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Sample records for non-selective opioid antagonist

  1. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse.

  2. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  3. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  4. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration.

  5. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Cor A J; Laheij, Robert J F; Krabbe, Paul F M

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  6. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  7. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  8. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  9. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  10. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  11. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. Spear

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US. In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors.

  12. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists as treatment options for constipation in noncancer pain patients on chronic opioid therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B; Pappagallo, Marco; Fleischer, Charles; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Duval, Elizabeth; Hishmeh, Janan; LeQuang, Jo Ann; Taylor, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC), a prevalent and distressing side effect of opioid therapy, does not reliably respond to treatment with conventional laxatives. OIC can be a treatment-limiting adverse event. Recent advances in medications with peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists, such as methylnaltrexone, naloxegol, and alvimopan, hold promise for treating OIC and thus extending the benefits of opioid analgesia to more chronic pain patients. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists have been clinically tested to improve bowel symptoms without compromise to pain relief, although there are associated side effects, including abdominal pain. Other treatment options include fixed-dose combination products of oxycodone analgesic together with naloxone. PMID:28176913

  13. Antagonists of toll like receptor 4 maybe a new strategy to counteract opioid-induced hyperalgesia and opioid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Long term opioid treatment results in hyperalgesia and tolerance, which is a troublesome phenomenon in clinic application. Recent studies have revealed a critical role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the neuropathological process of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance. TLR4 is predominantly expressed by microglial cells and is a key modulator in the activation of the innate immune system. Activation of TLR4 may initiate the activation of microglia and hence a number of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators that could enhance neuronal excitability are released. Blockade of TLR4 activation by its antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone, which were also demonstrated to be TLR4 antagonist, may have clinic application value in attenuation of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance.

  14. The incentive amplifying effects of nicotine are reduced by selective and non-selective dopamine antagonists in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Kellicut, Marissa R; Brianna Sheppard, A; Brown, Russell W; Robinson, Donita L

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine is a psychomotor stimulant with 'reinforcement enhancing' effects--the actions of nicotine in the brain increase responding for non-nicotine rewards. We hypothesized that this latter effect of nicotine depends on increased incentive properties of anticipatory cues; consistent with this hypothesis, multiple laboratories have reported that nicotine increases sign tracking, i.e. approach to a conditioned stimulus (CS), in Pavlovian conditioned-approach tasks. Incentive motivation and sign tracking are mediated by mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission and nicotine facilitates mesolimbic DA release. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incentive-promoting effects of nicotine would be impaired by DA antagonists. To test this hypothesis, separate groups of rats were injected with nicotine (0.4mg/kg base) or saline prior to Pavlovian conditioning sessions in which a CS (30s illumination of a light or presentation of a lever) was immediately followed by a sweet reward delivered in an adjacent location. Both saline and nicotine pretreated rats exhibited similar levels of conditioned approach to the reward location (goal tracking), but nicotine pretreatment significantly increased approach to the CS (sign tracking), regardless of type (lever or light). The DAD1 antagonist SCH-23390 and the DAD2/3 antagonist eticlopride reduced conditioned approach in all rats, but specifically reduced goal tracking in the saline pretreated rats and sign tracking in the nicotine pretreated rats. The non-selective DA antagonist flupenthixol reduced sign-tracking in nicotine rats at all doses tested; however, only the highest dose of flupenthixol reduced goal tracking in both nicotine and saline groups. The reductions in conditioned approach behavior, especially those by SCH-23390, were dissociated from simple motor suppressant effects of the antagonists. These experiments are the first to investigate the effects of dopaminergic drugs on the facilitation of sign-tracking engendered by

  15. Schild (apparent pA2) analysis of a kappa-opioid antagonist in Planaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Baron, David A; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigators have provided radioimmunological and immunocytochemical evidence for an enkephalinergic (opioid) system in Planaria and described naloxone-sensitive qualitative behavioral responses to kappa-opioid receptor agonists. We report the application of Schild-analysis to the antagonism of a selective kappa agonist (U-50,488H) by a selective kappa antagonist (nor-BNI) in a quantitative in vivo endpoint. The results provide further evidence of a kappa-opioid-like receptor in planarians.

  16. A new opioid designed multiple ligand derived from the micro opioid agonist endomorphin-2 and the delta opioid antagonist pharmacophore Dmt-Tic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Fiorini, Stella; Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2007-11-15

    Opioid compounds with mixed micro agonist/delta antagonist properties could be used as analgesics with low propensity to induce tolerance and dependence. Here we report the synthesis of a new designed multiple ligand deriving from the micro selective agonist endomorphin-2 and the delta selective antagonist pharmacophore Dmt-Tic. As predicted, the resulting bivalent ligand showed a micro agonist/delta antagonist profile deriving from the corresponding activities of each pharmacophore.

  17. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S;

    1998-01-01

    Much evidence points to the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the development and maintainance of neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, there is generally involved a presumed opioid-insensitive component, which apparently can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. However......, in order to obtain complete analgesia, a combination of an NMDA receptor antagonist and an opioid receptor agonist is needed. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated that methadone, ketobemidone, and dextropropoxyphene, in addition to being opioid receptor agonists, also are weak noncompetitive NMDA...... receptor antagonists. Clinical anecdotes suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonism of these opioids may play a significant role in the pharmacological action of these compounds; however, no clinical studies have been conducted to support this issue. In the present commentary, we discuss evidence...

  18. Selective κ opioid antagonists nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic have low affinities for non-opioid receptors and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Munro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic induce selective κ opioid antagonism that is delayed and extremely prolonged, but some other effects are of rapid onset and brief duration. The transient effects of these compounds differ, suggesting that some of them may be mediated by other targets. RESULTS: In binding assays, the three antagonists showed no detectable affinity (K(i≥10 µM for most non-opioid receptors and transporters (26 of 43 tested. There was no non-opioid target for which all three compounds shared detectable affinity, or for which any two shared sub-micromolar affinity. All three compounds showed low nanomolar affinity for κ opioid receptors, with moderate selectivity over μ and δ (3 to 44-fold. Nor-BNI bound weakly to the α(2C-adrenoceptor (K(i = 630 nM. GNTI enhanced calcium mobilization by noradrenaline at the α(1A-adrenoceptor (EC₅₀ = 41 nM, but did not activate the receptor, displace radioligands, or enhance PI hydrolysis. This suggests that it is a functionally-selective allosteric enhancer. GNTI was also a weak M₁ receptor antagonist (K(B = 3.7 µM. JDTic bound to the noradrenaline transporter (K(i = 54 nM, but only weakly inhibited transport (IC₅₀ = 1.1 µM. JDTic also bound to the opioid-like receptor NOP (K(i = 12 nM, but gave little antagonism even at 30 µM. All three compounds exhibited rapid permeation and active efflux across Caco-2 cell monolayers. CONCLUSIONS: Across 43 non-opioid CNS targets, only GNTI exhibited a potent functional effect (allosteric enhancement of α(1A-adrenoceptors. This may contribute to GNTI's severe transient effects. Plasma concentrations of nor-BNI and GNTI may be high enough to affect some peripheral non-opioid targets. Nonetheless, κ opioid antagonism persists for weeks or months after these transient effects dissipate. With an adequate pre-administration interval, our results therefore strengthen the evidence that nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic are highly

  19. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds.

  20. Nonpeptidic Delta (δ) Opioid Agonists and Antagonists of the Diarylmethylpiperazine Class: What Have We Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Silvia N.

    The discovery of the selective delta (δ) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, represented a major advance in the field of δ-opioid ligands. Extensive research has recently been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands, thereby providing valuable tools for the pharmacological characterization of the δ opioid receptor. This review focuses on the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and provides an overview of the various chemical routes that have been developed and optimized through the years to allow the syntheses of these ligands on a multigram scale. The search for selective δ opioid agonists and antagonists, as well as for those with mixed opioid agonist properties with potential therapeutic value, continues. Several questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of diphenylmethylpiperazine derivatives and related analogs with opioid receptors and in particular with the δ opioid system still remain unanswered. Indeed, the development and pharmacological characterization of novel nonpeptidic δ opioid ligands remains an active area of research, as it may provide a better understanding of the role of this receptor in multiple disease states and disorders.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new opioid agonist and neurokinin-1 antagonist bivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanyan, Ruben; Kumirov, Vlad K; Nichol, Gary S; Davis, Peg; Liktor-Busa, Erika; Rankin, David; Varga, Eva; Vanderah, Todd; Porreca, Frank; Lai, Josephine; Hruby, Victor J

    2011-10-15

    Newly designed bivalent ligands-opioid agonist/NK1-antagonists have been synthesized. The synthesis of new starting materials-carboxy-derivatives of Fentanyl (1a-1c) was developed. These products have been transformed to 'isoimidium perchlorates' (2a-c). The new isoimidium perchlorates have been successfully implemented in nucleophilic addition reactions, with l-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl ester to give the target compounds-amides (3a-c). Perchlorates (2a-c) successfully undergo reactions with other nucleophiles such as alcohols, amines or hydrazines. The obtained compound 3b exhibited μ-opioid agonist activity and NK1-antagonist activity and may serve as a useful lead compound for the further design of a new series of opioid agonist/NK1-antagonist compounds.

  2. Discovery of the first small-molecule opioid pan antagonist with nanomolar affinity at mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Nurulain T; Journigan, V Blair; Polgar, Willma E

    2015-04-15

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure-activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3-6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  3. Prevention of Stimulant Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    peers, deficits in the interactions with peers and superiors, emotional impulsivity that could lead to low self esteem , substance abuse, criminality...Young Adults With ADHD. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 50(6): p. 543- 53. 12. Zhu, J., et al., Methylphenidate and mu opioid receptor interactions...Sponsor Approved Recorded by / Date 6/14/13 6/14/13 1770201 The blood draw was not completed on Drug Feeling visit after 2 different phlebotomy

  4. Potent Dmt-Tic pharmacophoric delta- and mu-opioid receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingyou; Fujita, Yoshio; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    A series of dimeric Dmt-Tic (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) analogues (8-14, 18-22) were covalently linked through diaminoalkane and symmetric or asymmetric 3,6-diaminoalkyl-2(1H)-pyrazinone moieties. All the compounds exhibited high affinity for both delta-opioid receptors [Ki(delta) = 0.06-1.53 nM] and mu-opioid receptors [Ki(mu) = 1.37-5.72 nM], resulting in moderate delta-receptor selectivity [Ki(mu)/Ki(delta) = 3-46]. Regardless of the type of linker between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophores, delta-opioid-mediated antagonism was extraordinarily high in all analogues (pA2 = 10.42-11.28), while in vitro agonism (MVD and GPI bioassays) was essentially absent (ca. 3 to >10 microM). While an unmodified N-terminus (9, 13, 18) revealed weak mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 6.78-6.99), N,N'-dimethylation (21, 22), which negatively impacts on mu-opioid-associated agonism (Balboni et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2003, 11, 5435-5441), markedly enhanced mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 8.34 and 7.71 for 21 and 22, respectively) without affecting delta-opioid activity. These data are the first evidence that a single dimeric opioid ligand containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore exhibits highly potent delta- and mu-opioid antagonist activities.

  5. Opioid receptor antagonists increase [Ca2+]i in rat arterial smooth muscle cells in hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li KAI; Zhong-feng WANG; Yu-liang SHI; Liang-ming LIU; De-yao HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of opioid receptor antagonists and norepinephrine on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mesenteric arterial (MA) smooth muscle cells (SMC) isolated from normal and hemorrhagic shocked rats in the vascular hyporesponse stage. METHODS: The rat model of hemorrhagic shock was made by withdrawing blood to decrease the artery mean blood pressure to 3.73-4.26 kPa and keeping at the level for 3 h.[Ca2+]i of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were detected by the laser scan confocal microscopy. RESULTS:In the hyporesponse VMSC of rats in hemorrhagic shock, selective δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and β-funaltrexamine, 100 nmol/L) as well as norepinephrine 5 μmol/L significantly increased [Ca2+]i by 47 %±13 %, 37 %±14 %, 33 %±10 %, and 54 %±17 %, respectively, although their effects were lower than those in the normal rat cells (the increased values were 148 %±54 %, 130 %±44 %, 63 %±17 %and 110 %±38 %, respectively); and the norepinephrine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was further augmented by three δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (50 nmol/L, respectively) application (from 52 %± 16 % to 99 %±29 %,146 %±54 % and 137 %±47 %, respectively). CONCLUSION: The disorder of [Ca2+]i regulation induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by opioid receptor and α-adrenoceptor, which may be partly responsible for the vascular hyporesponse, and the opioid receptor antagonists improved the response of resistance arteries to vascular stimulants in decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock.

  6. Opioid Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serecigni, Josep Guardia

    2015-09-29

    Objetivos: A partir de los recientes progresos en la farmacoterapia del alcoholismo, hemos efectuado una revisión sobre los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides, que tienen aprobada la indicación para el tratamiento del alcoholismo, como son naltrexona y nalmefeno. Metodología: Hemos revisado más de 100 publicaciones sobre péptidos y receptores opioides, el efecto de los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides sobre el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales como en humanos, tanto en el laboratorio como para el tratamiento del alcoholismo. También se describen las características farmacológicas de naltrexona y de nalmefeno y su utilidad en la práctica clínica. Resultados: Múltiples evidencias han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona y nalmefeno para reducir el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales de laboratorio como también en personas estudiadas en situación de bar experimental, aunque debido al diferente perfil receptorial, nalmefeno ha sido relacionado con una mayor eficacia para la reducción del consumo de alcohol, en ratas que presentan dependencia del alcohol. Además, un gran número de ensayos clínicos controlados han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona para la prevención de recaídas, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol. Ensayos clínicos controlados recientes han demostrado la eficacia de nalmefeno “a demanda” para reducir el consumo de alcohol, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol de baja gravedad. Conclusiones: Tanto naltrexona como nalmefeno han demostrado ser fármacos seguros, bien tolerados, de manejo sencillo, y eficaces para el tratamiento del trastorno por dependencia del alcohol, (actualmente llamado trastorno por consumo de alcohol). A partir de recientes ensayos clínicos controlados se ha comprobado que nalmefeno produce una reducción significativa del consumo de alcohol, lo cual supone un nuevo objetivo que amplía las posibilidades de

  7. Kappa opioid receptor antagonist and N-methyl-D- aspartate receptor antagonist affect dynorphin- induced spinal cord electrophysiologic impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chen; Liangbi Xiang; Jun Liu; Dapeng Zhou; Hailong Yu; Qi Wang; Wenfeng Han; Weijian Ren

    2012-01-01

    The latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were prolonged to different degrees, and wave amplitude was obviously decreased, after injection of dynorphin into the rat subarachnoid cavity.The wave amplitude and latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were significantly recovered at 7 and 14 days after combined injection of dynorphin and either the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801.The wave amplitude and latency were similar in rats after combined injection of dynorphin and nor-binaltorphimine or MK-801.These results suggest that intrathecal injection of dynorphin causes damage to spinal cord function.Prevention of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor or kappa receptor activation lessened the injury to spinal cord function induced by dynorphin.

  8. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-03-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts.

  9. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  10. Evolution of the Bifunctional Lead μ Agonist / δ Antagonist Containing the Dmt-Tic Opioid Pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-02-17

    Based on a renewed importance recently attributed to bi- or multifunctional opioids, we report the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of some analogues derived from our lead μ agonist / δ antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Bzl. Our previous studies focused on the importance of the C-teminal benzyl function in the induction of such bifunctional activity. The introduction of some substituents in the para position of the phenyl ring (-Cl, -CH(3), partially -NO(2), inactive -NH(2)) was found to give a more potent μ agonist / antagonist effect associated with a relatively unmodified δ antagonist activity (pA(2) = 8.28-9.02). Increasing the steric hindrance of the benzyl group (using diphenylmethyl and tetrahydroisoquinoline functionalities) substantially maintained the μ agonist and δ antagonist activities of the lead compound. Finally and quite unexpectedly D-Tic2, considered as a wrong opioid message now; inserted into the reference compound in lieu of L-Tic, provided a μ agonist / δ agonist better than our reference ligand (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph) and was endowed with the same pharmacological profile.

  11. AM-251 and rimonabant act as direct antagonists at mu-opioid receptors: implications for opioid/cannabinoid interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Fantegrossi, William E; Prather, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    Mu-opioid and CB1-cannabinoid agonists produce analgesia; however, adverse effects limit use of drugs in both classes. Additive or synergistic effects resulting from concurrent administration of low doses of mu- and CB1-agonists may produce analgesia with fewer side effects. Synergism potentially results from interaction between mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). AM-251 and rimonabant are CB1R antagonist/inverse agonists employed to validate opioid-cannabinoid interactions, presumed to act selectively at CB1Rs. Therefore, the potential for direct action of these antagonists at MORs is rarely considered. This study determined if AM-251 and/or rimonabant directly bind and modulate the function of MORs. Surprisingly, AM-251 and rimonabant, but not a third CB1R inverse agonist AM-281, bind with mid-nanomolar affinity to human MORs with a rank order of affinity (K(i)) of AM-251 (251 nM) > rimonabant (652 nM) > AM281 (2135 nM). AM-251 and rimonabant, but not AM-281, also competitively antagonize morphine induced G-protein activation in CHO-hMOR cell homogenates (K(b) = 719 or 1310 nM, respectively). AM-251 and rimonabant block morphine inhibition of cAMP production, while only AM-251 elicits cAMP rebound in CHO-hMOR cells chronically exposed to morphine. AM-251 and rimonabant (10 mg/kg) attenuate morphine analgesia, whereas the same dose of AM-281 produces little effect. Therefore, in addition to high CB1R affinity, AM-251 and rimonabant bind to MORs with mid-nanomolar affinity and at higher doses may affect morphine analgesia via direct antagonism at MORs. Such CB1-independent of these antagonists effects may contribute to reported inconsistencies when CB1/MOR interactions are examined via pharmacological methods in CB1-knockout versus wild-type mice.

  12. Nalmefene: intravenous safety and kinetics of a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Howes, J; Gentile, J; Hsu, H B; Hsiao, J; Garg, D; Weidler, D; Meyer, M; Tuttle, R

    1986-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we evaluated the safety and kinetics of a new narcotic antagonist, nalmefene, after 2, 6, 12, and 24 mg intravenous doses to healthy men. At each dose level four subjects received active drug and two received placebo. The drug was well tolerated at all dose levels with only mild and transient side effects, the most common of which was lightheadedness. The plasma concentration-time data were best fit with a triexponential equation, and the terminal elimination phase had a harmonic mean t1/2 of 8 to 9 hours. Only about 5% of the dose was excreted in the urine as intact nalmefene, with up to 60% excreted as nalmefene glucuronide. Although intersubject differences were noted, mean or dose-normalized mean kinetic parameters such as clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, terminal t1/2, and AUC showed no consistent trends related to increasing doses, indicating that nalmefene has linear pharmacokinetics.

  13. The crystal structure of a bimorphinan with highly selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Etter, Margaret C.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    1987-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dihydrobromide heptahydrate of nor-binaltorphimine (17, 17'-bis(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,6',7,7'-tetrahydro-4,5α: 4',5'α-diepoxy-6,6'-imino[7,7' bimorphinan]-3,3',14,14'-tetraol)is presented. This structure is the first reported structure of a rigid bivalent opioid ligand. Two morphinan pharmacophores are connected by a rigid spacer, the pyrrole ring. The nor-binaltorphimine structure itself shows unique, high selectivity as a kappa opioid receptor antagonist. Crystal data: P3 2, Z = 3, a = b = 20.223 (4), c = 9.541(7) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°; R = 0.079 (1765 reflections, Fobs > 1σ( F)).

  14. Differential involvement of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone in motivational and hedonic aspects of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Miriam; Heise, Verena; Spanagel, Rainer

    2010-04-02

    In the present study dose-dependent effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were investigated on the rewarding effects of sweetened condensed milk (SCM) in four behavioral paradigms addressing hedonic, consummatory as well as motivational aspects of a reward: odour-conditioned pleasure attenuation of the acoustic startle response (PAS), conditioned place preference (CPP), voluntary consumption in a limited access paradigm, as well as break point determination in a progressive ratio (PR) task. A dose-dependent reduction in reward-related behavior was observed in all paradigms, with exception of the break point in the PR task, which was not affected by naloxone at all. CPP for SCM was only affected by the highest dose of naloxone. The present results indicate that naloxone is more effective in suppressing the hedonic than motivational aspects of reward, further supporting the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the mediation of hedonic properties of food reward.

  15. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien (Michigan-Med); (Stanford-MED); (UAB, Spain)

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  16. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  17. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Aminian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day, an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  18. Development of a peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Schneider, Séverine; Bertin, Isabelle; Wagner, Patrick; Schmitt, Martine; Laboureyras, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoît; Schneider, Elodie; Mollereau, Catherine; Simonnet, Guy; Simonin, Frédéric; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques

    2015-03-18

    Through the development of a new class of unnatural ornithine derivatives as bioisosteres of arginine, we have designed an orally active peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR). Systemic low-dose administration of this compound to rats blocked opioid-induced hyperalgesia, without any apparent side-effects. Interestingly, we also observed that this compound potentiated opioid-induced analgesia. This unnatural ornithine derivative provides a novel therapeutic approach for both improving analgesia and reducing hyperalgesia induced by opioids in patients being treated for chronic pain.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist – neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Schiller, Peter W.; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3’,5’-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioral assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat. PMID:25544687

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist - neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-03-06

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3',5'-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioural assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat.

  1. Effect of gonadal hormones on hypophagic property of opioid antagonist Naloxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargate Ashwini R, Kulkarni Dushant V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations that occur over the estrous cycle in rats affect food intake. It is possible that estrogen affects food intake via Opioid system and other brain areas which are involved in regulation of food intake. Therefore it may affect the sensitivity of female rats to hypophagic effect of Opioid antagonist Naloxone. Testosterone in male rats also changes food intake. However, little is known about hoe these Gonadal hormones interact with Opioid receptors to modulate food intake. Objective: The aim of the study was to find out how Gonadal hormones affect hypophagic property of Naloxone. Methods: Basal food intake of 40 healthy adult females and 20 healthy adult male rats was recorded. Then they were injected intraperitoneally with Naloxone after fasting for 24 hrs. In female rats food intake was measured during different phases of the estrous cycle. All the rats were then subjected to gonadectomy. The food intake was measured after gonadectomy. The effect of Naloxone was also measured in deprivation paradigm after gonadectomy. Results: Female rats showed decreased food intake during proestrous and estrous phases. In female rats there was no hypophagia after Naloxone injection during these phases. Male rats showed hypophagia on Naloxone injection. Male rats showed increased food intake after gonadectomy. In female rats the increase in food intake was not significant when gonadectomy was done during metestrous and diestrous. However, Naloxone could induce hypophagia in all female rats after gonadectomy. Conclusion: Estrogen decreases food intake, it decreases sensitivity of female rats to hypophasic effects of Naloxone. Testosterone decreases food intake. Testosterone does not interfere with hypophagic effect of Naloxone.

  2. In vivo antinociception of potent mu opioid agonist tetrapeptide analogues and comparison with a compact opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist chimera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillemyn Karel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important limiting factor in the development of centrally acting pharmaceuticals is the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Transport of therapeutic peptides through this highly protective physiological barrier remains a challenge for peptide drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS. Because the most common strategy to treat moderate to severe pain consists of the activation of opioid receptors in the brain, the development of active opioid peptide analogues as potential analgesics requires compounds with a high resistance to enzymatic degradation and an ability to cross the BBB. Results Herein we report that tetrapeptide analogues of the type H-Dmt1-Xxx2-Yyy3-Gly4-NH2 are transported into the brain after intravenous and subcutaneous administration and are able to activate the μ- and δ opioid receptors more efficiently and over longer periods of time than morphine. Using the hot water tail flick test as the animal model for antinociception, a comparison in potency is presented between a side chain conformationally constrained analogue containing the benzazepine ring (BVD03, Yyy3: Aba, and a "ring opened" analogue (BVD02, Yyy3: Phe. The results show that in addition to the increased lipophilicity through amide bond N-methylation, the conformational constraint introduced at the level of the Phe3 side chain causes a prolonged antinociception. Further replacement of NMe-D-Ala2 by D-Arg2 in the tetrapeptide sequence led to an improved potency as demonstrated by a higher and maintained antinociception for AN81 (Xxx2: D-Arg vs. BVD03 (Xxx2: NMe-D-Ala. A daily injection of the studied opioid ligands over a time period of 5 days did however result in a substantial decrease in antinociception on the fifth day of the experiment. The compact opioid agonist - NK1 antagonist hybrid SBCHM01 could not circumvent opioid induced tolerance. Conclusions We demonstrated that the introduction of a conformational constraint has an important

  3. Combinations of opioid agonist and opioid antagonist%阿片受体激动剂和拮抗剂的联用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石靖; 许真玉

    2013-01-01

    The opioid agonists employed primarily as moderate to strong analgesics have many pharmacological effects including vomiting,respiratory depression,constipation,and also have high possibility of addiction and dependence.Combinations of opioid agonists and opioid antagonists have been developed in recent years,and many clinical trials showed that such kind of drug combinations could moderate the side effects of opioid agonists and decrease the risk of drug abuse.Successful development of these combinations gives new options for the clinical application of opioid analgesics.%阿片受体激动剂是临床常用的镇痛药,通常用于中重度疼痛的治疗,但是此类药物常伴有明显的不良反应,如恶心、呕吐、便秘和呼吸抑制等,同时存在较高的成瘾性和依赖性,大大影响了药物的临床应用.近年来,阿片受体拮抗剂与阿片受体激动剂组成的复方药物陆续上市,临床试验显示此类复方制剂可以减轻不良反应,降低药物滥用的风险,为阿片类镇痛的临床应用提供了新的思路和选择.

  4. Beta-methyl substitution of cyclohexylalanine in Dmt-Tic-Cha-Phe peptides results in highly potent delta opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Ioja, Eniko; Tömböly, Csaba; Ballet, Steven; Tourwé, Dirk; Péter, Antal; Martinek, Tamás; Chung, Nga N; Schiller, Peter W; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna

    2007-01-25

    The opioid peptide TIPP (H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH, Tic:1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) was substituted with Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) and a new unnatural amino acid, beta-MeCha (beta-methyl-cyclohexylalanine). This double substitution led to a new series of opioid peptides displaying subnanomolar delta antagonist activity and mu agonist or antagonist properties depending on the configuration of the beta-MeCha residue. The most promising analog, H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3S)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH was a very selective delta antagonist both in the mouse vas deferens (MVD) assay (Ke = 0.241 +/- 0.05 nM) and in radioligand binding assay (K i delta = 0.48 +/- 0.05 nM, K i mu/K i delta = 2800). The epimeric peptide H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3R)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH and the corresponding peptide amide turned out to be mixed partial mu agonist/delta antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and MVD assays. Our results constitute further examples of the influence of Dmt and beta-methyl substitution as well as C-terminal amidation on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of TIPP related peptides. Some of these compounds represent valuable pharmacological tools for opioid research.

  5. Estrogenic effects of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeanu, M C; van Dieten, J A; Kolb, V M; Schoemaker, J; de Koning, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine (EH-NX) on pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the ovariectomized rat was studied. EH-NX is a hybrid between the steroid component estrone and the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NX). It is a potent and long-acting opioid antagonist in vitro and in vivo, but its effect upon in vivo LH secretion has not been tested before. The aims of the study were to investigate whether, unlike naltrexone, EH-NX can stimulate LH secretion without the need of additional estrogen pretreatment and whether EH-NX has peripheral estrogenic effects upon the uterine weight, when administered chronically to long-term ovariectomized rats. Female rats were injected subcutaneously with EH-NX 21 days after ovariectomy. The effects of EH-NX injections on LH secretion were compared to the effects of NX and estrone hydrazone (EH) alone, or in combination, with or without estradiol-benzoate (EB) pretreatment. Inhibition of LH secretion and uterine proliferation were observed in rats treated chronically with EH-NX in dosages of 0.250 mg/kg bw and higher. These effects were similar to those caused by EH and EB. In short-term OVX rats EH-NX appeared to act faster than EH. In contrast to NX, no stimulatory effect on LH secretion was seen with EH-NX in EB primed OVX rats. These results surprisingly demonstrate that EH-NX behaves like an estrogen and not like an opioid antagonist. The unexpected pharmacological profile of this new drug may open up doors for several medical applications.

  6. Effect of GNTI,a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, on MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotypy in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-ting QI; Hong ZOU; Chen-hao ZHANG; Qing-lian XIE; Mei-lei JIN; Lei YU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To examine the effect of GNTI[5'-guanidinyl-17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-dehydro-4,-5α-epoxy-3-14-dihydroxy-6,7-2',3'-indolomorphinan],a selective antagonist for the kappa opioid receptor,in the MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate)-induced behavioral model of psychosis in schizophrenia as a way to explore the involvement of the kappa opioid receptor in modulating psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia.Methods:Two doses 0f MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg and 0.6 mg/kg) were administered by systemic injection in mice to induce psychosis-like behavior as a rodent schizophrenia model, preceded by an injection of different doses of GNTI. Both locomotion and stereotypy were measured as the behavioral endpoints for quantitative analysis.Results:GNTI inhibited MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotypy.In particular,GNTI showed differential modulation of stereotypy induced by 0.3 mg/kg VS 0.6 mg/kg MK-801.Conclusion:Antagonism of kappa opioid receptors attenuates MK-801-induced behavior,suggesting a potential involvement of the kappa opioid receptor in psychosis-like symptoms of schizophrenia.GNTI aDpears to be a useful pharmacological tool to explore the kappa opioid receptor function in vivo.

  7. Nalmefene: safety and kinetics after single and multiple oral doses of a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Gentile, J; Hsu, H B; Hsiao, J; Howes, J; Garg, D; Weidler, D

    1987-03-01

    The aim of these two studies was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of oral nalmefene, a new orally effective opioid antagonist. In the first study, single ascending doses of 50, 100, 200, and 300 mg of nalmefene HCl were administered in double-blind fashion to four groups of healthy men. There were six subjects in each group; four received nalmefene and two received placebo. The drug was well tolerated at all dose levels with only mild and transient side effects, such as lightheadedness, at the higher doses. Model-independent pharmacokinetic analysis of the plasma concentration-time data showed that nalmefene was rapidly absorbed and had an elimination half-life that ranged from seven to 15 hours (mean, 10.7 hr). There was a good linear relationship (r = .97) between administered dose and total area under the curve at each dose level. Only about 4% of the dose was excreted in the urine as unchanged nalmefene, whereas up to 60% was excreted as a beta-glucuronidase/sulfatase hydrolysable conjugate(s) of nalmefene. In the second study, six healthy men were initially administered a single 50-mg dose of drug, and plasma samples were obtained at selected time intervals for 48 hours. A dosing schedule of 20 mg q12h was then started and continued for seven days. Plasma samples were collected immediately before each dose and at selected times for up to 48 hours after the last dose. The drug was well tolerated by all subjects, and no clinically significant adverse effects were observed during the seven-day administration period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats. PMID:28280461

  9. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats.

  10. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of the pseudopeptide {delta}-opioid antagonist [{sup 125}I]-ITIPP({psi})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, T.L. E-mail: TC311@columbia.edu; Schiller, P.W.; Waterhouse, R.N

    2001-05-01

    The radioiodinated tetrapeptide {delta}-opioid antagonist [{sup 125}I]ITIPP({psi}) [H-Tyr(3'I)-Tic{psi}[CH{sub 2}NH]Phe-Phe-OH] (Ki({delta}) 2.08 nM; Ki({mu})/Ki({delta}) = 1280) has been synthesized and evaluated as a potential lung tumour imaging agent. [{sup 125}I]ITIPP({psi}) was obtained, via electrophilic iodination, in 46% yield (>44,000 MBq/{mu}mol) from the parent TIPP({psi}). The biodistribution of [{sup 125}I]ITIPP({psi}) in nu/nu mice bearing SCLC-SW210.5 xenographs revealed good uptake and prolonged retention of radioactivity in organs known to possess {delta}-opioid receptors. Metabolite analysis showed that [{sup 125}I]ITIPP({psi}) was largely unmetabolized at 25 min PI and blocking studies showed significant reduction of uptake of the tracer in the brain, liver, intestine and tumor indicating that the iodinated tetrapeptide binds to {delta} opioid receptors in vivo.

  11. Synergistic antidepressant-like effects between a kappa opioid antagonist (LY2444296) and a delta opioid agonist (ADL5859) in the mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Tallarida, Ronald; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Kappa opioid (KOP) receptor antagonists and delta opioid (DOP) receptor agonists have antidepressant-like effects in animal tests and may be useful for treatment-resistant depression in humans. In this study, we examined whether the combination of a KOP receptor antagonist and a DOP receptor agonist would produce a better than additive effect (i.e. synergy). LY2444296 is a short-acting selective nonpeptide KOP receptor antagonist. ADL5859 is a selective nonpeptide DOP receptor agonist which does not produce seizures and EEG disturbances. Each compound and combinations of the two were examined in the forced swim test (FST) one h post injection, a screening test for antidepressant-like effect, in male adult C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Lab). LY2444296 [subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] at 10 and 30mg/kg, but not 3mg/kg, significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ADL5859 also reduced immobility time dose-dependently at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, but not at 1mg/kg. An analysis was conducted using the method of Tallarida and Raffa (2010), which employed dose equivalence. The relative potency of the drugs was determined to be LY2444296: ADL5859=1:0.28, which was the dose ratio for combination studies. Six combinations of the two compounds were tested in mice at a fixed dose ratio. We found that LY2444296 and ADL5859 yielded significant synergistic effects for the antidepressant-like effect at the combined dose ranging from 3.84mg/kg to 9.0mg/kg. ADL5859 (10mg/kg), LY2444296 (30mg/kg) and their combined dose (3.84mg/kg) had no effects on locomotor activities. Since the two drugs have distinct pharmacological profiles, such a synergism will allow use of lower doses of both drugs to achieve desired antidepressant effects with fewer side effects.

  12. Synthesis of [{sup 3}]DIPPA: a potent irreversible antagonist selective for the {kappa} opioid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Anchih; Portoghese, P.S. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). College of Pharmacy; Trometer, J.D. [E.I. Du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    2-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophe nyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]acetamide (1,DIPPA) has been previously reported to be an opioid receptor affinity label that produces selective and long-lasting {kappa} opioid receptor antagonism in mice. High specific activity [{sup 3}H]DIPPA (39.7 Ci/mmol) was prepared by bromination and catalytic tritiation of the amino precursor of DIPPA followed by conversion to the isothiocyanate with thiophosgene. (Author).

  13. A maternal "junk-food" diet reduces sensitivity to the opioid antagonist naloxone in offspring postweaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugusheff, Jessica R; Ong, Zhi Yi; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2013-03-01

    Perinatal exposure to a maternal "junk-food" diet has been demonstrated to increase the preference for palatable diets in adult offspring. We aimed to determine whether this increased preference could be attributed to changes in μ-opioid receptor expression within the mesolimbic reward pathway. We report here that mRNA expression of the μ-opioid receptor in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) at weaning was 1.4-fold (males) and 1.9-fold (females) lower in offspring of junk-food (JF)-fed rat dams than in offspring of dams fed a standard rodent diet (control) (Pfat intake in control offspring (males: 7.7 ± 0.7 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6 g/kg/d; females: 6.9 ± 0.3 vs. 3.9 ± 0.5 g/kg/d; Pfat intake in JF females (42.2 ± 6.0 vs. 23.1 ± 4.1% reduction, Pfood diet results in early desensitization of the opioid system which may explain the increased preference for junk food in these offspring.

  14. Inhibition of the development of morphine tolerance by a potent dual mu-delta-opioid antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa D; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2008-10-01

    Three analogues of the dual mu-/delta-antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-R-NH-CH2-Ph (R = 1, Lys-Z; 2, Lys-Ac; 3, Lys) were examined in vivo: 1 and 2 exhibited weak bioactivity, while 3 injected intracerebroventricularly was a potent dual antagonist for morphine- and deltorphin C-induced antinociception comparable to naltrindole (delta-antagonist), but 93% as effective as naloxone (nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist) and 4% as active as CTOP, a mu antagonist. Subcutaneous or oral administration of 3 antagonized morphine-induced antinociception indicating passage across epithelial and blood-brain barriers. Mice pretreated with 3 before morphine did not develop morphine tolerance indicative of a potential clinical role to inhibit development of drug tolerance.

  15. Opioid receptor types involved in the development of nicotine physical dependence in an invertebrate (Planaria) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Baron, Steve; Bhandal, Jaspreet S; Brown, Tevin; Song, Kevin; Tallarida, Christopher S; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-01

    Recent data suggest that opioid receptors are involved in the development of nicotine physical dependence in mammals. Evidence in support of a similar involvement in an invertebrate (Planaria) is presented using the selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, and the more receptor subtype-selective antagonists CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2) (μ, MOR), naltrindole (δ, DOR), and nor-BNI (norbinaltorphimine) (κ, KOR). Induction of physical dependence was achieved by 60-min pre-exposure of planarians to nicotine and was quantified by abstinence-induced withdrawal (reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity). Known MOR and DOR subtype-selective opioid receptor antagonists attenuated the withdrawal, as did the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but a KOR subtype-selective antagonist did not. An involvement of MOR and DOR, but not KOR, in the development of nicotine physical dependence or in abstinence-induced withdrawal was thus demonstrated in a sensitive and facile invertebrate model.

  16. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties.

  17. Probes for narcotic receptor mediated phenomena. Part 28: new opioid antagonists from enantiomeric analogues of 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-phenylethylmorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Akihiro; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rothman, Richard B; Dersch, Christina M; George, Clifford; Flippen-Anderson, Judith L; Rice, Kenner C

    2002-10-01

    Enantiomeric analogues of 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)morphan ligands were synthesized and evaluated because of our unexpected finding that opioid antagonists can be obtained in the 5-phenylmorphan series of opioids without sterically hindering the rotation of the phenolic ring. We determined the opioid receptor binding affinity of these new analogues, as well as the efficacy of the more interesting ligands. One of the new compounds [(1R,5S)-(-)-3-[2-(3'-phenylpropyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol, 15] was found to have half of the efficacy of naloxone, a potent opioid antagonist, in the [(35)S]GTPgammaS assay, and two others (1R,5S)-(-)-3-[2-(4'-phenylbutyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol, 17, and (1R,5S,1'S)-(+)-3-[2-(1'-methyl-2'-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol, 26, acted as moderately potent opioid antagonists. X-ray crystallographic structure data were obtained on three compounds. Two of them had three chiral centers; 25 [(1R,5S,1'R)-(-)-3-[2-(1'-methyl-2'-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol] was determined to have the 1R,5S,1'R configuration, and 26 the 1R,5S,1'S configuration. Since (1S,5R)-(+)-2-bromo-5-[2-(2'-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol (32) was a position isomer of (1S,5R)-(+)-4-bromo-3-[2-(2'-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-5-yl]-phenol (30), and both showed the same 1H NMR spectrum, the structure of 32 was unequivocally determined by X-ray structure analysis.

  18. Synthesis of a potent and selective (18)F-labeled delta-opioid receptor antagonist derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore for positron emission tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Wu, Zhanhong; Chen, Kai; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Marczak, Ewa D; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Salvadori, Severo; Ren, Chuancheng; Zhao, Heng; Balboni, Gianfranco; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-03-27

    Identification and pharmacological characterization of two new selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists, derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, of potential utility in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are described. On the basis of its high delta selectivity, H-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH (reference compound 1) is a useful starting point for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled compounds prepared by the coupling of N-succinimidyl 4-[ (18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) with Boc-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH under slightly basic conditions at 37 degrees C for 15 min, deprotection with TFA, and HPLC purification. The total synthesis time was 120 min, and the decay-corrected radiochemical yield of [(18)F]- 1 was about 25-30% ( n = 5) starting from [(18)F]SFB ( n = 5) with an effective specific activity about 46 GBq/micromol. In vitro autoradiography studies showed prominent uptake of [ (18)F]- 1 in the striatum and cortex with significant blocking by 1 and UFP-501 (selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), suggesting high specific binding of [(18)F]- 1 to delta-opioid receptors. Noninvasive microPET imaging studies revealed the absence of [(18)F]- 1 in rat brain, since it fails to cross the blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrates the suitability of [ (18)F]- 1 for imaging peripheral delta-opioid receptors.

  19. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioid-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, Merel; Niesters, Marieke; Sarton, Elise; Aarts, Leon; Smith, Terry W; Dahan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Opioids induce respiratory depression via activation of μ-opioid receptors at specific sites in the central nervous system including the pre-Bötzinger complex, a respiratory rhythm generating area in the pons. Full opioid agonists like morphine and fentanyl affect breathing with onset and offset profiles that are primarily determined by opioid transfer to the receptor site, while the effects of partial opioid agonists such as buprenorphine are governed by transfer to the receptor site together with receptor kinetics, in particular dissociation kinetics. Opioid-induced respiratory depression is potentially fatal but may be reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, an agent with a short elimination half-life (30 min). The rate-limiting factor in naloxone-reversal of opioid effect is the receptor kinetics of the opioid agonists that requires reversal. Agents with slow dissociation kinetics (buprenorphine) require a continuous naloxone infusion while agents with rapid kinetics (fentanyl) will show complete reversal upon a single naloxone dose. Since naloxone is non-selective and will reverse analgesia as well, efforts are focused on the development of compounds that reverse opioid-induced respiratory depression without affecting analgesic efficacy. Such agents include ampakines and serotonin agonists which are aimed at selectively enhancing central respiratory drive. A novel approach is aimed at the reduction of respiratory depression from opioid-activation of (micro-)glia cells in the pons and brainstem using micro-glia cell stabilizers. Since this approach simultaneously enhances opioid analgesic efficacy it seems an attractive alternative to the classical reversal strategies with naloxone.

  20. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Naeem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT. Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2–14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p=0.127. Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  1. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2', 6'dimethyltyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  2. Tritiation of delta opioid-receptor selective antagonist dipeptide ligands with extraordinary affinity containing 2‧, 6‧dimethyltyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, I.; Tóth, G.; Balboni, G.; Guerrini, R.; Salvadori, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a new class of δ opioid antagonists has been discovered by using Tyr-Tic sequence. The substitution of Tyr1 by Dmt resulted in a new analogue (H-Dmt-Tic-OH) with enhanced affinity and selectivity. Because of its excellent property we chose it for labelling with tritium. At the same time peptides containing Tic at position 2 undergo spontaneous diketopiperazine formation in some solvents, and they lose some of their binding ability. To avoid this unwanted side-reaction we synthetized the N-methylated analogue (N,N(Me)2-Dmt-Tic-OH), and it was more stable under storage condition, but δ affinity declined moderately. On the basis of this information we prepared diiodinated analogues of these dipeptides. Catalytic dehalotritiation of precursors resulted in tritiated peptides. High specific radioactivity, 44.67 Ci/mmol with [3H]Dmt-Tic-OH and 59.88 Ci/mmol with N,N(Me)2-[3H]Dmt-Tic-OH were achieved.

  3. The effects of alcohol on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist GSK1521498 in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nathan, Pradeep J; Dodds, Chris; Maltby, Kay; Miller, Sam R; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise; Zucchetto, Mauro; Bush, Mark; Johnson, Lakshmi Vasist; Sarai, Bhopinder; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P; Richards, Duncan B; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2013-10-01

    The mu-opioid system has a key role in hedonic and motivational processes critical to substance addiction. However, existing mu-opioid antagonists have had limited success as anti-addiction treatments. GSK1521498 is a selective and potent mu-opioid antagonist being developed for the treatment of overeating and substance addictions. In this study, 28 healthy participants were administered single doses of GSK1521498 20 mg, ethanol 0.5 g/kg body weight, or both in combination, in a double blind placebo controlled four-way crossover design. The primary objective was to determine the risk of significant adverse pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions. The effects of GSK1521498 on hedonic and consummatory responses to alcohol and the attentional processing of alcohol-related stimuli, and their modulation by the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism were also explored. GSK1521498 20 mg was well tolerated alone and in combination with ethanol. There were mild transient effects of GSK1521498 on alertness and mood that were greater when it was combined with ethanol. These effects were not of clinical significance. There were no effects of GSK1521498 on reaction time, hedonic or consummatory responses. These findings provide encouraging safety and PK data to support continued development of GSK1521498 for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  4. Dopamine D2/3- and μ-opioid receptor antagonists reduce cue-induced responding and reward impulsivity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S C; Beck-Schimmer, B; Kajdi, M-E; Müller, D; Tobler, P N; Quednow, B B

    2016-01-01

    Increased responding to drug-associated stimuli (cue reactivity) and an inability to tolerate delayed gratification (reward impulsivity) have been implicated in the development and maintenance of drug addiction. Whereas data from animal studies suggest that both the dopamine and opioid system are involved in these two reward-related processes, their role in humans is less clear. Moreover, dopaminergic and opioidergic drugs have not been directly compared with regard to these functions, even though a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms might inform the development of specific treatments for elevated cue reactivity and reward impulsivity. In a randomized, double-blind, between-subject design we administered the selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist amisulpride (400 mg, n=41), the unspecific opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (50 mg, n=40) or placebo (n=40) to healthy humans and measured cue-induced responding with a Pavlovian-instrumental transfer task and reward impulsivity with a delay discounting task. Mood was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Compared with placebo, amisulpride significantly suppressed cue-induced responding and reward impulsivity. The effects of naltrexone were similar, although less pronounced. Both amisulpride and naltrexone decreased average mood ratings compared with placebo. Our results demonstrate that a selective blockade of dopamine D2/D3 receptors reduces cue-induced responding and reward impulsivity in healthy humans. Antagonizing μ-opioid receptors has similar effects for cue-induced responding and to a lesser extent for reward impulsivity. PMID:27378550

  5. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Rockford (United States))

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  6. General, kappa, delta and mu opioid receptor antagonists mediate feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist baclofen in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens shell in rats: reciprocal and regional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Patricia; Shimonova, Lyudmila; Khaimov, Arthur; Borukhova, Yaffa; Ilyayeva, Ester; Ranaldi, Robert; Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-03-14

    Food intake is significantly increased following administration of agonists of GABA and opioid receptors into the nucleus accumbens shell (NACs) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects mu-opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Correspondingly, general or selective opioid receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects GABA agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Regional interactions have been evaluated in feeding studies by administering antagonists in one site prior to agonist administration in a second site. Thus, opioid antagonist-opioid agonist and GABA antagonist-GABA agonist feeding interactions have been identified between the VTA and NACs. However, pretreatment with GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonists in the VTA failed to affect mu opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the NACs, and correspondingly, these antagonists administered in the NACs failed to affect mu opioid-induced feeding elicited from the VTA. To evaluate whether regional and reciprocal VTA and NACs feeding interactions occur for opioid receptor modulation of GABA agonist-mediated feeding, the present study examined whether feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist, baclofen microinjected into the NACs was dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with general (naltrexone: NTX), mu (beta-funaltrexamine: BFNA), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine: NBNI) or delta (naltrindole: NTI) opioid antagonists in the VTA, and correspondingly, whether VTA baclofen-induced feeding was dose-dependently blocked by NACs pretreatment with NTX, BFNA, NBNI or NTI in rats. Bilateral pairs of cannulae aimed at the VTA and NACs were stereotaxically implanted in rats, and their food intakes were assessed following vehicle and baclofen (200 ng) in each site. Baclofen produced similar magnitudes of increased food intake following VTA and NACs treatment. Baclofen

  7. Dopamine D3/D2 Receptor Antagonist PF-4363467 Attenuates Opioid Drug-Seeking Behavior without Concomitant D2 Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Travis T; Chappie, Thomas; Horton, David; Chandrasekaran, Ramalakshmi Y; Samas, Brian; Dunn-Sims, Elizabeth R; Hsu, Cathleen; Nawreen, Nawshaba; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Schmidt, Christopher J; Dlugolenski, Keith; Stratman, Nancy C; Majchrzak, Mark J; Kormos, Bethany L; Nguyen, David P; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Mead, Andy N

    2017-01-18

    Dopamine receptor antagonism is a compelling molecular target for the treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders. From our corporate compound file, we identified a structurally unique D3 receptor (D3R) antagonist scaffold, 1. Through a hybrid approach, we merged key pharmacophore elements from 1 and D3 agonist 2 to yield the novel D3R/D2R antagonist PF-4363467 (3). Compound 3 was designed to possess CNS drug-like properties as defined by its CNS MPO desirability score (≥4/6). In addition to good physicochemical properties, 3 exhibited low nanomolar affinity for the D3R (D3 Ki = 3.1 nM), good subtype selectivity over D2R (D2 Ki = 692 nM), and high selectivity for D3R versus other biogenic amine receptors. In vivo, 3 dose-dependently attenuated opioid self-administration and opioid drug-seeking behavior in a rat operant reinstatement model using animals trained to self-administer fentanyl. Further, traditional extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), adverse side effects arising from D2R antagonism, were not observed despite high D2 receptor occupancy (RO) in rodents, suggesting that compound 3 has a unique in vivo profile. Collectively, our data support further investigation of dual D3R and D2R antagonists for the treatment of drug addiction.

  8. Kinetic modeling of 11C-LY2795050, a novel antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of the kappa opioid receptor in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Henry, Shannan; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    11C-LY2795050 is a novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this first-in-human study was to determine the optimal kinetic model for analysis of 11C-LY2795050 imaging data. Sixteen subjects underwent baseline scans and blocking scans after oral naltrexone. Compartmental modeling and multilinear analysis-1 (MA1) were applied using the arterial input functions. Two-tissue compartment model and MA1 were found to be the bes...

  9. Evaluation of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore: conversion of a potent delta-opioid receptor antagonist into a potent delta agonist and ligands with mixed properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Bianchi, Clementina; Rizzi, Daniela; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-31

    Analogues of the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore were prepared to test the hypothesis that a "spacer" and a third aromatic center in opioid peptides are required to convert a delta-antagonist into ligands with delta-agonist or with mixed delta-antagonist/mu-agonist properties. Potent delta-agonists and bifunctional compounds with high delta- and mu-opioid receptor affinities were obtained by varying the spacer length [none, NH-CH(2), NH-CH(2)-CH(2), Gly-NH-CH(2)] and C-terminal aromatic nucleus [1H-benzimidazole-2-yl, phenyl (Ph) and benzyl groups]. C-terminal modification primarily affected mu-opioid receptor affinities, which increased maximally 1700-fold relative to the prototype delta-antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH(2) and differentially modified bioactivity. In the absence of a spacer (1), the analogue exhibited dual delta-agonism (pEC(50), 7.28) and delta-antagonism (pA(2), 7.90). H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) (2) became a highly potent delta-agonist (pEC(50), 9.90), slightly greater than deltorphin C (pEC(50), 9.56), with mu-agonism (pE(50), 7.57), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Bid (4) retained potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.0) but with an order of magnitude less mu-agonism. Similarly, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph (5) had nearly equivalent high delta-agonism (pEC(50), 8.52) and mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.59), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph (6) whose spacer was longer by a single methylene group exhibited potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.25) and very high mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.57). These data confirm that the distance between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and a third aromatic nucleus is an important criterion in converting Dmt-Tic from a highly potent delta-antagonist into a potent delta-agonist or into ligands with mixed delta- and mu-opioid properties.

  10. Two new opioid delta-receptor ligands: a highly selective agonist and a potent selective antagonist in in vitro isolated preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, M; Aoki, K; Kajiwara, M; Shinozaki, K; Inoue, H; Oka, T

    1984-12-01

    N,N-Diallyl derivatives of enkephalin analogues were chemically synthesized, and their biological activities were estimated in vitro isolated preparations. N,N-Diallyl-[D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin [test compound I] at doses up to 10 microM did not inhibit the electrically-evoked contractions of guinea-pig ileum, which had been suggested to contain opioid mu- and kappa-receptors, but it significantly depressed the contractions of mouse vas deferens, which had been indicated to contain mu-, kappa- and delta-receptors, suggesting that test compound I did not act on both mu- and kappa-receptors, but acted on delta-receptors. Additionally, the Ke (equilibrium dissociation constant) values against test compound I of naloxone were approximately 30 nM and similar to those of Mr 2266, also indicating that test compound I acted as a delta agonist. Moreover, the Ke values of ICI 154129 against compound I were approximately 340 nM, strongly suggesting that test compound I acted as a delta agonist. The Ke values of bis-[N,N-diallyl-[D-Ala2, Leu5]-enkephalyl]-cystine [test compound II] against [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin in mouse vas deferens and morphine or ethylketocyclazocine in guinea-pig ileum were 44.9 nM and 5.00 or 11.3 microM, respectively, showing that test compound II was a potent selective opioid delta antagonist. In conclusion, among compounds synthesized, two new opioid delta-receptor ligands, one being a highly selective agonist and the other being a potent selective antagonist in in vitro isolated preparations, were found in the present study.

  11. Participation of dorsal periaqueductal gray 5-HT1A receptors in the panicolytic-like effect of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist Nor-BNI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Almeida, Camila Biesdorf; Rangel, Marcel Pereira; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Sestile, Caio César; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2017-06-01

    Panic patients may have abnormalities in serotonergic and opioidergic neurotransmission. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) plays an important role in organizing proximal defense, related to panic attacks. The 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) is involved in regulating escape behavior that is organized in the dPAG. Activation of κ-opioid receptor (KOR) in this region causes anxiogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the involvement of KOR in regulating escape behavior, using systemic and intra-dPAG injection of the KOR antagonist Nor-BNI. As panic models, we used the elevated T-maze (ETM) and the dPAG electrical stimulation test (EST). We also evaluated whether activation of the 5-HT1A-R or the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in the dPAG contributes to the Nor-BNI effects. The results showed that systemic administration of Nor-BNI, either subcutaneously (2.0 and 4.0mg/kg) or intraperitoneally (2.0mg/kg), impaired escape in the EST, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. Intra-dPAG injection of this antagonist (6.8nmol) caused the same effect in the EST and in the ETM. Association of ineffective doses of Nor-BNI and the 5-HT1A-R agonist 8-OH-DPAT caused panicolytic-like effect in these two tests. Previous administration of the 5-HT1A-R antagonist WAY-100635, but not of the MOR antagonist CTOP, blocked the panicolytic-like effect of Nor-BNI. These results indicate that KOR enhances proximal defense in the dPAG through 5-HT1A-R modulation, independently of MOR. Because former results indicate that the 5-HT1A-R is involved in the antipanic action of antidepressants, KOR antagonists may be useful as adjunctive or alternative drug treatment of panic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antinociceptive Action of Isolated Mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through Activation of Opioid Receptor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Aris Mohd Moklas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG, a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt. In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist, naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist, naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist naloxonazine (µ1-receptor antagonist and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg. The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor.

  13. Peripheral opioid antagonist enhances the effect of anti-tumor drug by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Suzuki

    Full Text Available The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to "wake up" these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs. The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs.

  14. Pharmacological differentiation of opioid receptor antagonists by molecular and functional imaging of target occupancy and food reward-related brain activation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiner, E A; Beaver, J; Makwana, A; Searle, G; Long, C; Nathan, P J; Newbould, R D; Howard, J; Miller, S R; Bush, M A; Hill, S; Reiley, R; Passchier, J; Gunn, R N; Matthews, P M; Bullmore, E T

    2011-08-01

    Opioid neurotransmission has a key role in mediating reward-related behaviours. Opioid receptor (OR) antagonists, such as naltrexone (NTX), can attenuate the behaviour-reinforcing effects of primary (food) and secondary rewards. GSK1521498 is a novel OR ligand, which behaves as an inverse agonist at the μ-OR sub-type. In a sample of healthy volunteers, we used [(11)C]-carfentanil positron emission tomography to measure the OR occupancy and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure activation of brain reward centres by palatable food stimuli before and after single oral doses of GSK1521498 (range, 0.4-100 mg) or NTX (range, 2-50 mg). GSK1521498 had high affinity for human brain ORs (GSK1521498 effective concentration 50 = 7.10 ng ml(-1)) and there was a direct relationship between receptor occupancy (RO) and plasma concentrations of GSK1521498. However, for both NTX and its principal active metabolite in humans, 6-β-NTX, this relationship was indirect. GSK1521498, but not NTX, significantly attenuated the fMRI activation of the amygdala by a palatable food stimulus. We thus have shown how the pharmacological properties of OR antagonists can be characterised directly in humans by a novel integration of molecular and functional neuroimaging techniques. GSK1521498 was differentiated from NTX in terms of its pharmacokinetics, target affinity, plasma concentration-RO relationships and pharmacodynamic effects on food reward processing in the brain. Pharmacological differentiation of these molecules suggests that they may have different therapeutic profiles for treatment of overeating and other disorders of compulsive consumption.

  15. New series of potent delta-opioid antagonists containing the H-Dmt-Tic-NH-hexyl-NH-R motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingyou; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Fujita, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    Heterodimeric compounds H-Dmt-Tic-NH-hexyl-NH-R (R=Dmt, Tic, and Phe) exhibited high affinity to delta- (K(i)delta=0.13-0.89nM) and mu-opioid receptors (K(i)mu=0.38-2.81nM) with extraordinary potent delta antagonism (pA(2)=10.2-10.4). These compounds represent the prototype for a new class of structural homologues lacking mu-opioid receptor-associated agonism (IC(50)=1.6-5.8muM) based on the framework of bis-[H-Dmt-NH]-alkyl (Okada, Y.; Tsuda, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Yokoi, T.; Sasaki, Y.; Ambo, A.; Konishi, R.; Nagata, M.; Salvadori, S.; Jinsmaa, Y.; Bryant, S. D.; Lazarus, L. H. J. Med. Chem.2003, 46, 3201), which exhibited both high mu affinity and bioactivity.

  16. Local peripheral opioid effects and expression of opioid genes in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia in neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Ilona; Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez; Korostynski, Michal; Makuch, Wioletta; Kaminska, Dorota; Przewlocka, Barbara; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the efficacy of local intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of peptide and non-peptide mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor agonists in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Locally applied agonists dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced flinching of the inflamed paw and induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in sciatic nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain. These effects were mediated by peripheral opioid receptors localized at the side of tissue/nerve injury, as was demonstrated by selective and non-selective opioid receptors antagonists. The ED(50) dose range of mu- and kappa-agonists required to induce analgesia in neuropathy was much higher than the ED(50) for inflammation; moreover, only delta-agonists were effective in the same dose range in both pain models. Additionally, effective antinociception was achieved at a lower dose of peptide, compared to non-peptide, opioids. Such findings support the use of the peripheral administration of opioid peptides, especially delta-agonists, in treating chronic pain. Furthermore, in order to assess whether adaptations in the expression of opioid genes could underlie the clinical observation of reduced opioid effectiveness in neuropathic pain, we analyzed the abundance of opioid transcripts in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during the neuropathy and inflammation. Nerve injury down-regulated mRNA for all types of opioid receptors in the DRG, which is predicted to decrease in the synthesis of opioid receptors to possibly account for the reduced effectiveness of locally administered opioids in neuropathy. The obtained results differentiate inflammatory and neuropathic pain and provide a novel insight into the peripheral effectiveness of opioids in both types of pain.

  17. Opioid Basics: Prescription Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Injury Violence Prevention WISQARS (Injury & Death Data) Prescription Opioids Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prescription opioids ... overdose before they start. Risk Factors for Prescription Opioid Abuse and Overdose Research shows that some risk ...

  18. The automated radiosynthesis and purification of the opioid receptor antagonist, [6-O-methyl-11C]diprenorphine on the GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Michael; Prenant, Christian; Brown, Gavin; McMahon, Adam; Lowe, Jonathan; Jones, Anthony

    2014-05-15

    [6-O-Methyl-(11)C]diprenorphine ([(11)C]diprenorphine) is a positron emission tomography ligand used to probe the endogenous opioid system in vivo. Diprenorphine acts as an antagonist at all of the opioid receptor subtypes, that is, μ (mu), κ (kappa) and δ (delta). The radiosynthesis of [(11)C]diprenorphine using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the 'wet' method on a home-built automated radiosynthesis set-up has been described previously. Here, we describe a modified synthetic method to [(11)C]diprenorphine performed using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the gas phase method on a GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module. Also described is the use of [(11)C]methyl triflate as the carbon-11 methylating agent for the [(11)C]diprenorphine syntheses. [(11)C]Diprenorphine was produced to good manufacturing practice standards for use in a clinical setting. In comparison to previously reported [(11)C]diprenorphine radiosyntheisis, the method described herein gives a higher specific activity product which is advantageous for receptor occupancy studies. The radiochemical purity of [(11)C]diprenorphine is similar to what has been reported previously, although the radiochemical yield produced in the method described herein is reduced, an issue that is inherent in the gas phase radiosynthesis of [(11)C]methyl iodide. The yields of [(11)C]diprenorphine are nonetheless sufficient for clinical research applications. Other advantages of the method described herein are an improvement to both reproducibility and reliability of the production as well as simplification of the purification and formulation steps. We suggest that our automated radiochemistry route to [(11)C]diprenorphine should be the method of choice for routine [(11)C]diprenorphine productions for positron emission tomography studies, and the production process could easily be transferred to other radiochemistry modules such as the TRACERlab FX C pro.

  19. From the potent and selective mu opioid receptor agonist H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) to the potent delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Cocco, Maria Teresa; Salvadori, Severo; Romagnoli, Romeo; Sasaki, Yusuke; Okada, Yoshio; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2005-08-25

    H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) binds with high affinity and selectivity to the mu opioid receptor and is a potent and long-acting analgesic. Substitution of d-Arg in position 2 with Tic and masking of the lysine amine side chain by Z protection and of the C-terminal carboxylic function instead of the amide function transform a potent and selective mu agonist into a potent and selective delta antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH. Such a delta antagonist could be used as a pharmacological tool.

  20. Discovery of Novel Multifunctional Ligands with μ/δ Opioid Agonist/Neurokinin-1 (NK1) Antagonist Activities for the Treatment of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Aswini Kumar; Apostol, Christopher R; Wang, Yue; Forte, Brittany L; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Davis, Peg; Rankin, David; Molnar, Gabriella; Olson, Keith M; Porreca, Frank; Vanderah, Todd W; Hruby, Victor J

    2015-11-12

    Multifunctional ligands with agonist bioactivities at μ/δ opioid receptors (MOR/DOR) and antagonist bioactivity at the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) have been designed and synthesized. These peptide-based ligands are anticipated to produce better biological profiles (e.g., higher analgesic effect with significantly less adverse side effects) compared to those of existing drugs and to deliver better synergistic effects than coadministration of a mixture of multiple drugs. A systematic structure-activity relationship (SAR) study has been conducted to find multifunctional ligands with desired activities at three receptors. It has been found that introduction of Dmt (2,6-dimethyl-tyrosine) at the first position and NMePhe at the fourth position (ligand 3: H-Dmt-d-Ala-Gly-NMePhe-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(3',5'-(CF3)2)) displays binding as well as functional selectivity for MOR over DOR while maintaining efficacy, potency, and antagonist activity at the NK1R. Dmt at the first position with Phe(4-F) at the fourth position (ligand 5: H-Dmt-d-Ala-Gly-Phe(4-F)-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(3',5'-(CF3)2)) exhibits balanced binding affinities at MOR and DOR though it has higher agonist activity at DOR over MOR. This study has led to the discovery of several novel ligands including 3 and 5 with excellent in vitro biological activity profiles. Metabolic stability studies in rat plasma with ligands 3, 5, and 7 (H-Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe(4-F)-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(3',5'-(CF3)2)) showed that their stability depends on modifications at the first and fourth positions (3: T1/2 > 24 h; 5: T1/2 ≈ 6 h; 7: T1/2 > 2 h). Preliminary in vivo studies with these two ligands have shown promising antinociceptive activity.

  1. Kinetic modeling of (11)C-LY2795050, a novel antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of the kappa opioid receptor in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Henry, Shannan; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-11-01

    (11)C-LY2795050 is a novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this first-in-human study was to determine the optimal kinetic model for analysis of (11)C-LY2795050 imaging data. Sixteen subjects underwent baseline scans and blocking scans after oral naltrexone. Compartmental modeling and multilinear analysis-1 (MA1) were applied using the arterial input functions. Two-tissue compartment model and MA1 were found to be the best models to provide reliable measures of binding parameters. The rank order of (11)C-LY2795050 distribution volume (VT) matched the known regional KOR densities in the human brain. Blocking scans with naltrexone indicated no ideal reference region for (11)C-LY2795050. Three methods for calculation of the nondisplaceable distribution volume (VND) were assessed: (1) individual VND estimated from naltrexone occupancy plots, (2) mean VND across subjects, and (3) a fixed fraction of cerebellum VT. Approach (3) produced the lowest intersubject variability in the calculation of binding potentials (BPND, BPF, and BPP). Therefore, binding potentials of (11)C-LY2795050 can be determined if the specific binding fraction in the cerebellum is presumed to be unchanged by diseases and experimental conditions. In conclusion, results from the present study show the suitability of (11)C-LY2795050 to image and quantify KOR in humans.

  2. Kinetic modeling of 11C-LY2795050, a novel antagonist radiotracer for PET imaging of the kappa opioid receptor in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Henry, Shannan; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Tauscher, Johannes; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    11C-LY2795050 is a novel kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The purpose of this first-in-human study was to determine the optimal kinetic model for analysis of 11C-LY2795050 imaging data. Sixteen subjects underwent baseline scans and blocking scans after oral naltrexone. Compartmental modeling and multilinear analysis-1 (MA1) were applied using the arterial input functions. Two-tissue compartment model and MA1 were found to be the best models to provide reliable measures of binding parameters. The rank order of 11C-LY2795050 distribution volume (VT) matched the known regional KOR densities in the human brain. Blocking scans with naltrexone indicated no ideal reference region for 11C-LY2795050. Three methods for calculation of the nondisplaceable distribution volume (VND) were assessed: (1) individual VND estimated from naltrexone occupancy plots, (2) mean VND across subjects, and (3) a fixed fraction of cerebellum VT. Approach (3) produced the lowest intersubject variability in the calculation of binding potentials (BPND, BPF, and BPP). Therefore, binding potentials of 11C-LY2795050 can be determined if the specific binding fraction in the cerebellum is presumed to be unchanged by diseases and experimental conditions. In conclusion, results from the present study show the suitability of 11C-LY2795050 to image and quantify KOR in humans. PMID:25182664

  3. Dopamine D1 and opioid receptor antagonists differentially reduce the acquisition and expression of fructose-conditioned flavor preferences in BALB/c and SWR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Tamar T; Yakubov, Yakov; Huang, Donald; Fitzgerald, Gregory; Natanova, Elona; Sclafani, Anthony; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Sugar appetite is influenced by unlearned and learned preferences in rodents. The present study examined whether dopamine (DA) D1 (SCH23390: SCH) and opioid (naltrexone: NTX) receptor antagonists differentially altered the expression and acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preferences (CFPs) in BALB/c and SWR mice. In expression experiments, food-restricted mice alternately (10 sessions, 1h) consumed a flavored (e.g., cherry) 8% fructose+0.2% saccharin solution (CS+) and a differently-flavored (e.g., grape) 0.2% saccharin solution (CS-). Two-bottle CS choice tests (1h) occurred 0.5h following vehicle: SCH (200 or 800 nmol/kg) or NTX (1 or 5mg/kg). SCH, but not NTX significantly reduced CS+ preference in both strains. In acquisition experiments, 0.5h prior to 10 acquisition training sessions, vehicle, SCH (50 nmol/kg), NTX (1 mg/kg) or Limited Control vehicle treatments were administered, followed by two-bottle CS choice tests without injections. SCH and NTX reduced training intakes in both strains. BALB/c mice displayed hastened extinction of the fructose-CFP following training with SCH, but not NTX. SCH eliminated fructose-CFP acquisition in SWR mice, whereas NTX hastened extinction of the CFP. These results are compared to previous drug findings obtained with sucrose-CFPs in SWR and BALB/c mice, and are discussed in terms of differential effects of these sugars on oral and post-oral conditioning.

  4. Orally administered H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2), a potent mu/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, regulates obese-related factors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Myers, Page H; Blankenship, Terry; Wilson, Ralph; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2009-08-15

    Orally active dual mu-/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH(2)-Ph (MZ-2) was applied to study body weight gain, fat content, bone mineral density, serum insulin, cholesterol and glucose levels in female ob/ob (B6.V-Lep/J homozygous) and lean wild mice with or without voluntary exercise on wheels for three weeks, and during a two week post-treatment period under the same conditions. MZ-2 (10mg/kg/day, p.o.) exhibited the following actions: (1) reduced body weight gain in sedentary obese mice that persisted beyond the treatment period without effect on lean mice; (2) stimulated voluntary running on exercise wheels of both groups of mice; (3) decreased fat content, enhanced bone mineral density (BMD), and decreased serum insulin and glucose levels in obese mice; and (4) MZ-2 (30 microM) increased BMD in human osteoblast cells (MG-63) comparable to naltrexone, while morphine inhibited mineral nodule formation. Thus, MZ-2 has potential application in the clinical management of obesity, insulin and glucose levels, and the amelioration of osteoporosis.

  5. Central effect of SNC 80, a selective and systemically active delta-opioid receptor agonist, on gastrointestinal propulsion in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccardo, M; Improta, G; Tabacco, A

    1998-01-26

    We investigated the effects of SNC 80 ((+)-4-[alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-ally1-2,5-dimethyl-1-pipera zinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide), a new highly selective, non-peptidic and systemically active delta-opioid receptor agonist, on gastrointestinal and colonic propulsion in mice. Intraperitoneally (i.p.) SNC 80 (1, 10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly decreased gastrointestinal propulsion measured as transit of an orally administered charcoal meal. Pretreatment with the delta-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (1 mg/kg) subcutaneously (s.c.), with the non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.) or the mu1-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly decreased the antitransit effect of SNC 80 but pretreatment with the non-selective opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg, s.c.), a quaternary salt of naloxone that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, did not. SNC 80 (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), produced dose-related inhibition of colonic propulsion measured as the increase in mean expulsion time of a 3 mm glass bead placed in the distal colon. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.) and naltrindole (1 mg/kg, s.c.), completely antagonized the colonic antipropulsive effect of SNC 80. In contrast, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg, s.c.), left the inhibitory effect of i.p. SNC 80 on colonic function unchanged. These results suggest that peripherally injected SNC 80 inhibits gastrointestinal transit and colonic propulsion. It does so mainly through a central mechanism. Although the gastrointestinal antitransit effect of SNC 80 is naltrindole- and naloxonazine-sensitive, we cannot exclude an opioid-independent mechanism. The colonic antipropulsive effect of SNC 80 confirms the inhibitory role of the central delta-opioid receptor system on colonic motility.

  6. A comprehensive study on the putative δ-opioid receptor (sub)types using the highly selective δ-antagonist, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkas, Erika; Bakota, Lidia; Gulya, Karoly; Wen, Ting; Pintar, John; Tóth, Geza; Szucs, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The goal of our work was a throughout characterization of the pharmacology of the TIPP-analog, Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH and see if putative δ-opioid receptor subtypes can be distinguished. Analgesic latencies were assessed in mouse tail-flick assays after intrathecal administration. In vitro receptor autoradiography, binding and ligand-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays were performed in the presence of putative δ(1)-(DPDPE: agonist, BNTX: antagonist), δ(2)-(agonist: deltorphin II, Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II, antagonist: naltriben) and μ-(DAMGO: agonist) opioid ligands. The examined antagonist inhibited the effect of DPDPE by 60%, but did not antagonize δ(2)- and μ-agonist induced analgesia. The radiolabeled form identified binding sites with K(D)=0.18 nM and receptor densities of 102.7 fmol/mg protein in mouse brain membranes. The binding site distribution of the [(3)H]Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH agreed well with that of [(3)H]Ile(5,6)-deltorphin II as revealed by receptor autoradiography. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH displayed 2.49±0.06 and 0.30±0.01 nM potency against DPDPE and deltorphin II in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay, respectively. The rank order of potency of putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-antagonists against DPDPE and deltorphin was similar in brain and CHO cells expressing human δ-opioid receptors. Deletion of the DOR-1 gene resulted in no residual binding of the radioligand and no significant DPDPE effect on G-protein activation. Tyr-Tic-(2S,3R)-β-MePhe-Phe-OH is a highly potent and δ-opioid specific antagonist both in vivo and in vitro. However, the putative δ(1)- and δ(2)-opioid receptors could not be unequivocally distinguished in vitro.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-1 (Antanal-1) and [Dmt(1), D-2-Nal(4)]endomorphin-2 (Antanal-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichna, Jakub; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Schiller, Peter W; Poels, Jeroen; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Costentin, Jean; Janecka, Anna

    2007-02-01

    To synthesize potent antagonists of the mu-opioid receptor, we prepared a series of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 analogues with 3-(1-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-1-Nal) or 3-(2-naphthyl)-d-alanine (d-2-Nal) in position 4. Some of these analogues displayed weak antagonist properties. We tried to strengthen these properties by introducing the structurally modified tyrosine residue 2,6-dimethyltyrosine (Dmt) in place of Tyr1. Among the synthesized compounds, [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-1, designated antanal-1, and [Dmt1, d-2-Nal4]endomorphin-2, designated antanal-2, turned out to be highly potent and selective mu-opioid receptor antagonists, as judged on the basis of two functional assays, the receptor binding assay and the hot plate test of analgesia. Interestingly, another analogue of this series, [Dmt1, d-1-Nal4]endomorphin-1, turned out to be a moderately potent mixed mu-agonist/delta-antagonist.

  8. Topical treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone accelerates the remodeling phase of full-thickness wound healing in type 1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Jessica A; Zagon, Ian S; Lewis, Gregory S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-10-01

    Wound repair involves a series of overlapping phases that include inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling, with the latter phase requiring months for proper healing. Delays in any of these processes can result in infection, chronic ulceration, and possible amputation. Diabetes is a major risk factor for improper wound repair, and impaired wound healing is a major complication for more than 26 million people in the US diagnosed with diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in moisturizing cream reverses delays in wound closure in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. NTX accelerated DNA synthesis and increased the number of epithelial and mast cells, as well as new blood vessel formation. In this study, remodeling was evaluated in T1D rats up to eight weeks after initial wounding. Twenty days following wounding, diabetic rats treated with vehicle had elevated numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts, suggesting delayed healing processes; birefringence of granulation tissue stained with Sirius red revealed diminished collagen formation and maturation. Wound tissue from NTX-treated T1D rats had comparable numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts to control specimens, as well as accelerated maturation of granulation tissue. The integrity of wounded skin was evaluated by tensile strength measurements. T1D resulted in delayed wound healing, and wounded skin that displayed reduced tensile strength relative to normal rats. Topical NTX applied to wounds in T1D rats resulted in enhanced collagen formation and maturation over a 60-day period of time. Moreover, the force required to tear skin of NTX-treated T1D rats was elevated relative to the force necessary to tear the skin of vehicle-treated T1D rats, and comparable to that for normal rats. These data reveal that complications in wound healing associated with T1D involve the novel OGF-OGFr pathway, and that topical NTX is an effective treatment to enhance wound

  9. Tumor Targeting and Pharmacokinetics of a Near-Infrared Fluorescent-Labeled δ-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Agent, Dmt-Tic-Cy5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Amanda Shanks; Estrella, Veronica; Stark, Valerie E; Cohen, Allison S; Chen, Tingan; Casagni, Todd J; Josan, Jatinder S; Lloyd, Mark C; Johnson, Joseph; Kim, Jongphil; Hruby, Victor J; Vagner, Josef; Morse, David L

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging can be employed for the development of novel cancer targeting agents. Herein, we investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and cellular uptake of Dmt-Tic-Cy5, a delta-opioid receptor (δOR) antagonist-fluorescent dye conjugate, as a tumor-targeting molecular imaging agent. δOR expression is observed normally in the CNS, and pathologically in some tumors, including lung liver and breast cancers. In vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo experiments were conducted to image and quantify the fluorescence signal associated with Dmt-Tic-Cy5 over time using in vitro and intravital fluorescence microscopy and small animal fluorescence imaging of tumor-bearing mice. We observed specific retention of Dmt-Tic-Cy5 in tumors with maximum uptake in δOR-expressing positive tumors at 3 h and observable persistence for >96 h; clearance from δOR nonexpressing negative tumors by 6 h; and systemic clearance from normal organs by 24 h. Live-cell and intravital fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that Dmt-Tic-Cy5 had sustained cell-surface binding lasting at least 24 h with gradual internalization over the initial 6 h following administration. Dmt-Tic-Cy5 is a δOR-targeted agent that exhibits long-lasting and specific signal in δOR-expressing tumors, is rapidly cleared from systemic circulation, and is not retained in non-δOR-expressing tissues. Hence, Dmt-Tic-Cy5 has potential as a fluorescent tumor imaging agent.

  10. A role for the mu opioid receptor in the antidepressant effects of buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shivon A; Erickson, Rebecca L; Browne, Caroline A; Lucki, Irwin

    2017-02-15

    Buprenorphine (BPN), a mixed opioid drug with high affinity for mu (MOR) and kappa (KOR) opioid receptors, has been shown to produce behavioral responses in rodents that are similar to those of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs. Although recent studies have identified KORs as a primary mediator of BPN's effects in rodent models of depressive-like behavior, the role of MORs in BPN's behavioral effects has not been as well explored. The current studies investigated the role of MORs in mediating conditioned approach behavior in the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) test, a behavioral measure previously shown to be sensitive to chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs. The effects of BPN were evaluated in the NIH test 24h post-administration in mice with genetic deletion of the MOR (Oprm1(-/-)) or KOR (Oprk1(-/-)), or after pharmacological blockade with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and selective MOR antagonist cyprodime. We found that behavioral responses to BPN in the NIH test were blocked in Oprm1(-/-) mice, but not in Oprk1(-/-) mice. Both cyprodime and naltrexone significantly reduced approach latency at doses experimentally proven to antagonize the MOR. In contrast the selective MOR agonist morphine and the selective KOR antagonist nor-BNI were both ineffective. Moreover, antinociceptive studies revealed persistence of the MOR antagonist properties of BPN at 24h post-administration, the period of behavioral reactivity. These data support modulation of MOR activity as a key component of BPN's antidepressant-like effects in the NIH paradigm.

  11. Molecular Simulation of κ Opioid Receptor and Antagonist Interaction Mechanism%κ阿片受体与拮抗剂作用机制的计算机模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁俊杰; 丁晓琴

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To build the three-dimensional model of human κ opioid receptor and study its interaction mechanism with antagonist. METHODS The three-dimensional model of κ opioid receptor was built through homology modeling, while the reliability of the model was assessed by Profile-3D analysis and Ramachandran plot. The active site of human κ opioid receptor was searched by DS/Define and Edit Binding Site, and the reasonable active cavity was gained. Then the selective antagonist 5'-GNTI was docked into κ opioid receptor model using CDOCKER. A series of molecular mechanics and dynamics operations were performed to find the most stable binding interaction between 5'-GNTI and the receptor. The "antagonist-bound" receptor model was built and test set antagonists were docked using AutoDock program. RESULTS There was a good linear relationship between △G and the experimental affinity lgKi (correlation r =0. 779). The ionic interaction was formed between the Asp138 residue at TMⅢ and the protonated amine of different antagonist classes, while the Tyr 139 at TMⅢ, Phe231 and Phe235 at TMV, and Trp287 and His291 at TMVI interacted with the hydrophobic groups or aromatic groups of antagonists with hydrophobic or π-π interaction. CONCLUSION The built receptor model is reasonable and may be used in designing new more active and selective antagoasits. The present study provides a consistent framework for further investigation of the opioid receptor-ligand interaction mechanisms.%目的 构建人κ阿片受体三维结构模型,探讨拮抗剂与受体作用机制.方法 应用同源模建方法构建人κ阿片受体三维结构模型,采用Profile-3D和Ramachaadran图验证模型的可靠性.将选择性κ阿片受体拮抗剂5'-GNTI与受体进行分子对接和分子动力学优化,得到拮抗状态κ阿片受体模型.采用AutoDock对接软件将受体与测试集拮抗剂进行分子对接研究.结果 搜寻和分析受体的活性位点,确定合理的κ阿

  12. Inhibition of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats by oxytocin is mediated by mu and kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Maria; Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2005-02-21

    Recent studies showed that oxytocin plays an important role in the modulation of pain at different levels of the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of oxytocin on trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats. With the experimental settings used in this study, we have demonstrated that oxytocin showed significant analgesic effect after intracerebroventricular administration in rats, as assayed by the amplitude of the retractory movements of the tongue after tooth pulp stimulation. Antinociceptive effect of oxytocin was inhibited by subsequent perfusion of cerebral ventricles with oxytocin antagonist, [deamino-Cys1-D-Tyr(OEt)2-Thr4-Orn8]-oxytocin, atosiban. An involvement of opioid system in the oxytocin-induced analgesia was studied after intracerebroventricular administration of different opioid antagonists: non-selective naloxone, mu-selective beta-funaltrexamine, delta-selective naltrindole, and kappa-selective nor-binaltorphimine. It was shown that inhibition of antinociceptive effects was mediated through mu and kappa opioid receptors, indicating that there is a synergy between oxytocin and opioid systems in transmitting and modulating pain stimuli. Co-administration of oxytocin and a mu-selective endogenous opioid ligand endomorphin-2 did not significantly increase the antinociceptive activity of endomorphin-2.

  13. Opioid intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... easily result in intoxication. The provider prescribes a sleep medicine (sedative) in addition to the opioid. The provider ... an opioid with certain other drugs, such as sleep medicines or alcohol Taking the opioid in ways not ...

  14. Activation profiles of opioid ligands in HEK cells expressing δ opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Clark J; Demirci Hasan; Gharagozlou Parham; Lameh Jelveh

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to characterize the activation profiles of 15 opioid ligands in transfected human embryonic kidney cells expressing only δ opioid receptors. Activation profiles of most of these ligands at δ opioid receptors had not been previously characterized in vitro. Receptor activation was assessed by measuring the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production. Results Naltrexone and nalorphine were classified as antagonists at δ opioid receptor....

  15. Opioids in Preclinical and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    Since 1952, when Gates determined the stereo structure of morphine, numerous groups have focused on discovering a nonnarcotic opioid drug [1]. Although several natural, semisynthetic, and synthetic opioid ligands (alkaloids and peptides) have been developed in clinical studies, very few were nonnarcotic opioid drugs [2]. One of the most important studies in the opioid field appeared in 1976, when Martin and colleagues [3] established types of opioid receptors (these are now classified into μ, δ, and κ types). Later, Portoghese discovered a highly selective μ type opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine [4]. This led to the finding that the μ type opioid receptor was correlated to drug dependence [5]. Consequently, δ, and particularly κ, opioid agonists were expected to lead to ideal opioid drugs. Moreover, opioid antagonists were evaluated for the treatment of symptoms related to undesirable opioid system activation. In this chapter, we provide a short survey of opioid ligands in development and describe the discovery of the two most promising drugs, TRK-851 [6] and TRK-820 (nalfurafine hydrochloride) [7].

  16. μ-Opioid and 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus interact for the regulation of panic-related defensive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Yamashita, Paula Shimene de Melo; Frias, Alana Tercino; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne; Zangrossi, Helio

    2017-06-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) have been implicated in the genesis and regulation of panic-related defensive behaviors, such as escape. Previous results point to an interaction between serotonergic and opioidergic systems within the DPAG to inhibit escape, involving µ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1AR). In the present study we explore this interaction in the DMH, using escape elicited by electrical stimulation of this area as a panic attack index. The obtained results show that intra-DMH administration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.5 nmol) prevented the panicolytic-like effect of a local injection of serotonin (20 nmol). Pretreatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTOP (1 nmol) blocked the panicolytic-like effect of the 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OHDPAT (8 nmol). Intra-DMH injection of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (0.3 nmol) also inhibited escape behavior, and a previous injection of the 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY-100635 (0.37 nmol) counteracted this panicolytic-like effect. These results offer the first evidence that serotonergic and opioidergic systems work together within the DMH to inhibit panic-like behavior through an interaction between µ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors, as previously described in the DPAG.

  17. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  18. Panicolytic-like effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaes, Gislaine Cardoso de Souza; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Sestile, Caio Cesar; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Souza, Rodolfo Luis Silva; Porcu, Mauro; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2017-05-30

    Tramadol is a synthetic opioid prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, acting as agonist of μ-opioid receptors and serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NE) reuptake inhibitor. This study evaluated the effects of tramadol in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM), an animal model that evaluates behavioural parameters such as anxiety and panic. Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally (i.p.) treated acutely with tramadol (16 and 32mg/kg) and were submitted to the ETM. Tramadol (32mg/kg) promoted a panicolytic-like effect. Considering that dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) is the main brain structure related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD), this study also evaluated the participation of 5-HT and opioid receptors located in the dPAG in the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol. Seven days after stereotaxic surgery for implantation of a cannula in the dPAG, the animals were submitted to the test. To assess the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors on the effect of tramadol, we combined the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100635 (0.37nmol), microinjected intra-dPAG, 10min prior to the administration of tramadol (32mg/kg, i.p.). WAY100635 did not block the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol. We also associated the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, systemically (1mg/kg, i.p.) or intra-dPAG (0.5nmol) administered 10min prior to tramadol (32mg/kg, i.p.). Naloxone blocked the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol in both routes of administrations, showing that tramadol modulates acute panic defensive behaviours through its interaction with opioid receptors located in the dPAG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of opioid-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David; Norton, Christine; Bharucha, Adil E

    Up to 40% of patients taking opioids develop constipation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) may limit the adequate dosing of opioids for pain relief and reduce quality of life. Health professionals must therefore inquire about bowel function in patients receiving opioids. The management of OIC includes carefully re-evaluating the necessity, type and dose of opioids at each visit. Lifestyle modification and alteration of aggravating factors, the use of simple laxatives and, when essential, the addition of newer laxatives or opioid antagonists (naloxone, naloxegol or methylnaltrexone) can be used to treat OIC. This review discusses the recent literature regarding the management of OIC and provides a rational approach to assessing and managing constipation in individuals receiving opioids.

  20. Opioid Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  2. Designing Opioids That Deter Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Raffa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid formulations designed to resist or deter abuse are an important step in reducing opioid abuse. In creating these new formulations, the paradigm of drug development target should be introduced. Biological targets relating to the nature of addiction may pose insurmountable hurdles based on our current knowledge and technology, but products that use behavioral targets seem logical and feasible. The population of opioid abusers is large and diverse so behavioral targets are more challenging than they appear at first glance. Furthermore, we need to find ways to correlate behavioral observations of drug liking to actual use and abuse patterns. This may involve revisiting some pharmacodynamic concepts in light of drug effect rather than peak concentration. In this paper we present several new opioid analgesic agents designed to resist or deter abuse using physical barriers, the inclusion of an opioid agonist or antagonist, an aversive agent, and a prodrug formulation. Further, this paper also provides insight into the challenges facing drug discovery in this field. Designing and screening for opioids intended to resist or deter abuse is an important step to meet the public health challenge of burgeoning prescription opioid abuse.

  3. Panicolytic-like action of bradykinin in the dorsal periaqueductal gray through μ-opioid and B2-kinin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestile, Caio César; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Gama, Vanessa Scalco; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2017-09-01

    A wealth of evidence has shown that opioid and kinin systems may control proximal defense in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG), a critical panic-associated area. Studies with drugs that interfere with serotonin-mediated neurotransmission suggest that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) synergistically interacts with the 5-HT1A receptor in the dPAG to inhibit escape, a panic-related behavior. A similar inhibitory effect has also been reported after local administration of bradykinin (BK), which is blocked by the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. The latter evidence, points to an interaction between BK and opioids in the dPAG. We further explored the existence of this interaction through the dPAG electrical stimulation model of panic. We also investigated whether intra-dPAG injection of captopril, an inhibitor of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) that also degrades BK, causes a panicolytic-like effect. Our results showed that intra-dPAG injection of BK inhibited escape performance in a dose-dependent way, and this panicolytic-like effect was blocked by the BK type 2 receptor (B2R) antagonist HOE-140, and by the selective MOR antagonist CTOP. Conversely, the panicolytic-like effect caused by local administration of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO was antagonized by pre-treatment with either CTOP or HOE-140, indicating cross-antagonism between MOR and B2R. Finally, intra-dPAG injection of captopril also impaired escape in a dose-dependent way, and this panicolytic-like effect was blocked by pretreatment with HOE-140, suggesting mediation by endogenous BK. The panicolytic-like effect of captopril indicates that the use of ACE inhibitors in the clinical management of panic disorder may be worth exploring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  5. Evaluation of 7 {alpha}-O-IADPN as a new potential SPECT opioid receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.F.; Mao, S.Y. [Fujian Medical College, Fuzhou (China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Tafani, J.A.M.; Coulais, Y.; Guiraud, R. [Hospital Purpan, Toulouse (France). Service Central de medicine Nucleaire; Zajac, J.M. [LPTF-CNRS, Toulouse (France)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A new iodinated diprenorphine antagonist analogue, [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}.-O-IADPN, [E] - 17-(cyclopropylmethyl) -4,5 (x-epoxy- 18,19-dihydro-3-hydroxy-6-methoxy-7 {alpha}-[1-(3-iodoallyl)oxy-1-methylethyl]-6,14-endo-ethenomorphinan for in vivo and in vitro studies as a potential central nervous system (CNS) opioid receptor imaging agent was developed. In vivo biodistribution and metabolism of 7 {alpha}-O-lADPN in rat demonstrated that 0.16% of the iodinated compound was presented in mouse brain with a degradation-resistant at the first 60 min, and that 36% of the total cerebral radioactivity and 63% of its specific binding to opioid receptors were observed 20 min after i.v. injection. The cerebral radioactivity in mouse brain concentrated in the basal ganglion and cortex, and displayed a remarkably high target-to-non-target ratio (cortex/cerebellum = 60 min post-injection). The in vitro binding studies showed that [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}-O-IADPN binds non selectively to multiple opioid receptors {mu} = 8 K) with a very high affinity (Ki = 0.4 + 0.2 nM). Ex vivo autoradiography results in mouse further confirmed the high uptake and retention of this agent in basal ganglion region and cortex. The planar imaging of monkey brains after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}-O-IADPN clearly displayed that multiple opioid receptors can be visualized. With the excellent in vitro affinity and in vivo stability to deiodination and high target-to-nontarget ratio, [{sup 123}I]7 {alpha}- O-IADPN appears to be useful as a CNS opioid receptor imaging probe for SPECT in primate and non-primate.

  6. Receptor-selective changes in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors after chronic naltrexone treatment in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesscher, HMB; Bailey, Alexis; Burbach, JPH; van Ree, JM; Kitchen, [No Value; Gerrits, MAFM

    2003-01-01

    Chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone induces functional supersensitivity to opioid agonists, which may be explained by receptor up-regulation induced by opioid receptor blockade. In the present study, the levels of opioid receptor subtypes through the brain of mice were determined

  7. Receptor-selective changes in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors after chronic naltrexone treatment in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesscher, HMB; Bailey, Alexis; Burbach, JPH; van Ree, JM; Kitchen, [No Value; Gerrits, MAFM

    Chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone induces functional supersensitivity to opioid agonists, which may be explained by receptor up-regulation induced by opioid receptor blockade. In the present study, the levels of opioid receptor subtypes through the brain of mice were determined

  8. Ibudilast: a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor in brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Schwenkgrub

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibudilast (IBD is a non-selective (3, 4, 10, 11 phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitor, used mainly as a bronchodilator for the treatment of bronchial asthma. PDE play a central role in cellular function (e.g. differentiation, synaptic plasticity and inflammatory response by metabolizing cyclic nucleotides. The results from preclinical and clinical studies indicate that IBD has a broader range of action through suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, toll-like receptor 4 blockade (TLR-4, inhibition of a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, up-regulation the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10, and promotion of neurotrophic factors (GDNF, NGF, NT-4. Recent data indicate that the efficacy of IBD appears to be independent from PDE inhibition activity and rather linked to glial activity attenuation. Additional advantages of IBD, such as crossing the blood–brain barrier, good tolerance and activity by oral administration, makes it a promising therapeutic candidate for treating neuroinflammatory conditions, where the currently available treatment remains unsatisfying due to poor tolerability and/or sub-optimal efficacy. IBD has no direct receptor affinity with exemption of some undefined effect on adenosine receptors that makes the drug devoid of its receptors-mediated adverse effects. Current article provides an overview of the pharmacology of IBD with a focus on preclinical and clinical data supporting its potential neuroprotective benefits for neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain, medication overuse headache, stroke, opioid, alcohol and methamphetamine abuse.

  9. Delayed cardioprotection is mediated via a non-peptide delta opioid agonist, SNC-121, independent of opioid receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemal H; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J

    2004-01-01

    Acute cardioprotection is mediated primarily through delta opioid receptor stimulation independent of micro or kappa opioid receptor stimulation. Delayed cardioprotection is mediated by delta opioid receptor agonists but ambiguity remains about direct receptor involvement. Therefore, we investigated the potential of SNC-121, a non-peptide delta opioid agonist, to produce delayed cardioprotection and characterized the role of opioid receptors in this delayed response. All rats underwent 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. SNC-121 induced a significant delayed cardioprotective effect. To determine the nature of this SNC-121-induced delayed cardioprotection, rats were treated with specific opioids receptor antagonists and underwent pertussis toxin (PT) treatment prior to opioid agonist stimulation. Control rats were injected with saline and allowed to recover for 24 hours. Pretreatment and early treatment with opioid receptor antagonists failed to inhibit the delayed protective effects of SNC-121, as did pretreatment with PT. Treatment with a free radical scavenger, 2-mercaptopropionyl glycine, at the time of opioid stimulation attenuated the delayed cardioprotective effects of SNC-121. These data suggest that delayed cardioprotection is stimulated via non-peptide delta opioid agonists by a mechanism unrelated to opioid receptor activation. The mechanism appears to be a non-opioid receptor mediated production of reactive oxygen species that triggers the signaling cascade leading to delayed cardioprotection.

  10. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  11. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain? Opioids attach to specific proteins, called opioid receptors, on nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, ... essential functions like breathing when they attach to opioid receptors in a brain area that controls respiration. Opioid ...

  12. Buprenorphine: an analgesic with an expanding role in the treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Susan E

    2002-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a long-acting opioid with both agonist and antagonist properties, binds to mu-opioid (OP(3)), kappa-opioid (OP(2)), delta-opioid (OP(1)), and nociceptin (ORL-1) receptors. Its actions at these receptors have not been completely characterized, although buprenorphine is generally regarded as a mu-opioid receptor partial agonist and a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. Its pharmacology is further complicated by an active metabolite, norbuprenorphine. Although buprenorphine can be used as an analgesic agent, it is of greater importance in the treatment of opioid abuse. Because of its partial agonist activity at mu-opioid receptors and its long half-life, buprenorphine has proven to be an excellent alternative to methadone for either maintenance therapy or detoxification of the opioid addict. Although buprenorphine may ultimately prove to be superior to methadone in the maintenance of the pregnant addict, its effects on the developing fetus must be carefully evaluated.

  13. Dmt and opioid peptides: a potent alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Salvadori, Severo; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the Dmt (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine)-Tic pharmacophore into the design of opioid ligands produced an extraordinary family of potent delta-opioid receptor antagonists and heralded a new phase in opioid research. First reviewed extensively in 1998, the incorporation of Dmt into a diverse group of opioid molecules stimulated the opioid field leading to the development of unique analogues with remarkable properties. This overview will document the crucial role played by this residue in the proliferation of opioid peptides with high receptor affinity (K(i) equal to or less than 1 nM) and potent bioactivity. The discussion will include the metamorphosis between delta-opioid receptor antagonists to delta-agonists based solely on subtle structural changes at the C-terminal region of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore as well as their behavior in vivo. Dmt may be considered promiscuous due to the acquisition of potent mu-agonism by dermorphin and endomorphin derivatives as well as by a unique class of opioidmimetics containing two Dmt residues separated by alkyl or pyrazinone linkers. Structural studies on the Dmt-Tic compounds were enhanced tremendously by x-ray diffraction data for three potent and biologically diverse Dmt-Tic opioidmimetics that led to the development of pharmacophores for both delta-opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. Molecular modeling studies of other unique Dmt opioid analogues illuminated structural differences between delta- and mu-receptor ligand interactions. The future of these compounds as therapeutic applications for various medical syndromes including the control of cancer-associated pain is only a matter of time and perseverance.

  14. O papel dos antagonistas periféricos dos opióides no tratamento da dor e nos cuidados perioperatórios El papel de los antagonistas periféricos de los opioides en el tratamiento del dolor y en los cuidados perioperatorios The role of peripheral opiate antagonists in pain medicine and perioperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Tanaka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Estudos clínicos e pré-clínicos sobre os antagonistas periféricos dos opióides aumentaram nosso conhecimento sobre os efeitos dos opióides exógenos e endógenos. CONTEÚDO: Este artigo faz uma revisão dos estudos clínicos e pré-clínicos sobre a disfunção intestinal secundária ao uso de opióides. CONCLUSÕES: Se forem aprovados, esses fármacos podem representar soluções importantes para os problemas encontrados na prática médica com relação ao tratamento da dor.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Estudios clínicos y preclínicos sobre los antagonistas periféricos de los opioides aumentaron nuestro conocimiento sobre los efectos de los opioides exógenos y endógenos. CONTENIDO: Este artículo nos trae una reflexión de los estudios clínicos y preclínicos sobre la disfunción intestinal secundaria al uso de opioides. CONCLUSIONES: Si se aprueban, los referidos fármacos pueden representar soluciones importantes para los problemas encontrados en la práctica médica en relación con el tratamiento del dolor.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pre-clinical and clinical trials of peripheral opiate antagonists have shed new light on the effects of exogenous and endogenous opioids. CONTENTS: This article review preclinical studies and clinical opioid bowel disfunction trials. CONCLUSIONS: If approved these drugs may offer potential solutions to important clinical problems in pain management.

  15. Inhibition of opioid systems in the hypothalamus as well as the mesolimbic area suppresses feeding behavior of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H; Ardianto, C; Yonemochi, N; Yang, L; Ohashi, T; Ikegami, M; Nagase, H; Kamei, J

    2015-12-17

    Opioid receptors, especially μ-opioid receptors, in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) are reported to regulate food motivation. However, the roles of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are not fully understood. Moreover, since μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are reported to distribute in the hypothalamus, these receptors in the hypothalamus might regulate feeding behavior. Thus, the present study investigated the role of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the VTA, the NAcc and the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding behavior. Male ICR mice were subjected to a feeding test after food deprivation for 16h. The mRNA levels of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), preproenkephalin (PENK) and prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursors of endogenous opioid peptides, were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The systemic injection of non-selective (naloxone) and selective μ (β-funaltrexamine; β-FNA), δ (naltrindole) and κ (norbinaltorphimine; norBNI) opioid receptor antagonists markedly reduced food intake. In contrast, the systemic injection of preferential μ (morphine), selective δ (KNT-127) and κ (U-50,488) opioid receptor agonists did not change food intake. The mRNA levels of POMC, PENK and PDYN were decreased in the hypothalamus and the midbrain after food deprivation, whereas the mRNA levels of PENK and PDYN, but not POMC, were decreased in the ventral striatum. The injection of naloxone into the NAcc, VTA and lateral hypothalamus (LH), but not the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, significantly decreased food intake. The injection of β-FNA and naltrindole into the LH, but not the VTA or NAcc, decreased food intake. The injection of norBNI into the LH and VTA, but not the NAcc, decreased food intake. These results indicate that μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the LH play a more important role in the regulation of feeding behavior than those receptors in the VTA and the NAcc. Copyright © 2015

  16. Dimethyltyrosine, the Viagra of Opioids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction The introduction of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) [1] at the N-terminus of Tyr-Tic ( 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid )-containing δ-opioid antagonists[2-8] enhances receptor affinity and in vitro bioactivity to several orders of magnitude[1] and its application in the formation of ligands with new properties[9], such as potent inverse agonism[10].

  17. Addictive evaluation of cholic acid-verticinone ester, a potential cough therapeutic agent with agonist action of opioid receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-liang ZHANG; Hui WANG; Chang CHEN; Hui-fang PI; Han-li RUAN; Peng ZHANG; Ji-zhou WU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this work was to search for potential drugs with potent antitussive and expectorant activities as well as a low toxicity, but without addictive properties. Cholic acid-verticinone ester (CA-Ver) was synthesized based on the clearly elucidated antitussive and expectorant activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. In our previous study, CA-Vet showed a much more potent activity than codeine phosphate. This study was carried out to investigate the central antitussive mechanism and the addictive evaluation of CA-Ver.Methods: Testing on a capsaicin-induced cough model of mice pretreated with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, was performed for the observation of CA-Ver's central antitussive mechanism. We then took naloxone-induced withdrawal tests of mice for the judgment of CA-Ver's addiction. Lastly, we determined the opioid dependence of CA-Ver in the guinea pig ileum. Results: The test on the capsaicin-induced cough model showed that naloxone could block the antitussive effect of CA-Ver,suggesting the antitussive mechanism of CA-Ver was related to the central opioid receptors. The naloxone-urged withdrawal tests of the mice showed that CA-Ver was not addictive, and the test of the opioid dependence in the guinea pig ileum showed that CA-Ver had no withdrawal response.Conclusion: These findings suggested that CA-Ver deserved attention for its potent antitussive effects related to the central opioid receptors, but without addiction, and had a good development perspective.

  18. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double......-five studies utilized 'inhibitory' test paradigms (ITP) and 38 studies utilized 'sensitizing' test paradigms (STP). The ITP-studies were characterized as conditioning modulation models (22 studies) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation models (rTMS; 3 studies), and, the STP-studies as secondary...

  19. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  20. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folabomi A Oladosu

    Full Text Available A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia.In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia.These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  1. Opioid Basics: Fentanyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Opioid Overdose Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Opioid Overdose Opioid Basics Understanding the Epidemic Commonly Used ...

  2. Opioid Abuse and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opioids, sometimes called narcotics, are a type of drug. They include strong prescription pain relievers, such as ... tramadol. The illegal drug heroin is also an opioid. Some opioids are made from the opium plant, ...

  3. Challenges to antagonist blockade during sustained-release naltrexone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Vederhus, John Kåre; Hjerkinn, Bjørg; Gossop, Michael; Hegstad, Solfrid; Kristensen, Øistein; Waal, Helge

    2010-09-01

    Naltrexone is a competitive opioid antagonist that effectively blocks the action of heroin and other opioid agonists. Sustained-release naltrexone formulations are now available that provide long-acting opioid blockade. This study investigates the use of heroin and other opioids among opioid-dependent patients receiving treatment with long-acting naltrexone implants, their subjective experience of drug 'high' after opioid use, and factors associated with opioid use. Participants (n = 60) were opioid-dependent patients receiving treatment with naltrexone implants. Outcome data on substance use, drug 'high', depression and criminal activity were collected over a 6-month period. Blood samples were taken to monitor naltrexone plasma levels, and hair samples to verify self-reported opioid use. More than half [n = 34 or 56%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 44-68%)] the patients challenged the blockade with illicit opioids during the 6-month treatment period; 44% (n = 26; 95% CI 32-56%) were abstinent from opioids. Mean opioid use was reduced from 18 [standard deviation (SD)13] days during the month preceding treatment to 6 days (SD 11) after 6 months. Of the respondents questioned on opioid 'high' (n = 31), nine patients (30%; 95% CI 16-47%) reported partial drug 'high' following illicit opioid use, and three (12%; 95% CI 3-26%) reported full 'high'. Opioid use was associated with use of non-opioid drugs and criminal behaviour. Challenging naltrexone blockade with heroin on at least one occasion is common among sustained-release naltrexone patients, but only a minority of patients use opioids regularly. Challenges represent a warning sign for poor outcomes and often occur in the context of polydrug use and social adjustment problems.

  4. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia.

  5. Methylphenidate and μ opioid receptor interactions: a pharmacological target for prevention of stimulant abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinmin; Spencer, Thomas J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2011-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly used and highly effective treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. As the therapeutic use of MPH has increased, so has its abuse and illicit street-use. Yet, the mechanisms associated with development of MPH-associated abuse and dependence are not well understood making it difficult to develop methods to help its mitigation. As a result, many ADHD patients especially children and youth, that could benefit from MPH treatment do not receive it and risk lifelong disabilities associated with untreated ADHD. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms associated with development of MPH addiction and designing methods to prevent it assume high public health significance. Using a mouse model we show that supra-therapeutic doses of MPH produce rewarding effects (surrogate measure for addiction in humans) in a conditioned place preference paradigm and upregulate μ opioid receptor (MOPR) activity in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with reward circuitry. Co-administration of naltrexone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, prevents MPH-induced MOPR activation and the rewarding effects. The MPH-induced MOPR activation and rewarding effect require activation of the dopamine D1 but not the D2-receptor. These findings identify the MOPR as a potential target for attenuating rewarding effects of MPH and suggest that a formulation that combines naltrexone with MPH could be a useful pharmaceutical approach to alleviate abuse potential of MPH and other stimulants.

  6. The µ-opioid system promotes visual attention to faces and eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokova, Olga; Laeng, Bruno; Løseth, Guro; Eikemo, Marie; Willoch, Frode; Leknes, Siri

    2016-12-01

    Paying attention to others' faces and eyes is a cornerstone of human social behavior. The µ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, central to social reward-processing in rodents and primates, has been proposed to mediate the capacity for affiliative reward in humans. We assessed the role of the human MOR system in visual exploration of faces and eyes of conspecifics. Thirty healthy males received a novel, bidirectional battery of psychopharmacological treatment (an MOR agonist, a non-selective opioid antagonist, or placebo, on three separate days). Eye-movements were recorded while participants viewed facial photographs. We predicted that the MOR system would promote visual exploration of faces, and hypothesized that MOR agonism would increase, whereas antagonism decrease overt attention to the information-rich eye region. The expected linear effect of MOR manipulation on visual attention to the stimuli was observed, such that MOR agonism increased while antagonism decreased visual exploration of faces and overt attention to the eyes. The observed effects suggest that the human MOR system promotes overt visual attention to socially significant cues, in line with theories linking reward value to gaze control and target selection. Enhanced attention to others' faces and eyes represents a putative behavioral mechanism through which the human MOR system promotes social interest.

  7. The pharmacological treatment of opioid addiction--a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, Philipp; Gossop, Michael; Waal, Helge; Bramness, Jorgen

    2010-06-01

    This article reviews the main pharmacotherapies that are currently being used to treat opioid addiction. Treatments include detoxification using tapered methadone, buprenorphine, adrenergic agonists such as clonidine and lofexidine, and forms of rapid detoxification. In opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), methadone is most widely used. OMT with buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone combination, or other opioid agonists is also discussed. The use of the opioid antagonists naloxone (for the treatment of intoxication and overdose) and oral and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone (for relapse prevention) is also considered. Although recent advances in the neurobiology of addictions may lead to the development of new pharmacotherapies for the treatment of addictive disorders, a major challenge lies in delivering existing treatments more effectively. Pharmacotherapy of opioid addiction alone is usually insufficient, and a complete treatment should also include effective psychosocial support or other interventions. Combining pharmacotherapies with psychosocial support strategies that are tailored to meet the patients' needs represents the best way to treat opioid addiction effectively.

  8. Opioid/NMDA receptors blockade reverses the depressant-like behavior of foot shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2014-07-15

    Opioid and glutamatergic receptors have a key role in depression following stress. In this study, we assessed opioid and glutamatergic receptors interaction with the depressant-like behavior of acute foot-shock stress in the mouse forced swimming test. Stress was induced by intermittent foot shock stimulation during 30min and swim periods were afterwards conducted by placing mice in separated glass cylinders filled with water for 6min. The immobility time during the last 4min of the test was considered. Acute foot-shock stress significantly increased the immobility time of mice compared to non-stressed control group (P≤0.01). Administration of non-selective opioid receptors antagonist, naltrexone (1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.), and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (5mg/kg), significantly reduced the immobility time in stressed animals (P≤0.01). Lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg), naltrexone (0.3mg/kg), NMDA (75mg/kg) and morphine(5mg/kg) had no effect on foot-shock stressed mice. Combined treatment of sub-effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 significantly showed an antidepressant-like effect (P≤0.001). On the other hand, co-administration of non-effective doses of NMDA and morphine with effective doses of naltrexone and MK-801 reversed the anti-immobility effect of these drugs. Taken together, we have for the first time demonstrated the possible role of opioid/NMDA receptors signaling in the depressant-like effect of foot-shock stress, and proposed the use of drugs that act like standard anti-depressants in stress-induced depression.

  9. A non-opioid pathway for dynorphin-caused spinal cord injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chen; Liangbi Xiang; Jun Liu; Dapeng Zhou; Hailong Yu; Qi Wang; Wenfeng Han; Mingming Guo

    2012-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of dynorphin into rats via subarachnoid catheter induces damage to spinal cord tissue and motor function. Injection of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphine, or the excitatory amino acid N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 into rats alleviated the pathological changes of dynorphin-caused spinal cord tissue injury and reduced the acid phosphatase activity in the spinal cord. The experimental findings indicate that there are opioid and non-opioid pathways for dynorphin-induced spinal cord injury, and that the non-opioid receptor pathway may be mediated by the excitatory amino acid N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

  10. Opioid regulation of Pavlovian overshadowing in fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelikowsky, Moriel; Fanselow, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    In Pavlovian overshadowing, a stimulus that predicts a biologically important event reduces conditioning to another, equally predictive stimulus. We tested the effects of an opioid antagonist and dopamine agonist on the ability of a salient white noise to overshadow a less salient light. Rats were conditioned to fear a light or a noise-light compound using a mild footshock. Compound-conditioned rats trained under the saline vehicle revealed significant overshadowing of the light by the noise. This overshadowing effect was significantly attenuated in rats trained under the opioid antagonist naltrexone, consistent with an opioid-mediated negative feedback model of conditioning. In line with predictions made by negative feedback-type models, we failed to obtain overshadowing with few trials, suggesting that the processes underlying conditioning during initial trials do not contribute to the opioid-dependent Pavlovian overshadowing obtained in our preparation. Lastly, we compared the involvement of dopamine-mediated and opioid-mediated processes in overshadowing by conditioning rats under the partial dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 or the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Both naltrexone and SKF 38393 were found to attenuate overshadowing; however, the behavioral profiles produced by each pharmacological manipulation were distinct. Collectively, these studies demonstrate an important role for both opioid- and dopamine-mediated processes in multiple-trial overshadowing.

  11. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  12. Understanding the Opioid Overdose Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can happen when someone takes more than prescribed, combines opioids with depressants (such as Xanax ® ) or alcohol, ... suffering with chronic pain.” Read More "Understanding Opioids" Articles Understanding The Opioid Overdose Epidemic / Beyond Opioids: Mind ...

  13. [Opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, W

    2004-05-01

    Opioids are the drugs of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. However, clinical evidence suggests that opioids can elicit increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli suggesting that administration of opioids can activate both pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, up-regulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days, which might by reflected by clinical observations that large doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists increased postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients often requires increasing doses and may be accompanied by the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha(2)-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor selectivity.

  14. The Useage of Opioids and their Adverse Effects in Gastrointestinal Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, MahmoudReza; Sohrabi, MasourReza; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Opium is one of the oldest herbal medicines currently used as an analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal treatment. The effects of opium are principally mediated by the μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Opioid substances consist of all natural and synthetic alkaloids that are derived from opium. Most of their effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion result from suppression of neural activity. Inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, changes in motor patterns, and blockage of peristalsis result from opioid use. Common adverse effects of opioid administration include sedation, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dependency and tolerance, and respiratory depression. The most common adverse effect of opioid use is constipation. Although stool softeners are frequently used to decrease opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, however they are not efficacious. Possibly, the use of specific opioid receptor antagonists is a more suitable approach. Opioid antagonists, both central and peripheral, could affect gastrointestinal function and visceromotor sensitivity, which suggests an important role for endogenous opioid peptides in the control of gastrointestinal physiology. Underlying diseases or medications known to influence the central nervous system (CNS) often accelerate the opioid’s adverse effects. However, changing the opioid and/or route of administration could also decrease their adverse effects. Appropriate patient selection, patient education and discussion regarding potential adverse effects may assist physicians in maximizing the effectiveness of opioids, while reducing the number and severity of adverse effects. PMID:24829664

  15. Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld1, Kelly M Standifer21Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Department of Physiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Constipation is a significant problem related to opioid medications used to manage pain. This review attempts to outline the latest findings related to the therapeutic usefulness of a μ opioid receptor antagonist, methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. The review highlights methylnaltrexone bromide (RelistorTM; Progenics/Wyeth a quaternary derivative of naltrexone, which was recently approved in the United States, Europe and Canada. The Food and Drug Administration in the United States approved a subcutaneous injection for the treatment of opioid bowel dysfunction in patients with advanced illness who are receiving palliative care and when laxative therapy has been insufficient. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally restricted, μ opioid receptor antagonist that accelerates oral–cecal transit in patients with opioidinduced constipation without reversing the analgesic effects of morphine or inducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal. An analysis of the mechanism of action and the potential benefits of using methylnaltrexone is based on data from published basic research and recent clinical studies.Keywords: methylnaltrexone, constipation, opioid

  16. Dextromethorphan differentially affects opioid antinociception in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Opioid drugs such as morphine and meperidine are widely used in clinical pain management, although they can cause some adverse effects. A number of studies indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may play a role in the mechanism of morphine analgesia, tolerance and dependence. Being an antitussive with NMDA antagonist properties, dextromethorphan (DM) may have some therapeutic benefits when coadministered with morphine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DM on th...

  17. Naloxone Administration for Suspected Opioid Overdose: An Expanded Scope of Practice by a Basic Life Support Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Services Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Ryan M.; Dickinson, Laura; Ng, Nicholas D.; DeGeorge, Lindsey M.; Nable, Jose V.

    2017-01-01

    Opioid abuse is a growing and significant public health concern in the United States. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that can rapidly reverse the respiratory depression associated with opioid toxicity. Georgetown University's collegiate-based emergency medical services (EMS) agency recently adopted a protocol, allowing providers to administer…

  18. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioid-induced nausea and vomiting: mechanisms and strategies for their limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Rocco, Alessandra; Mandatori, Ilenia; Mattia, Consalvo

    2012-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common gastrointestinal symptoms following opioid administration, for either chronic or acute pain management. As a consequence, patients' dissatisfaction has a negative impact on treatment efficacy. A number of mechanisms have been identified, involving both central and peripheral sites. This article will review the pathophysiology of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting and the various pharmacological treatments currently available for its management. Preventive strategies and therapeutic approaches are evaluated in the perioperative setting and in chronic pain. Newer drugs include second generation serotonin receptor antagonists (palonosetron) and neurokinin-1 (NK-1) antagonists (aprepitant).

  19. Involvement of peripheral mu opioid receptors in scratching behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-15

    Pruritus is a common adverse effect of opioid treatment. However, the mechanism by which pruritus is induced by opioid administration is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of the intradermal injection of loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid receptor agonist, on the itch sensation. When injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back in mice, loperamide elicited scratching behavior. We also examined the effects of the selective mu opioid receptor agonist [d-Ala², N-Me-Phe⁴, Gly⁵-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), the selective delta opioid receptor agonist [d-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE), and the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488H on scratching behavior in mice in order to determine which subtype is involved in opioid-induced pruritus. Following intradermal injection into the rostral part of the back in mice, DAMGO elicited scratching behavior, while DPDPE and U-50488H did not. This suggests that peripheral mu opioid activation elicits the itch sensation. Next, we focused on the treatment of opioid-induced itch sensation without central adverse effects. Naloxone methiodide is a peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonist. In the present study, naloxone methiodide significantly suppressed scratching behavior induced by loperamide and DAMGO. These findings suggest that mu opioid receptors play a primary role in peripheral pruritus and that naloxone methiodide may represent a possible remedy for opioid-induced itching.

  20. The impact of opioid-induced hyperalgesia for postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, Wolfgang; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that--besides their well known analgesic activity - opioids can increase rather than decrease sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Based on the observation that opioids can activate pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems, this pain hypersensitivity has been attributed to a relative predominance of pronociceptive mechanisms. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, upregulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days in rodents, and also in humans large-doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists were found to increase postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients is often associated with a requirement for increasing doses and the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha2-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor/selectivity.

  1. Involvement of cholecystokinin in the opioid tolerance induced by dipyrone (metamizol) microinjections into the periaqueductal gray matter of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorici, Victor; Nogueira, Lourdes; Aponte, Yexica; Vanegas, Horacio

    2004-11-01

    The analgesic effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is partly due to an action upon the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), which triggers the descending pain control system and thus inhibits nociceptive transmission. This action of NSAIDs engages endogenous opioids at the PAG, the nucleus raphe magnus and the spinal cord. Repeated administration of NSAIDs such as dipyrone (metamizol) and acetylsalicylate thus induces tolerance to these compounds and cross-tolerance to morphine. Since cholecystokinin plays a key role in opioid tolerance, the present study in rats investigated whether PAG cholecystokinin is also responsible for tolerance to PAG-microinjected dipyrone. Microinjection of cholecystokinin (1 ng/0.5 microl) into PAG blocked the antinociceptive effect of a subsequent microinjection of dipyrone (150 microg/0.5 microl) into the same site, as evaluated by the tail flick and hot plate tests. Microinjection of proglumide (0.4 microg/0.5 microl), a non-selective cholecystokinin antagonist, into PAG prevented the development of tolerance to subsequent microinjections of dipyrone, as well as cross-tolerance to microinjection of morphine (5 microg/0.5 microl) into the same site. In rats tolerant to PAG dipyrone, a PAG microinjection of proglumide restored the antinociceptive effect of a subsequent microinjection of dipyrone or morphine. These results suggest that PAG-microinjected dipyrone triggers and/or potentiates local opioidergic circuits leading to descending inhibition of nociception, on the one hand, and to a local antiopioid action by cholecystokinin, on the other. Reiteration of these events would then result in an enhancement of cholecystokinin's antiopioid action and thus tolerance to opioids and dipyrone in the PAG.

  2. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-05

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

  3. Methyl-orvinol-Dual activity opioid receptor ligand inhibits gastrointestinal transit and alleviates abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Marta; Jarmuż, Agata; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Husbands, Stephen; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The major IBS-D symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain and discomfort. High density of opioid receptors (ORs) in the GI tract and their participation in the maintenance of GI homeostasis make ORs ligands an attractive option for developing new anti-IBS-D treatments. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of methyl-orvinol on the GI motility and secretion and in mouse models mimicking symptoms of IBS-D. In vitro, the effects of methyl-orvinol on electrical field stimulated smooth muscle contractility and epithelial ion transport were characterized in the mouse colon. In vivo, the following tests were used to determine methyl-orvinol effect on mouse GI motility: colonic bead expulsion, whole GI transit and fecal pellet output. An antinociceptive action of methyl-orvinol was assessed in the mouse model of visceral pain induced by mustard oil. Methyl-orvinol (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) inhibited colonic smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist) and β-funaltrexamine (selective MOP antagonist). Experiments with a selective KOP receptor agonist, U50488 revealed that methyl-orvinol is a KOP receptor antagonist in the GI tract. Methyl-orvinol enhanced epithelial ion transport. In vivo, methyl-orvinol inhibited colonic bead expulsion and prolonged GI transit. Methyl-orvinol improved hypermotility and reduced abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Methyl-orvinol could become a promising drug candidate in chronic therapy of functional GI diseases such as IBS-D. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral chroma...

  5. Non-Selective Lexical Access in Different-Script Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jihye; Jiang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Lexical access in bilinguals is known to be largely non-selective. However, most studies in this area have involved bilinguals whose two languages share the same script. This study aimed to examine bilingual lexical access among bilinguals whose two languages have distinct scripts. Korean-English bilinguals were tested in a phoneme monitoring task…

  6. Tonic inhibitory control exerted by opioid peptides in the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus on regional hemodynamic activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Andrée; Bachelard, Hélène

    2002-07-01

    1. Systemic and regional cardiovascular changes were measured following bilateral microinjection of specific and selective opioid-receptor antagonists into the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN) of awake, freely moving rats. 2. PVN microinjection of increasing doses of the specific opioid antagonist naloxone - methiodide (1 - 5.0 nmol), or a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (0.05 - 0.5 nmol), evoked important cardiovascular changes characterized by small and transient increases in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), vasoconstriction in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and vasodilation in the hindquarter vascular bed. 3. No significant cardiovascular changes were observed following PVN administration of the highly selective delta-opioid-receptor antagonist, ICI 174864 (0.1 - 1 nmol), or the selective kappa-opioid-receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphine (0.1 - 1 nmol). 4. Most of the cardiovascular responses to naloxone (3 nmol) and beta-funaltrexamine (0.5 nmol) were attenuated or abolished by an i.v. treatment with a specific vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist. 5. These results suggest that endogenous opioid peptides and mu-type PVN opioid receptors modulate a tonically-active central depressor pathway acting on systemic and regional haemodynamic systems. Part of this influence could involve a tonic inhibition of vasopressin release.

  7. The Need for Psychosocial Interventions to Facilitate the Transition to Extended-Release Naltrexone (XR-NTX) Treatment for Opioid Dependence: A Concise Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Susan E.; Rounsaville, Dan; Hoskinson, Randall; Park, Tae Woo; Ames, Evan G.; Neirinckx, Victor D.; Friedmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given the increase of opioid dependence and opioid-related morbidity and mortality, improving treatment options for individuals with opioid dependence warrants increased attention. This article provides a concise review of work in this area. Remission from opioid dependence can be very difficult to sustain, particularly in the absence of opioid replacement or opioid antagonist therapy. For those who wish to transition from opioid use or opioid replacement therapy to opioid antagonist therapy, a significant challenge can be the period of withdrawal symptoms that must be endured prior to the initiation of opioid antagonist therapy. Studies that have incorporated psychosocial interventions into detoxification protocols have found that they can result in improved treatment outcomes. Interventions based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy have shown promise in the treatment of clinical disorders that present with symptoms similar to those of opioid withdrawal and have been found to positively impact outcomes among those tapering from methadone. However, the use of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based intervention has yet to be studied among opioid-dependent patients transitioning to XR-NTX, and its value to those transitioning to XR-NTX is currently unknown. PMID:27512336

  8. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  9. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  10. Opioid bifunctional ligands from morphine and the opioid pharmacophore Dmt-Tic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Marczak, Ewa D; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Si, Yu Gui; Neumeyer, John L

    2011-02-01

    Bifunctional ligands containing an ester linkage between morphine and the δ-selective pharmacophore Dmt-Tic were synthesized, and their binding affinity and functional bioactivity at the μ, δ and κ opioid receptors determined. Bifunctional ligands containing or not a spacer of β-alanine between the two pharmacophores lose the μ agonism deriving from morphine becoming partial μ agonists 4 or μ antagonists 5. Partial κ agonism is evidenced only for compound 4. Finally, both compounds showed potent δ antagonism.

  11. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0373 TITLE: " Opioid Abuse after TBI...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE " Opioid Abuse after TBI" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...the brain’s reward circuitry which may make an injured brain more susceptible to the rewarding effects of opioids . We are currently conducting

  12. Modulation of peripheral μ-opioid analgesia by σ1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Montilla-García, Ángeles; González-Cano, Rafael; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Romero, Lucía; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Montes, Rosa; Fernández-Pastor, Begoña; Merlos, Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of σ1-receptor inhibition on μ-opioid-induced mechanical antinociception and constipation. σ1-Knockout mice exhibited marked mechanical antinociception in response to several μ-opioid analgesics (fentanyl, oxycodone, morphine, buprenorphine, and tramadol) at systemic (subcutaneous) doses that were inactive in wild-type mice and even unmasked the antinociceptive effects of the peripheral μ-opioid agonist loperamide. Likewise, systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) treatment of wild-type mice with the selective σ1 antagonists BD-1063 [1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride] or S1RA [4-[2-[[5-methyl-1-(2-naphthalenyl)1H-pyrazol-3-yl]oxy]ethyl] morpholine hydrochloride] potentiated μ-opioid antinociception; these effects were fully reversed by the σ1 agonist PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate) hydrochloride], showing the selectivity of the pharmacological approach. The μ-opioid antinociception potentiated by σ1 inhibition (by σ1-receptor knockout or σ1-pharmacological antagonism) was more sensitive to the peripherally restricted opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide than opioid antinociception under normal conditions, indicating a key role for peripheral opioid receptors in the enhanced antinociception. Direct interaction between the opioid drugs and σ1 receptor cannot account for our results, since the former lacked affinity for σ1 receptors (labeled with [(3)H](+)-pentazocine). A peripheral role for σ1 receptors was also supported by their higher density (Western blot results) in peripheral nervous tissue (dorsal root ganglia) than in several central areas involved in opioid antinociception (dorsal spinal cord, basolateral amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostroventral medulla). In contrast to its effects on nociception, σ1-receptor inhibition did not alter fentanyl- or loperamide-induced constipation, a peripherally mediated nonanalgesic opioid effect. Therefore

  13. Which potent opioid? Important criteria for selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, J G

    1987-05-01

    Opioids remain the drugs of choice for the treatment of severe pain. In recent years several new potent opioids have become available for clinical use. These newer drugs are generally safer than the older morphine-like compounds and their differing pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties allow the physician to choose an appropriate drug according to the clinical situation and need of an individual patient. These drugs are classified according to their activity at the opioid receptors. The opioid agonists produce their pharmacological effect by an almost exclusive action at mu-receptors. The agonist-antagonist group are kappa-receptor agonists and either competitive antagonists at the mu-receptor or weak mu-agonists. The use of the potent opioid agonists, because of their potential for causing respiratory depression, is restricted to hospitals. Fentanyl, the oldest drug of this class, is extensively used as a supplement to general anaesthesia, or in high doses as a 'complete' anaesthetic for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Alfentanil and sufentanil are newer fentanyl derivatives. Alfentanil is unique in having a very short elimination half-life. This is a particular advantage during short operations and for day-case surgery. For longer operations alfentanil can be given as a continuous infusion to supplement nitrous oxide anaesthesia. Sufentanil is about 10 times more potent than fentanyl and is more rapidly eliminated. Initial reports suggest that it may be more effective than fentanyl as an anaesthetic supplement and that recovery may be more rapid. Both sufentanil and alfentanil are also used in cardiac anaesthesia. The newer agonist-antagonist opioids, butorphanol, nalbuphine and buprenorphine, have largely replaced pentazocine in clinical practice. Unlike pentazocine, they cause a low incidence of dysphoric side effects. Like the pure agonists, they cause respiratory depression; however, in contrast to the pure agonists this is not dose related

  14. Clinically employed opioid analgesics produce antinociception via μ-δ opioid receptor heteromers in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Banks, Matthew L; Lunzer, Mary M; Negus, Stevens S; Rice, Kenner C; Portoghese, Philip S

    2012-09-19

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans.

  15. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  16. Differences between opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn; Jensen, Rasmus D.; Nielsen, Lecia M.;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids...... to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients...... who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences...

  17. Effect of lysine at C-terminus of the Dmt-Tic opioid pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Onnis, Valentina; Congiu, Cenzo; Zotti, Margherita; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Trapella, Claudio; Salvadori, Severo

    2006-09-01

    Substitution of Gly with side-chain-protected or unprotected Lys in lead compounds containing the opioid pharmacophore Dmt-Tic [H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph, mu agonist/delta antagonist; H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph, mu agonist/delta agonist; and H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-Bid, delta agonist (Bid = 1H-benzimidazole-2-yl)] yielded a new series of compounds endowed with distinct pharmacological activities. Compounds (1-10) included high delta- (Ki(delta) = 0.068-0.64 nM) and mu-opioid affinities (Ki(mu) = 0.13-5.50 nM), with a bioactivity that ranged from mu-opioid agonism {10, H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH[(CH2)4-NH2]-Bid (IC50 GPI = 39.7 nM)} to a selective mu-opioid antagonist [3, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (pA2(mu) = 7.96)] and a selective delta-opioid antagonist [5, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys(Ac)-NH-Ph (pA2(delta) = 12.0)]. The presence of a Lys linker provides new lead compounds in the formation of opioid peptidomimetics containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore with distinct agonist and/or antagonist properties.

  18. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways.

  19. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  20. New opioid prescribing guidelines favor non-opioid alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Determined to make a dent in the growing problem of opioid addiction, the CDC has unveiled new guidelines for opioid prescribing for chronic pain. The recommendations urge providers to be more judicious in their prescribing, opting for opioids only after carefully weighing substantial risks and benefits. Public health authorities note the rampant use and misuse of opioids have "blurred the lines" between prescription opioids and illicit opioids. The new guidelines are designed to help frontline providers balance the need to manage their patients' chronic pain with the duty to curb dangerous prescribing practices. The recommendations are built around three principles: favor non-opioid alternatives for most cases of chronic pain, use the lowest effective dose when prescribing opioids, and exercise caution/monitor patients who are treated with opioids.

  1. Intermittent-access binge consumption of sweet high-fat liquid does not require opioid or dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Sylvie; Kim, James J; Nicola, Saleem M

    2015-10-01

    Binge eating disorders are characterized by episodes of intense consumption of high-calorie food. In recently developed animal models of binge eating, rats given intermittent access to such food escalate their consumption over time. Consumption of calorie-dense food is associated with neurochemical changes in the nucleus accumbens, including dopamine release and alterations in dopamine and opioid receptor expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that binge-like consumption on intermittent access schedules is dependent on opioid and/or dopamine neurotransmission in the accumbens. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether injection of dopamine and opioid receptor antagonists into the core and shell of the accumbens reduced consumption of a sweet high-fat liquid in rats with and without a history of intermittent binge access to the liquid. Although injection of a μ opioid agonist increased consumption, none of the antagonists (including μ opioid, δ opioid, κ opioid, D1 dopamine and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, as well as the broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone) reduced consumption, and this was the case whether or not the animals had a prior history of intermittent access. These results suggest that consumption of sweet, fatty food does not require opioid or dopamine receptor activation in the accumbens even under intermittent access conditions that resemble human binge episodes.

  2. Novel Oral Therapies for Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Renee M; Rhee, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives. The efficacy and safety of these agents in chronic noncancer pain were assessed from publications identified through Ovid and PubMed database searches. Trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of oral agents for opioid-induced constipation or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, excluding laxatives, were reviewed. Lubiprostone and naloxegol are approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration for use in opioid-induced constipation. Axelopran (TD-1211) and sustained-release naloxone have undergone phase 2 and phase 1 studies, respectively, for the same indication. Naloxegol and axelopran are peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Naloxone essentially functions as a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist when administered orally in a sustained-release formulation. Lubiprostone is a locally acting chloride channel (CIC-2) activator that increases secretions and peristalsis. All agents increase spontaneous bowel movements and reduce other bowel symptoms compared with placebo in patients with noncancer pain who are chronic opioid users. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, and none of the drugs were associated with severe adverse or cardiovascular events. Investigations comparing these agents to regimens using standard laxative and combination therapy and trials in special populations and patients with active cancer are

  3. Mycobacteria attenuate nociceptive responses by formyl peptide receptor triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Rittner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In inflammation, pain is regulated by a balance of pro- and analgesic mediators. Analgesic mediators include opioid peptides which are secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, leading to activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. In humans, local opioids and opioid peptides significantly downregulate postoperative as well as arthritic pain. In rats, inflammatory pain is induced by intraplantar injection of heat inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum, a component of complete Freund's adjuvant. We hypothesized that mycobacterially derived formyl peptide receptor (FPR and/or toll like receptor (TLR agonists could activate neutrophils, leading to opioid peptide release and inhibition of inflammatory pain. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds of the paw were quantified (Hargreaves and Randall-Selitto methods, respectively. Withdrawal time to heat was decreased following systemic neutrophil depletion as well as local injection of opioid receptor antagonists or anti-opioid peptide (i.e. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin antibodies indicating an increase in pain. In vitro, opioid peptide release from human and rat neutrophils was measured by radioimmunoassay. Met-enkephalin release was triggered by Mycobacterium butyricum and formyl peptides but not by TLR-2 or TLR-4 agonists. Mycobacterium butyricum induced a rise in intracellular calcium as determined by FURA loading and calcium imaging. Opioid peptide release was blocked by intracellular calcium chelation as well as phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibition. The FPR antagonists Boc-FLFLF and cyclosporine H reduced opioid peptide release in vitro and increased inflammatory pain in vivo while TLR 2/4 did not appear to be involved. In summary, mycobacteria activate FPR on neutrophils, resulting in tonic secretion of opioid peptides from neutrophils and in a decrease in inflammatory pain. Future therapeutic strategies may aim

  4. Understanding the Opioid Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Injury Awareness Home and Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Parents Are The Key to Safe Teen Drivers ... give health care providers information to improve patient safety and prevent ... high-risk prescribing and prevent opioid overdose. Improve detection of ...

  5. Remifentanil: a new opioid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, P S

    1995-11-01

    Remifentanil appears to have pharmacodynamic properties similar to other potent mu opioid agonists. It does, however, have unique pharmacokinetic properties, with a rapid onset and rapid offset of effect, irrespective of the duration of its administration. With this property, remifentanil appears to be a very titratable opioid that will make it suitable for administration for either very brief periods, in which analgesia is required, or over prolonged periods, without the concern for prolonged recovery.

  6. ACTH antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian John Clark

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ACTH acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1 Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially whilst preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumour, or in refractory cases, or (2 congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role.

  7. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED)

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  8. Activation and inhibition of the endogenous opioid system in human heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Oldroyd, K. G.; Gray, C E; Carter, R.; Harvey, K.; Borland, W; BEASTALL, G; Cobbe, S M

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In a canine model of congestive heart failure beta endorphin concentrations were high and opioid receptor antagonists exerted beneficial haemodynamic effects. In humans previous studies have suggested that opioid peptides may modify the perception of breathlessness and fatigue in heart failure. METHODS--Plasma concentrations of beta endorphin were measured in patients with acute and chronic heart failure and cardiogenic shock. A subgroup of eight patients with New York Heart Assoc...

  9. Buprenorphine-containing treatments: place in the management of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    Although the synthetic opioid buprenorphine has been available clinically for almost 30 years, its use has only recently become much more widespread for the treatment of opioid addiction. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine make it unique in the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of opioid addiction. Buprenorphine has partial mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and is a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist; hence, it can substitute for other micro-opioid receptor agonists, yet is less apt to produce overdose reactions or dysphoria. On the other hand, buprenorphine can block the effects of opioids such as heroin (diamorphine) and morphine, and can even precipitate withdrawal in individuals physically dependent upon these drugs. Buprenorphine has significant sublingual bioavailability and a long half-life, making administration on a less than daily basis possible. Furthermore, its discontinuation is associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome. Clinical trials have demonstrated that sublingual buprenorphine is effective in both maintenance therapy and detoxification of individuals addicted to opioids. The introduction of a sublingual formulation combining naloxone with buprenorphine further reduces the risk of diversion to illicit intravenous use. Because of its relative safety and lower risk of illegal diversion, buprenorphine has been made available in several countries for treating opioid addiction in the private office setting, greatly enhancing treatment options for this condition.

  10. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  11. Combined blockade of both mu- and kappa-opioid receptors prevents the acute orexigenic action of agouti-related protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, S; Clegg, DJ; Woods, SC; Seeley, RJ

    2002-01-01

    Agouti-related protein (AgRP) is an endogenous antagonist at the melanocortin 3 and 4 receptor in the hypothalamus. Central administration of AgRP produces a robust increase in food intake, and this effect can be blocked by administration of nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist. Such results impli

  12. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum.

  13. Molecular mechanism for opioid dichotomy: bidirectional effect of μ-opioid receptors on P2X₃ receptor currents in rat sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhmakov, Igor; Kulyk, Vyacheslav; Khasabova, Iryna; Khasabov, Sergey; Simone, Donald; Bakalkin, Georgy; Gordienko, Dmitri; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe a molecular switch associated with opioid receptors-linked signalling cascades that provides a dual opioid control over P2X3 purinoceptor in sensory neurones. Leu-enkephalin inhibited P2X3-mediated currents with IC50 ~10 nM in ~25% of small nociceptive rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In contrast, in neurones pretreated with pertussis toxin leu-enkephalin produced stable and significant increase of P2X3 currents. All effects of opioid were abolished by selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), nonselective inhibitor naloxone, and by PLC inhibitor U73122. Thus, we discovered a dual link between purinoceptors and μ-opioid receptors: the latter exert both inhibitory (pertussis toxin-sensitive) and stimulatory (pertussis toxin-insensitive) actions on P2X3 receptors through phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent pathways. This dual opioid control of P2X3 receptors may provide a molecular explanation for dichotomy of opioid therapy. Pharmacological control of this newly identified facilitation/inhibition switch may open new perspectives for the adequate medical use of opioids, the most powerful pain-killing agents known today.

  14. Opioid neuronal denervation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandyk, R

    1987-07-01

    Increased striatal dopaminergic functions with heightened postsynaptic receptor sensitivity has been proposed to underlie the major clinical symptoms of Tourette's syndrome (TS). The beneficial response of the majority of TS patients to haloperidol supports the hyperdopaminergic pathophysiological concept of TS. However, in 5 recently encountered TS patients, haloperidol failed to ameliorate self-injurious behavior (SIB) while the opiate antagonist, naloxone, attenuated SIB, implicating deranged endorphinergic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Brain damage is commonly associated with partial neuronal denervation, denervation supersensitivity and neuronal habituation (Cannon's Law). While the motor tics of TS possibly reflect neuronal denervation of striatal dopaminergic neurons. SIB may represent opioid denervation with alterations in opioid receptor sensitivity possibly involving striato-limbic-hypothalamic circuits. The effect of naloxone on SIB in TS could thus be explained on the basis of a modulatory effect of this drug on opioid receptor sensitivity.

  15. Peripheral Antinociception Induced by Aripiprazole Is Mediated by the Opioid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Mendes Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and related disorders. Our previous study showed that this compound also induces antinociceptive effects. The present study aimed to assess the participation of the opioid system in this effect. Methods. Male Swiss mice were submitted to paw pressure test and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2 μg. Aripiprazole was injected 10 min before the measurement. Naloxone, clocinnamox, naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and bestatin were given 30 min before aripiprazole. Nociceptive thresholds were measured in the 3rd hour after PGE2 injection. Results. Aripiprazole (100 μg/paw injected locally into the right hind paw induced an antinociceptive effect that was blocked by naloxone (50 μg/paw, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist. The role of μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors was investigated using the selective antagonists, clocinnamox (40 μg/paw, naltrindole (15, 30, and 60 μg/paw, and nor-binaltorphimine (200 μg/paw, respectively. The data indicated that only the δ-opioid receptor antagonist inhibited the peripheral antinociception induced by aripiprazole. Bestatin (400 μg, an aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, significantly enhanced low-dose (25 μg/paw aripiprazole-induced peripheral antinociception. Conclusion. The results suggest the participation of the opioid system via δ-opioid receptor in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by aripiprazole.

  16. [Nalmefene and Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome: Analysis of the Global Pharmacovigilance Database for Adverse Drug Reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmke, Hendrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Weiler, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    Nalmefene (Selincro®) is a selective opioid receptor antagonist, licensed in April 2014 in Switzerland for the reduction of alcohol consumption in adults with a high drinking risk level. 200 reports of adverse drug reactions of nalmefene have been documented worldwide in the WHO global pharmacovigilance database between 7th March 1997 to 1st March 2015. In 21 cases (10,5%) nalmefene and an opioid were administered concomitantly, causing withdrawal symptoms. Until now, the regional pharmacovigilance center in Zurich received four cases of nalmefene combined with opioids. This combination should be avoided.

  17. Involvement of the opioid system in the hypokinetic state induced in cockroaches by a parasitoid wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavra, Tali; Libersat, Frederic

    2011-03-01

    The parasitoid wasp Ampulex compressa stings and injects venom into the cockroach brain to induce a long-lasting hypokinetic state. This state is characterized by decreased responsiveness to aversive stimuli, suggesting the manipulation of a neuromodulatory system in the cockroach's central nervous system. A likely candidate is the opioid system, which is known to affect responsiveness to stimuli in insects. To explore this possibility, we injected cockroaches with different opioid receptor agonists or antagonists before they were stung by a wasp and tested the escape behavior of these cockroaches to electric foot shocks. Antagonists significantly decreased the startle threshold in stung individuals, whereas agonists led to an increased startle threshold in controls. Yet, neither agonists nor antagonists had any effect on grooming. To further characterize the interaction between the venom and opioid receptors, we used an antenna-heart preparation. In un-stung individuals external application of crude venom completely inhibits antenna-heart contractions. In stung individuals the antenna-heart showed no contractions. Although acetylcholine restored contractions, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone was unable to antagonize the venom inhibition. These results suggest that the venom of A. compressa might contribute to the manipulation of cockroach behavior by affecting the opioid system.

  18. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine ... variant of the gene for the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) with a decreased risk for addiction to ...

  19. Naloxone fails to produce conditioned place aversion in mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoubis, P D; Matthes, H W; Walwyn, W M; Kieffer, B L; Maidment, N T

    2001-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tonic activity of the opioid system may be important in the modulation of affective state. Naloxone produces a conditioned place aversion in rodents, an effect that is centrally mediated. Previous pharmacological data using antagonists with preferential actions at mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors indicate the importance of the mu-opioid receptor in mediating this effect. We sought to test the mu-opioid receptor selectivity of naloxone aversion using mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice. mu-Opioid receptor knock-out and wild-type mice were tested for naloxone (10 mg/kg, s.c.) aversion using a place conditioning paradigm. As a positive control for associative learning, knock-out mice were tested for conditioned place aversion to a kappa agonist, U50,488H (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Naloxone produced a significant place aversion in wild-type mice, but failed to have any effect in mu-opioid receptor knock-out mice. On the other hand, both knock-out and wild-type mice treated with U50,488H spent significantly less time in the drug-paired chamber compared to their respective vehicle controls. We conclude that the mu-opioid receptor is crucial for the acquisition of naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion. Furthermore, in a separate experiment using C57BL/6 mice, the delta-selective antagonist naltrindole (10 or 30 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to produce conditioned place aversion.Taken together, these data further support the notion that naloxone produces aversion by antagonizing tonic opioid activity at the mu-opioid receptor.

  20. Sustained-release naltrexone for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, P; Kornør, H; Kunøe, N; Bjørndal, A

    2008-04-16

    Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist which effectively blocks heroin effects. Since opioid dependence treatment with naltrexone tablets suffers from high dropout rates, several depot injections and implants are under investigation. Sustained-release formulations are claimed to be effective, but a systematic review of the literature is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of sustained-release naltrexone for opioid dependence and its adverse effects in different study populations. The following databases were searched from their inception to November 2007: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, trial database at http://clinicaltrials.gov, available NIDA monographs, CPDD and AAAP conference proceedings. The reference lists of identified studies, published reviews and relevant web sides were searched manually. Study authors and drug companies were contacted to obtain any unpublished material or missing data. To evaluate effectiveness only RCTs were included. To evaluate safety, any clinical trial reporting adverse effects was assessed. Treatment condition was extended to include alcohol dependent subjects and healthy volunteers. Reviewers independently evaluated the reports, rated methodological quality and extracted data. Analyses were performed separately for opioid dependent, alcohol dependent and healthy participants. Foe effectiveness, one report met inclusion criteria. Two dosages of naltrexone depot injections (192 and 384 mg) were compared to placebo. High-dose significantly increased days in treatment compared to placebo (WMD 21.00, 95% CI 10.68 to 31.32, p<0.0001). High-dose compared to low-dose significantly increased days in treatment (WMD 12.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 22.31, p=0.02). Number of patients retained in treatment did not show significant differences between groups. For adverse effects, seventeen reports met inclusion criteria analyses, six were RCTs. Side effects were significantly

  1. Emerging therapies for patients with symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert Chair and Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD comprises gastrointestinal (GI symptoms, including dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, gastric stasis, bloating, abdominal pain, and opioid-induced constipation, which significantly impair patients’ quality of life and may lead to undertreatment of pain. Traditional laxatives are often prescribed for OIBD symptoms, although they display limited efficacy and exert adverse effects. Other strategies include prokinetics and change of opioids or their administration route. However, these approaches do not address underlying causes of OIBD associated with opioid effects on mostly peripheral opioid receptors located in the GI tract. Targeted management of OIBD comprises purely peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists and a combination of opioid receptor agonist and antagonist. Methylnaltrexone induces laxation in 50%–60% of patients with advanced diseases and OIBD who do not respond to traditional oral laxatives without inducing opioid withdrawal symptoms with similar response (45%–50% after an oral administration of naloxegol. A combination of prolonged-release oxycodone with prolonged-release naloxone (OXN in one tablet (a ratio of 2:1 provides analgesia with limited negative effect on the bowel function, as oxycodone displays high oral bioavailability and naloxone demonstrates local antagonist effect on opioid receptors in the GI tract and is totally inactivated in the liver. OXN in daily doses of up to 80 mg/40 mg provides equally effective analgesia with improved bowel function compared to oxycodone administered alone in patients with chronic non-malignant and cancer-related pain. OIBD is a common complication of long-term opioid therapy and may lead to quality of life deterioration and undertreatment of pain. Thus, a complex assessment and management that addresses underlying

  2. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  3. Prevention of Stimulant Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    7 obtaining vital signs, a urine pregnancy and drug test, and...this event was unrelated to study medication. The third subject experienced a reoccurrence of her peptic stress ulcers, and was thus terminated...context of sleep loss and stress to diminish fatigue and motion sickness [3] as well as enhance alertness of pilots during lengthy flight [4, 5] as well

  4. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2009-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor fami...

  5. Effects of differential modulation of mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid systems on bicuculline-induced convulsions in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Y; Narita, M; Takahashi-Nakano, Y; Misawa, M; Nagase, H; Mizoguchi, H; Tseng, L F; Suzuki, T

    2000-04-17

    The present study investigated the effects of micro-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor agonists on seizures produced by blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated synaptic transmission in the mouse. The selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (1.25-3 mg/kg) given subcutaneously caused dose-dependent clonic-tonic convulsions. These convulsions were potentiated by the prototypic mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine given subcutaneously 20 min prior to a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline. The potentiation by morphine was completely reversed by pretreatment intraventricularly with the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (0.5 microgram/mouse). Pretreatment intraventricularly with the selective delta-opioid receptor agonists 2-methyl-4aalpha-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12, 12abeta-octahydro-quinolino[2,3,3-g]isoquinoline ((-)TAN-67) or [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE) showed a dose-dependent increase in the incidence of convulsions. Pretreatment with naltrindole (2 mg/kg, s.c.), a selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, abolished the enhancement of the bicuculline-induced convulsions by DPDPE. In contrast, pretreatment with the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U-50,488H (0.6-80 mg/kg, subcutaneously or 25-100 microgram/mouse, intraventricularly) produced a dose-dependent suppression of the bicuculline-induced convulsions. The inhibitory effect of U-50,488H was completely blocked by pretreatment subcutaneously with nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg), a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. This study demonstrates that activation of both mu- and delta-opioid receptors increases the incidence of convulsions produced by blockade of GABA-mediated synaptic transmission, while stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors has an anticonvulsive effect.

  6. Laboratory testing for prescription opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection), often in combination, to yield high detection sensitivity and drug specificity. Testing methods for opioids originated in the workplace-testing arena and focused on detection of illicit heroin use. Analysis for a wide range of opioids is now required in the context of the prescription opioid epidemic. Testing methods have also been primarily based upon urine screening; however, methods for analyzing alternative samples such as saliva, sweat, and hair are available. Application of testing to monitor prescription opioid drug therapy is an increasingly important use of drug testing, and this area of testing introduces new interpretative challenges. In particular, drug metabolism may transform one clinically available opioid into another. The sensitivity of testing methods also varies considerably across the spectrum of opioid drugs. An understanding of opioid metabolism and method sensitivity towards different opioid drugs is therefore essential to effective use of these tests. Improved testing algorithms and more research into the effective use of drug testing in the clinical setting, particularly in pain medicine and substance abuse, are needed.

  7. Buprenorphine-induced antinociception is mediated by mu-opioid receptors and compromised by concomitant activation of opioid receptor-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfy, Kabirullah; Eitan, Shoshana; Bryant, Camron D; Yang, Yu C; Saliminejad, Nazli; Walwyn, Wendy; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Carroll, F Ivy; Maidment, Nigel T; Evans, Christopher J

    2003-11-12

    Buprenorphine is a mixed opioid receptor agonist-antagonist used clinically for maintenance therapy in opiate addicts and pain management. Dose-response curves for buprenorphine-induced antinociception display ceiling effects or are bell shaped, which have been attributed to the partial agonist activity of buprenorphine at opioid receptors. Recently, buprenorphine has been shown to activate opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptors, also known as OP4 receptors. Here we demonstrate that buprenorphine, but not morphine, activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt via ORL-1 receptors. Because the ORL-1 receptor agonist orphanin FQ/nociceptin blocks opioid-induced antinociception, we tested the hypothesis that buprenorphine-induced antinociception might be compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors. In support of this hypothesis, the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine, but not morphine, was markedly enhanced in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors using the tail-flick assay. Additional support for a modulatory role for ORL-1 receptors in buprenorphine-induced antinociception was that coadministration of J-113397, an ORL-1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors. The ORL-1 antagonist also eliminated the bell-shaped dose-response curve for buprenorphine-induced antinociception in wild-type mice. Although buprenorphine has been shown to interact with multiple opioid receptors, mice lacking micro-opioid receptors failed to exhibit antinociception after buprenorphine administration. Our results indicate that the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in mice is micro-opioid receptor-mediated yet severely compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors.

  8. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  9. [Effect of opioid receptors on acute stress-induced changes in recognition memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Yu-Wei; Qian, Zhao-Qiang; Yan, Cai-Fang; Fan, Ka-Min; Xu, Jin-Hui; Li, Xiao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-12-25

    Although ample evidence has shown that acute stress impairs memory, the influences of acute stress on different phases of memory, such as acquisition, consolidation and retrieval, are different. Experimental data from both human and animals support that endogenous opioid system plays a role in stress, as endogenous opioid release is increased and opioid receptors are activated during stress experience. On the other hand, endogenous opioid system mediates learning and memory. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute forced swimming stress on recognition memory of C57 mice and the role of opioid receptors in this process by using a three-day pattern of new object recognition task. The results showed that 15-min acute forced swimming damaged the retrieval of recognition memory, but had no effect on acquisition and consolidation of recognition memory. No significant change of object recognition memory was found in mice that were given naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, by intraperitoneal injection. But intraperitoneal injection of naloxone before forced swimming stress could inhibit the impairment of recognition memory retrieval caused by forced swimming stress. The results of real-time PCR showed that acute forced swimming decreased the μ opioid receptor mRNA levels in whole brain and hippocampus, while the injection of naloxone before stress could reverse this change. These results suggest that acute stress may impair recognition memory retrieval via opioid receptors.

  10. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  11. Non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade prevents reduction of the cerebral metabolic ratio during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Rasmussen, P.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    of a non-selective beta-adrenergic (beta(1) + beta(2)) receptor antagonist (propranolol) reduced heart rate (69 +/- 8 to 58 +/- 6 beats min(-1)) and exercise capacity (239 +/- 42 to 209 +/- 31 W; P exercise with propranolol, the increase in a......Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of oxygen to carbohydrates [O(2)/(glucose + (1/2)lactate)], but whether this ratio is influenced by adrenergic stimulation is not known. In eight males, incremental cycle ergometry increased arterial lactate to 15.3 +/- 4.2 mm (mean +/- s.......d.) and the arterial-jugular venous (a-v) difference from -0.02 +/- 0.03 mm at rest to 1.0 +/- 0.5 mm (P increased from 0.7 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mm (P

  12. Clinical interpretation of opioid tolerance versus opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lucy; Sein, Michael; Vo, Trang; Amhmed, Shihab; Zhang, Yi; Hilaire, Kristin St; Houghton, Mary; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used to manage moderate to severe pain. However, the long-term use of opioids could lead to opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Distinguishing OIH from OT would impact the practice of opioid therapy because opioid dose adjustment may differentially influence OT and OIH. Currently, there are no standard criteria of OT versus OIH causing considerable ambiguity in clinical interpretation and management of these conditions. The authors designed a practitioner-based survey consisting of 20 targeted questions. Answering these questions would require responders' actual clinical experiences with opioid therapy. The survey was conducted between 2011 and 2012 through direct mails or e-mails to 1,408 physicians who are currently practicing in the United States. The authors find that certain clinical characteristics (eg, increased pain despite opioid dose escalation) are often used by practitioners to make differential diagnosis of OT and OIH despite some overlap in their clinical presentation. A key difference in clinical outcome is that OT and OIH could be improved and exacerbated by opioid dose escalation, respectively. Our survey results revealed a significant knowledge gap in some responders regarding differential diagnosis and management of OT and OIH. The results also identified several issues, such as opioid dose adjustment and clinical comorbidities related to OT and OIH, which require future patient-based studies.

  13. The role of naloxegol in the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Woron, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) significantly deteriorate patients’ quality of life and may lead to noncompliance with opioid schedule and undertreatment of pain. Although traditional oral laxatives are the first-line treatment of OIC, they do not address OIBD pathophysiology, and display numerous adverse effects. OIC treatment includes prokinetics (lubiprostone), opioid switch, and changing route of opioid administration. Targeted management of OIBD comprises the use of purely peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA): naloxegol and methylnaltrexone. Naloxegol (NKTR-118) is a polymer conjugate of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The polyethylene glycol limits naloxegol capacity to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Naloxegol is substrate for the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter. The central nervous system penetration of naloxegol is negligible due to reduced permeability and its increased efflux across the BBB, related to P-gp transporter. Naloxegol antagonizes μ- and κ-opioid receptors and displays low affinity to δ-opioid receptors in the GI tract, thereby decreasing OIBD symptoms without reversing central analgesic effects. Naloxegol is metabolised through CYP3A4 to six metabolites, with the majority of the dose (68%) excreted with faeces and less (16%) with urine. The dose of naloxegol equals 25 mg administered orally once daily on a fasting condition. Mild or moderate hepatic impairment has no impact on naloxegol dosing; naloxegol was not studied and is not recommended in patients with hepatic failure. Dose reduction (12.5 mg once daily) and caution is recommended in patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment. Efficacy (bowel movement in 42–49% of patients not responsive to laxatives) and safety of naloxegol were confirmed in studies conducted in patients with OIC and nonmalignant pain. Naloxegol may be useful for cancer patients with OIC

  14. Kappa-opioid receptor-mediated effects of the plant-derived hallucinogen, salvinorin A, on inverted screen performance in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantegrossi, William E; Kugle, Kelly M; Valdes, Leander J; Koreeda, Masato; Woods, James H

    2005-12-01

    Salvinorin A is a pharmacologically active diterpene that occurs naturally in the Mexican mint Ska Maria Pastora (Salvia divinorum) and represents the first naturally occurring kappa-opioid receptor agonist. The chemical structure of salvinorin A is novel among the opioids, and thus defines a new structural class of kappa-opioid-receptor selective drugs. Few studies have examined the effects of salvinorin A in vivo, and fewer still have attempted to assess the agonist actions of this compound at mu-opioid, delta-opioid, and kappa-opioid receptors using selective antagonists. In the mouse, salvinorin A disrupted climbing behavior on an inverted screen task, indicating a rapid, but short-lived induction of sedation/motor incoordination. Similar effects were observed with the mu-agonist remifentanil and the synthetic kappa-agonist U69,593. When behaviorally equivalent doses of all three opioids were challenged with antagonists at doses selective for mu-opioid, delta-opioid, or kappa-opioid receptors, results suggested that the motoric effects of remifentanil were mediated by mu-receptors, whereas those of salvinorin A and U69,593 were mediated via kappa-receptors. Despite similar potencies and degrees of effectiveness, salvinorin A and U69,593 differed with regard to their susceptibility to antagonism by the kappa-antagonist nor-binaltorphamine. This later finding, coupled with the novel chemical structure of the compound, is consistent with recent findings that the diterpene salvinorin A may bind to the kappa-receptor in a manner that is qualitatively different from that of more traditional kappa-agonists such as the benzeneacetamide U69,593. Such pharmacological differences among these kappa-opioids raise the possibility that the development of other diterpene-based opioids may yield important therapeutic compounds.

  15. Opioid dependence treatment, including buprenorphine/naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisch, Dennis W; Fye, Carol L; Boardman, Kathy D; Sather, Mike R

    2002-02-01

    To review opioid dependence (OD) and its treatment. Pharmacologic treatments, including the use of buprenorphine/naloxone, are presented. Pharmaceutical care functions for outpatient OD treatment are discussed. Primary and review articles were identified by MEDLINE and HEALTHSTAR searches (from 1966 to November 2000) and through secondary sources. Tertiary sources were also reviewed regarding general concepts of OD and its treatment. Relevant articles were reviewed after identification from published abstracts. Articles were selected based on the objectives for this article. Studies of the treatment of OD with buprenorphine were selected based on the topic (pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, adverse reactions) and study design (randomized, controlled clinical trials in patients with OD with active/placebo comparisons and/or comparisons of active OD treatments). Articles regarding pharmacists' activities in the treatment and prevention of OD were reviewed for the pharmaceutical care section. OD is considered a medical disorder with costly adverse health outcomes. Although methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is cost-effective for OD, only about 12% of individuals with OD receive this treatment. Psychological and pharmacologic modalities are used to treat OD, but patients often relapse. Drug therapy includes alpha 2-agonists for withdrawal symptoms, detoxification regimens with or without opioids, opioid antagonists, and opioid replacement including methadone, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 1999 allows for office-based opioid replacement therapies. Sublingual buprenorphine with naloxone can be used in this milieu. Buprenorphine with naloxone is currently under new drug application review with the Food and Drug Administration. Clinical research shows buprenorphine to be equal in effectiveness to methadone, but safer in overdose due to its ceiling effect on respiratory depression. It has lower abuse potential and fewer

  16. [Opioid μ receptors mediate the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lan-Qin; Wen, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-04-25

    Learning/memory impairment is one of the most serious problems induced by stress, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Opiates and opioid receptors are implicated in multiple physiological functions including learning and memory. However, there is no clear evidence whether the endogenous opioid system is involved in the formation of the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of μ opioid receptor in the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment by means of Morris water maze (MWM) test in a mouse elevated platform stress model. The mice were trained in the MWM for four trials a session for 4 consecutive days after receiving the elevated platform stress, and intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO, antagonist CTAP or saline. Retention of the spatial training was assessed 24 h after the last training session with a 60-s free-swim probe trial using a new starting position. The results showed that intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO but not antagonist CTAP before MWM training impaired the memory retrieval of mice. Elevated platform stress before MWM training also impaired memory retrieval, which could be reversed by pre-injection of CTAP, and aggravated by DAMGO. These results suggest that endogenous opioid system may play a crucial role in the formation of the stress-induced memory impairment.

  17. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    OpenAIRE

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Geno...

  18. "Interaction of different doses of Aspartame with Morphine-induced antinociception in the presence of MK-801, a NMDA antagonist "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the relative role of sweetness and comparative effects of different taste sensation of the non - caloric sweetener , aspartame on pain and its interaction with MK - 80] as a non - selective MMDA antagonist by formalin - test in mice. The formalin - test was chosen because it measures the response to a long - lasting nociceptive stimulus and closely resembles to the clinical pain. Morphine induced a dose dependent antinociception in the early and late phases of formalin test. Twelve days pretreatment of animals by aspartame ( 0.08% , 0.16% , 0.32% significantly potentiated morphine - induced (1.5-9 mg/kg analgesia in the early phase but significantly antagonized its analgesic effect in the late phase, dose dependently. Aspartame (0.16% alone showed a reduction in pain response . Naloxone (0.4 mg/kg significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effect of morphine in the presence of aspartame (0-0.32% in the early phase. Increasing the dose of aspartame decreased effects of naloxone. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg as an N- Methyl - D - Aspartate (NMDA antagonist significantly potentiated the effect of aspartame on morphine - induced antinociception in the early phase. In the late phase, naloxone (0.4 mg/kg increased pain response but MK- 801 (0.1 mg/kg induced anti-inflammatory effect significantly. Treatment of animals with MK- 801 alone, significantly induced analgesia in both phases of formalin - test. This effect was potentiated with aspartame dose - dependently. Possible interaction of aspartame with NMDA receptors and its role to facilitate endogenous opioid system are proposed mechanisms of aspartame in modulating morphine - induced antinociception. Furthermore, the resulting association between morphine and aspartame chronic consumption may be explained as an interactive action rather than simple dose combination of both drugs.

  19. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    swelling and pain determined, along with initial experiments on the chemokine receptor antagonist (CRA) AMD3100. Methods were established for measuring a...Presentations………………………….22 7. Inventions , Patents and Licenses……………………..………….22 8. Reportable Outcomes……………………………………………….22 9. Other Achievements...Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain; Chemokine and cytokine measurements 3. OVERALL PROJECT

  20. The dynamic relationship between mu and kappa opioid receptors in body temperature regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; McClatchy, Daniel B; Geller, Ellen B; Tallarida, Ronald J; Adler, Martin W

    2005-12-12

    Previous studies demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a kappa opioid receptor agonist decreased, and a mu agonist increased, body temperature (Tb) in rats. A dose-response study with the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) showed that a low dose (1.25 nmol, icv) alone had no effect, although a high dose (25 nmol, icv) increased Tb. It was hypothesized that the hyperthermia induced by nor-BNI was the result of the antagonist blocking the kappa opioid receptor and releasing its inhibition of mu opioid receptor activity. To determine whether the Tb increase caused by nor-BNI was a mu receptor-mediated effect, we administered the selective mu antagonist CTAP (1.25 nmol, icv) 15 min after nor-BNI (25 nmol, icv) and measured rectal Tb in unrestrained rats. CTAP significantly antagonized the Tb increase induced by icv injection of nor-BNI. Injection of 5 or 10 nmol of CTAP alone significantly decreased the Tb, and 1.25 nmol of nor-BNI blocked that effect, indicating that the CTAP-induced hypothermia was kappa-mediated. The findings strongly suggest that mu antagonists, in blocking the basal hyperthermia mediated by mu receptors, can unmask the endogenous kappa receptor-mediated hypothermia, and that there is a tonic balance between mu and kappa opioid receptors that serves as a homeostatic mechanism for maintaining Tb.

  1. When Is an Opioid Safe to Take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166872.html When Is an Opioid Safe to Take? Doctors say it can treat ... Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA): Why was I prescribed opioids? Did the doctor assume opioids are the strongest ...

  2. Beyond Opioids: Mind and Body Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that tai chi, a traditional Chinese practice that combines meditation with deep breathing, relaxation, and gentle movements, ... Tide Rx: turnthetiderx.org Read More "Understanding Opioids" Articles Understanding The Opioid Overdose Epidemic / Beyond Opioids: Mind ...

  3. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  4. Laboratory Testing for Prescription Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection),...

  5. Peripheral Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-16

    noxious insult . These substances include serotonin. bradykinin. and histamine . Serotonin (5-hydroxylryptamine [5-HT]) is derived from platelets in...IL-IP) and substance P, releases histamine which increases Ca·" permeability resulting in the release of certain neuropeptides (Falus and Meretey...i.p. injection than by intracerebroventricular injection. The effects of delta, mu, and kappa opioid agonists were investigated by Stein et al

  6. Opioid modulation of prolactin secretion induced by stress during late pregnancy. Role of ovarian steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Susana R; Pennacchio, Gisela E; Gamboa, Dante F; de Di Nasso, Elina G; Bregonzio, Claudia; Soaje, Marta

    2014-06-01

    The opioid system modulates prolactin release during late pregnancy. Its role and the participation of ovarian hormones in this modulation are explored in ether stress-induced prolactin release. Estrous, 3-day and 19-day pregnant rats were used. We administered the antagonist mifepristone (Mp) and tamoxifen to evaluate progesterone and estradiol action in naloxone (NAL, opioid antagonist) or saline treated rats. Ether stress had no effect on serum prolactin levels in controls but increased prolactin release in NAL-treated rats. Prolactin response to stress in NAL-treated rats was blocked by l-DOPA administration. Mp treatment on day 18 of pregnancy increased prolactin levels after stress without alterations by NAL. Tamoxifen on days 14 and 15 of pregnancy completely blocked Mp and NAL effects on prolactin release at late pregnancy. In contrast, stress significantly increased prolactin levels in estrous rats and pretreatment with NAL prevented this. On day 3 of pregnancy, at 6.00 p.m., stress and NAL treatment inhibited prolactin levels in saline-treated rat. No effect of stress or NAL administration was detected on day 3 of pregnancy at 9.00 a.m. icv administration of specific opioids antagonist, B-Funaltrexamine but not Nor-Binaltorphimine or Naltrindole, caused a significant increase in stress-induced prolactin release. Opioid system suppression of prolactin stress response during late pregnancy was observed only after progesterone withdrawal, involving a different opioid mechanism from its well-established stimulatory role. This mechanism acts through a mu opioid receptor and requires estrogen participation. The opioid system and progesterone may modulate stress-induced prolactin release, probably involving a putative prolactin-releasing factor. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Opioid induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Laufer, Andras

    2014-01-05

    Opioids are broad spectrum analgesics that are an integral part of the therapeutic armamentarium to combat pain in the palliative care population. Unfortunately, among the adverse effects of opioids that may be experienced along with analgesia is nausea, vomiting, and/or retching. Although it is conceivable that in the future, using combination agents (opioids combined with agents which may nullify emetic effects), currently nausea/vomiting remains a significant issue for certain patients. However, there exists potential current strategies that may be useful in efforts to diminish the frequency and/or intensity of opioid-induced nausea/vomiting (OINV).

  8. The effects of repeated opioid administration on locomotor activity: II. Unidirectional cross-sensitization to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A; Greene-Naples, Jennifer L; Felder, Jennifer N; Iordanou, Jordan C; Lyle, Megan A; Walker, Katherine L

    2009-08-01

    Sensitization refers to an increase in sensitivity to the effects of a drug and is believed to play a role in the etiology of substance use disorders. Cross-sensitization has been observed between drugs from different pharmacological classes and may play a role in the escalation of drug use in polydrug-abusing populations. The purpose of this study was to examine cross-sensitization between opioids and cocaine and to determine the extent to which cross-sensitization is mediated by an opioid's selectivity for mu, kappa, and delta receptors. Separate groups of rats were treated with opioid receptor agonists and antagonists every other day for 10 days, and the locomotor effects of cocaine were tested 8 days later. The mu agonists, morphine and buprenorphine, and the delta agonist, BW373U86 [(+/-)-4-[(R(*))-[(2S(*),5R(*))-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-(3-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide hydrochloride], produced cross-sensitization to cocaine, such that repeated administration of these drugs over a 10-day period significantly enhanced cocaine's locomotor effects when tested later. Coadministration of the opioid antagonist naltrexone prevented morphine and buprenorphine from producing cross-sensitization. Coadministration of naltrexone, but not the delta antagonist naltrindole, also prevented BW373U86 from producing cross-sensitization. The kappa agonist spiradoline failed to produce cross-sensitization, but coadministration of spiradoline prevented morphine and buprenorphine from producing cross-sensitization. The ability of spiradoline to block cross-sensitization was itself blocked by the kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. The mixed mu/kappa opioids butorphanol, nalbuphine, and nalorphine did not produce cross-sensitization under any condition examined. These data indicate that agonist activity at mu receptors positively modulates cross-sensitization between opioids and cocaine, whereas agonist activity at kappa receptors negatively modulates

  9. Activation of μ opioid receptors in the LPBN facilitates sodium intake in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Carolina G; Roncari, Camila F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Paula, Patrícia M; Colombari, Débora S A; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V

    2015-07-15

    Important inhibitory mechanisms for the control of water and sodium intake are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN). Opioid receptors are expressed by LPBN neurons and injections of β-endorphin (nonspecific opioid receptor agonist) in this area induce 0.3M NaCl and water intake in satiated rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the injections of endomorphin-1 (μ opioid receptor agonist) alone or combined with the blockade of μ, κ or δ opioid receptors into the LPBN on 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by subcutaneous injections of the diuretic furosemide (FURO) combined with low dose of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (CAP). Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the LPBN were used. Bilateral injections of endomorphin-1 (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by FURO+CAP. The previous blockade of μ opioid receptor with CTAP (1.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN reduced the effect of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. GNTI (κ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) and naltrindole (δ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) injected into the LPBN did not change the effects of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. The results suggest that μ opioid receptors in the LPBN are involved in the control of sodium intake.

  10. Co-prescription of opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications among opioid users: differential in opioid doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Che Suraya; Ismail, Fadhilah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the patterns of opioid co-prescription with benzodiazepine and other concomitant medications among opioid users. Opioid dose in each type of co-prescription was also examined. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among opioid users receiving concomitant medications at an outpatient tertiary hospital setting in Malaysia. Opioid prescriptions (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, dihydrocodeine and tramadol) that were co-prescribed with other medications (opioid + benzodiazepines, opioid + antidepressants, opioid + anticonvulsants, opioid + antipsychotics and opioid + hypnotics) dispensed from January 2013 to December 2014 were identified. The number of patients, number of co-prescriptions and the individual mean opioid daily dose in each type of co-prescription were calculated. Results A total of 276 patients receiving 1059 co-prescription opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications were identified during the study period. Of these, 12.3% of patients received co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine, 19.3% received opioid + anticonvulsant, 6.3% received opioid + antidepressant and 10.9% received other co-prescriptions, including antipsychotics and hypnotics. The individual mean opioid dose was <100 mg/d of morphine equivalents in all types of co-prescriptions, and the dose ranged from 31 to 66 mg/d in the co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine. Conclusion Among the opioid users receiving concomitant medications, the co-prescriptions of opioid with benzodiazepine were prescribed to 12.3% of patients, and the individual opioid dose in this co-prescription was moderate. Other co-medications were also commonly used, and their opioid doses were within the recommended dose. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the adverse effect and clinical outcomes of the co-medications particularly in long-term opioid users with chronic non-cancer pain. PMID:28182128

  11. Evaluation of [{sup 125}I]7{alpha}-O-iodoally diprenophine as a new potential SPECT opioid receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.F.; Tafani, J.A.M.; Frances, B.; Bergon, M.; Coulais, Y.; Zajac, J. M.; Guiraud, R

    1997-08-01

    A new iodinated diprenorphine analog, [{sup 125}I]7{alpha}-O-iodoallyl diprenorphine ([{sup 125}I]7{alpha}-O-IA-DPN), was prepared by iododestannylation and characterized. As an opioid antagonist, this agent showed very high affinity (K{sub i} = 0.4 {+-} 0.2 nM) and 63% of specific binding by in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Inhibition curves indicated that this tracer labeled with the same affinities to three opioid receptors ({mu} = {delta} = {kappa}). The findings demonstrate that this proposed compound appears to be a potential radioprobe for future study of opioid receptors by in vivo SPECT.

  12. Negative affect, pain and sex: the role of endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Ashley K; Drummond, Peter D

    2007-11-01

    Opioid neurotransmission modulates pain and negative affect during psychological stress. To determine whether these effects differ between men and women, the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or placebo was administered double-blind to 21 men and 22 women before they completed 30 min of difficult mental arithmetic. To heighten negative affect, participants received seven moderately noxious electric shocks during the math task, which were believed to be contingent upon performance. Before and after the math task, participants rated pain intensity and unpleasantness while their left hand was immersed in 2 degrees C water for up to 4 min. Anxiety, discouragement and anger were also rated before, during and after the math task. Tolerance of cold-induced pain was greater in men, whereas discouragement during the math task was greater in women. Opioid blockade did not influence ratings of negative affect, which increased in line with the intensity and unpleasantness of shock-induced pain. The intensity and unpleasantness of cold-induced pain increased after the math task only in women administered naltrexone. Within the naltrexone condition, pain ratings increased most in the most discouraged subjects. However, this relationship was absent in placebo recipients, implying that the hyperalgesic effect of psychological distress was tempered by opioid release. Greater stress-evoked discouragement in women than men may explain why cold-induced pain increased after the math task only in women administered naltrexone.

  13. Effects of Combined Opioids on Pain and Mood in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Rech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review the opioid literature for evidence of increased analgesia and reduced adverse side effects by combining mu-opioid-receptor (MOR agonists, kappa-opioid-receptor (KOR agonists, and nonselective low-dose-opioid antagonists (LD-Ant. We tested fentanyl (MOR agonist and spiradoline (KOR agonist, singly and combined, against somatic and visceral pain models. Combined agonists induced additive analgesia in somatic pain and synergistic analgesia in visceral pain. Other investigators report similar effects and reduced tolerance and dependence with combined MOR agonist and KOR agonist. LD-Ant added to either a MOR agonist or KOR agonist markedly enhanced analgesia of either agonist. In accordance with other place-conditioning (PC studies, our PC investigations showed fentanyl-induced place preference (CPP and spiradoline-induced place aversion (CPA. We reduced fentanyl CPP with a low dose of spiradoline and reduced spiradoline CPA with a low dose of fentanyl. We propose combined MOR agonist, KOR agonist, and LD-Ant to produce superior analgesia with reduced adverse side effects, particularly for visceral pain.

  14. Opioid receptor agonists may favorably affect bone mechanical properties in rats with estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Aleksandra; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The results of epidemiological, clinical, and in vivo and in vitro experimental studies on the effect of opioid analgesics on bone are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of morphine (an agonist of opioid receptors), buprenorphine (a partial μ opioid receptor agonist and κ opioid receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an antagonist of opioid receptors) on the skeletal system of female rats in vivo. The experiments were carried out on 3-month-old Wistar rats, divided into two groups: nonovariectomized (intact; NOVX) rats and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed 7 days before the start of drug administration. Morphine hydrochloride (20 mg/kg/day s.c.), buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg/day s.c.), or naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate (2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were administered for 4 weeks to NOVX and OVX rats. In OVX rats, the use of morphine and buprenorphine counteracted the development of osteoporotic changes in the skeletal system induced by estrogen deficiency. Morphine and buprenorphine beneficially affected also the skeletal system of NOVX rats, but the effects were much weaker than those in OVX rats. Naloxone generally did not affect the rat skeletal system. The results confirmed the role of opioid receptors in the regulation of bone remodeling processes and demonstrated, in experimental conditions, that the use of opioid analgesics at moderate doses may exert beneficial effects on the skeletal system, especially in estrogen deficiency.

  15. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  16. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  17. Antidepressant-like effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, but not agonists, in the mouse forced swim and mouse tail suspension tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Olsen, G M; Wiborg, O;

    2009-01-01

    AChR subtype/s involved remains unknown. In this study, we systematically compared the effects of non-selective and selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists in two different tests for antidepressant effects in mice: the tail suspension test and the forced swim test. Compounds: nicotine, RJR-2403 (alpha4......beta2-selective agonist), PNU-282987 (alpha7-selective agonist), mecamylamine (non-selective antagonist), dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE; alpha4beta2-selective antagonist), methyllycaconitine (MLA; alpha7-selective antagonist) and hexamethonium (non-brain-penetrant non-selective antagonist). All...... compounds were tested in a locomotor activity paradigm to rule out non-specific stimulant effects. The data show that blockade of nAChRs with mecamylamine, or selective antagonism of alpha4beta2 or alpha7 nAChRs with DHbetaE or MLA, respectively, has antidepressant-like effects. These effects were...

  18. mu-Opioid receptor-independent fashion of the suppression of sodium currents by mu-opioid analgesics in thalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Keisuke; Amano, Taku; Kasakura, Akiko; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro; Sakai, Norio; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2009-03-27

    Most reports in the literature have shown that the effects of opioid analgesics are primarily mediated by mu-opioid receptor (MOR), whereas other potential targets of opioid analgesics have not been thoroughly characterized. In this study, we found that extracellular application of morphine, fentanyl or oxycodone, which are all considered to be MOR agonists, at relatively high concentrations, but not endogenous mu-opioid peptides, produced a concentration-dependent suppression of sodium currents in cultured thalamic neurons. These effects of opioids were not affected by either a MOR antagonist naloxone or a deletion of MOR gene. Among these opioids, fentanyl strongly suppressed sodium currents to the same degree as lidocaine, and both morphine and oxycodone slightly but significantly reduced sodium currents when they were present extracellularly. In contrast, the intracellular application of morphine, but not oxycodone, fentanyl or lidocaine, reduced sodium currents. These results suggest that morphine, fentanyl and oxycodone each produce the MOR-independent suppression of sodium currents by distinct mechanisms in thalamic neurons.

  19. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  20. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double-blind studies using 'inhibitory' or 'sensitizing', physiological test paradigms in healthy human subjects. The databases PubMed and Embase were searched according to predefined criteria. Out of a total of 2,142 records, 63 studies (1,477 subjects [male/female ratio = 1.5]) were considered relevant. Twenty-five studies utilized 'inhibitory' test paradigms (ITP) and 38 studies utilized 'sensitizing' test paradigms (STP). The ITP-studies were characterized as conditioning modulation models (22 studies) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation models (rTMS; 3 studies), and, the STP-studies as secondary hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and rTMS. In the remaining 14 conditioning modulation studies either absence of effects or ambiguous effects by MOR-antagonists, were observed. In the STP-studies, no effect of the opioid-blockade could be demonstrated in 5 out of 6 secondary hyperalgesia studies. The direction of MOR-antagonist dependent effects upon pain ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 'pain' model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect, presumably mediated by an EOS-dependent mechanisms of analgesia and hyperalgesia.

  1. Peripheral antinociceptive action of mangiferin in mouse models of experimental pain: role of endogenous opioids, K(ATP)-channels and adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Synara C; da Silva, Ana Virginia L; Arruda, Bruno Rodrigues; Morais, Talita C; Rios, Jeison Barros; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the possible systemic antinociceptive activity of mangiferin and to clarify the underlying mechanism, using the acute models of chemical (acetic acid, formalin, and capsaicin) and thermal (hot-plate and tail-flick) nociception in mice. Mangiferin at oral doses of 10 to 100 mg/kg evidenced significant antinociception against chemogenic pain in the test models of acetic acid-induced visceral pain and in formalin- and capsaicin-induced neuro-inflammatory pain, in a naloxone-sensitive manner, suggesting the participation of endogenous opiates in its mechanism. In capsaicin test, the antinociceptive effect of mangiferin (30 mg/kg) was not modified by respective competitive and non-competitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists, capsazepine and ruthenium red, or by pretreatment with L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, or by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. However, mangiferin effect was significantly reversed by glibenclamide, a blocker of K(ATP) channels and in animals pretreated with 8-phenyltheophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist. Mangiferin failed to modify the thermal nociception in hot-plate and tail-flick test models, suggesting that its analgesic effect is only peripheral but not central. The orally administered mangiferin (10-100 mg/kg) was well tolerated and did not impair the ambulation or the motor coordination of mice in respective open-field and rota-rod tests, indicating that the observed antinociception was unrelated to sedation or motor abnormality. The findings of this study suggest that mangiferin has a peripheral antinociceptive action through mechanisms that involve endogenous opioids, K(ATP)-channels and adenosine receptors.

  2. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Opioid Tolerance: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Goldberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are efficacious and cost-effective analgesics, but tolerance limits their effectiveness. This paper does not present any new clinical or experimental data but demonstrates that there exist ascending sensory pathways that contain few opioid receptors. These pathways are located by brain PET scans and spinal cord autoradiography. These nonopioid ascending pathways include portions of the ventral spinal thalamic tract originating in Rexed layers VI–VIII, thalamocortical fibers that project to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1, and possibly a midline dorsal column visceral pathway. One hypothesis is that opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia may be caused by homeostatic upregulation during opioid exposure of nonopioid-dependent ascending pain pathways. Upregulation of sensory pathways is not a new concept and has been demonstrated in individuals impaired with deafness or blindness. A second hypothesis is that adjuvant nonopioid therapies may inhibit ascending nonopioid-dependent pathways and support the clinical observations that monotherapy with opioids usually fails. The uniqueness of opioid tolerance compared to tolerance associated with other central nervous system medications and lack of tolerance from excess hormone production is discussed. Experimental work that could prove or disprove the concepts as well as flaws in the concepts is discussed.

  3. Opioid-Induced Constipation and Bowel Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Bassotti, Gabrio; Coffin, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:  To formulate timely evidence-based guidelines for the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. SETTING:  Constipation is a major untoward effect of opioids. Increasing prescription of opioids has correlated to increased incidence of opioid-induced constipation. However, the inh...

  4. Central amygdala opioid transmission is necessary for increased high-fat intake following 24-h food deprivation, but not following intra-accumbens opioid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kyle E; Johns, Howard W; Floros, Ted G; Will, Matthew J

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a dissociation of certain neural mediators that contribute to the increased consumption of a high-fat diet that follows intra-accumbens (Acb) administration of μ-opioid receptor agonists vs. 24-h food deprivation. These two models, both which induce rapid consumption of the diet, have been shown to involve a distributed corticolimbic circuitry, including the amygdala. Specifically, the central amygdala (CeA) has been shown to be involved in high-fat feeding within both opioid and food-deprivation driven models. The present experiments were conducted to examine the more specific role of CeA opioid transmission in mediating high-fat feeding driven by either intra-Acb administration of the μ-opioid agonist d-Ala2-NMe-Phe4-Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) or 24-h home cage food deprivation. Injection of DAMGO into the Acb (0.25 μg/0.5 μl/side) increased consumption of the high-fat diet, but this feeding was unaffected by administration of opioid antagonist, naltrexone (5 μg/0.25 μl/side) administered into the CeA. In contrast, intra-CeA naltrexone administration attenuated high-fat intake driven by 24-h food deprivation, demonstrating a specific role for CeA opioid transmission in high-fat consumption. Intra-CeA naltrexone administration alone had no effect on baseline feeding levels within either feeding model. These findings suggest that CeA opioid transmission mediates consumption of a palatable high-fat diet driven by short-term negative-energy balance (24-h food deprivation), but not intra-Acb opioid receptor activation.

  5. Community-based opioid overdose prevention programs providing naloxone - United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Drug overdose death rates have increased steadily in the United States since 1979. In 2008, a total of 36,450 drug overdose deaths (i.e., unintentional, intentional [suicide or homicide], or undetermined intent) were reported, with prescription opioid analgesics (e.g., oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone), cocaine, and heroin the drugs most commonly involved . Since the mid-1990s, community-based programs have offered opioid overdose prevention services to persons who use drugs, their families and friends, and service providers. Since 1996, an increasing number of these programs have provided the opioid antagonist naloxone hydrochloride, the treatment of choice to reverse the potentially fatal respiratory depression caused by overdose of heroin and other opioids. Naloxone has no effect on non-opioid overdoses (e.g., cocaine, benzodiazepines, or alcohol) . In October 2010, the Harm Reduction Coalition, a national advocacy and capacity-building organization, surveyed 50 programs known to distribute naloxone in the United States, to collect data on local program locations, naloxone distribution, and overdose reversals. This report summarizes the findings for the 48 programs that completed the survey and the 188 local programs represented by the responses. Since the first opioid overdose prevention program began distributing naloxone in 1996, the respondent programs reported training and distributing naloxone to 53,032 persons and receiving reports of 10,171 overdose reversals. Providing opioid overdose education and naloxone to persons who use drugs and to persons who might be present at an opioid overdose can help reduce opioid overdose mortality, a rapidly growing public health concern.

  6. Tramadol reduces the 5-HTP-induced head-twitch response in mice via the activation of mu and kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Lei; Zheng, Ji-Wang; Wang, Keng; Liu, Rui-Ke; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2003-01-31

    Tramadol, an atypical opioid analgesic, stimulates both opiatergic and serotonergic systems. Here we have investigated the effect of tramadol in mice on 5-hydroxyptrytophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch response (HTR), which is an animal model for the activation of the CNS 5-HT(2A) receptors in mice. Tramadol attenuated 5-HTP-induced HTR in a dose-dependent manner as morphine. Furthermore, the nonselective opioid receptor antagonists, naloxone and diprenorphine (M5050), reversed the effect of tramadol on 5-HTP-induced HTR dose-dependently. Interestingly, in contrast to the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist NTI, beta-FNA, a selective mu receptor antagonist, and nor-BNI, a selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, antagonized the attenuation of 5-HTP-induced HTR by tramadol. In conclusion, administration of tramadol systemically inhibits 5-HTP-induced HTR in mice by activating opiatergic system in the CNS. Our findings show that mu and kappa opioid receptors, but not delta opioid receptor, play an important role in the regulation of serotonergic function in the CNS.

  7. Anti-nociceptive role of neuropeptide Y in the nucleus accumbens in rats with inflammation, an effect modulated by mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Recent study in our laboratory showed that neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an antinociceptive role in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in intact rats. The present study was performed to further investigate the effect of NPY in nociceptive modulation in the NAc of rats with inflammation, and the possible interaction between NPY and the opioid systems. Experimental inflammation was induced by subcutaneous injection of carrageenan into the left hindpaw of rats. Intra-NAc administration of NPY induced a dose-dependent increase of hindpaw withdrawal latencies (HWLs) to thermal and mechanical stimulations in rats with inflammation. The anti-nociceptive effect of NPY was significantly blocked by subsequent intra-NAc injection of the Y1 receptor antagonist NPY28-36, suggesting an involvement of Y1 receptor in the NPY-induced anti-nociception. Furthermore, intra-NAc administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone significantly antagonized the increased HWLs induced by preceding intra-NAc injection of NPY, suggesting an involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the NPY-induced anti-nociception in the NAc during inflammation. Moreover, the NPY-induced anti-nociception was attenuated by following intra-NAc injection of the μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), and κ-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI), but not by δ-opioid antagonist naltrindole, indicating that μ- and κ-opioid receptors, not δ-opioid receptor, are involved in the NPY-induced anti-nociception in the NAc in rats with inflammation.

  8. Quantitative immunolocalization of {mu} opioid receptors: regulation by naltrexone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, C.J.; Lam, H.; To, T.; Anton, B. [Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Unterwald, E.M. [Department of Psychiatry, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1998-04-24

    The present study utilized a newly developed quantitative immunohistochemical assay to measure changes in {mu} opioid receptor abundance following chronic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. These data were compared with those obtained from {mu} receptor radioligand binding on adjacent tissue sections, in order to determine whether the characteristic antagonist-induced increase in radioligand binding is due to an increase in the total number of {mu} receptors and/or to an increase in the proportion of receptors that are in an active binding conformation in the absence of a change in the total number of receptors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered naltrexone, 7-8 mg/kg per day, or saline continuously for seven days by osmotic minipumps, after which time their brains were processed for immunohistochemistry and receptor autoradiography on adjacent fresh frozen tissue sections. Semiquantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a radiolabelled secondary antibody for autoradiographic determination and a set of radioactive standards. Results demonstrate an overall concordance between the distribution of {mu} opioid receptors as measured by the two different methods with a few exceptions. Following naltrexone administration, {mu} receptor immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus, and interpeduncular nucleus as compared with the saline-treated control animals. [{sup 3}H]D-Ala{sup 2},N-Me-Phe{sup 4},Gly-ol{sup 5}-enkephalin binding to {mu} opioid receptors was significantly higher in the globus pallidus, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, central gray, and interpeduncular nucleus of the naltrexone-treated rats.These findings indicate that in some brain regions chronic naltrexone exposure increases the total number of {mu} opioid receptors, while in other regions there is an increase in the percent of active receptors without an

  9. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  10. A practical and ethical solution to the opioid scheduling conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatman ME

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Schatman,1 Beth D Darnall21Foundation for Ethics in Pain Care, Bellevue, WA, USA; 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Pain Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs of opioids have been in existence since the 1970s,1 with abuse-deterrent mechanisms including physical barriers (eg, barriers to crushing, chemical additives such as opioid antagonists or irritants, and prodrugs that require conversion of the medication into their active forms in the gastrointestinal tract.2 A recent systematic review and meta-analysis3 found no difference between ADFs and non-ADFs in terms of efficacy or adverse events including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache, somnolence, constipation, and pruritus. Notably, the efficacy of ADFs in preventing abuse is not yet established, and therefore the authors could only comment on their "potential … to deter or resist some of the common forms of tampering associated with opioid misuse and abuse". While Turk et al2 have elucidated the complexity of producing high-quality research on the efficacy of ADFs to reduce opioid abuse, recent data are encouraging. For example, since Purdue Pharma’s (Stamford, CT, USA voluntary reformulation of OxyContin® to an ADF in 2010, abuse of the medication has decreased significantly.4–6 As a specific example, National Poison Data System statistics indicated a 36% reduction in abuse exposure for OxyContin following ADF reformulation. Meanwhile, researchers for Purdue Pharma found an increase in abuse exposure for other single-entity oxycodone products and a 42% increase in abuse exposure for heroin during the same time frame.7 Although OxyContin has been the most investigated abuse deterrent formulation, ADFs of other opioids have demonstrated promise in preliminary investigations.8,9

  11. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalamachu, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.

  12. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids.

  13. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  14. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Opioid Tolerance: A New Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are efficacious and cost-effective analgesics, but tolerance limits their effectiveness. This paper does not present any new clinical or experimental data but demonstrates that there exist ascending sensory pathways that contain few opioid receptors. These pathways are located by brain PET scans and spinal cord autoradiography. These nonopioid ascending pathways include portions of the ventral spinal thalamic tract originating in Rexed layers VI–VIII, thalamocortical fibers that proje...

  15. Clinical potential of naloxegol in the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen JL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Lykke Poulsen,1 Christina Brock,1,2 Anne Estrup Olesen,1,2 Matias Nilsson,1 Asbjørn Mohr Drewes1,3 1Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, DenmarkAbstract: Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD is a burdensome condition which limits the therapeutic benefit of analgesia. It affects the entire gastrointestinal tract, predominantly by activating opioid receptors in the enteric nervous system, resulting in a wide range of symptoms, such as reflux, bloating, abdominal cramping, hard, dry stools, and incomplete evacuation. The majority of studies evaluating OIBD focus on constipation experienced in approximately 60% of patients. Nevertheless, other presentations of OIBD seem to be equally frequent. Furthermore, laxative treatment is often insufficient, which in many patients results in decreased quality of life and discontinuation of opioid treatment. Novel mechanism-based pharmacological approaches targeting the gastrointestinal opioid receptors have been marketed recently and even more are in the pipeline. One strategy is prolonged release formulation of the opioid antagonist naloxone (which has limited systemic absorption and oxycodone in a combined tablet. Another approach is peripherally acting, µ-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs that selectively target µ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. However, in Europe the only PAMORA approved for OIBD is the subcutaneously administered methylnaltrexone. Alvimopan is an oral PAMORA, but only approved in the US for postoperative ileus in hospitalized patients. Finally, naloxegol is a novel, oral PAMORA expected to be approved soon. In this review, the prevalence and pathophysiology of OIBD is presented. As PAMORAs seem to be a promising approach, their potential

  16. Animal models of motivation for drinking in rodents with a focus on opioid receptor neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, George F; Roberts, Amanda J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Heyser, Charles J; Katner, Simon N; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Weiss, Friedbert

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol, like other drugs of abuse, has motivating properties that can be developed as animal models of self-administration. A major strength of the operant approach where an animal must work to obtain ethanol is that it reduces confounds due to palatability and controls for nonspecific malaise-inducing effects. In the domain of opioid peptide systems, limited access paradigms have good predictive validity. In addition, animal models of excessive drinking-either environmentally or genetically induced-also appear sensitive to blockade or inactivation of opioid peptide receptors. Ethanol availability can be predicted by cues associated with positive reinforcement, and these models are sensitive to the administration of opioid antagonists. Perhaps most exciting are the recent results suggesting that the key element in opioid peptide systems that is important for the positive reinforcing effects of ethanol is the mu-opioid receptor. How exactly ethanol modulates mu-receptor function will be a major challenge of future research. Nevertheless, the apparently critical role of the mu receptor in ethanol reinforcement refocuses the neuropharmacology of ethanol reinforcement in the opioid peptide domain and opens a novel avenue for exploring medications for treating alcoholism.

  17. Involvement of opioid signaling in food preference and motivation: Studies in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, I; Font, L; Currie, P J; Pastor, R

    2016-01-01

    Motivation is a complex neurobiological process that initiates, directs, and maintains goal-oriented behavior. Although distinct components of motivated behavior are difficult to investigate, appetitive and consummatory phases of motivation are experimentally separable. Different neurotransmitter systems, particularly the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, have been associated with food motivation. Over the last two decades, however, research focusing on the role of opioid signaling has been particularly growing in this area. Opioid receptors seem to be involved, via neuroanatomically distinct mechanisms, in both appetitive and consummatory aspects of food reward. In the present chapter, we review the pharmacology and functional neuroanatomy of opioid receptors and their endogenous ligands, in the context of food reinforcement. We examine literature aimed at the development of laboratory animal techniques to better understand different components of motivated behavior. We present recent data investigating the effect of opioid receptor antagonists on food preference and effort-related decision making in rats, which indicate that opioid signaling blockade selectively affects intake of relatively preferred foods, resulting in reduced willingness to exert effort to obtain them. Finally, we elaborate on the potential role of opioid system manipulations in disorders associated with excessive eating and obesity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Naltrexone depot formulations for opioid and alcohol dependence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, Philipp P; Kunøe, Nikolaj; Gossop, Michael; Waal, Helge

    2011-12-01

    Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist that blocks the reinforcing effects of opioids and reduces alcohol consumption and craving. It has no abuse potential, mild and transient side effects, and thus appears an ideal pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Its effectiveness in alcohol dependence is less evident, but compliance with naltrexone combined with psychosocial support has been repeatedly shown to improve drinking outcomes. Limited compliance with oral naltrexone treatment is a known drawback. Several naltrexone implant and injectable depot formulations are being investigated and provide naltrexone release for at least 1 month. Studies among opioid-dependent patients indicate significant reductions in heroin use, but sample sizes are usually small. In alcohol dependence, two large multicenter trials report alcohol and craving reductions for naltrexone and placebo groups, indicating a significant but moderate effect. The pharmacokinetic profile of the injectable formulation indicates reliable naltrexone release over 1 month at therapeutic levels. Implant formulations releasing naltrexone up to 7 months are reported. Findings on safety and tolerability confirm the generally mild adverse effects described for naltrexone tablets. However, further research on therapeutic levels (i.e., opioid blocking) is warranted. The majority of naltrexone implants lacks approval for regular clinical use and larger longitudinal studies are needed. The available naltrexone depot formulations have the potential to significantly improve medication compliance in opioid and alcohol dependence. In certain circumstances, they may constitute a promising new treatment option. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Injectable and implantable sustained release naltrexone in the treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Ngo, Hanh; Hulse, Gary

    2014-02-01

    Sustained release technologies for administering the opioid antagonist naltrexone (SRX) have the potential to assist opioid-addicted patients in their efforts to maintain abstinence from heroin and other opioid agonists. Recently, reliable SRX formulations in intramuscular or implantable polymers that release naltrexone for 1-7 months have become available for clinical use and research. This qualitative review of the literature provides an overview of the technologies currently available for SRX and their effectiveness in reducing opioid use and other relevant outcomes. The majority of studies indicate that SRX is effective in reducing heroin use, and the most frequently studied SRX formulations have acceptable adverse events profiles. Registry data indicate a protective effect of SRX on mortality and morbidity. In some studies, SRX also seems to affect other outcomes, such as concomitant substance use, vocational training attendance, needle use, and risk behaviour for blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis or human immunodeficiency virus. There is a general need for more controlled studies, in particular to compare SRX with agonist maintenance treatment, to study combinations of SRX with behavioural interventions, and to study at-risk groups such as prison inmates or opioid-addicted pregnant patients. The literature suggests that sustained release naltrexone is a feasible, safe and effective option for assisting abstinence efforts in opioid addiction. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Individual variation in the motivational and neurobiological effects of an opioid cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Lindsay M; Pitchers, Kyle K; Flagel, Shelly B; Robinson, Terry E

    2015-03-13

    A discrete cue associated with intravenous injections of cocaine acquires greater control over motivated behavior in some rats ('sign-trackers', STs) than others ('goal-trackers', GTs). It is not known, however, if such variation generalizes to cues associated with other drugs. We asked, therefore, whether a discrete cue (a light) associated with the intravenous administration of an opioid drug (the short-acting mu receptor agonist, remifentanil) acquires incentive motivational properties differently in STs and GTs, as indicated by tests of Pavlovian conditioned approach and conditioned reinforcement. Consistent with studies using cocaine, STs approached a classically conditioned opioid cue more readily than GTs, and in a test of conditioned reinforcement worked more avidly to get it. Interestingly, STs and GTs did not differ in the acquisition of a conditioned orienting response. In addition, the performance of conditioned approach behavior, but not conditioned orientation, was attenuated by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist, flupenthixol, into the core of the nucleus accumbens. Lastly, food and opioid cues engaged similar amygdalo-striatal-thalamic circuitry to a much greater extent in STs than GTs, as indicated by Fos expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, similar to food and cocaine cues: (1) a discrete opioid cue attains greater incentive motivational value in STs than GTs; (2) the attribution of incentive motivational properties to an opioid cue is dopamine dependent; and (3) an opioid cue engages the so-called 'motive circuit' only if it is imbued with incentive salience.

  1. Orienting patients to greater opioid safety: models of community pharmacy-based naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Traci C; Dauria, Emily F; Bratberg, Jeffrey; Davis, Corey S; Walley, Alexander Y

    2015-08-06

    The leading cause of adult injury death in the U.S.A. is drug overdose, the majority of which involves prescription opioid medications. Outside of the U.S.A., deaths by drug overdose are also on the rise, and overdose is a leading cause of death for drug users. Reducing overdose risk while maintaining access to prescription opioids when medically indicated requires careful consideration of how opioids are prescribed and dispensed, how patients use them, how they interact with other medications, and how they are safely stored. Pharmacists, highly trained professionals expert at detecting and managing medication errors and drug-drug interactions, safe dispensing, and patient counseling, are an under-utilized asset in addressing overdose in the U.S. and globally. Pharmacies provide a high-yield setting where patient and caregiver customers can access naloxone-an opioid antagonist that reverses opioid overdose-and overdose prevention counseling. This case study briefly describes and provides two US state-specific examples of innovative policy models of pharmacy-based naloxone, implemented to reduce overdose events and improve opioid safety: Collaborative Pharmacy Practice Agreements and Pharmacy Standing Orders.

  2. State-dependent µ-opioid Modulation of Social Motivation – a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guro Engvig Loseth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by µ-opioid transmission. The µ-opioid receptor (MOR system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviours, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the µ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for µ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for µ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account.

  3. Amnesia Affecting Some Opioid Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they had used opioids. These drugs include prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone (Oxycontin) and oxycodone and acetaminophen ( ... attributed to a stroke or dementia. Moreover, the brain abnormalities seen on the MRI scans appear to ...

  4. Opioids and their peripheral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Amato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The inflammation of peripheral tissues leads the primary afferent neurons, in particular at the cell bodies level located in the DRG (dorsal root ganglia, to an increased synthesis of opioid receptors: determining an “up-regulation”. After that opioid receptors are transported at the level of the nociceptive terminals, they are incorporated into the neuronal membrane becoming functional receptors. The above receptor proteins bind to opioid produced by immune cells or the exogenous ones. This leads to a direct or indirect suppression of the Ca2+ currents induced by TRPV1 or the currents of the Na+, resulting in neuronal reduced excitability and in transmitted signals decrease. The observation that the immune system is able to modulate the pain by ligands that interact with the opioid receptors located on sensory neurons, may have broad implications for the development of innovative and safer pain drugs.

  5. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  6. Towards safer use of opioids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carson, R W R

    2009-09-01

    The main aim of our work was to improve the safety of opioid use in our institution, an acute generalhospital with 620 beds. Initially, all reported opioid errors from 2001 - 2006 were audited. The findings directed a range of multidisciplinary staff educational inputs to improve opioid prescribing and administration practice, and encourage drug error reporting. 448 drug errors were reported, of which 54 (12%) involved opioids; of these, 43 (79%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. 31 of the errors (57%) were associated with administration, followed by 12 (22%) with dispensing and 11 (20%) with prescribing. There were 2 reports of definite patient harm. A subsequent audit examined a 17-month period following the introduction of the above teaching: 17 errors were noted, of which 14 (83%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. Again, drug administration was most error-prone, comprising 11 (65%) of reports. However, just 2 (12%) of the reported errors now involved prescribing, which was a reduction.

  7. Asymmetric synthesis and in vitro and in vivo activity of tetrahydroquinolines featuring a diverse set of polar substitutions at the 6 position as mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptor/δ opioid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Aaron M; Griggs, Nicholas W; Anand, Jessica P; Traynor, John R; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Mosberg, Henry I

    2015-08-19

    We previously reported a small series of mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist/δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist peptidomimetics featuring a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and showed the promise of this series as effective analgesics after intraperitoneal administration in mice. We report here an expanded structure-activity relationship study of the pendant region of these compounds and focus in particular on the incorporation of heteroatoms into this side chain. These analogues provide new insight into the binding requirements for this scaffold at MOR, DOR, and the κ opioid receptor (KOR), and several of them (10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n) significantly improve upon the overall MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile of our previous compounds. In vivo data for 10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n are also reported and show the antinociceptive potency and duration of action of compounds 10j and 10m to be comparable to those of morphine.

  8. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid recepto

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid

  11. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Munguía, Norma; González-Trujano, Ma. Eva; Huerta, Miguel; Trujillo, Xochitl; Díaz-Reval, M. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and serotonergic systems in the synergic effect of the tramadol+caffeine combination in the rat formalin test. At the supraspinal level, the opioid antagonist, naloxone, completely reversed the effect of the drug combination, whereas ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, inhibited the effect by 60%; however, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, did not alter the combination effect. When the antagonists were intrathecally administered, there was a significant reduction in all tramadol-caffeine combination effects. With respect to tramadol alone, there was significant participation of the opioid system at the supraspinal level, whereas it was the serotonergic system that participated at the spinal level by means of the two receptors studied. In conclusion, the tramadol+caffeine combination synergically activated the opioid and serotonergic systems at the supraspinal level, as well as at the spinal level, to produce the antinociception. PMID:26146627

  12. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Carrillo-Munguía

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and serotonergic systems in the synergic effect of the tramadol+caffeine combination in the rat formalin test. At the supraspinal level, the opioid antagonist, naloxone, completely reversed the effect of the drug combination, whereas ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, inhibited the effect by 60%; however, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, did not alter the combination effect. When the antagonists were intrathecally administered, there was a significant reduction in all tramadol-caffeine combination effects. With respect to tramadol alone, there was significant participation of the opioid system at the supraspinal level, whereas it was the serotonergic system that participated at the spinal level by means of the two receptors studied. In conclusion, the tramadol+caffeine combination synergically activated the opioid and serotonergic systems at the supraspinal level, as well as at the spinal level, to produce the antinociception.

  13. Analgesic Properties of Opioid/NK1 Multitarget Ligands with Distinct in Vitro Profiles in Naive and Chronic Constriction Injury Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnowska, Joanna; Costante, Roberto; Guillemyn, Karel; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Mollica, Adriano; Streicher, John; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Schiller, Peter W; Tourwé, Dirk; Mika, Joanna; Ballet, Steven; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2017-07-26

    The lower efficacy of opioids in neuropathic pain may be due to the increased activity of pronociceptive systems such as substance P. We present evidence to support this hypothesis in this work from the spinal cord in a neuropathic pain model in mice. Biochemical analysis confirmed the elevated mRNA and protein level of pronociceptive substance P, the major endogenous ligand of the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor, in the lumbar spinal cord of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-mice. To improve opioid efficacy in neuropathic pain, novel compounds containing opioid agonist and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist pharmacophores were designed. Structure-activity studies were performed on opioid agonist/NK1 receptor antagonist hybrid peptides by modification of the C-terminal amide substituents. All compounds were evaluated for their affinity and in vitro activity at the mu opioid (MOP) and delta opioid (DOP) receptors, and for their affinity and antagonist activity at the NK1 receptor. On the basis of their in vitro profiles, the analgesic properties of two new bifunctional hybrids were evaluated in naive and CCI-mice, representing models for acute and neuropathic pain, respectively. The compounds were administered to the spinal cord by lumbar puncture. In naive mice, the single pharmacophore opioid parent compounds provided better analgesic results, as compared to the hybrids (max 70% MPE), raising the acute pain threshold close to 100% MPE. On the other hand, the opioid parents gave poor analgesic effects under neuropathic pain conditions, while the best hybrid delivered robust (close to 100% MPE) and long lasting alleviation of both tactile and thermal hypersensitivity. The results presented emphasize the potential of opioid/NK1 hybrids in view of analgesia under nerve injury conditions.

  14. REGULATION OF ANTI-SRBC ANTIBODY PRODUCTION BY OPIOIDS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧琴; 林嘉友; 刘景生

    1995-01-01

    This study focused on the influences of opioids on the generation of antibody againse sheep erythrocyte in vitro.It was found that morphine,a-CAO,DADLE,MENK were able to inhibit the capacity of murine spleen cells to generate antibody and leukotriene C4 and conversely,dynorphin was able to stimulate the capacity of murine spleen cells to generate antibody and leukotriene C4. Morphine,a-CAO,MENK,DA-DLE,dynorphin decreased intracellular cAMP level,increased [Ca2+]i and calmodulin activity.The effects were completely blocked by naloxone,the specific opioid antagonist.Our results showed that opioids regulate the production of antibody in murine spleen cells,and alter intracellular cAMP,[Ca2+]i calmodulin activity,and leukotriene C4 production by way of binding to different receptor types.

  15. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  16. Functional μ-Opioid-Galanin Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Quiroz, César; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Cortés, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has been shown to interact with the opioid system. More specifically, galanin counteracts the behavioral effects of the systemic administration of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists. Yet the mechanism responsible for this galanin–opioid interaction has remained elusive. Using biophysical techniques in mammalian transfected cells, we found evidence for selective heteromerization of MOR and the galanin receptor subtype Gal1 (Gal1R). Also in transfected cells, a synthetic peptide selectively disrupted MOR–Gal1R heteromerization as well as specific interactions between MOR and Gal1R ligands: a negative cross talk, by which galanin counteracted MAPK activation induced by the endogenous MOR agonist endomorphin-1, and a cross-antagonism, by which a MOR antagonist counteracted MAPK activation induced by galanin. These specific interactions, which represented biochemical properties of the MOR-Gal1R heteromer, could then be identified in situ in slices of rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) with MAPK activation and two additional cell signaling pathways, AKT and CREB phosphorylation. Furthermore, in vivo microdialysis experiments showed that the disruptive peptide selectively counteracted the ability of galanin to block the dendritic dopamine release in the rat VTA induced by local infusion of endomorphin-1, demonstrating a key role of MOR-Gal1R heteromers localized in the VTA in the direct control of dopamine cell function and their ability to mediate antagonistic interactions between MOR and Gal1R ligands. The results also indicate that MOR-Gal1R heteromers should be viewed as targets for the treatment of opioid use disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) localized in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a key role in the reinforcing and addictive properties of opioids. With parallel in vitro experiments in mammalian transfected cells and in situ and in vivo experiments in rat VTA, we demonstrate that a significant

  17. Brain delta2 opioid receptors mediate SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott Manning; Hewson, Jennifer Marie; Inan, Saadet; Cowan, Alan

    2005-07-05

    Despite insights into an increasingly significant role for delta opioid receptors in thermoregulation, it is unclear whether delta receptors located in the brain or periphery play the more critical role in body temperature regulation. Moreover, it is not entirely clear which delta receptor phenotype, delta1 or delta2, mediates the hypothermic actions of delta agonists. Because SNC-80 distributes into central and peripheral compartments and produces rapid hypothermia following systemic injection, the nonpeptide delta agonist is particularly useful in discriminating the site of action of delta receptor-mediated hypothermia. To determine the locus and phenotype of delta receptor which mediates SNC-80-induced hypothermia, we injected SNC-80 and phenotype selective delta antagonists to male Sprague-Dawley rats. SNC-80 (10-50 mg/kg, im) evoked hypothermia that peaked 30 min post-injection. Naltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), an opioid antagonist, or naltrindole (5 mg/kg, sc), a delta antagonist, blocked the hypothermic response to SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im). The hypothermia caused by SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) was blocked by a delta2 antagonist, naltriben (2.5 mg/kg, sc), but was not affected by BNTX (5 and 10 mg/kg, sc), a delta1 antagonist. The administration of naltriben (10 microg/rat, icv) 30 min before SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) prevented SNC-80-evoked hypothermia. In contrast, methylnaltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), a peripherally restricted opioid antagonist, did not affect the hypothermia caused by SNC-80. The present data demonstrate that selective activation of brain delta2 receptors is a major mechanism of SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

  18. Chemotaxis of human and rat leukocytes by the delta-selective non-peptidic opioid SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz-Sánchez, Iván; Weber, Richard J; Rice, Kenner C; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Rodríguez-Padilla, C; Tamez-Guerra, R; Méndez-Vázquez, José L; Gómez-Flores, R

    2003-01-01

    Opioids like morphine, represent a major source of relief for most chronic moderate to severe nonmalignant pain. However, opioid abuse may lead to infections such as hepatitis and AIDS because opioids have been associated with suppressing various parameters of immune function including antimicrobial resistance, antibody production, monocyte-mediated phagocytosis, and both neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis. We have previously reported immunopotentiating properties of non-peptidic opioid receptor selective agonists and antagonists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the nonpeptidic delta-opioid receptor agonist (+)-4-((alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl)-N, N-diethyl-benzamide (SNC 80) on chemotaxis of rat thymic and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a modified Wilkinson chamber. Cell recruitment is an essential process in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. We observed that SNC 80 at concentrations of 10(-10), 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6) M, significantly (p SNC 80 on chemotaxis of rat and human leukocytes were antagonized by naloxone, indicating that the modulation of chemotaxis by SNC 80 is via a classic opioid receptor. The development and use of non-peptidic opioids like SNC 80 could have an immediate impact not only as potent analgesics, but in immunoregulation.

  19. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J J

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  20. Interacting cannabinoid and opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens core control adolescent social play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Manduca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R or mu-opioid receptor (MOR antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC. Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of mediates social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  1. Phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit in dorsal horn neurons by remifentanil: a mechanism for opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Li, S S; Zhao, N; Yu, C

    2015-03-13

    Remifentanil (an ultra-short acting μ-opioid receptor agonist) use has been associated with acute opioid tolerance and hyperalgesia. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that remifentanil elicits rapid and prolonged upregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. However, the effect of remifentanil on the levels of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR in dorsal horn neurons (DHNs) has not been reported. We investigated the effect of remifentanil, along with ketamine (NMDAR antagonist) and naloxone (μ-opioid receptor antagonist), on GluN1 mRNA levels and the amount of phosphorylated GluN1 in primary cultures of embryonic rat DHNs. DHNs were isolated from 18-19-day rat embryos and treated with remifentanil or vehicle for 1 h. GluN1 mRNA and protein levels, determined by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively, were significantly and persistently increased by remifentanil exposure compared with the control group (P < 0.05). These results may partially account for the mechanism of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. This increase was prevented by ketamine (NMDAR antagonist) and naloxone (μ-opioid receptors antagonist), thus providing a potential therapeutic mechanism for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  2. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... buprenorphine and naloxone are used to treat opioid dependence (addiction to opioid drugs, including heroin and narcotic ... as ketoconazole (Nizoral); medications for anxiety such as benzodiazepines; cyclobenzaprine (Amrix); dextromethorphan (found in many cough medications; ...

  3. Medicare Part D Opioid Drug Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The opioid prescribing rate interactive mapping tool shows geographic comparisons, at the state, county, and ZIP code levels, of de-identified Medicare Part D opioid...

  4. Opioids and Alcohol a Dangerous Cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken opioids previously. Oxycodone, an ingredient in the brand-name drugs OxyContin and Percocet, is widely prescribed ... in the journal Anesthesiology . "We hope to increase awareness regarding the dangers of prescription opioids, the increased ...

  5. Can non-selective beta-blockers prevent hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Maja; Wiest, Reiner; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the main liver-related cause of death in patients with compensated cirrhosis. The early phases are asymptomatic and the prognosis is poor, which makes prevention essential. We propose that non-selective beta-blockers decrease the incidence and growth of hepatocellular...... carcinoma via a reduction of the inflammatory load from the gut to the liver and inhibition of angiogenesis. Due to their effect on the portal pressure, non-selective beta-blockers are used for prevention of esophageal variceal bleeding. Recently, non-hemodynamic effects of beta-blockers have received...... reduce hepatic inflammation. Blockage of β-adrenoceptors also decrease angiogenesis by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factors. Because gut-derived inflammation and neo-angiogenesis are important in hepatic carcinogenesis, non-selective beta-blockers can potentially reduce the development...

  6. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  7. Opioid Peptides: Potential for Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Jane V.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important targets for the treatment of pain and potentially for other disease states (e.g. mood disorders and drug abuse) as well. Significant recent advances have been made in identifying opioid peptide analogs that exhibit promising in vivo activity for treatment of these maladies. This review focuses on the development and evaluation of opioid peptide analogs demonstrating activity after systemic administration, and recent clinical evaluations of opioid peptides for po...

  8. The effect of opioid receptor blockade on the neural processing of thermal stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter D Schoell

    Full Text Available The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone.

  9. How to sell successfully a perfume in the non-selective market?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalho, Maria Rita Pinto Coelho de Magalhães

    2009-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics This document presents a market research on the positioning of perfumes in the non selective market. This project’s main goal had been to analyze the challenge of “successfully selling a perfume in the non-selective market” in order to propose potential solutions. To address this marketing problem, an exploratory research had been c...

  10. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    other symptoms. His medical history was significant for posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, chronic pain , phantom limb pain , insomnia, and depression...FEB 2013 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Opioid-induced hyperalgesia--worsening pain in opioid-dependent...Report Opioid-induced hyperalgesia—worsening pain in opioid-dependent patients☆ Abstract Patients with chronic opioid use are commonly treated in the

  11. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone

    OpenAIRE

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Music’s universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover stu...

  12. Blocking Opioids Attenuates Physical Warmth-Induced Feelings of Social Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Inagaki, TK; Irwin, MR; Eisenberger, NI

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 APA, all rights reserved). "Heartwarming" social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), "social warmth" and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms; however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in orde...

  13. New opioid designed multiple ligand from Dmt-Tic and morphinan pharmacophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, John L; Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2006-09-07

    Here, we report the synthesis of a designed multi-pharmacophore ligand derived from the linkage of a delta selective peptide antagonist (Dmt-Tic) and a mu/kappa morphinan agonist butorphan (MCL 101) through a two methylene spacer. The new compound MCL 450 maintains the same characteristics as those the two reference compounds. MCL 450 represents a useful starting point for the synthesis of other multiple opioid ligands endowed with analgesic properties with low tolerance and dependence.

  14. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: preparation and opioid receptor activity of salvinicin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Denise S; Katavic, Peter L; Lozama, Anthony; Harding, Wayne W; Parrish, Damon; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Dersch, Christina M; Partilla, John S; Rothman, Richard B; Navarro, Hernan; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2007-07-26

    Further modification of salvinorin A (1a), the major active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in the synthesis of novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. We report in this study that oxadiazole 11a and salvidivin A (12a), a photooxygenation product of 1a, have been identified as the first neoclerodane diterpenes with kappa antagonist activity. This indicates that additional structural modifications of 1a may lead to analogues with higher potency and utility as drug abuse medications.

  15. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N;

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... improved with naltrexone (P = 0.026). Subjects taking naltrexone with a family history of addiction showed a greater numerical reduction in the urges to pull, although it was not statistically significant. Future studies will have to examine whether pharmacological modulation of the opiate system may...

  16. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia: A Cautionary Tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Don L; Clauw, Daniel J; Palmer, Roy E; Clair, Andrew G

    2016-05-01

    Multiple pharmacotherapies are available for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), including opioid analgesics. We postulate that the mechanism of action of traditional opioids predicts their lack of efficacy in FM. Literature searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were conducted using the search term opioid AND fibromyalgia to identify relevant articles, with no date limitations set. Citation lists in returned articles and personal archives of references were also examined for additional relevant items, and articles were selected based on the expert opinions of the authors. We found no evidence from clinical trials that opioids are effective for the treatment of FM. Observational studies have found that patients with FM receiving opioids have poorer outcomes than patients receiving nonopioids, and FM guidelines recommend against the use of opioid analgesics. Despite this, and despite the availability of alternative Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies and the efficacy of nonpharmacologic therapies, opioids are commonly used in the treatment of FM. Factors associated with opioid use include female sex; geographic variation; psychological factors; a history of opioid use, misuse, or abuse; and patient or physician preference. The long-term use of opioid analgesics is of particular concern in the United States given the ongoing public health emergency relating to excess prescription opioid consumption. The continued use of opioids to treat FM despite a proven lack of efficacy, lack of support from treatment guidelines, and the availability of approved pharmacotherapy options provides a cautionary tale for their use in other chronic pain conditions.

  17. Stereochemical basis for a unified structure activity theory of aromatic and heterocyclic rings in selected opioids and opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-02-18

    This paper presents a novel unified theory of the structure activity relationship of opioids and opioid peptides. It is hypothesized that a virtual or known heterocyclic ring exists in all opioids which have activity in humans, and this ring occupies relative to the aromatic ring of the drug, approximately the same plane in space as the piperidine ring of morphine. Since the rings of morphine are rigid, and the aromatic and piperidine rings are critical structural components for morphine's analgesic properties, the rigid morphine molecule allows for approximations of the aromatic and heterocyclic relationships in subsequent drug models where bond rotations are common. This hypothesis and five propositions are supported by stereochemistry and experimental observations.Proposition #1 The structure of morphine provides a template. Proposition #2 Steric hindrance of some centric portion of the piperidine ring explains antagonist properties of naloxone, naltrexone and alvimopam. Proposition #3 Methadone has an active conformation which contains a virtual heterocyclic ring which explains its analgesic activity and racemic properties. Proposition #4 The piperidine ring of fentanyl can assume the morphine position under conditions of nitrogen inversion. Proposition #5 The first 3 amino acid sequences of beta endorphin (l-try-gly-gly) and the active opioid dipeptide, l-tyr-pro, (as a result of a peptide turn and zwitterion bonding) form a virtual piperazine-like ring which is similar in size, shape and location to the heterocyclic rings of morphine, meperidine, and methadone. Potential flaws in this theory are discussed.This theory could be important for future analgesic drug design.

  18. Mu opioid modulation of oxytocin secretion in late pregnant and parturient rats. Involvement of noradrenergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Selim; Yilmaz, Bayram; Canpolat, Sinan; Sandal, Suleyman; Ozcan, Mete; Kumru, Selahattin; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated effects of micro- and kappa-opioid agonists and antagonists on plasma oxytocin levels and noradrenaline content in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of 20-day pregnant rats. beta-Endorphin, oxytocin, estrogen and progesterone profiles in late pregnant and parturient rats were also sought. Stage of estrous cycle was monitored by vaginal smear, and pro-estrous animals were left overnight with male. In the first set of experiments, pregnant rats were monitored and decapitated on days 20 and 21 and after the delivery of second pup. In the second set, 20-day pregnant rats were intracerebroventricularly infused with morphine (50 microg/10 microl), U50,488H (kappa-agonist; 50 microg/10 microl), clocinnamox (micro-antagonist; 50 microg/10 microl) and norbinaltorphimine (kappa-antagonist; 50 microg/10 microl). Controls received saline alone. Serum estrogen and progesterone levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay, and plasma oxytocin and beta-endorphin by radioimmunoassay. Noradrenaline and its metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol) were determined in micropunched hypothalamic nuclei by HPLC-ECD. In parturient rats, oxytocin levels were increased (p oxytocin levels (p oxytocin secretion. We suggest that noradrenaline may mediate the inhibitory effects of micro-opioids on oxytocin release. Our findings have also shown that kappa-opioid receptors are not involved in modulation of oxytocin neurons in late pregnant rats. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Endomorphins and related opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G-protein-coupled receptors (delta, kappa, mu) are located in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The opioid system has been studied to determine the intrinsic mechanism of modulation of pain and to develop uniquely effective pain-control substances with minimal abuse potential and side effects. Two types of endogenous opioid peptides exist, one containing Try-Gly-Gly-Phe as the message domain (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins) and the other containing the Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp sequence (endomorphins-1 and -2). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2), which has high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.36 nM) and remarkable selectivity (4000- and 15,000-fold preference over the delta and kappa receptors, respectively), was isolated from bovine and human brain. In addition, endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2), isolated from the same sources, exhibited high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.69 nM) and very high selectivity (13,000- and 7500-fold preference relative to delta and kappa receptors, respectively). Both opioids bind to mu-opioid receptors, thereby activating G-proteins, resulting in regulation of gastrointestinal motility, manifestation of antinociception, and effects on the vascular systems and memory. To develop novel analgesics with less addictive properties, evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of the endomorphins led to the design of more potent and stable analgesics. Opioidmimetics and opioid peptides containing the amino acid sequence of the message domain of endomorphins, Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp, could exhibit unique binding activity and lead to the development of new therapeutic drugs for controlling pain.

  20. CCR2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struthers, Mary; Pasternak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of CCR2 has been considered as a target for multiple therapeutic diseases including autoimmune disease, atherosclerosis, pain, and metabolic disease, based in part on the critical role this receptor plays on monocyte migration. Numerous companies have reported programs to identify CCR2 antagonists. Common challenges to the development of CCR2 agents have included poor activity at the rodent receptor and selectivity for both other chemokine receptors and ion channels. This review summarizes the rationale for targeting CCR2 in disease, the recent progress in the identification of potent and select CCR2 antagonists, and the current status of clinical trials for CCR2 agents.

  1. Non-selective β-blockers do not affect mortality in cirrhosis patients with ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Lars; Krag, Aleksander; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The safety of non-selective β-blockers (NSBBs) in advanced cirrhosis has been questioned. We used data from three satavaptan trials to examine whether NSBBs increase mortality in cirrhosis patients with ascites. The trials were conducted in 2006-2008 and included 1198 cirrhosis patients with asci...

  2. Non-selective beta-blockers decrease thrombotic events in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Peuter, Olav R.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Lip, Gregory Y.; Buller, Harry R.; De Boer, Anthonius; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Beta-blockers are often prescribed to patients with heart failure (HF) without distinctions between types of beta-blockers. The 2002 COMET study showed superiority of carvedilol (a non-selective beta-blocker) over metoprolol (selective beta-blocker) on mortality and cardiovascular events

  3. Investigation of in vitro Opioid Receptor Binding Activities of Some Turkish Salvia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Gündüz Çınar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kappa Opioid Peptide Receptor (KOPr activation produces analgesic, psychotomimetic, diuretic and antipruritic effects. KOPr ligands are investigated for their potential roles in the treatment of addiction, depression, feeding behavior, psychosis and schizophrenia. In this study the methanolic extracts of a number of Salvia species which are native to Turkey (S. tomentosa, S. tchihatcheffii , S. rosifolia, S. dichroantha and S. sclarea were tested for their potential binding to opioid receptors in rat brain membranes and Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells expressing human KOPr (CHO-KOPh. [ 3H]Diprenorphine, an unselective opioid antagonist, was utilized in the radioligand receptor binding assays. All extracts (0.11 mg/ml inhibited the [ 3H]Diprenorphine binding with ranging KOPr binding affinities. More than 50% inhibition of diprenorphine binding was shown only with Salvia dichroantha and Salvia sclarea both in rat brain membranes and CHO-KOPh membranes.Among them Salvia sclarea deserves further investigation for its active component(s and its pharmacological characterization. This study clearly demonstrates the potential opioid receptor binding activities of several Turkish Salvia species. This work constitutes the first study on in vitro opioid receptor binding activities of Salvia species from the Turkish flora.

  4. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function.

  5. Sucrose-induced analgesia in mice: Role of nitric oxide and opioid receptor-mediated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtin Shahlaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanism of action of sweet substance-induced analgesia is thought to involve activation of the endogenous opioid system. The nitric oxide (NO pathway has a pivotal role in pain modulation of analgesic compounds such as opioids. Objectives: We investigated the role of NO and the opioid receptor-mediated system in the analgesic effect of sucrose ingestion in mice. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg of NO synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and 20 mg/kg of opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone on the tail flick response in sucrose ingesting mice. Results: Sucrose ingestion for 12 days induced a statistically significant increase in the latency of tail flick response which was unmodified by L-NAME, but partially inhibited by naltrexone administration. Conclusions: Sucrose-induced nociception may be explained by facilitating the release of endogenous opioid peptides. Contrary to some previously studied pain models, the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway had no role in thermal hyperalgesia in our study. We recommend further studies on the involvement of NO in other animals and pain models.

  6. [Nociceptin and the ORL1 receptor: pharmacology of a new opioid receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grond, S; Meuser, T; Pietruck, C; Sablotzki, A

    2002-12-01

    Molecular biological investigations led to the discovery of the ORL1 receptor ( opioid receptor like-1 receptor) and its endogenous ligand nociceptin. Although its sequence and structure are closely related to traditional opioid receptors, the ORL1 receptor shows low binding affinities for selective opioid agonists and antagonists. On the other hand, the ORL1 ligand nociceptin does not bind to the three traditional opioid receptors. The activation of the G protein-coupled ORL1 receptor inhibits adenlylate cyclase activity, reduces the intracellular concentration of the second messenger cAMP and regulates ion channels. The supraspinal administration of nociceptin produces hyperalgesia. unlike opioids. Spinal intrathecal and peripheral administration of nociceptin causes hyperalgesia in low doses and analgesia in high doses. The physiological role and detailed mechanisms of these dose-dependent nociceptin effects in opposite directions are not yet known. In addition, nociceptin modulates other biological phenomena such as feeding, locomotion, gastrointestinal function,memory, cardiovascular function,immunity, renal function, anxiety,dependence and tolerance.Future research on the physiological and pathophysiological importance of the nociceptin/ORL1 receptor systems may provide a target for novel therapeutics.

  7. Stress-evoked opioid release inhibits pain in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Ashley K; Drummond, Peter D

    2008-10-15

    To determine whether stress-evoked release of endogenous opioids might account for hypoalgesia in major depressive disorder (MDD), the mu-opioid antagonist naltrexone (50mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 24 participants with MDD and to 31 non-depressed controls. Eighty minutes later participants completed a painful foot cold pressor test and, after a 5-min interval, began a 25-min arithmetic task interspersed with painful electric shocks. Ten minutes later participants completed a second cold pressor test. Negative affect was greater in participants with MDD than in non-depressed controls throughout the experiment, and increased significantly in both groups during mental arithmetic. Before the math task, naltrexone unmasked direct linear relationships between severity of depression, negative affect while resting quietly, and cold-induced pain in participants with MDD. In contrast, facilitatory effects of naltrexone on cold- and shock-induced pain were greatest in controls with the lowest depression scores. Naltrexone strengthened the relationship between negative affect and shock-induced pain during the math task, particularly in the depressed group, and heightened anxiety in both groups toward the end of the task. Thus, mu-opioid activity apparently masked a positive association between negative affect and pain in the most distressed participants. These findings suggest that psychological distress inhibits pain via stress-evoked release of opioid peptides in severe cases of MDD. In addition, tonic endogenous opioid neurotransmission could inhibit depressive symptoms and pain in people with low depression scores.

  8. Opioid receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray regulate extinction of pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P; Pigg, Michael; Weidemann, Gabrielle

    2004-08-01

    Four experiments studied the role of opioid receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), an important structure eliciting conditioned fear responses, in the extinction of Pavlovian fear. Rats received pairings of an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) with a foot shock unconditioned stimulus (US). The freezing conditioned response (CR) elicited by the CS was then extinguished via nonreinforced presentations of the CS. Microinjection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone into the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) before nonrein-forced CS presentations impaired development of extinction, but such microinjections at the end of extinction did not reinstate an already extinguished freezing CR. This role for opioid receptors in fear extinction was specific to the vlPAG because infusions of naloxone into the dorsal PAG did not impair fear extinction. Finally, the impairment of fear extinction produced by vlPAG infusions of naloxone was dose-dependent. These results show for the first time that the midbrain PAG contributes to fear extinction and specifically identify a role for vlPAG opioid receptors in the acquisition but not the expression of such extinction. Taken together with our previous findings, we suggest that, during fear conditioning, activation of vlPAG opioid receptors contributes to detection of the discrepancy between the actual and expected outcome of the conditioning trial. vlPAG opioid receptors regulate the learning that accrues to the CS and other stimuli present on a trial because they instantiate an associative error correction process influencing US information reaching the site of CS-US convergence in the amygdala. During nonreinforcement, this vlPAG opioid receptor contribution signals extinction.

  9. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.Keywords: extended-release opioids, chronic pain, opioid rotation

  10. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  11. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless) inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Stagljar Igor; Van Bockstaele Elisabeth J; Reyes Beverly AS; Wong Victoria; Kittanakom Saranya; Jin Jay; Berrettini Wade; Levenson Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothes...

  12. Opioid use in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Pain treatment in the elderly is an important challenge to Western societies due to increasing numbers of old persons, their higher incidence of pain, and their greater susceptibility to adverse effects of pain medication. We provide an overview of the factors liable to influence opioid action in

  13. Opioid use in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Pain treatment in the elderly is an important challenge to Western societies due to increasing numbers of old persons, their higher incidence of pain, and their greater susceptibility to adverse effects of pain medication. We provide an overview of the factors liable to influence opioid action in th

  14. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Opioid treatment program certification. 8.11... PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.11 Opioid... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(g)(1)) to dispense opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. An OTP...

  15. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Shoptaw, Steven J; Bickel, Warren K; Ling, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N=353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR=1.30, peconomic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antagonism of the Met5-enkephalin-opioid growth factor receptor-signaling axis promotes MSC to differentiate into osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Nikhil A; DeBoyace, Sean D; Margulies, Bryan S

    2016-07-01

    Chronic opioid therapy is associated with bone loss. This led us to hypothesize that the opioid antagonists, that include naloxone, would stimulate bone formation by regulating MSC differentiation. The opioid growth factor receptor (OGFR) is a non-canonical opioid receptor that binds naloxone with high affinity whereas the native opioid growth factor, met5-enkephalin (met5), binds both the OGFR and the canonical delta opioid receptor (OPRD). Naloxone and an shRNA OGFR lentivirus were employed to disrupt the OGFR-signaling axis in cultured MSC. In parallel, naloxone was administered to bone marrow using a mouse unicortical defect model. OPRD, OGFR, and the met5-ligand were highly expressed in MSC and osteoblasts. A pulse-dose of naloxone increased mineral formation in MSC cultures in contrast to MSC treated with continuous naloxone or OGFR deficient MSC. Importantly, SMAD1 and SMAD8/9 expression increased after a pulse dose of naloxone whereas SMAD1, SMAD7, and ID1 were increased in the OGFR deficient MSC. Inhibited OGFR signaling decreased proliferation and increased p21 expression. The addition of naloxone to the unicortical defect resulted in increased bone formation within the defect. Our data suggest that novel mechanism through which signaling through the OGFR regulates osteogenesis via negative regulation of SMAD1 and p21. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1195-1205, 2016.

  17. Effects of histamine and opioid systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbano

    2002-10-04

    The present study investigated the effect of interactions between histamine receptor agents and the opioid peptidergic system on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections were carried out in all the experiments. Administration of histamine (20 micro g/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (20 and 50 micro g/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (10 and 50 micro g/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists decreased the response induced by histamine. Morphine (1-10 micro g/rat) reduced, while pentazocine (5 and 10 micro g/rat) or the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (5 and 15 micro g/rat), increased memory retention. The combination of histamine with morphine showed potentiation. Effects of pyrilamine and cimetidine were attenuated by morphine. The responses to pentazocine and naloxone also were decreased by histamine. It is concluded that the histaminergic system has an interaction with opioidergic system that is involved in the memory retention process.

  18. Use of Opioid Analgesics in Older Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Felicity C; Bereznicki, Luke R E; Thompson, Angus J; Peterson, Gregory M

    2015-08-01

    To identify potential medication management issues associated with opioid use in older Australians. Retrospective cross-sectional review of the utilization of analgesics in 19,581 people who underwent a medication review in Australia between 2010 and 2012. Australian residents living in the community deemed at risk for adverse medication outcomes or any resident living fulltime in an aged care facility. Patient characteristics in those taking regularly dosed opioids and not and those taking opioid doses >120 mg and ≤120 mg MEQ/day were compared. Multivariable binary logistic regression was used to analyze the association between regular opioid and high dose opioid usage and key variables. Additionally, medication management issues associated with opioids were identified. Opioids were taken by 31.8% of patients, with 22.1% taking them regularly. Several major medication management issues were identified. There was suboptimal use of multimodal analgesia, particularly a low use of non-opioid analgesics, in patients taking regular opioids. There was extensive use (45%) of concurrent anxiolytics/hypnotics among those taking regular opioid analgesics. Laxative use in those prescribed opioids regularly was low (60%). Additionally, almost 12% of patients were taking doses of opioid that exceeded Australian recommendations. A significant evidence to practice gap exists regarding the use of opioids amongst older Australians. These findings highlight the need for a quick reference guide to support prescribers in making appropriate decisions regarding pain management in older patients with persistent pain. This should also be combined with patient and caregiver education about the importance of regular acetaminophen to manage persistent pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Opiate-induced constipation related to activation of small intestine opioid μ2-receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wency Chen; Hsien-Hui Chung; Juei-Tang Cheng

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of opioid μ-receptor subtype in opiate-induced constipation (OIC).METHODS:The effect of loperamide on intestinal transit was investigated in mice.Ileum strips were isolated from 12-wk-old male BALB/c mice for identification of isometric tension.The ileum strips were precontracted with 1 μmol/L acetylcholine (ACh).Then,decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was characterized after cumulative administration of 0.1-10 μmol/k loperamide into the organ bath,for a concentration-dependent study.Specific blockers or antagonists were used for pretreatment to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation.RESULTS:In addition to the delay in intestinal transit,loperamide produced a marked relaxation in isolated ileum precontracted with ACh,in a dose-dependent manner.This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime,a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist,but not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block opioid μ-1 receptors.Also,treatment with opioid μ-1 receptor agonist failed to modify the muscle tone.Moreover,the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels,and by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor,but was enhanced by an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).CONCLUSION:Loperamide induces intestinal relaxation by activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMPPKA pathway to open KATP channels,relates to OIC.

  20. The stereoisomer (+)-naloxone potentiates G-protein coupling and feeding associated with stimulation of mu opioid receptors in the parabrachial nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Aloyo, Vincent J; Simansky, Kenny J

    2013-03-01

    Classically, opioids produce their effects by activating Gi-proteins that inhibit adenylate cyclase activity. Previous studies proposed that mu-opioid receptors can also stimulate adenylate cyclase due to an initial transient coupling to Gs-proteins. Treatment with ultra-low doses of the nonselective opioid antagonist (-)-naloxone or its inactive enantiomer (+)-naloxone blocks this excitatory effect and enhances Gi-coupling. Previously we reported that infusion of the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Glycinol5]-Enkephalin (DAMGO) into the mu-opioid receptor expressing lateral parabrachial nucleus increases feeding. Pretreatment with (-)-naloxone blocks this effect. We used this parabrachial circuit as a model to assess cellular actions of ultra-low doses of (-)-naloxone and (+)-naloxone in modifying the effects of DAMGO. Our results showed that an ultra-low concentration of (-)-naloxone (0.001 nM) and several concentrations of (+)-naloxone (0.01-10 nM) enhanced DAMGO-stimulated guanosine-5'-0-(γ-thio)-triphosphate incorporation in parabrachial sections in vitro. Further, we analyzed the relevance of these effects in vivo. In the present study, we show that (+)-naloxone can potentiate DAMGO-induced feeding at doses at which (-)-naloxone was an antagonist. These results implicated (+)-naloxone as a novel tool for studying mu-opioid receptor functions and suggest that (+)-naloxone may have therapeutic value to enhance clinical actions of opiate drugs.

  1. The kappa-opioid receptor is involved in the stimulating effect of nicotine on adrenocortical activity but not in nicotine induced anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Eva Maria; Llorente, Ricardo; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Moreno, Enrique; Guaza, Carmen; Viveros, Maria Paz

    2005-09-01

    The kappa (kappa) opioid system appears to interact with nicotine in the modulation of locomotion and addiction related processes. In this study we have investigated the possible implication of the kappa-opioid system in the effects of nicotine on anxiety and adrenocortical activity. In two different experiments, we analysed the possible interaction between nicotine (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) and either the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg i.p.) or the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U50,488H (1 mg/kg s.c.). Behavioural and endocrine experiments were performed in different groups of animals. Animals were exposed to the holeboard immediately followed by the plus-maze. Serum corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Nicotine induced an anxiogenic-like effect in the plus-maze and a significant decrease of holeboard activity. The anxiogenic-like effect in the plus-maze was not modified by any of the kappa-opioid receptor ligands. Nicotine also induced a significant increase in the corticosterone levels, and the kappa antagonist, which did not exert any effect per se, antagonised this effect. The kappa-agonist U50,488H induced a significant increase in corticosterone concentration when administered alone. We provide the first evidence for the involvement of the kappa-opioid receptor in the stimulatory effect of nicotine on adrenocortical activity.

  2. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  3. Opioid-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in rat enteric neurons following chronic morphine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Duraffourd

    Full Text Available Opioids, acting at μ opioid receptors, are commonly used for pain management. Chronic opioid treatment induces cellular adaptations, which trigger long-term side effects, including constipation mediated by enteric neurons. We tested the hypothesis that chronic opioid treatment induces alterations of μ opioid receptor signaling in enteric neurons, which are likely to serve as mechanisms underlying opioid-induced constipation. In cultured rat enteric neurons, either untreated (naïve or exposed to morphine for 4 days (chronic, we compared the effect of morphine and DAMGO (D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5 enkephalin on μ opioid receptor internalization and downstream signaling by examining the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK pathway, cAMP accumulation and transcription factor cAMP Response Element-Binding protein (CREB expression. μ opioid receptor internalization and MAPK/ERK phosphorylation were induced by DAMGO, but not morphine in naïve neurons, and by both opioids in chronic neurons. MAPK/ERK activation was prevented by the receptor antagonist naloxone, by blocking receptor trafficking with hypertonic sucrose, dynamin inhibitor, or neuronal transfection with mutated dynamin, and by MAPK inhibitor. Morphine and DAMGO inhibited cAMP in naïve and chronic enteric neurons, and induced desensitization of cAMP signaling. Chronic morphine treatment suppressed desensitization of cAMP and MAPK signaling, increased CREB phosphorylation through a MAPK/ERK pathway and induced delays of gastrointestinal transit, which was prevented by MAPK/ERK blockade. This study showed that opioids induce endocytosis- and dynamin-dependent MAPK/ERK activation in enteric neurons and that chronic morphine treatment triggers changes at the receptor level and downstream signaling resulting in MAPK/ERK-dependent CREB activation. Blockade of this signaling pathway prevents the development of gastrointestinal

  4. Opioid/naloxone prolonged release combinations for opioid induced constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shailendra Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    I read with great interest the recent article by Chen et a/in a recent issue of your esteemed journal.The article is highly thought provoking.One emerging therapeutic alternative for opioid induced constipation is the emergence of opioid/naloxone prolonged release combinations.For instance,naloxone when administered in a 1∶2 ratio with oxycodone reverses the inhibitory effect of oxycodone on the gastrointestinal tract.The advantage of oxycodone/naloxone prolonged release (OXN) is that while its anti-nociceptive efficacy is equivalent to that of oxycodone prolonged release (OXC),it significantly decreases the "Bowel Function Index" thereby ameliorating symptoms of opioid induced constipation to a large extent.Schutter et al in a recent study have reported a decrease in the bowel function index from 38.2 to 15.1.Similarly,L(o)wenstein et al in another recent study have reported that following a month of therapy,complete spontaneous bowel movements per week is increased from one in OXC therapy to three in OXN therapy.

  5. Attentional Bias For Prescription Opioid Cues Among Opioid Dependent Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Passik, Steven D.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent use of prescription opioid analgesics by chronic pain patients may result in opioid dependence, which involves implicit neurocognitive operations that organize and impel craving states and compulsive drug taking behavior. Prior studies have identified an attentional bias (AB) towards heroin among heroin dependent individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether opioid-dependent chronic pain patients exhibit an AB towards prescription opioidrelated cues. Opioid-dependent c...

  6. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    OpenAIRE

    Nalamachu S

    2011-01-01

    Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is b...

  7. Attentional Bias For Prescription Opioid Cues Among Opioid Dependent Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Passik, Steven D.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent use of prescription opioid analgesics by chronic pain patients may result in opioid dependence, which involves implicit neurocognitive operations that organize and impel craving states and compulsive drug taking behavior. Prior studies have identified an attentional bias (AB) towards heroin among heroin dependent individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether opioid-dependent chronic pain patients exhibit an AB towards prescription opioidrelated cues. Opioid-dependent c...

  8. Although Relatively Few, "Doctor Shoppers" Skew Opioid Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioid Prescribing Although Relatively Few, “Doctor Shoppers” Skew Opioid Prescribing Email Facebook Twitter May 27, 2014 One ... patterns and alert both physicians and pharmacies. Extreme Opioid Purchasers Figure 1. Prescriber Utilization Distinguishes Likely “Doctor ...

  9. Look before leaping: combined opioids may not be the rave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P; LeGrand, Susan B; Lagman, Ruth

    2005-10-01

    The use of combinations of potent opioids is a common clinical practice. The addition of one potent opioid to another has been recommended to reduce opioid side effects, improve pain control, and limit dose escalation of the first opioid. The advantages of using combined opioids have been reported to be relative to differences in receptor activation versus endocytosis (RAVE). However, the advantages and detriment to combining opioids are related to naturally occurring opioid receptor dimers. Dimers and oligomers result in a unique opioid pharmacodynamics which influence opioid binding, G protein interactions, desensitization, receptor trafficking, and endocytosis. The pharmacodynamics of dimers may lead to positive or negative cooperativity when two opioids are combined. The use of multiple opioids in practice can lead to increased risk for dosing errors, reduced patient compliance, increased drug interactions and cost. Opioid combinations should not be used until prospective randomized trials clarify the benefits and safety.

  10. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally;

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...... cognition resulting in complex interactions between pain, opioids and cognition. The literature on this complexity is sparse and information regarding the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic pain patients is substantially lacking. Two previous systematic reviews on cancer pain and non-cancer pain...... patients only using controlled studies were updated. Fourteen controlled studies on the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain patients and eleven controlled studies in cancer pain patients were included and analyzed. Opioid treatment involved slightly opposite outcomes in the two patient...

  11. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  12. δ-Opioid receptors in the accumbens shell mediate the influence of both excitatory and inhibitory predictions on choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Vincent; Wong, Felix L; Balleine, Bernard W

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli that predict rewarding events can control choice between future actions, and this control could be mediated by δ-opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAc-S). Stimuli predicting the absence of important events can also guide choice, although it remains unknown whether they do so via changes in an accumbal δ-opioid receptor-related process. δ-opioid receptor-eGFP mice were trained to perform two instrumental actions that delivered different food outcomes. Choice between the two actions was then tested in the presence of stimuli paired with either the delivery or the non-delivery of each of the two outcomes. Bilateral infusions of the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole into the NAc-S were used to determine the role of these receptors at the time of choice and δ-opioid receptor expression in the NAc-S used to assess functional activity. A stimulus predicting a specific outcome biased choice performance towards the action previously earning that same outcome. In contrast, a stimulus signalling the absence of that outcome biased performance away from the action that delivered that outcome towards actions associated with the absence of that outcome. Both effects were associated with increased δ-opioid receptor expression on the membrane of cholinergic interneurons within the NAc-S. Furthermore, both effects were blocked by naltrindole infused into the NAc-S. These findings suggest that δ-opioid receptors in the NAc-S were involved in the effects of predictive learning on choice between actions, whether those predictions involve the presence or absence of specific rewarding events. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Opioids for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, César Osório; Carvalho, Luciane Bc; Carlos, Karla; Conti, Cristiane; de Oliveira, Marcio M; Prado, Lucila Bf; Prado, Gilmar F

    2016-06-29

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a distressing and common neurological disorder that may have a huge impact in the quality of life of those with frequent and intense symptoms. Patients complain of unpleasant sensations in the legs, at or before bedtime, and feel an urge to move the legs, which improves with movement, such as walking. Symptoms start with the patient at rest (e.g. sitting or lying down), and follow a circadian pattern, increasing during the evening or at night. Many pharmacological intervention are available for RLS, including drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease (L-Dopa and dopaminergic agonists), epilepsy (anticonvulsants), anxiety (benzodiazepines), and pain (opioids). Dopaminergic drugs are those most frequently used for treatment of RLS, but some patients do not respond effectively and require other medication. Opioids, a class of medications used to treat severe pain, seem to be effective in treating RLS symptoms, and are recommended for patients with severe symptoms, because RLS and pain appear to share the same mechanism in the central nervous system. All available drugs are associated to some degree with side effects, which can impede treatment. Opioids are associated with adverse events such as constipation, tolerance, and dependence. This justifies the conduct of a systematic review to ascertain whether opioids are safe and effective for treatment of RLS. To asses the effects of opioids compared to placebo treatment for restless legs syndrome in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, CENTRAL 2016, issue 4 and MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS up to April 2016, using a search strategy adapted by Cochraneto identify randomised clinical trials. We checked the references of each study and established personal communication with other authors to identify any additional studies. We considered publications in all languages. Randomised controlled clinical trials of opioid treatment in adults with idiopathic RLS. Two

  14. Maintainence treatment of opioid dependence with tramadol

    OpenAIRE

    Siddharth Sarkar; Mohit Varshney; Vaibhav Patil; Rakesh Lal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although tramadol has been used in the management of acute withdrawal in patients with opioid dependence, its use for maintenance treatment as a harm reduction approach has not been assessed systematically. This case series describes patients with opioid dependence who were treated with tramadol for long-term maintenance. Methods: Patients with opioid dependence who received treatment at the National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New ...

  15. Opioid tolerance and the emergence of new opioid receptor-coupled signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintzler, A R; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-01-01

    Multiple cellular adaptations are elicited by chronic exposure to opioids. These include diminution of spare opioid receptors, decreased opioid receptor density, and G-protein content and coupling thereof. All imply that opioid tolefance is a manifestation of a loss of opioid function, i.e., desensitization. Recent observations challenge the exclusiveness of this formulation and indicate that opioid tolerance also results from qualitative changes in opioid signaling. In this article, Gintzler and Chakrabarti discuss the evidence that suggests that opioid tolerance results not only from impaired opioid receptor functionality, but also from altered consequences of coupling. Underlying the latter are fundamental changes in the nature of effectors that are coupled to the opioid receptor/G-protein signaling pathway. These molecular changes include the upregulation of adenylyl cyclase isoforms of the type II family as well as a substantial increase in their phosphorylation state. As a result, there is a shift in opioid receptor/G-protein signaling from predominantly Gialpha inhibitory to Gbetagamma stimulatory following chronic in vivo morphine exposure. These adaptations to chronic morphine indicate the plasticity of opioid-signal transduction mechanisms and the ability of chronic morphine to augment new signaling strategies.

  16. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: interactions between opioids and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Kalso, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are increasingly used to manage not only acute but also chronic pain and heroine addiction. These patients usually receive many other medications that can interfere with the effects of opioids and vice versa. Patients often need combinations of drugs for their pain management, for treating opioid-related adverse effects or for other indications including depression and anxiety. Several antibiotics can also have interactions with opioids. It is important to understand what potential interactions exist between opioids and other drugs. Drug interactions can occur due to pharmacokinetic interactions including effects of absorption, metabolic pathways, drug transport through membranes and protein binding. Our knowledge of the metabolism of opioids has significantly increased over the last years and it is now possible to appreciate the role CYP enzymes, mainly CYP 2D6 and 3A4/5, in the metabolism of many commonly used opioids like codeine and oxycodone. Our knowledge regarding the role of the transporter proteins in drug interactions related to opioids is unfortunately meagre. Opioids inhibit the gastrointestinal system and can thus change the absorption of other drugs. Opioids can have synergistic or additive interactions with other drugs that have analgesic or sedative effects. Endogenous opioids control many physiological functions and exogenous opioids can have effects on all important transmitter systems (cholinergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic). The literature in this field is mainly based on case reports. Interindividual differences play an important role. Other potential interactions include prolongation of the QT-interval and lowering of the threshold for convulsions.

  17. Opioid Attentional Bias and Cue-Elicited Craving Predict Future Risk of Prescription Opioid Misuse Among Chronic Pain Patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some chronic pain patients receiving long-term opioid analgesic pharmacotherapy are at risk for misusing opioids. Like other addictive behaviors, risk of opioid misuse may be signaled by an attentional bias (AB) towards drug-related cues. The purpose of this study was to examine opioid AB as a potential predictor of opioid misuse among chronic pain patients following behavioral treatment. Methods Chronic pain patients taking long-term opioid analgesics (N = 47) completed a dot probe task designed to assess opioid AB, as well as self-report measures of opioid misuse and pain severity, and then participated in behavioral treatment. Regression analyses examined opioid AB and cue-elicited craving as predictors of opioid misuse at 3-months posttreatment follow-up. Results Patients who scored high on a measure of opioid misuse risk following treatment exhibited significantly greater opioid AB scores than patients at low risk for opioid misuse. Opioid AB for 200 ms cues and cue-elicited craving significantly predicted opioid misuse risk 20 weeks later, even after controlling for pre-treatment opioid dependence diagnosis, opioid misuse, and pain severity (Model R2 = .50). Conclusion Biased initial attentional orienting to prescription opioid cues and cue-elicited craving may reliably signal future opioid misuse risk following treatment. These measures may therefore provide potential prognostic indicators of treatment outcome. PMID:25282309

  18. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ing-Kang Ho; Cynthia Wei-Sheng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-ol...

  19. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuilleumier PH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pascal H Vuilleumier,1 Ulrike M Stamer,1 Ruth Landau21Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Schmerztherapie, Inselspital Universität Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration.Keywords: pain perception, opioid analgesia, genetic variation, pharmacogenetics

  1. Hibernation-like state induced by an opioid peptide protects against experimental stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Tsung-Ping

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delta opioid peptide [D-ala2,D-leU5]enkephalin (DADLE induces hibernation in summer ground squirrels, and enhances preservation and survival of isolated or transplanted lungs and hearts. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of DADLE in the central nervous system. Results Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with DADLE (4 mg/kg every 2 h × 4 injections, i.p. or saline prior to unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Daily behavioral tests revealed that ischemic animals treated with DADLE did not show any significant behavioral dysfunctions compared with saline-treated ischemic animals. Opioid antagonists only transiently inhibited the protective effect of DADLE, indicating the participation of non-opioid mechanisms in DADLE neuroprotection. Histological examination using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC revealed that brains from ischemic animals treated with DADLE, either alone or with adjuvant opioid blockers, exhibited almost completely intact striata. In contrast, brains from ischemic animals that received saline showed significant infarction in the lateral striatum. Analyses of apoptotic cell death revealed a significant increase in the p-53 mRNA expression in the striatum of ischemic animals that received saline, while those that received DADLE exhibited near normal striatal p-53 expression. This protective effect was accompanied by significant increments in protein levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the striatum of DADLE-treated ischemic animals. Conclusion These results indicate that DADLE protected against necrotic and apoptotic cell death processes associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury. The present study demonstrates that delta opioids are crucially involved in stroke, suggesting that the opioid system is important in the study of brain injury and protection.

  2. Utilizing buprenorphine–naloxone to treat illicit and prescription-opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauger S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sofie Mauger,1 Ronald Fraser1,2 Kathryn Gill1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Addictions Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada Objectives: To review current evidence on buprenorphine–naloxone (bup/nx for the treatment of opioid-use disorders, with a focus on strategies for clinical management and office-based patient care. Quality of evidence: Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Consensus reports, guidelines published, and other authoritative sources were also included in this review. Apart from expert guidelines, data included in this review constitute level 1 evidence. Findings: Bup/nx is a partial µ-opioid agonist combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4:1 ratio. It has a lower abuse potential, carries less stigma, and allows for more flexibility than methadone. Bup/nx is indicated for both inpatient and ambulatory medically assisted withdrawal (acute detoxification and long-term substitution treatment (maintenance of patients who have a mild-to-moderate physical dependence. A stepwise long-term substitution treatment with regular monitoring and follow-up assessment is usually preferred, as it has better outcomes in reducing illicit opioid use, minimizing concomitant risks such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C transmission, retaining patients in treatment and improving global functioning. Conclusion: Bup/nx is safe and effective for opioid detoxification and substitution treatment. Its unique pharmaceutical properties make it particularly suitable for office-based maintenance treatment of opioid-use disorder. Keywords: Zubsolv, Suboxone, methadone, opiate detoxification, opiate substitution, clinical management

  3. Morphine protects against methylmercury intoxication: a role for opioid receptors in oxidative stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Costa-Malaquias

    Full Text Available Mercury is an extremely dangerous environmental contaminant responsible for episodes of human intoxication throughout the world. Methylmercury, the most toxic compound of this metal, mainly targets the central nervous system, accumulating preferentially in cells of glial origin and causing oxidative stress. Despite studies demonstrating the current exposure of human populations, the consequences of mercury intoxication and concomitant use of drugs targeting the central nervous system (especially drugs used in long-term treatments, such as analgesics are completely unknown. Morphine is a major option for pain management; its global consumption more than quadrupled in the last decade. Controversially, morphine has been proposed to function in oxidative stress independent of the activation of the opioid receptors. In this work, a therapeutic concentration of morphine partially protected the cellular viability of cells from a C6 glioma cell line exposed to methylmercury. Morphine treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation and totally prevented increases in nitrite levels in those cells. A mechanistic study revealed no alteration in sulfhydryl groups or direct scavenging at this opioid concentration. Interestingly, the opioid antagonist naloxone completely eliminated the protective effect of morphine against methylmercury intoxication, pointing to opioid receptors as the major contributor to this action. Taken together, the experiments in the current study provide the first demonstration that a therapeutic concentration of morphine is able to reduce methylmercury-induced oxidative damage and cell death by activating the opioid receptors. Thus, these receptors may be a promising pharmacological target for modulating the deleterious effects of mercury intoxication. Although additional studies are necessary, our results support the clinical safety of using this opioid in methylmercury-intoxicated patients, suggesting that normal analgesic doses could

  4. Analysis of opioid consumption in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Inconsistent trial design and analysis is a key reason that few advances in postoperative pain management have been made from clinical trials analyzing opioid consumption data. This study aimed to compare four different approaches to analyze opioid consumption data. A repeated time-to-event (RTTE...... of potency was obtained with a RTTE model accounting for both morphine effects and time-varying covariates on opioid consumption. An RTTE analysis approach proved better suited for demonstrating efficacy of opioid sparing analgesics than traditional statistical tests as a lower sample size was required due...

  5. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  6. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  7. SNC 80 and related delta opioid agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, S N; Coop, A

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of the selective delta (delta) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, was a major advance in the field of delta-opioid ligands. Much research has been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands and also to compare the diarylmethylpiperazines with the traditional morphinan-based delta opioids. This review focuses on the development of the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and discusses questions which remain unanswered.

  8. Hiperalgesia induzida por opioides (HIO

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    Plínio da Cunha Leal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Opioides são medicamentos frequentemente usados para o controle da dor que, contudo, podem causar hiperalgesia. A circunstância pela qual esse fenômeno pode ocorrer não está inteiramente esclarecida. O objetivo desta revisão foi descrever os mecanismos, os fatores implicados e a modulação por medicamentos. CONTEÚDO: Foram descritos os fatores implicados no desenvolvimento da hiperalgesia induzida por opioides (HIO, como duração de uso, dose e tipo de opioide. Os mecanismos incluem o sistema glutamatérgico e receptores N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA, ativação de ciclo-oxigenase (COX espinal, aminoácidos excitatórios, dinorfina, citocinas e quimocinas; prostaglandinas e facilitação descendente. A modulação de hiperalgesia pode ser feita com antagonistas de receptores NMDA, agonistas adrenérgicos-alfa2 e inibidores de COX. CONCLUSÕES: O assunto é bastante complexo, envolvendo uma série de mecanismos fisiopatológicos que podem contribuir para a HIO e o desconforto do paciente, trazendo consequências que podem ser danosas.

  9. Role of the thalamic submedius nucleus histamine H1 and H 2 and opioid receptors in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Taati, Mina; Dabaghi, Milad

    2015-10-01

    Histamine and opioid systems are involved in supraspinal modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of separate and combined microinjections of agonists and antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors into the thalamic submedius (Sm) nucleus on the formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulas were implanted into the right and left sides of the Sm in ketamine- and xylazine-anesthetized rats. Orofacial formalin pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of a diluted formalin solution (50 μl, 1.5%) into the vibrissa pad. Face rubbing durations were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45 min. Formalin produced a biphasic pain response (first phase: 0-3 min and second phase: 15-33 min). Separate and combined microinjections of histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists, 2-pyridylethylamine (2-PEA) and dimaprit, respectively, and opioid receptor agonist, morphine, attenuated the second phase of pain. The analgesic effects induced by 2-PEA, dimaprit, and morphine were blocked by prior microinjections of fexofenadine (a histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist), respectively. Naloxone also prevented 2-PEA- and dimaprit-induced antinociception, and the analgesic effect induced by morphine was inhibited by fexofenadine and famotidine. These results showed the involvement of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors in the Sm modulation of orofacial pain. Opioid receptor might be involved in analgesia induced by activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors and vice versa.

  10. Hyaluronic acid induces activation of the κ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zavan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA appears to be particularly effective in reducing pain and improving patient function. METHODS: We performed an in vitro study conducted in CHO cells that expressed a panel of opioid receptors and in primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to determine if HA induces the activation of opioid peptide receptors (OPr using both aequorin and the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. RESULTS: Selective agonists and antagonists for each OPr expressed on CHO cells were used to test the efficacy of our in vitro model followed by stimulation with HA. The results showed that HA induces stimulatory effects on the κ receptor (KOP. These effects of HA were also confirmed in rat DRG neurons, which express endogenously the OPr. CONCLUSIONS: HA activates the KOP receptor in a concentration dependent manner, with a pEC(50 value of 7.57.

  11. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  12. Mu opioid mediated discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol: an individual subjects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Rush, Craig R; Stoops, William W

    2015-03-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human participants. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human participants first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to participants after they acquired the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all participants. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual participant records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  13. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  14. Opioid antinociception, tolerance and dependence: interactions with the N-methyl-D-aspartate system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Linda A; Fischer, Bradford D; Balter, Rebecca E; Henry, Fredrick E; Schmidt, Karl T; Miller, Laurence L

    2011-09-01

    This study explored the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the effects of μ-opioid agonists. A hot-plate procedure was used to assess antinociception and tolerance in mice in which the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor was reduced [knockdown (KD)] to approximately 10%, and in mice treated with the NMDA antagonist, (-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959). The μ opioid agonists, morphine, l-methadone and fentanyl, were approximately three-fold less potent in the NR1 KD mice than in wild-type (WT) controls; however, the development of morphine tolerance and dependence did not differ markedly in the NR1 KD and the WT mice. Acute administration of the NMDA antagonist, LY235959, produced dose-dependent, leftward shifts in the morphine dose-effect curve in the WT mice, but not in the NR1 KD mice. Chronic administration of LY235959 during the morphine tolerance regimen did not attenuate the development of tolerance in the NR1 KD or the WT mice. These results indicate that the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor does not play a prominent role in μ opioid tolerance.

  15. Intraplantar injection of bergamot essential oil induces peripheral antinociception mediated by opioid mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Tsukasa; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Kuwahata, Hikari; Katsuyama, Soh; Komatsu, Takaaki; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bergamot essential oil (BEO) containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components in the capsaicin test. The intraplantar injection of capsaicin (1.6 μg) produced a short-lived licking/biting response toward the injected paw. The nociceptive behavioral response evoked by capsaicin was inhibited dose-dependently by intraplantar injection of BEO. Both linalool and linalyl acetate, injected into the hindpaw, showed a significant reduction of nociceptive response, which was much more potent than BEO. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) and intraplantar pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist, significantly reversed BEO- and linalool-induced antinociception. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor preferring antagonist, resulted in a significant antagonizing effect on antinociception induced by BEO and linalool. Antinociception induced by i.p. or intrathecal morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool. The enhanced effect of combination of BEO or linalool with morphine was antagonized by pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of peripheral opioids, in the antinociception induced by BEO and linalool. Combined administration of BEO or linalool acting at the peripheral site, and morphine may be a promising approach in the treatment of clinical pain.

  16. Conformationally constrained opioid ligands: the Dmt-Aba and Dmt-Aia versus Dmt-Tic scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Wachter, Rien De; Vlaeminck, Magali De; Marczak, Ewa D; Salvadori, Severo; Graaf, Chris de; Rognan, Didier; Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Tourwé, Dirk; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2009-01-15

    Replacement of the constrained phenylalanine analogue 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) in the opioid Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Bn scaffold by the 4-amino-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-indolo[2,3-c]azepin-3-one (Aia) and 4-amino-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzazepin-3-one (Aba) scaffolds has led to the discovery of novel potent mu-selective agonists (Structures 5 and 12) as well as potent and selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists (Structures 9 and 15). Both stereochemistry and N-terminal N,N-dimethylation proved to be crucial factors for opioid receptor selectivity and functional bioactivity in the investigated small peptidomimetic templates. In addition to the in vitro pharmacological evaluation, automated docking models of Dmt-Tic and Dmt-Aba analogues were constructed in order to rationalize the observed structure-activity data.

  17. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles.

  18. Opioid therapy: a trade-off between opioid-analgesia and opioid-induced respiratory depression

    OpenAIRE

    Boom, Maria Catharina Anna

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions that may be drawn from the data in this thesis: 1. The ideal drug for antagonism of respiratory depression has not yet been found. At present naloxone seems the most appropriate drug although reversal of respiratory depression coincides with loss of analgesia. New reversal agents acting via non-opioidergic pathways are under investigation and are aimed at reversal of opioid-induced respiratory depression without compromising analgesia. 2. Mathematical modelling of the non-steady s...

  19. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and rapid opioid detoxification after tacrolimus administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Piraccini, Emanuele; Miklosova, Zuzana; Taddei, Stefania; Faenza, Stefano; Martinelli, Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    Opioids can induce central sensitization and hyperalgesia, referred to as "opioid-induced hyperalgesia." Our report describes a patient who underwent intestinal transplant followed by immunosuppressant-related neuropathic pain. Her pain was treated with limited success over the course of 3 yr with different therapies, including i.v. morphine. She developed opioid-induced hyperalgesia, which was successfully treated with rapid detoxification under general anesthesia. Detoxification improved her quality of life, including the ability to resume physiotherapy. Six months after treatment, she remained opioid free. Our experience suggests that rapid detoxification under general anesthesia may be an effective treatment for opioid-induced hyperalgesia and merits comparison to traditional detoxification methods.

  20. Predator stress engages corticotropin-releasing factor and opioid systems to alter the operating mode of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Andre L; Leiser, Steven C; Snyder, Kevin; Valentino, Rita J

    2012-03-01

    The norepinephrine nucleus, locus coeruleus (LC), has been implicated in cognitive aspects of the stress response, in part through its regulation by the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). LC neurons discharge in tonic and phasic modes that differentially modulate attention and behavior. Here, the effects of exposure to an ethologically relevant stressor, predator odor, on spontaneous (tonic) and auditory-evoked (phasic) LC discharge were characterized in unanesthetized rats. Similar to the effects of CRF, stressor presentation increased tonic LC discharge and decreased phasic auditory-evoked discharge, thereby decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensory response. This stress-induced shift in LC discharge toward a high tonic mode was prevented by a CRF antagonist. Moreover, CRF antagonism during stress unmasked a large decrease in tonic discharge rate that was opioid mediated because it was prevented by pretreatment with the opiate antagonist, naloxone. Elimination of both CRF and opioid influences with an antagonist combination rendered LC activity unaffected by the stressor. These results demonstrate that both CRF and opioid afferents are engaged during stress to fine-tune LC activity. The predominant CRF influence shifts the operational mode of LC activity toward a high tonic state that is thought to facilitate behavioral flexibility and may be adaptive in coping with the stressor. Simultaneously, stress engages an opposing opioid influence that restrains the CRF influence and may facilitate recovery toward pre-stress levels of activity. Changes in the balance of CRF:opioid regulation of the LC could have consequences for stress vulnerability.

  1. A method to diagnose opioid dependence resulting from heroin versus prescription opioids using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jennifer S; Prather, Kristi; Kropp, Frankie; Byrne, Mimmie; Sullivan, C Rollynn; Mohamedi, Nadia; Copersino, Marc L; Weiss, Roger D

    2010-03-01

    Treatment research with opioid-dependent populations has not traditionally distinguished between those dependent on prescription opioids versus dependent upon heroin. Evidence suggests there is a substantial subpopulation of individuals with opioid dependence resulting largely or exclusively from prescription opioid use. Because this subpopulation may respond to treatment differently from heroin users, a method for discriminating DSM-IV opioid dependence due to prescription opioid use would provide more precision when examining this population. This paper describes an innovative method using a currently available diagnostic instrument, to diagnose DSM-IV opioid dependence and distinguish between dependence resulting from prescription opioids versus dependence upon heroin.

  2. Opioid medication misuse among unhealthy drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Gerald; McCarthy, Rebecca; Gordon, Adam J; Tarter, Ralph E

    2017-10-01

    Combining opioid medications and alcohol has serious implications for patient health, including overdose. Information regarding those who use/misuse opioid medications and engage in unhealthy alcohol use is limited to pharmacological and epidemiological descriptions. This study presents opioid medication misuse and behavioral, mental, and physical health characteristics of persons filling opioid medications that are engaged in unhealthy alcohol use. We conducted a cross-sectional survey at 5 community pharmacies in Southwestern, Pennsylvania among patients filling opioid medications. Respondents completed validated opioid medication misuse, alcohol use, illicit drug use, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and physical health functioning assessments. We present univariate and multivariate statistics describing opioid medication misuse and health risks among those positive for unhealthy alcohol use. A total of 344 patients completed the survey (75.8% response). A total of 15.9% of respondents screened positive for opioid medication misuse, of whom 20.3% reported unhealthy alcohol use. Taking opioid medications too often was reported among a larger proportion of the sample with unhealthy alcohol use (34.3%) compared to those without (22.1%, p=0.04). Further, among respondents with unhealthy alcohol use, illicit drug use (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=12.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.64-89.72) and PTSD (AOR=9.77, 95% CI=1.70-56.11) were associated with increased odds for opioid medication misuse. Results suggest respondents with unhealthy alcohol use had distinct health profiles, which may place them at risk for opioid misuse and adverse events, such as overdose. Continued research must work to further understand these relationships and identify intervention and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Blocking opioids attenuates physical warmth-induced feelings of social connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K.; Irwin, Michael R.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2015-01-01

    “Heartwarming” social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), “social warmth” and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms, however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in order to examine the role of opioids, previously shown to alter temperature and social bonding behavior, on perceived thermal intensity, general positive affect, and feelings of social connection from physical warmth. Thirty-one participants took both naltrexone and placebo and completed a temperature manipulation task (held a warm pack, cold pack, and neutral object) while on each drug. Replicating previous research, holding a warm (vs. a cold or neutral) object increased feelings of social connection. Moreover, blocking opioids reduced this effect. Hence, naltrexone specifically reduced feelings of social connection to holding a warm (vs. neutral) object but not to holding a cold (vs. neutral) object. These results lend further support to the theory that social and physical warmth share neurobiological, opioid receptor dependent mechanisms. PMID:26098729

  4. Blocking opioids attenuates physical warmth-induced feelings of social connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2015-08-01

    "Heartwarming" social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), "social warmth" and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms; however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in order to examine the role of opioids, previously shown to alter temperature and social bonding behavior, on perceived thermal intensity, general positive affect, and feelings of social connection from physical warmth. Thirty-one participants took both naltrexone and a placebo and completed a temperature manipulation task (held a warm pack, cold pack, and neutral object) while on each drug. Replicating previous research, holding a warm (vs. a cold or neutral) object increased feelings of social connection. Moreover, blocking opioids reduced this effect. Hence, naltrexone specifically reduced feelings of social connection to holding a warm (vs. neutral) object but not to holding a cold (vs. neutral) object. These results lend further support to the theory that social and physical warmth share neurobiological, opioid receptor dependent mechanisms.

  5. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic: a novel radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisnel, Geraldine; Oueslati, Farhana; Dhilly, Martine; Delamare, Jerome [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France); Perrio, Cecile [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: perrio@cyceron.fr; Debruyne, Daniele [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: debruyne@cyceron.fr; Barre, Louisa [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals that can bind selectively the {kappa}-opioid receptor may present opportunities for staging clinical brain disorders and evaluating the efficiency of new therapies related to stroke, neurodegenerative diseases or opiate addiction. The N-methylated derivative of JDTic (named MeJDTic), which has been recently described as a potent and selective antagonist of {kappa}-opioid receptor in vitro, was labeled with carbon-11 and evaluated for in vivo imaging the {kappa}-opioid receptor in mice. Methods: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic was prepared by methylation of JDTic with [{sup 11}C]-methyl triflate. The binding of [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic to {kappa}-opioid receptor was investigated ex vivo by biodistribution and competition studies using nonfasted male CD1 mice. Results: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic exhibited a high and rapid distribution in peripheral organs. The uptake was maximal in lung where the {kappa} receptor is largely expressed. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic rapidly crossed the blood-brain barrier and accumulated in the brain regions of interest (hypothalamus). The parent ligand remained the major radioactive compound in brain during the experiment. Chase studies with U50,488 (a {kappa} referring agonist), morphine (a {mu} agonist) and naltrindole (a {delta} antagonist) demonstrated that this uptake was the result of specific binding to the {kappa}-opioid receptor. Conclusion: These findings suggested that [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic appeared to be a promising selective 'lead' radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor PET imaging.

  6. Exogenous melatonin abolishes mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain. The role of the opioid system and benzodiazepine-gabaergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurowski, D; Nowak, L; Machowska, A; Wordliczek, J; Thor, P J

    2012-12-01

    Melatonin (MT) is a neurohormone synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland. MT plays an important role in the regulation of physiological and neuroendocrine functions. The purpose of this study was to assess the overall effect of melatonin on neuropathic pain, the type of melatonin receptor involved, and potential role of the opioid system and GABA(A) receptors. The experiments were conducted by using the animal neuropathic pain model (CCI). The rats with CCI showed the characteristic for the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia signs that were calculated by using the von Frey's and Hargreaves' tests. The conducted studies measured the effects of intraperitoneal administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist), prazosin (MT3 antagonist), luzindole (MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist), picrotoxin (GABA(A) antagonist) and flumazenil (benzodiazepine antagonist) on the antinociceptive effects caused by melatonin. Melatonin caused the increase in the pain threshold of the mechanical allodynia and the slight increase in the threshold of the thermal hyperalgesia. The pre-treatment with naloxone completely abolished the antinociceptive effects of melatonin in von Frey's test, but not thermal sensation in the Hargreaves's test. Prazosin did not have any effects, while administration of luzindole significantly suppressed the antinociceptive effect of melatonin. The antiallodynic effect of MT was also abolished by flumazenil and picrotoxin. Melatonin influences the mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia via activation of opioid system and benzodiazepine-GABAergic pathway. Antinociceptive effects of melatonin are mostly related to the MT1/MT2 receptors interaction.

  7. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  8. Pain as a reward: changing the meaning of pain from negative to positive co-activates opioid and cannabinoid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Thoen, Wilma; Blanchard, Catherine; Vighetti, Sergio; Arduino, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a negative emotional experience that is modulated by a variety of psychological factors through different inhibitory systems. For example, endogenous opioids and cannabinoids have been found to be involved in stress and placebo analgesia. Here we show that when the meaning of the pain experience is changed from negative to positive through verbal suggestions, the opioid and cannabinoid systems are co-activated and these, in turn, increase pain tolerance. We induced ischemic arm pain in healthy volunteers, who had to tolerate the pain as long as possible. One group was informed about the aversive nature of the task, as done in any pain study. Conversely, a second group was told that the ischemia would be beneficial to the muscles, thus emphasizing the usefulness of the pain endurance task. We found that in the second group pain tolerance was significantly higher compared to the first one, and that this effect was partially blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone alone and by the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant alone. However, the combined administration of naltrexone and rimonabant antagonized the increased tolerance completely. Our results indicate that a positive approach to pain reduces the global pain experience through the co-activation of the opioid and cannabinoid systems. These findings may have a profound impact on clinical practice. For example, postoperative pain, which means healing, can be perceived as less unpleasant than cancer pain, which means death. Therefore, the behavioral and/or pharmacological manipulation of the meaning of pain can represent an effective approach to pain management.

  9. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially.

  10. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...

  11. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carullo, Veronica; Fitz-James, Ingrid; Delphin, Ellise

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are utilized frequently for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain in the perioperative setting, as well as in the treatment of cancer-related pain. When prescribing chronic opioid therapy to patients with chronic pain, it is crucial for the practitioner to be aware not only of the issues of tolerance and withdrawal, but also to have knowledge of the possibility for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). An understanding of the differences between tolerance and OIH when escalating opioid therapy allows the titration of opioid as well as nonopioid analgesics in order to obtain maximum control of both chronic and acute pain. A case study is described to highlight the importance of judicious utilization of opioids in the treatment of cancer-related pain. In this case, high-dose opioid therapy did not improve chronic pain and contributed to a hyperalgesic state in which a young man experienced severe intractable pain postoperatively after two routine thoracotomies, despite aggressive pharmacologic measures to manage his perioperative pain. Furthermore, it illustrates the potential advantages of opioid rotation to methadone when OIH is suspected.

  12. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  13. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Music’s universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants’ responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music. PMID:28176798

  14. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J

    2017-02-08

    Music's universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants' responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music.

  15. The effects of a new opioid analgesic, meptazinol, on the respiration of the conscious rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowlrick, I S; Shepperson, N B

    1985-05-01

    In the conscious rat arterial PCO2 was measured as an index of respiratory status. The opioid analgesic meptazinol (7.5 - 30 mg kg-1) evoked small but significant increases in arterial PCO2 which were attenuated by naloxone. Meptazinol significantly reduced the increase in arterial PCO2 evoked by morphine. The respiratory depression induced by meptazinol, but not that induced by morphine, was enhanced by pretreatment with atropine. The (+)-enantiomer, but not the (-)-enantiomer of meptazinol increased arterial PCO2. In contrast, only the (-)-enantiomer reduced the respiratory depressant effect of morphine. It is proposed that the degree of respiratory depression induced by meptazinol is limited by its opioid antagonist and cholinomimetic properties.

  16. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  17. Synthesis of novel triplets with a 1,3,5-trioxazatriquinane skeleton and their pharmacologies for opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Kutsumura, Noriki

    2015-06-01

    We designed and synthesized novel triplet molecules with 1,3,5-trioxazatriquinane skeletons. One class comprises double-capped triplets with a morphinan skeleton; the other class comprises simple phenol derivatives with phenethylamine moieties. One compound with m-phenolic hydroxyl group, called SYK-146, is a highly selective, potent agonist for the κ receptor, with activity nearly equivalent to that of U-50488H. The o-phenolic isomer of SYK-146, called SYK-524, showed potent but non-selective agonistic activity for the opioid receptors. We also added several simple phenol derivatives to a library of compounds that target opioid receptors, and they showed high hit rates for the receptor. This library might also be expected to show high hit rates for other receptors.

  18. Opioid receptors are involved in the sedative and antinociceptive effects of hesperidin as well as in its potentiation with benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscalzo, Leonardo M; Wasowski, Cristina; Paladini, Alejandro C; Marder, Mariel

    2008-02-12

    Previous reports from our laboratory described the sedative activity of hesperidin (hesperetin-7-rhamnoglucoside). This property is greatly increased when the glycoside is injected jointly with diazepam and this interaction has been shown to be synergistic. In the present work the generality of the synergistic phenomenon is proved, since potentiation also occurs with several other benzodiazepines, namely alprazolam, bromazepam, midazolam and flunitrazepam. In order to advance in the study of the mechanism of action of hesperidin, the possible participation of several brain receptors, which are implicated in the control of numerous behavioral and physiological functions, was explored by investigating the effects of a variety of their antagonists on hesperidin actions. The results showed that the 5-HT2 receptor and the alpha1-adrenoceptor seem unlikely to be involved in the behavioral effects of hesperidin. Naltrexone, a nonselective antagonist of opioid receptors, totally blocked hesperidin effects on locomotion, and partially antagonized hesperidin-induced decreased exploration in the hole board test. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, was able to partially block hesperidin effects on locomotor activity. Furthermore, hesperidin-induced antinociception was partially blocked by naltrexone, and potentiated by co-administration with alprazolam. Hence, the participation of the opioid system in the sedative, antinociceptive and potentianting effects of hesperidin with benzodiazepines in mice is highly probable. Our results suggest a possible beneficial use of the association of hesperidin with benzodiazepines, not only to improve human sedative therapy, but also in the management of pain.

  19. Prefrontal Cortical Kappa Opioid Receptors Attenuate Responses to Amygdala Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Hanks, Ashley N; Scott, Liam; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Hughes, Zoë A; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2015-12-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have been implicated in anxiety and stress, conditions that involve activation of projections from the basolateral amygdala (BLA) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Although KORs have been studied in several brain regions, their role on mPFC physiology and on BLA projections to the mPFC remains unclear. Here, we explored whether KORs modify synaptic inputs from the BLA to the mPFC using in vivo electrophysiological recordings with electrical and optogenetic stimulation. Systemic administration of the KOR agonist U69,593 inhibited BLA-evoked synaptic responses in the mPFC without altering hippocampus-evoked responses. Intra-mPFC U69,593 inhibited electrical and optogenetic BLA-evoked synaptic responses, an effect blocked by the KOR antagonist nor-BNI. Bilateral intra-mPFC injection of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI increased center time in the open field test, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. The data demonstrate that mPFC KORs negatively regulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the BLA-mPFC pathway and anxiety-like behavior. These findings provide a framework whereby KOR signaling during stress and anxiety can regulate the flow of emotional state information from the BLA to the mPFC.

  20. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. (Univ. of Toledo, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  1. Desensitization of functional µ-opioid receptors increases agonist off-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John T

    2014-07-01

    Desensitization of µ-opioid receptors (MORs) develops over 5-15 minutes after the application of some, but not all, opioid agonists and lasts for tens of minutes after agonist removal. The decrease in function is receptor selective (homologous) and could result from 1) a reduction in receptor number or 2) a decrease in receptor coupling. The present investigation used photolysis of two caged opioid ligands to examine the kinetics of MOR-induced potassium conductance before and after MOR desensitization. Photolysis of a caged antagonist, carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (caged naloxone), blocked the current induced by a series of agonists, and the time constant of decline was significantly decreased after desensitization. The increase in the rate of current decay was not observed after partial blockade of receptors with the irreversible antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA). The time constant of current decay after desensitization was never more rapid than 1 second, suggesting an increased agonist off-rate rather than an increase in the rate of channel closure downstream of the receptor. The rate of G protein-coupled K(+) channel (GIRK) current activation was examined using photolysis of a caged agonist, carboxynitrobenzyl-tyrosine-[Leu(5)]-enkephalin. After acute desensitization or partial irreversible block of MORs with β-CNA, there was an increase in the time it took to reach a peak current. The decrease in the rate of agonist-induced GIRK conductance was receptor selective and dependent on receptor number. The results indicate that opioid receptor desensitization reduced the number of functional receptor and that the remaining active receptors have a reduced agonist affinity.

  2. Studies on mu and delta opioid receptor selectivity utilizing chimeric and site-mutagenized receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Shahrestanifar, M; Jin, J; Howells, R D

    1995-01-01

    Opioid receptors are members of the guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor family. Three types of opioid receptors have been cloned and characterized and are referred to as the delta, kappa and mu types. Analysis of receptor chimeras and site-directed mutant receptors has provided a great deal of information about functionally important amino acid side chains that constitute the ligand-binding domains and G-protein-coupling domains of G-protein-coupled receptors. We have constructed delta/mu opioid receptor chimeras that were express in human embryonic kidney 293 cells in order to define receptor domains that are responsible for receptor type selectivity. All chimeric receptors and wild-type delta and mu opioid receptors displayed high-affinity binding of etorphine (an agonist), naloxone (an antagonist), and bremazocine (a mixed agonist/antagonist). In contrast, chimeras that lacked the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor did not bind the mu-selective peptide [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO). Chimeras that lacked the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor did not bind the delta-selective peptide, [D-Ser2,D-Leu5]enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Point mutations in the putative third extracellular loop of the wild-type delta receptor that converted vicinal arginine residues to glutamine abolished DSLET binding while not affecting bremazocine, etorphine, and naltrindole binding. We conclude that amino acids in the putative first extracellular loop of the mu receptor are critical for high-affinity DAMGO binding and that arginine residues in the putative third extracellular loop of the delta receptor are important for high-affinity DSLET binding. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618916

  3. Determination of substance overdose in two Iranian centers: comparison between opioids and non-opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghaddosinejad, Fakhreddin; Arefi, Mohammad; Fayaz, Amir Farshid; Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh

    2013-04-01

    Recently, new trend toward non-opioid substances is observed in Iran. This is, therefore, to compare overdose of opioids and non-opioids origin. We performed this investigation to provide more detailed information so that preventive actions are taken in future. Over 18 month, 1876 individuals with opioid (opium, heroin, compact-heroin, buprenorphine and opiates) or non-opioid (MDMA (ecstasy), LSD, hashish and cocaine) overdose were selected. They have been compared regarding sex, age, reason of overdose, method of substance use, occupation, marital status, history of addiction in parents/siblings, duration of hospital admission and educational level. There were 1782 and 94 persons with opioid and non-opioid, respectively. Inhalation was the method of choice and women were found to have more tendencies to hallucinogens rather opioids. Moreover, use of non-opioids was observed more in individuals with university education and moreover in whom none of whose parents/siblings was addict. Policies should be planned by the governments to prevent further addictions especially to non-opioids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  5. Methadone-related opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. History, recent molecular and neurochemical research and future in mainstream medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreek, M J

    2000-01-01

    In 1963, Professor Vincent P. Dole at the Rockefeller University formed a small team to develop a pharmacotherapy for the management of heroin addiction. They hypothesized that heroin addiction is a disease of the brain with behavioral manifestations, and not merely a personality disorder or criminal behavior and began to address the specific question of whether a long-acting opioid agonist could be used in the long-term maintenance treatment of heroin addiction. Over the next 35 years, many studies documented the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of methadone pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, but Federal regulations and stigmatization of heroin addiction prevented implementation of treatment. Finally, in 1999, NIH published a report unequivocally supporting methadone maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. Two other effective opioid agonist treatments have been developed: the even longer acting opioid agonist l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has been approved for pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, and still under study is the opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine-naloxone combination. A variety of studies, both laboratory based and clinical, have revealed the mechanisms of action of long-acting opioid agonists in treatment, including prevention of disruption of molecular, cellular and physiologic events and, in fact, allowing normalization of those functions disrupted by chronic heroin use. Recent molecular biological studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of the human mu opioid receptor gene; the mu opioid receptor is the site of action of heroin, the major opiate drug of abuse, analgesic agents such as morphine, and the major treatment agents for heroin addiction. These findings support the early hypotheses of our laboratory that addiction may be due to a combination of genetic, drug-induced and environmental (including behavioral) factors and also, that atypical stress responsivity may contribute to the acquisition and

  6. Fluoxetine reverses the behavioral despair induced by neurogenic stress in mice: role of N-methyl-d-aspartate and opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate different effects of fluoxetine. We investigated whether opioid and NMDA receptors are involved in the protective effect of fluoxetine against the behavioral despair induced by acute physical stress in male mice. We used the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and open-field test (OFT) for behavioral evaluation. We used fluoxetine, naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist), MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist), morphine (opioid receptor agonist), and NMDA (NMDA receptor agonist). Acute foot-shock stress (FSS) significantly induced behavioral despair (depressive-like) and anxiety-like behaviors in tests. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) reversed the depressant-like effect of FSS, but it did not alter the locomotion and anxiety-like behavior in animals. Acute administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.3 mg/kg) or MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine, while subeffective doses of morphine (1 mg/kg) and NMDA (75 mg/kg) abolished this effect of fluoxetine. Also, co-administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.05 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.003 mg/kg) with fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) induced a significant decrease in the immobility time in FST and TST. Our results showed that opioid and NMDA receptors (alone or in combination) are involved in the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine against physical stress.

  7. Dopamine-dependent behavioural stimulation by non-peptide delta opioids BW373U86 and SNC 80: 1. Locomotion, rearing and stereotypies in intact rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, L; Longoni, R; Mulas, A; Chang, K J; Di Chiara, G

    1998-02-01

    The unconditioned behavioural effects of two non-peptide delta-opioid receptor agonists, BW 373U86 and SNC 80, were studied in the intact rat. BW 373U86 (0.1-2.5 mg/kg s.c.) and SNC 80 (2.5-10 mg/kg s.c.) dose-dependently elicited locomotion, rearing, stereotyped sniffing, licking and gnawing. These effects were abolished by pretreatment with the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole (5.0 mg/kg s.c.). In view of the phenomenological similarities between this syndrome and that elicited by dopamine-receptor agonists, the role played by dopamine receptors was investigated. The specific dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and the specific dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist raclopride reduced or even abolished the behavioural stimulation induced by lower doses of BW 373U86 and SNC 80. When higher doses of BW 373U86 were used (2.5 mg/kg), however, raclopride, even at high cataleptic doses (6.0 mg/kg), only partly prevented the behavioural stimulation induced by the delta-opioid receptor agonist. The behavioural stimulation remaining after high doses of raclopride was abolished by the administration of SCH 23390. These results show that delta-opioid receptor stimulation elicits dopamine-dependent behavioural activation in the rat that depends on dopamine receptors, particularly of the D1 subtype.

  8. Purification to homogeneity of an active opioid receptor from rat brain by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, S; Mercouris, M; Panetsos, F; Zioudrou, C

    1994-05-10

    Active opioid binding proteins were solubilized from rat brain membranes in high yield with sodium deoxycholate in the presence of NaCl. Purification of opioid binding proteins was accomplished by opioid antagonist affinity chromatography. Chromatography using the delta-opioid antagonist N,N-diallyl-Tyr-D-Leu-Gly-Tyr-Leu attached to omega-aminododecyl-agarose (Affi-G) (procedure A) yielded a partially purified protein that binds selectively the delta-opioid agonist [3H]Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr ([3H]DSLET), with a Kd of 19 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 5.1 +/- 0.4 nmol/mg of protein. Subsequently, Lens culinaris agglutinin-Sepharose 4B chromatography of the Affi-G eluate resulted in isolation of an electrophoretically homogeneous protein of 58 kDa that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 21 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 16.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/mg of protein. Chromatography using the nonselective antagonist 6-aminonaloxone coupled to 6-aminohexanoic acid-Sepharose 4B (Affi-NAL) (procedure B) resulted in isolation of a protein that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 32 +/- 2 nM and a Bmax of 12.4 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg of protein, and NaDodSO4/PAGE revealed a major band of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies (Anti-R IgG) raised against the Affi-NAL protein inhibit the specific [3H]DSLET binding to the Affi-NAL eluate and to the solubilized membranes. Moreover, the Anti-R IgG inhibits the specific binding of radiolabeled Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu-agonist), DSLET (delta-agonist), and naloxone to homogenates of rat brain membranes with equal potency. Furthermore, immunoaffinity chromatography of solubilized membranes resulted in the retention of a major protein of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. In addition, immunoblotting of solubilized membranes and purified proteins from the Affi-G and Affi-NAL matrices revealed that the Anti-R IgG interacts with a protein of 58 kDa.

  9. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The potent opioid agonist, (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl binds pseudoirreversibly to the opioid receptor complex in vitro and in vivo: Evidence for a novel mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, L.; Xu, Heng; Bykov, V.; Rothman, R.B.; Kim, Chongho; Newman, A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (NIDDK, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Greig, N. (NIA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of rat brain membranes with (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl ((+)-cis-MF), followed by extensive washing of the membranes, produces a wash-resistant decreasing in the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5})enkephalin to the d binding site of the opioid receptor complex ({delta}{sub cx} binding site). Intravenous administration of (+)-cis-MF (50 {mu}g/kg) to rats produced a pronounced catalepsy and also produced a wash-resistant masking of {delta}{sub cx} and {mu} binding sites in membranes prepared 120 min post-injection. Administration of 1 mg/kg i.v. of the opioid antagonist, 6-desoxy-6{beta}-fluoronaltrexone (cycloFOXY), 100 min after the injection of (+)-cis-MF (20 min prior to the preparation of membranes) completely reversed the catatonia and restored masked {delta}{sub cx} binding sites to control levels. This was not observed with (+)-cycloFOXY. The implications of these and other findings for the mechanism of action of (+)-cis-MF and models of the opioid receptors are discussed.

  11. Central delta-opioid receptor interactions and the inhibition of reflex urinary bladder contractions in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, A.; Nunan, L.; Wire, W.

    1985-01-01

    The in vivo effects of a number of opioid agonists and antagonists were studied on the spontaneous reflex contractions of the urinary bladder recorded isometrically in the rat anesthetized with urethane. All substances were administered into the central nervous system by the intracereboventricular (i.c.v.) or spinal intrathecal (i.t.) route. The conformationally restricted enkephalin analogues [2-D-penicillamine, 5-L-cysteine] enkephalin (DPLCE), [2-D-penicillamine, 5-L-penicillamine] enkephalin (DPLPE) and [2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine] enkephalin (DPDPE) produced dose-related inhibition of reflex bladder contractions when administered by the i.c.v. or i.t. route. Both the novel delta-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 154,129 (200-600 micrograms) [N,N-bisallyl-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Psi-(CH2S)-Phe-Leu-OH) and ICI 174,864 (1-3 micrograms) [N,N-dially-Tyr-Aib-Aib-Phe-Leu-OH: Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid] attenuated or abolished the effects of DPLCE, DPLPE and DPDPE when administered by the i.c.v. or i.t. route. The antagonism observed was selective since the equipotent inhibition produced by the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly(ol)5] enkephalin (DAGO) was unaffected. Overall, ICI 154,129 was considerably weaker than ICI 174,864 and both antagonists inhibited bladder activity at doses higher than those required to demonstrate delta-receptor antagonism. Further studies of the agonistic effect of ICI 174,864 showed that it was insensitive to low doses of naloxone (2 micrograms, i.c.v. or i.t.) but could be abolished by higher (10-15 micrograms) doses of naloxone. These observations suggested that the agonistic effect of ICI 174,864 was not mediated by mu-opioid receptor. beta-Endorphin (0.2-1.0 micrograms, i.c.v.) inhibited bladder contractions but following recovery from this effect, appeared to prevent the expression of delta-receptor antagonism by ICI 174,864. In addition a previously subthreshold dose of ICI 174,864 now exhibited marked agonistic

  12. In vitro binding affinities of a series of flavonoids for μ-opioid receptors. Antinociceptive effect of the synthetic flavonoid 3,3-dibromoflavanone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Josefina; Wasowski, Cristina; Loscalzo, Leonardo M; Marder, Mariel

    2013-09-01

    The pharmacotherapy for the treatment of pain is an active area of investigation. There are effective drugs to treat this problem, but there is also a need to find alternative treatments free of undesirable side effects. In the present work the capacity of a series of flavonoids to bind to the μ opioid receptor was evaluated. The most active compound, 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), a synthetic flavonoid, presented a significant inhibition of the binding of the selective μ opioid ligand [(3)H]DAMGO, with a Ki of 0.846 ± 0.263 μM. Flavanone 31 was further synthesized using a simple and cheap procedure with good yield. Its in vivo effects in mice, after acute treatments, were studied using antinociceptive and behavioral assays. It showed no sedative, anxiolytic, motor incoordination effects or inhibition of the gastrointestinal transit in mice at the doses tested. It evidenced antinociceptive activity on the acetic acid-induced nociception, hot plate and formalin tests (at 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). The results showed that the 5-HT2 receptor and the adrenoceptors seem unlikely to be involved in its antinociceptive effects. Naltrexone, a nonselective opioid receptors antagonist, totally blocked compound 31 antinociceptive effects on the hot plate test, but naltrindole (δ opioid antagonist) and nor-binaltorphimine (κ opioid antagonist) did not. These findings demonstrated that 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), at doses that did not interfere with the motor performance, exerted clear dose dependent antinociception when assessed in the chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice and it seems that its action is related to the activation of the μ opioid receptor.

  13. Reducing cardiovascular risk factors in non-selected outpatients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Vinther; Hjorth, Peter; Kristiansen, Christina Blanner;

    2016-01-01

    glucose, serum lipids, and information on smoking and alcohol were obtained. Results: On average, small significant increases in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumferences were observed while small non-significant improvements in other cardiovascular risk factors were seen. Patients with high baseline......Objectives: Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of premature death in patients with schizophrenia. We aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk factors in non-selected outpatients with schizophrenia using methods proven effective in short-term trials. Furthermore, we examined whether any...... motivated to participate in the interventions, and it was difficult to monitor the recommended metabolic risk measures in the patient group. Future research should focus on simple strategies in health promotion that can be integrated into routine care....

  14. Effect of anchoring 4-anilidopiperidines to opioid peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Vardanyan, Ruben S.; Liu, Lu; Ma, Shou-wu; Davis, Peg; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Vanderah, Todd W.; Hruby, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the design, synthesis, and in vitro characterization of new opioid peptides featuring a 4-anilidopiperidine moiety. Despite the fact that the chemical structures of fentanyl surrogates have been found suboptimal per se for the opioid activity, the corresponding conjugates with opioid peptides displayed potent opioid activity. These studies shed an instructive light on the strategies and potential therapeutic values of anchoring the 4-anilidopiperidine scaffold to different classes of opioid peptides. PMID:23623418

  15. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population.

  16. Psychotherapeutic benefits of opioid agonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Peter L

    2008-01-01

    Opioids have been used for centuries to treat a variety of psychiatric conditions with much success. The so-called "opium cure" lost popularity in the early 1950s with the development of non-addictive tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Nonetheless, recent literature supports the potent role of methadone, buprenorphine, tramadol, morphine, and other opioids as effective, durable, and rapid therapeutic agents for anxiety and depression. This article reviews the medical literature on the treatment of psychiatric disorders with opioids (notably, methadone and buprenorphine) in both the non-opioid-dependent population and in the opioid-dependent methadone maintenance population. The most recent neurotransmitter theories on the origin of depression and anxiety will be reviewed, including current information on the role of serotonin, N-Methyl d-Aspartate, glutamate, cortisol, catecholamine, and dopamine in psychiatric disorders. The observation that methadone maintenance patients with co-existing psychiatric morbidity (so called dual diagnosis patients) require substantially higher methadone dosages by between 20% and 50% will be explored and qualified. The role of methadone and other opioids as beneficial psychiatric medications that are independent of their drug abuse mitigating properties will be discussed. The mechanisms by which methadone and other opioids can favorably modulate the neurotransmitter systems controlling mood will also be discussed.

  17. Interaction of trimebutine and Jo-1196 (fedotozine) with opioid receptors in the canine ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allescher, H.D.; Ahmad, S.; Classen, M.; Daniel, E.E. (Technical Univ., Munich, (West Germany))

    1991-05-01

    Receptor binding of the opioid receptor antagonist, ({sup 3}H)diprenorphine, which has a similar affinity to the various opioid receptor subtypes, was characterized in subcellular fractions derived from either longitudinal or circular smooth muscle of the canine small intestine with their plexuses (myenteric plexus and deep muscular plexus, respectively) attached. The distribution of opioid binding activity showed a good correlation in the different fractions with the binding of the neuronal marker ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin but no correlation to the smooth muscle plasma membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase. The saturation data (Kd = 0.12 +/- 0.04 nM and maximum binding = 400 +/- 20 fmol/mg) and the data from kinetic experiments (Kd = 0.08 nmol) in the myenteric plexus were in good agreement with results obtained previously from the circular muscle/deep muscular plexus preparation. Competition experiments using selective drugs for mu (morphiceptin-analog (N-MePhe3-D-Pro4)-morphiceptin), delta (D-Pen2,5-enkephalin) and kappa (dynorphin 1-13, U50488-H) ligands showed the existence of all three receptor subtypes. The existence of kappa receptors was confirmed in saturation experiments using ({sup 3}H) ethylketocycloazocine as labeled ligand. Two putative opioid agonists, with effects on gastrointestinal motility, trimebutine and JO-1196 (fedotozin), were also examined. Trimebutine (Ki = 0.18 microM), Des-Met-trimebutine (Ki = 0.72 microM) and Jo-1196 (Ki = 0.19 microM) displaced specific opiate binding. The relative affinity for the opioid receptor subtypes was mu = 0.44, delta = 0.30 and kappa = 0.26 for trimebutine and mu = 0.25, delta = 0.22 and kappa = 0.52 for Jo-1196.

  18. Hyperalgesic priming (type II) induced by repeated opioid exposure: maintenance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2017-07-01

    We previously developed a model of opioid-induced neuroplasticity in the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor that could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia, type II hyperalgesic priming. Repeated administration of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, such as DAMGO, at the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor, induces long-lasting plasticity expressed, prototypically as opioid-induced hyperalgesia and prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of type II priming. Opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, induced hyperalgesia in DAMGO-primed paws. When repeatedly injected, naloxone-induced hyperalgesia, and hyperalgesic priming, supporting the suggestion that maintenance of priming involves changes in MOR signaling. However, the knockdown of MOR with oligodeoxynucleotide antisense did not reverse priming. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and focal adhesion kinase, which are involved in the Src signaling pathway, previously implicated in type II priming, also inhibited the expression, but not maintenance of priming. However, when Src and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors were coadministered, type II priming was reversed, in male rats. A second model of priming, latent sensitization, induced by complete Freund's adjuvant was also reversed, in males. In females, the inhibitor combination was only able to inhibit the expression and maintenance of DAMGO-induced priming when knockdown of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) in the nociceptor was performed. These findings demonstrate that the maintenance of DAMGO-induced type II priming, and latent sensitization is mediated by an interaction between, Src and MAP kinases, which in females is GPR30 dependent.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Efficiency of Using Non-Selective Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients with Endoprosthetic Total Knee and Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Logvinenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the postoperative efficacy and safety of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients undergoing endoprosthetic total knee and hip arthroplasty (ETKAP and ETHAP. Subjects and methods. The study included 60 patients who were referred for ETKAP or ETHAP and randomly assigned to 3 groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 patients were anesthetized with ketorolac, metamizol, and paracetamol, respectively. Real-time evaluation of the efficiency of postoperative analgesia was carried out within 3 days after surgery; the patients were questioned about bowel function, the onset of the first active movement in the ward, and occurring unpleasant sensations. Results. Reduced or no appetite was more common in the paracetamol and metamizol groups than in the ketorolac; the paracetamol group was found to have dizziness in 20% of cases, which was not observed in the two other groups. The patients who started to have routine hospital diet in the first 24 postoperative hours were significantly fewer among the paracetamol-treated patients. The shortest time to the first active movement was observed in the ketorolac group, which corresponded to the end of the first 24 hours and significantly distinguished it from the other groups. This appeared to be due to the best analgesic effect that, after epidural block, was significantly more effective (according to VAS scores in the ketorolac group, if not enhanced in any group, which agrees with information available on the drug as a worthy alternative to opioids due to its valid analgesic effect. Conclusion. __Intravenous ketorolac is a worthy alternative to narcotic analgesics in ensuring the comfortable course of the immediate postoperative period in patients operated on the knee and hip joints. Key words: ketorolac (ketorol, postoperative analgesia, endoprosthetic knee and hip arthroplasty.

  20. Hiperalgesia asociada al tratamiento con opioides

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Martín, A.; M. Moreno García; J. Sánchez-Rubio Ferrández; T. Molina García

    2014-01-01

    La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides es una reacción paradójica caracterizada por una percepción intensificada de dolor relacionada con el uso de estos medicamentos en ausencia de progresión de la enfermedad o de síndrome de retirada. A diferencia de los casos de tolerancia, definida como pérdida de potencia analgésica durante el uso prolongado de opioides, no se produce mejoría con el escalado de dosis. La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides se ha manifestado en pacientes con dosis de manten...

  1. Sustained Suppression of Hyperalgesia during Latent Sensitization by μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors and α2A Adrenergic Receptors: Role of Constitutive Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy M; Chen, Wenling; Kim, Hyeyoung; Minasyan, Ani; Ennes, Helena S; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2016-01-06

    Many chronic pain disorders alternate between bouts of pain and periods of remission. The latent sensitization model reproduces this in rodents by showing that the apparent recovery ("remission") from inflammatory or neuropathic pain can be reversed by opioid antagonists. Therefore, this remission represents an opioid receptor-mediated suppression of a sustained hyperalgesic state. To identify the receptors involved, we induced latent sensitization in mice and rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw. In WT mice, responses to mechanical stimulation returned to baseline 3 weeks after CFA. In μ-opioid receptor (MOR) knock-out (KO) mice, responses did not return to baseline but partially recovered from peak hyperalgesia. Antagonists of α2A-adrenergic and δ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia in WT mice and abolished the partial recovery from hyperalgesia in MOR KO mice. In rats, antagonists of α2A adrenergic and μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia during remission from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Therefore, these four receptors suppress hyperalgesia in latent sensitization. We further demonstrated that suppression of hyperalgesia by MORs was due to their constitutive activity because of the following: (1) CFA-induced hyperalgesia was reinstated by the MOR inverse agonist naltrexone (NTX), but not by its neutral antagonist 6β-naltrexol; (2) pro-enkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, and pro-dynorphin KO mice showed recovery from hyperalgesia and reinstatement by NTX; (3) there was no MOR internalization during remission; (4) MORs immunoprecipitated from the spinal cord during remission had increased Ser(375) phosphorylation; and (5) electrophysiology recordings from dorsal root ganglion neurons collected during remission showed constitutive MOR inhibition of calcium channels. Chronic pain causes extreme suffering to millions of people, but its mechanisms remain to be unraveled. Latent sensitization is a phenomenon

  2. Opioid overuse pain syndrome (OOPS): the story of opioids, prometheus unbound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendale, Anand W; Goldman, Mark P; Mehendale, Rachel P

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, opioids have effectively alleviated pain but not without the risk of addiction and death. Seductive and dangerous, full of promise and destruction, opioids are both revered and feared by Western culture. Their exponential use in "developed countries" is now an enormous public health problem and requires us to harness their properties with scientific rigor and adequate safeguards. The use of opioids for the treatment of chronic nonterminal pain (CNTP) has been a relatively new phenomenon which has coincided with the proclamation by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization in 2000 that pain assessment be the "fifth vital sign," notwithstanding the fact that pain is a symptom and not a sign.(1) Nonetheless, this resulted in a culture of a marked increase in use of opioids for acute and chronic pain management. Consequently, there are many unintended outcomes which include opioid-induced hyperalgesia increased diversion, addiction, and death. Understandably, this has resulted in many regulatory responses from such agencies such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and state medical boards. This article proposes a clinically relevant paradigm of opioid overuse pain syndrome. The goal of this article is to inform the clinicians of the complicated neurobiology of opioids. It is our hope that scientists rather than government regulators dictate the appropriate response to the epidemic of over prescription of opioids. A similar designation of "medication overuse headache" has resulted in near extinction of excessive use of opioids in the field of headache medicine.

  3. Antinociceptive Effect of Ghrelin in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Involves TRPV1/Opioid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Mao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, defined as recurrent abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, seriously affects quality of life and ability to work. Ghrelin is a brain-gut hormone, which has been reported to show antinociceptive effects in peripheral pain. We investigated the effect of ghrelin on visceral hypersensitivity and pain in a rat model of IBS. Methods: Maternal deprivation (MD was used to provide a stress-induced model of IBS in Wistar rats. Colorectal distension (CRD was used to detect visceral sensitivity, which was evaluated by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores. Rats that were confirmed to have visceral hypersensitivity after MD were injected with ghrelin (10 µg/kg subcutaneously twice a week from weeks 7 to 8. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (100 nmol/L and naloxone (100 nmol/L were administered subcutaneously to block growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS-R1α and opioid receptors, respectively. Expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and µ and κ opioid receptors (MOR and KOR in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex tissues were detected by western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical analyses and immunofluorescence. Results: Ghrelin treatment increased expression of opioid receptors and inhibited expression of TRPV1 in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex. The antinociceptive effect of ghrelin in the rat model of IBS was partly blocked by both the ghrelin antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Conclusion: The results indicate that ghrelin exerted an antinociceptive effect, which was mediated via TRPV1/opioid systems, in IBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Ghrelin might potentially be used as a new treatment for IBS.

  4. Role of NOC/oFQ in impaired opioid-induced pial artery dilation following brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, W M

    2000-06-30

    Previous studies in piglets show that opioid-induced pial artery dilation was impaired following fluid percussion brain injury (FPI). This study was designed to determine the role of the newly described opioid nociceptin orphanin FQ (NOC/oFQ) in such impaired dilation to other opioids after FPI. CSF NOC/oFQ concentration was elevated from 70+/-6 to 444+/-56 pg/ml ( approximately 10(-10) M) within 1 h of FPI. Coadministration of NOC/oFQ (10(-10) M) with methionine enkephalin (10(-10), 10(-8), 10(-6) M) attenuated pial dilation induced by this opioid (7+/-1, 13+/-2, and 19+/-2 vs. 2+/-1, 6+/-1, and 7+/-2%) under non-brain injury conditions. Similar inhibition by NOC/oFQ was observed for leucine enkephalin and dynorphin. Methionine enkephalin (10(-10), 10(-8), 10(-6) M)-induced pial artery dilation was also inhibited within 1 h of FPI, but such responses were partially restored in animals pretreated with the NOC/oFQ receptor antagonist [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2) (10(-6) M) (8+/-1, 14+/-1, and 21+/-1 vs. 1+/-1, 3+/-1, and 4+/-1 vs. 7+/-1, 11+/-1, and 17+/-1% for sham control, FPI and FPI pretreated with the NOC/oFQ receptor antagonist). Leucine enkephalin and dynorphin-induced pial artery dilation were similarly altered by FPI and partially restored by [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2). These data indicate that the NOC/oFQ released by FPI contributes to impaired dilation to other opioids observed following this insult.

  5. Influence of intramuscular heat stimulation on modulation of nociception: complex role of central opioid receptors in descending facilitation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hao-Jun; Lei, Jing; Ye, Gang; Fan, Xiao-Li; Li, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that the threshold to activate 'silent' or inactive descending facilitation of nociception is lower than that of descending inhibition. Thus, the development of pain therapy to effectively drive descending inhibition alone, without the confounding influences of facilitation is a challenge. To address this issue we investigated the effects of intramuscular stimulation with a heating-needle on spinal nociception, assessed by measuring nociceptive paw withdrawal reflex in rats. Additionally, involvement of the thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' (thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei), and opioid-mediated mechanisms were further explored. Descending facilitation and inhibition were elicited by 46°C noxious heating-needle stimulation, and were regulated by thalamic MD and VM nuclei, respectively. In contrast, innocuous heating-needle stimulation at a temperature of 43°C elicited descending inhibition modulated by the thalamic VM nucleus alone. Microinjection of μ/δ/κ-opioid receptor antagonists β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride/naltrindole/nor-binaltorphimine, into the VM nucleus attenuated the 46°C intramuscular heating-needle stimulation-evoked descending inhibition, whereas treatment of the MD nucleus with β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride significantly decreased the descending facilitation. By contrast, descending inhibition evoked by 43°C heating-needle stimulation was only depressed by naltrindole, as opposed to μ- and κ-opioid receptor antagonists, which failed to influence descending inhibition. The present study reveals distinct roles of μ-opioid receptors in the function of thalamic MD and VM nuclei,which exert facilitatory and inhibitory actions on nociception. Furthermore, innocuous, but not noxious, intramuscular heating-needle stimulation targeting δ-opioid receptors is suggested to be a promising avenue for the effective inhibition of pain.

  6. δ-Opioid receptor activation stimulates normal diet intake but conversely suppresses high-fat diet intake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kentaro; Mizushige, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Yuri; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Kanamoto, Ryuhei; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2014-02-15

    The central opioid system is involved in a broadly distributed neural network that regulates food intake. Here, we show that activation of central δ-opioid receptor not only stimulated normal diet intake but conversely suppressed high-fat diet intake as well. [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE), an agonist selective for the δ-receptor, increased normal diet intake after central administration to nonfasted male mice. The orexigenic activity of DPDPE was inhibited by blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS), D-type prostanoid receptor 1 (DP(1)), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor type 1 (Y1) for PGD(2) and NPY, respectively, suggesting that this was mediated by the PGD(2)-NPY system. In contrast, DPDPE decreased high-fat diet intake in mice fed a high-fat diet. DPDPE-induced suppression of high-fat diet intake was blocked by antagonists of melanocortin 4 (MC(4)) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors but not by knockout of the L-PGDS gene. These results suggest that central δ-opioid receptor activation suppresses high-fat diet intake via the MC-CRF system, independent of the orexigenic PGD(2) system. Furthermore, orally administered rubiscolin-6, an opioid peptide derived from spinach Rubisco, suppressed high-fat diet intake. This suppression was also blocked by centrally administered naltrindole, an antagonist for the δ-receptor, suggesting that rubiscolin-6 suppressed high-fat diet intake via activation of central δ-opioid receptor.

  7. Opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying: a peripheral mechanism in humans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Opioids delay gastric emptying, which in turn may increase the risk of vomiting and pulmonary aspiration. Naloxone reverses this opiate action on gastric emptying, but it is not known whether this effect in humans is mediated by central or peripheral opiate antagonism. The importance of peripheral opioid receptor antagonism in modulating opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying was evaluated using methylnaltrexone, a quaternary derivative of the opiate antagonist naltrexone, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover placebo-controlled study, 11 healthy volunteers were given either placebo (saline), 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine, or 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine plus 0.3 mg\\/kg methylnaltrexone on three separate occasions before ingesting 500 ml deionized water. The rate of gastric emptying was measured by two methods: a noninvasive epigastric bioimpedance technique and the acetaminophen absorption test. RESULTS: The epigastric bioimpedance technique was sufficiently sensitive to detect opioid-induced changes in the rate of gastric emptying. The mean +\\/- SD time taken for the gastric volume to decrease to 50% (t0.5) after placebo was 5.5 +\\/- 2.1 min. Morphine prolonged gastric emptying to (t0.5) of 21 +\\/- 9.0 min (P < 0.03). Methylnaltrexone given concomitantly with morphine reversed the morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying to a t0.5 of 7.4 +\\/- 3.0 (P < 0.04). Maximum concentrations and area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min of serum acetaminophen concentrations after morphine were significantly different from placebo and morphine administered concomitantly with methylnaltrexone (P < 0.05). No difference in maximum concentration or area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min was noted between placebo and methylnaltrexone coadministered with morphine. CONCLUSIONS: The attenuation of morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying by methylnaltrexone suggests that the opioid effect is

  8. Effect of Iboga alkaloids on µ-opioid receptor-coupled G protein activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Antonio

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The iboga alkaloids are a class of small molecules defined structurally on the basis of a common ibogamine skeleton, some of which modify opioid withdrawal and drug self-administration in humans and preclinical models. These compounds may represent an innovative approach to neurobiological investigation and development of addiction pharmacotherapy. In particular, the use of the prototypic iboga alkaloid ibogaine for opioid detoxification in humans raises the question of whether its effect is mediated by an opioid agonist action, or if it represents alternative and possibly novel mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to independently replicate and extend evidence regarding the activation of μ-opioid receptor (MOR-related G proteins by iboga alkaloids. METHODS: Ibogaine, its major metabolite noribogaine, and 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC, a synthetic congener, were evaluated by agonist-stimulated guanosine-5´-O-(γ-thio-triphosphate ([(35S]GTPγS binding in cells overexpressing the recombinant MOR, in rat thalamic membranes, and autoradiography in rat brain slices. RESULTS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In rat thalamic membranes ibogaine, noribogaine and 18-MC were MOR antagonists with functional Ke values ranging from 3 uM (ibogaine to 13 uM (noribogaine and 18MC. Noribogaine and 18-MC did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human or rat MORs, and had only limited partial agonist effects in human embryonic kidney cells expressing mouse MORs. Ibogaine did not did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in any MOR expressing cells. Noribogaine did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in brain slices using autoradiography. An MOR agonist action does not appear to account for the effect of these iboga alkaloids on opioid withdrawal. Taken together with existing evidence that their mechanism of action also differs from that of other non-opioids with clinical effects on opioid tolerance and withdrawal, these

  9. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  10. Long-term opioid therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birke, H; Ekholm, O; Sjøgren, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Longitudinal population-based studies of long-term opioid therapy (L-TOT) in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) patients are sparse. Our study investigated incidence and predictors for initiating L-TOT and changes in self-rated health, pain interference and physical activities in long......-term opioid users. METHODS: Data were obtained from the national representative Danish Health and Morbidity Surveys and The Danish National Prescription Registry. Respondents with no dispensed opioids the year before the survey were followed from 2000 and from 2005 until the end of 2012 (n = 12...... defined as those who were dispensed at least one opioid prescription in six separate months within a year. RESULTS: The incidence of L-TOT was substantially higher in CNCP patients at baseline than in others (9/1000 vs. 2/1000 person-years). Smoking behaviour and dispensed benzodiazepines were...

  11. Depressed Back Pain Patients Often Get Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166796.html Depressed Back Pain Patients Often Get Opioids Study finds they are ... June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low back pain who are depressed are more likely to be ...

  12. Opioider påvirker immunsystemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundestrup, Svend; Sjøgren, Per

    2014-01-01

    Opioids can modulate and suppress the immune system through central mediated mechanisms. Morphine increases replication and spread of HIV-1. Evidence suggests that morphine can also enhance growth and spread of some cancer diagnoses like breast-, prostate- and non-small cell lung cancer. The mech......Opioids can modulate and suppress the immune system through central mediated mechanisms. Morphine increases replication and spread of HIV-1. Evidence suggests that morphine can also enhance growth and spread of some cancer diagnoses like breast-, prostate- and non-small cell lung cancer....... The mechanisms behind the effects of morphine are mainly mediated by inhibiting apoptosis of cancer cells and by stimulation of angiogenesis. Some other opioid agonists seem to be depleted from these effects. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the immunosuppressive effects of opioids in cancer pain...

  13. Opioid-induced constipation: advances and clinical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alfred D.; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Currently opioids are the most frequently used medications for chronic noncancer pain. Opioid-induced constipation is the most common adverse effect associated with prolonged use of opioids, having a major impact on quality of life. There is an increasing need to treat opioid-induced constipation. With the recent approval of medications for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, there are several therapeutic approaches. This review addresses the clinical presentation and diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, barriers to its diagnosis, effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract, differential tolerance to opiates in different gastrointestinal organs, medications approved and in development for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, and a proposed clinical management algorithm for treating opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. PMID:26977281

  14. Neuraxial Opioid-Induced Itch and Its Pharmacological Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Given its profound analgesic nature, neuraxial opioids are frequently used for pain management. Unfortunately, the high incident rate of itch/pruritus after spinal administration of opioid analgesics reported in postoperative and obstetric patients greatly diminishes patient satisfaction and thus the value of the analgesics. Many endeavors to solve the mystery behind neuraxial opioid-induced itch had not been successful, as the pharmacological antagonism other than the blockade of mu opioid receptors remains elusive. Nevertheless, as the characteristics of all opioid receptor subtypes have become more understood, more studies have shed light on the potential effective treatments. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying neuraxial opioid-induced itch and compares pharmacological evidence in nonhuman primates with clinical findings across diverse drugs. Both nonhuman primate and human studies corroborate that mixed mu/kappa opioid partial agonists seem to be the most effective drugs in ameliorating neuraxial opioid-induced itch while retaining neuraxial opioid-induced analgesia. PMID:25861787

  15. Studies on antagonistic marine streptomycetes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, D.; Nair, S.

    Sixty nine strains of Streptomyces sp. isolated from the sediments of Andaman and Nicobar islands (Bay of Bengal) were screened for their antagonistic property against a number of test cultures (Vibrio sp., Klebsiella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella...

  16. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E.; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10−5 M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10−4 M and 9 × 10−6 M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol. PMID:28167903

  17. Acute morphine induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 up-regulation in primary sensory neurons to mask opioid-induced analgesia in mice

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    Liu Yen-Chin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite decades of intense research efforts, actions of acute opioids are not fully understood. Increasing evidence suggests that in addition to well-documented antinociceptive effects opioids also produce paradoxical hyperalgesic and excitatory effects on neurons. However, most studies focus on the pronociceptive actions of chronic opioid exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 plays an important role in neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain development. We examined MMP-9 expression and localization in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs after acute morphine treatment and, furthermore, the role of MMP-9 in modulating acute morphine-induced analgesia and hyperalgesia in mice. Results Subcutaneous morphine induced a marked up-regulation of MMP-9 protein in DRGs but not spinal cords. Morphine also increased MMP-9 activity and mRNA expression in DRGs. MMP-9 up-regulation peaked at 2 h but returned to the baseline after 24 h. In DRG tissue sections, MMP-9 is expressed in small and medium-sized neurons that co-express mu opioid receptors (MOR. In DRG cultures, MOR agonists morphine, DAMGO, and remifentanil each increased MMP-9 expression in neurons, whereas the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and the MOR-selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP suppressed morphine-induced MMP-9 expression. Notably, subcutaneous morphine-induced analgesia was enhanced and prolonged in Mmp9 knockout mice and also potentiated in wild-type mice receiving intrathecal injection of MMP-9 inhibitors. Consistently, intrathecal injection of specific siRNA targeting MMP-9 reduced MMP-9 expression in DRGs and enhanced and prolonged morphine analgesia. Subcutaneous morphine also produced heat hyperalgesia at 24 h, but this opioid-induced hyperalgesia was not enhanced after MMP-9 deletion or inhibition. Conclusions Transient MMP-9 up-regulation in DRG neurons can mask opioid analgesia, without modulating opioid-induced hyperalgesia

  18. Maintainence Treatment of Opioid Dependence with Tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Varshney, Mohit; Patil, Vaibhav; Lal, Rakesh

    2017-08-01

    Although tramadol has been used in the management of acute withdrawal in patients with opioid dependence, its use for maintenance treatment as a harm reduction approach has not been assessed systematically. This case series describes patients with opioid dependence who were treated with tramadol for long-term maintenance. Patients with opioid dependence who received treatment at the National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, were included in the study. Patients who received at least 6 months of tramadol and had follow-up adherence of more than 80% were included in the case series. A total of 25 cases were included, all of whom were males. The types of opioids being taken at the time of initiation of tramadol were natural opiates (poppy husk and raw opium), followed by heroin. The median dose of tramadol at initiation and maintenance was 300 mg/day. Nineteen patients were able to achieve complete abstinence to other opiates on tramadol. Tramadol may be an effective option in the long-term management of patients with opioid dependence. Further studies are required for establishing the efficacy of tramadol for agonist management of patients with opioid dependence.

  19. The Opioid Epidemic: Crisis and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Phil

    2017-10-02

    The widespread abuse of prescription opioids and a dramatic increase in the availability of illicit opioids have created what is commonly referred to as the opioid epidemic. The magnitude of this epidemic is startling: About 4% of the adult US population misuses prescription opioids, and in 2015, more than 33,000 deaths were attributable to overdose with licit and illicit opioids. Increasing the availability of medication-assisted treatments (such as buprenorphine and naltrexone), the use of abuse-deterrent formulations, and the adoption of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prescribing guidelines all constitute short-term approaches to quell this epidemic. However, with more than 125 million Americans suffering from either acute or chronic pain, the development of effective alternatives to opioids, enabled at least in part by a fuller understanding of the neurobiological bases of pain, offers the best long-term solution for controlling and ultimately eradicating this epidemic. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Volume 58 is January 6, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. Attenuation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yildirim, Kemal; Ozdemir, Ercan; Bagcivan, Ihsan; Gursoy, Sinan; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists may be useful for their potential to increase or prolong opioid analgesia while attenuating the development of opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist) and JTE907 (a selective CB2 antagonist) on morphine analgesia and tolerance in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats weighing 205-225 g were used in these experiments. To constitute morphine tolerance, we used a 3 day cumulative dosing regimen. After the last dose of morphine was injected on day 4, morphine tolerance was evaluated by analgesia tests. The analgesic effects of morphine (5 mg/kg), ACEA (a CB1 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), JWH-015 (a CB2 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), AM251 (1 mg/kg) and JTE907 (5 mg/kg) were considered at 30-min intervals (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) by tail-flick and hot-plate analgesia tests. Our findings indicate that ACEA and JWH907 significantly increased morphine analgesia and morphine antinociceptive tolerance in the analgesia tests. In contrast, the data suggested that AM251 and JTE907 significantly attenuated the expression of morphine tolerance. In conclusion, we observed that co-injection of AM251 and JTE907 with morphine attenuated expression of tolerance to morphine analgesic effects and decreased the morphine analgesia.

  1. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L; Hutchinson, Mark R; Olson, David M; Rice, Kenner C; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-11-07

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (-)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting.

  2. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Olson, David M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (−)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting. PMID:27819333

  3. Effect of a corticotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist on colonic sensory and motor function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is presumed to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with an exaggerated response to stress. We hypothesised that peripheral administration of α-helical CRH (αhCRH), a non-selective CRH receptor antagonist, would improve gastrointestinal motility, visceral perception, and negative mood in response to gut stimulation in IBS patient...

  4. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

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    Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs. In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH. In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM, ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs, and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3 channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  5. Effects of kappa opioid receptor-selective agonists on responses of pelvic nerve afferents to noxious colorectal distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X; Sengupta, J N; Gebhart, G F

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of kappa-opioid receptor selective agonists on responses of mechanosensitive afferent fibers in the pelvic nerve. Single-fiber recordings were made from pelvic nerve afferents in the decentralized S1 dorsal root of the rat. A total of 572 afferent fibers in the S1 dorsal root were identified by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve; 252 (44%) responded to noxious colorectal distension (CRD; 80 mmHg). Of these 252 fibers that responded to CRD, 100 were studied further. All 100 fibers gave monotonic increases in firing to increasing pressures of CRD. Eighty-eight fibers had low thresholds for response (mean: 3 mmHg) and 12 fibers had high-thresholds for response (mean: 28 mmHg). Responses of 17 fibers also were tested after instillation of 5% mustard oil (MO) into the colon. The resting activity of 16/17 fibers significantly increased after MO instillation; 13 (77%) also exhibited sensitization of responses to graded CRD when tested 30 min after intracolonic MO instillation. The effects of kappa1-opioid receptor preferring agonists (U50,488H, U69,593 and U62,066), the kappa2-opioid receptor preferring agonist bremazocine, and the kappa3-opioid receptor preferring agonist naloxone benzoylhydrazone (nalBzoH) were tested on responses of 64 mechanosensitive afferent fibers to noxious CRD. All five agonists dose-dependently inhibited afferent fiber responses to noxious CRD. Doses producing inhibition to 50% of the control response to CRD did not differ among the five agonists, ranging from approximately 4 to 15 mg/kg. The effects of kappa1, kappa2, and kappa3 receptor agonists were attenuated by naloxone; two kappa-opioid receptor-selective antagonists were ineffective. There were no differences in the dose-response relationships of these drugs for fibers recorded from untreated and irritant-treated colons. Conduction velocities of the fibers remained unaffected after high doses of all tested agonists. In an in vitro

  6. Persistent inflammatory pain decreases the antinociceptive effects of the mu opioid receptor agonist DAMGO in the locus coeruleus of male rats.

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    Jongeling, Amy C; Johns, Malcolm E; Murphy, Anne Z; Hammond, Donna L

    2009-01-01

    Persistent inflammatory nociception increases levels of endogenous opioids with affinity for delta opioid receptors in the ventromedial medulla and enhances the antinociceptive effects of the mu opioid receptor (MOPr) agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) [Hurley, R.W., Hammond, D.L., 2001. Contribution of endogenous enkephalins to the enhanced analgesic effects of supraspinal mu opioid receptor agonists after inflammatory injury. J. Neurosci. 21, 2536-2545]. It also increases levels of endogenous opioids that act at MOPr elsewhere in the CNS [Zangen, A., Herzberg, U., Vogel, Z., Yadid, G., 1998. Nociceptive stimulus induces release of endogenous beta-endorphin in the rat brain. Neuroscience 85, 659-662]. This study tested the hypothesis that a sustained release of endogenous opioids leads to a downregulation of MOPr in the locus coeruleus (LC) and induces a state of endogenous opioid tolerance. Four days after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left hindpaw of the rat, both the magnitude and duration of the antinociception produced by microinjection of DAMGO in the right LC were reduced. Saturation isotherms demonstrated a 50% decrease in MOPr B(max) in homogenates of the LC from CFA-treated rats; K(d) was unchanged. Receptor autoradiography revealed that this decrease was bilateral. The decreased efficacy of DAMGO in CFA-treated rats most likely results from a decreased number of MOPr in the LC. Microinjection of the MOPr antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP) in the LC did not exacerbate hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hindpaw or produce hyperalgesia in the contralateral hindpaw of CFA-treated rats. The downregulation in MOPr is therefore unlikely to result from the induction of endogenous opioid tolerance in the LC. These results indicate that persistent inflammatory nociception alters the antinociceptive actions of MOPr agonists in the CNS by diverse mechanisms that are nucleus specific and likely to have

  7. NIDA Clinical Trials Network CTN-0051, Extended-Release Naltrexone vs. Buprenorphine for Opioid Treatment (X:BOT): Study Design and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joshua D.; Nunes, Edward V.; Novo, Patricia; Bailey, Genie L.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Cohen, Allan J.; Fishman, Marc; Ling, Walter; Lindblad, Robert; Shmueli-Blumberg, Dikla; Stablein, Don; May, Jeanine; Salazar, Dagmar; Liu, David; Rotrosen, John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction For opioid-dependent patients in the US and elsewhere, detoxification and counseling-only aftercare are treatment mainstays. Long-term abstinence is rarely achieved; many patients relapse and overdose after detoxification. Methadone, buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NX) and extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) can prevent opioid relapse but are underutilized. This study is intended to develop an evidence-base to help patients and providers make informed choices and to foster wider adoption of relapse-prevention pharmacotherapies. Methods The National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study CTN-0051, X:BOT, is a comparative effectiveness study of treatment for 24 weeks with XR-NTX, an opioid antagonist, versus BUP-NX, a high affinity partial opioid agonist, for opioid dependent patients initiating treatment at 8 short-term residential (detoxification) units and continuing care as outpatients. Up to 600 participants are randomized (1:1) to XR-NTX or BUP-NX. Results The primary outcome is time to opioid relapse (i.e., loss of persistent abstinence) across the 24-week treatment phase. Differences between arms in the distribution of time-to-relapse will be compared (construction of the asymptotic 95% CI for the hazard ratio of the difference between arms). Secondary outcomes include proportions retained in treatment, rates of opioid abstinence, adverse events, cigarette, alcohol, and other drug use, and HIV risk behaviors; opioid cravings, quality of life, cognitive function, genetic moderators, and cost effectiveness. Conclusions XR-NTX and BUP-NX differ considerably in their characteristics and clinical management; no studies to date have compared XR-NTX with buprenorphine maintenance. Study design choices and compromises inherent to a comparative effectiveness trial of distinct treatment regimens are reviewed. PMID:27521809

  8. Variants of opioid system genes are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randesi, Matthew; van den Brink, Wim; Levran, Orna; Blanken, Peter; Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; van Ree, Jan M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heroin addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease. Genetic factors are involved in the development of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to determine whether specific variants in genes of the opioid system are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence.

  9. Role of Opioid Receptors Signaling in Remote Electrostimulation--Induced Protection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts.

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    Hsin-Ju Tsai

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated that remote electro-stimulation (RES increased myocardial GSK3 phosphorylation and attenuated ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R injury in rat hearts. However, the role of various opioid receptors (OR subtypes in preconditioned RES-induced myocardial protection remains unknown. We investigated the role of OR subtype signaling in RES-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury of the rat heart.Male Spraque-Dawley rats were used. RES was performed on median nerves area with/without pretreatment with various receptors antagonists such as opioid receptor (OR subtype receptors (KOR, DOR, and MOR. The expressions of Akt, GSK3, and PKCε expression were analyzed by Western blotting. When RES was preconditioned before the I/R model, the rat's hemodynamic index, infarction size, mortality and serum CK-MB were evaluated. Our results showed that Akt, GSK3 and PKCε expression levels were significantly increased in the RES group compared to the sham group, which were blocked by pretreatment with specific antagonists targeting KOR and DOR, but not MOR subtype. Using the I/R model, the duration of arrhythmia and infarct size were both significantly attenuated in RES group. The mortality rates of the sham RES group, the RES group, RES group + KOR antagonist, RES group + DOR/MOR antagonists (KOR left, RES group + DOR antagonist, and RES group + KOR/MOR antagonists (DOR left were 50%, 20%, 67%, 13%, 50% and 55%, respectively.The mechanism of RES-induced myocardial protection against I/R injury seems to involve multiple target pathways such as Akt, KOR and/or DOR signaling.

  10. Novel κ-opioid receptor agonist MB-1C-OH produces potent analgesia with less depression and sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le-sha; Wang, Jun; Chen, Jian-chun; Tao, Yi-min; Wang, Yu-hua; Xu, Xue-jun; Chen, Jie; Xu, Yun-gen; Xi, Tao; Hu, Xiao-wu; Wang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jing-gen

    2015-05-01

    To characterize the pharmacological profiles of a novel κ-opioid receptor agonist MB-1C-OH. [(3)H]diprenorphine binding and [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays were performed to determine the agonistic properties of MB-1C-OH. Hot plate, tail flick, acetic acid-induced writhing, and formalin tests were conducted in mice to evaluate the antinociceptive actions. Forced swimming and rotarod tests of mice were used to assess the sedation and depression actions. In [(3)H]diprenorphine binding assay, MB-1C-OH did not bind to μ- and δ-opioid receptors at the concentration of 100 μmol/L, but showed a high affinity for κ-opioid receptor (Ki=35 nmol/L). In [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay, the compound had an Emax of 98% and an EC50 of 16.7 nmol/L for κ-opioid receptor. Subcutaneous injection of MB-1C-OH had no effects in both hot plate and tail flick tests, but produced potent antinociception in the acetic acid-induced writhing test (ED50=0.39 mg/kg), which was antagonized by pretreatment with a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist Nor-BNI. In the formalin test, subcutaneous injection of MB-1C-OH did not affect the flinching behavior in the first phase, but significantly inhibited that in the second phase (ED50=0.87 mg/kg). In addition, the sedation or depression actions of MB-1C-OH were about 3-fold weaker than those of the classical κ agonist (-)U50,488H. MB-1C-OH is a novel κ-opioid receptor agonist that produces potent antinociception causing less sedation and depression.

  11. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

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    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  12. Possible role of a dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Wedekind, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Around half the inmates in prison institutions have antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). A recent theory has proposed that a dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) underlies the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). In the present theoretical paper, based on a comprehensive database and hand search of the relevant literature, this hypothesis is extended to ASPD, which may be the predominant expression of EOS dysfunction in men, while the same pathology underlies BPD in women. According to evidence from human and animal studies, the problematic behaviours of persons with antisocial, callous, or psychopathic traits may be seen as desperate, unconscious attempts to stimulate their deficient EOS, which plays a key role in brain reward circuits. If the needs of this system are not being met, the affected persons experience dysphoric mood, discomfort, or irritability, and strive to increase binding of endogenous opioids to receptors by using the rewarding effects of aggression by exertion of physical or manipulative power on others, by abusing alcohol or substances that have the reward system as target, by creating an "endorphin rush" by self-harm, by increasing the frequency of their sexual contacts, or by impulsive actions and sensation seeking. Symptoms associated with ASPD can be treated with opioid antagonists like naltrexone, naloxone, or nalmefene. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Opioid receptor blockade and warmth-liking: effects on interpersonal trust and frontal asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Desirée; Stemmler, Gerhard; Burgdorf, Christin; Wacker, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The emotion 'warmth-liking' (WL) associated with feelings of affection and acceptance is regularly activated in social contexts. WL has been suggested to be more closely related to the consummatory phase of post-goal attainment positive affect than to pre-goal attainment positive affect/approach motivation and to be partly mediated by brain opioids. To validate these assumptions we employed film/imagery to induce either a neutral emotional state or WL in female participants after intake of either placebo or the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Dependent variables were emotion self-report, interpersonal trust (TRUST, i.e. a behavioral indicator of WL) and frontal asymmetry (i.e. an electroencephalogram (EEG) indicator of approach motivation/behavioral activation). We found that participants reported more WL in the placebo/WL group than in the placebo/neutral group and both naltrexone groups. In addition, TRUST increased in the WL group after placebo, but not after naltrexone, and this pattern was reversed in the neutral control groups. Consequently, opioid blockade suppressed or even reversed the effects of the WL induction on the levels of self-report and behavior, respectively. In addition, we observed reduced relative left-frontal asymmetry in the WL (vs neutral) group, consistent with reduced approach motivation. Overall, these results suggest opioidergic influences on WL and TRUST and reduced approach motivation/behavioral activation for the positive emotion WL.

  14. Error correction in latent inhibition and its disruption by opioid receptor blockade with naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hiu T; Killcross, A S; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2013-11-01

    Latent inhibition refers to the retardation in the development of conditioned responding when a pre-exposed stimulus is used to signal an unconditioned stimulus. This effect is described by error-correction models as an attentional deficit and is commonly used as an animal model of schizophrenia. A series of experiments studied the role of error-correction mechanism in latent inhibition and its interaction with the endogenous opioid system. Systemic administration of the competitive opioid receptor antagonist naloxone before rats were pre-exposed to a target stimulus prevented latent inhibition of its subsequent fear conditioning; it was without effect on a non-pre-exposed stimulus and did not produce state-dependent learning (Experiments 1a and 1b). Naloxone did not reverse the latent inhibitory effect already accrued to a pre-exposed target. However, it did prevent the enhancement of latent inhibition by a long retention interval interpolated between its initial exposure and re-exposure (Experiment 2) or by a novel stimulus compounded with the pre-exposed target during re-exposure (Experiment 3). These results provide evidence that attentional loss in latent inhibition is instructed by an opioid-mediated error signal which diminishes with repeated stimulus exposures but recovers with the passage of time or reintroduction of novelty.

  15. The μ-opioid receptor gene and smoking initiation and nicotine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendler Kenneth S

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The gene encoding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 is reported to be associated with a range of substance dependence. Experiments in knockout mice indicate that the mu-opioid receptor may mediate reinforcing effects of nicotine. In humans, opioid antagonist naltrexone may reduce the reinforcing effects of tobacco smoking. Additionally, the OPRM1 gene is located in a region showing linkage to nicotine dependence. The OPRM1 is thus a plausible candidate gene for smoking behavior. To investigate whether OPRM1 contributes to the susceptibility of smoking initiation and nicotine dependence, we genotyped 11 SNPs in the gene for 688 Caucasian subjects of lifetime smokers and nonsmokers. Three SNPs showed nominal significance for smoking initiation and one reached significance for nicotine dependence. The global test for three-marker (rs9479757-rs2075572-rs10485057 haplotypes was significant for smoking initiation (p = 0.0022. The same three-marker haplotype test was marginal (p = 0.0514 for nicotine dependence. These results suggest that OPRM1 may be involved in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence.

  16. Role of kinin B2 receptors in opioid-induced hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grastilleur, Sébastien; Mouledous, Lionel; Bedel, Jerome; Etcheverry, Jonathan; Bader, Michael; Girolami, Jean-Pierre; Fourcade, Olivier; Frances, Bernard; Minville, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative pain management is a clinical challenge that can be complicated by opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Kinin receptors could mediate both the acute and chronic phases of inflammation and pain. A few recent studies suggest that dynorphin A could maintain neuropathic pain by activating the bradykinin (BK) receptor. Thus, the effect of a single administration of sufentanil (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) was investigated in a model of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain using three strains of mice, i.e., knockout mice for one kinin receptor, B1R or B2R (B1KO, B2KO), and wild-type C57/BL6J mice (WT) treated with either a B1R (R954) or a B2R antagonist (HOE140) or a KKS inhibitor (aprotinin). Pain was assessed and compared between the different groups using two behavioral tests exploring mechanical (von Frey filaments) and thermal (Hargreaves test) sensitivity. Pretreatment with sufentanil induced a sustained increase in pain sensitivity with a delayed return to baseline values characterizing an OIH in carrageenan-injected mice only. Sufentanil-induced OIH was not observed in B2KO but persisted in B1KO and was blunted by aprotinin and the B2R antagonist only. Collectively, our data indicate that the B2R receptor and BK synthesis or availability are essential peripheral steps in the mechanism leading to OIH in a pain context.

  17. Involvement of GABA and opioid peptide receptors in sevoflurane-induced antinociception in rat spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-wei WANG; Xiao-ming DENG; Xin-min YOU; Shu-xiao LIU; Zhi-qi ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The spinal cord is pivotal in immobility induced by volatile anesthetics because the anesthetics depress the activity of motor neurons in the spinal cord.The aim of this study was to observe the effects of sevoflurane on pain processing at the spinal level. Methods: The firing of the gastrocnemius muscle was evoked by electrical stimulation to the ipsilateral hindpaw in rats. The nociceptive C response of electromyography (EMG)was selected to study. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.1 mg/kg) and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.4 mg/kg) were administered intravenously, either in the presence or in the absence of 1.0% sevoflurane. Results: In rats with transected spinal cord,sevoflurane produced a profound reduction in the C response in a dose- and timedependent manner. In the presence of 1.0% sevoflurane, the C responses were increased after injections of bicuculline and naloxone. Conclusion: Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that acts directly on the spinal cord to suppress the nociceptive reflex. The sevoflurane-induced suppression of the C response is antagonized by either bicuculline or naloxone. The results suggest that spinal GABAA receptors and opioid peptide receptors are involved in the sevoflurane-induced suppression of spinal nociception.

  18. Studies toward bivalent κ opioids derived from salvinorin A: heteromethylation of the furan ring reduces affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Munro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent crystal structure of the κ-opioid receptor (κ-OR revealed, unexpectedly, that the antagonist JDTic is a bivalent ligand: in addition to the orthosteric pocket occupied by morphinans, JDTic also occupies a distinct (allotopic pocket. Mutagenesis data suggest that salvinorin A (1 also binds to this allotopic pocket, adjacent to the aspartate residue that anchors the basic nitrogen atom of classical opiates (Asp138. It has been suggested that an H-bond donor appended to 1 might interact with Asp138, increasing affinity. Such a bivalent ligand might also possess altered functional selectivity. Based on modeling and known N-furanylmethyl opioid antagonists, we appended H-bond donors to the furan ring of 1. (Dimethylaminomethyl groups at C-15 or C-16 abolished affinity for κ-OR. Hydroxymethylation at C-16 was tolerated, but 15,16-bis-hydroxymethylation was not. Since allosteric modulators may go undetected in binding assays, we also tested these and other low-affinity derivatives of 1 for allosteric modulation of dynorphin A in the [35S]GTPγS assay. No modulation was detected. As an alternative attachment point for bivalent derivatives, we prepared the 2-(hydroxyethoxymethyl ether, which retained high affinity for κ-OR. We discuss alternative design strategies for linked, fused or merged bivalent derivatives of 1.

  19. Studies toward bivalent κ opioids derived from salvinorin A: heteromethylation of the furan ring reduces affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Thomas A; Xu, Wei; Ho, Douglas M; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Cohen, Bruce M

    2013-12-20

    The recent crystal structure of the κ-opioid receptor (κ-OR) revealed, unexpectedly, that the antagonist JDTic is a bivalent ligand: in addition to the orthosteric pocket occupied by morphinans, JDTic also occupies a distinct (allotopic) pocket. Mutagenesis data suggest that salvinorin A (1) also binds to this allotopic pocket, adjacent to the aspartate residue that anchors the basic nitrogen atom of classical opiates (Asp138). It has been suggested that an H-bond donor appended to 1 might interact with Asp138, increasing affinity. Such a bivalent ligand might also possess altered functional selectivity. Based on modeling and known N-furanylmethyl opioid antagonists, we appended H-bond donors to the furan ring of 1. (Dimethylamino)methyl groups at C-15 or C-16 abolished affinity for κ-OR. Hydroxymethylation at C-16 was tolerated, but 15,16-bis-hydroxymethylation was not. Since allosteric modulators may go undetected in binding assays, we also tested these and other low-affinity derivatives of 1 for allosteric modulation of dynorphin A in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay. No modulation was detected. As an alternative attachment point for bivalent derivatives, we prepared the 2-(hydroxyethoxy)methyl ether, which retained high affinity for κ-OR. We discuss alternative design strategies for linked, fused or merged bivalent derivatives of 1.

  20. Role of 2',6'-dimethyl-l-tyrosine (Dmt) in some opioid lead compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Marzola, Erika; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Marczak, Ewa D; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Salvadori, Severo

    2010-08-15

    Here we evaluated how the interchange of the amino acids 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt), 2',6'-difluoro-L-tyrosine (Dft), and tyrosine in position 1 can affect the pharmacological characterization of some reference opioid peptides and pseudopeptides. Generally, Dft and Tyr provide analogues with a similar pharmacological profile, despite different pK(a) values. Dmt/Tyr(Dft) replacement gives activity changes depending on the reference opioid in which the modification was made. Whereas, H-Dmt-Tic-Asp *-Bid is a potent and selective delta agonist (MVD, IC(50)=0.12nM); H-Dft-Tic-Asp *-Bid and H-Tyr-Tic-Asp *-Bid are potent and selective delta antagonists (pA(2)=8.95 and 8.85, respectively). When these amino acids are employed in the synthesis of deltorphin B and its Dmt(1) and Dft(1) analogues, the three compounds maintain a very similar delta agonism (MVD, IC(50) 0.32-0.53 nM) with a decrease in selectivity relative to the Dmt(1) analogue. In the less selective H-Dmt-Tic-Gly *-Bid the replacement of Dmt with Dft and Tyr retains the delta agonism but with a decrease in potency. Antagonists containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore do not support the exchange of Dmt with Dft or Tyr.

  1. YFa and analogs: Investigation of opioid receptors in smooth muscle contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishan Kumar; Ritika Goyal; Annu Mudgal; Anita Mohan; Santosh Pasha

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacological profile and inhibition of smooth muscle contraction by YFa and its analogs in conjunction with their receptor selectivity. METHODS: The effects of YFa and its analogs (D-Ala2) YFa, Y (D-Ala2) GFMKKKFMRF amide and Des-Phe- YGGFMKKKFMR amide in guinea pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) motility were studied using an isolated tissue organ bath system, and morphine and DynA (1-13) served as controls. Acetylcholine was used for muscle stimulation. The observations were validated by specific antagonist pretreatment experiments using naloxonazine, naltrindole and norbinaltorphimine norBNI. RESULTS: YFa did not demonstrate significant inhibition of GPI muscle contraction as compared with morphine (15% vs 62%, P = 0.0002), but moderate inhibition of MVD muscle contraction, indicating the role of κ opioid receptors in the contraction. A moderate inhibition of GPI muscles by (Des-Phe) YFa revealed the role of anti-opiate receptors in the smooth muscle contraction. (D-Ala-2) YFa showed significant inhibition of smooth muscle contraction, indicating the involvement of mainly d receptors in MVD contraction. These results were supported by specific antagonist pretreatment assays. CONCLUSION: YFa revealed its side-effect-free analgesic properties with regard to arrest of gastrointestinal transit. The study provides evidences for the involvement of κ and anti-opioid receptors in smooth muscle contraction.

  2. Possible Opioid Shopping and Its Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Weatherby, Lisa B; Cepeda, M Soledad; Bradford, Daniel; Yuan, Yingli

    2017-01-31

    We created an operational definition of possible opioid shopping in US commercial health insurance data and examined its correlates. The population consisted of 264,204 treatment courses in persons with a fill for an opioid or diuretic prescription in 2012 and a second within 18 months. We examined counts of prescribers and pharmacies and the numbers of fills and overlaps for ability to discriminate courses of opioids from diuretics, which were a negative control. The most discriminatory measure, indicating possible shopping behavior, was cross-tabulated against other prescriptions filled and diagnoses as found in insurance claims. The associations between claims characteristics and shopping behavior were assessed in a logistic regression. A definition that classified possible "moderate" or "extensive" shopping when a person obtained drug through at least three practices and at least three pharmacies over 18 months was highly discriminatory between opioid and diuretic treatment. Overlaps between fills and number of fills did not improve the discrimination. Data from insurance claims strongly predicted moderate-to-extensive levels of possible shopping (c=0.82). Prominent among 20 significant predictors were: state of residence; amount of opioid dispensed; self-payment; use of non-specialist prescribers; high use of anxiolytics, hypnotics, psychostimulants and antipsychotics; use of both immediate release (IR) and extended-release or long-acting (ER/LA) opioids. The use of three or more prescribing practices and three or more dispensing pharmacies over 18 months sharply discriminated courses of opioid treatment from courses of diuretics. This pattern of fills was additionally associated with the numbers of non-specialist and self-paid fills, the total MEQ dispensed and heavier use of drugs for anxiety, sleep, attention and psychosis.

  3. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  4. δ-阿片受体抑制阿片诱发痛觉过敏的研究进展%The role of δ- opioid receptor in the inhibition of opioid induced hyperalgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李依泽; 王海云; 王国林

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are the most powerful analgesics for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.Although opioids have analgesic effect,they have many side effects at the same time.Long term opioids exposure can induce hyperalgesia and tolerance.Moreover,increasing the dose of opioids,paradoxically,aggravates the hyperalgesia and tolerance,causing a vicious cycle.The use of opioids,therefore,is largely limited in the clinical setting. Objective The relevant literatures involved in the role of δ-opioid receptors in the attenuation of opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH) in recent years were summarized,which helps readership to update the latest information about this topic. Content The structure,distribution,physiological function and the progress of antihyperalgesic effect of δ-opioid receptors were reviewed in this article.Those researches suggest that OIH and tolerance can be attenuated by the inhibition of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation,knocking out δ-opioid receptor coding genes and the application of δ-opioid receptor antagonists. Trend Since the antihyperalgesia effect of δ-opioid receptor is widely acknowledged,δ- opioid receptor may become a new target to relieve pain in the clinical setting.%背景 阿片类药物是治疗中、重度疼痛的主要药物,长时间应用可出现阿片诱发的痛觉过敏和耐受,而增加药物剂量可造成更严重的痛觉过敏和耐受,从而形成恶性循环,很大程度上限制了阿片类药物在临床工作中的应用.目的 通过对近年δ-阿片受体在痛觉过敏中所起作用的研究进行总结,帮助读者了解国外相关研究的最新趋势和进展.内容 就δ-阿片受体的结构、分布、生理功能和δ-阿片受体的抗痛觉过敏作用的研究进展进行综述.得出如下结论,通过抑制δ-阿片受体磷酸化、敲除δ-阿片受体编码基因和应用δ-阿片受体拮抗剂等方法,可抑制痛觉过敏和耐受的形成.趋向 随着越来越多的学者对

  5. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders.

  6. Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167269.html Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life ... when it comes to long-term use of opioid painkillers, cutting back on the dose of the ...

  7. Half of Opioid Prescriptions Go to People with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167031.html Half of Opioid Prescriptions Go to People With Mental Illness Those ... disorders receive a troubling percentage of the nation's opioid prescriptions, a new study finds. Of the 115 ...

  8. Ending U.S. Opioid Abuse Epidemic Will Take Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167176.html Ending U.S. Opioid Abuse Epidemic Will Take Years: Report Expert panel ... wide-ranging "action plan" to combat the U.S. opioid abuse epidemic warn there's no quick fix. Needed ...

  9. U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167050.html U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High: CDC And ... THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescriptions for opioid painkillers have dropped since 2010 in the United ...

  10. Allostatic Mechanisms of Opioid Tolerance Beyond Desensitization and Downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Catherine M; Walwyn, Wendy; Taylor, Anna M W; Pradhan, Amynah A A; Evans, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Mechanisms of opioid tolerance have focused on adaptive modifications within cells containing opioid receptors, defined here as cellular allostasis, emphasizing regulation of the opioid receptor signalosome. We review additional regulatory and opponent processes involved in behavioral tolerance, and include mechanistic differences both between agonists (agonist bias), and between μ- and δ-opioid receptors. In a process we will refer to as pass-forward allostasis, cells modified directly by opioid drugs impute allostatic changes to downstream circuitry. Because of the broad distribution of opioid systems, every brain cell may be touched by pass-forward allostasis in the opioid-dependent/tolerant state. We will implicate neurons and microglia as interactive contributors to the cumulative allostatic processes creating analgesic and hedonic tolerance to opioid drugs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. What You Need to Know When Prescribed an Opioid Painkiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Need to Know When Prescribed an Opioid Painkiller Tell your doctor if you or anyone in ... doctor or other health care provider prescribes opioid painkillers such as Oxycontin, Vicodin, codeine and morphine, the ...

  12. Lithium attenuated the behavioral despair induced by acute neurogenic stress through blockade of opioid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaloo, Pegah; Sadeghi, Banafshe; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Zolfagharie, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-10-01

    Major depressive disorder is disease with high rate of morbidity and mortality. Stressful events lead to depression and they can be used as a model of depression in rodents. In this study we aimed to investigate whether lithium modifies the stressed-induced depression through blockade of opioid receptors in mice. We used foot shock stress as stressor and forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) to evaluation the behavioral responses in mice. We also used naltrexone hydrochloride (as opioid receptor antagonist), and morphine (as opioid receptor agonist). Our results displayed that foot-shock stress significantly increased the immobility time in TST and FST but it could not change the locomotor behavior in OFT. When we combined the low concentrations of lithium and naltrexone a significant reduction in immobility time was seen in the FST and TST in comparison with control foot-shock stressed group administered saline only. Despite the fact that our data showed low concentrations of lithium, when administered independently did not significantly affect the immobility time. Also our data indicated that concurrent administration of lithium and naltrexone had no effect on open field test. Further we demonstrated that simultaneous administration of morphine and lithium reverses the antidepressant like effect of active doses of lithium. Our data acclaimed that we lithium can augment stressed-induced depression and opioid pathways are involved in this action.

  13. Delta opioid receptor on equine sperm cells: subcellular localization and involvement in sperm motility analyzed by computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacalandra Giovanni M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides act not only in the control of nociceptive pathways, indeed several reports demonstrate the effects of opiates on sperm cell motility and morphology suggesting the importance of these receptors in the modulation of reproduction in mammals. In this study we investigated the expression of delta opioid receptors on equine spermatozoa by western blot/indirect immunofluorescence and its relationship with sperm cell physiology. Methods We analyzed viability, motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and mitochondrial activity in the presence of naltrindole and DPDPE by means of a computer assisted sperm analyzer and a fluorescent confocal microscope. The evaluation of viability, capacitation and acrosome reaction was carried out by the double CTC/Hoechst staining, whereas mitochondrial activity was assessed by means of MitoTracker Orange dye. Results We showed that in equine sperm cells, delta opioid receptor is expressed as a doublet of 65 and 50 kDa molecular mass and is localized in the mid piece of tail; we also demonstrated that naltrindole, a delta opioid receptor antagonist, could be utilized in modulating several physiological parameters of the equine spermatozoon in a dose-dependent way. We also found that low concentrations of the antagonist increase sperm motility whereas high concentrations show the opposite effect. Moreover low concentrations hamper capacitation, acrosome reaction and viability even if the percentage of cells with active mitochondria seems to be increased; the opposite effect is exerted at high concentrations. We have also observed that the delta opioid receptor agonist DPDPE is scarcely involved in affecting the same parameters at the employed concentrations. Conclusions The results described in this paper add new important details in the comprehension of the mammalian sperm physiology and suggest new insights for improving reproduction and for

  14. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF OPIOID DRUG ABUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carballo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prescription of opioid analgesics is related to increased rates of opioid abuse and the negative consequences of medication misuse. Several international health organisations recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary patient assessment for the duration of the opioid treatment in order to identify and prevent medication abuse. Due to the lack of specific clinical guidelines in the Spanish National Health System, the aim of this paper is to present a proposal for psychological assessment based on the main psychological tools currently available for assessing opioid abuse. The assessment guidelines have been established based on the psychological variables that can predict and prolong the abuse, classifying all of the variables depending on the current stage of the therapeutic process for each patient. Although there are instruments with good psychometric properties, further research is necessary to adapt, translate and validate these instruments for use in the Spanish population. Future studies are also needed to investigate intervention and prevention strategies in depth in order to reduce the likelihood of abuse in patients treated with opioids.

  15. Medical cannabis and chronic opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M

    2010-12-01

    Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of cannabis for medical purposes. A small, high-quality literature supports the efficacy of medical cannabis for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The smoked botanical product, however, is associated with a number of adverse medical and psychiatric consequences. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that acute use of cannabis results in impairment of every important metric related to the safe operation of a motor vehicle. Epidemiological data show associations between recent cannabis use and both psychomotor impairment and motor vehicle crashes, associations that are strengthened by the concomitant use of alcohol and other central nervous system depressants. Finally, data from pain clinics reveals an unusually high prevalence of cannabis use in nearly all age groups and an association between cannabis use and opioid and other substance misuse. Based on available data and expert opinion, concomitant use of cannabis and opioids is an absolute contraindication to the operation of a motor vehicle. In patients who use cannabis and are prescribed opioids, heightened vigilance for opioid- and other substance-related problems is warranted. It is appropriate to refrain from prescribing opioids to individuals using medical cannabis if there is reasonable suspicion that the combination will pose a risk to the patient or others.

  16. When medications make pain worse: opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2011-08-01

    Opioid medications are commonly used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. While these medications are generally an effective means of pain control, they can, in rare cases, actually exacerbate the pain. This paradoxical reaction is called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Patients experiencing OIH may benefit from decreasing or discontinuing the opioid, switching to an alternative opioid, and/or using a nonopioid medication for pain.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of opioid growth factor and its receptor in tongue epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagon, Ian S; Ruth, Torre B; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions of the opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met(5)]-enkephalin, and opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) in the epithelium of the rat tongue were determined in order to reveal structure-function relationships. Laser scanning confocal microscopic analysis showed that both OGF and OGFr were colocalized in the paranuclear cytoplasm and in the nuclei of keratinocytes in the stratum basale. Using immunoelectron microscopy and postembedding techniques, double labeling experiments disclosed that complexes of OGF-OGFr were colocalized on the outer nuclear envelope, in the paranuclear cytoplasm, perpendicular to the nuclear envelope in a putative nuclear pore complex, and in the nucleus adjacent to heterochromatin. Anti-OGF IgG alone was detected in the cytoplasm, and anti-OGFr IgG alone was associated with the outer nuclear envelope. Study of chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), which blocks opioid-receptor binding, revealed the presence of OGFr immunoreactivity alone in the cytoplasm and the nucleus; some OGF-OGFr complexes were also observed. Colocalization of OGFr and karyopherin (importin) beta was recorded in the cytoplasm and nucleus. These results in tongue epithelium are the first to suggest that OGFr resides on the outer nuclear envelope, where OGF interacts with OGFr; that the OGF-OGFr complex translocates between cytoplasm and nucleus at the nuclear pore; and that the nuclear localization signal of OGFr interacts with karyopherin beta for nuclear transport. These novel data also indicate that signal transduction for cell proliferation appears to involve an OGF-OGFr complex that interfaces with chromatin in the nucleus. Moreover, the unique finding that OGFr was found in the cytoplasm and nucleus in NTX-treated specimens may suggest that NTX-OGFr complexes have the same pathway as OGF-OGFr.

  18. Enkephalins modulate inhibitory neuromuscular transmission in circular muscle of human colon via delta-opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, C H; Kamm, M A; Burnstock, G; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    1. A sucrose-gap technique was used to investigate the neuromodulatory actions of enkephalins on non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) in the circular muscle of the human large intestine. 2. The native enkephalins, [Leu5]enkephalin (LENK) and [Met5]enkephalin (MENK) caused a concentration-dependent reduction in amplitude of IJPs without a significant effect on the smooth muscle membrane. 3. The actions of LENK and MENK were mimicked by the delta-selective opioid receptor agonists [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE) and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE). 4. The actions of LENK, MENK and DPDPE were antagonized to similar extents by the delta-selective opioid receptor antagonist ICI 174,864. 5. The mu-selective opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, Me Phe, Gly-ol5]enkephalin was approximately 100-fold less potent than any of the native or synthetic enkephalins at reducing the amplitude of the IJP. Dynorphin A and beta-endorphin both had very weak activity. 6. Responses to all of the agonists were inhibited by naloxone. The degree of antagonism of DPDPE or DADLE by naloxone (1 microM) was the same as that of LENK or MENK. 7. Neither MENK nor LENK affected hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle membrane induced by ATP or 5-hydroxytryptamine. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (1 pM-1 microM) did not produce any observable responses and this lack of reactivity was not affected by the enkephalins. 8. It is concluded that in the circular muscle of the human colon, LENK and MENK can act on prejunctional delta-opioid receptors to produce inhibition of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory neuromuscular transmission. Possible physiological significance of this prejunctional receptor is discussed. PMID:1966052

  19. A novel, potent, oral active and safe antinociceptive pyrazole targeting kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Walker, Cristiani I B; Oliveira, Sara M; Rosa, Fernanda; Tonello, Raquel; Silva, Cássia R; Machado, Pablo; Boligon, Aline A; Martins, Marcos A P; Zanatta, Nilo; Bonacorso, Hélio G; Athayde, Margareth L; Rubin, Maribel A; Calixto, João B; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-10-01

    Pyrazole compounds are an intriguing class of compounds with potential analgesic activity; however, their mechanism of action remains unknown. Thus, the goal of this study was to explore the antinociceptive potential, safety and mechanism of action of novel 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives, which were designed by molecular simplification, using in vivo and in vitro methods in mice. First, tree 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives (DMPE, MPFE, and MPCIE) were tested in the capsaicin test and all presented antinociceptive effect; however the MPClE (methyl 5-trichloromethyl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxylate) was the most effective. Thus, we selected this compound to assess the effects and mechanisms in subsequent pain models. MPCIE produced antinociception when administered by oral, intraperitoneal, intrathecal and intraplantar routes and was effective in the capsaicin and the acetic acid-induced nociception tests. Moreover, this compound reduced the hyperalgesia in diverse clinically-relevant pain models, including postoperative, inflammatory, and neuropathic nociception in mice. The antinociception produced by orally administered MPClE was mediated by κ-opioid receptors, since these effects were prevented by systemically pre-treatment with naloxone and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Moreover, MPCIE prevented binding of the κ-opioid ligand [(3)H]-CI-977 in vitro (IC₅₀ of 0.68 (0.32-1.4) μM), but not the TRPV1 ([(3)H]-resiniferatoxin) or the α₂-adrenoreceptor ([(3)H]-idazoxan) binding. Regarding the drug-induced side effects, oral administration of MPClE did not produce sedation, constipation or motor impairment at its active dose. In addition, MPCIE was readily absorbed after oral administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPClE is a novel, potent, orally active and safe analgesic drug that targets κ-opioid receptors.

  20. Enhanced Neurohypophyseal Vasopressin Release is Associated with Increased Opioid Inhibition of Oxytocin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijning, B J; Herik, I K; Rots, N Y; Greidanus, T B

    1991-02-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis of a cross-inhibition of oxytocin (OT) release by endogenous opioid peptides co-released with vasopressin (VP). This opioid cross-inhibition resulted in a selective block of OT release and hence in preferential release of VP. The effects of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone were tested on neurohypophyseal VP release during dehydration, ethanol administration and sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S) application, assuming that the inhibition of pituitary OT release by endogenous opioids increases as neurohypophyseal VP output increases. A high VP output was found to coincide with increased inhibition of OT release: Subcutaneous injection of graded doses of naloxone (30 min prior to decapitation), augmented OT plasma levels significantly more in 24 h water-deprived male rats than in normally hydrated rats. Naloxone had no effect on VP release. Ethanol (10% in saline) administered intragastrically 50 min prior to decapitation and 20 min before subcutaneous naloxone (5 mg/kg) resulted in the inhibition of VP output. The ethanol treatment resulted in a rise in plasma OT levels that was additional to the effect of naloxone. These features were present in normally hydrated as well as in 24 h water-deprived animals, but were more pronounced in the latter group. Peripheral CCK-8S administration induces an abrupt and selective secretion of OT. Blocking the opioid inhibition of OT release with naloxone resulted in a significant rise of OT compared to that with CCK-8S alone. The magnitude of the opioid inhibition coincided with the activity of the VP system, and a higher dose of naloxone was needed to potentiate the CCK-8S effect on OT release in the water-deprived group than in euhydrated rats. No effect of CCK-8S and/or naloxone was found on VP plasma levels. The data indicate that opioid peptides co-released with VP (like dynorphin) may be responsible for cross-inhibition of OT release during dehydration. This suggests that

  1. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  2. Parent and Metabolite Opioid Drug Concentrations in Unintentional Deaths Involving Opioid and Benzodiazepine Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Marcia D; Abate, Marie A; Hu, Lan; Long, D Leann; Blommel, Matthew L; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2015-07-01

    Effects of benzodiazepines on postmortem opioid parent and parent/metabolite blood concentration ratios were determined for fentanyl-, hydrocodone-, methadone-, or oxycodone-related accidental deaths. These opioids are partially metabolized by the CYP3A4 enzyme system, which is also affected by diazepam and alprazolam. Opioid/metabolite combinations examined were as follows: fentanyl/norfentanyl, hydrocodone/dihydrocodeine, methadone/EDDP, and oxycodone/oxymorphone. Parent opioid concentrations were analyzed for 877 deaths. Parent/metabolite concentration ratios were analyzed for 349 deaths, excluding cases with co-intoxicants present known to interfere with opioid elimination. Alprazolam in combination with diazepam significantly decreased median hydrocodone concentrations by 48% (p = 0.01) compared to hydrocodone alone. The methadone parent/metabolite concentration ratio was reduced by 35% in the presence of diazepam compared to methadone alone (p = 0.03). Benzodiazepines did not statistically significantly affect fentanyl or oxycodone concentrations. Possible factors affecting opioid concentrations and possible toxicity development, including any differential effects on specific opioids, should continue to be explored.

  3. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Den Abt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria. Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used

  4. Prevention of Stimulant-Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Broadcast emails, images and text for Facebook advertising , and a Facebook Ad Landing Page (the internet webpage that will open if potential subject...clicks on the Facebook advertisement ). AME 15 IRB Approval: 9/19/13 Added: Olivia Bogucki, Stephannie Furtak, Brittany Hughes, Tara

  5. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  6. Prevalence of Opioid Dispensings and Concurrent Gastrointestinal Medications in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Williams

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioids are frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain. A side effect of opioid usage is the inhibition of gastrointestinal (GI motility, known as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD. OBD is typically treated prophylactically with laxatives and/or acid suppressants.

  7. Deficiency in the Opioid Hypotheses of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This commentary critiques two papers by Curt Sandman, pointing out interpretive problems in models explaining self-injurious behavior in terms of opioids. Withdrawal effects are emphasized as an alternative to hypotheses asserting congenital opioid excess as a cause of sensory depression or an addiction to a relative excess of opioid activity in…

  8. In vivo opioid receptor heteromerization: where do we stand?

    OpenAIRE

    Massotte, D

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors are highly homologous GPCRs that modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration, including autonomous, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. Opioid receptors functionally interact in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms involving direct receptor–receptor interactions, affecting signalling pathways or engaging different neuronal circuits, remain unsolved. Heteromer formation through direct physical interaction between two opioid receptors or between an opioi...

  9. The Opioid Crisis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current issue contents The Opioid Crisis Follow us The Opioid Crisis Photo: AdobeStock BY THE NUMBERS - Opioid misuse and addiction is a major ... drug. They include strong prescription pain relievers and the illegal drug heroin. Millions of Americans suffer from ...

  10. Deficits in social perception in opioid maintenance patients, abstinent opioid users and non-opioid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Skye; Darke, Shane; Kaye, Sharlene; Torok, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to compare emotion perception and social inference in opioid maintenance patients with abstinent ex-users and non-heroin-using controls, and determine whether any deficits in could be accounted for by cognitive deficits and/or risk factors for brain damage. Case-control. Sydney, Australia. A total of 125 maintenance patients (MAIN), 50 abstinent opiate users (ABST) and 50 matched controls (CON). The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) was used to measure emotion perception and social inference. Measures were also taken of executive function, working memory, information processing speed, verbal/non-verbal learning and psychological distress. After adjusting for age, sex, pre-morbid IQ and psychological distress, the MAIN group was impaired relative to CON (β = -0.19, P perception and relative to CON (β = -0.25, P social inference. In neither case did the CON and ABST groups differ. For both emotion perception (P social inference (P perception (β = -0.44, P social inference (β = -0.48, P perception and ability to make inferences about social situations. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-04

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds.

  12. Molecular modeling study of the differential ligand-receptor interaction at the μ, δ and κ opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filizola, Marta; Carteni-Farina, Maria; Perez, Juan J.

    1999-07-01

    3D models of the opioid receptors μ, δ and κ were constructed using BUNDLE, an in-house program to build de novo models of G-protein coupled receptors at the atomic level. Once the three opioid receptors were constructed and before any energy refinement, models were assessed for their compatibility with the results available from point-site mutations carried out on these receptors. In a subsequent step, three selective antagonists to each of three receptors (naltrindole, naltrexone and nor-binaltorphamine) were docked onto each of the three receptors and subsequently energy minimized. The nine resulting complexes were checked for their ability to explain known results of structure-activity studies. Once the models were validated, analysis of the distances between different residues of the receptors and the ligands were computed. This analysis permitted us to identify key residues tentatively involved in direct interaction with the ligand.

  13. The endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists endomorphins 1 and 2 have novel hypotensive activity in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, H C; Zadina, J E; Kastin, A J; Hackler, L; Ge, L J; Kadowitz, P J

    1997-06-27

    The endogenous peptides endomorphins 1 and 2 are newly isolated, potent, and selective mu-opioid receptor agonists. In the present study, responses to the endomorphin peptides were investigated in the systemic vascular bed of the rabbit. Endomorphins 1 and 2 induced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure when injected in doses of 1-30 nmol/kg i.v. In terms of relative vasodepressor activity, endomorphins 1 and 2 were similar to the ORL1 receptor ligand, nociceptin (Orphanin FQ), and met-enkephalin in decreasing systemic arterial pressure. Vasodepressor responses to endomorphins 1 and 2 were inhibited by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, in a dose of 2 mg/kg i.v. These results demonstrate that endomorphins 1 and 2 have significant naloxone-sensitive, vasodepressor activity in the rabbit.

  14. Involvement of mu opioid receptors of periaqueductal gary (PAG) in acupuncture inhibition of noxious blood pressure response in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M; Xu, W; Chen, W; He, L

    1994-01-01

    Strong electric shock stimulation of the rabbit front paw elicited a pressor blood pressure response regarded as noxious response. Ligands of mu opioid receptors were microinjected into the PAG to observe their effects on acupunture inhibition of the pressor response. (1) Ohmefentanyl (OMF), a mu agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor response. Mu antagonist TCTAP greatly enhanced the pressor response. (2) Electroacupuncture (EA) significantly inhibited the pressor response, the inhibition being readily reversed by TCTAP. The response after TCTAP was significantly greater than that of the control before EA. The results suggest that noxious stimulation is able to activate the mu opioid receptor of the PAG to modulate the noxious response and EA is able to enhance the activation.

  15. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg(-1) ), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg(-1) ) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg(-1) ) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg(-1) ) and diazepam (1 mg·kg(-1) ). Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The

  16. N-terminal guanidinylation of TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe) peptides results in major changes of the opioid activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Chung, Nga N; Wilkes, Brian C; Schiller, Peter W

    2013-09-15

    Derivatives of peptides of the TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe; Tic=1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) family containing a guanidino (Guan) function in place of the N-terminal amino group were synthesized in an effort to improve their blood-brain barrier permeability. Unexpectedly, N-terminal amidination significantly altered the in vitro opioid activity profiles. Guan-analogues of TIPP-related δ opioid antagonists showed δ partial agonist or mixed δ partial agonist/μ partial agonist activity. Guanidinylation of the mixed μ agonist/δ antagonists H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) and H-Dmt-TicΨ[CH2NH]Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2[Ψ]) converted them to mixed μ agonist/δ agonists. A docking study revealed distinct positioning of DIPP-NH2 and Guan-DIPP-NH2 in the δ receptor binding site. Lys(3)-analogues of DIPP-NH2 and DIPP-NH2[Ψ] (guanidinylated or non-guanidinylated) turned out to be mixed μ/κ agonists with δ antagonist-, δ partial agonist- or δ full agonist activity. Compounds with some of the observed mixed opioid activity profiles have therapeutic potential as analgesics with reduced side effects or for treatment of cocaine addiction.

  17. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  18. Effects of selective and non-selective inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase on morphine- and endomorphin-1-induced analgesia in acute and neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Wioletta; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Zychowska, Magdalena; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be involved in the mechanisms of pain generation throughout the nervous system. We examined the effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on the antinociceptive effects of morphine and endomorphin-1 during acute pain and in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-exposed rats. We used N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-selective NOS inhibitor; 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) or 1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-imidazole (TRIM), selective inhibitors of neuronal NOS (NOS1); and 1400W dihydrochloride, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (NOS2). Morphine (0.5-2.5 μg) and endomorphin-1 (2.5-20 μg) in acute pain and morphine (10-40 μg) and endomorphin-1 (5-20 μg) after CCI-injury were combined with NOS inhibitors. For acute pain, the ED50 for endomorphin-1 (7.1 μg) was higher than that of morphine (1.3 μg) in the tail-flick test. For neuropathic pain, the ED50 value for morphine was much higher (43.2 μg) than that of endomorphin-1 (9.2 μg) in von Frey test. NOS inhibitors slightly influenced pain thresholds in both pain models. Moreover, in neuropathic pain, the effects of morphine were more potentiated by L-NAME, TRIM, 7-NI and 1400W (12×, 8.6×, 4.1× and 5.3×, respectively) than were the effects of endomorphin-1 (2.7×, 4.3×, 3.4× and 2.1×, respectively) in the von Frey test. Minocycline which is known to enhance the efficiency of morphine in neuropathic pain, decreased the mRNA expression of NOS1 in the DRG and NOS2 and C1q in the spinal cord after CCI. Both NOS2 and IBA-1 protein levels in the spinal cord and NOS1, NOS2 and IBA1 protein levels in DRG decreased after minocycline administration. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that both neuronal and non-neuronal NOS/NO pathways contribute to the behavioural pain responses evoked by nerve injury. The NOS inhibitors regardless of the type of pain enhanced morphine antinociception and, to a lesser extent, altered the

  19. Prescription Opioid Analgesics Commonly Unused After Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Long, Jane J; Pronovost, Peter J; Alexander, G Caleb; Wu, Christopher L

    2017-08-02

    Prescription opioid analgesics play an important role in the treatment of postoperative pain; however, unused opioids may be diverted for nonmedical use and contribute to opioid-related injuries and deaths. To quantify how commonly postoperative prescription opioids are unused, why they remain unused, and what practices are followed regarding their storage and disposal. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception to October 18, 2016, for studies describing opioid oversupply for adults after a surgical procedure. The primary outcome-opioid oversupply-was defined as the number of patients with either filled but unused opioid prescriptions or unfilled opioid prescriptions. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed the study quality. Six eligible studies reported on a total of 810 unique patients (range, 30-250 patients) who underwent 7 different types of surgical procedures. Across the 6 studies, 67% to 92% of patients reported unused opioids. Of all the opioid tablets obtained by surgical patients, 42% to 71% went unused. Most patients stopped or used no opioids owing to adequate pain control, and 16% to 29% of patients reported opioid-induced adverse effects. In 2 studies examining storage safety, 73% to 77% of patients reported that their prescription opioids were not stored in locked containers. All studies reported low rates of anticipated or actual disposal, but no study reported US Food and Drug Administration-recommended disposal methods in more than 9% of patients. Postoperative prescription opioids often go unused, unlocked, and undisposed, suggesting an important reservoir of opioids contributing to nonmedical use of these products, which could cause injuries or even deaths.

  20. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  1. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  2. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LHRH ANTAGONISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGDun-Ren; XIAOShao-Bo

    1989-01-01

    An ideal antagonist of LHRH is one which can act on the pitutary to inhibit LHRH-stimulatod LH / FSH secretion by competitive occupying the LHRH receptor in the pitutary gland. Its action should be very specific, fast and highly effective, the durations

  4. To Make Opioid Painkiller without Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Opioid analgesics such as morphine are the most powerful and widely-used drugs to relieve pain in clinical treatment. They largely work through the μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, alleviating the perception of pain. But repeated application of the drugs within a certain period of time could lead to side-effects, like addiction and tolerance. In order to develop new effective painkillers with less side-effects, researchers strive to have a deeper understanding of the mechanism responsible for the analgesic efficacy of the drugs and the formation of their adverse effects.

  5. Structural comparisons of meptazinol with opioid analgesics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Jing-lai HAO; Yun TANG; Yan CHEN; Zhui-bai QIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of action of a potent analgesic, (±)-meptazinol.Methods: The structures of meptazinol enantiomers were compared with opioid pharmacophore and tramadol. Results: Neither enantiomer of meptazinol fitted any patterns among the opioid pharmacophore and tramadol, although they did share some structural and pharmacological similarities. However, the structure superpositions implied that both enantiomers of meptazinol might share some similar analgesic mechanisms with typical opiate analgesics. Conclusion:Meptazinol should have a different mechanism of action to known analgesics,which would be helpful in further investigations of meptazinol in the search for non-addictive analgesics.

  6. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  7. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoa; Maga, Matthew; Pradhan, Amynah; Evans, Christopher J; Maidment, Nigel T; Hales, Tim G; Walwyn, Wendy

    2011-04-12

    Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2) augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca²+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2⁻/⁻ and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  8. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  9. Potent delta-opioid receptor agonists containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Guerrini, Remo; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-12-01

    Conversion of delta-opioid receptor antagonists containing the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore into potent delta-agonists required a third heteroaromatic nucleus, such as 1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) and a linker of specified length both located C-terminally to Tic in the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(R)-R'. The distance between Tic and Bid is a determining factor responsible for the acquisition of delta agonism (2, 2', 3, 4, 6) or delta antagonism (8). Compounds containing a C-terminal Ala (1, 1'), Asp (5), or Asn (7) with an amide (1, 1', 5) or free acid group (7) served as delta-antagonist controls lacking the third heteroaromatic ring. A change in chirality of the spacer (2, 2') or inclusion of a negative charge via derivatives of Asp (4, 6) resulted in potent delta agonism and moderate mu agonism, although delta-receptor affinity decreased about 10-fold for 4 while mu affinity fell by over 2 orders of magnitude. Repositioning of the negative charge in the linker altered activity: H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(CH(2)-Bid)COOH (6) maintained high delta affinity (K(i) = 0.042 nM) and delta agonism (IC(50) = 0.015 nM), but attachment of the free acid group to Bid [H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-Bid(CH(2)-COOH) (9)] reconstituted delta antagonism (K(e) = 0.27 nM). The data demonstrate that a linker separating the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and Bid, regardless of the presence of a negative charge, is important in the acquisition of opioids exhibiting potent delta agonism and weak mu agonism from a parent delta antagonist.

  10. Liquid chromatography-electrospray linear ion trap mass spectrometry analysis of targeted neuropeptides in Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords reveals significant lower concentration of opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Mouna; Beaudry, Francis

    2015-08-01

    Tachykinin and opioid peptides play a central role in pain transmission, modulation and inhibition. The treatment of pain is very important in medicine and many studies using NK1 receptor antagonists failed to show significant analgesic effects in humans. Recent investigations suggest that both pronociceptive tachykinins and the analgesic opioid systems are important for normal pain sensation. The analysis of opioid peptides in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues offers a great opportunity to verify the influence of the tachykinin system on specific opioid peptides. The objectives of this study were to develop an HPLC-MS/MRM assay to quantify targeted peptides in spinal cord tissues. Secondly, we wanted to verify if the Tac1(-/-) mouse endogenous opioid system is hampered and therefore affects significantly the pain modulatory pathways. Targeted neuropeptides were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Our results reveal that EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A were down-regulated in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues. Interestingly, Dyn A was almost 3 fold down-regulated (p<0.0001). No significant concentration differences were observed in mouse Tac1(-/-) spinal cords for Met-Enk and CGRP. The analysis of Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords revealed noteworthy decreases of EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A concentrations which strongly suggest a significant impact on the endogenous pain-relieving mechanisms. These observations may have insightful impact on future analgesic drug developments and therapeutic strategies.

  11. Opioid receptors: toward separation of analgesic from undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ping-Yee; Reggio, Patricia H; Loh, Horace H

    2013-06-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor hetero-oligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics.

  12. Opioid Receptors: Toward Separation of Analgesic from Undesirable Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, P.Y.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Loh, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor heterooligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics PMID:23598157

  13. Development and preliminary validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie-Barrus, Patricia; Averill, Lynnette A; Sudweeks, Richard R; Averill, Christopher L; Mota, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid drug abuse has reached epidemic proportions. Individuals with chronic pain represent a large population at considerable risk of abusing opioids. The Opioid Abuse Risk Screener was developed as a comprehensive self-administered measure of potential risk that includes a wide range of critical elements noted in the literature to be relevant to opioid risk. The creation, refinement, and preliminary modeling of the item pool, establishment of preliminary concurrent validity, and the determination of the factor structure are presented. The initial development and validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener shows promise for effective risk stratification.

  14. Development and preliminary validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Henrie-Barrus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid drug abuse has reached epidemic proportions. Individuals with chronic pain represent a large population at considerable risk of abusing opioids. The Opioid Abuse Risk Screener was developed as a comprehensive self-administered measure of potential risk that includes a wide range of critical elements noted in the literature to be relevant to opioid risk. The creation, refinement, and preliminary modeling of the item pool, establishment of preliminary concurrent validity, and the determination of the factor structure are presented. The initial development and validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener shows promise for effective risk stratification.

  15. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: cardiovascular effects of opioids and their receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; Pepe, Salvatore; Peart, Jason N

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators within the cardiovascular system, implicated in modulation of electrophysiological function, heart rate, myocardial inotropy, vascular function, and cellular stress resistance. The opioid system is also involved in cardiovascular development, adaptation to injury and effects of advanced age. The significant roles of opioids are emphasized by the observation that the heart produces prodynorphin and proenkephalin, which are enzymatically processed from small to large active polypeptides. Indeed, depending on species, cardiac preproenkephalin mRNA levels are comparable to or higher than those found in the central nervous system. This review highlights and discusses current knowledge and recent findings regarding physiological and pathophysiological modulation of the heart and vessels by the opioid receptor system.

  16. Comparison of the Risks of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse Between Tapentadol and Oxycodone and Association of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Kihm, Mary A.; Mastrogiovanni, Greg; Yuan, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared the risks of opioid shopping behavior and opioid abuse between tapentadol immediate release and oxycodone immediate release and, to validate the definition of shopping, examined the association between opioid shopping and opioid abuse further. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study using linked dispensing and diagnosis databases followed opioid-naive patients for development of shopping behavior and/or opioid abuse during 1 year after initial ex...

  17. Combining opioid and adrenergic mechanisms for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2014-07-01

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent medical problem in the United States. Although opioids and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have demonstrated efficacy for relief of chronic pain, each has risks of adverse events in patients. Because of the risk of opioid abuse and addiction, combinations reducing opioid requirements are particularly valuable. Opioid and SNRI agents relieve pain by different pathways; concurrent use of each agent separately offers many potential benefits: complementary and possibly synergistic analgesic efficacy, separate titrations of opioid and SNRI effects, and the reduction of opioid requirements. However, few clinical studies have investigated the ideal ratios for combinations of opioids and SNRIs. A number of factors affect whether specific combinations have additive, synergistic, less than additive efficacy, or increase adverse events in patients, including general pharmacokinetic considerations, the potential for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, dose, and timing. Because there is little clinical evidence guiding combination therapy with separate opioid and SNRI agents, using single-molecule agents provides safe and effective therapy and should be the first option presented to patients. The use of empiric combinations of separate opioid and SNRI combinations needs to be considered in light of clinical cautions, including the lack of published evidence to guide dose conversion from any opioid to tramadol or to tapentadol, and vice versa; the need to avoid combinations with known drug interactions; and the need to titrate the dose when adding an SNRI to an opioid, and vice versa.

  18. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  19. Secular trends in opioid prescribing in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezalla, Edmund J; Rosen, David; Erensen, Jennifer G; Haddox, J David; Mayne, Tracy J

    2017-01-01

    Opioid abuse and misuse in the USA is a public health crisis. The use of prescription opioid analgesics increased substantially from 2002 through 2010, then plateaued and began to decrease in 2011. This study examined prescriptions of branded and generic immediate- and extended-release opioid analgesics from 1992 to 2016. This was juxtaposed against state and federal policies designed to decrease overutilization and abuse, as well as the launch of new opioid products, including opioids with abuse-deterrent properties (OADPs). The data indicate that these health policies, including the utilization and reimbursement of OADPs, have coincided with decreased opioid utilization. The hypothesis that OADPs will paradoxically increase opioid prescribing is not supported.

  20. Secular trends in opioid prescribing in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezalla, Edmund J; Rosen, David; Erensen, Jennifer G; Haddox, J David; Mayne, Tracy J

    2017-01-01

    Opioid abuse and misuse in the USA is a public health crisis. The use of prescription opioid analgesics increased substantially from 2002 through 2010, then plateaued and began to decrease in 2011. This study examined prescriptions of branded and generic immediate- and extended-release opioid analgesics from 1992 to 2016. This was juxtaposed against state and federal policies designed to decrease overutilization and abuse, as well as the launch of new opioid products, including opioids with abuse-deterrent properties (OADPs). The data indicate that