica Van; Meeus, Mira; Danneels, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar muscle dysfunction due to pain might be related to altered lumbar muscle structure. Macroscopically, muscle degeneration in low back pain (LBP) is characterized by a decrease in cross-sectional area and an increase in fat infiltration in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. In addition microscopic changes, such as changes in fiber distribution, might occur. Inconsistencies in results from different studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions on which structural changes are present in the different types of non-specific LBP. Insights regarding structural muscle alterations in LBP are, however, important for prevention and treatment of non-specific LBP. The goal of this article is to review which macro- and/or microscopic structural alterations of the lumbar muscles occur in case of non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), recurrent low back pain (RLBP), and acute low back pain (ALBP). Systematic review. All selected studies were case-control studies. A systematic literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and Web of Science. Only full texts of original studies regarding structural alterations (atrophy, fat infiltration, and fiber type distribution) in lumbar muscles of patients with non-specific LBP compared to healthy controls were included. All included articles were scored on methodological quality. Fifteen studies were found eligible after screening title, abstract, and full text for inclusion and exclusion criteria. In CLBP, moderate evidence of atrophy was found in the multifidus; whereas, results in the paraspinal and the erector spinae muscle remain inconclusive. Also moderate evidence occurred in RLBP and ALBP, where no atrophy was shown in any lumbar muscle. Conflicting results were seen in undefined LBP groups. Results concerning fat infiltration were inconsistent in CLBP. On the other hand, there is moderate evidence in RLBP that fat infiltration does not occur, although a larger muscle fat index was found in the erector spinae

  2. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, René; Walker, Bruce

    2012-03-21

    Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11). The patients received three manual interventions (e.g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. A clinically relevant decrease of four NRS scores in associated with manual interventions correlated with a significant decrease in postural sway. In contrast, if no clinically relevant change in intensity occurred (≤ 1 level), postural sway remained similar compared to baseline. The postural sway measures obtained at follow-up sessions 2 and 3 associated with specific NRS level showed no significant differences compared to reference values for the same pain score. Alterations in self-reported pain intensities are closely related to changes in postural sway. The previously reported linear relationship between the two variables is maintained as pain levels change. Pain interference appears responsible for the altered sway in pain sufferers. This underlines the clinical use of sway measures as an objective monitoring tool during treatment or rehabilitation.

  3. Exercise therapy for treatment of non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, J A; van Tulder, M W; Malmivaara, A; Koes, B W

    2005-07-20

    Exercise therapy is widely used as an intervention in low-back pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise therapy in adult non-specific acute, subacute and chronic low-back pain versus no treatment and other conservative treatments. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 3, 2004), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL databases to October 2004; citation searches and bibliographic reviews of previous systematic reviews. Randomized controlled trials evaluating exercise therapy for adult non-specific low-back pain and measuring pain, function, return-to-work/absenteeism, and/or global improvement outcomes. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data on study characteristics, quality, and outcomes at short, intermediate, and long-term follow-up. Sixty-one randomized controlled trials (6390 participants) met inclusion criteria: acute (11), subacute (6) and chronic (43) low-back pain (1 unclear). Evidence was found of effectiveness in chronic populations relative to comparisons at all follow-up periods; pooled mean improvement was 7.3 points (95% CI, 3.7 to 10.9) for pain (out of 100), 2.5 points (1.0 to 3.9) for function (out of 100) at earliest follow-up. In studies investigating patients (i.e. presenting to healthcare providers) mean improvement was 13.3 points (5.5 to 21.1) for pain, 6.9 (2.2 to 11.7) for function, representing significantly greater improvement over studies where participants included those recruited from a general population (e.g. with advertisements). There is some evidence of effectiveness of graded-activity exercise program in subacute low-back pain in occupational settings, though the evidence for other types of exercise therapy in other populations is inconsistent. There was evidence of equal effectiveness relative to comparisons in acute populations [pain: 0.03 points (95% CI, -1.3 to 1.4)]. This review largely reflects limitations of the literature, including low quality studies with heterogeneous

  4. Review article: the functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, A D; Drossman, D A

    2011-03-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a debilitating disorder with constant or nearly constant abdominal pain, present for at least 6 months and loss of daily functioning. To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of FAPS. A literature review using the keywords: functional abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome and functional gastrointestinal disorders. No epidemiological studies have focused specifically on FAPS. Estimates of prevalence range from 0.5% to 1.7% and tend to show a female predominance. FAPS pathophysiology appears unique in that the pain is caused primarily by amplified central perception of normal visceral input, rather than by enhanced peripheral stimulation from abdominal viscera. The diagnosis of FAPS is symptom-based in accordance with the Rome III diagnostic criteria. These criteria are geared to identify patients with severe symptoms as they require constant or nearly constant abdominal pain with loss of daily function and are differentiated from IBS based on their non-association with changes in bowel habit, eating or other gut-related events. As cure is not feasible, the aims of treatment are reduced suffering and improved quality of life. Treatment is based on a biopsychosocial approach with a therapeutic patient-physician partnership at its base. Therapeutic options include central nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities and peripheral modalities. These can be combined to produce an augmentation effect. Although few studies have assessed functional abdominal pain syndrome or its treatment specifically, the treatment strategies outlined in this paper appear to be effective. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  6. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood.

  7. Role of posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization versus thermotherapy in non specific lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Aftab Ahmed Mirza; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Ali, Syed Shahzad; Rahmani, Asim; Siddiqui, Faizan

    2018-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is the foremost cause to hamper an individual's functional activities in Pakistan. Its impact on the quality of life and work routine makes it a major reason for therapeutic consultations. About 90% of the cases with LBP are non-specific. Various options are available for the treatment of LBP. Posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization, a manual therapy technique; and thermotherapy are used in clinical practice, however evidence to gauge their relative efficacy is yet to be synthesised. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization versus thermotherapy in the management of non-specific low back pain along with general stretching exercises. A randomised controlled trial with two-group pretest-posttest design was conducted at IPM&R, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS). A total of 60 Non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) patients with ages from 18 to 35 years were inducted through non-probability and purposive sampling technique. Baseline screening was done using an assessment form (Appendix-I). Subjects were allocated into two groups through systematic random sampling. Group-A (experimental group) received posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization with general stretching exercises while group B (control group) received thermotherapy with general stretching exercises. Pain and functional disability were assessed using NPRS and RMDQ respectively. Pre & post treatment scores were documented. A maximum drop-out rate of 20% was assumed. Recorded data were entered into SPSS V-19. Frequency and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. Intragroup and intergroup analyses were done using Wilcoxon signed ranked test and Mann-Whitney Test respectively. A P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Pre and post treatment analysis revealed that P-values for both pain and disability were less than 0.05, suggesting significant difference in NPRS and RMDQ scores. Whereas, median scores for

  8. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory systems may have an important role. The management of patients with functional abdominal pain requires a tailored multidisciplinary approach in a supportive and empathetic environment in order to develop an effective therapeutic relationship. Patient education directed towards an explanation of the pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is in our opinion a prerequisite step and provides the rationale for the introduction of interventions. Interventions can usefully be categorised into general measures, pharmacotherapy, psychological interventions and 'step-up' treatments. Pharmacotherapeutic/step-up options include tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors and the gabapentinoids. Psychological treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy. However, the objective evidence base for these interventions is largely derived from other chronic pain syndrome, and further research is warranted in adult patients with functional abdominal pain. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  9. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical effect of deep water running on non-specific low back pain: A randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Cuesta-Vargas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate clinical effect of deep water running(DW R on non-specific low back pain. Outcome measures were pain, disability,general health and physical fitness.  Materials and methods: Experimental, randomized,  controlled trial involving 46 persons with CLBP over 15 weekswith two experimental processes, each three times a week. Evidence-basedProgram (EBP, personalized physical exercise program, manual therapy andhealth educa tion was the common process to which was added 20 minutes ofpersonalized intensity DW R at the aerobic threshold. Measurements were made at the beginning and end of the studyof pain, disability, general health and physical fitness.  R esults: The pain of CLBP were homogeneous at baseline.Significant changes between group were don’t found for pain in favour of the EBP+DW R group (p<0.3. The within-group differences were highly significant for all clinical and functional variables. The effect was clinically relevant forpain in the EBP+DW R group (0.70 and in the EBP group (0.58, and for disability degree it was also relevant in theEBP+DW R group (0.48 and relevant for the EBP group (0.36. Conclusion: Significant improvement was seen inCLBP when EBP was complemented with the high-intensity exercise of DW R.

  11. [Implementationof a low FODMAP dietforfunctional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranguán Castro, María Luisa; Ros Arnal, Ignacio; García Romero, Ruth; Rodríguez Martínez, Gerardo; Ubalde Sainz, Eduardo

    2018-04-20

    The low FODMAP diet (fermentable oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polyols) has shown to be effective in adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but there are few studies on paediatric patients. The aim of this study is to assess the implementation and the outcomes of a low FODMAP diet in the treatment of functional abdominal pain in children from a Mediterranean area. A table was designed in which foods were classified according to their FODMAP content, as well as a 'Symptoms and Stools Diary'. A prospective study was conducted on children with functional abdominal pain in our Paediatric Gastroenterology Unit. A total of 22 patients were enrolled in the trial, and 20 completed it. Data were collected of the abdominal pain features over a period of 3 days, and then patients followed a two-week low FODMAP diet. Afterwards, information about abdominal pain features was collected again. After the diet, they showed fewer daily abdominal pain episodes compared to baseline (1.16 [IQR: 0.41-3.33] versus 2 [IQR: 1.33-6.33] daily episodes, P=.024), less pain severity compared to baseline (1.41cm [IQR: 0.32-5.23] versus 4.63cm [IQR: 2.51-6.39] measured by 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, P=.035), less interference with daily activities, and less gastrointestinal symptoms. Only 15% of patients found it difficult to follow the diet. The implementation of a low FODMAP diet for 2 weeks in a Mediterranean paediatric population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain is possible with adapted diets. It was highly valued by patients, and they showed an improvement in abdominal pain symptoms assessed by objective methods. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that

  13. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Passive Stretch Versus Active Stretch on Intervertebral Movement in Non - Specific Neck Pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El - Aziz, A.H.; Amin, D.I.; Moustafa, I.

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain is one of the most common and painful musculoskeletal conditions. Point prevalence ranges from 6% to 22% and up to 38% of the elderly population, while lifetime prevalence ranges from 14,2% to 71%. Up till now no randomized study showed the effect between controversy of active and passive stretch on intervertebral movement. The purpose: the current study was to investigate the effect of the passive and active stretch on intervertebral movement in non - specific neck pain. Material and methods: Forty five subjects from both sexes with age range between 18 and 30 years and assigned in three groups, group I (15) received active stretch, ultrasound and TENS. Group II (15) received passive stretch, ultrasound and TENS. Group III (15) received ultrasound and TENS. The radiological assessment was used to measure rotational and translational movement of intervertebral movement before and after treatment. Results: MANOVA test was used for radiological assessment before and after treatment there was significant increase in intervertebral movement in group I as p value =0.0001. Conclusion: active stretch had a effect in increasing the intervertebral movement compared to the passive stretch

  15. Yoga Treatment for Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain (2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Alison; Gould Fogerite, Susan

    Wieland LS, Skoetz N, Pilkington K, Vempati R, D׳Adamo CR, Berman BM. Yoga treatment for chronic non-specific low back pain.Cochrane Database Syst Rev2017, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD010671. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010671.pub2. Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g., education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases, and four trials registers to 11 March 2016 without restriction of language or publication status. We screened reference lists and contacted experts in the field to identify additional studies. We included randomized controlled trials of yoga treatment in people with chronic non-specific low back pain. We included studies comparing yoga to any other intervention or to no intervention. We also included studies comparing yoga as an adjunct to other therapies, versus those other therapies alone. Two authors independently screened and selected studies, extracted outcome data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors to obtain missing or unclear information. We evaluated the overall certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 12 trials (1080 participants) carried out in the USA (seven trials), India (three trials), and the UK (two trials). Studies were unfunded (one trial), funded by a yoga institution (one trial), funded by non-profit or government sources (seven trials), or did not report on funding (three trials). Most trials used Iyengar, Hatha, or Viniyoga forms of yoga. The trials compared yoga to no intervention or a non

  16. The Evaluation of Pelvic Cross Syndrome in Patients with Non-specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Masoud A'rab

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was the investigation of relationship between muscle imbalance syndrome in the lumbo-pelvic area (Pelvic Cross Syndrome which includes the combination of weakness of phasic muscles and tightness of postural muscles, lordosis and chronic low back pain. Materials & Methods: This study was a comparative - cross-sectional and case – control research. A convenience sample of 600 subjects participated in this study. The size of lordosis, strength of abdominal and gluteal muscles and the extensibility of iliopsoas and back extensor muscles were measured in each group. The best cut-off values obtained from Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis were used to categorize subjects as having weak or tight muscles in accordance with the assumptions. The lumbar lordosis in subjects with and without patterns of muscle impairments, and the association between lordosis and low back pain was assessed. Data were analyzed by using statistical methods such as: ICC, Kolmogroff – Smirnoff, Independent T test and ANOVA. Results: The Findings of this study showed no significant difference in the degree of lordosis in subjects with and without patterns of muscle impairment in pelvic cross syndrome (P=0.38 and no significant difference in the lordosis between subjects with and without low back pain among those with specific patterns of muscle impairment in pelvic cross syndrome (P=0.62. Data also showed no significant association between degree of lordosis and low back pain (P=0.25. Conclusion: The findings of this study did not support the Pelvic Cross Syndrome theory, which indicates certain patterns of muscle impairment would lead to exaggerated LL and LBP. Our data show a relationship between muscle impairment and occurrence of LBP, but probably not via changing the degree of lumbar lordosis as it has been proposed in PCS theory.

  17. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Rebecca; Bloxham, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is a major health issue in Western countries and 60%–80% of adults are likely to experience low back pain. This paper explores the impact of back pain on society and the role of physical activity for treatment of non-specific low back pain. A review of the literature was carried out using the databases SPORTDiscuss, Medline and Google Scholar. A general exercise programme that combines muscular strength, flexibility and aerobic fitness is beneficial for rehabilitation of non-specific chronic low back pain. Increasing core muscular strength can assist in supporting the lumbar spine. Improving the flexibility of the muscle-tendons and ligaments in the back increases the range of motion and assists with the patient’s functional movement. Aerobic exercise increases the blood flow and nutrients to the soft tissues in the back, improving the healing process and reducing stiffness that can result in back pain. PMID:27417610

  18. [Approaching a child with chronic abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollee, L.A.A.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed anamnesis and a complete physical examination are essential for establishing the cause of recurrent abdominal pain in a child. Often no medical abnormalities will be found and additional diagnostic procedures may be limited. Most cases are functional in nature or have a psychosomatic

  19. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause ofabdominal pain: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. Objectives: In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Methods: Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ...

  20. Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in non-specific chronic low back pain subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostagi, Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci; Dias, Josilainne Marcelino; Pereira, Ligia Maxwell; Obara, Karen; Mazuquin, Bruno Fles; Silva, Mariana Felipe; Silva, Monica Angelica Cardoso; de Campos, Renata Rosa; Barreto, Maria Simone Tavares; Nogueira, Jéssyca Fernandes; Lima, Tarcísio Brandão; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Core outcome domains for clinical trials in non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Deyo, Richard A; Terwee, Caroline B; Boers, Maarten; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Corbin, Terry P; Costa, Leonardo O P; Foster, Nadine E; Grotle, Margreth; Koes, Bart W; Kovacs, Francisco M; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Chris G; Pearson, Adam M; Peul, Wilco C; Schoene, Mark L; Turk, Dennis C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2015-06-01

    Inconsistent reporting of outcomes in clinical trials of patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) hinders comparison of findings and the reliability of systematic reviews. A core outcome set (COS) can address this issue as it defines a minimum set of outcomes that should be reported in all clinical trials. In 1998, Deyo et al. recommended a standardized set of outcomes for LBP clinical research. The aim of this study was to update these recommendations by determining which outcome domains should be included in a COS for clinical trials in NSLBP. An International Steering Committee established the methodology to develop this COS. The OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to draw a list of potential core domains that were presented in a Delphi study. Researchers, care providers and patients were invited to participate in three Delphi rounds and were asked to judge which domains were core. A priori criteria for consensus were established before each round and were analysed together with arguments provided by panellists on importance, overlap, aggregation and/or addition of potential core domains. The Steering Committee discussed the final results and made final decisions. A set of 280 experts was invited to participate in the Delphi; response rates in the three rounds were 52, 50 and 45%. Of 41 potential core domains presented in the first round, 13 had sufficient support to be presented for rating in the third round. Overall consensus was reached for the inclusion of three domains in this COS: 'physical functioning', 'pain intensity' and 'health-related quality of life'. Consensus on 'physical functioning' and 'pain intensity' was consistent across all stakeholders, 'health-related quality of life' was not supported by the patients, and all the other domains were not supported by two or more groups of stakeholders. Weighting all possible argumentations, the Steering Committee decided to include in the COS the three domains that reached overall consensus and

  2. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor will also ask about the effects of foods and beverages upon the pain, and relationship to stools, sleep, ... during the evaluation, the physician will discuss specific management of ... IBD, celiac disease, and food allergies. If no specific cause is found and ...

  3. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  4. Acute abdominal pain: Advances in diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gans, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    The term acute abdominal pain refers to non-traumatic abdominal pain of rapid onset with duration of less than five days. Acute abdominal pain can be divided in urgent and non-urgent conditions. Urgent causes require treatment within 24 hours to prevent serious complications whereas for non-urgent

  5. The effectiveness of isometric exercises as compared to general exercises in the management of chronic non-specific neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad; Soomro, Rabail Rani; Ali, Syed Shahzad

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of isometric exercises as compared to general exercises in chronic non-specific neck pain. For this randomised controlled trial total 68 patients (34 each group) with chronic non-specific neck pain were recruited from Alain Poly Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi between May, 2012 and August, 2012. Simple randomisation method was used to assign participants into isometric exercise group and general exercise groups. The isometric exercise group performed exercises for neck muscle groups with a rubber band and general exercises group performed active range of movement exercises for all neck movements. Patients in both groups received 3 supervised treatment sessions per week for 12 weeks. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), North wick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire and goniometer were used to assess pain, disability and neck range of movements at baseline and after 12 weeks. Both interventions showed statistically significant improvements in pain, function and range of movement p = 0.001f or isometric exercise group, p = 0.04 for general exercises group and p = 0.001 for range of movement. However, mean improvements in post intervention VAS score and North wick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire score was better in isometric exercises group as compared to general exercise group. In conclusion, both interventions are effective in the treatment of chronic non-specific neck pain however; isometric exercises are clinically more effective than general exercises.

  6. Results of a Pilates exercise program in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, M C; Rodríguez-Torres, J; Cabrera-Martos, I; Díaz-Pelegrina, A; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, M E; Castellote-Caballero, Y

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of a Pilates exercise program on disability, pain, lumbar mobility, flexibility and balance in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Randomized controlled trial. University laboratory. A total of 54 patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Patients were randomly allocated to an experimental group ( n=27) included in a Pilates exercise program or to a control group ( n=27) receiving information in a form of a leaflet. Disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index), current, average and pain at it least and at its worst (Visual Analogue Scales), lumbar mobility (modified Shober test), flexibility (finger-to-floor test) and balance (single limb stance test) were measured at baseline and after the intervention. A between-group analysis showed significant differences in the intervention group compared to the control group for both disability scores, the Rolland-Morris questionnaire (mean change±standard deviation of 5.31±3.37 and 2.40±6.78 respectively and between-groups mean difference of 3.2 ± 4.12, p=0.003) and the Oswestry Disability Index ( ppain ( p=0.002) and pain at it least ( p=0.033), flexibility (0.032) and balance (0.043). An 8-week Pilates exercise program is effective in improving disability, pain, flexibility and balance in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

  7. Motor unit potential morphology differences in individuals with non-specific arm pain and lateral epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Linda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of non-specific arm pain (NSAP is unclear and the diagnosis is made by excluding other specific upper limb pathologies, such as lateral epicondylitis or cervical radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to determine: (i if the quantitative parameters related to motor unit potential morphology and/or motor unit firing patterns derived from electromyographic (EMG signals detected from an affected muscle of patients with NSAP are different from those detected in the same muscle of individuals with lateral epicondylitis (LE and/or control subjects and (ii if the quantitative EMG parameters suggest that the underlying pathophysiology in NSAP is either myopathic or neuropathic in nature. Methods Sixteen subjects with NSAP, 11 subjects with LE, eight subjects deemed to be at-risk for developing a repetitive strain injury, and 37 control subjects participated. A quantitative electromyography evaluation was completed using decomposition-based quantitative electromyography (DQEMG. Needle- and surface-detected EMG signals were collected during low-level isometric contractions of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB muscle. DQEMG was used to extract needle-detected motor unit potential trains (MUPTs, and needle-detected motor unit potential (MUP and surface detected motor unit potential (SMUP morphology and motor unit (MU firing rates were compared among the four groups using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Post hoc analyses were performed using Tukey's pairwise comparisons. Results Significant group differences were found for all MUP variables and for MU firing rate (p p p p p Conclusion The size-related parameters suggest that the NSAP group had significantly smaller MUPs and SMUPs than the control and LE subjects. Smaller MUPs and SMUPs may be indicative of muscle fiber atrophy and/or loss. A prospective study is needed to confirm any causal relationship between smaller MUPs and SMUPs and NSAP as found

  8. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed ...

  9. The effect of Kinesio Taping on postural control in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Soheila; Rojhani-Shirazi, Zahra; Shokri, Esmaeil; García-Muro San José, Francisco

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible alterations in postural control during upright standing in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain and the effect of Kinesio taping on the postural control. Twenty subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain and twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. The center of pressure excursion was evaluated before the intervention for both groups, and immediately after intervention for the low back pain group. Independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney test and repeated measure ANOVA were used for the statistical analysis of the data. There were significant differences in the center of pressure excursion between the low back pain group versus the healthy group. The results of the ANOVA demonstrated a statistically significant difference in the mean COP displacement and velocity before Kinesio Taping, immediately after, and 24 h after in the low back pain group. There are poor postural control mechanisms in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain. Kinesio taping seems to change postural control immediately and have lasting effects until the day after. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Office workers' risk factors for the development of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paksaichol, A.; Janwantanakul, P.; Purepong, N.; Pensri, P.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review prospective cohort studies to gain insights into risk factors for the development of non-specific neck pain in office workers as well as to assess the strength of evidence. Publications were systematically searched from 1980 - March 2011 in

  11. Nonspecific abdominal pain is a safe diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennel, David John Laurie; Goergen, Nina; Driver, Chris P

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess if a clinical diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is safe and if patients with this initial diagnosis are likely to require further investigation or surgical intervention. 3323 patients admitted with NSAP from July 1990 to September 2012 utilizing a prospective database of all surgical admissions were included. Readmission over the period of the study and specifically within 30 days of their initial presentation was identified together with any invasive investigation or surgical intervention. 319 children (9.6%) were subsequently readmitted with abdominal pain at some point during the study period. Of these, 78 (2.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. 118 (3.5%) children subsequently had an operation or invasive investigation some point following their initial admission. Of these 33 (0.6%) had the procedure within 3 months of the initial admission. 13 patients had an appendicectomy within 3 months of the initial presentation. Of these histology confirmed appendicitis in 8 patients. This gives an overall incidence of "missed" appendicitis of 0.2 % (8/3323). This study confirms that a clinical diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is safe in a pediatric population and the risk of "missing" appendicitis is only 0.2%. Patients and/or parents can be confidently reassured that the risk of missing organic pathology is very low. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interplay among pain intensity, sleep disturbance and emotion in patients with non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilabant Sen Sribastav

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Low back pain (LBP is the most common problem worldwide. There are several negative consequences of LBP, such as sleep disorders, work leave, disability, depression, anxiety, and poor quality of life. In this study, we designed to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disturbance in patients with non-specific LBP(NSLBP, and cross-correlation among sleep disorder, anxiety, depression and pain intensity in patients with NSLBP. Aim In this study, we designed to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disturbance in patients with NSLBP, and cross-correlation among sleep disorder, anxiety, depression and pain intensity in patients with NSLBP. Methods A cross-sectional self-assessment questionnaire survey was carried out in an outpatient clinic. Anonymous assessments were used to characterize the presence of NSLBP, PSQI, VAS, SF-36 form, ODI, BAI and BDI. Cross-correlation among the severity of NSLBP and sleep disturbance, anxiety, depression and life quality were evaluated. Results Patients with NSLBP have a higher incidence of sleep disorder, anxiety and depression, and higher ODI scores than healthy people without LPB (P < 0.01. NSLBP patients with sleep disorders have more severe anxiety, depression, an increased VAS score and poor daily living (P < 0.05. NSLBP patients with anxiety have declined sleep quality, poor daily living, decreased work and social skills, and increased LBP severity (P < 0.05. NSLBP patients with depression have declined sleep quality, poor daily living, decreased work and social skills (P < 0.05. Significant associations were found between the severity of NSLBP and sleep disorders, anxiety and ODI scores. Conclusion Psychological and social factors play an important role in the development of NSLBP. NSLBP leads to sleep disorders, which decrease the sleep quality and increase the unpleasant emotions and memories in return; these can exacerbate the severity of LBP, with the cycle repeating to form a vicious circle.

  13. Comparative effectiveness of manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument in treatment of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Peter

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a common problem and different forms of manual therapy are used in its treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the literature that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument for non-specific neck pain. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MANTIS and CINAHL were searched from their inception to October 2005 for all English language randomised clinical trials that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select the studies and these studies were then evaluated using validated criteria. Results Five such studies were identified. The methodological quality was mostly poor. Findings from the studies were mixed and no one therapy was shown to be more effective than the others. Conclusion Further high quality research has to be done before a recommendation can be made as to the most effective manual method for non-specific neck pain.

  14. Massage and modality effects on treatment of sub-acute and chronic non specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Panahi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP is the second most common medical complaint. It’s estimated that about 70-85% of the population will suffer at least one episode of LBP during their life. The aim of present study was to compare the effects of massage and modality in patient with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBPMethods: In this clinical trial study 30 women (MeanAge: 33.96±10.93 with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBP (Mean pain-duration:9.68±3.38 were included in the study and randomized into two equal groups; massage and modality. Patients in both group underwent 10 sessions treatment period. Pain (numerical-pain-scale,NRS, functional disability index (oswestry-disability-index,ODI and lumbar-flexion(modified-schober-testwere recorded before and immediately after treatment period. Data was analyzed using paired t-test and independent sample t-test.Results: Significant improvement showed in both groups separately in pain-intensity, disability level, and flexion after treatment (P<0.001. Statically significant improvement was seen in massage group in comparison to modality group for NRS & ODI after treatment (PNRS=0.015, PODI=0.013. There was a not significant change in point of lumber flexion between two groupsConclusion: The results showed that both massage and modality had beneficial effects on the improvement of pain, functional disability and lumbar flexion in patients with non-specific LBP. It seems that massage is better than modality for non-specific LBP in a short period of time.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of non-specific neck pain and low back pain : a systematic review with meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyamoto, Gisela Cristiane; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Cabral, Cristina Maria Nunes; van Dongen, Johanna M; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of patients with non-specific neck pain and low back pain. DESIGN: Systematic review of economic evaluations. DATA SOURCES: The search was performed in 5 clinical and 3 economic electronic databases. ELIGIBILITY

  16. A study of abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, K N; Dongol, U M S; Khadka, S B

    2008-01-01

    Pain abdomen is a common pediatric complaint that brings patient to the hospital in Nepal. Knowledge about its etiology and frequency helps in its evaluation and management. The present study was undertaken to find out the causes and their frequency of pain abdomen in Nepali children. Children with pain abdomen presenting at the emergency room and pediatric outpatient department of Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu from January, 2006 to December 2007 were clinically evaluated and investigated to find out the causes and frequency of their pain abdomen. The outcomes were tabulated and analyzed for interpretation. Of 444 patients attended, 356 completed investigations and came for follow up. Cause of pain abdomen was apparent in 117 (32.9%) only. 91.5% were medical causes, comprising predominantly of diarrheal diseases (28.3%), infantile colic (9.4%), urinary tract infection (7.7%) and acid peptic disease (6.8%). 8.5% causes were related to surgical conditions, which needed operative management. Secondary or extra-abdominal causes were found in 20 cases (17.1%). Pneumonia (2), functional (5), vulvovaginitis (2) and infantile colic (11) were predominant causes. Our study showed that the causes of pain abdomen in children were predominantly medical. Gastroenteritis was the most frequent cause. Secondary causes, including functional and emotional causes were infrequent. Small percentage needing surgical management formed a diagnostic challenge.

  17. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal

  18. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal

  19. [Design of an educational tool for Primary Care patients with chronic non-specific low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Current scientific evidence on the management of chronic non-specific low back pain highlights the benefits of physical exercise. This goal is frequently undermined due to lack of education of the subjects on the multifactorial, benign, and non-specific nature of low back pain, which can lead to a chronic disease with genuine psychosocial risk factors. Its influence may not only interfere with individual decision to adopt more adaptive coping behaviors, but also with the endogenous mechanisms of pain neuromodulation. Thus, the educational strategies and control of these factors have become important objectives to be incorporated into the management of the disorder and research guidelines. This paper presents the theoretical models and the scientific basis on which it has based the design of an educational tool for patients with chronic non-specific low back pain treated in Primary Care physiotherapy. Structure, content and objectives are also presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Zeevenhooven, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Perera, Bonaventure Jayasiri Crispus; Benninga, Marc A

    2018-04-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common problem in pediatric practice. The majority of cases fulfill the Rome IV criteria for functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). At times, these disorders may lead to rather serious repercussions. Area covered: We have attempted to cover current knowledge on epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors related to pathophysiology, clinical evaluation and management of children with FAPDs. Expert commentary: FAPDs are a worldwide problem with a pooled prevalence of 13.5%. There are a number of predisposing factors and pathophysiological mechanisms including stressful events, child maltreatment, visceral hypersensitivity, altered gastrointestinal motility and change in intestinal microbiota. It is possible that the environmental risk factors intricately interact with genes through epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to the pathophysiology. The diagnosis mainly depends on clinical evaluation. Commonly used pharmacological interventions do not play a major role in relieving symptoms. Centrally directed, nonpharmacological interventions such as hypnotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy have shown both short and long term efficacy in relieving pain in children with FAPDs. However, these interventions are time consuming and need specially trained staff and therefore, not currently available at grass root level. Clinicians and researchers should join hands in searching for more pragmatic and effective therapeutic modalities to improve overall care of children with FAPDs.

  1. Comparison of the efficacy of dexketoprofen and diclofenac in treatment of non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeziński, Krzysztof; Wordliczek, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Work-related loads, improper lifestyle, increasing obesity, and lack of adequate prophylaxy render low back pain (LBP) one of the most common causes of chronic pain worldwide. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two analgesic drugs on the effectiveness of therapy measured by pain intensity. and the degree of disability during treatment of chronic low back pain syndrome The retrospective analysis involved 185 patients undergoing treatment for chronic low back pain syndrome with dexketoprofen (DEX) and diclofenac (DIC). Patients' gender. place of residence. cause of the pain as well as pain intensity in the visual-analogue scale (VAS) and the disability degree (Oswestry Disability Index - ODI) were analysed. From the first week of treatment to the end of the observation. the DEX group exhibited significantly lower values of pain intensity on the disability index. The correlation coefficients between the parameters were significantly higher in the DEX group. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the choice of NSAIDs was the most significant factor determining the effectiveness of the treatment. The cause of the pain and place of residence did not have any impact on the treatment efficacy. The pharmacological properties of dexketoprofen contribute to its beneficial effect on the therapy used. which validates the potential use of DEX in LBP management. The significantly increased correlation between the aforementioned parameters suggests that administration of dexketoprofen in the management of non-specific low back pain results in a more rapid return to full physical activity and therefore more prompt return to work.

  2. Predictors of disability and absenteeism in workers with non-specific low back pain: A longitudinal 15-month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardon, Arnaud; Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Cantin, Vincent; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify baseline predictors of disability and absenteeism in workers with a history of non-specific low back pain (LBP). One hundred workers with a history of non-specific LBP participated in three evaluations (baseline, 7 and 15 months follow-up). Current and past history of LBP, clinical pain intensity, disability, absenteeism, fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, pain hypervigilance, work satisfaction and patient stratification based on "risk of poor clinical outcome assessment" (RPCO) were evaluated using questionnaires and interviews. In addition, cutaneous heat pain thresholds, cutaneous heat pain tolerance thresholds, conditioned pain modulation (CPM), trunk kinematics and muscle activity were measured during each evaluation. Logistic regression models were used to determine predictors of LBP disability and absenteeism at 15-months. Sixty-eight workers returned for the 15-month follow-up and among this sample, 49% reported disability and 16% reported absenteeism at follow-up. Baseline clinical pain intensity predicted disability (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.03-1.13) at 15-month while work satisfaction (OR = 0.93, 95%CI: 0.87-0.99) and RPCO (OR = 1.51, 95%CI: 1.05-2.16) predicted absenteeism. These results remained significant after adjustments for age, gender as well as type of work and intervention. This study highlights the importance of clinical pain and psychological factors in the prediction and potentially the prevention of future disability. Screening tools assessing these risk factors can be useful to evaluate workers with past history of low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of Pain and Pain-Related Brain Activity by Heterotopic Noxious Counter-Stimulation and Selective Attention in Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Alexandra; Rustamov, Nabi; Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Tessier, Jessica; Lehmann, Alexandre; Descarreaux, Martin; Rainville, Pierre; Piché, Mathieu

    2017-10-10

    The aim of the present study was to assess inhibition of pain and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) by heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) and by selective attention in patients with chronic non-specific LBP. Seventeen patients and age/sex-matched controls were recruited (10 men, 7 women; mean age ± SD: 43.3 ± 10.4 and 42.7 ± 11.1, respectively). On average, patients with LBP reported pain duration of 7.6 ± 6.5 years, light to moderate disability (19.3 ± 5.7/100) and low clinical pain intensity (21.8 ± 1.5/100), while pain catastrophizing, state and trait anxiety and depressive symptoms were not significantly different between groups (all p's >0.05). HNCS and selective attention had differential inhibitory effects on pain and SEP, but no difference was observed between groups. Across both groups, HNCS decreased pain (p = 0.06) as well as the N100 and the N150 components of SEP (p's selective attention only decreased pain (p attention was directed toward the HNCS stimulus (pselective attention. Importantly, this experiment was carefully designed to control for non-specific effects associated with the repetition of the test stimulus and the effect of an innocuous counter-stimulation. It remains to be determined if these results hold for patients with severe LBP and psychological symptoms or whether symptom severity may be associated with pain inhibition deficits. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of core stabilization exercises versus conventional exercises on pain and functional status in patients with non-specific low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inani, Sumit B; Selkar, Sohan P

    2013-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) results in significant level of disability, producing significant restriction on usual activity such as an inability to work. Nearly two third of the adults are affected by non-specific low back pain at some point in their lives. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of core stabilization exercises in comparison with conventional exercises on pain, functional status in patients with non-specific LBP. Thirty patients diagnosed with non-specific LBP participated with age group between 20-50 years and divided in to 2 groups, one with core stabilization exercises and other conventional exercises, 15 subjects each. Three months study, pre and post treatment outcome measures used were VAS for pain intensity and Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index for functional status (disability). Data were analyzed using student 't' test (paired and unpaired). Whereas both groups improved significantly from the initiation of treatment, a between-group comparison revealed significantly greater (ppain and functional status for experimental group compared to control group. Core stabilization exercises were found to be more effective in reducing pain and improving functional status by decreasing disability of patients with non-specific low back pain in comparison with conventional exercises.

  5. Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cerminara, Caterina; El Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain is an unusual partial epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal episodes of abdominal or visceral pain, disturbance of awareness and electroencephalographic abnormalities. We describe a new case of ictal abdominal pain in which gastrointestinal complaints were the only manifestation of seizures and review the previously described pediatric patients. In our patient clinical findings, ictal EEG abnormalities, and a good response to antiepileptic drugs allowed...

  6. Effects of Functional Fascial Taping on pain and function in patients with non-specific low back pain: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Alexander, Ron; Lo, Sing Kai; Cook, Jill

    2012-10-01

    To compare the short-term and medium-term effect of Functional Fascial Taping to placebo taping on pain and function in people with non-specific low back pain. A pilot randomized controlled trial with a 2-week intervention, and 2-, 6- and 12-week follow-up. Individuals with non-specific low back pain recruited from local communities. Forty-three participants with non-specific low back pain for more than 6 weeks were randomized into either Functional Fascial Taping group (n = 21) or placebo group (n = 22). The intervention group was treated with Functional Fascial Taping while the control group was treated with placebo taping. Both groups received four treatments over 2 weeks. Worst and average pain and function were assessed at baseline, after the 2-week intervention, and at 6 and 12 weeks follow-up. The Functional Fascial Taping group demonstrated significantly greater reduction in worst pain compared to placebo group after the 2-week intervention (P = 0.02, effect size = 0.74; 95% confidence interval 0.11-1.34). A higher proportion of participants in Functional Fascial Taping group attained the minimal clinically important difference in worst pain (P = 0.007) and function (P = 0.007) than those in placebo group after the 2-week intervention. There were no significant differences in either group's disability rating or clinically important difference in average pain at any time. Functional Fascial Taping reduced worst pain in patients with non-acute non-specific low back pain during the treatment phase. No medium-term differences in pain or function were observed.

  7. Inter-tester reliability of a new diagnostic classification system for patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tom Erik; Olsen, Steen; Laslett, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Most patients referred to physiotherapy with low back pain are without a precise medical diagnosis. Identification of subgroups of non-specific low back pain patients may improve clinical outcomes and research efficiency. A pathoanatomic classification system has been developed, classifying...... modest level of total agreement (39%) for the system as a whole might indicate that the utility of the system for general screening purposes is limited, compared with the utility in identification of particular syndromes. Due to low prevalence of positive findings in some of the syndromes, future work...... should focus on testing reliability on a larger sample of patients, and testing of validity and feasibility of the system....

  8. Abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnostic work-up in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Strandberg, C; Pærregaard, Anders

    1997-01-01

    We report on our experience with routine abdominal ultrasonography in 120 children (aged 3-15 years) with recurrent abdominal pain, in order to determine the diagnostic value of this investigation. Eight children (7%) revealed sonographic abnormalities: gallbladder stone (n = 2), splenomegaly (n...... = 1) and urogenital abnormalities (n = 5). The recurrent abdominal pain could be explained by these findings in only two (may be three) cases. CONCLUSION: The diagnostic value of abdominal ultrasonography in unselected children with recurrent abdominal pain is low. However, the direct visualization...... of the abdominal structures as being normal may be helpful to the parents and the child in their understanding and acceptance of the benign nature of recurrent abdominal pain....

  9. Effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment for non-specific lower back pain: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jungtae; Lee, Seunghoon; Park, Yeoncheol; Seo, Byung-Kwan; Cho, Yeeun; Kang, Jung Won; Lee, Yoon Jae; Ha, In-Hyuk; Lee, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sanghoon; Nam, Dongwoo

    2017-06-23

    Many patients experience acute lower back pain that becomes chronic pain. The proportion of patients using complementary and alternative medicine to treat lower back is increasing. Even though several moxibustion clinical trials for lower back pain have been conducted, the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion intervention is controversial. The purpose of this study protocol for a systematic review is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment for non-specific lower back pain patients. We will conduct an electronic search of several databases from their inception to May 2017, including Embase, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Wanfang Database, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, Korean Medical Database, Korean Studies Information Service System, National Discovery for Science Leaders, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System, the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, and KoreaMed. Randomised controlled trials investigating any type of moxibustion treatment will be included. The primary outcome will be pain intensity and functional status/disability due to lower back pain. The secondary outcome will be a global measurement of recovery or improvement, work-related outcomes, radiographic improvement of structure, quality of life, and adverse events (presence or absence). Risk ratio or mean differences with a 95% confidence interval will be used to show the effect of moxibustion therapy when it is possible to conduct a meta-analysis. This review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be presented at an international academic conference for dissemination. Our results will provide current evidence of the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment in non-specific lower back pain patients, and thus will be beneficial to patients, practitioners, and policymakers

  10. Laser heat hyperalgesia is not a feature of non-specific chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Ritter, A; Puta, C; Nötzel, D; Miltner, W H R; Weiss, T

    2014-11-01

    Based upon studies using mechanical pin-prick, pressure, electrical or heat stimuli applied to painful and/or pain-free parts of the body, chronic low back pain (CLBP) has been shown to be associated with generalized and enhanced pain sensitivity and altered brain responses to noxious stimuli. To date, no study examined the processing of noxious laser heat pulses, which are known to selectively excite thermal nociceptors located in the superficial skin layers, in CLBP. We studied laser heat pain thresholds (LHPTs) and nociceptive laser-evoked brain electrical potentials (LEPs) following skin stimulation of the pain-affected back and the pain-free abdomen using noxious laser heat stimulation in 16 CLBP patients and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs). We observed no statistically significant differences in LHPTs between CLBP patients and HCs, neither on the back nor on the abdomen. Furthermore, we found no evidence for altered brain responses between CLBP patients and HCs in response to stimulation of the back and abdomen in single-trial latencies and amplitudes of LEP components (N2, P2). The results are in contrast to previous studies showing hypersensitivity to different experimental noxious stimuli (e.g., contact heat). We argue that these discrepancies may be due to low spatial and temporal summation within the central nervous system following laser heat stimulation. Our results indicate important methodological differences between laser heat and thermode stimulation that should be taken into account when interpreting results, such as from thermal quantitative sensory testing. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  11. Pain following the repair of an abdominal hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Crawford, Michael Edward

    2010-01-01

    Pain and other types of discomfort are frequent symptoms following the repair of an abdominal hernia. After 1 year, the incidence of light to moderate pain following inguinal hernia repair is as high as 10% and 2% for severe disabling chronic pain. Postoperative chronic pain not only affects......, psychosocial characteristics, and surgical procedures) related to the postoperative pain conditions. Furthermore, the mechanisms for both acute and chronic pain are presented. We focus on inguinal hernia repair, which is the most frequent type of abdominal hernia surgery that leads to chronic pain. Finally...

  12. Effects of pilates on patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hung, Wei-Ching; Hung, Jia-Ling; Wu, Pei-Shan; Liaw, Li-Jin; Chang, Jia-Hao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of Pilates on patients with chronic low back pain through a systematic review of high-quality articles on randomized controlled trials. [Subjects and Methods] Keywords and synonyms for “Pilates” and “Chronic low back pain” were used in database searches. The databases included PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Medline, and the Cochrane Library. Articles involving randomized controlled trials with higher than 5 points on the PEDro scale were reviewed for suitability and inclusion. The methodological quality of the included randomized controlled trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Relevant information was extracted by 3 reviewers. [Results] Eight randomized controlled trial articles were included. Patients with chronic low back pain showed statistically significant improvement in pain relief and functional ability compared to patients who only performed usual or routine health care. However, other forms of exercise were similar to Pilates in the improvement of pain relief and functional capacity. [Conclusion] In patients with chronic low back pain, Pilates showed significant improvement in pain relief and functional enhancement. Other exercises showed effects similar to those of Pilates, if waist or torso movement was included and the exercises were performed for 20 cumulative hours. PMID:27821970

  13. Pharmacotherapy for chronic non-specific low back pain: current and future options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, Bart W; Backes, Daan; Bindels, Patrick J E

    2018-04-01

    Low back pain is associated with a large burden-of-illness. It is responsible for the most years lived with disability as compared with any other medical condition. A comprehensive overview of the evidence on pharmacological treatment options for chronic low back pain is lacking. This review evaluates the evidence for the benefits and risks of currently available pharmacological treatments for chronic low back pain. Areas covered: The authors focus on the recent (Cochrane) systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials covering paracetamol (acetaminophen), NSAIDs, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and other (new) drugs. Expert opinion: The overall impression of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for patients with chronic low back pain is rather sobering. The effects on pain reduction and improvement of function are commonly small to moderate and short lasting when compared to placebo. At the same time, the various types of drugs are not without side-effects. This holds especially true for serious side-effects associated with (prolonged) use of strong opioids. Future studies on patients with chronic back pain should aim to identify subgroups of patients with good response to specific pharmacological treatment to facilitate personalized care.

  14. Non-specific chronic orofacial pain patients' experiences of everyday life situations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eva; Nilner, Maria; Petersson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a complex condition with consequences that affect daily living. The aim was to analyse nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients'experiences of everyday life situations, using a qualitative approach. Eleven women and 3 men (21 to 77years) were selected through a purposive sampling among chronic orofacial pain patients referred to the Faculty of Odontology's orofacial pain unit at Malmö University, Malmö Sweden. All selected subjects agreed to participate. Data were obtained via two thematic in-depth interviews with each subject. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim.Text dealing with the subjects' daily experiences was identified in all interviews and analysed using qualitative content analysis that focused on manifest content. In everyday life situations, the analysis of nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients' narrations exposed a fear of conflict, of personal weakness, and of the intangible; they also exposed self-blame and avoidance of fear-triggering situations. Eight of the 14 subjects did not spontaneously mention any situation in which they were content during daily living. When the patients spoke about everyday life experiences, the main finding was that unpleasant emotions dominated the subjects'experiences. In conclusion, the chronic orofacial pain condition cannot be understood as an isolated phenomenon; it must be considered in rela- tion to the person who is suffering from the condition.

  15. Does cervical lordosis change after spinal manipulation for non-specific neck pain? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Michael; Branney, Jonathan; de Vries, Bas Penning; Breen, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    The association between cervical lordosis (sagittal alignment) and neck pain is controversial. Further, it is unclear whether spinal manipulative therapy can change cervical lordosis. This study aimed to determine whether cervical lordosis changes after a course of spinal manipulation for non-specific neck pain. Posterior tangents of C2 and C6 were drawn on the lateral cervical fluoroscopic images of 29 patients with subacute/chronic non-specific neck pain and 30 healthy volunteers matched for age and gender, recruited August 2011 to April 2013. The resultant angle was measured using 'Image J' digital geometric software. The intra-observer repeatability (measurement error and reliability) and intra-subject repeatability (minimum detectable change (MDC) over 4 weeks) were determined in healthy volunteers. A comparison of cervical lordosis was made between patients and healthy volunteers at baseline. Change in lordosis between baseline and 4-week follow-up was determined in patients receiving spinal manipulation. Intra-observer measurement error for cervical lordosis was acceptable (SEM 3.6°) and reliability was substantial ICC 0.98, 95 % CI 0.962-0991). The intra-subject MDC however, was large (13.5°). There was no significant difference between lordotic angles in patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.16). The mean cervical lordotic increase over 4 weeks in patients was 2.1° (9.2) which was not significant (p = 0.12). This study found no difference in cervical lordosis (sagittal alignment) between patients with mild non-specific neck pain and matched healthy volunteers. Furthermore, there was no significant change in cervical lordosis in patients after 4 weeks of cervical spinal manipulation.

  16. Do the key prognostic factors for non-specific neck pain have moderation effects? - A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, Arun Prasad; Robinson, Hilde Stendal; Vøllestad, Nina Køpke

    2018-05-01

    Neck pain is one of the common musculoskeletal conditions prevalent in the general population in Norway. Patients with neck pain, seek treatment from different health professionals such as general practitioners, physiotherapists, chiropractors and alternative medicine practitioners. The interventions for neck pain are typically provided in a primary care or specialised healthcare setting depending on the general practitioners' referral patterns. Clinicians are interested to know the various prognostic factors that can explain the recovery from neck pain. In order to know this, studies have explored and reported on a range of prognostic factors that contribute to the outcomes in patients with neck pain. This information is currently available only for neck pain following whiplash injury that has a traumatic origin. There is limited information on the role of prognostic factors specifically for non-specific neck pain without a traumatic episode. Moreover, there is a lack of data on whether there are interactions (moderation effects) between the prognostic factors. Therefore, we propose a hypothesis to elucidate whether the same set of prognostic factors found in neck pain associated with whiplash injuries are also identified in patients with neck pain without trauma. Additionally, we hypothesize that the association between a prognostic factor and the outcome variable (s) would be dependent on the third variable, thereby confirming the moderation effects. Clinicians could make informed decisions in the clinical management of neck pain with the knowledge of prognostic factors that explain the outcomes. It could also be used for the development of new interventions or for modifying the existing ones. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Imperforate Hymen - a rare cause of acute abdominal pain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imperforate hymen is a rare condition that presents with amenorrhea, cyclical abdominal pains and urine retention among pubertal girls. A 14 year old girl with imperforate hymen underwent hymenotomy for hematocolpometra, having presented with abdominal pains and tenesmus. Key words: Imperforate hymen, ...

  18. Acute abdominal pain : considerations on diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorenvliet, Boudewijn Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects on the diagnosing and management of patients with acute abdominal pain are investigated. 1; The efficacy and safety of standard outpatient re-evaluation for patients not admitted to the hospital after emergency department evaluation for acute abdominal pain. 2; The use

  19. Acute Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain in Childhood at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The assessment and diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood is clinically challenging. The epidemiologic correlates differ for different paediatric age groups and settings. Objectives To determine the clinical spectrum of acute abdominal pain in childhood at a referral Kenyan public hospital. Design

  20. Effects of Hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mahjur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain. Thirty men with chronic non-specific LBP divided into two hydrotherapy and control groups, randomly and equally. Electromyographic activity of erector spinae muscles and balance measured for both of groups before and after intervention. Hydrotherapy program was consisted of 24 sessions. Subjects in control group didn’t have any special activity. Two-way variance was used to interpret the data and correlated and independent T-tests were used for analysis of data at the significance level of (P0.05. However, a significant difference observed between two groups in balance index (P<0.05.

  1. EFFICACY OF POST ISOMETRIC RELAXATION VERSUS STATIC STRECHING IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NON SPECIFIC NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Haritha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain is a common problem within our society. Upper trapezius sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae are the most common postural muscles that tends to get shorten leading to restricted neck mobility. There is lack of evidence to allow conclusions to be drawn about the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation when compared with static stretching exercises. The aim is to find out the effectiveness of Post isometric relaxation Versus Static stretching in the subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation technique on pain by using Visual analoge scale, range of motion by using Universal Goniometry, and functional disability by using Neck Disability Index in chronic nonspecific neck pain. Methods: A convenient sample of thirty seven subjects was diagnosed with nonspecific neck pain was randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups on the basis of the inclusion criteria. The experimental group (n=15 received three sessions of post isometric relaxation technique for trapezius, sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae and control group (n=15 received the three sessions of static stretching for trapezius, sternocliedomastiod and levator scapulae for four weeks. Results: Non parametric tests demonstrated a statistically significant difference with experimental group showing greater improvement in ROM, VAS, and NDI than the control group and significant difference within the group also. Conclusion: This study concluded and the results reflected that post isometric relaxation technique group had better improvement in reduction of pain, improvement in the range of motion, and increased neck functional activities than the static stretching group.

  2. Unusual causes of abdominal pain: sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Shahid, Rabia K; Russo, Linda A

    2005-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive painful crises. The vascular occlusion in sickle cell disease is a complex process and accounts for the majority of the clinical manifestation of the disease. Abdominal pain is an important component of vaso-occlusive painful crises. It often represents a substantial diagnostic challenge in this population of patients. These episodes are often attributed to micro-vessel occlusion and infarcts of mesentery and abdominal viscera. Abdominal pain due to sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis is often indistinguishable from an acute intra-abdominal disease process such as acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, hepatic infarction, ischemic colitis and acute appendicitis. In the majority of cases, however, no specific cause is identified and spontaneous resolution occurs. This chapter will focus on etiologies, pathophysiology and management of abdominal pain in patients with sickle cell disease.

  3. Metabolic syndrome presenting as abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Y Al-Dossary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome represents a sum of risk factors that lead to the occurrence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The early detection of metabolic syndrome is extremely important in adults who are at risk. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the metabolic syndrome are not yet clear, insulin resistance plays a key role that could explain the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in untreated metabolic syndrome patients. Here, we present the case of a 26-year-old male who was diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and severe hypertriglyceridemia after presenting with abdominal pain. Although hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia are the most common predictors of metabolic syndrome, clinicians need to be vigilant for unexpected presentations in patients at risk for metabolic syndrome. This case sheds light on the importance of early detection.

  4. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cabe, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anorexia and haematemesis. The patient was previously diagnosed with latent tuberculosis (TB). On examination, his abdomen was diffusely tender, with localised guarding in the right iliac fossa. CT imaging of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a low volume of ascites, diffuse studding of the peritoneum, omental caking and several bulky low-density lymph nodes in the retroperitoneum. A laparoscopy was performed to obtain a peritoneal biopsy. Histology demonstrated fragments of peritoneum with necrotising granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in keeping with an infectious process, favouring TB. He was commenced on rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and pyridoxine under the direct observed therapy by the infectious diseases team. In view of his extensive peritoneal involvement, he was empirically started on high-dose prednisolone for symptomatic control and to reduce complications related to peritoneal adhesions.

  5. [Clinical Approach to Abdominal Pain as Functional Origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2018-02-25

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom that patients refer to a hospital. Organic causes should be differentiated in patients with abdominal pain and treatment should be administered in accordance with the causes. A meticulous history taking and physical examination are highly useful in making a diagnosis, and blood tests, imaging modalities, and endoscopy are useful for confirming diagnosis. However, in many cases, patients have functional disorders with no obvious abnormal findings obtained even if many diagnostic tests are performed. Patients with functional disorders usually complain the vague abdominal pain located in the center and other portions of the abdominal area. Although the most representative disease is irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain syndrome is currently researched as a new disease entity of functional abdominal pain. As various receptors related to functional abdominal pain have been discovered, drugs associated with those receptors are used to treat the disorders, and additional new drugs are vigorously developed. In addition, medical therapy with pharmacological or non-pharmacological psychiatric treatment is effective for treating functional abdominal pain.

  6. Effects of core stabilization with and without conventional physical therapy for the management of non-specific low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoukat, F.; Ahmed, A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of core stabilization exercises with conventional physiotherapy for the management of non-specific low back pain (LBP). Methodology: This experimental comparative study was conducted at Department of Physiotherapy, PSRD hospital, Ferozpur Road Lahore. The study involved 40 subjects diagnosed with non-specific LBP with age ranges from 18 - 65 years. Patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: treated with core stabilization exercises and conventional physiotherapy. Group - B (Control Group): In this group, patients were treated by conventional physiotherapy alone. The outcome measures were pain and physical functional outcomes. Pain was measured by using Visual Analo- gue Scale (V AS) and the physical functional outcomes of patients were measured by using Modified Oswes- tery Disability Questionnaire (MODQ). Results: By applying paired t-test in group - A, the p-values obtained for VAS and MODQ were statisti- cally significant (i.e., p = 0.000, p = 0.000 respectively) while in group - B, the p-values for VAS and MODQ were also found to be significant (p = 0.000, p = 0.000 respectively). By applying repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), p-values were find to be insignificant for VAS (p = 0.09) and MODQ (p = 0.018). Conclusion: Both groups showed improvement in severity of pain and functional activity but the group- A that was given core stabilization exercises along with conventional treatment showed same improve- ment in pain and functional status as shown by group- B so any of the intervention can be used to gain better results as both are equally effective. (author)

  7. Comparison of hand grip strength and upper limb pressure pain threshold between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Calvo Lobo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background There is a high prevalence of non-specific shoulder pain associated with upper limb functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID of grip strength and pressure pain threshold (PPT in the upper limb between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain. Methods A case-control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE criteria. A sample of 132 shoulders (mean ± SD years with (n = 66; 76.04 ± 7.58 and without (n = 66; 75.05 ± 6.26 non-specific pain were recruited. The grip strength and PPT of the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB muscles were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences (mean ± SD; P-value for anterior deltoid PPT (2.51 ± 0.69 vs 3.68 ± 0.65, kg/cm2; P < .001, ECRB PPT (2.20 ± 0.60 vs 3.35 ± 0.38 kg/cm2; P < .001 and grip strength (20.78 ± 10.94 vs 24.63 ± 9.38 kg; P = .032 between shoulders with and without non-specific pain, respectively. Discussion The MCID of 1.17 kg/cm2, 1.15 kg/cm2 and 3.84 kg were proposed for anterior deltoid PPT, ECRB PPT and grip strength, respectively, to assess the upper limb of older adults with non-specific shoulder pain after treatment. In addition, univariate and multivariate (linear regression and regression trees analyses may be used to consider age distribution, sex, pain intensity, grip strength and PPT in older adults including clinical and epidemiological studies with non-specific shoulder pain.

  8. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits-Engelsman Bouwien CM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used in daily practice. Methods A computerised literature search was performed in the Medline, CINAHL and Embase databases from 1980 to January 2007. Two reviewers independently assessed the clinimetric properties of identified measurement methods, using a checklist of generally accepted criteria for reproducibility (inter- and intra-observer reliability and agreement, construct validity, responsiveness and feasibility. Results The search identified a total of 16 studies. The instruments or tests included were: muscle endurance tests for short neck flexors, craniocervical flexion test with an inflatable pressure biofeedback unit, manual muscle testing of neck musculature, dynamometry and functional lifting tests (the cervical progressive iso-inertial lifting evaluation (PILE test and the timed weighted overhead test. All the articles included report information on the reproducibility of the tests. Acceptable intra- and inter-observer reliability was demonstrated for t enduranctest for short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test. Construct validity and responsiveness have hardly been documented for tests on muscle functioning. Conclusion The endurance test of the short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test can be regarded as appropriate instruments for measuring different aspects of neck muscle function in patients with non-specific neck pain. Common methodological flaws in the studies were their small sample size and an inappropriate description of the study design.

  9. Laparoscopy in unexplained abdominal pain: surgeon's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.T.; Waqar, S.H.; Zahid, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Results: Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients. (author)

  10. The efficacy of adhesiolysis on chronic abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerner-Rasmussen, Jonas; Burcharth, Jakob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal adhesions are a frequent reason for chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the evidence of performing laparoscopic adhesiolysis as a treatment for patients with chronic abdominal pain. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Cen...... Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for trials performing lysis of adhesions on patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain. Clinical studies on patients being treated for chronic abdominal pain with surgical adhesiolysis were included. The main outcome of the study...... chronic abdominal pain. A total of 22 trials were identified as case-series and included no control group. Three studies were identified as randomized controlled trials (RCT). A benefit of the intervention varied from 16 to 88 % in the non-randomized studies, with the majority reporting pain relief...... no difference between the intervention and control group. CONCLUSION: The identified studies showed promising but preliminary results of laparoscopic adhesiolysis as a treatment of chronic abdominal pain. The evidence for laparoscopic adhesiolysis is not sufficient to make definitive conclusions....

  11. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire...... to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort.Results:Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women....../discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured....

  12. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire....../discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured....... to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort.Results:Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women...

  13. Core outcome measurement instruments for clinical trials in non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Boers, Maarten; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Disability Index version 2.1a (ODI 2.1a) for physical functioning (78% agreement) and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain intensity (75% agreement). No consensus was achieved on any HRQoL instrument, although the Short Form 12 (SF12) approached the consensus threshold (64% agreement). In Round 2...... COSMIN methodology. Researchers, clinicians and patients (n = 207) were invited in a two-round Delphi survey to generate consensus ( ≥ 67% agreement among participants) on which instruments to endorse. Response rates were 44% and 41%, respectively. In Round 1, consensus was achieved on the Oswestry......, consensus was reached on a NRS version with a 1-week recall period (96% agreement). Various participants requested one free-to-use instrument per domain. Considering all issues together, recommendations on core instruments were formulated: ODI 2.1a or 24-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire...

  14. VISCERAL ABDOMINAL PAIN AND OPPORTUNITIES OF SPASMOLYTIC TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Kornienko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of treatment of 30 children with visceral abdominal pain caused by different etiological factors with neurotropic selective m9cholinergic antagonist hyoscine butilbromide (buscopan are presented in this article. Two groups of children were treated with hyoscine butilbromide and drotaverine accordingly. Administration of hyoscine butilbromide allows to stop pain in 93% of patients; mean duration of abdominal pain was 3,4 ± 1,2 days (4,2 ± 1,4 days in children treated with drotaverine, р < 0,05. Activity of dyspeptic disorders was decreased at the time of treatment. a tolerance to hyoscine butilbromide was satisfactory, and no adverse events were registered. hyoscine butilbromide is effective in treatment of visceral abdominal pain in children, allowing shortening its duration more actively then drotaverine.Key words: children, visceral abdominal pain, hyoscine butilbromide.

  15. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Tachamo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiploic appendagitis (EA is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome.

  16. Individual preferences for physical exercise as secondary prevention for non-specific low back pain: A discrete choice experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Aboagye

    Full Text Available Exercise is effective in improving non-specific low back pain (LBP. Certain components of physical exercise, such as the type, intensity and frequency of exercise, are likely to influence participation among working adults with non-specific LBP, but the value and relative importance of these components remain unknown. The study's aim was to examine such specific components and their influence on individual preferences for exercise for secondary prevention of non-specific LBP among working adults.In a discrete choice experiment, working individuals with non-specific LBP answered a web-based questionnaire. Each respondent was given ten pairs of hypothetical exercise programs and asked to choose one option from each pair. The choices comprised six attributes of exercise (i.e., type of training, design, intensity, frequency, proximity and incentives, each with either three or four levels. A conditional logit regression that reflected the random utility model was used to analyze the responses.The final study population consisted of 112 participants. The participants' preferred exercise option was aerobic (i.e., cardiovascular rather than strength training, group exercise with trainer supervision, rather than individual or unsupervised exercise. They also preferred high intensity exercise performed at least once or twice per week. The most popular types of incentive were exercise during working hours and a wellness allowance rather than coupons for sports goods. The results show that the relative value of some attribute levels differed between young adults (age ≤ 44 years and older adults (age ≥ 45 years in terms of the level of trainer supervision required, exercise intensity, travel time to exercise location and financial incentives. For active study participants, exercise frequency (i.e., twice per week, 1.15; CI: 0.25; 2.06 influenced choice of exercise. For individuals with more than one child, travel time (i.e., 20 minutes, -0.55; CI: 0

  17. Is physiotherapy integrated virtual walking effective on pain, function, and kinesiophobia in patients with non-specific low-back pain? Randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Yelvar, Gul Deniz; Çırak, Yasemin; Dalkılınç, Murat; Parlak Demir, Yasemin; Guner, Zeynep; Boydak, Ayşenur

    2017-02-01

    According to literature, virtual reality was found to reduce pain and kinesiophobia in patients with chronic pain. The purpose of the study was to investigate short-term effect of the virtual reality on pain, function, and kinesiophobia in patients with subacute and chronic non-specific low-back pain METHODS: This randomised controlled study in which 44 patients were randomly assigned to the traditional physiotherapy (control group, 22 subjects) or virtual walking integrated physiotherapy (experimental group, 22 subjects). Before and after treatment, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), TAMPA Kinesiophobia Scale (TKS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Timed-up and go Test (TUG), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), and Single-Leg Balance Test were assessed. The interaction effect between group and time was assessed by using repeated-measures analysis of covariance. After treatment, both groups showed improvement in all parameters. However, VAS, TKS, TUG, and 6MWT scores showed significant differences in favor of the experimental group. Virtual walking integrated physiotherapy reduces pain and kinesiophobia, and improved function in patients with subacute and chronic non-specific low-back pain in short term.

  18. Exercise capacity in non-specific chronic low back pain patients : A lean body mass-based Astrand bicycle test; Reliability, validity and feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, Audy P.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    Objective Measurement of exercise capacity is essential in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, the conventional Astrand bicycle test is not feasible in patients with a very poor aerobic capacity. Therefore the Astrand bicycles test for non-specific CLBP patients based

  19. The efficacy of Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides with and without Isometric Exercise Training in Non-specific Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Shakil-Ur-Rehman, Syed; Sibtain, Fozia

    2014-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs) with and without Isometric Exercise Training Program (IETP) in Non-specific Neck Pain (NSNP) Methods: This randomized control trial of one year duration was conducted at out-patient department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar, Pakistan from July 2012 to June 2013. The sample of 102 patients of NSNP were randomly selected through simple random sampling technique, and placed into two groups. The SNAGs manual physical therapy technique with IETP was applied on 51 patients in group A and SNAGs manual physical therapy techniques was applied alone on 51 patients in group B. The duration of intervention was 6 weeks, at 4 times per week. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for neck pain were assessment tools used for all patients before and after 6 weeks of physical therapy intervention. All the patients were assessed through NDI and VAS before intervention and at the completion of 6 weeks program. The data of all 102 was analyzed by SPSS-20 and statistical test was applied at 95% level of significance determine the efficacy of both the treatments interventions and compare with each other. The patients in group A, treated with SNAGs and followed by IETP for 6 weeks, demonstrated more improvement in pain and physical activity as assessed by VAS (p=0.013) and NDI (p=0.003), as compared to the patients treated with SNAGS alone, as pain and function assessed by VAS (p=0.047) and NDI (p=0.164). In group A the NDI score improved from 40 to 15 and VAS from 7 to 4, while in group B the NDI score improved from 42 to 30 and VAS from 7 to 4. Patients with non-specific neck pain treated with SNAGs manual physical therapy techniques and followed by IETP was more effective in reduction of pain and enhancement of function, as compared to those patients treated with SNAGs manual physical therapy techniques alone.

  20. Physical risk factors for developing non-specific neck pain in office workers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Deokhoon; Zoe, Michaleff; Johnston, Venerina; O'Leary, Shaun

    2017-07-01

    Identifying risk factors associated with the development of work-related neck pain in office workers is necessary to facilitate the development of prevention strategies that aim to minimise this prevalent and costly health problem. The aim of this systematic review is to identify individual worker (e.g., lifestyle activity, muscular strength, and posture) and workplace (e.g., ergonomics and work environment) physical factors associated with the development of non-specific neck pain in office workers. Studies from 1980 to 2016 were identified by an electronic search of Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychlnfo and Proquest databases. Two authors independently screened search results, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias using the epidemiological appraisal instrument (EAI). A random effect model was used to estimate the risk of physical factors for neck pain. Twenty papers described the findings of ten prospective cohort studies and two randomized controlled trials. Low satisfaction with the workplace environment (pooled RR 1.28; CI 1.07-1.55), keyboard position close to the body [pooled RR 1.46; (CI 1.07-1.99)], low work task variation [RR 1.27; CI (1.08-1.50)] and self-perceived medium/high muscular tension (pooled RR 2.75/1.82; CI 1.60 /1.14-4.72/2.90) were found to be risk factors for the development of neck pain. This review found evidence for a few number of physical risk factors for the development of neck pain, however, there was also either limited or conflicting factors. Recommendations for future studies evaluating risk factors are reported and how these may contribute to the prevention of neck pain in office workers.

  1. Augmented Feedback System to Support Physical Therapy of Non-specific Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Dominique; Degen, Markus; Stanimirov, Michael; Kool, Jan; Scheermesser, Mandy; Oesch, Peter; Neuhaus, Cornelia

    Low back pain is an important problem in industrialized countries. Two key factors limit the effectiveness of physiotherapy: low compliance of patients with repetitive movement exercises, and inadequate awareness of patients of their own posture. The Backtrainer system addresses these problems by real-time monitoring of the spine position, by providing a framework for most common physiotherapy exercises for the low back, and by providing feedback to patients in a motivating way. A minimal sensor configuration was identified as two inertial sensors that measure the orientation of the lower back at two points with three degrees of freedom. The software was designed as a flexible platform to experiment with different hardware, and with various feedback modalities. Basic exercises for two types of movements are provided: mobilizing and stabilizing. We developed visual feedback - abstract as well as in the form of a virtual reality game - and complemented the on-screen graphics with an ambient feedback device. The system was evaluated during five weeks in a rehabilitation clinic with 26 patients and 15 physiotherapists. Subjective satisfaction of subjects was good, and we interpret the results as encouraging indication for the adoption of such a therapy support system by both patients and therapists.

  2. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain; Celiac Truncus Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Birkan

    2016-01-01

    In this case we presented a patient who were admitted to surgery department with complaints of abdominal pain and nausea. There were no pathological findings on physical examination, direct abdominal x-ray, chest radiograph and biochemical parameters. At proximal of the celiac trunk, it was shown approximately 3x2 cm in size fusiform aneurysmal dilatation on the patient%u2019s abdominal ultrasonography and turbulence, arterial flow on the patient%u2019s abdominal doppler ultrasonography subsequently. In abdominal computed tomography we detected dense calcifications, dilatation and hypodensities that may belong to a thrombus in the lumen superior mesenteric vein (SMV. At the same time, approximately 3.5 cm segment of trunk celiak we observed aneurysm dilatation which reaching 2 cm at the widest point. Celiac trunk aneurysm is a rare cause of abdominal pain and often noticed after the complicated, thus it must always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Common Functional Gastroenterologic Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in a variety of peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation, luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be very helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. PMID:27492916

  4. A novel method for neck coordination exercise – a pilot study on persons with chronic non-specific neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björklund Martin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common problem and is often associated with changes in sensorimotor functions, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity of the neck, altered coordination of the cervical muscles, and increased postural sway. In line with these findings there are studies supporting the efficacy of exercises targeting different aspects of sensorimotor function, for example training aimed at improving proprioception and muscle coordination. To further develop this type of exercises we have designed a novel device and method for neck coordination training. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical applicability of the method and to obtain indications of preliminary effects on sensorimotor functions, symptoms and self-rated characteristics in non-specific chronic neck pain Methods The study was designed as an uncontrolled clinical trial including fourteen subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. A new device was designed to allow for an open skills task with adjustable difficulty. With visual feedback, subjects had to control the movement of a metal ball on a flat surface with a rim strapped on the subjects' head. Eight training sessions were performed over a four week period. Skill acquisition was measured throughout the intervention period. After intervention subjects were interviewed about their experience of the exercise and pain and sensorimotor functions, including the fast and slow components of postural sway and jerkiness-, range-, position sense-, movement time- and velocity of cervical rotation, were measured. At six-month follow up, self-rated pain, health and functioning was collected. Results The subjects improved their skill to perform the exercise and were overall positive to the method. No residual negative side-effects due to the exercise were reported. After intervention the fast component of postural sway (p = 0.019 and jerkiness of cervical rotation (p = 0.032 were reduced. The follow up

  5. The effects of spinal support device on pain and extensibility of the hamstrings in patients with non-specific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Eun Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Moon, Jong Hoon; Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Won, Young Sik; Kim, Sung-Jin; Hahm, Suk-Chan; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of spinal support device (SSD) on pain and hamstring extensibility in patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). [Subjects and Methods] 20 patients with NSLBP were recruited and randomly assigned to either the SSD group or the control group. In the SSD group, SSD was applied; in the control group, bed rest in supine position was performed. Both groups underwent treatment 20?min/day, 3 times a week, for a duration of 4...

  6. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  7. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the “Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney.” A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang, along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  8. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang-Gue

    2014-06-01

    A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the " Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney ." A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang , along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  9. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the ?Yang deficiency of sp...

  10. Recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents with anxiety and depression disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fastralina Fastralina; Sri Sofyani; M. Joesoef Simbolon; Iskandar Z. Lubis

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depression disorders in adolescents may affect their academic performances and social functioning at school. Adolescents with these disorders sometimes develop recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Objective To assess the occurence of recurrent abdominal pain among adolescents with anxiety and depression disorders Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from August to September 2009 in 12-18 year-old adolescents from 3 junior high schools and 3 se...

  11. Recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents with anxiety and depression disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fastralina; Sri Sofyani; M. Joesoef Simbolon; Iskandar Z. Lubis

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depression disorders in adolescents may affect their academic performances and social functioning at school. Adolescents with these disorders sometimes develop recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Objective To assess the occurence of recurrent abdominal pain among adolescents with anxiety and depression disorders Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from August to September 2009 in 12–18 year-old adolescents from 3 junior high schools and 3 senior high school...

  12. Increased auditory startle reflex in children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Mirte J; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A; Koelman, Johannes H T M; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (13 irritable bowel syndrome [IBS], 7 functional abdominal pain syndrome; mean age, 12.4 years; 15 girls) and 23 control subjects (14 girls; mean age, 12.3 years) using a case-control design. The activity of 6 left-sided muscles and the sympathetic skin response were obtained by an electromyogram. We presented sudden loud noises to the subjects through headphones. Both the combined response of 6 muscles and the blink response proved to be significantly increased in patients with abdominal pain compared with control subjects. A significant increase of the sympathetic skin response was not found. Comorbid anxiety disorders (8 patients with abdominal pain) or Rome III subclassification did not significantly affect these results. This study demonstrates an objective hyperresponsivity to nongastrointestinal stimuli. Children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders may have a generalized hypersensitivity of the central nervous system. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of functional abdominal pain in children: A look beyond the belly

    OpenAIRE

    Korterink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain represents a common problem in children. In almost 90% of children presenting with chronic abdominal pain, no organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain is made. Initially this condition was referred to as ‘recurrent abdominal pain’ by Apley and Naish and it is currently defined as abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs); divided into functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal migraine (A...

  14. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerve in functional abdominal pain syndrome -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ji-Won; Joo, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Joong; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Sim, Woo-Seok

    2011-01-01

    The thoracic splanchnic nerve block has been used in managing abdominal pain, especially for pains arising from abdominal cancers. A 27-year-old male patient who had a constant abdominal pain was referred to our clinic for pain management but had no organic disease. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain scored 7/10. We applied a diagnostic thoracic splanchnic nerve block under the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain syndrome. Since the block reduced the pain, we applied a radiofrequency ...

  15. Effect of thoracoscopic esophagus cancer surgery on postoperative incision pain as well as non-specific and specific immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Wu1

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of thoracoscopic esophagus cancer surgery on postoperative incision pain as well as non-specific and specific immune response. Methods: 56 patients with esophageal cancer who accepted surgical treatment in our hospital between March 2011 and February 2016 were collected, the operation methods and related laboratory tests were reviewed, and then they were divided into the thoracoscope group (n=27 who accepted thoracoscopic surgery and the open surgery group (n=29 who accepted traditional thoracotomy. Before operation and 1 d after operation, immune scatter turbidimetry was used to detect serum levels of pain mediators, and flow cytometer was used to detect the levels of nonspecific immune indexes and specific immune indexes. Results: Before operation, the differences in serum pain mediators as well as nonspecific immune response and specific immune response indexes were not statistically significant between two groups of patients (P>0.05. 1 d after operation, serum pain mediators 5-HT, K+ and NE levels of thoracoscope group were lower than those of open surgery group (P<0.05; nonspecific immune response indexes NK cell as well as C3 and C4 levels in peripheral blood of thoracoscope group were significantly higher than those of open surgery group (P<0.05; specific immune response indexes CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, IgA and IgG levels in peripheral blood of thoracoscope group were significantly higher than those of open surgery group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic esophagus cancer surgery causes less damage, has lighter inhibition on the immune response system, and is an ideal operation method for patients with early middle esophagus cancer.

  16. [The etiological aspects of acute abdominal pain in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, C A; Moraru, D

    2011-01-01

    The study of the etiological aspects of acute abdominal pain in children, in order to perceive the clinical-etiological correlations and the disorders distribution related to age, gender and the origin of the patients. The criteria for including patients were age (between 0 and 18 years) and the presence of acute abdominal pain before or during the consultation with the physician. The research on acute abdominal pain in children was performed on the level of the Surgery and Pediatrics II clinical departments of the "Sf. Ioan" Children's Emergency Clinical Hospital in Galati, between 01.01.2009 - 01.01.2011. The clinical study performed on the patients registered in the studied groups focused on the identification, the evaluation of the symptoms of acute abdominal pain in children, diagnosing and treating it. The criteria for excluding patients were an age older than 18 years or the absence of acute abdominal pain as a symptom before or during the examination. The statistical analysis used the descriptive and analytical methods. The data was centralized and statistically processed in M.S.EXCEL and S.P.S.S. databases. The patients with acute abdominal pain represent a percentage of 92.9% (2358 cases) of the total number of patients who suffer from abdominal pain (N=2537). The highest frequency of cases is represented by acute appendicitis (1056 cases - 44.8%). In the 5-18 years age group, acute appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, ovarian follicular cysts, acute pyelenophritis and salpingitis are predominant. In the 0-4 years age group gastroenteritis, acute pharyngitis, reactive hepatitis and lower digestive bleeding are predominant. In females, acute appendicitis, gastroenteritis, gastroduodenitis and cystitis are predominant, whereas in males, peritonitis, sepsis through E. coli, the contusion of the abdominal wall and acute pharyngitis are predominant.

  17. The effects of spinal support device on pain and extensibility of the hamstrings in patients with non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Tae; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Moon, Jong Hoon; Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Won, Young Sik; Kim, Sung-Jin; Hahm, Suk-Chan; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of spinal support device (SSD) on pain and hamstring extensibility in patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). [Subjects and Methods] 20 patients with NSLBP were recruited and randomly assigned to either the SSD group or the control group. In the SSD group, SSD was applied; in the control group, bed rest in supine position was performed. Both groups underwent treatment 20 min/day, 3 times a week, for a duration of 4 weeks. To assess the hamstring extensibility, sit and reach test (SRT) was performed. To assess pain pressure threshold (PPT) of the sacroiliac joint, a pressure algometer was used. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to quantify pain. [Results] The SSD group showed a significant improvement in sacroiliac joint pain with increased VAS, and the control group showed a significantly increased VAS after intervention. In the SSD group, VAS was significantly increased, but SRT was not changed compared with the control group. [Conclusion] These results demonstrated that an application of SSD effectively attenuates low back pain. Therefore, SSD may be a suitable intervention for pain control in patients with NSLBP.

  18. Few promising multivariable prognostic models exist for recovery of people with non-specific neck pain in musculoskeletal primary care: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Wingbermühle (Roel); E. van Trijffel (Emiel); Nelissen, P.M. (Paul M.); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractQuestion: Which multivariable prognostic model(s) for recovery in people with neck pain can be used in primary care? Design: Systematic review of studies evaluating multivariable prognostic models. Participants: People with non-specific neck pain presenting at primary care.

  19. Assessing the perception of trunk movements in military personnel with chronic non-specific low back pain using a virtual mirror

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; McFadyen, B.J.; Hebert, L.J.; Jackson, P.L.; Bouyer, L.J.; Mercier, C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain, including chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP), is often associated with body perception disturbances, but these have generally been assessed under static conditions. The objective of this study was to use a "virtual mirror" that scaled visual movement feedback to assess body

  20. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted...... formation and physical function. RESULTS: A total of 50 publications were identified; 42 publications were excluded leaving eight publications counting a total of 578 patients for analysis. Generally, the scientific quality of the studies was poor. Use of abdominal binder revealed a non-significant tendency...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  1. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central

  2. Effectiveness of core stabilization exercises and routine exercise therapy in management of pain in chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Waseem; Karimi, Hossein; Gilani, Syed Amir

    2017-01-01

    non-specific low back pain.

  3. A Rare Cause of Postprandial Abdominal Pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causes abdominal symptoms. Median ... compression of the coeliac artery by the median arcuate ligament. ... existing symptoms might cause frustration to patient and relatives. ... disease, chest pathology, etc., were excluded from the study.

  4. A STUDY TO ANALYSE THE EFFICACY OF MODIFIED PILATES BASED EXERCISES AND THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC NON SPECIFIC LOW BACK PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRAIL

    OpenAIRE

    U.Albert Anand,; P.Mariet Caroline,; B.Arun,; G.Lakshmi Gomathi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal symptoms seen in 85 % of individuals in their life time. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP) is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Objective: The purpose of the study was to find out the effect of Modified Pilates based exercises for patients with ...

  5. Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Maurício A.; Sousa, Manoel V.; Neves, Luciana A. F. S.; Cezar, Aline A. C.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping ® has been widely used in clinical practice. However, it is unknown whether this type of tape is more effective than placebo taping in patients with chronic lower back pain. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping ® in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain against a placebo tape and a control group. Method: This is a 3-arm, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were randomized into one of the three groups: Kinesio Taping ® group (n=20), Micropore® (placebo) group (n=20) and control group (n=20). Patients allocated to both the Kinesio Taping ® group and the placebo group used the different types of tape for a period of 48 hours. The control group did not receive any intervention. The outcomes measured were pain intensity (measured by an 11-point numerical rating scale) and disability (measured by the 24-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire). A blinded assessor measured the outcomes at baseline, 48 hours and 7 days after randomization. Results: After 48 hours, there was a statistically significant difference between the Kinesio Taping ® group versus the control group (mean between-group difference = -3.1 points, 95% CI=-5.2 to -1.1, p=0.003), but no difference when compared to the placebo group (mean between-group difference= 1.9 points, 95% CI=-0.2 to 3.9, p=0.08). For the other outcomes no differences were observed. Conclusions: The Kinesio Taping ® is not better than placebo (Micropore®) in patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:26647750

  6. Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Luz Júnior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kinesio Taping® has been widely used in clinical practice. However, it is unknown whether this type of tape is more effective than placebo taping in patients with chronic lower back pain. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping® in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain against a placebo tape and a control group. Method: This is a 3-arm, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were randomized into one of the three groups: Kinesio Taping® group (n=20, Micropore® (placebo group (n=20 and control group (n=20. Patients allocated to both the Kinesio Taping® group and the placebo group used the different types of tape for a period of 48 hours. The control group did not receive any intervention. The outcomes measured were pain intensity (measured by an 11-point numerical rating scale and disability (measured by the 24-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. A blinded assessor measured the outcomes at baseline, 48 hours and 7 days after randomization. Results: After 48 hours, there was a statistically significant difference between the Kinesio Taping® group versus the control group (mean between-group difference = -3.1 points, 95% CI=-5.2 to -1.1, p=0.003, but no difference when compared to the placebo group (mean between-group difference= 1.9 points, 95% CI=-0.2 to 3.9, p=0.08. For the other outcomes no differences were observed. Conclusions: The Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo (Micropore® in patients with chronic low back pain.

  7. Epidemiology, diagnosis and management of functional abdominal pain in children: A look beyond the belly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain represents a common problem in children. In almost 90% of children presenting with chronic abdominal pain, no organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain is made. Initially this condition was referred to as ‘recurrent abdominal pain’ by Apley and Naish

  8. Common Functional Gastroenterological Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia and depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in various peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation and luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Childhood: Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvan Caglar Citak

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac angiosarcomas are extremely rare in childhood, they are rapidly progressive tumours that often present themselves as diagnostic dilemmas, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Also, extracardiac manifestations, including abdominal pain, are extremely rare in patients with intracardiac tumors. We herein present the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with abdominal pain. Echocardiography and thoracic computed tomography showed right atrial mass. The patient underwent surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Eight months after treatment, abdominal recurrence was detected. The abdominal mass was resected, and radiotherapy and new chemotherapy protocol were given. The present case illustrates a rare case of primary cardiac angiosarcoma posing a diagnostic dilemma in an adolescent girl.

  10. Do we really need radiographic assessment for the diagnosis of non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Ozkan

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) is a common disorder, particularly in physically active growing children. Foot radiographs are usually obtained as part of the clinical evaluation in routine orthopaedic practice. However, there is still controversy about the specific findings on radiographs, and it is unclear what information is present on radiographs that may alter the diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of patients with the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis to assess the yield of routine radiographs of the foot. A prospective study was performed on 61 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis in a single-surgeon practice. Standard anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing foot radiographs were obtained for each patient. Seventy-one sets of foot radiographs were reviewed to determine whether radiographs had an impact on diagnosis and management. Patients with antecedent trauma, penetrating injury, foot deformity, achilles tendonitis, bursitis and infections were excluded from the study. Seventy foot radiographs were considered to be normal. The radiographs changed the diagnosis in only one patient, in whom a simple bone cyst of the calcaneous was seen. Calcaneal apophysitis is a self-limiting disease, and patients can be treated conservatively. Neither the sclerosis nor the fragmentation of the apophysis could be used to establish the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis. Therefore, obtaining radiographs as an initial step in their evaluation does not seem to be justified. (orig.)

  11. Do we really need radiographic assessment for the diagnosis of non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) in children?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kose, Ozkan [Diyarbakir Education and Research Hospital, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Diclekent Bulvari, Ataslar Serhat Evleri, Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) is a common disorder, particularly in physically active growing children. Foot radiographs are usually obtained as part of the clinical evaluation in routine orthopaedic practice. However, there is still controversy about the specific findings on radiographs, and it is unclear what information is present on radiographs that may alter the diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of patients with the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis to assess the yield of routine radiographs of the foot. A prospective study was performed on 61 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis in a single-surgeon practice. Standard anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing foot radiographs were obtained for each patient. Seventy-one sets of foot radiographs were reviewed to determine whether radiographs had an impact on diagnosis and management. Patients with antecedent trauma, penetrating injury, foot deformity, achilles tendonitis, bursitis and infections were excluded from the study. Seventy foot radiographs were considered to be normal. The radiographs changed the diagnosis in only one patient, in whom a simple bone cyst of the calcaneous was seen. Calcaneal apophysitis is a self-limiting disease, and patients can be treated conservatively. Neither the sclerosis nor the fragmentation of the apophysis could be used to establish the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis. Therefore, obtaining radiographs as an initial step in their evaluation does not seem to be justified. (orig.)

  12. The efficacy of manual therapy and exercise for treating non-specific neck pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Benjamin; Hall, Toby; Bossert, Jean; Dugeny, Axel; Cagnie, Barbara; Pitance, Laurent

    2017-11-06

    To review and update the evidence for different forms of manual therapy (MT) and exercise for patients with different stages of non-specific neck pain (NP). MEDLINE, Cochrane-Register-of-Controlled-Trials, PEDro, EMBASE. A qualitative systematic review covering a period from January 2000 to December 2015 was conducted according to updated-guidelines. Specific inclusion criteria only on RCTs were used; including differentiation according to stages of NP (acute - subacute [ASNP] or chronic [CNP]), as well as sub-classification based on type of MT interventions: MT1 (HVLA manipulation); MT2 (mobilization and/or soft-tissue-techniques); MT3 (MT1 + MT2); and MT4 (Mobilization-with-Movement). In each sub-category, MT could be combined or not with exercise and/or usual medical care. Initially 121 studies were identified for potential inclusion. Based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, 23 RCTs were identified for review. Evidence for ASNP: MODERATE-evidence: In favour of (i) MT1 to the cervical spine (Cx) combined with exercises when compared to MT1 to the thoracic spine (Tx) combined with exercises; (ii) MT3 to the Cx and Tx combined with exercise compared to MT2 to the Cx with exercise or compared to usual medical care for pain and satisfaction with care from short to long-term. Evidence for CNP: STRONG-evidence: Of no difference of efficacy between MT2 at the symptomatic Cx level(s) in comparison to MT2 on asymptomatic Cx level(s) for pain and function. MODERATE to STRONG-evidence: In favour of MT1 and MT3 on Cx and Tx with exercise in comparison to exercise or MT alone for pain, function, satisfaction with care and general-health from short to moderate-terms. MODERATE-evidence: In favour (i) of MT1 as compared to MT2 and MT4, all applied to the Cx, for neck mobility, and pain in the very short term; (ii) of MT2 using sof-tissue-techniques to the Cx and Tx or MT3 to the Cx and Tx in comparison to no-treatment in the short-term for pain and disability

  13. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kuijpers, Ton; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne P; de Boer, Michiel R; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple databases up to December 22, 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with chronic non-specific LBP, which evaluated at least one clinically relevant, patient-centred outcome measure were included. Two authors working independently from one another assessed the risk of bias using the criteria recommended by the CBRG and extracted the data. The data were pooled when clinically homogeneous and statistically possible or were otherwise qualitatively described. GRADE was used to determine the quality of the evidence. In total, 35 RCTs (8 SMT, 20 acupuncture, 7 herbal medicine), which examined 8,298 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Approximately half of these (2 SMT, 8 acupuncture, 7 herbal medicine) were thought to have a low risk of bias. In general, the pooled effects for the studied interventions demonstrated short-term relief or improvement only. The lack of studies with a low-risk of bias, especially in regard to SMT precludes any strong conclusions; however, the principal findings, which are based upon low- to very-low-quality evidence, suggest that SMT does not provide a more clinically beneficial effect compared with sham, passive modalities or any other intervention for treatment of chronic low-back pain. There is evidence, however, that acupuncture provides a short-term clinically relevant effect when compared with a waiting list control or when acupuncture is added to another intervention. Although there are some good results for individual herbal medicines in short-term individual trials, the lack of homogeneity across studies did not allow for a pooled estimate of the effect. In general, these results are in agreement with other recent systematic reviews on

  14. Cauda equina syndrome presenting as abdominal pain: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-09-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is an uncommon entity. Symptoms include bowel and bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia, and varying degrees of lower limb motor and sensory disturbances. The consequences of delayed diagnosis can be devastating, resulting in bowel and bladder incontinence and lower limb paralysis. There is little in literature regarding abdominal pain as a significant feature of the initial presentation of CES. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman with CES who presented to the emergency department with gradually worsening lower abdominal pain.

  15. Managing acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijaz NM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadia M Hijaz, Craig A Friesen Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients has been a challenge for providers because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms and difficulty in the assessment and physical examination in children. Although most children with acute abdominal pain have self-limited benign conditions, pain may be a manifestation of an urgent surgical or medical condition where the biggest challenge is making a timely diagnosis so that appropriate treatment can be initiated without any diagnostic delays that increase morbidity. This is weighed against the need to decrease radiation exposure and avoid unnecessary operations. Across all age groups, there are numerous conditions that present with abdominal pain ranging from a very simple viral illness to a life-threatening surgical condition. It is proposed that the history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies should initially be directed at differentiating surgical versus nonsurgical conditions both categorized as urgent versus nonurgent. The features of the history including patient’s age, physical examination focused toward serious conditions, and appropriate tests are highlighted in the context of making these differentiations. Initial testing and management is also discussed with an emphasis on making use of surgeon and radiologist consultation and the need for adequate follow-up and reevaluation of the patient. Keywords: acute abdominal pain, surgical abdomen, ultrasound

  16. The effect of group-exercising on females with non-specific chronic low back pain in a sitting position: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beladev, Noa; Masharawi, Youssef

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of active group-exercising on women with non specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) in a sitting position. 25 females with NSCLBP underwent 8 group sitting-exercise sessions of a 45 minute duration, over an 8 week period. Pain intensity (VAS), back specific disability (Rolland Morris questionnaire-RMQ), and lumbar flexion and extension ranges of motion were measured twice, for reliability tests and cut-off score values, with a 1 week interval between measurements, prior to intervention and subsequently, six weeks following intervention. Several significant changes in outcome measures were indicated following intervention compared with baseline (p position, improved the functional, painful status and lumbar ranges of motion in the sagittal plane of women suffering from non specific chronic low back pain. As sitting is considered the most common posture in today's workplace, applying this protocol during working hours would be very effective.

  17. Role of laparoscopy in evaluation of abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Adil, M.; Gondal, Z.I.; Aquil, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of laparoscopy in ill-defined recurrent chronic abdominal pain. Study Design: Prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Jul 2011 to Dec 2013. Material and Methods: A total of 102 patients who presented to surgical department with chronic recurrent abdominal pain of unknown etiology and underwent diagnostic laparoscopy were included in our study. Patients with acute onset of abdominal pain, hemodynamically unstable, pregnant or those in which diagnosis can be made by radiological techniques were excluded from our study. Patient's demographic data, clinical findings and laparoscopic findings were recorded. Finally data was analyzed by using SPSS version 21. Results: Out of 110 patients 96 were female while remaining 14 were male. The age range of the patients was 20- 70 years with mean age of 50 +- 10 years. The most common site of pain was lower abdomen while mean duration of abdominal pain was 34 weeks. Laparoscopic findings include acute recurrent appendicitis in 32 (29.09%) patients, cholecystitis with biliary sludge in 14 (12.72%), pelvic inflammatory disease in 12 (10.90%), ovarian cyst in 11(10%), adhesions in 10(9.09%), intestinal tuberculosis in 8 (7.27%), mesenteric lymphadenitis in 7 (6.36%), lymphoma in 4 (3.63%), ectopic pregnancy in 3 (2.7%), CA gallbladder in 2 (1.81%), meckels diverticulum in 2 (1.81%), endometriosis in 2 (1.81%) and crohns disease in 1 (0.9%) patients. Mean operative time was 48 min while average hospital stay was 2-3 days. No major complications were noticed. Conclusion: Laparoscopy in our clinical setup has significant role in diagnosing cases of vague abdominal pain which cannot be diagnosed by routine investigations. (author)

  18. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern.

  19. A rare cause of lomber pain: diopatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, F.; Saglam, M.; Sahin, M.; Bozlar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysms are rare and life-threatening situations. Trauma and operative procedures are common causes of pseudoaneurysm. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom of them. They are usually detected incidentally. Objectives and tasks: We aim to present CTA findings of abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm causes gradually increasing lomber pain in 70-year-old female patient. Physical examination also made diagnosis easy because of pulsatile mass detected. Materials and methods: Lomber MRG and endoscopic procedures were normal. Then we performed CTA to find the cause for pulsatile mass. Results: Pseudoaneurysm with approximately 6 x 7.5 cm size was compressing duodenum and not showing extravasation at the infrarenal segment of abdominal aorta detected in CTA. Pseudoaneurysm was filling from aorta through a 2 cm neck. Conclusion: Primary cause for pseudoaneurysms is traumating injuries. Initial presentation may be abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding or pulsatile mass. To plan treatment and figure out pseudoaneurysm CTA is very fast and non-invasive technic

  20. Evaluation of mesenteric lymph nodes in children with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedrzejewski, G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes seen on pediatric abdominal ultrasound examinations performed in children with abdominal pain. Ultrasound was performed with Sonoline Elegra and Philips iU-22 units with convex-array 2-5 MHz transducer for the general abdominal examination, and in addition with convex 5-8 MHz or linear 7.5 MHz transducers specially to detect lymph nodes. Enlarged lymph nodes were found in 248 (21,2%) out of 1171 symptomatic patients. In 53 patients some other abnormalities were found. The nodes were mostly disc-like and oval in shape. They had usually a homogeneous appearance and were iso- or hypoechoic relative to the surrounding tissues and intestinal loops. Mesenteric lymphadenitis is commonly reported in children with acute, chronic or recurrent abdominal pain and no evidence of other pathologies, and has been reported as one of the most common explanation for acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain. (authors)

  1. [Gastrointestinal diseases and abdominal pain in combat veterans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal'tsev, A I; Torgashov, M N; Popova, O S

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the role of consequences of combat stress in the development of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases. One hundred and sixty-one combat veterans aged 24 to 69 years were examined. All underwent a clinical and neurological examination using the McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), Beck depression inventory, Kotenev trauma stress questionnaire, and visual analogue scale to determine pain intensity. Anxiety, impairments in memory and sleep, and depression were identified. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to estimate quality of life in the patients. Gastric secretory function was investigated; esophagogastroduodenoscopy, X-ray and ultrasound studies, clinical and biochemical blood tests, coprological examinations, fecal tests for dysbiosis, if indicated, occult blood were made. Combat stress and its consequences as posttraumatic stress disorder have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GIT diseases and in the development of chronic abdominal pain. GIT diseases in combat veterans are in larger measure a sequel of impaired processes of adjustment to combat stress. Chronic abdominal pains were heterogeneous. On the one hand, chronic GIT disease serves as a source of pain syndrome; on the other hand, the central nervous system is of importance in the development of chronic abdominal pain. In addition to therapy for GIT and hepatobiliary diseases, the treatment of GIT diseases in this category of patients involves psychotherapy and neuroprotection, aimed at reducing the consequences of combat stress in combat veterans.

  2. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain : A synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakke, Sandra E.; Soer, Remko; Takken, Tim; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and

  3. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Lameris, Wytze; Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2009-01-01

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  4. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  5. Unexplained right upper quadrant abdominal pain? do not forget the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Right upper quadrant abdominal pain is a common reason for consulting a gastroenterologist. Commonly, it portends pathological processes occurring in the liver, gall bladder, or the gut however, unusual causes have been reported. We report cervical intervertebral disc prolapse causing right upper quadrant ...

  6. Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain in Older Patients | Lyon | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions ...

  7. Psychological aspects of Recurrent Abdominal Pain Syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayedi, A; Moayedi, F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Intermittent visceral distress syndrome is described as "at least three scenes of visceral distress, sufficiently severe to hinder their actions over a time longer than 3 months, continuing from the preceding year". Organic factors causing abdominal pain are rare, so most of the children with an intermittent visceral distress are designated to have a functional abdominal pain. This study was designed to evaluate psychological problems such as anxiety and distress in children with functional intestinal distress. Method. 120 children (50 boys and 70 girls) with an age range of 5-18 years, who complained of abdominal pain among other things, were included in this cross-sectional case-control study (forty with an organic etiology, 38 diagnosed as RAPS and 42 healthy controls). Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) questionnaire and Depression Self-Rated Scale (DSRS) questionnaire were used to determine the level of anxiety. A 28-question General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) was also used to investigate the general mental health of their mothers. Result. In the present study, organic and functional etiology of abdominal pain was significantly different with regard to the anxiety score. However, this was not seen as far as depression was concerned. The total GHQ score of mothers was not significantly different between the three groups. ANOVA was used to compare groups. Conclusion. As shown in the present study, that is consistent with most other studies, psychological factors were seen in RAP and need a more in depth investigation to be resolved.

  8. Race and acute abdominal pain in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperell, Kerry; Pitetti, Raymond; Cross, Keith P

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the demographic and clinical factors of children who present to the pediatric emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and their outcomes. A review of the electronic medical record of patients 1 to 18 years old, who presented to the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh ED with a complaint of abdominal pain over the course of 2 years, was conducted. Demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as visit outcomes, were reviewed. Subjects were grouped by age, race, and gender. Results of evaluation, treatment, and clinical outcomes were compared between groups by using multivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. There were 9424 patient visits during the study period that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Female gender comprised 61% of African American children compared with 52% of white children. Insurance was characterized as private for 75% of white and 37% of African American children. A diagnosis of appendicitis was present in 1.9% of African American children and 5.1% of white children. Older children were more likely to be admitted and have an operation associated with their ED visit. Appendicitis was uncommon in younger children. Constipation was commonly diagnosed. Multivariate analysis by diagnosis as well as recursive partitioning analysis did not reflect any racial differences in evaluation, treatment, or outcome. Constipation is the most common diagnosis in children presenting with abdominal pain. Our data demonstrate that no racial differences exist in the evaluation, treatment, and disposition of children with abdominal pain.

  9. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Korterink, Judith J.; Venmans, Leonie M. A. J.; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Various nonpharmacologic treatments are available for pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Data on efficacy and safety are scarce. The goal of this study was to summarize the evidence regarding nonpharmacologic interventions for

  10. Recurrent severe abdominal pain in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, James L; Foster, Ashley A

    2014-05-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is a blockage occurring at the junction of the ureter and the renal pelvis. Pediatric patients with UPJO pose a diagnostic challenge when they present to the emergency department (ED) with severe recurrent abdominal pain if there is not a level of suspicion for this condition. Our aim was to review presentation of UPJO to the ED, methods of diagnosis, and treatment of this common but often overlooked condition. We report on 2 patients, a 9-year-old and 3-year-old, who had multiple presentations to health care providers and the ED with intermittent and recurrent abdominal pain. Subsequent testing, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) with diuretic-recreated symptoms, revealed UPJO. Open pyeloplasty was performed, resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. UPJO is an important diagnosis to consider when patients present to the ED with recurrent abdominal pain. US can be helpful in suspecting the diagnosis, but often CT, magnetic resonance urography, or diuretic scintigraphy is required for confirmation. Diuretics can be used to aid diagnostic testing by reproducing abdominal pain at the time of imaging. Referral to a urologist for open pyeloplasty is definitive treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  12. Validation of the Diagnostic Score for Acute Lower Abdominal Pain in Women of Reproductive Age

    OpenAIRE

    Jearwattanakanok, Kijja; Yamada, Sirikan; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin; Smuthtai, Waratsuda; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2014-01-01

    Background. The differential diagnoses of acute appendicitis obstetrics, and gynecological conditions (OB-GYNc) or nonspecific abdominal pain in young adult females with lower abdominal pain are clinically challenging. The present study aimed to validate the recently developed clinical score for the diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain in female of reproductive age. Method. Medical records of reproductive age women (15–50 years) who were admitted for acute lower abdominal pain were collec...

  13. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  14. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  15. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  16. Abdominal and lower back pain in pediatric idiopathic stabbing headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Ohara, Tomoichiro; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache (ISH) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by transient, sharp, stabbing pains located in the first division of the trigeminal nerve. Reports of pediatric ISH are rare, and extracephalic pain in pediatric ISH is extremely rare. Here we report the case of a 7-year-old male patient suffering from frequent, short, stabbing headache, which was occasionally associated with abdominal and lower back pain. Various investigations were normal. He was diagnosed with ISH, and valproic acid was administered to relieve his headache and accompanying symptoms. Our case demonstrates that abdominal and lower back pain may occur in pediatric ISH. This case may provide new evidence linking ISH and migraine by showing that extracephalic symptoms accompanying ISH are similar to those of migraine. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying the headache and abdominal and lower back pain associated with ISH may be similar to that of a migraine headache. Accumulating additional cases by asking specific questions regarding the presence of the unusual symptoms presented in our case may help to establish a detailed clinical profile of these unfamiliar and peculiar symptoms in the pediatric ISH population.

  17. A multimedia campaign to improve back beliefs in patients with non-specific low back pain: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Arnela; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Bamarni, Jiman; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2017-05-18

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and costly disorders worldwide. To reduce its burden in the Netherlands, implementation of a multidisciplinary guideline for LBP was supported by a multifaceted eHealth campaign for patients with LBP. The current study aims 1) to evaluate whether the implementation strategy was performed as planned; 2) to assess the feasibility, barriers and facilitators of the patient based eHealth campaign; 3) to gain insight into the satisfaction and experiences of patients with various ethnic backgrounds with the implementation strategy and to make a comparison between them; and 4) to explore the association between exposure to and satisfaction with the implementation strategy. This process evaluation was performed using the Linnan and Steckler framework, and used a mixed methods approach for data collection and analysis. The relationship between satisfaction of patients and exposure to the strategy was statistically examined. Semi-structured interviews were analysed using qualitative data analysis methods. Two hundred and fourteen patients participated in the quantitative, and 44 in the qualitative analysis. Most were female and had a high level of education. Many patients did not use the campaign at all or only once, and those that did rated it as reasonable. Patient satisfaction with the campaign increased significantly with an increase in its use. Qualitative analysis showed that four main themes played a role in campaign rating and use: satisfaction with intervention components, perceived benefits of the intervention, usage of the intervention, and satisfaction with the medium used. This process evaluation showed that the eHealth campaign was used only by a small proportion of patients with non-specific LBP. It seemed that the campaign was offered to the patients too late, that the lay-out of the campaign did not meet patient needs, and that healthcare providers rarely discussed the campaign with their patients, while

  18. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Daniël R.; Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.

    2015-01-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed.

  19. Prognosis of abdominal pain in children in primary care : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Spee, Leo A A; Benninga, Marc A; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Berger, Marjolein Y

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Abdominal pain is a common complaint in children. Because few data exist on its natural history, we wanted to investigate the prognosis of abdominal pain in children in general practice. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study of children (aged 4 to 17 years) complaining of abdominal pain,

  20. Protozoa as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Schweizer, Joachim J; Büller, Hans A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether protozoa can be identified as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and whether protozoan infections can be recognized by a specific clinical presentation. For 2 years, all patients (ages 4-16 years) fulfilling the Apley criteria of RAP referred to secondary care were prospectively evaluated for protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis) and treated if positive. Re-examination followed at least 10 days after treatment. Disappearance of pain with eradication and a pain-free follow-up of at least 6 months were considered to be indicative of a causal relation with RAP. The predictive value of the characteristics of the pain for protozoan infections was calculated. Of 220 included patients (92 boys, mean age 8.8 years), 215 brought a stool sample; 73 (34%) carried parasites, 10 of whom had 2 parasites, 2 had 3 parasites. Sixty-five patients were treated. Twenty-five (11%) were pain-free after eradication (21 had D fragilis, 8 B hominis, 4 G lamblia), of whom 11 had another infection (2) or constipation (9) as second diagnosis for the pain. Five had recurrence of infection with D fragilis and were again pain-free with eradication. Patients with protozoa as cause of their pain did not show differences with respect to their presentation when compared with patients with an asymptomatic infection and patients without protozoa. Protozoa were found as the cause of pain in 6% to 11% of children with RAP. These patients did not show a characteristic presentation when compared with patients with other causes of abdominal pain.

  1. A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn S; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8-18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children's pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the 13 PRI subscales identified pain coping profiles in Sample 1 (n=311) that replicated in Sample 2 (n=388). Evidence was found of external validity and distinctiveness of the profiles. The findings support a typology of pain coping that reflects the quality of patients' pain mastery efforts and interpersonal relationships associated with pain coping. Results are discussed in relation to developmental processes, attachment styles, and treatment implications.

  2. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Sands, Daniel Z.; Edlow, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic multi-segmental postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain compared to pain-free controls: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Michael A; Wirth, Brigitte; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bruin, Eling D

    2018-01-01

    Reduced postural control is thought to contribute to the development and persistence of chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP). It is therefore frequently assessed in affected patients and commonly reported as the average amount of postural sway while standing upright under a variety of sensory conditions. These averaged linear outcomes, such as mean centre of pressure (CP) displacement or mean CP surface areas, may not reflect the true postural status. Adding nonlinear outcomes and multi-segmental kinematic analysis has been reported to better reflect the complexity of postural control and may detect subtler postural differences. In this cross-sectional study, a combination of linear and nonlinear postural parameters were assessed in patients with CNLBP (n = 24, 24-75 years, 9 females) and compared to symptom-free controls (CG, n = 34, 22-67 years, 11 females). Primary outcome was postural control measured by variance of joint configurations (uncontrolled manifold index, UI), confidence ellipse surface areas (CEA) and approximate entropy (ApEn) of CP dispersion during the response phase of a perturbed postural control task on a swaying platform. Secondary outcomes were segment excursions and clinical outcome correlates for pain and function. Non-parametric tests for group comparison with P-adjustment for multiple comparisons were conducted. Principal component analysis was applied to identify patterns of segmental contribution in both groups. CNLBP and CG performed similarly with respect to the primary outcomes. Comparison of joint kinematics revealed significant differences of hip (P postural differences in CNLBP patients with low to moderate pain status.

  4. A workplace exercise versus health promotion intervention to prevent and reduce the economic and personal burden of non-specific neck pain in office personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, V; O'Leary, S; Comans, T

    2014-01-01

    practice ergonomic and neck exercise program reduce productivity losses and risk of developing neck pain in asymptomatic workers, or decrease severity of neck pain in symptomatic workers, compared to a best practice ergonomics and general health promotion program? DESIGN: Prospective cluster randomised......INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain is a major burden to industry, yet the impact of introducing a workplace ergonomics and exercise intervention on work productivity and severity of neck pain in a population of office personnel is unknown. RESEARCH QUESTION: Does a combined workplace-based best...... ergonomics intervention plus 1-hour weekly health information sessions for 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS: Primary (productivity loss) and secondary (neck pain and disability, muscle performance, and quality of life) outcome measures will be collected using validated scales at baseline, immediate post...

  5. Effects of McGill stabilization exercises and conventional physiotherapy on pain, functional disability and active back range of motion in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour, Arsalan; Azghani, Mahmoud Reza; Taghipour, Mohammad; Salahzadeh, Zahra; Ghaderi, Fariba; Oskouei, Ali E

    2018-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of "McGill stabilization exercises" and "conventional physiotherapy" on pain, functional disability and active back flexion and extension range of motion in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty four patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were randomly assigned to McGill stabilization exercises group (n=17) and conventional physiotherapy group (n=17). In both groups, patients performed the corresponding exercises for six weeks. The visual analog scale (VAS), Quebec Low Back Pain Disability Scale Questionnaire and inclinometer were used to measure pain, functional disability, and active back flexion and extension range of motion, respectively. [Results] Statistically significant improvements were observed in pain, functional disability, and active back extension range of motion in McGill stabilization exercises group. However, active back flexion range of motion was the only clinical symptom that statistically increased in patients who performed conventional physiotherapy. There was no significant difference between the clinical characteristics while compared these two groups of patients. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that McGill stabilization exercises and conventional physiotherapy provided approximately similar improvement in pain, functional disability, and active back range of motion in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. However, it appears that McGill stabilization exercises provide an additional benefit to patients with chronic non-specific low back, especially in pain and functional disability improvement.

  6. Lactose and Fructose Intolerance in Turkish Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Ozlem; Kalayci, Ayhan Gazi; Comba, Atakan; Eren, Esra; Caltepe, Gonul

    2016-05-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lactose and fructose intolerance in children with chronic abdominal pain. Hydrogen breath tests were done to detect lactose and fructose malabsorption in 86 children with chronic abdominal pain (44 irritable bowel syndrome, 24 functional abdominal pain and 17 functional abdominal pain syndrome as per Rome III criteria) presenting to a Pediatric Gastroentreology department. 14 (16.3%) of patients were diagnosed with lactose intolerance and 11 (12.8%) with fructose intolerance. Lactose and fructose intolerance in children can lead to chronic abdominal pain and symptoms improve with dietary modifications.

  7. Cognitive mediators of treatment outcomes in pediatric functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Romano, Joan M; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S; Murphy, Tasha B; Tilburg, Miranda A L van; Feld, Lauren D; Christie, Dennis L; Whitehead, William E

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral (CB) interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to 1 week posttreatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief CB intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Two hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: a 3-session social learning and CB treatment (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the social learning and CB treatment condition on child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents' solicitous responses to their child's pain symptoms. Reductions in parents' perceived threat regarding their child's pain mediated reductions in both parent-reported and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children's catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Results suggest that reductions in reports of children's pain and GI symptoms after a social learning and CB intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions.

  8. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific acute low back pain: a randomised controlled multicentre trial protocol [ISRCTN65814467

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Barquin Dulce

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain and its associated incapacitating effects constitute an important healthcare and socioeconomic problem, as well as being one of the main causes of disability among adults of working age. The prevalence of non-specific low back pain is very high among the general population, and 60–70% of adults are believed to have suffered this problem at some time. Nevertheless, few randomised clinical trials have been made of the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture with respect to acute low back pain. The present study is intended to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for acute low back pain in terms of the improvement reported on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ on low back pain incapacity, to estimate the specific and non-specific effects produced by the technique, and to carry out a cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods/Design Randomised four-branch controlled multicentre prospective study made to compare semi-standardised real acupuncture, sham acupuncture (acupuncture at non-specific points, placebo acupuncture and conventional treatment. The patients are blinded to the real, sham and placebo acupuncture treatments. Patients in the sample present symptoms of non specific acute low back pain, with a case history of 2 weeks or less, and will be selected from working-age patients, whether in paid employment or not, referred by General Practitioners from Primary Healthcare Clinics to the four clinics participating in this study. In order to assess the primary and secondary result measures, the patients will be requested to fill in a questionnaire before the randomisation and again at 3, 12 and 48 weeks after starting the treatment. The primary result measure will be the clinical relevant improvement (CRI at 3 weeks after randomisation. We define CRI as a reduction of 35% or more in the RMQ results. Discussion This study is intended to obtain further evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture on acute low back pain

  9. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kuijpers, Ton; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne P; de Boer, Michiel R; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple databases up to

  10. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); T. Kuijpers (Ton); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M.R. de Boer (Michiel Robert); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple

  11. Perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorf, Luise Jessen; Nedergaard, H. K.; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-01-01

    422 participants in our analysis. Thirteen studies are awaiting classification. For the comparison dexmedetomidine versus placebo (six studies, 402 participants), most studies found a reduction in 'rescue' opioid consumption in the first 24 hours after surgery, together with in general no clinically...... elective abdominal surgery. A potential bias was a considerable quantity of unobtainable data from studies with mixed surgery. To detect and investigate patient-important outcomes, larger studies with longer periods of follow-up are needed.......Background Acute postoperative pain is still an issue in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain and side effects of analgesic treatment, in particular those of opioids, need to be minimized. Opioid-sparing analgesics, possibly including dexmedetomidine, seem a promising avenue...

  12. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain: Primary Appendagitis Epiploica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica – one of the causes of acute abdominal pain – is a self-limited rare benign inflammatory condition involving the colonic epiploic appendages. Their therapy is conservative and clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. However, being a quite rare condition is the reason they are usually neglected by both the surgeon and the radiologist. However the computed tomography (CT findings are rather characteristic and pathognomonic. Thus, to consider CT as the diagnostic modality of choice is extremely important in order to diagnose the condition and to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.             This is a paper reporting an acute abdominal pain case of primary appendicitis epiploica diagnosed using computed tomography. 

  13. [Treatment of functional somatic syndrome with abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tetsuya; Kanbara, Kenji; Mizuno, Yasuyuki; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2009-09-01

    Functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with abdominal pain include functional gastrointestinal disorder, chronic pancreatitis, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, which generally contain autonomic dysfunction. Regarding the treatment of FSS, it is important to know about FSS for a therapist at first. Secondly, the therapist should find out physical dysfunction of patients positively, and confirm objectively the hypotheses about both peripheral and central pathophysiological mechanisms as much as possible. Heart rate variability is an easy method, and useful to assess autonomic function. After grasping the patient's explanatory model about the illness, the therapist showes the most acceptable treatment for the patient at last.

  14. Proportional lumbar spine inter-vertebral motion patterns: a comparison of patients with chronic, non-specific low back pain and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Mellor, Fiona E.; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Paul W.; Breen, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Identifying biomechanical subgroups in chronic, non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) populations from inter-vertebral displacements has proven elusive. Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) has excellent repeatability and provides continuous standardised inter-vertebral kinematic data from fluoroscopic sequences allowing assessment of mid-range motion. The aim of this study was to determine whether proportional continuous IV rotational patterns were different in patients and controls. A ...

  15. Tension gastrothorax in a child presenting with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Ross; Claudius, Ilene; Truong, Anh

    2012-02-01

    A 4-year-old girl was brought to our hospital by her parents because of abdominal pain. She had suffered minor trauma after rolling from her standard-height bed 2 days prior. Vital signs were appropriate for age. Physical examination was remarkable for decreased breath sounds to the left side of the chest. A chest radiograph (Figure) demonstrated a large gas-filled structure in the left side of the chest with mediastinal shift.

  16. Tension Gastrothorax in a Child Presenting with Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Hooker; Ilene Claudius; Anh Truong

    2012-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl was brought to our hospital by her parents because of abdominal pain. She hadsuffered minor trauma after rolling from her standard-height bed 2 days prior. Vital signs wereappropriate for age. Physical examination was remarkable for decreased breath sounds to the left sideof the chest. A chest radiograph (Figure) demonstrated a large gas-filled structure in the left side of thechest with mediastinal shift. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(1):117–118.

  17. Outcomes of children after esophagogastroduodenoscopy for chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kalpesh; Chen, Leon; Tessier, Mary E; Gilger, Mark A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is the most common indication for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in children. However, little is known about the accuracy of EGD-based diagnosis or the outcomes of the patients who undergo this procedure. We examined the diagnostic yield of EGD and short-term outcomes of children who underwent this procedure for chronic abdominal pain. We conducted a prospective study of 290 children (4-18 years old; mean age, 11.9 ± 3.5 years; 93 girls) who underwent EGD for the primary indication of chronic abdominal pain (216 with at least 1 alarm feature) at a US pediatric gastroenterology referral center. We collected data on demographic features (age, sex), clinical characteristics (alarm features, Rome III criteria), and EGD results for each patient. All subjects with diagnostic lesions were followed for at least 1 year after EGD to determine short-term outcomes. Overall, EGD provided an accurate diagnosis for 109 children (38%). Diagnoses included esophagitis (21.0%), eosinophilic gastroenteritis (4.1%), eosinophilic esophagitis (3.8%), Helicobacter pylori infection (2.0%), celiac disease (0.6%), and Crohn's disease (0.4%). Short-term outcomes were available for 81% of patients with diagnostic findings, and medical therapy was effective in approximately 67% of these children. EGD is valuable for the diagnosis of children with abdominal pain, with a 38% diagnostic yield. EGD identified disorders for which medical therapy was effective in 67% of children during the year after diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with acute non-specific chest pain in emergency and cardiology departments after the introduction of high-sensitivity troponins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilangkovan, Nivethitha; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of clinical, cardiac-related endpoints and mortality among patients presenting to an emergency or cardiology department with non-specific chest pain (NSCP), and who receive testing with a high-sensitivity troponin. A second objective was to identify risk...... factors for the above-noted endpoints during 12 months of follow-up. DESIGN: A prospective multicentre study. SETTING: Emergency and cardiology departments in Southern Denmark. SUBJECTS: The study enrolled 1027 patients who were assessed for acute chest pain in an emergency or cardiology department...

  19. Risk factors for development of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preteens and early adolescents: a prospective 1-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinen Anssi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common in children and adolescents. These symptoms have a negative impact on children's physical and emotional well-being, but their underlying aetiology and risk factors are still poorly understood. Most of the previous cohort studies were conducted among mid and/or late adolescents and were mainly focused on a specific pain location (e.g. low back pain or neck pain. The purpose of this study is to estimate occurrence of new-onset pain symptoms, in all musculoskeletal locations, in preteens and early adolescents and investigate risk factors for development of these symptoms. Methods 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8 were recruited from schools in southern Finland. Information was extracted as to whether they experienced musculoskeletal pain and a total of 1192 children were identified as free of musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Information was collected on factors which could potentially predict the development of musculoskeletal pain: headache, abdominal pain, sadness/feeling down, day-time tiredness, difficulty in falling asleep, waking up during nights, level of physical activity and hypermobility. These children were followed-up 1-year later and those with new episodes of non-traumatic and traumatic musculoskeletal pain symptoms were identified. Results A total of 1113 schoolchildren (93% of baseline pain-free children were found at one-year follow-up. New episodes of musculoskeletal pain were reported by 21.5% of these children. Of them 19.4% reported non-traumatic pain and 4.0% reported traumatic pain. The neck was the most commonly reported site with non-traumatic pain, while the lower limb was the most common site for traumatic pain. The independent risk factors for non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain were headache (OR = 1.68, [95% CI 1.16–2.44] and day-time tiredness (OR = 1.53, [95% CI 1.03–2.26]. The risk factors for traumatic musculoskeletal pain were vigorous exercise (OR = 3

  20. EFFECTS OF HIGH INTENSITY TRAINING IN PATIENTS WITH NON-SPECIFIC CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: A CLINICAL PILOT TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Agten, Anouk; Verbrugghe, Jonas; Eijnde, Bert O.; Timmermans, Annick; Vandenabeele, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP), is the most common musculoskeletal cause of disability and has a major socio-economic impact on today’s western society1. The rehabilitation of chronic low back pain requires a multidisciplinary approach with both education and exercise therapy. Since physical deconditioning is often observed in patients with chronic low back pain, physical reconditioning is an important component of the exercise therapy during rehabilitation2. High ...

  1. Genetic and environmental influences on non-specific neck pain in early adolescence: A classical twin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Minna K; El-Metwally, Ashraf A; Mikkelsson, Marja K; Salminen, Jouko J; Pulkkinen, Lea R; Rose, Richard J; Kaprio, Jaakko A

    2012-01-01

    Background Prevalence of neck pain has increased among adolescents. The origins of adult chronic neck pain may lie in late childhood, but for early prevention, more information is needed about its aetiology. We investigated the relative roles of genetic and environmental factors in early adolescent neck pain with a classic twin study. Methods Frequency of neck pain was assessed with a validated pain questionnaire in a population-based sample of nearly 1800 pairs of 11–12-year-old Finnish twins. Twin pair similarity for neck pain was quantified by polychoric correlations, and variance components were estimated with biometric structural equation modelling. Results Prevalence of neck pain reported at least once monthly was 38% and at least once weekly 16%, with no significant differences between gender or zygosity. A greater polychoric correlation in liability to neck pain was found in monozygotic (0.67) than for dizygotic pairs (0.38), suggesting strong genetic influences. Model-fitting indicated that 68% (95% CI 62 to 74) of the variation in liability to neck pain could be attributed to genetic effects, with the remainder attributed to unshared environmental effects. No evidence for sex-specific genetic effects or for sex differences in the magnitude of genetic effects was found. Conclusions Genetic and unique environmental factors seem to play the most important roles in liability to neck pain in early adolescence. Future research should be directed to identifying pathways for genetic influences on neck pain and in exploring effectiveness of interventions that target already identified environmental risk factors. PMID:23139100

  2. Spinal manipulative therapy versus Graston Technique in the treatment of non-specific thoracic spine pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The one year prevalence of thoracic back pain has been estimated as 17% compared to 64% for neck pain and 67% for low back pain. At present only one randomised controlled trial has been performed assessing the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT for thoracic spine pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT, a soft tissue massage therapy using hand-held stainless steel instruments. The objective of this trial is to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT compared to a placebo for the treatment of non specific thoracic spine pain. Methods Eighty four eligible people with non specific thoracic pain mid back pain of six weeks or more will be randomised to one of three groups, either SMT, GT, or a placebo (de-tuned ultrasound. Each group will receive up to 10 supervised treatment sessions at the Murdoch University Chiropractic student clinic over a 4-week period. Treatment outcomes will be measured at baseline, one week after their first treatment, upon completion of the 4-week intervention period and at three, six and twelve months post randomisation. Outcome measures will include the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Intention to treat analysis will be utilised in the statistical analysis of any group treatment effects. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on the 7th February 2008. Trial number: ACTRN12608000070336

  3. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, C.H. de; Heuvel, S.P. van den; Staal, J.B.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Hendriks, E.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle

  4. Few promising multivariable prognostic models exist for recovery of people with non-specific neck pain in musculoskeletal primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingbermühle, Roel W; van Trijffel, Emiel; Nelissen, Paul M; Koes, Bart; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2018-01-01

    Which multivariable prognostic model(s) for recovery in people with neck pain can be used in primary care? Systematic review of studies evaluating multivariable prognostic models. People with non-specific neck pain presenting at primary care. Baseline characteristics of the participants. Recovery measured as pain reduction, reduced disability, or perceived recovery at short-term and long-term follow-up. Fifty-three publications were included, of which 46 were derivation studies, four were validation studies, and three concerned combined studies. The derivation studies presented 99 multivariate models, all of which were at high risk of bias. Three externally validated models generated usable models in low risk of bias studies. One predicted recovery in non-specific neck pain, while two concerned participants with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Discriminative ability of the non-specific neck pain model was area under the curve (AUC) 0.65 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.71). For the first WAD model, discriminative ability was AUC 0.85 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.91). For the second WAD model, specificity was 99% (95% CI 93 to 100) and sensitivity was 44% (95% CI 23 to 65) for prediction of non-recovery, and 86% (95% CI 73 to 94) and 55% (95% CI 41 to 69) for prediction of recovery, respectively. Initial Neck Disability Index scores and age were identified as consistent prognostic factors in these three models. Three externally validated models were found to be usable and to have low risk of bias, of which two showed acceptable discriminative properties for predicting recovery in people with neck pain. These three models need further validation and evaluation of their clinical impact before their broad clinical use can be advocated. PROSPERO CRD42016042204. [Wingbermühle RW, van Trijffel E, Nelissen PM, Koes B, Verhagen AP (2018) Few promising multivariable prognostic models exist for recovery of people with non-specific neck pain in musculoskeletal primary care: a systematic review

  5. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Benninga, Marc A; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed. Patients' parents completed a questionnaire concerning usage of healthcare resources, travel costs, out-of-pocket expenses, productivity loss of parents, and supportive measures at school. Use of abdominal pain related prescription medication was derived from case reports forms. Total annual costs per patient were calculated as the sum of direct and indirect medical and nonmedical costs. Costs of initial diagnostic investigations were not included. A total of 258 children, mean age 13.4 years (±5.5), were included, and 183 (70.9%) were female. Total annual costs per patient were estimated to be €2512.31. Inpatient and outpatient healthcare use were major cost drivers, accounting for 22.5% and 35.2% of total annual costs, respectively. Parental productivity loss accounted for 22.2% of total annual costs. No difference was found in total costs between children with IBS or FAP/FAPS. Pediatric abdominal pain related functional gastrointestinal disorders impose a large economic burden on patients' families and healthcare systems. More than one-half of total annual costs of IBS and FAP/FAPS consist of inpatient and outpatient healthcare use. Netherlands Trial Registry: NTR2725. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.

  7. Development of a simple measurement scale to evaluate the severity of non-specific low back pain for industrial ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Kumashiro, Mashaharu

    2010-06-01

    This study developed an assessment scale that hierarchically classifies degrees of low back pain severity. This assessment scale consists of two subscales: 1) pain intensity; 2) pain interference. First, the assessment scale devised by the authors was used to administer a self-administered questionnaire to 773 male workers in the car manufacturing industry. Subsequently, the validity of the measurement items was examined and some of them were revised. Next, the corrected low back pain scale was used in a self-administered questionnaire, the subjects of which were 5053 ordinary workers. The hierarchical validity between the measurement items was checked based on the results of Mokken Scale analysis. Finally, a low back pain assessment scale consisting of seven items was perfected. Quantitative assessment is made possible by scoring the items and low back pain severity can be classified into four hierarchical levels: none; mild; moderate; severe. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The use of this scale devised by the authors allows a more detailed assessment of the degree of risk factor effect and also should prove useful both in selecting remedial measures for occupational low back pain and evaluating their efficacy.

  8. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerve in functional abdominal pain syndrome -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Won; Joo, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Joong; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Sim, Woo-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The thoracic splanchnic nerve block has been used in managing abdominal pain, especially for pains arising from abdominal cancers. A 27-year-old male patient who had a constant abdominal pain was referred to our clinic for pain management but had no organic disease. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain scored 7/10. We applied a diagnostic thoracic splanchnic nerve block under the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain syndrome. Since the block reduced the pain, we applied a radiofrequency thermocoagulation at the T11 and T12 vertebral level. Thereafter, his symptoms improved markedly with pain decreasing to an NRS score of 2-3/10. Hereby, we report a successful management of functional abdominal pain via radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the thoracic splanchnic nerves.

  9. A pilot study on using acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to treat chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kazunori; Itoh, Satoko; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    The present study tests whether a combined treatment of acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is more effective than acupuncture or TENS alone for treating chronic low back pain (LBP). Thirty-two patients with chronic LBP were randomly allocated to four groups. The acupuncture group (ACP) received only acupuncture treatment at selected acupoints for low back pain; the TENS group (TENS) received only TENS treatment at pain areas; the acupuncture and TENS group (A&T) received both acupuncture and TENS treatments; the control group (CT) received topical poultice (only when necessary). Each group received specific weekly treatment five times during the study. Outcome measures were pain intensity in terms of visual analogue scale (VAS) and QOL of low back in terms of Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ). The ACP, TENS and A&T groups all reported lower VAS and RDQ scores. Significant reduction in pain intensity (PTENS treatment is effective in pain relief and QOL of low back improvement for the sampled patients suffering from chronic LBP.

  10. Immediate effects of Pilates based therapeutic exercise on postural control of young individuals with non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Susana; Correia, Christophe; Félix, Gonçalo; Lopes, Mário; Cruz, Ana; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    Low back pain affects the person's ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of Pilates exercises on postural sway and dynamic balance of young individuals with non-specific low back pain. Controlled laboratory design. Forty-six participants with non-specific low back pain were randomized to a Pilates (n=23, 10 males; age: 21.8±3.2years) and a control group (n=23, 9 males; age: 22.8±3.6years). Postural sway was assessed with a force platform and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test, before and after the intervention or rest period. To assess postural sway, participants stood still on an unstable surface set on the force plate for 90s, with eyes closed. The intervention lasted 20min and consisted on four Pilates exercises: single leg stretch (level 1), pelvic press (level 1), swimming (level 1) and kneeling opposite arm and leg reach. At baseline, no differences were found between groups. The Pilates group improved in all the postural sway values (area of CoP: 11.5±3.4 to 9.7±2.7cm 2 , p=0.002 and CoP velocity: 2.8±0.6 to 2.3±0.5cm/s, pControl group only improved in CoP velocity, however, this improvement was significantly inferior compared to the Pilates group. Pilates exercises immediately improved postural sway and dynamic balance in young adults with non-specific low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal pain localization is associated with non-diarrheic Rome III functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, M; Fysekidis, M; Devroede, G; Raynaud, J-J; Bejou, B; Benamouzig, R

    2013-08-01

    Abdominal pain is common in patients with functional bowel disorders (FBDs). The aim of this study was to characterize the predominant sites of abdominal pain associated with FBD subtypes, as defined by the Rome III criteria. A total of 584 consecutive patients attending FBD consultations in a tertiary center participated in the study. Stool form, abdominal pain location (nine abdominal segments), and pain intensity (10-point Likert scale) during the previous week were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was used to characterize the association of abdominal pain sites with specific FBD subtypes. FBDs were associated with predominant pain sites. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with constipation was associated with pain in the left flank and patients were less likely to report pain in the right hypochondrium. Patients with functional constipation reported pain in the right hypochondrium and were less likely to report pain in the left flank and left iliac site. IBS with alternating constipation and diarrhea was associated with pain in the right flank, and unsubtyped IBS with pain in the hypogastrium Patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome reported the lower right flank as predominant pain site. Patients with unspecified FBDs were least likely to report pain in the hypogastrium. Patients with functional diarrhea, IBS with diarrhea, or functional bloating did not report specific pain sites. The results from this study provide the basis for developing new criteria allowing for the identification of homogeneous groups of patients with non-diarrheic FBDs based on characteristic sites of pain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effect of non-weight bearing group-exercising on females with non-specific chronic low back pain: a randomized single blind controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masharawi, Youssef; Nadaf, Nedal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of active non-weight-bearing (NWB) group exercising on women with non specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Forty females with NSCLBP were assigned in a randomized control longitudinal single blinded pilot study. 20 of them were assigned to a NWB bi-weekly group exercise class and 20 females were included in the control group. The exercises involved the entire lumbo-pelvic spine aimed at improving lumbar mobility/flexibility and stability. Pain intensity (VAS), back specific disability (Rolland Morris questionnaire-RMQ), and lumbar flexion and extension ranges of motion measurements were taken prior to intervention (t(0)), immediately following 4 weeks of intervention (t(1)) and 8 weeks later (t(fu)). Reliability trials were conducted on 10 females. Non-parametric tests were used for statistical significance (p exercising improves functional, painful status, lumbar flexion and extension ranges of motion in women suffering from NSCLBP.

  13. Relationship Between Abdominal Symptoms and Fructose Ingestion in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Veronika; Hammer, Katharina; Memaran, Nima; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Hammer, Karin; Hammer, Johann

    2018-05-01

    Limited valid data are available regarding the association of fructose-induced symptoms, fructose malabsorption, and clinical symptoms. To develop a questionnaire for valid symptom assessment before and during a carbohydrate breath test and to correlate symptoms with fructose breath test results in children/adolescents with functional abdominal pain. A Likert-type questionnaire assessing symptoms considered relevant for hydrogen breath test in children was developed and underwent initial validation. Fructose malabsorption was determined by increased breath hydrogen in 82 pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain disorders; fructose-induced symptoms were quantified by symptom score ≥2 and relevant symptom increase over baseline. The results were correlated with clinical symptoms. The time course of symptoms during the breath test was assessed. The questionnaire exhibited good psychometric properties in a standardized assessment of the severity of carbohydrate-related symptoms. A total of 40 % (n = 33) had malabsorption; symptoms were induced in 38 % (n = 31), but only 46 % (n = 15) with malabsorption were symptomatic. There was no significant correlation between fructose malabsorption and fructose-induced symptoms. Clinical symptoms correlated with symptoms evoked during the breath test (p Fructose-induced symptoms but not fructose malabsorption are related to increased abdominal symptoms and have distinct timing patterns.

  14. Heterotopic gastric mucosa associated with abdominal abscess formation, hypotension, and acute abdominal pain in a puppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobleman, Bridget N; Sinnott, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    To describe the presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa forming an abscess associated with acute abdominal pain and shock in a puppy. A 7-month-old male intact Shih-Tzu was presented to the emergency service for evaluation of a 12-hour history of vomiting and lethargy progressing to weakness. On presentation, the puppy was obtunded and hypotensive. Radiographs revealed an ill-defined mid-ventral abdominal mass. Ultrasound revealed an echogenic, fluid-filled mass associated with the jejunum. The puppy had an exploratory celiotomy and a 2 × 4 cm oval fluid-filled soft tissue mass was found to be intimately associated, but not communicating with, a section of the mid-jejunum. The mass and associated jejunum were removed via enterectomy. Histopathology of the resected mass revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa; bacterial culture of the fluid contained in the mass revealed heavy growth of Escherichia coli. The puppy recovered from surgery, was discharged from the hospital, and has had no further complications from this episode. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is commonly found incidentally on necropsy. When it has been associated with acute gastrointestinal signs, mechanical intestinal obstruction with or without perforation was noted. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to abscess formation and acute abdominal pain in the dog. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  15. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Neve

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leon Neve1, John Orchard2, Nathan Gibbs3, Willem van Mechelen4, Evert Verhagen4, Ken Sesel5, Ian Burgess6, Brett Hines61VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3South Sydney Sports Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4EMGO, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Sydney X-ray Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Mater Imaging, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2. These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT, even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis.Objectives: To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain.Study design: Retrospective case series.Methods: Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N.Results: 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60. Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43. Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the

  16. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Eyad M; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H

    2014-12-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabic translation - was collected. Classes from academic years (grades) 6 - 8 were selected. SPSS Statistical Package Version 17 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) was used. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test, and continuous data were analyzed using t -test. P abdominal pain-predominant FGID. Seventy-nine (68%) of them were females. Forty-seven (10.6%) had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-six (8%), 17 (3.8%), 11 (2.4%) and five (1.1%) had abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain, functional abdominal pain syndrome and functional dyspepsia, respectively. Abdominal pain-predominant FGID has become a major health issue in Jordanian children. One of four children between the ages of 11 and 15 years exhibits at least one abdominal pain-predominant FGID. The most common form of abdominal pain-predominant FGID in our children was IBS. Females are affected more often than males. Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms are seen regularly with abdominal pain-predominant FGIDs.

  17. Nonpharmacologic treatment of functional abdominal pain disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Juliette M T M; Korterink, Judith J; Venmans, Leonie M A J; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-03-01

    Various nonpharmacologic treatments are available for pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Data on efficacy and safety are scarce. The goal of this study was to summarize the evidence regarding nonpharmacologic interventions for pediatric AP-FGIDs: lifestyle interventions, dietary interventions, behavioral interventions, prebiotics and probiotics, and alternative medicine. Searches were conducted of the Medline and Cochrane Library databases. Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning nonpharmacologic therapies in children (aged 3-18 years) with AP-FGIDs were included, and data were extracted on participants, interventions, and outcomes. The quality of evidence was assessed by using the GRADE approach. Twenty-four RCTs were found that included 1390 children. Significant improvement of abdominal pain was reported after hypnotherapy compared with standard care/wait-list approaches and after cognitive behavioral therapy compared with a variety of control treatments/wait-list approaches. Written self-disclosure improved pain frequency at the 6-month follow-up only. Compared with placebo, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and VSL#3 were associated with significantly more treatment responders (LGG relative risk: 1.31 [95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 1.59]; VSL#3: P pediatric AP-FGIDs. Data on fiber supplements are inconclusive. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Comparison of low back mobility and stability exercises from Pilates in non-specific low back pain: A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Iã Ferreira; Souza, Catiane; Schneider, Alexandre Tavares; Chagas, Leandro Campos; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2018-05-01

    There is some evidence in the literature about the effectiveness of the Pilates methods in the low back pain. Moreover, Pilates focus on exercises that empathizes the stability and/or mobility of the spine. Therefore, it is discussed in the literature whether higher levels of stability or mobility of the lumbar spine generates better results, both in performance and rehabilitation for low back pain. Compare the effects of the low back mobility and stability exercises from Pilates Method on low back pain, disability and movement functionality in individuals with non-specific chronic low back pain. 28 participants will be randomized into two exercise protocol from Pilates methods, one focusing on low back stability and other on low back mobility. Low back pain (visual analogic scale), low back disability (Oswestry) and movement functionality (7 functional movement tasks) will be evaluated before and after 10 sessions of Pilates exercise by the same trained assessor. A mixed designed ANOVA with two factors will be used. This study is the first to compare these outcomes for chronic low back pain participants with two exercises protocol focusing on low back mobility and stability and the results will evaluate what to prioritize with Pilates exercises to give better results for that population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in a child with sickle cell anemia and recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, L; Mahoney, D H; Redel, C A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common complaint in children with sickle cell disease. Helicobacter pylori gastritis has recently been described in association with recurrent abdominal pain in children. A case report is given of a 16-year-old black male with hemoglobin SS disease presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and hematemesis. Endoscopic exam of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed gastritis, and biopsy confirmed H. pylori infection. Serology studies demonstrated increased anti-H. pylori antibody titers. The young man responded well to treatment, with resolution of his symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection is a new diagnostic consideration for children with recurrent abdominal pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with sickle cell disease, especially when abdominal pain is recurrent and accompanied by vomiting. Larger case studies will be necessary to determine the true incidence of H. pylori in children with sickle cell disease and recurrent abdominal pain.

  20. Blastocystis Hominis and Chronic Abdominal Pain in Children: Is there an Association between Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Monjaraz, Erick Manuel; Vichido Luna, Miguel Angel; Montijo Barrios, Ericka; Cervantes Bustamante, Roberto; Zárate Mondragón, Flora; Huante Anaya, Alfonso; Cadena León, José; Mendez, Monserrat Cazares; López Ugalde, Martha; Ramirez Mayans, Jaime A

    2017-08-03

    Chronic abdominal pain has many etiologies, one of them being parasites. The aim of this study was to find an association between chronic abdominal pain in children and Blastocystis hominis (Bh). Clinical files of patients with Bh and functional abdominal pain were reviewed. A comparison was made between patients who showed an improvement of their symptoms and those who did not. Out of the 138 patients who had functional abdominal pain and Bh, 37 patients did not receive any treatment (26.8%), while 101 received it and were treated with different antimicrobial agents (73.2%); regarding the improvement of symptoms, a statistically significant difference (p abdominal pain in children has different etiologies; however, we have documented through this work that it is appropriate to provide antimicrobial treatment for patients with Bh and chronic abdominal pain. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A systematic review on the effectiveness of physical and rehabilitation interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); T. Kuijpers (Ton); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLow back pain (LBP) is a common and disabling disorder in western society. The management of LBP comprises a range of different intervention strategies including surgery, drug therapy, and non-medical interventions. The objective of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of

  2. A multimedia campaign to improve back beliefs in patients with non-specific low back pain : a process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suman, Arnela; Schaafsma, Frederieke G.; Bamarni, Jiman; Van Tulder, Maurits W.; Anema, Johannes R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and costly disorders worldwide. To reduce its burden in the Netherlands, implementation of a multidisciplinary guideline for LBP was supported by a multifaceted eHealth campaign for patients with LBP. The current study aims 1) to evaluate

  3. A multimedia campaign to improve back beliefs in patients with non-specific low back pain: a process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suman, A.; Schaafsma, F.G.; Bamarni, J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Anema, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and costly disorders worldwide. To reduce its burden in the Netherlands, implementation of a multidisciplinary guideline for LBP was supported by a multifaceted eHealth campaign for patients with LBP. The current study aims 1) to evaluate

  4. A systematic review on the effectiveness of physical and rehabilitation interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Middelkoop, M.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Kuijpers, T.; Verhagen, A.P.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Koes, B.W.; van Tulder, M.W.

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and disabling disorder in western society. The management of LBP comprises a range of different intervention strategies including surgery, drug therapy, and non-medical interventions. The objective of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of physical and

  5. ABDOMINAL DRAWING IN MANEUVER: EFFECT ON GAIT PARAMETERS AND PAIN REDUCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramasivan Mani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back pain is the common musculoskeletal condition with a high prevalence of up to 80% among the general and work force population at some times in their lives.Muscular injury, fatigue, or facet or disc degeneration can compromise the stabilizing effects resulting in shearing forces that cause pain.Abdominal drawing in maneuver is used to facilitate the re-education of neuromuscular control mechanisms provided by local stabilizing muscles. Objective of the study is to measure the gait parameters and pain control before and after abdominal drawing in maneuver in patient with chronic mechanical low back pain. Methods: Total number of 30 consecutive patients and they were divided into two groups by purposive sampling. Group A is subjects with low back pain and Group B is subjects without low back pain. Outcome measures were average step cycle, average step length, coefficient of variation, time on each foot, Ambulation index measured with Biodex gait trainer. Pain is measured with Revised-Oswestry low back pain questionnaire. Results: Significant difference between gait parameters were observed in both low back pain group and the group without low back pain group with abdominal drawing in maneuver and the changes without abdominal drawing in maneuver was minimal. There was no significant difference found between both groups with or without abdominal drawing in maneuver. Conclusion: Gait parameters and Pain control can be improved by training with abdominal drawing in maneuver thereby it reduces pain and improves gait symmetry in subjects with low back pain.

  6. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Treatment for Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Richmond

    Full Text Available To assess whether cognitive behavioural (CB approaches improve disability, pain, quality of life and/or work disability for patients with low back pain (LBP of any duration and of any age.Nine databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs from inception to November 2014. Two independent reviewers rated trial quality and extracted trial data. Standardised mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for individual trials. Pooled effect sizes were calculated using a random-effects model for two contrasts: CB versus no treatment (including wait-list and usual care (WL/UC, and CB versus other guideline-based active treatment (GAT.The review included 23 studies with a total of 3359 participants. Of these, the majority studied patients with persistent LBP (>6 weeks; n=20. At long term follow-up, the pooled SMD for the WL/UC comparison was -0.19 (-0.38, 0.01 for disability, and -0.23 (-0.43, -0.04 for pain, in favour of CB. For the GAT comparison, at long term the pooled SMD was -0.83 (-1.46, -0.19 for disability and -0.48 (-0.93, -0.04 for pain, in favour of CB. While trials varied considerably in methodological quality, and in intervention factors such as provider, mode of delivery, dose, duration, and pragmatism, there were several examples of lower intensity, low cost interventions that were effective.CB interventions yield long-term improvements in pain, disability and quality of life in comparison to no treatment and other guideline-based active treatments for patients with LBP of any duration and of any age.PROSPERO protocol registration number: CRD42014010536.

  7. [Rome III classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children with chronic abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocek, Anna; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The updated Rome III Classification of paediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) associated with abdominal pain comprises: functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain (FAP), functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS). To assess the value of the Rome criteria in identifying FGIDs in children with chronic abdominal pain. The study group consisted of 439 consecutive paediatric patients (192 boys and 247 girls) aged 4-18 years (mean age was 11.95 +/- 3.89 years) referred to the Paediatric Gastroenterology Department at Medical University of Lodz from January 2008 to June 2009 for evaluation of abdominal pain of at least 2 months' duration. After exclusion of organic disease children suspected of functional chronic abdominal pain were categorized with the use of Rome III criteria of FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (H2a-H2d1) and the Questionnaire on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (with the permission of doctor L. S. Walker). The patients with known nonabdominal organic disease, chronic illness or handicap were excluded. In 161 patients (36.58%) organic etiology was confirmed. Of the 278 children (63.42%) with functional chronic abdominal pain, 228 (82.02%) met the Rome III criteria for FGIDs associated with abdominal pain (FD, 15.5%; IBS, 21.6%; abdominal migraine, 5%; FAP 24.5%; FAPS, 15.9%). Fifty cases (17.98%) did not fulfill the criteria for subtypes of abdominal pain-related FGIDs--mainly due to different as defined by Rome III criteria (at least once per week) frequency of symptom presentation. (1) In the authors'investigations FGIDs was the most frequent cause of chronic abdominal pain in children. (2) The significant number of children with nonclassified FGIDs implies the need to modify the diagnostic criteria of Rome III classification concerning the prevalence of symptoms.

  8. Tension Gastrothorax in a Child Presenting with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Hooker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old girl was brought to our hospital by her parents because of abdominal pain. She hadsuffered minor trauma after rolling from her standard-height bed 2 days prior. Vital signs wereappropriate for age. Physical examination was remarkable for decreased breath sounds to the left sideof the chest. A chest radiograph (Figure demonstrated a large gas-filled structure in the left side of thechest with mediastinal shift. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(1:117–118.

  9. Intestinal obstruction and other causes of abdominal pain in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, N.D.; Chaffin, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous causes of colic in foals. Nearly all forms of obstructive gastrointestinal disorders that have been recognized in adultshave also been described in foals. Meconium impaction, intussusceptions, ascarid impactions, small intestinal volvulus, and hernias are evidently the most common causes of mechanical obstruction in foals. Other frequently recognized causes of colic in foals are gastric ulceration, uroperitoneum, and ileus. For some disorders, the history, signalment, and physical examination findings may lead to a presumptive diagnosis; in other disorders, ultrasonography and clinicopathologic examination of blood and peritoneal fluid may be required in the diagnostic evaluation. This article considers the causes of intestinal obstructionand abdominal pain in foals from birth to weaning

  10. Intestinal malrotation as a cause for abdominal pain in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Guillermo Lubinus Badillo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We show the case of a 63 year old woman complaining of chronicabdominal pain and bilious vomiting. The patient was admitted tothe hospital with a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction which got better by medical treatment. After performing an abdominal computarized tomography, a midgut volvulus was diagnosed and later confirmed by an intestinal transit time. The patient was discharged with out symptoms after medical treatment and an elective procedure was scheduled (Ladd procedure and to reduce the risk of volvulusand intestinal ischemia. We discuss the clinical presentation of thedisease, the diagnostic methods used and the treatment optionsavailable.

  11. Returning to work - a long-term process reaching beyond the time frames of multimodal non-specific back pain rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Therese; Jensen, Irene; Bergström, Gunnar; Busch, Hillevi

    2015-01-01

    To explore and describe health professionals' experience of working with return to work (RTW) in multimodal rehabilitation for people with non-specific back pain. An interview study using qualitative content analysis. Fifteen participants were interviewed, all were working with multimodal rehabilitation for people with non-specific back pain in eight different rehabilitation units. The participants experienced RTW as a long-term process reaching beyond the time frames of the multimodal rehabilitation (MMR). Their attitudes and, their patients' condition, impacted on their work which focused on psychological and physical well-being as well as participation in everyday life. They often created an action plan for the RTW process, however the responsibility for its realisation was transferred to other actors. The participants described limited interventions in connection with patients' workplaces. Recommended support in the RTW process in MMR comprises the provision of continuous supervision of vocational issues for the health care professionals, the development of guidelines and a checklist for how to work in close collaboration with patients' workplaces and employers, the provision of long-term follow-up in relation to the patients' work, and the development of proper interventions in order to promote transitions between all the different actors involved. Rehabilitation programs targeting return to work (RTW) for people with non-specific back pain needs to include features concretely focusing on vocational issues. Health and RTW is often seen as a linear process in which health comes before RTW. Rehabilitation programs could be tailored to better address the reciprocal relationship between health and work, in which they are interconnected and affect each other. The RTW process is reaching beyond the time frames of the multimodal rehabilitation but further support from the patients are asked for. The rehabilitation programs needs to be designed to provide long

  12. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Luz Maurício Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j

  13. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j PMID:23298183

  14. Effects of preferred-exercise prescription compared to usual exercise prescription on outcomes for people with non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial [ACTRN12608000524392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keating Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP has become a significant problem due to high healthcare utilization, rising costs of care and perceived limitations of effectiveness of many current treatments. Systematic reviews have repeatedly concluded that, on average across participants, exercise for NSCLBP appears effective in decreasing pain and improving function. Not all people with NSCLBP benefit from exercise programs and it would assist care-providers and care-seekers if factors that impact on program effectiveness and success were identified. Methods and design The study will be a randomised controlled trial comparing an exercise rehabilitation program informed by a participant preferences questionnaire compared to a program without this guideline for patients with chronic low back pain. A sample of 150 patients will be recruited in Melbourne, Australia through community-based healthcare clinics that provide supervised exercise rehabilitation programs for people with non-specific chronic low back pain. Clinicians will be randomly assigned to exercise preferences questionnaire or no questionnaire and participants will be allocated in a concealed manner. A qualitative focus group study of exercise instructor feedback about the exercise preferences instrument will be embedded in the research design. Two qualitative focus group studies will also be conducted for participants in the intervention and the control groups to obtain feedback about participants' experiences of the two types of exercise programs. The primary outcomes will be functional ability, pain, fear avoidance, exercise adherence. Discussion This trial will evaluate the effectiveness of individualised exercise prescription compared to usual exercise prescription for NSCLP and, using feedback following the trial, refine the exercise preferences questionnaire.

  15. Nonspecific abdominal pain in pediatric primary care: evaluation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Elizabeth M; Fiks, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of children with nonspecific abdominal pain (AP) in primary care, their evaluation, and their outcomes. Between 2007 and 2009, a retrospective cohort of children from 5 primary care practices was followed from an index visit with AP until a well-child visit 6 to 24 months later (outcome visit). Using International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision (ICD-9), codes and chart review, we identified afebrile children between 4 and 12 years old with AP. Use of diagnostic testing was assessed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the association of index visit clinical and demographic variables with persistent pain at the outcome visit, and receipt of a specific diagnosis. Three hundred seventy-five children presented with AP, representing 1% of the total population of 4- to 12-year-olds during the study period. Eighteen percent of children had persistent pain, and 70% of the study cohort never received a specific diagnosis for their pain. Seventeen percent and 14% of children had laboratory and radiology testing at the index visit, respectively. Only 3% of laboratory evaluations helped to yield a diagnosis. Among variables considered, only preceding pain of more than 7 days at the index visit was associated with persistent pain (odds ratio 2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.19-3.89). None of the variables considered was associated with receiving a specific diagnosis. Most children with AP do not receive a diagnosis, many have persistent pain, and very few receive a functional AP diagnosis. Results support limited use of diagnostic testing and conservative management consistent with national policy statements. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... abdominal pain and in 91 healthy controls. Sera with an ELISA unit-value above the cut-off level were confirmed by Western immunoblot. Only seropositive children with recurrent abdominal pain were examined by an oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. Symptomatology was recorded according to the localization...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  17. Disaccharidase Deficiencies in Children With Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chammas, Khalil; Williams, Sara E; Miranda, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    Carbohydrate intolerance or malabsorption has been suggested as a cause of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in a subset of patients. We aimed to evaluate disaccharidase deficiencies in children with functional CAP and to correlate deficiencies with clinical features. Patients presenting to the gastroenterology clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with abdominal pain prospectively completed a detailed demographic, history, and symptom questionnaire. The CAP cohort included those with at least 1 month of symptoms. Data on disaccharidase activity and histology of endoscopic biopsies were collected retrospectively. Only patients with normal histology were included in the study. The association between groups with low disaccharidases and clinical features was examined. A total of 203 pediatric patients with CAP were included. The mean (SD) age was 11.5 (3.1) years, and 32.5% were male. The percentages of abnormally low disaccharidase levels using the standard laboratory cutoffs were lactase, 37%; sucrase, 21%; glucoamylase, 25%; and palatinase, 8%. Thirty-nine percent of the patients with low lactase also had low sucrase, and 67% of the patients with low sucrase had low lactase. There was no significant difference in the activities of any of the disaccharidases or sucrase/lactase ratio in relation to age. Also, no association was found between stool consistency, stool frequency, or location of pain and low disaccharidase activity. A large proportion of patients with CAP have deficiencies in disaccharidases. Bowel frequency, vomiting, or location of pain was no different between groups, suggesting that these clinical features cannot be used to predict disaccharidase deficiencies.

  18. Time perspective as a predictor of acute postsurgical pain and coping with pain following abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol-Kwapinska, M; Plotek, W; Bąbel, P; Cybulski, M; Kluzik, A; Krystianc, J; Mandecki, M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to predict acute postsurgical pain and coping with pain following surgery based on preoperative time perspectives. Time perspective is a basic dimension of psychological time. It is a tendency to focus on a particular time area: the past, the present and the future. Seventy-six patients completed measures of time perspective and pain 24 h before abdominal surgery. During the 3 days after surgery, measures of pain and coping with pain were completed. We performed hierarchical regression analyses to identify predictors of acute postsurgical pain and how patients cope with it. These analyses suggested that a preoperative past-negative time perspective can be a predictor of postoperative pain level and catastrophizing after surgery. The findings of our study indicate the importance of time perspective, especially the past perspective, in dealing with postoperative pain. Our research indicates that a preoperative past-negative time perspective is a significant predictor of acute postsurgical pain intensity and the strongest predictor of pain catastrophizing. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  19. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Møller Faaborg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI. It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC. Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81% SCI and 14 (93% CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (. Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (. Only minor differences were found in patient’s qualitative description of abdominal pain or in the location of pain. In neither SCI nor CIC was pain associated with GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI.

  20. Neuromuscular adaptations predict functional disability independently of clinical pain and psychological factors in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Abboud, Jacques; St-Pierre, Charles; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain exhibit characteristics such as clinical pain, psychological symptoms and neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the independent contribution of clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations to disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, anxiety, neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain were assessed in 52 patients with chronic low back pain. Lumbar muscle electromyographic activity was assessed during a flexion-extension task (flexion relaxation phenomenon) to assess both chronic neuromuscular adaptations and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain during the task. Multiple regressions showed that independent predictors of disability included neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain (β=0.25, p=0.006, sr(2)=0.06), neuromuscular responses to experimental pain (β=-0.24, p=0.011, sr(2)=0.05), clinical pain intensity (β=0.28, p=0.002, sr(2)=0.08) and psychological factors (β=0.58, ppain intensity and psychological factors, and contribute to inter-individual differences in patients' disability. This suggests that disability, in chronic low back pain patients, is determined by a combination of factors, including clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic appendicitis in a patient with 15 years abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bizhan Khorasani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Khorasani B1, Gholizadeh Pasha A2 1. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Tehran University of rehabilitation 2. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Babol University of medical sciences Abstract Background: Acute appendicitis is a completely known disease but for many physicians chronic appendicitis is unknown and some of them don believe in it. Although the number of people suffer from chronic appendicitis is much fewer than those who suffer from acute appendicitis, we shouldn ignore it. Clinical symptoms for these patients are chronic, longtime and recurrent abdominal pain, which is usually in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. In the Para clinical examinations there isn any considerable pathological problem (in urine, stool, and sonography of the abdomen and pelvis. By recognizing appendicitis and appendectomy, the symptoms will be vanished and the patients will recover. Case presentation: The case was a 57-year-old man who has complained from chronic abdominal pain in the RLQ area since 15years ago. No pathological problem had been found in all diagnostic process. Conclusion: The problem was diagnosed as the chronic appendicitis and he underwent the appendectomy by laparoscopic procedure and was completely recovered.

  2. Abdominal Pain-predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Adolescent Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Ekong; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Meremikwu, Martin; Benninga, Marc Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence, pattern, and predisposing factors of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) in adolescent Nigerians. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 states in the southern part of Nigeria in June 2014. Adolescents of age 10 to 18 years were recruited from 11 secondary schools using a stratified random sampling technique. A validated self-administered questionnaire on Rome III criteria for diagnosing AP-FGIDs and its determinants were filled by the participants in a classroom setting. A total of 874 participants filled the questionnaire. Of this, 818 (93.4%) filled it properly and were included in the final analysis. The mean age of the participants was 14.6 ± 2.0 years with 409 (50.0%) being boys. AP-FGIDs were present in 81 (9.9%) participants. Forty six (5.6%) of the study participants had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 21 (2.6%) functional abdominal pain, 15 (1.8%) abdominal migraine while 3 (0.4%) had functional dyspepsia. The difference in AP-FGIDs between adolescents residing in rural and urban areas was not statistically significant (P = 0.22). Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms occurred more frequently in those with AP-FGIDs. Nausea was the only symptom independently associated with AP-FGIDs (p = 0.015). Multiple regression analysis showed no significant association between stressful life events and AP-FGIDs. AP-FGIDs are a significant health problem in Nigerian adolescents. In addition to the intestinal symptoms, most of the affected children and others also had extraintestinal symptoms. None of the stressful life events evaluated was significantly associated with FGIDs.

  3. The clinical reasoning process in randomized clinical trials with patients with non-specific neck pain is incomplete: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maissan, Francois; Pool, Jan; de Raaij, Edwin; Mollema, Jürgen; Ostelo, Raymond; Wittink, Harriet

    2018-06-01

    Primarily to evaluate the completeness of the description of the clinical reasoning process in RCTs with patients with non-specific neck pain with an argued or diagnosed cause i.e. an impairment or activity limitation. Secondly, to determine the association between the completeness of the clinical reasoning process and the degree of risk of bias. Pubmed, Cinahl and PEDro were systematically searched from inception to July 2016. RCTs (n = 122) with patients with non-specific neck pain receiving physiotherapy treatment published in English were included. Data extraction included study characteristics and important features of the clinical reasoning process based on the Hypothesis-Oriented Algorithm for Clinicians II (HOAC II)]. Thirty-seven studies (30%) had a complete clinical reasoning process of which 8 (6%) had a 'diagnosed cause' and 29 (24%) had an 'argued cause'. The Spearmans rho association between the extent of the clinical reasoning process and the risk of bias was -0.2. In the majority of studies (70%) the described clinical reasoning process was incomplete. A very small proportion (6%) had a 'diagnosed cause'. Therefore, a better methodological quality does not necessarily imply a better described clinical reasoning process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical stimulation for chronic non-specific low back pain in a working-age population: a 12-week double blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiese, Matthew S; Hughes, Matthew; Biggs, Jeremy

    2013-03-28

    Non-invasive electrotherapy is commonly used for treatment of chronic low back pain. Evidence for efficacy of most electrotherapy modalities is weak or lacking. This study aims to execute a high-quality, double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial comparing 1) H-Wave(®) Device stimulation plus usual care with 2) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) plus usual care, and 3) Sham electrotherapy plus usual care to determine comparative efficacy for treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain patients. Chronic non-specific low back pain patients between ages of 18-65 years, with pain of at least 3 months duration and minimal current 5/10 VAS pain. Patients will have no significant signs or symptoms of lumbosacral nerve impingement, malignancy, spinal stenosis, or mood disorders. Double blind RCT with 3 arms and 38 subjects per arm. Randomization by permuted blocks of random length, stratified by Workers Compensation claim (yes vs. no), and use of opioids. The null hypothesis of this study is that there are no statistically significant differences in functional improvement between treatment types during and at the end of a 12-week week treatment period. Subjective data will be collected using Filemaker Pro™ database management collection tools. Objective data will be obtained through functional assessments. Data will be collected at enrollment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks for each participant by a blinded assessor. H-Wave(®) device stimulation (Intervention A) plus usual care, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (Intervention B) plus usual care, and sham electrotherapy plus usual care (control). Each treatment arm will have identical numbers of visits (4) and researcher contact time (approximately 15 hours). Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary measures include: Rowland Morris Instrument, VAS pain score, functional evaluation including strength when pushing and pulling, pain free range of motion in flexion and extension

  5. Effects of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on non-specific chronic back pain: a randomized controlled trial with additional exploration of the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Hartmann, Mechthild; Seidler, Günther H; Eich, Wolfgang

    2013-08-30

    Non-specific chronic back pain (CBP) is often accompanied by psychological trauma, but treatment for this associated condition is often insufficient.Nevertheless, despite the common co-occurrence of pain and psychological trauma, a specific trauma-focused approach for treating CBP has been neglected to date. Accordingly, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), originally developed as a treatment approach for posttraumatic stress disorders, is a promising approach for treating CBP in patients who have experienced psychological trauma.Thus, the aim of this study is to determine whether a standardized, short-term EMDR intervention added to treatment as usual (TAU) reduces pain intensity in CBP patients with psychological trauma vs. TAU alone. The study will recruit 40 non-specific CBP patients who have experienced psychological trauma. After a baseline assessment, the patients will be randomized to either an intervention group (n = 20) or a control group (n = 20). Individuals in the EMDR group will receive ten 90-minute sessions of EMDR fortnightly in addition to TAU. The control group will receive TAU alone. The post-treatment assessments will take place two weeks after the last EMDR session and six months later.The primary outcome will be the change in the intensity of CBP within the last four weeks (numeric rating scale 0-10) from the pre-treatment assessment to the post-treatment assessment two weeks after the completion of treatment.In addition, the patients will undergo a thorough assessment of the change in the experience of pain, disability, trauma-associated distress, mental co-morbidities, resilience, and quality of life to explore distinct treatment effects. To explore the mechanisms of action that are involved, changes in pain perception and pain processing (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) will also be assessed.The statistical analysis of the primary outcome will be performed on an intention-to-treat basis

  6. Person-centred pain management for the patient with acute abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avallin, Therese; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Sorensen, Erik Elgaard

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To explore and describe the impact of the organizational culture on and the patient-practitioner patterns of actions that contribute to or detract from successful pain management for the patient with acute abdominal pain across the acute care pathway. BACKGROUND: Although pain management...... is a recognised human right, unmanaged pain continues to cause suffering and prolong hospital care. Unanswered questions about how to successfully manage pain relate to both organizational culture and individual practitioners' performance. DESIGN: Focused ethnography, applying the Developmental Research Sequence...... and the Fundamentals of Care framework. METHODS: Participant observation and informal interviews (92 hours) were performed at one emergency department and two surgical wards at a University Hospital during April - November 2015. Data includes 261 interactions between patients, aged ≥18 years seeking care for acute...

  7. Characteristics of chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents attending a rheumatology outpatients clinic: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain (CNSMSP may develop in childhood and adolescence, leading to disability and reduced quality of life that continues into adulthood. The purpose of the study was to build a biopsychosocial profile of children and adolescents with CNSMSP. Methods CNSMSP subjects (n = 30, 18 females, age 7-18 were compared with age matched pain free controls across a number of biopsychosocial domains. Results In the psychosocial domain CNSMSP subjects had increased levels of anxiety and depression, and had more somatic pain complaints. In the lifestyle domain CNSMSP subjects had lower physical activity levels, but no difference in television or computer use compared to pain free subjects. Physically, CNSMSP subjects tended to sit with a more slumped spinal posture, had reduced back muscle endurance, increased presence of joint hypermobility and poorer gross motor skills. Conclusion These findings support the notion that CNSMSP is a multidimensional biopsychosocial disorder. Further research is needed to increase understanding of how the psychosocial, lifestyle and physical factors develop and interact in CNSMSP.

  8. Are there abnormalities in peripheral and central components of somatosensory evoked potentials in non - specific chronic low back pain ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Puta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP was shown to be associated with longer reflex response latencies of trunk muscles during external upper limb perturbations. One theoretical, but rarely investigated possibility for longer reflex latencies might be related to modulated somatosensory information processing. Therefore, the present study investigated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs to median nerve stimulation in CLBP patients and healthy controls (HC. Latencies of the peripheral N9 SEP component were used as primary outcome. In addition, latencies and amplitudes of the central N20 SEP component, sensory thresholds, motor thresholds, and nerve conduction velocity were also analyzed in CLBP patients and HC. There is a trend for the CLBP patients to exhibited longer N9 latencies at the ipsilateral Erb’s point compared to HC. This trend is substantiated by significantly longer N9 latencies in CLBP patients compared to normative data. None of the other parameters showed any significant difference between CLBP patients and HC. Overall, our data indicate small differences of the peripheral N9 SEP component; however, these differences cannot explain the reflex delay observed in CLBP patients. While it was important to rule out the contribution of early somatosensory processing and to elucidate its contribution to the delayed reflex responses in CLBP patients, further research is needed to find the primary source(s of time-delayed reflexes in CLBP.

  9. Effectiveness of Back School program versus hydrotherapy in elderly patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Cosimo; Romiti, Davide

    2014-06-24

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a major cause of disability, for which clinical practice guidelines suggest exercise programs, such as Back School program (stretching and selective muscle reinforcement techniques) and Hydrotherapy technique, as an effective treatment to reduce pain intensity and disability. We enrolled 56 elderly individuals, affected by non-specific CLBP, whose pain had worsened in the last three months, which were randomly allocated to Back School (group A) or to Hydrotherapy program (group B). Each group underwent two one-hour-treatment sessions per week, over a 12-week period. Each patient was evaluated using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) V2.0 at the beginning (T0), at the end of treatment (T1) and at the 3-month follow-up (T2). At T1 and T2 we observed a highly significant statistical difference in the values measured  in both groups: at T1 in group A RMDQ improvement of 3.26±1.02 (p<0.001) and SF-36 of 13.30±1.44 (p<0.001); in group B RMDQ improvement of 4.96±0.71 (p<0.001) and SF-36 of 14.19±1.98 (p<0.001). We have also evaluated the difference in effectiveness of the two programs and no significant statistical differences were found between the two groups. Back School program and Hydrotherapy could be valid treatment options in the rehabilitation of non-specific CLBP in elderly people. Both therapies proved to be effective and can be used in association with other rehabilitation programs. We believe that Back School program should be favored for its simplicity and the small number of resources required. 

  10. Non-specific low back pain in primary care in the Spanish National Health Service: a prospective study on clinical outcomes and determinants of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Alfonso

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spanish National Health Service is a universal and free health care system. Non-specific low back pain (LBP is a prevalent disorder, generating large health and social costs. The objectives of this study were to describe its management in primary care, to assess patient characteristics that influence physicians' decisions, and to describe clinical outcome at 2 months. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 648 patients with non-specific low back pain was recruited by 75 physicians (out of 361 – 20.8% working in 40 primary care centers in 10 of the 17 administrative regions in Spain, covering 693,026 out of the 40,499,792 inhabitants. Patients were assessed on the day they were recruited, and prospectively followed-up 14 and 60 days later. The principal patient characteristics that were analyzed were: sex, duration of the episode, history of LBP, working status, severity of LBP, leg pain and disability, and results of straight leg raising test. Descriptors of management were: performance of the straight leg raising test, ordering of diagnostic procedures, prescription of drug treatment, referral to physical therapy, rehabilitation or surgery, and granting of sick leave. Regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between patients' baseline characteristics and physicians' management decisions. Only workers were included in the models on sick leave. Results Mean age (SD of included patients was 46.5 (15.5 years, 367 (56.6% were workers, and 338 (52.5% were females. Median (25th–75th interquartile range duration of pain when entering the study was 4 (2–10 days and only 28 patients (4.3% had chronic low back pain. Diagnostic studies included plain radiographs in 43.1% of patients and CT or MRI scans in 18.8%. Drug medication was prescribed to 91.7% of patients, 19.1% were sent to physical therapy or rehabilitation, and 9.6% were referred to surgery. The main determinants of the clinical management were duration

  11. Anterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient Previously Diagnosed With Functional Abdominal Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiusto, Matthew; Suleman, M-Irfan

    2018-03-23

    Chronic abdominal pain is common in children and adolescents but challenging to diagnose, because practitioners may be concerned about missing serious occult disease. Abdominal wall pain is an often ignored etiology for chronic abdominal pain. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome causes abdominal wall pain but is frequently overlooked. Correctly diagnosing patients with anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is important because nerve block interventions are highly successful in the remittance of pain. Here, we present the case of a pediatric patient who received a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain but experienced pain remittance after receiving a trigger-point injection and transverse abdominis plane block.

  12. Hyoscine butylbromide - A review of its use in the treatment of abdominal cramping and pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, Guido N.

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal cramping and pain is a frequent problem in the adult population of Western countries, with an estimated prevalence of <= 30%. Hyoscine butylbromide (scopolamine butylbromide) [Buscopan((R))/Buscapina((R))] is an antispasmodic drug indicated for the treatment of abdominal pain associated

  13. Epidemiology of pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Diederen, Kay; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to review the literature regarding epidemiology of functional abdominal pain disorders in children and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution including associated risk factors of developing functional abdominal pain. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychInfo

  14. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A. A.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children presenting

  15. Prevalence, characteristics, and management of childhood functional abdominal pain in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Leo A. A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Benninga, Marc A.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2013-01-01

    To (i) describe the proportion of children presenting with abdominal pain diagnosed by the GP as functional abdominal pain (GPFAP); (ii) evaluate the association between patient and disease characteristics and GPFAP; (iii) describe diagnostic management by the GP in children presenting with

  16. Re-Appraising the Role of Sonography in Pediatric Acute Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2013-01-01

    Objective Most pediatric emergency department (ED) visits are due to acute abdominal pain. Sonography is a reliable technique for differential diagnosis. The objective of this study was to re-appraise the role of sonography in evaluating acute abdominal pain in children. Methods Retrospective chart review of children aged

  17. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, J.E.; Strauch, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.)

  18. Systemic classification for a new diagnostic approach to acute abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hoi; Kang, Hyun Sik; Han, Kyung Hee; Kim, Seung Hyo; Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Suk; Jeong, In Ho; Kim, Young Sil; Kang, Ki-Soo

    2014-12-01

    With previous methods based on only age and location, there are many difficulties in identifying the etiology of acute abdominal pain in children. We sought to develop a new systematic classification of acute abdominal pain and to give some helps to physicians encountering difficulties in diagnoses. From March 2005 to May 2010, clinical data were collected retrospectively from 442 children hospitalized due to acute abdominal pain with no apparent underlying disease. According to the final diagnoses, diseases that caused acute abdominal pain were classified into nine groups. The nine groups were group I "catastrophic surgical abdomen" (7 patients, 1.6%), group II "acute appendicitis and mesenteric lymphadenitis" (56 patients, 12.7%), group III "intestinal obstruction" (57 patients, 12.9%), group IV "viral and bacterial acute gastroenteritis" (90 patients, 20.4%), group V "peptic ulcer and gastroduodenitis" (66 patients, 14.9%), group VI "hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease" (14 patients, 3.2%), group VII "febrile viral illness and extraintestinal infection" (69 patients, 15.6%), group VIII "functional gastrointestinal disorder (acute manifestation)" (20 patients, 4.5%), and group IX "unclassified acute abdominal pain" (63 patients, 14.3%). Four patients were enrolled in two disease groups each. Patients were distributed unevenly across the nine groups of acute abdominal pain. In particular, the "unclassified abdominal pain" only group was not uncommon. Considering a systemic classification for acute abdominal pain may be helpful in the diagnostic approach in children.

  19. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  20. Yoga Therapy for Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Ockeloen, Lize E.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Benninga, Marc A.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare effects of 10 weeks of yoga therapy (YT) and standard medical care (SMC) on abdominal pain and quality of life (QoL) in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Sixty-nine patients, ages 8 to 18 years, with

  1. MR imaging evaluation of abdominal pain during pregnancy: appendicitis and other nonobstetric causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Woodfield, Courtney A; DeBenedectis, Carolynn M; Lazarus, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of the cause of abdominal pain in a pregnant patient is particularly difficult because of multiple confounding factors related to normal pregnancy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful in evaluation of abdominal pain during pregnancy, as it offers the benefit of cross-sectional imaging without ionizing radiation or evidence of harmful effects to the fetus. MR imaging is often performed specifically for diagnosis of possible appendicitis, which is the most common illness necessitating emergency surgery in pregnant patients. However, it is important to look for pathologic processes outside the appendix that may be an alternative source of abdominal pain. Numerous entities other than appendicitis can cause abdominal pain during pregnancy, including processes of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, vascular, and gynecologic origin. MR imaging is useful in diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain in a pregnant patient because of its ability to safely demonstrate a wide range of pathologic conditions in the abdomen and pelvis beyond appendicitis. © RSNA, 2012.

  2. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum in pediatric functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; Comito, Donatella; Famiani, Annalisa; Calamarà, Sabrina; Loddo, Italia

    2013-01-14

    To assess the effects of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) diet supplement in pediatric chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A randomized, double-blind pilot study was performed in sixty children (8-16 years) with functional bowel disorders, such as CAP or IBS, diagnosed according to Rome III criteria. All patients underwent ultrasound, blood and stool examinations to rule out any organic disease. Patients were allocated to receive PHGG at dosage of 5 g/d (n = 30) or placebo (fruit-juice n = 30) for 4 wk. The evaluation of the efficacy of fiber supplement included IBS symptom severity score (Birmingham IBS Questionnaire), severity of abdominal pain (Wong-Baker Face Pain Rating Score) and bowel habit (Bristol Stool Scale). Symptom scores were completed at 2, 4, and 8 wk. The change from baseline in the symptom severity scale at the end of treatment and at 4 wk follow-up after treatment was the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoint was to evaluate compliance to supplementation with the PHGG in the pediatric population. Differences within groups during the treatment period and follow-up were evaluated by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results of the study were assessed considering some variables, such as frequency and intensity of symptoms with modifications of the bowel habit. Both groups were balanced for baseline characteristics and all patients completed the study. Group A (PHGG group) presented a higher level of efficacy compared to group B (control group), (43% vs 5%, P = 0.025) in reducing clinical symptoms with modification of Birmingham IBS score (median 0 ± 1 vs 4 ± 1, P = 0.025), in intensity of CAP assessed with the Wong-Baker Face Pain Rating Score and in normalization of bowel habit evaluated with the Bristol Stool Scale (40% vs 13.3%, P = 0.025). In IBS subgroups, statistical analysis shown a tendency toward normalization of bowel movements, but there was no difference in the prevalence of improvement in two bowel

  3. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years) were randomised to a treatment group (TG) or a waiting-list control group (WL). Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR) and maximal pain related to movement (PM) on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), pain diary (PD) data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT), vibration-detection thresholds (VDT), and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01). Pain diaries (PD) revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001). There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006) and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006). Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial registration The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01289964). PMID

  4. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain - a randomised controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobos Gustav J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Methods Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years were randomised to a treatment group (TG or a waiting-list control group (WL. Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR and maximal pain related to movement (PM on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS, pain diary (PD data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS, Neck Disability Index (NDI, and health-related quality of life (SF-36. In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT, vibration-detection thresholds (VDT, and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT were determined at pain-related and control areas. Results Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01. Pain diaries (PD revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001. There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006 and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006. Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p Conclusions A series of five dry cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. Trial registration The trial was registered at

  5. The influence of a series of five dry cupping treatments on pain and mechanical thresholds in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain--a randomised controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Dobos, Gustav J; Musial, Frauke

    2011-08-15

    In this preliminary trial we investigated the effects of dry cupping, an ancient method for treating pain syndromes, on patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Sensory mechanical thresholds and the participants' self-reported outcome measures of pain and quality of life were evaluated. Fifty patients (50.5 ± 11.9 years) were randomised to a treatment group (TG) or a waiting-list control group (WL). Patients in the TG received a series of 5 cupping treatments over a period of 2 weeks; the control group did not. Self-reported outcome measures before and after the cupping series included the following: Pain at rest (PR) and maximal pain related to movement (PM) on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), pain diary (PD) data on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). In addition, the mechanical-detection thresholds (MDT), vibration-detection thresholds (VDT), and pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were determined at pain-related and control areas. Patients of the TG had significantly less pain after cupping therapy than patients of the WL group (PR: Δ-22.5 mm, p = 0.00002; PM: Δ-17.8 mm, p = 0.01). Pain diaries (PD) revealed that neck pain decreased gradually in the TG patients and that pain reported by the two groups differed significantly after the fifth cupping session (Δ-1.1, p = 0.001). There were also significant differences in the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain (Δ13.8, p = 0.006) and vitality (Δ10.2, p = 0.006). Group differences in PPT were significant at pain-related and control areas (all p cupping treatments appeared to be effective in relieving chronic non-specific neck pain. Not only subjective measures improved, but also mechanical pain sensitivity differed significantly between the two groups, suggesting that cupping has an influence on functional pain processing. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01289964).

  6. Psychological factors addressed in cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric functional abdominal pain: Which are most important to target?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; de Haan, Else; Derkx, H. H. F.; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric functional abdominal pain leaves room for improvement. We studied which factors addressed in cognitive behaviour therapy relate most strongly to the physical and psychological functioning of children with functional abdominal pain and

  7. No diagnostic utility of antibody patterns against Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular serotypes in patients with axial spondyloarthritis vs. patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, L T; Loft, A G; Christiansen, A A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether antibody response patterns against Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular serotypes can discriminate patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) from patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP). METHOD: Immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA antibodies against K. pneumoniae...... capsular serotypes K2, K26, K36, and K50 were measured, and antibody seropositivity compared between groups and analysed for patient correlation in five different groups: (a) 96 patients fulfilling the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA; (b) 38...... ankylosing spondylitis (AS) served as the negative and positive control groups. RESULTS: There was no difference in IgG and IgA seropositivity against all serotypes between the axSpA, non-axSpA, and LBP groups. No significant correlations were found between anti-Klebsiella antibodies and age, gender, HLA-B27...

  8. Expectations about recovery from acute non-specific low back pain predict absence from usual work due to chronic low back pain : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallegraeff, J.M.; Krijnen, W.P.; van der Schans, C.P.; de Greef, M.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Question: Do negative expectations in patients after the onset of acute low back pain increase the odds of absence from usual work due to progression to chronic low back pain? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of prospective inception cohort studies. Participants: Adults with acute or

  9. Differences in pain perception, health-related quality of life, disability, mood, and sleep between Brazilian and Spanish people with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana P. Rodrigues-De-Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Cultural and social factors play an important role in the development and persistence of Low Back Pain (LBP. Nevertheless, there are few studies investigating differences in LBP features between countries. Objective To determine differences in pain perception between individuals with LBP living in Brazil and Spain. Method Thirty Spanish individuals and 30 age- and sex-comparable Brazilian individuals with LBP were recruited from the Public Health Services of both countries. The Numerical Pain Rating Scale and the pain rating index (PRI, the number of words chosen (NWC, and the present pain index (PPI extracted from the McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain. The Oswestry Disability Index, the Short Form-36, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were also applied. Differences between countries and the correlation between demographic and clinical variables in each country were assessed with parametric and the nonparametric tests. Results A significant Country by Gender interaction was found for the PRI total score (P=0.038, but not for intensity of pain, disability, PPI, or NWC, in which Spanish women exhibited greater pain ratio than Spanish men (P=0.014, and no gender differences were identified in Brazilians. The Spanish group showed a consistent pattern of correlations for clinical data. Within Brazilian patients, fewer correlations were found and all of the coefficients were lower than those in the Spanish group. Conclusion The pain perception in patients with LBP is different depending on the country. Within Spanish patients, LBP is considered a more global entity affecting multidimensional contexts.

  10. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. Methods We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to100 numerical rating scale (NRS for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ, and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. Results The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group, but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52. However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p Conclusion This pilot study may provide preliminary data on the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatments for PNSLBP. Future full-scale randomised controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention

  11. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-In; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kang, Jung Won; Kim, Kun Hyung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Kang, Kyung-Won; Kim, Ae-Ran; Shin, Mi-Suk; Jung, So-Young; Choi, Sun-mi

    2011-06-10

    Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP) is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group) who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to 100 numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group), but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52). However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p cupping group during 4 weeks (p = 0.09). The ODQ score did not show significant differences between the two groups (-5.60 [-8.90 to -2.30] in the wet-cupping group and -1.8 [-5.8 to 2.2] in the waiting-list group, p = 0.14). There was no report of adverse events due to wet-cupping. This pilot study may

  12. Varicella Zoster Infection: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain Mimicking Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Olmez, Deniz; Boz, Alper; Erkan, Nazif

    2009-01-01

    Varicella zoster is an acute viral infection that results from reactivation of a latent varicella zoster virus. It usually occurs in adult population and immune compromised patients. It rarely occurs in healthy children. Here we present a 14 years old male with varicella zoster that had abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen to alert others who are consulted for the differentiation of acute abdomen and others who may be consulted for pain management. Keywords Varicella zoster; Abdominal pain

  13. Assessing the perception of trunk movements in military personnel with chronic non-specific low back pain using a virtual mirror.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyke Roosink

    Full Text Available Chronic pain, including chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP, is often associated with body perception disturbances, but these have generally been assessed under static conditions. The objective of this study was to use a "virtual mirror" that scaled visual movement feedback to assess body perception during active movement in military personnel with CNSLBP (n = 15 as compared to military healthy control subjects (n = 15. Subjects performed a trunk flexion task while sitting and standing in front of a large screen displaying a full-body virtual mirror-image (avatar in real-time. Avatar movements were scaled to appear greater, identical, or smaller than the subjects' actual movements. A total of 126 trials with 11 different scaling factors were pseudo-randomized across 6 blocks. After each trial, subjects had to decide whether the avatar's movements were "greater" or "smaller" than their own movements. Based on this two-alternative forced choice paradigm, a psychophysical curve was fitted to the data for each subject, and several metrics were derived from this curve. In addition, task adherence (kinematics and virtual reality immersion were assessed. Groups displayed a similar ability to discriminate between different levels of movement scaling. Still, subjects with CNSLBP showed an abnormal performance and tended to overestimate their own movements (a right-shifted psychophysical curve. Subjects showed adequate task adherence, and on average virtual reality immersion was reported to be very good. In conclusion, these results extend previous work in patients with CNSLBP, and denote an important relationship between body perception, movement and pain. As such, the assessment of body perception during active movement can offer new avenues for understanding and managing body perception disturbances and abnormal movement patterns in patients with pain.

  14. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relationship between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natoshia Raishevich; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors in response to their child’s pain (overprotection, minimizing and/or encouragement) interact with child coping characteristics (e.g., catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relationship between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children’s level of maladaptive coping (i.e., pain catastrophizing). Methods Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: protection, minimizing, and encouragement/monitoring subscales). Results Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relationship between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relationship between parent protectiveness and disability. Conclusions The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined in part by the child’s coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP. PMID:25121521

  15. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relation between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natoshia R; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-12-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning, and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors (overprotection, minimizing, and/or encouragement) in response to their child's pain interact with child coping characteristics (eg, catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relation between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children's levels of maladaptive coping (ie, pain catastrophizing). Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated in the study. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: Protection, Minimizing, and Encouragement/Monitoring subscales). Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relation between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relation between parent protectiveness and disability. The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined, in part, by the child's coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP.

  16. Effectiveness of core stabilization exercises and routine exercise therapy in management of pain in chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, Muhammad Waseem; Karimi, Hossein; Gilani, Syed Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Low back pain is a frequent problem faced by the majority of people at some point in their lifetime. Exercise therapy has been advocated an effective treatment for chronic low back pain. However, there is lack of consensus on the best exercise treatment and numerous studies are underway. Conclusive studies are lacking especially in this part of the world. Thisstudy was designed to compare the effectiveness of specific stabilization exercises with routine physical thera...

  17. Validity and everyday clinical applicability of lumbar muscle fatigue assessment methods in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Peranzoni, Matteo; Naik, Ganesh; Imperio, Grace; Cleland, Joshua A; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    This systematic literature review aimed at examining the validity and applicability in everyday clinical rehabilitation practise of methods for the assessment of back muscle fatiguability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP). Extensive research was performed in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases from their inception to September 2014. Potentially relevant articles were also manually looked for in the reference lists of the identified publications. Studies examining lumbar muscle fatigue in people with CNSLBP were selected. Two reviewers independently selected the articles, carried out the study quality assessment and extracted the results. A modified Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) scale was used to evaluate the scientific rigour of the selected works. Twenty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in the systematic review. We found conflicting data regarding the validity of methods used to examine back muscle fatigue. The Biering-Sorensen test, performed in conjunction with surface electromyography spectral analysis, turned out to be the most widely used and comparatively, the most optimal modality currently available to assess objective back muscle fatigue in daily clinical practise, even though critical limitations are discussed. Future research should address the identification of an advanced method for lower back fatigue assessment in patients with CNSLBP which, eventually, might provide physical therapists with an objective and reliable test usable in everyday clinical practise. Implications for Rehabilitation Despite its limitations, the Biering-Sorensen test is currently the most used, convenient and easily available fatiguing test for lumbar muscles. To increase validity and reliability of the Biering

  18. Functional abdominal pain in childhood: background studies and recent research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; van Tilburg, Miranda A L

    2012-01-01

    The present review summarizes many of the major research trends investigated in the past five years regarding pediatric functional abdominal pain, and also summarizes the primary related findings from the authors' research program. Specific areas discussed based on work within the authors' group include familial illness patterns, genetics, traits, and mechanisms or processes related to abdominal pain. Topics covered from research published in the past five years include prevalence and cost, longitudinal follow-up, overlap with other disorders, etiology and mechanisms behind functional abdominal pain and treatment studies. It is hoped that findings from this work in abdominal pain will be interpreted as a framework for understanding the processes by which other pain phenomena and, more broadly, reactions to any physical state, can be developed and maintained in children. The present article concludes with recommendations for clinical practice and research.

  19. Chronic abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury: a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen D; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Christensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    for at least 10 years; 203 of them responded. An almost identical questionnaire including questions on intensity and interference of pain within the past 7 days, as well as descriptors and treatment, was sent to the 178 surviving members in 2015. Of 130 (73%) responders, 125 answered the question on chronic...... abdominal pain. The mean time since injury was 30.5 (9.8) years. Chronic abdominal pain or discomfort was reported by 32.8% (41/125), and 23% (29/125) of responders had been at least moderately bothered by this in the past week. Abdominal pain or discomfort was more common in women and in those with self...... it at both time points with a similar intensity. CONCLUSION: Chronic abdominal pain or discomfort is common and bothersome in long-term SCI. It has a late onset, but the prevalence and severity do not seem to further increase between 20 and 30 years following SCI....

  20. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 in the Treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain in Children: RCT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadrešin, Oleg; Hojsak, Iva; Mišak, Zrinjka; Kekez, Alemka Jaklin; Trbojević, Tena; Ivković, Lana; Kolaček, Sanja

    2017-06-01

    Beneficial therapeutic effect of probiotics has been reported in children with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but not consistently in other functional abdominal pain-related disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 in the treatment of functional abdominal pain (FAP) and IBS in children. Children (age 4-18 years) referred to pediatric gastroenterologist at Children's Hospital Zagreb from May 2012 to December 2014, diagnosed as FAP or IBS, were randomized to receive L reuteri DSM 17938 10⁸ CFU daily or placebo. The study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study. Symptoms were evaluated using Wong-Baker FACES pain rating scale for pain and Bristol scale for stool shape and consistence. Data were analyzed for 55 children (26 in the intervention group and 29 in the placebo group). Children in the intervention group had significantly more days without pain (median 89.5 vs 51 days, P = 0.029). Abdominal pain was less severe in children taking probiotics during the second month (P abdominal pain, stool type, or absence from school. Both groups experienced significant reduction in the severity of abdominal pain from first to fourth month, with the reduction more prominent in the intervention group (P pain and significantly more days without pain in children with FAP and IBS.

  1. Does low-dose CCK-8 injection produce abdominal pain in 'truly normal' individuals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.; Webb, B.; Hille, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The development of abdominal pain following cholecystokinin (CCK) injection is not specific for biliary disease. Patients can develop abdominal pain with CCK during hepatobiliary studies and have normal gallbladder function. Does this non-biliary pain indicate pathology? High doses of CCK induce pain in functional bowel syndromes, but may also produce pain in normals. Pain is less common at lower CCK doses, and hence may be more significant. This study aimed to determine the rate at which the low dose of CCK used in hepatobiliary scans causes abdominal pain and other side-effects in 'truly normal' individuals. Some preliminary results of CCK-induced pain in gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) patients are also discussed. Six 'truly normal' subjects were studied. 'Truly normal' was defined as: no current history of abdominal pain; no biliary or gallbladder disease; no significant GIT pathology; not currently on medication designed to be pharmacologically active in the GIT. Each patient was given an intravenous dose of 0.01 μg-kg -1 of CCK8 over 3 min, and side-effects were recorded for 30 min. No subject had abdominal pain. Two developed nausea, 1 moderate and 1 mild. An identical dose of CCK was given to 2 patients with endoscopically proven GOR. Anti-reflux medication had been ceased for 12 h. After CCK, 1 patient developed typical 'reflux' pain and 1 was asymptomatic. In conclusion, none of our 'truly normal' patients had abdominal pain with low-dose CCK. This suggests that patients developing pain following injection of this dose of CCK are indeed abnormal. The literature infers these patients may have irritable bowel syndrome; however, this hypothesis is complicated by our preliminary results indicating that CCK can reproduce pain in some patients with GOR

  2. Longitudinal trends in the treatment of abdominal pain in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Orhan; Jay, Loni; Fosnocht, David; Carey, Jessica; Rogers, LeGrand; Carey, Adrienne; Horne, Benjamin; Madsen, Troy

    2013-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a top chief complaint of patients presenting to Emergency Departments (ED). Historically, uncertainty surrounded correct management. Evidence has shown adequate analgesia does not obscure the diagnosis, making it the standard of care. We sought to evaluate trends in treatment of abdominal pain in an academic ED during a 10-year period. We prospectively evaluated a convenience sample of patients in an urban academic tertiary care hospital ED from September 2000 through April 2010. Adult patients presenting with a chief complaint of abdominal pain were included in this study. Analgesic administration rates and times, pain scores, and patient satisfaction at discharge were analyzed to evaluate trends by year. There were 2,646 patients presenting with abdominal pain who were enrolled during the study period. Rates of analgesic administration generally increased each year from 39.9% in 2000 to 65.5% in 2010 (p value for trend trend of increase in analgesic administration. In patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain, analgesia administration increased and time to medication decreased during the 10-year period. Despite overall improvements in satisfaction, significant numbers of patients presenting with abdominal pain still reported moderate to severe pain at discharge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Small bowel permeability to 51Cr-EDTA in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meer, S.B. van der.; Forget, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    Small bowel permeability was investigated in 87 children with recurrent abdominal pain by measuring the 24-h urinary excretion of orally administered 51 Cr-EDTA. The mean excreation was 3.64% ± 1.49% per 24 h. The difference between the mean urinary excretion in children with recurrent abdominal pain and control children (2.51% ± 0.70%), was significant (p<0.01, two sample t-test). The increased small permeability in children with recurrent abdominal pain might indicate an intestinal etiology for the patients complaints

  4. Abdominal Pain in Children: From the Eternal City to the Examination Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiter, Donna K

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal pain is a common presenting symptom in children. The differential diagnosis of abdominal pain is extensive; however, a vast majority of patients ultimately are diagnosed with functional abdominal pain disorders. Functional gastrointestinal disorders are defined using the recently released Rome IV criteria. These are not diagnoses of exclusion. If there are no alarm signs, the diagnosis may be made with a focused evaluation. Treatment of these disorders requires a biopsychosocial approach to the disorder and an individualized and multipronged treatment plan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesenteric Torsion as a Cause of Late Abdominal Pain after Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Sven G; Ekelund, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) has been the most common surgical way to treat obesity and its comorbidities. Late abdominal pain may occur by gastro-jejunal ulcers, gallstones, internal herniation or, rarely, intussusception. In an area with more than 1000 GBPs performed yearly, three patients with primary small bowel volvulus causing abdominal pain and requiring emergency or semi-urgent surgery were identified. Patients' histories, radiology, and surgery performed are presented. Weight loss followed by mesenteric narrowing of the root and thus relative elongation may make rotation of the small bowel mesentery possible. Such a torsion might be an overlooked differential diagnosis in obscure abdominal pain after GBP.

  6. Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlove-Delgado, Tamsin V; Martin, Alice E; Abbott, Rebecca A; Bethel, Alison; Thompson-Coon, Joanna; Whear, Rebecca; Logan, Stuart

    2017-03-23

    This is an update of the original Cochrane review, last published in 2009 (Huertas-Ceballos 2009). Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), including children with irritable bowel syndrome, is a common problem affecting between 4% and 25% of school-aged children. For the majority of such children, no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Many dietary inventions have been suggested to improve the symptoms of RAP. These may involve either excluding ingredients from the diet or adding supplements such as fibre or probiotics. To examine the effectiveness of dietary interventions in improving pain in children of school age with RAP. We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, eight other databases, and two trials registers, together with reference checking, citation searching and contact with study authors, in June 2016. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dietary interventions with placebo or no treatment in children aged five to 18 years with RAP or an abdominal pain-related, functional gastrointestinal disorder, as defined by the Rome III criteria (Rasquin 2006). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We grouped dietary interventions together by category for analysis. We contacted study authors to ask for missing information and clarification, when needed. We assessed the quality of the evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach. We included 19 RCTs, reported in 27 papers with a total of 1453 participants. Fifteen of these studies were not included in the previous review. All 19 RCTs had follow-up ranging from one to five months. Participants were aged between four and 18 years from eight different countries and were recruited largely from paediatric gastroenterology clinics. The mean age at recruitment ranged from 6.3 years to 13.1 years. Girls outnumbered boys in most trials. Fourteen trials recruited children with a diagnosis under the broad umbrella of RAP or functional

  7. Predicting persistence of functional abdominal pain from childhood into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sara; Shelby, Grace; Anderson, Julia; Acra, Sari; Polk, D Brent; Saville, Benjamin R; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric functional abdominal pain has been linked to functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in adulthood, but little is known about patient characteristics in childhood that increase the risk for FGID in young adulthood. We investigated the contribution of gastrointestinal symptoms, extraintestinal somatic symptoms, and depressive symptoms in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and whether these predicted FGIDs later in life. In a longitudinal study, consecutive new pediatric patients, diagnosed with functional abdominal pain in a subspecialty clinic, completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation of the severity of their physical and emotional symptoms. They were contacted 5 to 15 years later and evaluated, based on Rome III symptom criteria, for abdominal pain-related FGIDs, including irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain syndrome, and abdominal migraine. Controlling for age, sex, baseline severity of abdominal pain, and time to follow-up evaluation, multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of baseline gastrointestinal, extraintestinal somatic, and depressive symptoms in childhood with FGID in adolescence and young adulthood. Of 392 patients interviewed an average of 9.2 years after their initial evaluation, 41% (n = 162) met symptom criteria for FGID; most met the criteria for irritable bowel syndrome. Extraintestinal somatic and depressive symptoms at the initial pediatric evaluation were significant predictors of FGID later in life, after controlling for initial levels of GI symptoms. Age, sex, and abdominal pain severity at initial presentation were not significant predictors of FGID later in life. In pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain, assessment of extraintestinal and depressive symptoms may be useful in identifying those at risk for FGID in adolescence and young adulthood. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Gallbladder contractility in children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwańczak, Franciszek; Siedlecka-Dawidko, Jolanta; Iwanczak, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    III Rome Criteria of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children, distinguished the disturbances with abdominal pain, to which irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pains, functional dyspepsia and abdominal migraine were included. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was sonographic assessment of the gallbladder and its contractility in functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children. The study comprised 96 children aged 6 to 18 years, 59 girls and 37 boys. Depending on diagnosis, the children were divided into three groups. 38 children with functional abdominal pain constituted the first group, 26 children with irritable bowel syndrome were included to the second group, the third group consisted of 32 healthy children (control group). Diagnosis of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome was made based on the III Rome Criteria. In irritable bowel syndrome both forms with diarrhea (13) and with constipation (13) were observed. Anatomy and contractility of the gallbladder were assessed by ultrasound examination. The presence of septum, wall thickness, thick bile, vesicle volume in fasting state and 30th and 60th minute after test meal were taken into consideration. Test meal comprised about 15% of caloric requirement of moderate metabolism. Children with bile stones and organic diseases were excluded from the study. Thickened vesicle wall and thick bile were present more frequently in children with irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain than in control group (p functional abdominal pain than in irritable bowel syndrome and control group (p = 0.003, p = 0.05). Vesicle contractility after test meal was greatest in children with functional abdominal pain. Evaluation of diminished (smaller than 30%) and enlarged (greater then 80%) gallbladder contractility at 30th and 60th minute after test meal demonstrated disturbances of contractility in children with irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain. In children

  9. Cost and consultation patterns of abdominal pain in Uruguayan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Bolioli, Pablo; Espana, Magali; Marshall, Beth M; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

    2008-02-01

    Children with abdominal pain (AP) have worse quality of life and poorer social functioning and school attendance than their healthy peers. This is the first investigation of consultation patterns and costs of AP in South American children. All data were collected from Unidad Coronaria Movil in Montevideo, Uruguay. Diagnoses of all house calls during a 4-year period (January 2002 through December 2005) were analyzed. Variances in consultation patterns based on sex and age were investigated. Supply and personnel costs were analyzed and prorated to obtain an accurate estimate of the cost per house call and outpatient visit. A total of 125,945 in-home visits and 1588 outpatient consultations were analyzed. Consultation rates for AP peaked among patients 7 to 9 years of age. Female subjects 9 to 14 years of age consulted significantly more frequently for AP than male subjects in the same age group. The average AP consultation accounted for approximately 3.8% of the per capita health care spending in Uruguay in 2005. AP is a global health problem that is present across ethnicities, nationalities, and geographic locations and is associated with significant health care expenditure.

  10. Bowel perforation by crumpled paper in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshaeekia, Alireza; Hosseini, Seyed M.V; Razmi, Tannaz; Shamsaeefar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Many of the abdominal foreign bodies are due to accidental ingestion. Our objective in this case report is to emphasize the importance of the enquiry about the foreign body in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. According to our knowledge, this is the first report of bowel perforation caused by paper ingestion. A 14-year-old boy with abdominal pain underwent exploratory laparotomy and was found to have abdominal pus and ileal perforation. A crumpled paper was found at the site of perforation. Postoperative enquiry revealed that the patient had ingested 10 crumpled papers. We highlight that recording the history is an important aspect in the management of patients with acute abdominal pain and that foreign bodies should be included in its differential diagnosis. (author)

  11. Changing beliefs for changing movement and pain: Classification-based cognitive functional therapy (CB-CFT) for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziat Filho, N

    2016-02-01

    This case report presents the effect of classification-based cognitive functional therapy in a patient with chronic disabling low back pain. The patient was assessed using a multidimensional biopsychosocial classification system and was classified as having flexion pattern of movement impairment disorder. Management of this patient was to change her belief that bending over and sitting would cause damage to her disc, combined with active exercises for graded exposure to lumbar flexion to restore normal movement. Three months after the first appointment, the treatment resulted in reduced pain, the mitigation of fear avoidance beliefs and the remediation of functional disability. The patient returned to work and was walking for one hour a day on a treadmill. The cognitive intervention to change the patient's negative beliefs related to the biomedical model was important to make the graded exercises and the lifestyle changes possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Parental report of abdominal pain and abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders from a community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Adams, Papa; Bonilla, Silvana; Chogle, Ashish; Nichols-Vinueza, Diana

    2012-12-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common in children. Abdominal pain (AP) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) symptom in children. The severity of AP drives medical consultations and quality of life in adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-eight percent of 8- to 15-year-old schoolchildren report AP weekly with 24% of those children reporting persistence of AP >8 weeks. Despite the high prevalence of AP, only 2% of school children seek medical attention for AP. Lack of parental knowledge on their child's symptoms may constitute one of the factors affecting the low ratio of consultation in children reporting AP. The aim was to assess parental reports of AP symptoms in a population of healthy community children. Data of 5 studies with identical methodology to assess GI symptoms in children with celiac disease (CD), cow's milk allergy (CMA), pyloric stenosis (PS), Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), and stem cell transplant (SC) and their healthy siblings were reviewed: a phone questionnaire on GI symptoms and Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rome III version questionnaire (QPGS-RIII). Inclusion criteria were healthy children 4 to 18 years of age with a sibling previously diagnosed with CD, CMA, PS, HSP, or SC. Data on 246 healthy children, mean age (9.8 years, range 3-24, 112 girls) were obtained. Parents reported presence of AP in the last 8 weeks before the telephone contact in 20 (8.1%) children (age range 4-18 years, 11 girls). There was no significant difference in AP prevalence between boys and girls (P = 0.64). Six children (2.4%) met QPGS-RIII diagnostic criteria for FGIDs: 3 functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 3 IBS. AP was common in community children. FAP was the most common FGID among healthy community children. The prevalence of AP by parental report is lower than the previously published prevalence of AP reported by children. Lack of awareness of children's symptoms may play a role in the low ratio of

  13. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain in children: Isolated tubal torsion; a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Dere Gunal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated tubal torsion -a rare cause of acute abdomen in children-is usually difficult to diagnose because of non-specific findings. Surgical salphingectomy is required in delayed diagnosis in most cases. Three sexual inactive adolescents diagnosed in isolated tubal torsion (ITT were discussed for its diagnostic features and surgical management. Laboratory tests and radiological studies including ultrasonography (US, color doppler ultrasound were performed in all patients after evaluation for acute lower abdominal pain in emergency department and they underwent surgical intervention with laparotomy (n:2 and laparoscopy (n:1. One of the patients in this study had salpingectomy. Detorsion of the fallopian tube and cyst excision were performed in the remaining two patients who also had paratubal cysts. There was no recurrence in these patients during the follow-up for 3 and 2 years. The isolated tubal torsion should be kept in mind and early surgical management is essential in order to preserve fallopian tube because of its importance in fertility. Keywords: Fallopian tube, Torsion, Paratubal cyst, Adolescent, Acute abdomen

  14. CT and MR imaging in patients with localized acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pain (AAP) is one of the most common causes for admissions to emergency departments. Clinical presentation, physical and laboratory examinations are often inconclusive and, therefore, imaging evaluation is required. Ultrasonography is efficient in the evaluation of gallbladder and gynecologic conditions and it is considered the first-line examination in many centres. Plain radiography and barium studies are often falsely normal or non-specific, especially in the most common conditions related with rightsided AAP and their use has significantly decreased. CT is a rapid and accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of common (appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, duodenal ulcer perforation) or uncommon (mesenteric adenitis, liver abscess, cholangitis etc) conditions associated with right-sided AAP. CT may demonstrate a number of either specific or sensitive imaging findings for the confident diagnosis of diseases manifested with AAP. Moreover, CT has the advantage to suggest alternative diagnoses, if the suspected clinical diagnosis is unconfirmed. Different examination protocols and different strategies for the application of oral-rectal-intravenous contrast agents have been proposed to balance diagnostic accuracy to time effectiveness and radiation dose. MRI is suggested for AAP related to biliary abnormalities or to gynecologic diseases and it may be used as a complementary examination in pregnant patients. Imaging evaluation is an indispensable part in the diagnostic work up of most patients with AAP. CT has gained widespread acceptance, as offering more accurate and confident diagnosis and its use has changed management of the patients in 28-60% of the cases

  15. Congenital left paraduodenal hernia causing chronic abdominal pain and abdominal catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Felsted, Amy E; Masand, Prakash M; Mothner, Brent A; Nuchtern, Jed G; Rodriguez, J Ruben; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A

    2015-04-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are the most common type of congenital internal hernia. Because of its overall rare incidence, this entity is often overlooked during initial assessment of the patient. Lack of specific diagnostic criteria also makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult, and the resulting diagnostic delays can lead to tragic outcomes for patients. Despite these perceived barriers to timely diagnosis, there may be specific radiographic findings that, when combined with the appropriate constellation of clinical symptoms, would aid in diagnosis. This patient first presented at 8 years of age with vague symptoms of postprandial emesis, chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and syncope. Over the span of 6 years he was evaluated 2 to 3 times a year with similar complaints, all of which quickly resolved spontaneously. He underwent multiple laboratory, imaging, and endoscopic studies, which were nondiagnostic. It was not until he developed signs of a high-grade obstruction and extremis that he was found to have a large left paraduodenal hernia that had volvulized around the superior mesenteric axis. This resulted in the loss of the entire superior mesenteric axis distribution of the small and large intestine and necrosis of the duodenum. In cases of chronic intermittent obstruction without clear etiology, careful attention and consideration should be given to the constellation of symptoms, imaging studies, and potential use of diagnostic laparoscopy. Increased vigilance by primary care and consulting physicians is necessary to detect this rare but readily correctable condition. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Haemangiopericytoma of greater omentum. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, A; Basso, L; Di Giacomo, G; Codacci Pisanelli, M; Basile, U; De Toma, G

    2003-12-01

    Haemangiopericytoma (HPT) is a rare neoplasm that can occur in any part of the human body. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with sudden severe upper abdominal pain caused by primary HPT in the greater omentum.

  17. Computed tomography use among children presenting to emergency departments with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimi, Jahan; Herring, Andrew; Harries, Aaron; Gonzales, Ralph; Alter, Harrison

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate trends in and factors associated with computed tomography (CT) use among children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain. This study was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1998 to 2008. We identified ED patients aged abdominal pain and collected patient demographic and hospital characteristics, and outcomes related to imaging, hospital admission, and diagnosis of appendicitis. Trend analysis was performed over the study period for the outcomes of interest, and a multivariate regression model was used to identify factors associated with CT use. Of all pediatric ED visits, 6.0% were for abdominal pain. We noted a rise in the proportion of these patients with CT use, from 0.9% in 1998 to 15.4% in 2008 (P pediatric patients with abdominal pain. Some groups of children may have a differential likelihood of receiving CT scans.

  18. Navigating recurrent abdominal pain through clinical clues, red flags, and initial testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Joshua D; Li, B U K

    2009-05-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common chronic complaint that presents to your office. The constant challenge is one of detecting those with organic disease from the majority who have a functional pain disorder including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain, and abdominal migraine. Beginning with a detailed history and physical exam, you can: 1) apply the symptom-based Rome III criteria to positively identify a functional disorder, and 2) filter these findings through the diagnostic clues and red flags that point toward specific organic disease and/or further testing. Once a functional diagnosis has been made or an organic disease is suspected, you can initiate a self-limited empiric therapeutic trial. With this diagnostic approach, you should feel confident navigating through the initial evaluation, management, and consultation referral for a child or adolescent with recurrent abdominal pain.

  19. Pharmacologic treatment in pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Venmans, Leonie; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review literature assessing efficacy and safety of pharmacologic treatments in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). MEDLINE and Cochrane Database were searched for systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials investigating

  20. The association of mast cells and serotonin in children with chronic abdominal pain of unknown etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Ravi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal pain of unknown origin affects up to 20% of school-aged children. Evaluation of children is symptom-based without clear guidelines to investigate molecular mechanisms of abdominal pain. Aberrant molecular mechanisms may increase intestinal permeability leading to interactions between the immune and nervous systems, subclinical inflammation, and visceral pain. This study evaluated the association between interleukin-6 (IL-6, mast cell infiltrates, and serotonin (5-HT levels in gastrointestinal (GI biopsies, with perceived abdominal pain in a pediatric cohort. Methods Clinical data and biopsy samples from pediatric patients (n = 48 with chronic abdominal pain, with and without inflammation were included. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded GI biopsies were sectioned and immunohistochemistry performed for IL-6 and 5-HT; mast cells were identified with toluidine blue stain. Histological findings were compared to self-reported abdominal pain between groups. Results There was significantly greater IL-6 immunoreactivity in biopsies with confirmed histologic inflammation (p = 0.004. There was a greater number of mast cells per HPF in non-inflammatory biopsies (3.5 ± 2.9 compared to the inflammatory biopsies (2.6 ± 1.8 p = 0.049. The non-inflammatory biopsy group was significantly less likely to respond to standard treatment as evidenced by higher pain reports (p = .018. Mast cells (p = .022 and 5-HT (p = .02 were significantly related to abdominal pain scores. Conclusions A potential association between self-reported abdominal pain, number of mast cells, and 5-HT levels, which may contribute to perceived GI pain in pediatric patients may exist.

  1. [Clinical-demographic factors associated with fear-avoidance in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain in Primary Care: secondary analysis of intervention study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio; Clavero-Cano, Susana; Pérez-González, Rita; Martinez-Calderon, Javier; Luque-Suarez, Alejandro

    2018-01-30

    To describe some sociodemographics and clinical characteristics of subjects with Non-specific Chronic Low Back Pain (NCLBP) in Primary Care, as well as to investigate their association with Fear-Avoidance (FA). Cross-sectional. Secondary analysis of an intervention study. Basic Health Areas in Costa del Sol Health District (Málaga, Spain). An analysis was performed on 147 subjects with NCLBP from a previous intervention study database in Primary Care Physiotherapy (PCP). Characteristics: age 18-65; understanding of the Spanish language; absence of cognitive disorders, fibromyalgia or dorsolumbar surgery, and to be able to perform physical exercise. The main variable was FA level (FABQ and the FABQ-PA and FABQ-W) sub-scales. Clinical variables included: pain (NRPS-11), disability (RMQ), evolution, previous treatments and diagnostic imaging. The sociodemographic variables included: gender, age, educational level, and employment status. Just over half (51.7%) of the subjects had high FA on the FABQ-PA sub-scale. Sick leave (SL) [β=24.45 (P=.009 * ); β=13.03 (P=.016 * ); β=14.04 (P=.011 * ) for FABQ, FABQ-PA and FABQ-W, respectively]; primary studies level [β=15.09 (P=.01 * ); β=9.73 (P=.01 * ) for FABQ and FABQ-PA], and disability [β=1.45 (P<.001); β=0.61 (P<.001); β=0.68 (P<.001) for FABQ, FABQ-PA and FABQ-W, respectively] were associated with FA when they were modeled by multivariate regression. Some sociodemographic and clinical features of the NCLBP population are presented. Imaging tests (81.63%) and previous passive treatments (55.78%) could reflect problems of adherence to recommendations of CPGs. Sick leave, primary studies level, and disability were associated with FA. The findings should be interpreted in the light of possible limitations. Some suggestions for clinical practice are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and application of a newly designed massage instrument for deep cross-friction massage in chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Yu, Ki-Pi; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kwak, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jong Yun

    2012-02-01

    To introduce a newly designed massage instrument, the Hand Grip T-bar (HT-bar) and use it to relieve chronic non-specific low back pain (nLBP) through deep cross-friction massage (roptrotherapy). 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, aged 51.6±6.7) with chronic nLBP were allocated randomly to a Roptrotherapy group (n=12) and a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) group (n=10). The Roptrotherapy group received deep cross-friction massage with the HT-bar, which was made of metal and had a cylinder for increasing weight and grooves for an easy grip. It was applied across the middle and lower back for 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week for 2 weeks. The TENS group received TENS for 20 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. The outcome was measured on the pain numeric rating scale (PNRS), by the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and by the Roland & Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) at pre-treatment, at immediate post-treatment and 2 weeks later. The application of the HT-bar was assessed by a questionnaire to 19 therapists. At post-treatment, immediately and 2 weeks later, both groups showed significant improvement in PNRS, ODI and RMDQ. During the two weeks after post-treatment, however, the Roptrotherapy group improved in PNRS, ODI and RMDQ, but the TENS group did not. Over 80% of the therapists responded that the HT-bar was useful and comfortable. This study suggests that deep cross-friction massage can be a beneficial therapeutic technique and that the HT-bar can be a useful instrument in deep cross-friction massage for chronic nLBP patients.

  3. Cross friction algometry (CFA): Comparison of pressure pain thresholds between patients with chronic non-specific low back pain and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farasyn, Andre; Lassat, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Palpation is widely used to assess muscular sensitivity in clinical settings but still remains a subjective evaluation. This cross-sectional study assessed a newly developed cross-friction algometry making palpation measurable. The objective was to investigate the reliability of pressure pain thresholds obtained using Cross-Friction Algometry (CFA-PPTs) measured at the level of Erector spinae and Gluteus maximus central muscle parts, and to compare the CFA-PPTs between patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (nCLBP) and matching healthy subjects. Patients presenting nCLBP to GP's and send into a Pain Center and healthy subjects recruited via university ad valvas & flyers distribution. 30 patients with nCLBP were measured for cross-friction algometry. Other evaluations consisted of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The inter- and intra-reliability were tested and found to be sufficient. The mean CFA-PPT values of the Erector spinae at levels T8, T10, L1 & L3 and the Gluteus maximus of the nCLBP group were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.001) when compared to the CFA-PPT values of the healthy group. The greatest difference (-58%) was found at L1 Erector spinae level and at the superior part of the Gluteus maximus measuring point (-59%). Within the group of patients with nCLBP it was surprising to notice that there was no significant correlation between all the reference points measured using CFA-PPTs and the outcomes of the VAS and ODI scores. With the aid of CFA, the importance of local muscular disorder in the lumbar part of the Erector spinae and Gluteus maximus in patients with nCLBP is obviously demonstrated, but also reveals the very large inter-individual differences in muscular fibrosis sensitivity and/or pain behavior in daily life. This possibly re-opens the debate on which influences can be put forward as the most important: the central or the peripheral sensitization system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Epidemiology of pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korterink, Judith J; Diederen, Kay; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to review the literature regarding epidemiology of functional abdominal pain disorders in children and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution including associated risk factors of developing functional abdominal pain. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychInfo databases were systematically searched up to February 2014. Study selection criteria included: (1) studies of birth cohort, school based or general population samples (2) containing data concerning epidemiology, prevalence or incidence (3) of children aged 4-18 years (4) suffering from functional abdominal pain. Quality of studies was rated by a self-made assessment tool. A random-effect meta-analysis model was used to estimate the prevalence of functional abdominal pain in childhood. A total of 58 articles, including 196,472 children were included. Worldwide pooled prevalence for functional abdominal pain disorders was 13.5% (95% CI 11.8-15.3), of which irritable bowel syndrome was reported most frequently (8.8%, 95% CI 6.2-11.9). The prevalence across studies ranged widely from 1.6% to 41.2%. Higher pooled prevalence rates were reported in South America (16.8%) and Asia (16.5%) compared to Europe (10.5%). And a higher pooled prevalence was reported when using the Rome III criteria (16.4%, 95% CI 13.5-19.4). Functional abdominal pain disorders are shown to occur significantly more in girls (15.9% vs. 11.5%, pooled OR 1.5) and is associated with the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders, stress and traumatic life events. Functional abdominal pain disorders are a common problem worldwide with irritable bowel syndrome as most encountered abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. Female gender, psychological disorders, stress and traumatic life events affect prevalence.

  5. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Altamimi, Eyad M.; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. Methods This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabi...

  6. Epidemiology of pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith J Korterink

    Full Text Available We aimed to review the literature regarding epidemiology of functional abdominal pain disorders in children and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution including associated risk factors of developing functional abdominal pain.The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychInfo databases were systematically searched up to February 2014. Study selection criteria included: (1 studies of birth cohort, school based or general population samples (2 containing data concerning epidemiology, prevalence or incidence (3 of children aged 4-18 years (4 suffering from functional abdominal pain. Quality of studies was rated by a self-made assessment tool. A random-effect meta-analysis model was used to estimate the prevalence of functional abdominal pain in childhood.A total of 58 articles, including 196,472 children were included. Worldwide pooled prevalence for functional abdominal pain disorders was 13.5% (95% CI 11.8-15.3, of which irritable bowel syndrome was reported most frequently (8.8%, 95% CI 6.2-11.9. The prevalence across studies ranged widely from 1.6% to 41.2%. Higher pooled prevalence rates were reported in South America (16.8% and Asia (16.5% compared to Europe (10.5%. And a higher pooled prevalence was reported when using the Rome III criteria (16.4%, 95% CI 13.5-19.4. Functional abdominal pain disorders are shown to occur significantly more in girls (15.9% vs. 11.5%, pooled OR 1.5 and is associated with the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders, stress and traumatic life events.Functional abdominal pain disorders are a common problem worldwide with irritable bowel syndrome as most encountered abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. Female gender, psychological disorders, stress and traumatic life events affect prevalence.

  7. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Kentaro; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Kentaro Iwata1, Tomoko Toma2, Akihiro Yachie21Department of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Japan; 2Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medical Science and School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, JapanAbstract: A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After...

  8. Systematic review: interventions for abdominal pain management in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, C; Czuber-Dochan, W; Artom, M; Sweeney, L; Hart, A

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal pain is frequently reported by people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including in remission. Pain is an under-treated symptom. To systematically review evidence on interventions (excluding disease-modifying interventions) for abdominal pain management in IBD. Databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Library) were searched (February 2016). Two researchers independently screened references and extracted data. Fifteen papers were included: 13 intervention studies and two cross-sectional surveys. A variety of psychological, dietary and pharmacological interventions were reported. Four of six studies reported pain reduction with psychological intervention including individualised and group-based relaxation, disease anxiety-related Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and stress management. Both psychologist-led and self-directed stress management in inactive Crohn's disease reduced pain compared with controls (symptom frequency reduction index=-26.7, -11.3 and 17.2 at 6-month follow-up, respectively). Two dietary interventions (alcoholic drinks with high sugar content and fermentable carbohydrate with prebiotic properties) had an effect on abdominal pain. Antibiotics (for patients with bacterial overgrowth) and transdermal nicotine patches reduced abdominal pain. Current and past cannabis users report it relieves pain. One controlled trial of cannabis reduced SF-36 and EQ-5D pain scores (1.84 and 0.7, respectively). These results must be treated with caution: data were derived from predominantly small uncontrolled studies of moderate to low quality. Few interventions have been tested for IBD abdominal pain. The limited evidence suggests that relaxation and changing cognitions are promising, possibly with individualised dietary changes. There is a need to develop interventions for abdominal pain management in IBD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Proportional lumbar spine inter-vertebral motion patterns: a comparison of patients with chronic, non-specific low back pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Fiona E; Thomas, Peter W; Thompson, Paul; Breen, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    Identifying biomechanical subgroups in chronic, non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) populations from inter-vertebral displacements has proven elusive. Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) has excellent repeatability and provides continuous standardised inter-vertebral kinematic data from fluoroscopic sequences allowing assessment of mid-range motion. The aim of this study was to determine whether proportional continuous IV rotational patterns were different in patients and controls. A secondary aim was to update the repeatability of QF measurement of range of motion (RoM) for inter-vertebral (IV) rotation. Fluoroscopic sequences were recorded of passive, recumbent coronal and sagittal motion, which was controlled for range and velocity. Segments L2-5 in 40 primary care CNSLBP patients and 40 matched controls were compared. Patients also completed the von Korff Chronic Pain Grade and Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire. Sequences were processed using automated image tracking algorithms to extract continuous inter-vertebral rotation data. These were converted to continuous proportional ranges of rotation (PR). The continuous proportional range variances were calculated for each direction and combined to produce a single variable representing their fluctuation (CPRV). Inter- and intra-rater repeatability were also calculated for the maximum IV-RoM measurements obtained during controlled trunk motion to provide an updated indication of the reliability and agreement of QF for measuring spine kinematics. CPRV was significantly higher in patients (0.011 vs. 0.008, Mann-Whitney two-sided p = 0.008), implying a mechanical subgroup. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found its sensitivity and specificity to be 0.78 % (60-90) and 0.55 % (37-73), respectively (area under the curve 0.672). CPRV was not correlated with pain severity or disability. The repeatability of maximum inter-vertebral range was excellent, but range was only significantly greater in patients

  10. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children had......The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... of the abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  11. [Severe upper abdominal pain during a long distance flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestehorn, D; Schmidt, C; Lock, G

    2014-10-01

    A 43-year-old woman of Ghanaian origin presented with severe upper abdominal pain starting on a long distance flight. Physical examination revealed tenderness on palpation in the left upper abdomen and flank. There was no report of pre-existing conditions or permanent medication in the medical history. Laboratory tests showed signs of haemolytic anemia and elevated inflammatory parameters. The "thick blood smear" was normal. Ultrasonography revealed an enlarged spleen (14×5 cm) with inhomogeneous parenchyma and vast, diffusely spread hypoechoic lesions in perihilar location, interpreted as extended splenic infarction. Symptom onset on a long distance flight, haemolytic anemia and extended splenic infarction led to the assumption of a vasoocclusive crisis with haemolysis. Moleculargenetic tests proved the presence of HbSC-sickle cell disease and heterozygous alpha-thalassemia. After infusion of crystalloid solution the patient was asymptomatic further on. Due to splenic infarction she received prophylactic treatment with Cefuroxim. A vaccination against pneumococci, meningococci and Haemophilus influenza B was recommended. Mild hypoxia and dehydration on a long distance flight can trigger a sickle cell crisis and may contribute to late clinical manifestation and diagnosis of sickle cell disease in some cases. Patients suffering from HbSC-sickle cell disease are at risk for the same life-threatening complications as patients with HbSS-sickle cell disease. HbSC-sickle cell disease should not be considered as a mild form of HbSS-sickle cell disease but as a separate disease with specific clinical manifestations. In contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, splenic infarction due to sickle cell crisis may markedly differ from "typical" arterial thromboembolic infarction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Overlap between functional abdominal pain disorders and organic diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langshaw, A H; Rosen, J M; Pensabene, L; Borrelli, O; Salvatore, S; Thapar, N; Concolino, D; Saps, M

    2018-04-02

    Functional abdominal pain disorders are highly prevalent in children. These disorders can be present in isolation or combined with organic diseases, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal inflammation (infectious and non-infectious) predisposes children to the development of visceral hypersensitivity that can manifest as functional abdominal pain disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome. The new onset of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a patient with an underlying organic disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is clinically challenging, given that the same symptomatology may represent a flare-up of the inflammatory bowel disease or an overlapping functional abdominal pain disorder. Similarly, irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a child previously diagnosed with celiac disease may occur due to poorly controlled celiac disease or the overlap with a functional abdominal pain disorder. There is little research on the overlap of functional abdominal disorders with organic diseases in children. Studies suggest that the overlap between functional abdominal pain disorders and inflammatory bowel disease is more common in adults than in children. The causes for these differences in prevalence are unknown. Only a handful of studies have been published on the overlap between celiac disease and functional abdominal pain disorders in children. The present article provides a review of the literature on the overlap between celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and functional abdominal pain disorders in children and establish comparisons with studies conducted on adults. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral.

  14. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  15. Meta-analysis: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, A; Dziechciarz, P; Szajewska, H

    2011-06-01

    A lack of reliable treatments for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders prompts interest in new therapies. To evaluate systematically the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for treating abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, trial registries and proceedings of major meetings were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating LGG supplementation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the Rome II or Rome III criteria. Risk of bias was assessed for generation of the allocation sequence, allocation concealment, blinding and follow-up. Compared with placebo, LGG supplementation was associated with a significantly higher rate of treatment responders (defined as no pain or a decrease in pain intensity) in the overall population with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (three RCTs, n = 290; risk ratio, RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.08-1.59, number needed to treat, NNT 7, 95% CI 4-22) and in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subgroup (three RCTs, n = 167; RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.27-2.27, NNT 4, 95% CI 3-8). However, no difference was found in the rate of treatment responders between children with functional abdominal pain or functional dyspepsia who received placebo or LGG. The intensity of pain was significantly reduced in the overall study population and in the IBS subgroup. The frequency of pain was significantly reduced in the IBS subgroup only. The use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG moderately increases treatment success in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders, particularly among children with IBS. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Effects of functional taping compared with sham taping and minimal intervention on pain intensity and static postural control for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain: a randomised clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassi, F J; Del Antônio, T; Moraes, R; George, S Z; Chaves, T C

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the immediate and 1-month effects of functional taping to lumbar spine for pain intensity and postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Randomised clinical trial. One hundred and twenty participants aged 18 to 50 years. Participants will be allocated at random to receive one of three interventions: functional star-shape taping for 7 days, sham functional taping for 7 days or minimal intervention, one session. The primary outcomes will be pain intensity and postural control. Four measurements of static posturography will be conducted: pre-intervention, immediately after application of the tape, 7 days post-intervention (after removal of the tape) and 1-month follow-up. The secondary outcomes will be low-back-pain-related disability, global perceived effect of treatment and fear avoidance beliefs. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed on three occasions: pre-intervention, 7 days post-intervention and at 1-month follow-up. All statistical analyses will be conducted following intention-to-treat principles, and the treatment effects will be calculated using linear mixed models. The results of this study will determine the effects of functional taping on pain intensity and postural control compared with sham taping and minimal intervention. NCT02546466. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P < 0.001) and lower PGI/PGII ratio (P = 0.036) than controls infected with H. pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori

  18. Exercise prescription for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain: a qualitative exploration of decision making in physiotherapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Rob; Swinkels, Annette; Mitchell, Theresa; Palmer, Shea

    2016-12-01

    Providing an effective exercise prescription process for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) is a challenging task. Emerging research has indicated that partnership in care and shared decision making are important for people with NSCLBP and calls for further investigation into the approaches used to prescribe exercise. To explore how shared decision making and patient partnership are addressed by physiotherapists in the process of exercise prescription for patients with NSCLBP. A qualitative study using a philosophical hermeneutic approach. Eight physiotherapists were each observed on three occasions undertaking their usual clinical activities (total n=24 observations). They conducted brief interviews after each observation and a later in depth semi-structured interview. Iterative hermeneutic strategies were used to interpret the texts and identify the characteristics and processes of exercise prescription for patients with NSCLBP. The findings revealed how physiotherapy practice often resulted in unequal possibilities for patient participation which were in turn linked to the physiotherapists' assumptions about the patients, clinical orientation, cognitive and decision making processes. Three linked themes emerged: (1) I want them to exercise, (2) which exercise? - the tension between evidence and everyday practice and (3) compliance-orientated more than concordance based. This research, by focusing on a patient-centred approach, makes an important contribution to the body of evidence relating to the management of NSCLBP. It challenges physiotherapists to critically appraise their approaches to the prescription of exercise therapy in order to improve outcomes for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences in personal and lifestyle characteristics among Zimbabwean high school adolescents with and without recurrent non-specific low back pain: a two part cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiwaridzo, Matthew; Naidoo, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is increasingly becoming common among adolescents worldwide. A recent study in Zimbabwe showed a relatively high prevalence (28.8 %) among high school students. Influential associated factors, however, remain unclear. This is a significant shortcoming. The aim was to determine personal or lifestyle-related factors associated with recurrent NSLBP among high school adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe. This study was part of a large epidemiological study conducted in two continuous parts. Part one sought to determine self-reported associated factors among 532 participants (mean age =16 ± 1.72 years) drawn randomly from selected government schools using a reliable and content-validated questionnaire (Kappa coefficient, k = 0.32-1). Part two purposively identified adolescents ( N  = 64, median age =17 years, interquartile range, IQR = 15-18 years) with a history of 'severe' recurrent NSLBP from part one based on a specific eligibility criteria and compared body mass index, relative school bag weight and hamstring flexibility with matched adolescents without NSLBP. Data was analysed using Statistica version 11. Independent t -tests or χ 2 tests of association were used for continuous and categorical data, respectively. The statistical significance was set at p  hamstrings [χ 2 (1) =7.6, p  = 0.006]. Although conclusions from this study are hesitant because of the cross-sectional nature of the study and the relatively small sample size in follow-up study, recurrent NSLBP is associated with perceptions of a heavy school bag, duration of school bag carriage, no sports participation, prolonged sitting on entertainment activities, and tight hamstrings. These findings add to the importance of promoting physical activity at school or home especially aimed at improving muscle flexibility.

  20. Annual incidence of non-specific low back pain as an occupational disease attributed to whole-body vibration according to the National Dutch Register 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijer, P Paul F M; van der Molen, Henk F; Schop, Astrid; Moeijes, Fred; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Hulshof, Carel T J

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific low back pain (nLBP) is the second most important reason for sick leave in the Netherlands, and more than 50% of the workers on sick leave attribute these complaints to their work. To stimulate recognition and prevention, an occupational disease (OD) registration-guideline was implemented for the assessment of the work-relatedness of nLBP in the Netherlands in 2005. The aim of this study is to present the annual incidence of nLBP as an OD and specifically for whole-body vibration (WBV) including patient characteristics such as age, sick leave and actions initiated by the occupational physician (OP). The data were retrieved from the National Dutch Register for 2005-2012. Each year about 118 OPs reported 509 cases (SD 139) of nLBP as an OD in a Dutch working population of 7.5 million workers (8% of all annual reported ODs). Less than 1% of these cases were attributed to WBV: 94% were men, 45% were between 51 and 60 years and 35% were on sick leave for more than 2 weeks. Most initiated actions were ergonomic interventions (35%). The number of notified cases of nLPB as an occupational disease attributed to whole-body vibration is low with less than 1% of all cases in the Netherlands. An explanation is that other work-related risk factors for nLBP such as lifting are more frequently occurring, more visible and have a higher attributable risk than WBV. However, continuing attention for WBV remains warranted given a higher percentage of cases with sick leave of more than 2 weeks.

  1. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Thirumazhisai; Prabhakar, Gautham; Schwartz, Alan; Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep; Berman, James

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group.

  2. Autonomic nervous system function in patients with functional abdominal pain. An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L S; Christiansen, P; Raundahl, U

    1993-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain--that is, pain without demonstrable organic abnormalities--has often been associated with psychologic stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sympathetic nervous system response to laboratory stress and basal parasympathetic neural activity were...

  3. The Impact of Upper Abdominal Pain During Pregnancy Following a Gastric Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Lauenborg, Jeannet; Svare, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to describe the risk of internal herniation (IH) and the obstetric outcome in pregnant women with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and episodes of upper abdominal pain.  Methods: The cohort included 133 women with RYGB: 94 with 113 pregnancies, from......).  Results: Upper abdominal pain complicated 42/113 (37.2 %) pregnancies in the local cohort and 11 women (9.7 %) had IH. In the birth cohort, upper abdominal pain complicated 64/139 (46.0 %) pregnancies; surgery was performed in 30/64 (46.9 %), and IH diagnosed in 21/64 (32.8 %). The median gestational age...... at onset of pain was 25 + 3 weeks. Women reporting abdominal pain had a higher risk of preterm birth (n = 14/64 vs. 1/75, p women without abdominal pain...

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for children with functional abdominal pain and their parents decreases pain and other symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Walker, Lynn S; Romano, Joan M; Christie, Dennis L; Youssef, Nader; DuPen, Melissa M; Feld, Andrew D; Ballard, Sheri A; Welsh, Ericka M; Jeffery, Robert W; Young, Melissa; Coffey, Melissa J; Whitehead, William E

    2010-04-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain in children has been shown to be related to parental responses to symptoms. This randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to improve outcomes in idiopathic childhood abdominal pain by altering parental responses to pain and children's ways of coping and thinking about their symptoms. Two hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions-a three-session intervention of cognitive-behavioral treatment targeting parents' responses to their children's pain complaints and children's coping responses, or a three-session educational intervention that controlled for time and attention. Parents and children were assessed at pretreatment, and 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months post-treatment. Outcome measures were child and parent reports of child pain levels, function, and adjustment. Process measures included parental protective responses to children's symptom reports and child coping methods. Children in the cognitive-behavioral condition showed greater baseline to follow-up decreases in pain and gastrointestinal symptom severity (as reported by parents) than children in the comparison condition (time x treatment interaction, Pparents in the cognitive-behavioral condition reported greater decreases in solicitous responses to their child's symptoms compared with parents in the comparison condition (time x treatment interaction, Pparental responses and increasing child coping skills is effective in reducing children's pain and symptom levels compared with an educational control condition.

  5. Trial Protocol: Cognitive functional therapy compared with combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for people with non-specific chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belache, Fabiana Terra Cunha; Souza, Cíntia Pereira de; Fernandez, Jessica; Castro, Julia; Ferreira, Paula Dos Santos; Rosa, Elizana Rodrigues de Sousa; Araújo, Nathalia Cristina Gimenez de; Reis, Felipe José Jandre; Almeida, Renato Santos de; Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Correia, Luís Cláudio Lemos; Meziat-Filho, Ney

    2018-06-11

    manual therapy and exercise group will be treated by two physiotherapists with an average of >10years of clinical experience in manual therapy and motor control exercises, including isolated contractions of the deep abdominal muscles. The primary outcome measures will be pain intensity and disability 3 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will be pain and disability assessed 6 and 12 months after randomisation, and both global perceived effect and patient satisfaction at 3, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The potential outcome mediators will be assessed at 3 and 6 months after randomisation, with brief screening questions for anxiety, social isolation, catastrophisation, depression, fear of movement, stress and sleep. Non-specific predictors and moderators will include age, gender, duration of chronic low back pain, chronicity risk (Örebro and Start Back score), number of pain areas, stressful life event, MRI scan imaging, and family history. Intention-to-treat analysis will be performed. Linear mixed models will be used to compare the mean differences in pain intensity, disability and global perceived effect between the intervention arms. The analysis of the effect of potential mediators of the treatment will be performed using the causal mediation methods described by Imai and colleagues. The baseline variables will be evaluated as predictors and moderators of treatment, including terms and interaction models. A level of statistical significance of 5% will be used in the analysis. All the analyses will be performed using RStudio. This study will investigate whether the results of the first cognitive functional therapy randomised clinical trial are reproducible. The present study will have a sample size capable of detecting clinically relevant effects of the treatment with a low risk of bias. In pragmatic terms, this clinical trial is designed to reproduce the intervention as it would be performed in clinical practice by a trained physiotherapist who

  6. Unexplained lower abdominal pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man presented with chronic lower back pain and unexplained lower abdominal pain. Both patients had groin tenderness at the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine. The results of radiographical and physical examinations suggested sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Sacroiliac joint injection relieved their symptoms, including groin tenderness. In our experience, groin tenderness is highly specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We speculate that spasm of the iliac muscle can cause groin pain and tenderness. Groin pain and a history of unexplained abdominal pain, with lower back pain, are symptoms that suggest sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Additionally, compression of the iliac muscle is a simple and useful maneuver; therefore, it can be used as a screening test for sacroiliac joint dysfunction, alongside other provocation tests.

  7. An Elderly Female with Dyspnea and Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Van Heukelom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 55-year-old female presented via transfer from a referring hospital with 48 hours of abdominal pain, vomiting and dyspnea. She was found to be in severe distress. Her temperature was 37.5° C (99.5° F, heart rate 130 beats per minute, respiratory rate 47 breaths per minute, blood pressure 80/48, and oxygen saturation of 95% on a non-rebreather mask. She had distended neck veins, diminished breath sounds on the left hemi-thorax, and a distended abdomen. A chest x-ray that had been obtained at the referring hospital was immediately reviewed. The decision was made to intubate the patient. Following intubation, a nasogastric tube was placed with marked improvement in her hemodynamics. An abdomen-pelvis CT was obtained which showed a para-esophageal hernia with the majority of the stomach located in the left hemi-thorax and evidence of a bowel obstruction. Significant findings: Radiography shows a dilated, gas-filled structure that fills nearly the entire left hemi-thorax. Lung markings are visible in the uppermost portion of the left hemi-thorax. There is mediastinal shift to the right. In the visualized portion of the abdomen, dilated loops of bowel are also visualized. This constellation of findings is consistent with a tension gastrothorax. Discussion: Tension gastrothorax is a rare complication of blunt trauma, diaphragmatic hernias, and certain surgical procedures.1,2 Clinically, a tension gastrothorax may mimic that of a tension pneumothorax, making it difficult to diagnose.3,4 Stabilizing treatment includes decompressing the stomach by means of a nasogastric (NG tube.2 Placement may be difficult due the intra-thoracic position of the stomach leading to kinking of the tube. The attempt to place an NG tube can lead to hyperventilation and air swallowing, which can aggravate gastric distention.4 Failure to decompress the stomach, however, may lead to patient decompensation and cardiac arrest.5 Definitive treatment

  8. Validation of the Rome III criteria and alarm symptoms for recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Benninga, Marc A; Schweizer, Joachim J; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Büller, Hans A

    2014-06-01

    Rome criteria were formulated to define functional gastrointestinal disorders (Rome III criteria, 2006) excluding organic diagnoses when alarm symptoms were absent. The aims of the study were to validate the Rome III criteria as to their capacity to differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain and to assess the role of alarm symptoms in this differentiation. During 2 years all of the patients (ages 4-16 years) presenting with recurrent abdominal pain (Apley criteria) and referred to secondary care were included. Clinical diagnoses were based on protocolized evaluation and intervention with 6-month follow-up. Alarm symptoms were registered. Rome III criteria for functional pain syndromes were assigned independently. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. In 200 patients (87 boys, mean age 8.8 years), organic (17%), functional (40%), combined organic and functional (9%), spontaneous recovery (27%), and other (8%) clinical diagnoses were established. Alarm symptoms were found in 57.5% (organic causes 56%, functional causes 61%). The evaluation for Rome symptom clusters revealed symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in 27%, functional dyspepsia in 15%, functional abdominal pain in 28%, functional abdominal pain syndrome in 14.5%, and no pain syndrome in 15.5%. Rome diagnoses, based on symptoms and absence of alarm symptoms, predicted functional clinical diagnosis with sensitivity 0.35 (95% confidence interval 0.27-0.43), specificity 0.60 (0.46-0.73), positive predictive value 0.71 (0.61-0.82), and negative predictive value of 0.24 (0.17-0.32). The Rome III criteria for abdominal pain are not specific enough to rule out organic causes. Alarm symptoms do not differentiate between organic and functional abdominal pain.

  9. Increased wind-up to heat pain in women with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler-Crish, Christine M; Bruehl, Stephen; Walker, Lynn S

    2011-04-01

    Idiopathic or functional abdominal pain (FAP) is common in school-age children and typically reflects a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID). FGIDs in adults have been distinguished by enhanced responses of the central nervous system to pain stimuli, known as central sensitization. This study investigated whether adolescents and young adults with a history of pediatric FAP (n=144), compared with well control subjects (n=78), showed enhanced central sensitization demonstrated by greater temporal summation (wind-up) to brief, repetitive heat pulses. We also assessed the role of gender and trait anxiety in wind-up to heat pain. Women with a history of FAP showed greater wind-up to heat pain than men with a history of FAP (Ppain was ongoing at follow-up and those whose pain had resolved. Although anxiety was significantly higher in the FAP group compared with control subjects (Ppain associated with enhanced central nervous system responses to pain stimuli. Young women with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain may have a long-term vulnerability to pain that is associated with enhanced responses of the central nervous system to pain stimuli. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of the diagnostic score for acute lower abdominal pain in women of reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearwattanakanok, Kijja; Yamada, Sirikan; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin; Smuthtai, Waratsuda; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2014-01-01

    Background. The differential diagnoses of acute appendicitis obstetrics, and gynecological conditions (OB-GYNc) or nonspecific abdominal pain in young adult females with lower abdominal pain are clinically challenging. The present study aimed to validate the recently developed clinical score for the diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain in female of reproductive age. Method. Medical records of reproductive age women (15-50 years) who were admitted for acute lower abdominal pain were collected. Validation data were obtained from patients admitted during a different period from the development data. Result. There were 302 patients in the validation cohort. For appendicitis, the score had a sensitivity of 91.9%, a specificity of 79.0%, and a positive likelihood ratio of 4.39. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio in diagnosis of OB-GYNc were 73.0%, 91.6%, and 8.73, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating curves (ROC), the positive likelihood ratios, for appendicitis and OB-GYNc in the validation data were not significantly different from the development data, implying similar performances. Conclusion. The clinical score developed for the diagnosis of acute lower abdominal pain in female of reproductive age may be applied to guide differential diagnoses in these patients.

  11. Lead toxicity as an etiology for abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarity, Risa S; Harris, James T; Cox, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Abdominal pain is an uncommon presentation of lead toxicity in the emergency department (ED). However, making the diagnosis is important in avoiding unnecessary testing and the long-term sequelae of lead toxicity. To illustrate possible presentations of abdominal pain secondary to lead toxicity and highlight the importance of taking a thorough patient history. We report 2 patients who presented to the ED with abdominal pain and underwent extensive evaluations that did not reveal an etiology. At follow-up visits, their occupational histories revealed possible lead exposures from working for a bullet-recycling company. Tests revealed that each patient had extremely high lead levels and they were both treated for lead toxicity. Their abdominal pain resolved as their lead levels decreased. These cases demonstrate a rare but significant cause of abdominal pain in the ED. Although history-taking in the ED is necessarily brief, these cases underscore the importance of obtaining an occupational history. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abdominal pain symptoms are associated with anxiety and depression in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Moritz, Anne-Michaela; Thome-Granz, Sigrid; Equit, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain symptoms and incontinence are common in childhood. The aim of this study was to analyse abdominal pain symptoms and their associations with incontinence and symptoms of anxiety and depression in young children. We examined 1130 children during the school entry check-up (mean age 6.2 years) and 951 participated in the study. Parents completed a questionnaire contained 11 items regarding Rome-III functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and incontinence and 14 items from the anxious/depressed scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Of the 951 children (55.6% boys) we recruited, 30.1% had experienced abdominal pain symptoms in the past two months and 14% had complained of them at least once a week. In addition, 2.6% had irritable bowel syndrome, 11.3% had childhood functional abdominal pain, 2.4% were affected by faecal incontinence, 2.1% were affected by daytime urinary incontinence, and 5.5% were affected by nocturnal enuresis. One in ten (10.6%) had symptoms of anxiety and depression, and these were significantly higher in the children with FGIDs, particularly if they were also incontinent. Nearly a third of the children (30.1%) had abdominal pain symptoms, and FGIDs were associated with significantly higher symptoms of anxiety and depression, especially if children were also incontinent. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in a postmenopausal woman: adnexal torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Biler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adnexal torsion is an infrequent but significant cause of acute lower abdominal pain in women. While adnexal torsion is generally considered in premenopausal women presenting with acute abdominal pain and a pelvic mass, it is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain during postmenopausal period. The diagnosis of adnexal torsion is often challenging due to nonspesific clinical, laboratory and physical examination findings. Causes of adnexal torsion is also different in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. While a simple functional cyst is often the cause of torsion in premenopausal women, it is more rarely the cause in postmenopausal women. Adnexal torsion is a surgical emergency. The surgery of adnexal torsion is performed either via conventional exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery. Adnexal torsion in postmenopausal women should be considered not only in the setting of sudden onset pain, but also in long-term abdominal discomfort. In this article, we presented a case with adnexal torsion that rarely cause acute abdominal pain in postmenopausal women. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 167-170

  15. Rectal sensory threshold for pain is a diagnostic marker of irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halac, Ugur; Noble, Angela; Faure, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the rectal sensory threshold for pain (RSTP) in children and adolescents with chronic abdominal pain. Fifty-one patients (25 girls; median age 14.2 years; range 8.4-17.6) with abdominal pain >2 months underwent a series of rectal distensions with an electronic barostat. RSTP and viscerosomatic referrals were assessed. Three months after the barostat, the final diagnosis was documented. Thirty-five patients had a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain), and 16 had an organic disease. RSTP was lower in the FGID group than in the organic disease group (25.4mm Hg vs 37.1mm Hg; P = .0002). At the cutoff of 30mm Hg, the RSTP measurement for the diagnosis of FGID had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 77%. Both groups similarly reported aberrant viscerosomatic projections. In children, RSTP is a diagnostic marker of irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain. Viscerosomatic referrals are similar in children with FGID and organic diseases.

  16. A pilot study of yoga treatment in children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Marion M M G; Purperhart, Helen; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of yoga exercises on pain frequency and intensity and on quality of life in children with functional abdominal pain. 20 children, aged 8-18 years, with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (FAP) were enrolled and received 10 yoga lessons. Pain intensity and pain frequency were scored in a pain diary and quality of life was measured with the Kidscreen quality of life questionnaire (KQoL). In the 8-11 year old group and the 11-18 year old group pain frequency was significantly decreased at the end of therapy (p=0.031 and p=0.004) compared to baseline. In the 8-11 year group pain intensity was also significantly decreased at this time point (p=0.015). After 3 months there still was a significant decrease in pain frequency in the younger patient group (p=0.04) and a borderline significant decrease in pain frequency in the total group (p=0.052). Parents reported a significantly higher KQoL-score after yoga treatment. This pilot study suggests that yoga exercises are effective for children aged 8-18 years with FAP, resulting in significant reduction of pain intensity and frequency, especially in children of 8-11 years old. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome. PMID:19946504

  18. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  19. Ectopic Pelvic Kidney With Urinary Tract Infection Presenting as Lower Abdominal Pain in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Ching Lu; You-Lin Tain; Kwok-Wan Yeung; Mao-Meng Tiao

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic pelvic kidney is a rare developmental anomaly. Ectopic pelvic kidney can present without the characteristic symptoms associated with the urinary tract pathology. Ectopic pelvic kidney is usually unknown, and nonspecific vague abdominal comfort maybe the only symptom. Early detection and recognition of an ectopic kidney can prevent long-term complications. We report a 3-year-5-month-old girl with ectopic pelvic kidney who experienced intermittent episodes of lower abdominal pain for ab...

  20. Role of diagnostic laproscopy in evaluation and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talat, N.; Afzal, M.; Ahmad, S.; Rasool, N.; Wasti, A.R.; Saleem, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. Methods: A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007- Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS17. Results: Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54 percentage) were male, 23/50 (46 percentage) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60 percentage), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24 percentage) cases while 16 percentage (8/50) still complained of pain. Conclusions: Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries. (author)

  1. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Nabila; Afzal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Rasool, Naima; Wasti, Arsalan Raza; Saleem, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo's Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007-Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS-17. Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54%) were male, 23/50 (46%) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60%), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24%) cases while 16% (8/50) still complained of pain. Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries.

  2. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaluso CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Macaluso, Robert M McNamaraDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain.Keywords: acute abdomen, emergency medicine, peritonitis

  3. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  4. Home-Based Hypnotherapy Self-exercises vs Individual Hypnotherapy With a Therapist for Treatment of Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, or Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K.; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Tjon A ten, Walther; van Wering, Herbert M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Merkus, Maruschka P.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Individual gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) is effective in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAP[S]). It is, however, unavailable to many children. To compare the effectiveness of HT by means of home-based self-exercises

  5. Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Prior Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting: Consider the Tip!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Charalampoudis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunting is the treatment of choice for nonobstructive hydrocephalus. In patients with such a device, right lower quadrant abdominal pain can puzzle the surgeon, posing a differential diagnostic problem among appendicitis, nonsurgical colicky pain, and primary shunt catheter tip infection. Treatment is different in either case. Presentation of Case. We hereby present a case of a young woman with prior ventriculoperitoneal shunt positioning who presented to our department with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. The patient underwent a 24-hour observation including a neurosurgery consult in order to exclude acute appendicitis and VP shunt tip infection. Twenty four hours later, the patient’s symptomatology improved, and she was discharged with the diagnosis of atypical colicky abdominal pain seeking a gastroenterologist consult. Discussion. This case supports that when a patient with prior VP shunting presents with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, differential diagnosis can be tricky for the surgeon. Conclusion. Apart from acute appendicitis, primary or secondary VP catheter tip infection must be considered because the latter can be disastrous.

  6. Perioperative use of etoricoxib reduces pain and opioid side-effects after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Frenkl, Tara L; Hartrick, Craig T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effects of two different doses of etoricoxib delivered perioperatively compared with placebo and standard pain management on pain at rest, pain with mobilization, and use of additional morphine/opioids postoperatively. Research design and methods: In this double......-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, we evaluated postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy over 5 days in patients receiving placebo or etoricoxib administered 90 min prior to surgery and continuing postoperatively. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n...... in the active treatment groups by ~10 hours vs. placebo. A greater proportion of patients on etoricoxib (10-30% greater than placebo) achieved mild levels of pain with movement, defined as pain pain measurements were not designated...

  7. Female Adolescent Presenting With Abdominal Pain: Accidental Wire Bristle Ingestion Leading to Colonic Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guglielmo, Matthew; Savage, Jillian; Gould, Sharon; Murphy, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Abdominal pain in female adolescents is a common presentation to both the emergency department and the outpatient pediatric clinic. The broad differential diagnosis for abdominal pain requires a high index of suspicion to make an accurate diagnosis of foreign body ingestion as the etiology. Foreign body ingestion occurs in all age groups, but sequelae of gastrointestinal tract perforation in children are rare. Treatment for perforation requires consultation of the pediatric general surgeon. Clinicians should take care to not overlook subtle imaging findings or dietary/exposure history, even in the context of a patient with known history of abdominal pain. We report the accidental ingestion of a wire bristle from a grill cleaning brush by a female adolescent. The patient, previously treated and seen for constipation and irritable bowel syndrome in the outpatient gastroenterology clinic, was referred to the emergency department after identification of a foreign body on abdominal radiography. Emergency department physicians discovered the history of grilling and consumption of grilled food, facilitating diagnosis of a wire bristle as the foreign body. The metallic foreign body had migrated to the colon, where it perforated and lodged into the abdominal wall, causing acute, focal symptoms. Observation in the hospital with pain control and infection management allowed for elective laparoscopy. The surgical team removed the object with minimal morbidity and avoided laparotomy. Reports of unintended ingestion of wire bristles have been increasingly reported in the literature; however, most focus on injury to the upper airway or upper digestive tract and subsequent endoscopic or laryngoscopic removal. Most reports detail injury in adult patients, pediatric case reports with digestive tract injury are uncommon, and foreign body removal after lower digestive tract injury in children from a wire bristle has not been reported. We caution pediatric emergency medicine and

  8. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Lactobacillus reuteri for Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kambiz Eftekhari; Zahra Vahedi; Mojtaba Kamali Aghdam; Diana Noemi Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is one of the most common diseases, and large percentages of children suffer from it. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri in treatment of children with functional abdominal pain. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Children aged 4 to ...

  9. Preoperative pain measures ineffective in outpatient abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Wright, Julia; Perry, Kyler; Wright, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The multimodality addition of preoperative gabapentin, acetaminophen, and celecoxib (GAC) and postoperative TENS has been recommended to diminish narcotics. We predict that GAC-TENS implementation will reduce recovery room time, improve pain control, reduce narcotic refills, and demonstrate usefulness of TENS treatment. A prospective study compared a control group of patients not utilizing the GAC-TENS protocol during 2015 to patients using the GAC-TENS protocol during 2016. There was less recovery room time in the control group compared to the protocol group. Postoperative day one pain control was similar between the groups. Less refills were noted. TENS unit satisfaction level was rated "very helpful" by 63% of patients. The results call into question the efficacy of the American Pain Society recommendations as they increase time in recovery room but do not decrease the quantity of narcotics used in the recovery room, nor do they improve pain satisfaction responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaesthetic injection versus ischemic compression for the pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Mary L L S; Braz, Carolina A; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio C; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Nogueira, Antonio A; Poli-Neto, Omero B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition among women, and 10 to 30 % of causes originate from the abdominal wall, and are associated with trigger points. Although little is known about their pathophysiology, variable methods have been practiced clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local anaesthetic injections versus ischemic compression via physical therapy for pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain. We conducted a parallel group randomized trial including 30 women with chronic pelvic pain with abdominal wall trigger points. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups. One group received an injection of 2 mL 0.5 % lidocaine without a vasoconstrictor into a trigger point. In the other group, ischemic compression via physical therapy was administered at the trigger points three times, with each session lasting for 60 s, and a rest period of 30 s between applications. Both treatments were administered during one weekly session for four weeks. Our primary outcomes were satisfactory clinical response rates and percentages of pain relief. Our secondary outcomes are pain threshold and tolerance at the trigger points. All subjects were evaluated at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the interventions. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital that was associated with a university providing assistance predominantly to working class women who were treated by the public health system. Clinical response rates and pain relief were significantly better at 1, 4, and 12 weeks for those receiving local anaesthetic injections than ischemic compression via physical therapy. The pain relief of women treated with local anaesthetic injections progressively improved at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. In contrast, women treated with ischemic compression did not show considerable changes in pain relief after intervention. In the local anaesthetic injection group, pain threshold

  11. Conceptualization and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in pediatric gastroenterology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurman, Jennifer V; Hunter, Heather L; Friesen, Craig A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how children with abdominal pain presently are viewed, assessed, and treated by pediatric gastroenterologists across North America, as well as how perspectives have changed since initial release of the Rome criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders approximately 15 years ago. One hundred seventy-four full members of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition completed a pediatric gastroenterology practice survey designed by the authors in 2006. The responses were examined for practice patterns and specific knowledge/use of the Rome criteria. The responses were also compared with historical data from 151 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition members who completed a similar survey in 1992. There were few changes in the evaluation, treatment, or outcomes for children with abdominal pain for the past 15 years. Knowledge of the Rome criteria was common, but use in practice was not; several specific problems with the criteria were identified. A mismatch also appeared between belief in the importance of psychological factors in the creation/maintenance of pediatric abdominal pain and integration of these factors as part of standard evaluation and treatment. Finally, controversy emerged regarding both the term "functional" and the importance of histologic inflammation in the pathophysiology of pediatric abdominal pain. The evolution and dissemination of the Rome criteria for the past 15 years have not substantially changed evaluation or treatment practices for children with abdominal pain. Many areas of inconsistency and controversy remain. More focused research is needed to better understand this common pain condition and to establish an effective treatment program that can be disseminated across practitioners.

  12. [Spontaneous bile duct perforation: a rare cause of acute abdominal pain during childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Tunç; Akgül, Ahsen Karagözlü; Arpaz, Yağmur; Arikan, Ahmet

    2008-07-01

    Spontaneous perforation of the bile duct (SPBD) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain during childhood. Pancreatico-biliary malfunction has been postulated to contribute to its etiology. Factors related to diagnosis and treatment and difference from the other common causes of acute abdominal pain are emphasized. Five patients (3 boys, 2 girls, mean age 4.6) were admitted with peritonitis and operated with initial diagnosis of perforated appendicitis. During laparotomy, SPBD was detected. Presentation, laboratory findings and operative technique of the patients were evaluated retrospectively. Common complaints were abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. Abdominal distention was present in all patients. Leukocytosis and mild hyperbilirubinemia were detected in 5, elevated serum transaminase levels in 4, hyperglycemia in 1 and constipation in 1 patient(s). Abdominal ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid. During laparotomy, sterile bile peritonitis was detected initially. After exploration, SPBD was seen. T-tube drainage of the bile duct was carried out. Patients were discharged after removal of the T-tubes. Pancreatico-biliary malfunction was detected in 4 of 5 patients. In patients with generalized peritonitis, elevated transaminase levels and hyperbilirubinemia, SPBD must be considered. Even though the T-tube drainage is the treatment of choice, Roux-en-Y hepatico-portoenterostomy may be mandatory in certain patients.

  13. Severe abdominal pain as a presenting symptom of probable catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Orly; Amir, Jacob; Schwarz, Michael; Schonfeld, Tommy; Nahum, Elhanan; Ling, Galina; Prais, Dario; Harel, Liora

    2012-07-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pediatric medicine is rare. We report 3 adolescents who presented with acute onset of severe abdominal pain as the first manifestation of probable catastrophic APS. The 3 patients, 2 male patients and 1 female patient were 14 to 18 years old. One had been diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus in the past, but the other 2 had no previous relevant medical history. All presented with excruciating abdominal pain without additional symptoms. Physical examination was noncontributory. Laboratory results were remarkable for high inflammatory markers. Abdominal ultrasonography was normal, and abdominal computed tomography scan showed nonspecific findings of liver infiltration. Only computed tomography angiography revealed evidence of extensive multiorgan thrombosis. All patients had elevated titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patients were treated with full heparinization, high-dose steroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin with a resolution of symptoms. One patient was resistant to the treatment and was treated with rituximab. In conclusion, severe acute abdominal pain can be the first manifestation of a thromboembolic event owing to catastrophic APS even in previously healthy adolescents. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion with prompt evaluation and treatment to prevent severe morbidity and mortality.

  14. Eighty-two year old female with long term abdominal pain, fever and skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Nicolás, G; Zafar Iqbal-Mirza, S; Gonzáles Carhuancho, J A; Mollejo Villanueva, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an old woman, consulting for fever, abdominal pain and constitutional symptoms one year of evolution. The differential diagnosis is between infectious, tumoral, or inflammatory disease, which may be located at the abdominal level, performing additional tests to rule out abdominal process. The existence of pain in the legs and level scan left thigh of a mass of hard consistency, makes us raise another diagnosis. Finally show on ultrasound soft tissue inflammatory changes regarding panniculitis. From this finding aetiologies of panniculitis are reviewed. Skin biopsy that shows the final diagnosis is made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Elderly patient with acute, left lower abdominal pain: perforated jejunal diverticulitis (2010:7b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Manuela; Certo, Manuela; Varzim, Pedro; Silva, Donzilia; Peixoto, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    An elderly patient with acute, left, lower abdominal pain is described, for whom the diagnosis of perforated jejunal diverticulitis was established by computed tomography (CT). The presence of a jejunal segmental inflammatory process, with or without abscess or perforation, in the setting of jejunal diverticulosis, is very suggestive of jejunal diverticulitis. (orig.)

  16. Biliary scintigraphy in children with sickle cell anemia and acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Heyman, S.

    1985-09-01

    The patterns of radionuclide hepatobiliary scans in nine children with sickle cell disease and acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain were reviewed. The most common pattern observed was delayed gall bladder visualization, consistent with chronic cholecystitis. The value of hepatobiliary imaging in distinguishing acute cholecystitis from crisis is presented.

  17. Increased diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy in patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common chief complaints, but the underlying pathophysiology often remains unknown after routine clinical evaluation. Capsule endoscopy (CE is a new technique for the visualization of the entire small bowel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of CE in patients with chronic abdominal pain of obscure origin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred forty three patients with chronic abdominal pain with no significant lesions were enrolled in this study. CE was performed in all patients. RESULTS: A diagnosis was made in 23.0% of patients screened with CE. Of the 243 patients, 19 (7.8% were diagnosed with Crohn's disease, 15 (6.2% with enteritis, 11 (4.5% with idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia, 5 (2.1% with uncinariasis, and a number of other diagnoses including small bowel tumor, ascariasis, and anaphylactoid purpura. Five patients had abnormal transit time, and capsule retention occurred in two patients. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to other previous studies, we found that CE is an effective diagnostic tool for patients with abdominal pain.

  18. Clinical and laboratory findings in 220 children with recurrent abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, C. F. M.; Benninga, M. A.; Büller, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and laboratory findings in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Methods: Consecutive patients with RAP (Apley criteria), age 4-16 years, referred to a secondary medical centre were evaluated by a standardized history, physical examination and laboratory

  19. Biliary scintigraphy in children with sickle cell anemia and acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Heyman, S.

    1985-01-01

    The patterns of radionuclide hepatobiliary scans in nine children with sickle cell disease and acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain were reviewed. The most common pattern observed was delayed gall bladder visualization, consistent with chronic cholecystitis. The value of hepatobiliary imaging in distinguishing acute cholecystitis from crisis is presented. (orig.)

  20. Childhood nonspecific abdominal pain in family practice: incidence, associated factors, and management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Berger, M.Y.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is a common complaint in childhood. In specialist care, childhood NSAP is considered to be a complex and time-consuming problem, and parents are hard to reassure. Little is known about NSAP in family practice, but the impression is that family physicians

  1. Childhood Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Family Practice : Incidence, Associated Factors, and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is a common complaint in childhood. In specialist care, childhood NSAP is considered to be a complex and time-consuming problem, and parents are hard to reassure. Little is known about NSAP in family practice, but the impression is that family physicians

  2. Lead Poisoning Can Be Easily Misdiagnosed as Acute Porphyria and Nonspecific Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ta Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning (LP is less commonly encountered in emergency departments (ED. However, lead exposure still occurs, and new sources of poisoning have emerged. LP often goes unrecognized due to a low index of suspicion and nonspecific symptoms. We present a case of a 48-year-old man who had recurring abdominal pain with anemia that was misdiagnosed. His condition was initially diagnosed as nonspecific abdominal pain and acute porphyria. Acute porphyria-like symptoms with a positive urine porphyrin test result led to the misdiagnosis; testing for heme precursors in urine is the key to the differential diagnosis between LP and acute porphyria. The final definitive diagnosis of lead toxicity was confirmed based on high blood lead levels after detailed medical history taking. The lead poisoning was caused by traditional Chinese herbal pills. The abdominal pain disappeared after a course of chelating treatment. The triad for the diagnosis of lead poisoning should be a history of medicine intake, anemia with basophilic stippling, and recurrent abdominal pain.

  3. [Hydrocholecystis, unrecognized cause of painful abdominal crises in patients with sickle cell anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, S; Desjardin, F; Baruchel, S; Bégué, P; Cordier, M D; Lasfargues, G

    1985-12-01

    The first case of painful abdominal crisis caused by hydrops of the gallbladder during sickle cell disease is reported. The cholecystosonography allowed diagnosis and supervision in a 4 year-old black boy with sickle cell anemia. The persistence of hydrops led to cholecystectomy. Pathophysiology is discussed according to the other etiologies reported in the literature.

  4. Current radiological strategies for the assessment of right lower quadrant abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pumersha Naidoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Right lower quadrant abdominal pain is a common clinical entity. Imaging and the radiologistplay an integral role in achieving a diagnosis, so guiding prompt management of patients.This review discusses the spectrum of pathology and imaging findings, and highlights and contrasts the preferred imaging modalities in different subsets of patients.

  5. Cognitive behavior therapy for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Derkx, Bert H. F.; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits; de Haan, Else

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of a 6-session protocolized cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) compared with 6 visits to a pediatrician (intensive medical care; IMC) for the treatment of pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP). One hundred four children aged 7 to 18

  6. The Nutcracker Syndrome as a Rare Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Pournasiri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal vein entrapment, named nutcracker phenomenon, is a contraction of renal vein between abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Patients can be asymptomatic or clinically manifested, called nutcracker syndrome. Proteinuria, hematuria, flank pain, varicocele in males and pelvic congestion in females are reported in such patients. Case Presentation The current report presented an eight-year-old girl with micr...

  7. Nausea in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Predicts Poor Health Outcomes in Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Alexandra C; Stone, Amanda L; Walker, Lynn S

    2017-05-01

    Nausea is common among children with functional abdominal pain (FAP). We evaluated the relation of nausea to short- and long-term morbidity in pediatric patients with FAP. We performed a prospective study of 871 children with FAP (age, 8-17 y) seen in a pediatric gastroenterology practice; follow-up data were collected from 392 of the patients at 8.7 ± 3.3 years later. Participants were defined as having significant nausea if they reported nausea "a lot" or "a whole lot" within the past 2 weeks. Validated questionnaires assessed abdominal pain, gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms, and depression. Baseline measures, anxiety, and the Rome III criteria were assessed in the follow-up evaluation. At baseline, 44.8% of the patients reported significant nausea. Those with nausea reported worse abdominal pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, somatic symptoms, and depression than those without nausea (P abdominal pain severity. Pediatric patients with FAP and nausea have more severe short- and long-term gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms than patients with FAP without nausea, as well as reductions in mental health and daily function. Pediatric patients with FAP and nausea therefore need intensive treatment and follow-up evaluation. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  9. Functional abdominal pain disorders in children: therapeutic strategies focusing on hypnotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, J.M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain disorders are common pediatric disorders, which can significantly impact the child and his/her family. Treatment of these children is hampered, because of the incomplete understanding of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. This thesis focusses on the clinical and

  10. Hypnotherapy for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Menko-Frankenhuis, Carla; Wolfkamp, Simone C. S.; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are highly prevalent in childhood. A substantial proportion of patients continues to experience long-lasting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of adult

  11. The Import of Abdominal Pain in Adults with Sickle Cell Disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    crisis in sickle cell patients with abdominal pain and their clinical correlates if any. METHODS: Clinical records of adults with SCD (Hb SS and Hb SC) attending the Haematology Outpatients' Clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Southwest Nigerian, over a ten-year period, were reviewed.

  12. Acute lower abdominal pain caused by adnexal torsion in a ten-year-old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Hansen, Lars Folmer; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    A ten-year-old girl presented with four days of lower abdominal pain. A diagnostic laparoscopy on the suspicion of acute appendicitis revealed left-sided adnexal torsion. The cyanotic ovary was detorsed and recovered. At three-month follow-up there were no clinical or ultrasonic signs of pathology...

  13. Primary segmental omental infarction as a rare cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Tepeneu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary omental infarction (POI has a low incidence worldwide, with most cases occurring in adults. This condition is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Material and methods: We present 2 cases of omental infarction in an obese 8-year-old boy and a 5-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain in the right abdomen. Both patients were initially treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics with no improvement. Abdominal ultrasound of the first patient showed free intraperitoneal fluid, meteorism and distended bowel loops. The appendix was not visualized. With a presumptive clinical diagnosis of appendicitis the child underwent laparotomy.On entering the peritoneal cavity an omental infarction was seen and a portion of the omentum was resected. Appendectomy was performed.The second patient presented with acute abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant, which started 2 days before. There was a history of possible abdominal trauma about 3 weeks earlier. The patient had repeated ultrasound examinations and a CT scan of the abdomen which showed a omental infarction. He underwent laparoscopy and resection of the omental infarction, as well as incidental appendectomy. Results: The postoperative period was uneventful. The first patient was discharged on day 3, the second patient on day 4 after surgery. Histology showed a normal vermiform appendix and an omental infarction in both cases. Conclusion and discussion: Since the omental infarction as etiology of acute abdominal pain is uncommon in children, we emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of omental infarction. Keywords: Primary segmental omental infarction (POI, Appendicitis, Childhood

  14. Tripolar spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of abdominal pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Maunak V; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe the use of transverse tripolar dorsal column stimulation in a patient with a history of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) associated with abdominal pain resistant to conservative treatments. We report a 36-year-old man who presented to the pain clinic with an eight-year history of IBS (constipation predominant with occasional diarrheal episodes), with "crampy and sharp" abdominal pain. He also had nonradicular thoracic spine pain due to thoracic scoliosis. Both pains were affecting his ability to function as an attorney. Prior conservative therapy, including psychologic treatment, antidepressants, and opioids, was without any benefits. The use of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) was discussed with the patient. The procedure was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. A tripolar SCS was implanted at the T8 level using one-eight contact and two-four contact percutaneous leads based on paresthesia reproduction of patient's areas of discomfort. This tripolar spinal cord stimulation provided relief of abdominal and thoracic pain, and better management of gastrointestinal symptoms. The patient was followed-up for one year, and his quality of life also was improved via the IBS-Severity Scoring System quality of life tool. The use of the tripolar SCS in this patient provided relief of abdominal and thoracic spine pain, regulated bowel habits, and improved the patient's quality of life. We believe that the use of SCS should be considered as a treatment option in patients with IBS when all conservative treatments failed. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  16. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellegaard Hanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP. In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological–hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23–30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7–10 (Box scale from 0–10 and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Results Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort. Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. Conclusions CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be

  17. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3-12 months' duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Hanne; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2012-09-06

    There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE) were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient's capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological-hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23-30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7-10 (Box scale from 0-10) and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort.Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be regarded as two symptom complexes that mutually affect each other in negative

  18. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE) were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological–hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23–30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7–10 (Box scale from 0–10) and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Results Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort. Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. Conclusions CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be regarded as two symptom

  19. Kinesio Taping to generate skin convolutions is not better than sham taping for people with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parreira, P.D.S.; Costa, L.D.M.; Takahashi, R.; Hespanhol, L.C.; da Luz, M.A.; da Silva, T.M.; Costa, L.O.P.

    2014-01-01

    Question: For people with chronic low back pain, does Kinesio Taping, applied according to the treatment manual to create skin convolutions, reduce pain and disability more than a simple application without convolutions? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis

  20. Evaluation of influence of stretching therapy and ergonomic factors on postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gawda

    2015-02-01

    Ergonomic factors are often accompanied by the appearance of LBP. The restrictions within the musculoskeletal system cause disorders in muscle synergies, which is expressed by an increase in the angular velocity of the COG. In patients with chronic back pain syndrome, selected stretching therapy techniques improves the range of motion of the spine and reduces pain.

  1. Pentazocine Pain Relief in Adult Patients With Acute Abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    on pain relief, diagnostic accuracy and treatment decisions in patients with acute ... With level of power at 80% and a 5% significance level, a ... 72 hours` duration and were judged by the attending physician to require surgical consultation. .... Clinically Important Differences Between Pre Injection, Post Injection and Final ...

  2. Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Kort Nelleke

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP, with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days, Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term. Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694

  3. The effect of a preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Holst, Lars B; Jørgensen, Jørgen C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methylprednisolone has been shown to have analgesic effects after orthopedic surgery. The objective of this trial was to compare the effect of 125 mg methylprednisolone with placebo on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. STUDY DESIGN: In this randomized double......-blinded placebo-controlled trial women scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy (n=59) were randomized to preoperatively receive either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline intravenously. Primary outcome was postoperative pain measured on a 0.0-10.0 visual analog scale and assessed at rest and during...... models. RESULTS: Forty-nine cases were analyzed (methylprednisolone n=25, placebo n=24). Pain scores were significantly higher in the methylprednisolone group compared to the placebo group during mobilization (0.79 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.07-1.50] P=0.03) but not at rest (0.55 [95% CI: -0...

  4. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-02-24

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. ANTISPASMODIC MEDICATION WITH DIRECTIVE EFFECT IN CHILDREN WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN AT THE STAGE OF DIAGNOSTIC SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A. Kozlova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Additional examination is needed for the purpose of detection of its etiology in some patients with abdominal pain, and it takes several days to prove a diagnosis. In most cases this pain is a result of muscle spasm in gastrointestinal tract. The administration of antispasmodic medication with directive effect, particularly, of hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan, is well-grounded. Hyoscine butylbromide is M-cholinergic antagonist, it does not penetrates blood-brain barrier, does not induce common for cholinergic antagonists vascular reactions and decrease of blood pressure. This drug is used in pediatric practice for a long time, it can be used in patients 6 years old anв older, and it has good safety profile. Key words: abdominal pain, hyoscine butylbromide.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:168-170

  6. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  7. Primary Cardiac Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting with Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Tzachanis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 44-year-old woman with primary Burkitt lymphoma of the heart who presented with abdominal bloating and epigastric discomfort secondary to tamponade physiology caused by a large pericardial effusion. The pericardial fluid contained a large number of highly atypical lymphocytes with moderate basophilic cytoplasm, rare punched-out vacuoles, a vesicular nuclear chromatin, large nucleolus, and marginated chromatin that by FISH were positive for the 8;14 translocation. She had no other sites of disease. She was treated with four alternating cycles of modified CODOX-M and IVAC in combination with rituximab and remains in remission more than 5 years since diagnosis.

  8. Glucomannan for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Andrea; Dziechciarz, Piotr; Szajewska, Hania

    2013-05-28

    To assess the efficacy of glucomannan (GNN) as the sole treatment for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were recruited among children referred to the Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Warsaw. Included in the study were children aged 7-17 years with abdominal pain-related FGIDs classified according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria. The children were randomly assigned to receive GNN, a polysaccharide of 1,4-D-glucose and D-mannose, a soluble fiber from the Japanese Konjac plant, at a dosage of 2.52 g/d (1 sachet of 1.26 g 2 times a day), or a comparable placebo (maltodextrin) at the same dosage. The content of each sachet was dissolved in approximately 125 mL of fluid and was consumed twice daily for 4 wk. Of the 89 eligible children, 84 (94%) completed the study. "No pain" and "treatment success" (defined as no pain or a decrease ≥ 2/6 points on the FACES Pain Scale Revised) were similar in the GNN (n = 41) and placebo (n = 43) groups [no pain (12/41 vs 6/43, respectively; RR = 2.1, 95%CI: 0.87-5.07) as well as treatment success (23/41 vs 20/43; RR = 1.2, 95%CI: 0.79-1.83)]. No significant differences between the groups were observed in the secondary outcomes, such as abdominal cramps, abdominal bloating/gassiness, episodes of nausea or vomiting, or a changed in stool consistency. GNN demonstrated no significant influence on the number of children requiring rescue therapy, school absenteeism, or daily activities. In our setting, GNN, as dosed in this study, was no more effective than the placebo in achieving therapeutic success in the management of FGIDs in children.

  9. Reported provision of analgesia to patients with acute abdominal pain in Canadian paediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Cowie, Allyson; Davidson, Chloe; Benidir, Andréanne; Thompson, Graham C; Boisclair, Philippe; Harman, Stuart; Miller, Michael; Butter, Andreana; Lim, Rod; Ali, Samina

    2016-09-01

    Evidence exists that analgesics are underutilized, delayed, and insufficiently dosed for emergency department (ED) patients with acute abdominal pain. For physicians practicing in a Canadian paediatric ED setting, we (1) explored theoretical practice variation in the provision of analgesia to children with acute abdominal pain; (2) identified reasons for withholding analgesia; and (3) evaluated the relationship between providing analgesia and surgical consultation. Physician members of Paediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) were prospectively surveyed and presented with three scenarios of undifferentiated acute abdominal pain to assess management. A modified Dillman's Tailored Design method was used to distribute the survey from June to July 2014. Overall response rate was 74.5% (149/200); 51.7% of respondents were female and mean age was 44 (SD 8.4) years. The reported rates of providing analgesia for case scenarios representative of renal colic, appendicitis, and intussusception, were 100%, 92.1%, and 83.4%, respectively, while rates of providing intravenous opioids were 85.2%, 58.6%, and 12.4%, respectively. In all 60 responses where the respondent indicated they would obtain a surgical consultation, analgesia would be provided. In the 35 responses where analgesia would be withheld, 21 (60%) believed pain was not severe enough, while 5 (14.3%) indicated it would obscure a surgical condition. Pediatric emergency physicians self-reported rates of providing analgesia for acute abdominal pain scenarios were higher than previously reported, and appeared unrelated to request for surgical consultation. However, an unwillingness to provide opioid analgesia, belief that analgesia can obscure a surgical condition, and failure to take self-reported pain at face value remain, suggesting that the need exists for further knowledge translation efforts.

  10. Neuroimmune interactions at different intestinal sites are related to abdominal pain symptoms in children with IBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, G; Barbara, G; Cucchiara, S; Cremon, C; Shulman, R J; Isoldi, S; Zecchi, L; Drago, L; Oliva, S; Saulle, R; Barbaro, M R; Stronati, L

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimmune interactions and inflammation have been proposed as factors involved in sensory-motor dysfunction and symptom generation in adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. In children with IBS and healthy controls, we measured ileocolonic mast cell infiltration and fecal calprotectin and evaluated the relationships between these parameters and abdominal pain symptoms and stooling pattern. Irritable bowel syndrome patients diagnosed according to Pediatric Rome III criteria and healthy controls kept a 2-week pain/stooling diary. Ileocolonic mucosal mast cells (MC) and MC in close proximity to nerve fibers (MC-NF) were identified immunohistochemically and quantified. Fecal calprotectin concentration was measured. 21 IBS patients and 10 controls were enrolled. The MC-NF count was significantly higher in the ileum (p = 0.01), right colon (p = 0.04), and left colon (p Abdominal pain intensity score correlated with ileal MC count (r(s) = 0.47, p = 0.030) and right colon MC-NF count (r(s) = 0.52, p = 0.015). In addition, children with IBS with >3 abdominal pain episodes/week had greater ileal (p = 0.002) and right colonic (p = 0.01) MC counts and greater ileal (p = 0.05) and right colonic (p = 0.016) MC-NF counts than children with less frequent pain. No relationship was found between MC and MC-NF and fecal calprotectin or stooling pattern. Mast cells-nerve fibers counts are increased in the ileocolonic mucosa of children with IBS. Mast cells and MC-NF counts are related to the intensity and frequency of abdominal pain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The efficacy of a HUBER exercise system mediated sensorimotor training protocol on proprioceptive system, lumbar movement control and quality of life in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

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    Letafatkar, Amir; Nazarzadeh, Maryam; Hadadnezhad, Malihe; Farivar, Niloufar

    2017-08-03

    There is a relation between deficits of the proprioceptive system and movement control dysfunction in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) but, the exact mechanism of this relation is unknown. Exercise therapy has been recognized as an effective method for low back pain treatment. In spite of this, it is not clear which of the various exercise therapy programs lead to better results. Therefore, the present analyze the efficacy of a HUBER study aims to exercise system mediated sensorimotor training protocol on proprioceptive system, lumbar movement control (LMC) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic non-specific LBP. Quasi-experimental study. 53 patients with chronic non-specific LBP (mean age 37.55 ± 6.67 years,and Body Mass Index (BMI) 22.4 ± 3.33) were selected by using Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ) and were assigned into two experimental (N= 27) and control groups (N= 26) The experimental group underwent a five-week (10 sessions) Sensorimotor training by using the Human Body Equalizer (HUBER) spine force under the supervision of an investigator. The movement control battery tests, the HUBER machine testing option, goniometer and visual analogue scale used for movement control, neuromuscular coordination, proprioception and LBP assessment respectively. The assessments were completed in pre-test and after five weeks. The paired and sample T tests were used for data analysis in SPSS program version 18 (Significance level were set at a P value pain scores of subjects with chronic non-specific LBP in the sensorimotor group (P= 0.001). In this study, only the short term effects of the sensorimotor training were examined. The results suggest that a sensorimotor training program causes significant improvement in patients with chronic non-specific LBP. Future research should be carried out with a larger sample size to examine the long term effects of the sensorimotor training program on treatment of patients with chronic non-specific

  12. Relative abdominal adiposity is associated with chronic low back pain: a preliminary explorative study

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    Cristy Brooks

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although previous research suggests a relationship between chronic low back pain (cLBP and adiposity, this relationship is poorly understood. No research has explored the relationship between abdominal-specific subcutaneous and visceral adiposity with pain and disability in cLBP individuals. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the relationship of regional and total body adiposity to pain and disability in cLBP individuals. Methods A preliminary explorative study design of seventy (n = 70 adult men and women with cLBP was employed. Anthropometric and adiposity measures were collected, including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, total body adiposity and specific ultrasound-based abdominal adiposity measurements. Self-reported pain and disability were measured using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI questionnaires respectively. Relationships between anthropometric and adiposity measures with pain and disability were assessed using correlation and regression analyses. Results Significant correlations between abdominal to lumbar adiposity ratio (A-L variables and the waist-to-hip ratio with self-reported pain were observed. A-L variables were found to predict pain, with 9.1–30.5 % of the variance in pain across the three analysis models explained by these variables. No relationships between anthropometric or adiposity variables to self-reported disability were identified. Conclusions The findings of this study indicated that regional distribution of adiposity via the A-L is associated with cLBP, providing a rationale for future research on adiposity and cLBP.

  13. Twelve-month follow-up of cognitive behavioral therapy for children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Walker, Lynn S; Romano, Joan M; Christie, Dennis L; Youssef, Nader; DuPen, Melissa M; Ballard, Sheri A; Labus, Jennifer; Welsh, Ericka; Feld, Lauren D; Whitehead, William E

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether a brief intervention for children with functional abdominal pain and their parents' responses to their child's pain resulted in improved coping 12 months later. Prospective, randomized, longitudinal study. Families were recruited during a 4-year period in Seattle, Washington, and Morristown, New Jersey. Two hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents. A 3-session social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy intervention or an education and support intervention. Child symptoms and pain-coping responses were monitored using standard instruments, as was parental response to child pain behavior. Data were collected at baseline and after treatment (1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment). This article reports the 12-month data. Relative to children in the education and support group, children in the social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy group reported greater baseline to 12-month follow-up decreases in gastrointestinal symptom severity (estimated mean difference, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.63 to -0.01) and greater improvements in pain-coping responses (estimated mean difference, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.02). Relative to parents in the education and support group, parents in the social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy group reported greater baseline to 12-month decreases in solicitous responses to their child's symptoms (estimated mean difference, -0.22; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.03) and greater decreases in maladaptive beliefs regarding their child's pain (estimated mean difference, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.59 to -0.13). Results suggest long-term efficacy of a brief intervention to reduce parental solicitousness and increase coping skills. This strategy may be a viable alternative for children with functional abdominal pain. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00494260.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of reflexology massage on pain severity after abdominal surgery

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    Abolfazl Rahimi Zarchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain caused by surgery is one of the major problems of the patients. Therefore, pain reduction through using noninvasive and simple methods is one of the nursing priorities. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of reflexology massage on pain intensity in the patients following the abdominal surgery. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients undergoing abdominal surgery, referring to the Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran, in 2016. The participants were selected using the purposive sampling technique, and then randomly divided into three groups of 30 cases. The a 30-minute session of reflexology and simple massage were applied by the researcher for the first and second groups, respectively, after transferring the patients to the ward and regaining full consciousness. The pain was measured immediately, 10 min, and 24 h after the massage (30 min after the pre-test using the visual analogue scale. The data analysis was performed in the SPSS version 19, using the one-way and repeated measures ANOVA as well as Chi-square test. Results: According to the results of this study, 24 h after the intervention, the foot reflexology group had lower mean score of pain intensity (1.9±1.6, compared to the simple massage (3.3±1.64 and control groups (3.8±02 (P<0.001. The decrease in the pain score was significant between the groups only 10 min and 24 h after the intervention (P<0.001 Conclusion: As the findings of the present study indicated, the reflexology massage could alleviate the pain in the patients after abdominal surgery. Given the simple and non-invasive nature of this method, it could be used to reduce the pain in the patients along with other healthcare measures.

  15. Recurrent abdominal pain: when an epileptic seizure should be suspected? Dor abdominal recorrente: quando suspeitar de crise epiléptica?

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    Renata C. Franzon

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE. AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI showed tumor in the left temporal region. As a differential diagnosis, we report a 10 year-old boy who had long episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by blurring of vision, vertigo, gait ataxia, dysarthria, acroparesthesias and vomiting. He received the diagnosis of basilar migraine. In our opinion, AE is part of a large group (partial epilepsies and does not require a special classification. Pediatric neurologists must be aware of these two entities that may cause abdominal pain.Episódios recorrentes de dor abdominal são freqüentes na infância e entre as causas neurológicas há migrânea e epilepsia abdominal (EA. EA é uma síndrome que consiste de episódios paroxísticos de dor abdominal associada à alteração de consciência, anormalidades eletrencefalográficas e boa resposta à terapia anticonvulsivante. Apresentamos uma menina de 6 anos que tinha desde os 4 anos episódios de curta duração de dor abdominal, seguidos por choro, medo e ocasional generalização secundária. A RM mostrou a presença de um tumor em região temporal esquerda. Como diagnóstico diferencial, apresentamos um menino de 10 anos que há 12 meses referia episódios de dor abdominal de longa duração acompanhados por turvação visual, vertigem, marcha atáxica, disartria, acroparestesia e vômito, recebendo posteriormente o diagnóstico de migrânia basilar. Em nossa opinião, EA faz parte de um grande grupo (epilepsias parciais e não requer uma classificação especial

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain in five-year-old children are related to lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusijärvi, Agneta; Alm, Johan; Lindblad, Frank; Olén, Ola

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal pain of functional origin is very common in childhood, and environmental factors are thought to be of aetiologic importance. The anthroposophic lifestyle has dietary and lifestyle characteristics that may influence child health, and this study aimed to assess the effect of such lifestyles on abdominal pain of functional origin. A prospective Swedish lifestyle cohort (n = 470) was followed from birth to five years of age. Family lifestyles were characterised through questionnaires. Abdominal pain was defined as irritable bowel syndrome or functional abdominal pain according to the Rome III criteria and measured with parental questionnaires and interviews at the age of five. The prevalence of abdominal pain was 15%. Children were more likely to have abdominal pain at five years of age if their family had a partly anthroposophic lifestyle, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.61 (95% CI 1.15-5.93), or an anthroposophic lifestyle, with an adjusted OR of 2.34 (95% CI 0.96-5.70). A family lifestyle with anthroposophic characteristics was associated with an increased risk of abdominal pain in five-year-old children. The mechanisms for this increase were unclear, but we speculate that there may have been different prerequisites for coping with stressors. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Jejunal Choristoma: A Very Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children

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    T. A. Olajide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  18. [Evaluation of anger expression, school functioning and a level of anxiety in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyńska, Paulina; Kowalkowska, Katarzyna; Kuczyńska, Renata; Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Krogulska, Aneta

    Psychosocial conditions may have influence on the occurrence of functional abdominal pain. Anxiety, school-related difficulties and suppression of emotions negatively impact on the psychosocial condition of a child and could impede its treatment. The analysis of the psychosocial determinants of functioning of children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain. Meterial and methods: The study group comprised 58 patients (12 boys and 46 girls) from 9 to 17 years of age (av. 13.34±2.14 years) with functional abdominal pain, diagnosed according to the III Roman Criteria, and the control group of 58 healthy children in adequate age, of Bydgoszcz primary and secondary schools. The test method utilised The Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (SEG), The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) and Me and My School Questionnaire. Analysing the results of scale SEG between the group of children with functional abdominal pain and healthy children, significant differences were observed in the scale of external anger (p=0.045). There were no differences between the group of children with functional abdominal pain and the comparative one in terms of Me and My School Inventory scale (p> 0.05). In the group of healthy adolescents, the average of motivation differed significantly from the result of the adolescents with functional abdominal pain (p=0.031). There were no differences between the group of children and adolescents with abdominal pain and the healthy ones in terms of the performance in STAIC scales (p>0.05). 1. Healthy children compared to children with functional abdominal pain more openly express negative emotions, such as anger and irritation, which can cause reduced tendency to the somatization of symptoms. 2. Symptoms of young people with functional abdominal pain intensify reluctance to fulfill school duties and heighten fear of school, depending on the speed of activation of the autonomic nervous system.

  19. The neurolytic celiac plexus block using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach to control the cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jie; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Jin Zhengyu; Zhao Yupei; Cai Lixing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus block (Ncb) using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach. Methods: The clinical data of 24 patients who were given NCPB because of the suffering of upper abdominal and back pain caused by pancreatic carcinoma and other cancer in advanced stage were retrospectively analyzed. The therapeutic effect was evaluated with complete pain relief and partial pain relief. Results: The effective rate and complete pain relief rate in short period ( 3 months) were 71.4% and 14.3% respectively. No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT through anterior abdominal approach is an effective, safe and simple method to control the upper abdominal and back pain caused by cancer

  20. Differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain – acute intermittent porphyria

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    Mislav Klobučić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of heme biosynthesis in liver due to deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme. Clinically, AIP is dominatedby a colicky type pain, which does not subside after taking usual analgesics. Additional frequent symptoms are vomiting, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, depression, delirium and coma. This paper reported a case of a twenty-fi- ve-year-old female patient, who had undergone a period of six days between the first presentationto the medical department and the diagnosis confirmation. It has accentuated possible mistakes in symptomatic therapy administration as well as dangers of a delayed diagnosis.

  1. Emergency department assessment of abdominal pain: clinical indicator tests for detecting peritonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Scott; Watt, Martin

    2005-12-01

    Peritonism is a finding that leads to a more cautious approach in the emergency department management of abdominal pain. This study examined whether peritonism assessment using inspiration, expiration and cough tests was associated with the patient's clinical management. This prospective observational study evaluated consecutive patients presenting directly to the emergency department for 3 months from June 2000 with abdominal pain. Triage initial observations of blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature were recorded. The examining emergency physician recorded each patient's response and pain score to the individual peritonism tests and scored it as positive if there was an indication of it being a painful manoeuvre. The results were blinded from the receiving specialty if subsequent referral was required. Sixty-seven patients had peritonism tests performed. No individual test was more painful than the others with similar values in pain scores. In all, 70% (7/10) were admitted when all three tests were positive, compared with 21% (12/57) when two or less of the tests scored positive (P=0.004, Fisher's exact test). Admission was not associated with any individual test or combination of tests, or any other variable. The peritonism tests were not associated with any other physiological observation or measurement. These peritonism tests represent a simple investigation, and are significantly associated with admission when all three tests are positive. They seem to be a clinical predictor of cases in which continuing assessment was required, and may be useful as a departmental 'safety net' in the management of abdominal pain.

  2. Stress reactivity in childhood functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewitsch, M D; Weimer, K; Enck, P; Schwille-Kiuntke, J; Hautzinger, M; Schlarb, A A

    2017-01-01

    Frequent abdominal pain (AP) in childhood has been shown to be associated with elevated experience of stress and with deficits in stress coping, but psychophysiological stress reactivity has been studied rarely. We examined whether children with frequent AP show altered reactions of the parasympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during and following an afternoon laboratory social stress task in comparison to healthy children and children with anxiety disorders. Twenty-four children with frequent AP (18 with functional AP and six with irritable bowel syndrome; M = 9.9 years), and 24 healthy controls underwent stressful free speech and arithmetic tasks. Twelve children with anxiety disorders served as second comparison sample. Groups were compared regarding parasympathetic reaction and saliva cortisol concentration. We found no differences in parasympathetic withdrawal between the groups. Concerning the HPA axis, we detected an attenuated cortisol reactivity in children with AP compared to both other groups. This study provides preliminary evidence that childhood AP is not associated with altered parasympathetic withdrawal during stress. It seems to be related to a down-regulated reactivity of the HPA axis. This pattern was ascertained in comparison to healthy children and also in comparison to children with anxiety disorders. Childhood abdominal pain could be related to down-regulated HPA axis reactivity to stress but not to altered parasympathetic reaction. Children with abdominal pain and children with anxiety disorders exhibit a divergent stress-related HPA axis reaction. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. Validation of the Abdominal Pain Index using a revised scoring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Kelsey T; Sherman, Amanda L; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate the psychometric properties of child- and parent-report versions of the four-item Abdominal Pain Index (API) in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and healthy controls, using a revised scoring method that facilitates comparisons of scores across samples and time. Pediatric patients aged 8-18 years with FAP and controls completed the API at baseline (N = 1,967); a subset of their parents (N = 290) completed the API regarding the child's pain. Subsets of patients completed follow-up assessments at 2 weeks (N = 231), 3 months (N = 330), and 6 months (N = 107). Subsets of both patients (N = 389) and healthy controls (N = 172) completed a long-term follow-up assessment (mean age at follow-up = 20.21 years, SD = 3.75). The API demonstrated good concurrent, discriminant, and construct validity, as well as good internal consistency. We conclude that the API, using the revised scoring method, is a useful, reliable, and valid measure of abdominal pain severity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months.

  5. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  6. Emotion awareness and coping in children with functional abdominal pain: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, H H F; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Literature on somatization suggests that patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms are less aware of their emotions and use maladaptive coping strategies when coping with everyday problems. In addition, coping is hypothesized to mediate between emotion awareness and medically unexplained symptoms. Scientific evidence for the relevance of this hypothesis for children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) is, however, lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis in Dutch children with functional abdominal pain (FAP), aged 7-18 years. Between April 2007 and April 2010, a total of 114 referred children with FAP, 235 schoolchildren without abdominal pain and 407 schoolchildren with some abdominal pain (AP) of diverse etiology filled out questionnaires concerning their pain, emotion awareness and coping. MANOVA was used to investigate group differences in emotional awareness and coping. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the mediational role of coping. The results showed that children with FAP scored significantly lower on most aspects of emotion awareness than children without AP, although these differences were small. Contrary to expectations, children with FAP were more aware of a link between emotions and bodily sensations than children without AP. As for coping, we found that children with FAP used avoidant coping more often than children without AP. Overall, children with FAP mostly did not differ in their emotional awareness and coping compared to children with some AP. Problem focused coping had a small mediating effect for two aspects of emotion awareness. We conclude that children with FAP show only small differences in emotion awareness and coping compared to children without AP, and are practically no different from children with some AP. Contrary to common belief, it can be questioned whether emotion awareness and general coping are useful targets for psychological treatments of FAP to

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of self-report and subjective history in the diagnosis of low back pain with non-specific lower extremity symptoms: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Susan; Averell, Kristina; Eickelman, Angela; Sanker, Holly; Donaldson, Megan Burrowbridge

    2015-02-01

    Subjective history questions/self-report items are commonly used to triage the patient with low back pain and related leg symptoms. However the value of the history taking process for decision-making to identify common classifications/diagnosis for patients presenting with low back related leg pain (LBRLP) have not been considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of self-report items/history-taking questions used to identify patients with LBRLP. Eligible studies included: 1)subjects with low back pain AND related lower extremity pain, 2)details of subjective examination/self-report items, 3)cohort, prospective/longitudinal studies, and randomized control trials, 4)use of statistical reporting, 5)an acceptable reference standard. Quality was evaluated using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2. A synthesis of history items that met the threshold for at least a small shift in the likelihood of the condition with a +LR ≥ 2 or -LR ≤ 0.5 were reported. Conditions commonly reported in the literature: lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbosacral nerve root compression/radiculopathy, disc herniation and neurophysiological low back pain ± leg pain. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. This is the first systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies that examined only the history-taking items for their ability to identify LBRLP conditions. Clustering key items may provide a more precise clinical picture necessary to detect and treat a patient's presentation. History questions formed within the interview and their contributing value for decision-making remain understudied. There is a need for better designs to determine a more accurate diagnostic power to identify conditions with LBRLP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intra-operative remifentanil might influence pain levels in the immediate postoperative period after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, EG; Duedahl, Tina H; Rømsing, Janne

    2005-01-01

    Remifentanil, a widely used analgesic agent in anaesthesia, has a rapid onset and short duration of action. In clinical settings, this requires an appropriate pain strategy to prevent unacceptable pain in the post-operative period. The aim of this study was to investigate whether remifentanil had...... any impact on post-operative pain and opioid consumption after major abdominal surgery....

  9. When is irritable bowel syndrome not irritable bowel syndrome? Diagnosis and treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Madhusudan

    2012-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a distinct chronic gastrointestinal (GI) pain disorder characterized by the presence of constant or frequently recurring abdominal pain that is not associated with eating, change in bowel habits, or menstrual periods. The pain experience in FAPS is predominantly centrally driven as compared to other chronic painful GI conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and chronic pancreatitis where peripherally acting factors play a major role in driving the pain. Psychosocial factors are often integrally associated with the disorder and can pose significant challenges to evaluation and treatment. Patients suffer from considerable loss of function, which can drive health care utilization. Treatment options are limited at best with most therapeutic regimens extrapolated from pain management of other functional GI disorders and chronic pain conditions. A comprehensive approach to management using a biopsychosocial construct and collaboration with pain specialists and psychiatry is most beneficial to the management of this disorder.

  10. The effectiveness and cost-evaluation of manual therapy and physical therapy in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Rationale and design of a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Assen Luite

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual Therapy applied to patients with non specific neck pain has been investigated several times. In the Netherlands, manual therapy as applied according to the Utrecht School of Manual Therapy (MTU has not been the subject of a randomized controlled trial. MTU differs in diagnoses and treatment from other forms of manual therapy. Methods/Design This is a single blind randomized controlled trial in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Patients with neck complaints existing for two weeks (minimum till one year (maximum will participate in the trial. 180 participants will be recruited in thirteen primary health care centres in the Netherlands. The experimental group will be treated with MTU during a six week period. The control group will be treated with physical therapy (standard care, mainly active exercise therapy, also for a period of six weeks. Primary outcomes are Global Perceived Effect (GPE and functional status (Neck Disability Index (NDI-DV. Secondary outcomes are neck pain (Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, Eurocol, costs and quality of life (SF36. Discussion This paper presents details on the rationale of MTU, design, methods and operational aspects of the trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843

  11. Limited Abdominal Sonography for Evaluation of Children With Right Lower Quadrant Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munden, Martha M; Wai, Shannon; DiStefano, Michael C; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether a complete abdominal sonographic examination is necessary in the evaluation of children with right lower quadrant pain that is suspicious for appendicitis in the emergency department and whether performing a limited, more-focused study would miss clinically important disease. With Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective study was performed of 704 patients, from ages 5-19 years, presenting to the emergency department with right lower quadrant pain that was suspicious for appendicitis who underwent a complete abdominal sonographic examination. Data were extracted from the complete abdominal sonographic examination to see whether abnormalities were noted in the pancreas, spleen, and left kidney. Patients' medical charts were reviewed to see whether any positive findings in these organs were clinically important. Of the 65 studies with a finding that would have been missed with a limited study, only 6 were found to be clinically important. Of those, 5 were managed medically and 1 surgically. The chance of missing a potentially important finding using a limited study with our group of patients was 65 of 704 patients (9.2%), with a 95% confidence interval of 7.2% to 11.7%. The chance of missing an abnormality that was clinically important was 6 of 704 patients (0.85%), with a 95% confidence interval of 0.35% to 1.94%. In children older than 5 years with abdominal pain that is suspicious for appendicitis, performing only a limited abdominal sonographic examination that excludes the pancreas, left kidney, and spleen will yield a miss rate for clinically important disease that is acceptably low to justify the savings of examination time. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: a feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie C; French, Simon D; Hartvigsen, Jan; Azari, Michael F

    2018-01-01

    Dizziness in older people is a risk factor for falls. Neck pain is associated with dizziness and responds favourably to neck manipulation. However, it is unknown if chiropractic intervention including instrument-assisted manipulation of the neck in older people with neck pain can also improve dizziness. This parallel two-arm pilot trial was conducted in Melbourne, Australia over nine months (October 2015 to June 2016). Participants aged 65-85 years, with self-reported chronic neck pain and dizziness, were recruited from the general public through advertisements in local community newspapers and via Facebook. Participants were randomised using a permuted block method to one of two groups: 1) Activator II™-instrument-assisted cervical and thoracic spine manipulation plus a combination of: light massage; mobilisation; range of motion exercises; and home advice about the application of heat, or 2) Sham-Activator II™-instrument-assisted manipulation (set to zero impulse) plus gentle touch of cervical and thoracic spinal regions. Participants were blinded to group allocation. The interventions were delivered weekly for four weeks. Assessments were conducted one week pre- and post-intervention. Clinical outcomes were assessed blindly and included: dizziness (dizziness handicap inventory [DHI]); neck pain (neck disability index [NDI]); self-reported concerns of falling; mood; physical function; and treatment satisfaction. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rates, compliance with intervention and outcome assessment, study location, success of blinding, costs and harms. Out of 162 enquiries, 24 participants were screened as eligible and randomised to either the chiropractic ( n  = 13) or sham ( n  = 11) intervention group. Compliance was satisfactory with only two participants lost to follow up; thus, post-intervention data for 12 chiropractic intervention and 10 sham intervention participants were analysed. Blinding was similar between groups. Mild harms

  13. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  14. Presumptive intraperitoneal envenomation resulting in hemoperitoneum and acute abdominal pain in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istvan, Stephanie A; Walker, Julie M; Hansen, Bernard D; Hanel, Rita M; Marks, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, diagnostic findings, treatment, and outcome of a dog with acute abdominal pain and hemoperitoneum secondary to a presumptive intraperitoneal (IP) snakebite. A 10-month-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated for suspected snake envenomation. The dog presented recumbent and tachycardic with signs of severe abdominal pain. Two cutaneous puncture wounds and hemoperitoneum were discovered during evaluation. Ultrasonographic examination revealed communication of the wounds with the peritoneal cavity. The dog was treated with supportive care, parenteral analgesia, packed red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma transfusions, crotalid antivenom, and placement of an IP catheter to provide local analgesia. The dog recovered fully and was discharged 5 days after initial presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IP envenomation accompanied by hemorrhage treated with continuous IP analgesia in the veterinary literature. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  15. COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF ABDOMINAL STRETCHING EXERCISE AND COLD COMPRESS THERAPY ON MENSTRUAL PAIN INTENSITY IN TEENAGE GIRLS

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    Desta Ayu Cahya Rosyida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain during menstruation is not uncommon, especially in young women, which has an impact on their life activities. Objective: To examine the effect of abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy on decreasing intensity of menstrual pain in teenage girls at SMK Bakti Indonesia Medika. Design: A Quasy Experimental Study with two group comparison pretest-postest design. There were 46 respondents selected in this study by consecutive sampling that consisted of 23 samples in the abdominal stretching exercise group and 23 samples in the cold compress group. The menstrual pain was measured using VAS (visual analog scale. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney, Chi-Square, and Wilcoxon test. Results: Findings showed that the mean of menstrual pain before intervention in the abdominal stretching exercise was 7.04 and in the cold compress therapy was 6.74 with p-value 0.211 (<0.05, which indicated that there was no mean difference of pain between both groups. However, after intervention, the menstrual pain was reduced from 7.04 to 1.91 (5.09 difference in the abdominal stretching exercise group; and from 6.74 to 5.52 (1.22 difference in the cold compress group with p-value 0.000 (<0.05, which indicated that there was statistically significant difference of menstrual pain before and after intervention, both abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy. Conclusion: There were statistically significant effects of abdominal stretching exercise and cold compress therapy on menstrual pain in teenage girls. The abdominal stretching exercise is more effective than cold compress therapy in reducing menstrual pain intensity. Thus, it is suggested that abdominal stretching exercise can be an alternative choice of management of dysmenorrhea in teenage girls, and can be a part of subject in the education as non-pharmacological medicine.

  16. Investigation of psychological traits in patients with chronic abdominal pain syndrome

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    A. A. Tokareva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects of the study were 100 chronic abdominal pain syndrome inpatients assigned to subgroups of different level of significance of psychological factors for the development of pain syndrome, different self-assessed pain level (utilizing visual analog scale, and different type of attitude towards disease (by the Bekhterev Institute Personality Inventory. Character and psychodynamic specialties were assessed in the aforementioned subgroups following to assignment. Proved by clinical and psychometric methods diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder was used as an indicator of high importance of psychological determinants. Differences between subgroups were assessed by the kit of questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger Anxiety Scales, Wasserman Social Frustration Inventory, TAS, MCMI-III and projective tests (Luscher and Szondi tests. Interference between psychosomatic and demographic characteristics within the sample, and accuracy of assigning subjects to subgroups were discussed. Interpretation of the acquired data with implications for psychotherapists was offered.

  17. An Unusual Cause of Abdominal Pain: Three Lead Pellets within the Appendix Vermiformis

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    Orhan Veli Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most ingested foreign bodies usually pass out in the feces uneventfully. Complications such as intestinal perforation and bleeding usually occur with sharp, thin, stiff, long, and pointed objects. This case describes the management of three lead pellets within the appendix vermiformis. A 45-year-old male visited our clinic complaining of a 4-month history of abdominal pain. The patient inquiry revealed that he had eaten hunted rabbit meat on numerous occasions and had unintentionally ingested three lead pellets. Plain abdominal films and a barium enema showed foreign bodies in the right lower abdominal quadrant. Since the lead pellets were thought to have migrated extraluminally, they were removed through laparotomy under fluoroscopic guidance. An appendectomy was performed. Pathologically, three lead pellets were embedded in the appendix, which showed signs of intramucosal inflammation. Foreign bodies causing appendicitis are rare. However, if stiff or pointed objects enter the appendicular lumen, there is a high risk of appendicitis, perforation, or abdominal pain. An appendectomy was required to remove the ingested lead pellets in the appendix.

  18. ENDOMETRIOSIS OF APPENDIX IN WOMEN PRESENTING WITH RIGHT LOWER ABDOMINAL PAIN

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    Radha Bai Prabhu T, Velayudam DA, Jayalakshmi M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a well known gynaecological condition associated with infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Review of literature shows that endometriosis can affect any tissue in the body, including the appendix. Here we report a case of pelvic endometriosis involving the vermiform appendix in a 45 years old multiparous woman. When women of the reproductive age present with recurrent lower abdominal pain on the right side, endometriosis of the appendix should also be considered. At the time of surgery appendix should be inspected and removed; especially in the presence of pelvic endometriosis.

  19. 10-Year-Old Female with Acute Abdominal Pain with Pancreatic Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Charles K. Powers; Molly Posa; Dhanashree Rajderkar; Jaclyn Otero

    2017-01-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old female presented to a local emergency department following three days of nausea and vomiting diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumor. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are a rare form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm that typically presents in young females in their 20–30s and are very rare in children. These neoplasms often present as an asymptomatic tumor found on incidental imaging. When symptomatic they most commonly present with abdominal pain and can als...

  20. US Emergency Department Trends in Imaging for Pediatric Nontraumatic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Lauren M; Goyal, Monika K; Badolato, Gia M; Chamberlain, James M; Cohen, Joanna S

    2017-10-01

    To describe national emergency department (ED) trends in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound imaging for the evaluation of pediatric nontraumatic abdominal pain from 2007 through 2014. We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to measure trends in CT and ultrasound use among children with nontraumatic abdominal pain. We performed multivariable logistic regression to measure the strength of the association of ED type (pediatric versus general ED) with CT and ultrasound use adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of an estimated 21.1 million ED visits for nontraumatic abdominal pain, 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.2%-16.0%) had CT imaging only, 10.9% (95% CI, 9.7%-12.1%) had ultrasound imaging only, and 1.9% (95% CI, 1.4%-2.4%) received both CT and ultrasound. The overall use of CT and ultrasound did not significantly change over the study period ( P trend .63 and .90, respectively). CT use was lower among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17-0.69). Conversely, ultrasound use was higher among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 2.14; 95% CI, 1.29-3.55). CT imaging for pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain has plateaued since 2007 after the steady increase seen in the preceding 9 years. Among this population, an increased likelihood of CT imaging was demonstrated in general EDs compared with pediatric EDs, in which there was a higher likelihood of ultrasound imaging. Dissemination of pediatric-focused radiology protocols to general EDs may help optimize radiation exposure in children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Tachycardia may prognosticate life- or organ-threatening diseases in children with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Atsumi, Yukari; Hataya, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal pain is common in children, but expeditious diagnosis of life- or organ-threatening diseases can be challenging. An evidence-based definition of tachycardia in children was established recently, but its diagnostic utility has not yet been studied. To test the hypothesis that abdominal pain with tachycardia may pose a higher likelihood of life- or organ-threatening diseases in children. A nested case-control study was conducted in a pediatric emergency department in 2013. Tachycardia was defined as a resting heart rate of more than 3 standard deviations above the average for that age. Life- or organ-threatening diseases were defined as "disorders that might result in permanent morbidity or mortality without appropriate intervention." A triage team recorded vital signs before emergency physicians attended patients. Patients with tachycardia (cases) and without tachycardia (controls) were systematically matched for age, sex, and month of visit. The groups were compared for the presence of life- or organ-threatening diseases. There were 1683 visits for abdominal pain, 1512 of which had vital signs measured at rest. Eighty-three patients experienced tachycardia, while 1429 did not. Fifty-eight cases and 58 controls were matched. Life- or organ-threatening diseases were more common in the case group (19%) than the control group (5%, p=0.043). The relative risk of tachycardia to the presence of the diseases was 3.7 (95% confidence interval 1.2-12.0). Tachycardia significantly increased the likelihood of life- or organ-threatening diseases. Tachycardia in children with abdominal pain should alert emergency physicians to the possibility of serious illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  4. A 27-years-old Man with Abdominal Pain; Lead Toxicity

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    Maryam Kia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Case presentation: A 27-year-old man came to our emergency department with chief complaints of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, colicky pain in all area of abdomen without any radiation and generalized myalgia. In his background, he had no previous medical problem. In his social history he had worked in an automobile battery-reclaiming factory for 5 years. During his physical examination, his appearance was pale with perioral priority, ill and agitated but not toxic with a blood pressure of 127/85 mmHg and a pulse of 80 beats/min, respiratory rate of 14 breaths/min and oral temperature of 37.3 °C, mild generalized abdominal tenderness without rebound. No obvious signs of sensory and motor neuropathy were found. In the head and neck examination, we found lead-lined teeth. Learning points: The most common cause of chronic metal poisoning is lead. Exposure occurs through inhalation or ingestion. Both inorganic and organic forms of lead that exist naturally produce clinical toxicity. Gastrointestinal manifestations occur more frequently with acute rather than with chronic poisoning, and concurrent hemolysis may cause the colicky abdominal pains. Patients may have complained of a metallic taste and, with long-term exposure, have bluish-gray gingival lead lines. In addition, constitutional symptoms, including arthralgia, generalized weakness, and weight loss raises the possibility of lead toxicity.

  5. Soap Suds Enemas Are Efficacious and Safe for Treating Fecal Impaction in Children With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Henkel, Erin B; Valdez, Karina L; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2016-07-01

    Constipation is a common cause of pediatric abdominal pain and emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the high prevalence, there is a dearth of clinical information and wide practice variation in childhood constipation management in the ED. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of soap suds enema (SSE) in the therapy for fecal impaction in children with abdominal pain within the pediatric ED setting. The primary outcome was stool output following SSE. Secondary outcomes were adverse events, admissions, and return visits within 72 hours. The present study is a retrospective cross-sectional study performed in the ED at a quaternary care children's hospital of patients seen during a 12-month period who received an SSE for fecal impaction. Five hundred twelve patients (53% girls, median age 7.8 years, range: 8 months-23 years) received SSE therapy during a 1-year period. Successful therapy (bowel movement) following SSE occurred in 419 (82%). Adverse events included abdominal pain in 24 (5%) and nausea/vomiting in 18 (4%). No SSE-related serious adverse events were identified. Following SSE, 405 (79%) were subsequently discharged, of which 15 (3.7%) returned to the ED for re-evaluation within 72 hours. SSE is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for the acute treatment of childhood fecal impaction in the ED setting.

  6. Prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen tests in children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Basu, Srikanta; Singh, Preeti; Kumar, Ruchika; Sharma, Lokesh; Kumar, Praveen

    2017-05-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen test in children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain. Children with chronic abdominal pain were examined and investigated for organic causes. All children without a known organic cause underwent lactose and glucose breath hydrogen test. After a standard dose of 2 g/kg of lactose to a maximum of 50 g, hydrogen in breath was measured at 15 min intervals for 3 h. A rise of 20 ppm above baseline was considered suggestive of lactose malabsorption. Of 108 children screened, organic causes were found in 46 children. Sixty-two patients without any organic cause underwent hydrogen breath test. Lactose hydrogen breath test (HBT) was positive in 36 of 62 (58%), while 11 (17%) had positive HBT with glucose suggestive of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Twenty out of 34 (59%) improved on lactose free diet while 8 out of 11 (72%) children of SIBO improved on antibiotics. Lactose malabsorption was seen in 58% of children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain.

  7. Towards remote assessment and screening of acute abdominal pain using only a smartphone with native accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David R; Weiss, Alexander; Rollins, Margo R; Lam, Wilbur A

    2017-10-06

    Smartphone-based telehealth holds the promise of shifting healthcare from the clinic to the home, but the inability for clinicians to conduct remote palpation, or touching, a key component of the physical exam, remains a major limitation. This is exemplified in the assessment of acute abdominal pain, in which a physician's palpation determines if a patient's pain is life-threatening requiring emergency intervention/surgery or due to some less-urgent cause. In a step towards virtual physical examinations, we developed and report for the first time a "touch-capable" mHealth technology that enables a patient's own hands to serve as remote surrogates for the physician's in the screening of acute abdominal pain. Leveraging only a smartphone with its native accelerometers, our system guides a patient through an exact probing motion that precisely matches the palpation motion set by the physician. An integrated feedback algorithm, with 95% sensitivity and specificity, enabled 81% of tested patients to match a physician abdominal palpation curve with work addresses a key issue in telehealth that will vastly improve its capabilities and adoption worldwide.

  8. An unusual cause of paediatric abdominal pain: Mesenteric masses accompanied with volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Xiang Ru; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Li, Chang Chun

    2016-07-01

    Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is rare and may result in serious consequences. This study aimed to better characterize volvulus caused by mesenteric masses in children. A retrospective study was conducted in 24 patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 1994 and January 2014 in one single institution. There were 10 boys and 14 girls. The most frequent findings were abdominal pain (100%), emesis (91.7%) and nausea (83.3%). Physical examination showed positive ileus signs in majority cases, and palpable mass was found in half of the patients. Ultrasound and CT scans revealed mesenteric masses in 21 and 24 patients, and 'whirlpool sign' was observed in 19 and 22 patients, respectively. Emergency laparotomy was performed in all patients. Histological examination revealed that 18 cystic masses were lymphangioma, 5 solid cases were lipoma and the remaining one was lipoblastoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in 22 patients, and postoperative obstruction and incision infection occurred in 2 patients. There was no evidence of recurrence at follow-up. Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is a rare but potentially life-threatening cause of abdominal pain, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of paediatric acute abdominal pain.

  9. Abdominal Pain in Dutch Schoolchildren: Relations With Physical and Psychological Comorbid Complaints in Children and Their Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Derkx, Hhf; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) frequently report comorbid complaints such as anxiety and activity limitations. Their parents often experience heightened levels of anxiety, depression, and somatization. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these comorbid

  10. Abdominal pain in Dutch schoolchildren: relationships with physical and psychological co-morbid complaints in children and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, S.M.C.; Derkx, H.H.F.; de Haan, E.; Benninga, M.A.; de Boer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) frequently report comorbid complaints such as anxiety and activity limitations. Their parents often experience heightened levels of anxiety, depression, and somatization. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these comorbid

  11. The Placebo Response in Pediatric Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Daniël R.; Zeevenhooven, Judith; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S.; Douwes Dekker, Iuke; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Vlieger, Arine M.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the magnitude and determinants of the placebo response in studies with pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for systematic reviews and randomized

  12. Evaluation of influence of stretching therapy and ergonomic factors on postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gawda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objectives. [/b]The vertical orientation of the body in the upright standing position is maintained by keeping the body’s centre of gravity (COG upright, above the base of support, by a dynamic interplay of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory control systems. The objectives of this study were: to compare the postural control strategy between people with and without low back pain (LBP, to estimate the influence of the stretching therapy on the postural control strategy, and to discover the relationship between the restriction of spine mobility and occurrence of some ergonomic factors. [b]Materials and methods.[/b] The study consisted of 32 patients with LBP and 25 healthy controls. Postural characteristics of the subjects were measured with the use of a computerized force platform. The software programme filters and measures COG sway velocity in different conditions. Additional measurements and tests were conducted in patients after stretching therapy. Based on survey research, all individuals were selected and evaluated from the aspect of ergonomics. [b]Results[/b]. The results of the COG sway velocity vary under the testing conditions. From the aspect of ergonomic attitude and influence of the rehabilitation, results varied in the groups. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Ergonomic factors are often accompanied by the appearance of LBP. The restrictions within the musculoskeletal system cause disorders in muscle synergies, which is expressed by an increase in the angular velocity of the COG. In patients with chronic back pain syndrome, selected stretching therapy techniques improves the range of motion of the spine and reduces pain.

  13. Validation of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Gesture Behavior Test for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain

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    Ricardo Furtado

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a Brazilian version of the gesture behavior test (GBT for patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Translation of GBT into Portuguese was performed by a rheumatologist fluent in the language of origin (French and skilled in the validation of questionnaires. This translated version was back-translated into French by a native-speaking teacher of the language. The two translators then created a final consensual version in Portuguese. Cultural adaptation was carried out by two rheumatologists, one educated patient and the native-speaking French teacher. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and fifteen healthcare professionals involved in the education of patients with low back pain through back schools (gold-standard were evaluated. Reproducibility was initially tested by two observers (inter-observer; the procedures were also videotaped for later evaluation by one of the observers (intra-observer. For construct validation, we compared patients' scores against the scores of the healthcare professionals. RESULTS: Modifications were made to the GBT for cultural reasons. The Spearman's correlation coefficient and the intra-class coefficient, which was employed to measure reproducibility, ranged between 0.87 and 0.99 and 0.94 to 0.99, respectively (p < 0.01. With regard to validation, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference (p < 0.01 between the averages for healthcare professionals (26.60; SD 2.79 and patients (16.30; SD 6.39. There was a positive correlation between the GBT score and the score on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (r= 0.47. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian version of the GBT proved to be a reproducible and valid instrument. In addition, according to the questionnaire results, more disabled patients exhibited more protective gesture behavior related to low-back.

  14. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

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    Kudaira Miwako

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS, and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS.

  15. A randomized controlled trial to compare pregabalin with gabapentin for postoperative pain in abdominal hysterectomy

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    Anju Ghai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregabalin is a potent ligand for alpha-2-delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system, which exhibits potent anticonvulsant, analgesic and anxiolytic activity. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar to that of gabapentin and shows possible advantages. Although it shows analgesic efficacy against neuropathic pain, very limited evidence supports its postoperative analgesic efficacy. We investigated its analgesic efficacy in patients experiencing acute pain after abdominal hysterectomy and compared it with gabapentin and placebo. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 90 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy who were anaesthetized in a standardized fashion. Patients received 300 mg pregabalin, 900 mg gabapentin or placebo, 1-2 hours prior to surgery. Postoperative analgesia was administered at visual analogue scale (VAS ≥3. The primary outcome was analgesic consumption over 24 hours and patients were followed for pain scores, time to rescue analgesia and side effects as secondary outcomes. Results: The diclofenac consumption was statistically significant between pregabalin and control groups, and gabapentin and control groups; however, pregabalin and gabapentin groups were comparable. Moreover, the consumption of tramadol was statistically significant among all the groups. Patients in pregabalin and gabapentin groups had lower pain scores in the initial hour of recovery. However, pain scores were subsequently similar in all the groups. Time to first request for analgesia was longer in pregabalin group followed by gabapentin and control groups. Conclusion: A single dose of 300 mg pregabalin given 1-2 hours prior to surgery is superior to 900 mg gabapentin and placebo after abdominal hysterectomy. Both the drugs are better than placebo.

  16. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.S. Montenegro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 diferent days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test. There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  17. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, M L L S; Braz, C A; Mateus-Vasconcelos, E L; Rosa-e-Silva, J C; Candido-dos-Reis, F J; Nogueira, A A; Poli-Neto, O B

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years) were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days) and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 different days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test). There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women.

  18. Social learning pathways in the relation between parental chronic pain and daily pain severity and functional impairment in adolescents with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Smith, Craig A; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S

    2017-10-06

    Having a parent with chronic pain (CP) may confer greater risk for persistence of CP from childhood into young adulthood. Social learning, such as parental modeling and reinforcement, represents one plausible mechanism for the transmission of risk for CP from parents to offspring. Based on a 7-day pain diary in 154 pediatric patients with functional abdominal CP, we tested a model in which parental CP predicted adolescents' daily average CP severity and functional impairment (distal outcomes) via parental modeling of pain behaviors and parental reinforcement of adolescent's pain behaviors (mediators) and adolescents' cognitive appraisals of pain threat (proximal outcome representing adolescents' encoding of parents' behaviors). Results indicated significant indirect pathways from parental CP status to adolescent average daily pain severity (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.31, p = 0.03) and functional impairment (b = 0.08, SE = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.02, 0.15, p = 0.03) over the 7-day diary period via adolescents' observations of parent pain behaviors and adolescent pain threat appraisal. The indirect pathway through parental reinforcing responses to adolescents' pain did not reach significance for either adolescent pain severity or functional impairment. Identifying mechanisms of increased risk for pain and functional impairment in children of parents with CP ultimately could lead to targeted interventions aimed at improving functioning and quality of life in families with chronic pain. Parental modeling of pain behaviors represents a potentially promising target for family based interventions to ameliorate pediatric chronic pain.

  19. Neural circuitry of abdominal pain-related fear learning and reinstatement in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icenhour, A; Langhorst, J; Benson, S; Schlamann, M; Hampel, S; Engler, H; Forsting, M; Elsenbruch, S

    2015-01-01

    Altered pain anticipation likely contributes to disturbed central pain processing in chronic pain conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the learning processes shaping the expectation of pain remain poorly understood. We assessed the neural circuitry mediating the formation, extinction, and reactivation of abdominal pain-related memories in IBS patients compared to healthy controls (HC) in a differential fear conditioning paradigm. During fear acquisition, predictive visual cues (CS(+)) were paired with rectal distensions (US), while control cues (CS(-)) were presented unpaired. During extinction, only CSs were presented. Subsequently, memory reactivation was assessed with a reinstatement procedure involving unexpected USs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, group differences in neural activation to CS(+) vs CS(-) were analyzed, along with skin conductance responses (SCR), CS valence, CS-US contingency, state anxiety, salivary cortisol, and alpha-amylase activity. The contribution of anxiety symptoms was addressed in covariance analyses. Fear acquisition was altered in IBS, as indicated by more accurate contingency awareness, greater CS-related valence change, and enhanced CS(+)-induced differential activation of prefrontal cortex and amygdala. IBS patients further revealed enhanced differential cingulate activation during extinction and greater differential hippocampal activation during reinstatement. Anxiety affected neural responses during memory formation and reinstatement. Abdominal pain-related fear learning and memory processes are altered in IBS, mediated by amygdala, cingulate cortex, prefrontal areas, and hippocampus. Enhanced reinstatement may contribute to hypervigilance and central pain amplification, especially in anxious patients. Preventing a 'relapse' of learned fear utilizing extinction-based interventions may be a promising treatment goal in IBS. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Elderly female with acute abdominal pain presenting with Superior Mesenteric Artery Thrombus

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    Sassan Ghassemzadeh, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 80-year-old female with history of hypertension and atrial fibrillation, presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain after eating at a restaurant. The patient denied any fever, vomiting or diarrhea. She admitted to being noncompliant with medications including warfarin. Initial vital signs were within normal limits. On exam, the patient was very uncomfortable and could not lay still in bed, even after multiple doses of intravenous narcotic pain medications. The patient had generalized abdominal tenderness without rebound or guarding. Labs revealed a white-blood-cell count of 13.8, lactic acid of 3.6, and international normalized ratio (INR of 1.1, with normal renal function. Significant findings: Computed tomography (CT angiogram of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a superior mesenteric artery (SMA thrombosis 5 cm from the origin off of the abdominal aorta. As seen in the sagittal view, there does not appear to be any contrast 5 cm past the origin of the SMA. On the axial views, you can trace the SMA until the point that there is no longer any contrast visible which indicates the start of the thrombus. The SMA does not appear to be reconstituted. There was normal flow to the celiac artery. (See annotated images. Discussion: This case involves a classic presentation of acute mesenteric ischemia, which is defined as the sudden onset of abdominal pain due to small intestinal hypo-perfusion secondary to reduction or complete occlusion of arterial blood flow to the intestines. The most common artery affected is the SMA. The main two reasons for this phenomenon are either due to an arterial embolus or from arterial thrombus from underlying atherosclerosis. The ratio of superior mesenteric embolus to thrombus has been shown to be 1.4:1.1 Embolism to the mesenteric arteries is most frequently from a thrombus that breaks off from the left atrium, left ventricle, or proximal aorta, as in this case from underlying atrial

  1. Quantifying the usefulness of CT in evaluating seniors with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Lawrence M.; Klippel, Allen P.; Bavolek, Rebecca A.; Ross, Laura M.; Scherer, Tara M.; Banet, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: (1) Determine if older patients with abdominal pain who receive emergency department (ED) abdominal CT have changes in diagnosis and/or disposition more often than similar patients without CT; (2) compare physician confidence in diagnosis and disposition for patients with versus without CT; (3) document factors that most influence physician's decision to order abdominal CT in this population. Methods: ED patients 60 years of age or older, with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain were enrolled over a 6-week period. Physicians documented a preliminary and final ED diagnosis and disposition, along with pre- and post-evaluation confidence levels. Decision to order CT, along with clinical information most influencing that decision, was noted. Physician confidence levels and percent change in diagnosis and disposition were compared for patients with versus without CT. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients comprised study sample. Abdominal CT rate was 59% (95%CI, 50-67%). CT was associated with an increased change in diagnosis (46%; 95%CI, 4-58% versus 29%; 95%CI, 16-42%), but no change in disposition between patients with versus without CT. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower for EPs who ordered a CT than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Patient history most influenced ordering CT, whereas prior lab/imaging results most influenced not ordering CT. Conclusion: Patients with CT had a change in diagnosis more often than those without. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower in CT group. Percent change in disposition did not differ between groups. Physicians most often ordered CT based on history and did not order CT when other diagnostic evaluation supported a specific diagnosis

  2. Estudo prospectivo de pacientes pediátricos com dor abdominal crônica Prospective study of infants with chronic abdominal pain

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    Tatiana Kores Dorsa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Classificar a dor abdominal crônica em crianças e adolescentes por meio dos critérios de Roma II e definir o desfecho diagnóstico em três anos de seguimento. MÉTODOS: Durante um ano, 71 pacientes com dor abdominal crônica foram atendidos como casos novos num ambulatório terciário de gastroenterologia pediátrica. Causas orgânicas foram excluídas por bases clínicas e laboratoriais, e relatos clínicos foram avaliados especificamente quanto à possibilidade de preencherem os Critérios de Roma II para dor abdominal em crianças. Para estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo, os pacientes foram seguidos por três anos, em média. RESULTADOS: A alocação dos 71 pacientes segundo Roma II foi: doença orgânica (n=12, remissão dos sintomas após a primeira consulta (n=7, ou preencheram os critérios para dor funcional (n=52. Dos 12 pacientes de doença orgânica, nove foram diagnosticados como intolerantes à lactose, mas foram re-alocados para doença funcional no seguimento, visto que a dieta de isenção não aliviou a queixa. Dos 52 pacientes com doença funcional (idade mediana=9,3 anos, 50% meninos, nove, que inicialmente preencheram o critério para dor abdominal funcional, foram re-alocados no diagnóstico de constipação funcional e 43 mantiveram o diagnóstico funcional: 24 com dispepsia funcional, 18 com dor abdominal funcional e um com síndrome do intestino irritável. CONCLUSÕES: Dentre os casos de dor abdominal crônica, a dor do tipo funcional foi mais comum que as causas orgânicas e, dentre os seus subgrupos, a dispepsia funcional foi mais freqüente. O seguimento em longo prazo permitiu estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo da origem da dor abdominal nessas crianças.OBJECTIVE: To classify chronic abdominal pain in children and adolescents, according to Rome II criteria and to define diagnosis outcome in a three-year follow-up period. METHODS: During one year, 71 consecutive new patients with abdominal pain

  3. The prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain in 11- to 16-year-old Malaysian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C; Yap, S; Goh, K L

    2000-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) among Malaysian school children aged from 11 to 16 years. A preliminary cross-sectional survey in which three urban schools and three rural schools were selected randomly. Two classes were selected randomly from each year. A questionnaire was given to each child asking him or her about whether they had experienced abdominal pain occurring at least three times over a period of at least 3 months, interfering with normal daily activity. 1 Interfering with normal daily activity was defined as missing school and/or having to stop doing a routine daily activity on account of the pain. Girls whose pains were related to periods were excluded. After the forms had been completed, each child was again interviewed to ensure that Apley's criteria1 was fulfilled in cases of RAP. The overall prevalence of RAP among 1549 schoolchildren (764 boys; 785 girls) was 10.2% (95% confidence interval (CI), 8.8-11.8). There appeared to be a higher prevalence in rural schoolchildren (P = 0.008; odds ratio (OR) 1.58), in those with a lower family income (P family size. : In spite of differences in time and culture, the overall prevalence of 10.2% found in this study is similar to that determined by Apley.1 There are significant differences in the prevalence of RAP between children from rural and urban schools, among children with different family incomes and among children whose parents have different educational backgrounds.

  4. Psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Moaiedy, Farah; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Askani, Hamid; Haghighat, Mahmood; Dehbozorgi, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2008-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder. There is a heightened risk when conducting potentially dangerous and unnecessary medical investigations and procedures in children with FAPS. The aim of this study was to survey the rate of the psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with FAPS. The subjects were a consecutive new sample of 45 children and adolescents with FAPS, 45 with an organic abdominal pain, and 45 pain-free comparison subjects aged 5-18 years that were interviewed using the Farsi version of K-SADS. Family functioning and the severity of pain were also studied. About 51.1% of patients with FAPS suffered from at least one psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric disorders in the FAPS patients studied included general anxiety disorder (8.9%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (11.1%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (15.6%), separation anxiety disorder (24.4%), and major depressive disorder (15.6%). Except for generalized anxiety disorder and tic disorder, the other disorders were significantly more common in the FAPS group than in the two other control groups. Family functioning scores were not significantly different between groups. There is a high rate of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with FAPS in Iran, but our study found fewer incidences of disorders than previous reports have indicated. Family dysfunction difficulties in FAPS children are not more common than those in the control groups.

  5. Red flags in children with chronic abdominal pain and Crohn's disease-a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chammas, Khalil; Majeskie, Angela; Simpson, Pippa; Sood, Manu; Miranda, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    To compare history and symptoms at initial presentation of patients with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and Crohn's disease (CD). Red flags are used to help determine which patients with CAP are likely to have an underlying disease such as CD. However, red flags have not been validated and pediatric studies are lacking. Patients seen in the outpatient Pediatric Gastroenterology Clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin between 2005 and 2008 prospectively completed a demographic, history, and symptom questionnaire. Patients with abdominal pain for at least 1 month and no evidence of organic disease were compared with patients diagnosed with CD confirmed by mucosal biopsies. Data were collected on 606 patients (128 with CD and 478 with functional gastrointestinal disorders). Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders had more stressors (P pain were no different between groups. Anemia, hematochezia, and weight loss were most predictive of CD (cumulative sensitivity of 94%). The presence of anemia, hematochezia, and weight loss help identify patients with CAP who require further work-up and referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist. Furthermore, waking from sleep or joint pain occurred similarly between groups and should not be considered as "red flags." Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  6. Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Nancy; Mauro, Christian; Craske, Michelle; Wagner, H Ryan; Datta, Nandini; Hopkins, Hannah; Caldwell, Kristen; Kiridly, Adam; Marsan, Samuel; Maslow, Gary; Mayer, Emeran; Egger, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral treatments for FAP target primarily older children (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger, emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments. Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents" - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated sensations through exercises that provoked somatic experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71 for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total pain: X 2 (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen somatic fear generally. NCT02075437. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CPDX (Chest Pain Diagnostic Program) - A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-25

    pain: appendicitis; renal colic; perforated duodenal ulcer ; acute cholecystitis; small bowel obstruction; and non-specific abdominal pain, This...psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and costochrondritis denote muscle, rib, or cartilage...hyperventilation syndrome; f) psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and the

  8. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention.

  9. An 88-Year-Old Man with Sudden Onset Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Manouchehrifar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An 88-year-old man presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of abdominal pain since 6 hours before. He was a known case of chronic renal failure that underwent hemodialysis three times a week. He also suffered from hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The patients’ on-arrival vital signs were as follows: systolic blood pressure: 100/60 mmHg, pulse rate: 88/minute, respiratory rate: 25/minute, oral temperature: 36◦C, oxygen saturation 93% in room air.  He had severely ill appearance on admission. Distended abdomen was considerable but had normal bowel sound and clearly, pain was disproportionate to physical examination. His electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm and venous blood gas analysis revealed the following: pH=6.96, PaCO2=49 mmHg, HCO3=11 mEq/L, Base excess= -20.  The bedside ultrasonography showed echogenic particles in hepatic parenchyma and same findings that were passing through the portal vein. Chest and abdominal X-rays were reported as normal. The patient underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT scan with oral contrast.What is your diagnosis?

  10. Non-pharmacological management of abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Basude, Dharamveer

    2016-11-01

    Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) comprises of 4 main conditions: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal migraine and functional abdominal pain. AP-FGIDs are diagnosed clinically based on the Rome IV criteria for FGIDs of childhood. There is limited evidence for pharmacological therapies. This review article discusses nonpharmacological management of AP-FGID based on the current literature including systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort and case control studies. We aim to provide a comprehensive overview on the available evidence for the pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists involved in managing children with AP-FGID. Managing AP-FGIDs can be challenging. This should follow a stepwise approach with focused history, identification of "red flag" signs and symptoms, physical examination and investigations done following initial consultation. Family needs explaining that there is nothing seriously wrong with the child's abdomen. This explanation and reassurance can achieve symptom control in large number of cases. Non-pharmacological interventions are delivered through lifestyle and dietary changes and bio-psychosocial therapies. Dietary interventions vary depending on the type of AP-FGID. Bio-psychosocial therapies such as hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and yoga aim at stress reduction. There is increasing evidence for use of non-pharmacological interventions in children with APFGID.

  11. Acute abdominal pain as the only symptom of a thoracic demyelinating lesion in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shohei; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Fukui, Miho; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a syndrome characterized by complex neurological symptoms resulting from demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system. We report a child with a relapse of MS whose only presenting symptom was severe abdominal pain. Dysfunctional intestinal mobility was assessed by abdominal computed tomography. Findings resembled paralytic ileus resulting from peritonitis. However, the patient demonstrated no other symptoms of peritonitis. A T2-weighted magnetic resonance image revealed a new demyelinating lesion localized to thoracic segments T4-T12. The lesion presumably affected autonomic efferents involved in intestinal mobility. Treatment with a pulse of methylprednisolone reduced both abdominal pain and lesion size. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a pediatric MS patient with a demyelinating lesion associated with an autonomic symptom of altered intestinal mobility in the absence of neurological symptoms. This atypical presentation of MS highlights the need for physicians' vigilance when treating this patient population. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of measurement properties of self-administered PROMs aimed at patients with non-specific shoulder pain and "activity limitations": a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoomes-de Graaf, M; Scholten-Peeters, G G M; Schellingerhout, J M; Bourne, A M; Buchbinder, R; Koehorst, M; Terwee, C B; Verhagen, A P

    2016-09-01

    To critically appraise and compare the measurement properties of self-administered patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) focussing on the shoulder, assessing "activity limitations." Systematic review. The study population had to consist of patients with shoulder pain. We excluded postoperative patients or patients with generic diseases. The methodological quality of the selected studies and the results of the measurement properties were critically appraised and rated using the COSMIN checklist. Out of a total of 3427 unique hits, 31 articles, evaluating 7 different questionnaires, were included. The SPADI is the most frequently evaluated PROM and its measurement properties seem adequate apart from a lack of information regarding its measurement error and content validity. For English, Norwegian and Turkish users, we recommend to use the SPADI. Dutch users could use either the SDQ or the SST. In German, we recommend the DASH. In Tamil, Slovene, Spanish and the Danish languages, the evaluated PROMs were not yet of acceptable validity. None of these PROMs showed strong positive evidence for all measurement properties. We propose to develop a new shoulder PROM focused on activity limitations, taking new knowledge and techniques into account.

  13. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to the Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Visceral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Patrizi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic abdominal visceral pain (CAVP has a significant clinical impact and represents one of the most frequent and debilitating disorders in the general population. It also leads to a significant economic burden due to workdays lost, reduced productivity, and long-term use of medications with their associated side effects. Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, the management of patients with CAVP is often inadequate, resulting in frustration for both patients and physicians. This may in part be explained by the lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain; in contrast with acute pain in which the pathophysiology is relatively well known and has several satisfactory therapeutic options. Recently, the development of tools for brain investigation, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided new insights on the pathophysiology of chronic pain. These new data have shown that plastic changes in the central and peripheral nervous system might play an important role in the maintenance of chronic pain. Therefore, approaches aimed at the modulation of the nervous system, rather than the ones interfering with the inflammatory pathways, may be more effective for chronic pain treatment. We propose that noninvasive central nervous system stimulation, with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, might be a novel therapeutic option for CAVP. This paper will present an overview of the pathophysiology and the available therapies for CAVP, focusing on the recent advances in the treatment of this pathology.

  14. Association of race and ethnicity with management of abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tiffani J; Weaver, Matthew D; Borrero, Sonya; Davis, Esa M; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Kraemer, Kevin L

    2013-10-01

    To determine if race/ethnicity-based differences exist in the management of pediatric abdominal pain in emergency departments (EDs). Secondary analysis of data from the 2006-2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey regarding 2298 visits by patients ≤ 21 years old who presented to EDs with abdominal pain. Main outcomes were documentation of pain score and receipt of any analgesics, analgesics for severe pain (defined as ≥ 7 on a 10-point scale), and narcotic analgesics. Secondary outcomes included diagnostic tests obtained, length of stay (LOS), 72-hour return visits, and admission. Of patient visits, 70.1% were female, 52.6% were from non-Hispanic white, 23.5% were from non-Hispanic black, 20.6% were from Hispanic, and 3.3% were from "other" racial/ethnic groups; patients' mean age was 14.5 years. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for confounders revealed that non-Hispanic black patients were less likely to receive any analgesic (odds ratio [OR]: 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.87) or a narcotic analgesic (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18-0.81) than non-Hispanic white patients (referent group). This finding was also true for non-Hispanic black and "other" race/ethnicity patients with severe pain (ORs [95% CI]: 0.43 [0.22-0.87] and 0.02 [0.00-0.19], respectively). Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic patients were more likely to have a prolonged LOS than non-Hispanic white patients (ORs [95% CI]: 1.68 [1.13-2.51] and 1.64 [1.09-2.47], respectively). No significant race/ethnicity-based disparities were identified in documentation of pain score, use of diagnostic procedures, 72-hour return visits, or hospital admissions. Race/ethnicity-based disparities exist in ED analgesic use and LOS for pediatric abdominal pain. Recognizing these disparities may help investigators eliminate inequalities in care.

  15. Reliability of Measuring Lumbar Lordosis, Flexion and Extension Using Dual Inclinometer in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Garmabi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Accurate assessment of lumbar range of motion is of great value for both evaluating lumbar functions and monitoring treatment progress. Recent research indicates that there is no general consensus on the most valid and reliable method of measuring spinal range of motion. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-rater reliability of lumbar flexion and extension measurements (within-day and between-days using the dual inclinometer technique.   Materials & Methods: Lumbar flexion and extension of 22 women (14 healthy and 8 with low back pain, were measured by the same examiner on three occasions. The first two measurements were taken with half an hour apart on the first occasion to assess the within-day reliability and the third measurement was taken one week later to assess the between-days reliability.  Results: Within-day lumbar lordosis, flexion and extension measurements using dual inclinometer technique were shown to be very reliable with high Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC values (ICC were 98%, 77% and 69% for lordosis, flexion and extension measurements, respectively in healthy subjects and 94%, 95% and 69% for lordosis, flexion and extension measurements, respectively in patients group. Between-Days measurements also demonstrated high reliability with the high values of ICC (ICC were 96%, 70% and 67% for lordosis, flexion and extension measurements, in healthy subjects and 91%, 71% and 66% for lordosis, flexion and extension measurements, respectively in patients group. Conclusion: The results indicated that, the dual inclinometer technique appears to be a highly reliable method for measuring lumbar lordosis, flexion and extension and can be used as a reliable tool in the assessment of lumbar range of motion and monitoring therapeutic interventions.

  16. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  17. 10-Year-Old Female with Acute Abdominal Pain with Pancreatic Mass

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    Charles K. Powers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 10-year-old female presented to a local emergency department following three days of nausea and vomiting diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumor. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are a rare form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm that typically presents in young females in their 20–30s and are very rare in children. These neoplasms often present as an asymptomatic tumor found on incidental imaging. When symptomatic they most commonly present with abdominal pain and can also cause a palpable abdominal mass, weight loss, gastrointestinal obstruction, and nausea and vomiting. Timely diagnosis of this rare neoplasm is very important because complete resection of the tumor is the definitive treatment and leads to an excellent long-term survival.

  18. Effects of behavioural exercise therapy on the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation for chronic non-specific low back pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Jana; Peters, Stefan; Geidl, Wolfgang; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2013-03-11

    In Germany, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation named "behavioural medical rehabilitation" (BMR) is available for treatment of chronic low back pain (clbp). A central component of BMR is standard exercise therapy (SET), which is directed mainly to improve physical fitness. There is a need to address psychosocial factors within SET and therefore to improve behavior change with a focus on the development of self-management skills in dealing with clbp. Furthermore, short-term effectiveness of BMR with a SET has been proven, but the impact of a behavioural exercise therapy (BET) for improvement of the long-term effectiveness of BMR is unclear. To compare the effectiveness of two exercise programs with different approaches within BMR on the effects of BMR a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) in two rehabilitation centres will be performed. 214 patients aged 18-65 with clbp will be, based on an "urn randomisation"-algorithm, randomly assigned to a BMR with SET (function-oriented, n=107) and BMR with BET (behaviour-oriented, n=107). Both exercise programs have a mean duration of 26 hours in three weeks and are delivered by a limited number of not-blinded study therapists in closed groups with six to twelve patients who will be masked regarding study group. The main differences of BET lie in its detailed manualised program with a theory-based, goal-orientated combination of exercise, education and behavioural elements, active participation of patients and consideration of their individual preferences and previous experiences with exercise. The primary outcome is functional ability assessed with the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire directly before and after the rehabilitation program, as well as a six and twelve-month follow-up. This RCT is designed to explore the effects of BET on the effectiveness of a BMR compared to a BMR with SET in the management of patients with clbp. Methodological challenges arise from conducting a RCT within routine health care

  19. Brief hypnotherapeutic-behavioral intervention for functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in childhood: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewitsch, Marco Daniel; Müller, Judith; Hautzinger, Martin; Schlarb, Angelika Anita

    2013-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome are two prevalent disorders in childhood which are associated with recurrent or chronic abdominal pain, disabilities in daily functioning, and reduced quality of life. This study aimed to evaluate a brief hypnotherapeutic-behavioral intervention program in a prospective randomized controlled design. Thirty-eight children, 6 to 12 years of age, and their parents were randomly assigned to a standardized hypnotherapeutic-behavioral treatment (n = 20) or to a waiting list condition (n = 18). Both groups were reassessed 3 months after beginning. Primary outcome variables were child-completed pain measures and pain-related disability. Secondary outcome variables were parent-completed measures of their children's pain and pain-related disability. Health-related quality of life from both perspectives also served as a secondary outcome. In the treatment group, 11 of 20 children (55.0%) showed clinical remission (>80% improvement), whereas only one child (5.6%) in the waiting list condition was classified as responder. Children in the treatment group reported a significantly greater reduction of pain scores and pain-related disability than children of the waiting list condition. Parental ratings also showed a greater reduction of children's abdominal pain and pain-related disability. Health-related quality of life did not increase significantly. Hypnotherapeutic and behavioral interventions are effective in treating children with long-standing AP. Treatment success of this brief program should be further evaluated against active interventions with a longer follow-up.

  20. Health outcomes in US children with abdominal pain at major emergency departments associated with race and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K T

    2015-01-01

    Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children's hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 - 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 - 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery.

  1. Abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 27. MacGilchrist A, Iredale J, ... eds. Macleod's Clinical Examination . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 8. McQuaid KR. Approach to the ...

  2. Diagnostic errors related to acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura; Park, Elizabeth; Shlamovitz, Gil; Suliburk, James; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic errors in the emergency department (ED) are harmful and costly. We reviewed a selected high-risk cohort of patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain to evaluate for possible diagnostic errors and associated process breakdowns. We conducted a retrospective chart review of ED patients >18 years at an urban academic hospital. A computerised 'trigger' algorithm identified patients possibly at high risk for diagnostic errors to facilitate selective record reviews. The trigger determined patients to be at high risk because they: (1) presented to the ED with abdominal pain, and were discharged home and (2) had a return ED visit within 10 days that led to a hospitalisation. Diagnostic errors were defined as missed opportunities to make a correct or timely diagnosis based on the evidence available during the first ED visit, regardless of patient harm, and included errors that involved both ED and non-ED providers. Errors were determined by two independent record reviewers followed by team consensus in cases of disagreement. Diagnostic errors occurred in 35 of 100 high-risk cases. Over two-thirds had breakdowns involving the patient-provider encounter (most commonly history-taking or ordering additional tests) and/or follow-up and tracking of diagnostic information (most commonly follow-up of abnormal test results). The most frequently missed diagnoses were gallbladder pathology (n=10) and urinary infections (n=5). Diagnostic process breakdowns in ED patients with abdominal pain most commonly involved history-taking, ordering insufficient tests in the patient-provider encounter and problems with follow-up of abnormal test results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of surgeons and trainees in assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain in the emergency ward is not adequate. It has been argued that this is because the investigations are carried out predominantly by a trainee. Resource utilization could be lowered if surgeons had a higher initial diagnostic accuracy. Patients with acute abdominal pain were included in a prospective cohort study. A surgical trainee and a surgeon made independent assessments in the emergency department, recording the clinical diagnosis and proposed diagnostic investigations. A reference standard diagnosis was established by an expert panel, and the proportion of correct diagnoses was calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was expressed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis and elements of history-taking and physical examination were expressed by means of Cohen's κ. Certainty of diagnosis was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A trainee and a surgeon independently assessed 126 patients. Trainees made a correct diagnosis in 44·4 per cent of patients and surgeons in 42·9 per cent (P = 0·839). Surgeons, however, recorded a higher level of diagnostic certainty. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable in distinguishing urgent from non-urgent diagnoses, and for the most common diseases. Interobserver agreement for the clinical diagnosis varied from fair to moderate (κ = 0·28-0·57). The diagnostic accuracy of the initial clinical assessment is not improved when a surgeon rather than a surgical trainee assesses a patient with abdominal pain in the emergency department. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The diagnostic role of US in patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain

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    Lee, Sheen Woo; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Baek, Seung Yon; Kang, Byung Chul; Lee, Sun Wha [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To determine the frequency with which ultrasonography (US) provides a correct diagnosis and suggests appropriate guidance for the treatment of patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. During an 11-month period, US was consecutively performed in 84 patients who were presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. In the 76 [M:F = 16:60, age range 14-87 (mean, 41) years] who formed the study population, final diagnoses were made surgically or clinically. For US, a 5-7-MHz convex-array, 4-MHz vector-array, and/or 7-MHz linear-array transducer was used, according to the patient's body habitus. To determine how often our US reports had provided a correct diagnosis and suggested appropriate guidance for surgical or medical treatment, and to calculate their diagnostic value, the reports were retrospectively compared with final diagnoses. US diagnoses were acute appendicitis in 40 patients (53%), diseases other than this in 25 patients (33%), and no abnormality in 11 (14%). In 38 of the 40 patients (95%), the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was surgically confirmed as correct, and for other diseases, diagnoses based on the findings of US proved to be correct in 21 of 25 patients (84%). Overall, diagnoses was correct in 67 (88%). As regards appropriate guidance for treatment, 46 (61%) and 30 (39%) patients were diagnosed by US to have surgical and medical diseases, respectively. In 44 of the 46 (96%), it was confirmed guidance was appropriate, and for the 30 with medical disease, this was so in all but one case (97%). Overall, the treatment plan was appropriate in 72 patients (95%). Our study revealed that US was able to provide a correct diagnosis in 88% of patients with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, and in 95% of these, the treatment plan suggested was appropriate. US is, therefore, a valuable screening tool in the diagnosis and therapeutic guidance of such patients.

  5. Children in pain: recurrent back pain, abdominal pain, and headache in children and adolescents in a four-year-period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gessel, Hester; Gassmann, Jennifer; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2011-06-01

    To analyze the development of recurrent pain in 3 body locations in children and adolescents (baseline age, 9 to 14 years) in a 4-year period. In a large population-based longitudinal epidemiological study data was collected through annual postal questionnaires (longitudinal, n = 2025). Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used. Girls were more likely to report recurrent pain, demonstrated a steeper development during the 4-year period, and reported multiple pain more often than boys. Younger children reported less recurrent pain, but displayed a steeper trend of increasing prevalence rates as they grew older. Older children illustrated a more stable development of recurrent pain and reported multiple pain more often. Disability experienced because of recurrent pain was related strongest to pain intensity. Stable patterns of pain were related to higher intensity and disability reports. The children experienced headache as the most disabling of the 3 pains. The results show that boys and girls report recurrent pain in different patterns in the years. To identify risk factors, analysis should be performed separately for boys and girls. Furthermore, it is recommended to include children before the age of 9 years in a prevention study. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between abdominal muscle activity and pain, disability and fear of movement during standing postural tasks in females with chronic nonspecific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ehsani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It appears that the level of fear of movement changes deep trunk muscle activity in the patients with low back pain (LBP. There is no study to investigate the relationship between deep trunk muscle activity and fear of movement in the patients with LBP. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between abdominal muscle activity and pain, disability and fear of movement during standing postural tasks in females with chronic nonspecific LBP. Materials and Methods: Forty four females participated were asked to maintain their balance during standing on the platform stability levels of Biodex Balance System (BBS. Concurrently, ultrasonography (US data about abdominal muscles thickness measurement were transferred and saved to process offline. The pain intensity, disability and fear of movement were assessed by valid scales and questionnaire. Results: There was not significant correlation between abdominal muscle thickness changes and pain and disability intensity (P>0.05, while significant and inverse correlation between deep abdominal muscle thickness changes and fear of movement was observed in the patients (P<0.05, although this correlation is weak (r= -0.36- -0.32. Conclusion: It seems that increases in fear of movement decrease significantly deep abdominal muscles activity in the patients with LBP. This relationship demonstrates the importance of cognitive behavioral therapy and controlling fear of movement on improvement of deep abdominal muscle activity in the patients with LBP

  7. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. 73-year-old woman with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a six-day history of abdominal pain that had started in the epigastrium, but recently had become more intense in the right lower quadrant. Peptic ulcer had been diagnosed three years prior to presentation and had been managed medically. On physical examination, epigastric tenderness as well as guarding and rebound tenderness in the right lower quandrant were present. Mild leukocytosis was reported. Computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm retrocecal mass with low attenuation (fluid content) surrounded by an irregularly thickened uncalcified wall. Multiple areas of tissue debris were seen extending into the mass, but no true separation was present

  9. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility.

  10. The Effect of Stabilization Exercises on Objective Outcome Measures in Patients with Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review with Particular Emphasis On Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ehsani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common and costly health problems. Changes in muscle activity and recruitment of lumbar deep muscles which are responsible for lumbar spine stability have been reported in patients with LBP. Different exercise programs are used in the treatment of such patients to improve spinal stability. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effect of stabilization exercises on objective outcome measures in patients with non-specific chronic LBP in previous randomized controlled trials. Materials & Methods: A literature search for the period of 2000-2012 was performed, using MEDLINE, PubMed, Google scholar, Science Direct, OVID and CINAHL databases. Low back pain, stabilization exercise, motor control exercise, segmental stabilization, transverse abdominis muscle, multifidus muscle, electromyography, ultrasound, ultrasonography, and randomized controlled trial were used as keywords. Muscle recruitment, postural balance control, muscle endurance, muscle size and lumbar range of motion were studied as objective outcome measures.  Results: In total, of 158 articles, 13 articles were selected according to the inclusion criteria of the study. There was a wide variation among studies in terms of methodology, main outcome measures, sample size, procedure, etc. The results demonstrated that stabilization exercise was more effective than other interventions on activity pattern of deep muscles, postural balance control, muscle endurance and range of motion, while it was not significantly different with other interventions on deep muscle size.  Conclusion: It seems that stabilization exercise has considerable effect on activity pattern of deep muscles, postural control, muscle endurance and range of moti