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Sample records for non-selective muscarinic receptor

  1. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  2. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

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    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  3. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

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    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  4. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

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    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  5. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

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    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  6. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

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    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS IN GUINEA-PIG UTERUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOODS, HN; WILLIM, KD; BODDEKE, HWGM; ENTZEROTH, M

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the muscarinic receptor present in guinea-pig uterus smooth muscle the affinities of a series of 27 muscarinic receptor antagonists for M1 (rat cortex), M2 (rat heart), M3 (rat submandibular gland), m4 (transfected in CHO cells) and muscarinic binding sites in guinea-pig uterus

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN RAT PROSTATE

    OpenAIRE

    Pontari, M.A.; LUTHIN, G. R.; Braverman, A. S.; Ruggieri, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the individual lobes of the rat prostate. Immunoprecipitation was performed on homogenates of these 3 lobes using antibodies to the m1-m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays (RT-PCR) were also performed using primers specific for each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5). The susceptibility of the receptors to degradation by endogenous prostate proteas...

  9. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  10. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In animal cells, action of acetylcholine depends on its binding with its two specific receptors on the plasma membrane: the nicotinic and muscarinic respectively. The present investigation has shown that agonists of muscarinic receptor (muscarine) could induce stomatal opening, while the antagonists (atropine) could block stomatal opening induced by acetylcholine. Their effects can only be realized in medium containing Ca2+, but not in medium containing K+. The results tend to reveal that the muscarinic receptor is involved in acetylcholine-induced stomatal movement.

  12. Evidence of paired M2 muscarinic receptors

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    Potter, L.T.; Ballesteros, L.A.; Bichajian, L.H.; Ferrendelli, C.A.; Fisher, A.; Hanchett, H.E.; Zhang, R. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Binding assays involving various antagonists, including N-(3H) methylscopolamine, (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate, AFDX-116, pirenzepine, and propylbenzilylcholine mustard, disclosed only a single population of M2 muscarinic receptors in membranes from the rat brainstem (medulla, pons, and colliculi). However, competition curves between N-(3H)methylscopolamine and various agonists, including oxotremorine, cis-dioxolane, and acetylethylcholine mustard, showed approximately equal numbers of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity (H) sites and guanine nucleotide-insensitive low affinity (L) sites. This 50% H phenomenon persisted in different buffers, at different temperatures, after the number of receptors was halved (and, thus, the remaining receptor to guanine nucleotide-binding protein ratio was doubled), after membrane solubilization with digitonin, and when rabbit cardiac membranes were used instead of rat brainstem membranes. Preferential occupation of H sites with acetylethylcholine mustard, and of L sites with quinuclidinyl benzilate or either mustard, yielded residual free receptor populations showing predominantly L and H sites, respectively. Low concentrations of (3H)-oxotremorine-M labeled only H sites, and the Bmax for these sites was 49% of the Bmax found with (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate plus guanine nucleotide. These and other results are most consistent with the idea that H and L receptor sites exist on separate but dimeric receptor molecules and with the hypothesis that only the H receptors cycle between high and low affinity, depending upon interactions between this receptor molecule and a guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

  13. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

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    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  14. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

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    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  15. Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain.

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    Nukina,Itaru

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors were studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS using 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the rat CNS had a single 3H-QNB binding site with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 5.0 X 10(-10 M. Li+, Zn++ and Cu++ had strong effects on 3H-QNB binding which indicates that these metal ions might play important roles at muscarinic ACh receptor sites in the brain. Since antidepressants and antischizophrenic drugs displaced the binding of 3H-QNB, the anticholinergic effects of these drugs need to be taken into account when they are applied clinically. The muscarinic ACh receptor was successfully solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine. By gel chromatography, with a Sepharose 6B column, the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor molecule eluted at the fraction corresponding to a Stokes' radius of 6.1 nm. With the use of sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular weight of the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor was determined to be about 90,000 daltons. The regional distribution of 3H-QNB binding in rat brain was examined, and the highest level of 3H-QNB binding was found to be in the striatum followed by cerebral cortex and hippocampus, indicating that muscarinic ACh mechanisms affect CNS function mainly through these areas.

  16. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  17. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

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    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  18. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

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    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. (Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  19. Muscarinic receptor signaling in the pathophysiology of asthma and COPD

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    Zaagsma Johan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anticholinergics are widely used for the treatment of COPD, and to a lesser extent for asthma. Primarily used as bronchodilators, they reverse the action of vagally derived acetylcholine on airway smooth muscle contraction. Recent novel studies suggest that the effects of anticholinergics likely extend far beyond inducing bronchodilation, as the novel anticholinergic drug tiotropium bromide can effectively inhibit accelerated decline of lung function in COPD patients. Vagal tone is increased in airway inflammation associated with asthma and COPD; this results from exaggerated acetylcholine release and enhanced expression of downstream signaling components in airway smooth muscle. Vagally derived acetylcholine also regulates mucus production in the airways. A number of recent research papers also indicate that acetylcholine, acting through muscarinic receptors, may in part regulate pathological changes associated with airway remodeling. Muscarinic receptor signalling regulates airway smooth muscle thickening and differentiation, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, acetylcholine and its synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, are ubiquitously expressed throughout the airways. Most notably epithelial cells and inflammatory cells generate acetylcholine, and express functional muscarinic receptors. Interestingly, recent work indicates the expression and function of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils is increased in COPD. Considering the potential broad role for endogenous acetylcholine in airway biology, this review summarizes established and novel aspects of muscarinic receptor signaling in relation to the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma and COPD.

  20. Binding of tropane alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeller, T; Sporer, F; Sauerwein, M; Wink, M

    1995-07-01

    Fourteen tropane and related alkaloids were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The biogenetic intermediates littorine, 6 beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine, 7 beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine exhibit similar affinities at the muscarinic receptor as scopolamine and atropine. The quarternary derivatives N-methylatropine and N-methylscopolamine show the highest binding with IC50 values of less than 100 pM and 300 pM, respectively. The tropane alkaloids (including cocaine) also bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, albeit with much lower affinities.

  1. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Wymke Ockenga; Ritva Tikkanen

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimul...

  2. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

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    Large, T.H.; Cho, N.J.; De Mello, F.G.; Klein, W.L.

    1985-07-25

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed.

  3. Identification of M1 muscarinic receptors in pulmonary sympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig by use of pirenzepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclagan, J.; Fryer, A. D.; Faulkner, D.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of pirenzepine, a muscarinic antagonist considered to be selective for M1 receptors, was studied on bronchoconstriction and bradycardia elicited by preganglionic stimulation of the parasympathetic vagal nerves and by i.v. injections of acetylcholine (ACh) in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. 2. Pirenzepine was equipotent in the heart and lung as an antagonist of the effects of i.v. ACh at postjunctional muscarinic receptors. Doses of pirenzepine in excess of 1 mumol kg-1 abolished all muscarinic responses consistent with non-selective blockade of M3 receptors on airway smooth muscle and M2 receptors on atrial cells. 3. In the lung, low doses of pirenzepine (1-100 nmol kg-1) increased vagally-induced bronchoconstriction despite concurrent partial blockade of the postjunctional receptors. This suggests blockade of neuronal muscarinic receptors. 4. Propranolol (1 mg kg-1) increased control bronchoconstrictor responses elicited by ACh and vagal stimulation but did not alter the potency of pirenzepine for postjunctional receptors in heart or lung. However, pirenzepine-induced enhancement of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction was abolished by propranolol, suggesting that pirenzepine may be an antagonist for muscarinic receptors located in the sympathetic nerves innervating airway smooth muscle. 5. These results confirm that bronchoconstrictor stimuli indirectly initiate activation of an opposing sympathetic reflex in the guinea-pig lung. This response is facilitated by muscarinic receptors located in the sympathetic nervous pathway. 6. The high potency of pirenzepine for the neuronal receptors in the sympathetic nerves suggests that these are M1 receptors. In contrast, the parasympathetic nerves innervating airway smooth muscle in this species contain M2 receptors which inhibit neurotransmission. PMID:2758228

  4. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

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    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  5. Interaction between muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin C. Michel

    2012-01-01

    In many tissues the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system regulate smooth musc tone via their transmitters aeetylcholine and noradrenaline, respectively. Direct smooth musc e e effects of acetylcholine via muscarinic receptors always promote contraction, but non-neuronal sources can importantly contribute to such stimulation. Direct smooth muscle effects of noradren- aline can promote contraction via al- and sometimes also α2-adrenoceptors but can promote re- laxation and inhibit contraction via β-adrenoceptors. I will focus on the interaction between sub- types of muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors, largely using the urinary bladder as an exam- ple.

  6. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  7. Muscarinic receptors stimulate cell proliferation in the human urothelium-derived cell line UROtsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Lucente, Alessandra; Michel, Martin C; Zani, Danilo; Simeone, Claudio; Cunico, Sergio Cosciani; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    The widespread non-neuronal synthesis of acetylcholine (ACh) has changed the paradigm of ACh acting solely as a neurotransmitter. Indeed, the presence of ACh in many types of proliferating cells suggests a role for this neurotransmitter in the control of cell division. The parasympathetic system is a major pathway regulating micturition, but ACh-mediated control plays a more complex role than previously described, acting not only in the detrusor muscle, but also influencing detrusor function through the activity of urothelial muscarinic receptors. Here we investigated the role of muscarinic receptors in mediating cell proliferation in the human UROtsa cell line, which is a widely used experimental model to study urothelium physiology and pathophysiology. Our results demonstrate that UROtsa cells express the machinery for ACh synthesis and that muscarinic receptors, with the rank order of M3>M2>M5>M1=M4, are present and functionally linked to their known second messengers. Indeed, the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) (1-100 μM) concentration-dependently raised IP(3) levels, reaching 66±5% over basal. The forskolin-mediated adenylyl cyclase activation was reduced by CCh exposure (forskolin: 1.4±0.14 pmol/ml; forskolin+100 μM CCh: 0.84±0.12 pmol/ml). CCh (1-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased UROtsa cell proliferation and this effect was inhibited by the non-selective antagonist atropine and the M(3)-selective antagonists darifenacin and J104129. Finally, CCh-induced cell proliferation was blocked by selective PI-3 kinase and ERK activation inhibitors, strongly suggesting that these intracellular pathways mediate, at least in part, the muscarinic receptor-mediated cell proliferation.

  8. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  9. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  10. Muscarinic receptor heterogeneity in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Garay, Edith; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Ionic current responses elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. ACh generated a fast chloride current (Fin) and inhibited K+ currents gated by cAMP (IK,cAMP) following receptor activation by adenosine, follicle-stimulating hormone or noradrenaline. These previously described cholinergic responses were confirmed to be of the muscarinic type, and were independently generated among follicles from different frogs.Inhibition of IK,cAMP was about 100 times more sensitive to ACh than Fin activation; the half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 6.6 ± 0.4 and 784 ± 4 nm, respectively.Both responses were blocked by several muscarinic receptor antagonists. Using the respective EC50 concentrations of ACh as standard, the antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide blocked the two effects with very different potencies. Fin was blocked with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.4 ± 0.07 nm, whilst the IC50 for IK,cAMP inhibition was 5.9 ± 0.2 μm.Oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, preferentially stimulated IK,cAMP inhibition (EC50= 15.8 ± 1.4 μm), whilst Fin was only weakly activated. In contrast, oxotremorine inhibited Fin generated by ACh with an IC50 of 2.3 ± 0.7 μm.Fin elicited via purinergic receptor stimulation was not affected by oxotremorine, indicating that the inhibition produced was specific to the muscarinic receptor, and suggesting that muscarinic actions do not exert a strong effect on follicular cell-oocyte coupling.Using reverse transcription-PCR, transcripts of a previously cloned muscarinic receptor from Xenopus (XlmR) were amplified from the RNA of both the isolated follicular cells and the oocyte. The pharmacological and molecular characteristics suggest that XlmR is involved in IK,cAMP inhibition.In conclusion, follicular cells possess two different muscarinic receptors, one resembling the M2 (or M4) subtype

  11. Activation and dynamic network of the M2 muscarinic receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yinglong; Nichols, Sara E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Metzger, Vincent T; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate cellular responses to various hormones and neurotransmitters and are important targets for treating a wide spectrum of diseases. Although significant advances have been made in structural studies of GPCRs, details of their activation mechanism remain unclear. The X-ray crystal structure of the M2 muscarinic receptor, a key GPCR that regulates human heart rate and contractile forces of cardiomyocytes, was determined recently in an inactive antagonist...

  12. The modulatory role of M2 muscarinic receptor on apomorphine-induced yawning and genital grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Nasello, Antonia Gladys

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of behavioral responses has been previously established. In the brain, M2 receptors are found predominantly in presynaptic cholinergic neurons as autoreceptors, and in dopaminergic neurons as heteroceptors, suggesting a control role of acetylcholine and dopamine release, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the role of M2 receptors on the yawning and genital grooming of rats induced by apomorphine, a dopaminergic receptor agonist, focusing on the interaction between cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways. Initially, the effect of atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, on yawning and genital grooming induced by apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.) was analyzed. Atropine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before induction of the behavioral responses by apomorphine. Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were quantified over a 60 min period. Apomorphine-induced yawning was increased by low dose (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) but not by high doses (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) of atropine. Genital grooming was antagonized by 2 mg/kg i.p. of atropine and showed no changes at the other doses tested. Tripitramine, a selective M2 cholinergic antagonist, was used as a tool for distinguishing between M2 and all other muscarinic receptor subtypes in yawning and genital grooming. Tripitramine doses of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 μmol/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.). Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were also quantified over a 60 min period. Tripitramine 0.01 μmol/kg increased all parameters. Higher doses, which possibly block all subtypes of muscarinic receptor, did not modify the response of apomorphine, suggesting a non-selective effect of tripitramine at these doses. Given that low doses of tripitramine increased the behavioral responses induced by apomorphine and that the main distribution of the M2

  13. Selectivity of oxomemazine for the M1 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S W; Woo, C W; Kim, J G

    1994-12-01

    The binding characteristics of pirenzepine and oxomemazine to muscarinic receptor were studied to evaluate the selectivity of oxomemazine for the muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat cerebral microsomes. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate([3H]QNB) determined from saturation isotherms was 64 pM. Analysis of the pirenzepine inhibition curve of [3H]QNB binding to cerebral microsome indicated the presence of two receptor subtypes with high (Ki = 16 nM, M1 receptor) and low (Ki = 400 nM, M3 receptor) affinity for pirenzepine. Oxomemazine also identified two receptor subtypes with about 20-fold difference in the affinity for high (Ki = 84 nM, OH receptor) and low (Ki = 1.65 microM, OL receptor) affinity sites. The percentage populations of M1 and M3 receptors to the total receptors were 61:39, and those of OH and OL receptors 39:61, respectively. Both pirenzepine and oxomemazine increased the KD value for [3H]QNB without affecting the binding site concentrations and Hill coefficient for the [3H]QNB binding. Oxomemazine had a 10-fold higher affinity at M1 receptors than at M3 receptors, and pirenzepine a 8-fold higher affinity at OH receptors than at OL receptors. Analysis of the shallow competition binding curves of oxomemazine for M1 receptors and pirenzepine for OL receptors yielded that 69% of M1 receptors were of OH receptors and the remaining 31% of OL receptors, and that 29% of OL receptors were of M1 receptors and 71% of M3 receptors. However, M3 for oxomemazine and OH for pirenzepine were composed of a uniform population. These results suggest that oxomemazine could be classified as a selective drug for M1 receptors and also demonstrate that rat cerebral microsomes contain three different subtypes of M1, M3 and the other site which is different from M1, M2 and M3 receptors.

  14. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

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    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Cross, R.S.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E. (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (USA))

    (3H)Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors.

  15. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in cilia-driven transport and airway epithelial development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Maike K.; Haberberger, Rainer V.; Hartmann, Petra; Faulhammer, Petra; Lips, Katrin S.; Krain, Benjamin; Wess, Jürgen; Kummer, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells drives the removal of mucus and particles from the airways. Mucociliary transport and possibly airway epithelial development are governed by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but the precise roles of the subtypes involved are unknown. This issue was addressed by determining cilia-driven particle transport, ciliary beat frequency, and the composition and ultrastructural morphology of the tracheal epithelium in M1–M5 muscarinic receptor gene-deficient mice. Knockout of M3 muscarinic receptors prevented an increase in particle transport speed and ciliary beat frequency in response to muscarine. Furthermore, the ATP response after application of muscarine was blunted. Pretreatment with atropine before application of muscarine restored the response to ATP. Additional knockout of the M2 receptor in these mice partially restored the muscarine effect most likely through the M1 receptor and normalized the ATP response. M1, M4, and M5 receptor deficient mice exhibited normal responses to muscarine. None of the investigated mutant mouse strains had any impairment of epithelial cellular structure or composition. In conclusion, M3 receptors stimulate whereas M2 receptors inhibit cilia-driven particle transport. The M1 receptor increases cilia-driven particle transport if the M3 and M2 receptor are missing. None of the receptors is necessary for epithelial development. PMID:19213795

  16. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  17. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  19. Muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in regulation of colonic motility in mice: functional studies using muscarinic receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takaji; Nakajima, Miwa; Teraoka, Hiroki; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Sei-ichi; Yamada, Masahisa; Kitazawa, Takio

    2011-11-16

    Although muscarinic M(2) and M(3) receptors are known to be important for regulation of gastric and small intestinal motility, muscarinic receptor subtypes regulating colonic function remain to be investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize muscarinic receptors involved in regulation of colonic contractility. M(2) and/or M(3) receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type mice were used in in vivo (defecation, colonic propulsion) and in vitro (contraction) experiments. Amount of feces was significantly decreased in M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice but not in M(2)R-KO mice. Ranking of colonic propulsion was wild-type=M(2)R-KO>M(3)R-KO>M(2)/M(3)R-KO. In vitro, the amplitude of migrating motor complexes in M(2)R-KO, M(3)R-KO and M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice was significantly lower than that in wild-type mice. Carbachol caused concentration-dependent contraction of the proximal colon and distal colon from wild-type mice. In M(2)R-KO mice, the concentration-contraction curves shifted to the right and downward. In contrast, carbachol caused non-sustained contraction and relaxation in M(3)R-KO mice depending on its concentration. Carbachol did not cause contraction but instead caused relaxation of colonic strips from M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice. 4-[[[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]oxy]-N,N,N-trimethyl-2-butyn-1-aminium chloride (McN-A-343) caused a non-sustained contraction of colonic strips from wild-type mice, and this contraction was changed to a sustained contraction by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-nitroarginine methylester (L-NAME). In the colon of M(2)/M(3)R-KO mice, McN-A-343 caused only relaxation, which was decreased by tetrodotoxin, pirenzepine and L-NAME. In conclusion, M(1), M(2) and M(3) receptors regulate colonic motility of the mouse. M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate cholinergic contraction, but M(1) receptors on inhibitory nitrergic nerves counteract muscarinic contraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Widespread decreases in cortical muscarinic receptors in a subset of people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Scarr, Elizabeth; Boer, Simone; Money, Tammie; Jeon, Won-Je; Felder, Chris; Dean, Brian

    2013-02-01

    These studies were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of cortical muscarinic receptor radioligand binding in muscarinic M(1) and M(4) receptor knockout mice and to determine whether a marked decrease in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in Brodmann's area (BA) 9 from a subset of people with schizophrenia was predictive of decreased muscarinic receptors in other central nervous system (CNS) regions. Our data show that, under the conditions used, [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was highly selective for the muscarinic M(1) receptor whereas both [(3)H]AF-DX 386 and [(3)H]4DAMP had less discriminatory power. In addition, the data suggest that a marked decrease in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in BA 9 from a subset of people with schizophrenia is predictive of decreases in muscarinic receptors in other CNS regions. However, there were some region-specific decreases in muscarinic receptors in tissue from people with schizophrenia who were outside this subset. These data add to a growing body of evidence suggesting there are widespread decreases in muscarinic receptors in the CNS of some subjects with schizophrenia, as demonstrated by neuroimaging. Our data have implications for understanding the potential clinical utility of drugs directed at the orthosteric and allosteric sites of muscarinic receptors to treat schizophrenia.

  1. CONDITIONAL INVOLVEMENT OF MUSCARINIC M(1) RECEPTORS IN VAGALLY MEDIATED CONTRACTION OF GUINEA-PIG BRONCHI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    The involvement of ganglionic muscarinic M(1) receptors in vagally induced bronchoconstriction in guinea-pig airways is controversial. Therefore, we studied the effects of the M(1)-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine on vagus nerve (VNS, preganglionic) and electrical field

  2. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus...... for cocaine addiction....

  3. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  4. Does pirenzepine distinguish between 'subtypes' of muscarinic receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelenyi, I.

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacological studies with pirenzepine were carried out on the isolated ileum and atrium of the guinea-pig and on the acid secretion from the isolated stomach of the mouse. Pirenzepine inhibited the bethanechol-evoked changes in all three organs in a dose-dependent manner. The slopes of the Schild-plots confirmed the competitive nature of the antagonism by pirenzepine. The estimated pA2-values were very similar. Based on these data, it might be concluded that pirenzepine is an anticholinoceptor compound without specific affinity for gastric muscarinic receptors. PMID:6897522

  5. Revisiting the endocytosis of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-05-12

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  6. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymke Ockenga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  7. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  8. Binding characteristics of the muscarinic receptor subtype in rabbit pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Zwam, A.J.; Willems, P.H.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; de Pont, J.J.; van Ginneken, C.A. (Catholic Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    The muscarinic receptor in the rabbit pancreas was characterized with the use of the labeled ligand ({sup 3}H)-(-)-quinuclidinyl-benzylate (({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB). Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB to pancreatic acini was found to be reversible and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 68 pmol/l and a receptor density (RT) of 170 fmol/mg protein. Agonist binding behaviour was investigated by displacement of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by eight agonists like arecoline, arecadine-propargylester (APE) and carbachol, yielding only low affinity binding sites. The inhibition of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by the selective antagonists pirenzepine, hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD) and (11-(2-(diethyl-amino)-methyl-1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyr ido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116) confirmed the M3 nature of the rabbit pancreatic receptor.

  9. Changing face of β2-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor therapies in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Nastasia V; Lougheed, M Diane; Fisher, John T

    2014-06-01

    Despite current available treatment options, a significant proportion of patients with asthma remain uncontrolled and asthma pharmacotherapy continues to evolve. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists play a major role as bronchodilators in asthma therapy, although new perspectives reflect the potential for bias G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways. Due to the success of muscarinic antagonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the elucidation that muscarinic receptors play a role in airway remodeling, muscarinic receptors represent an attractive therapeutic target in asthma. Although short-acting muscarinic antagonists are currently limited to their use in acute asthma and as alternative bronchodilators in individuals who experience side effects with β2-agonists, recent clinical trials indicate that the long-acting muscarinic antagonist, tiotropium, deserves consideration as a potential therapeutic agent for select populations. The continued evolution of anticholinergic therapy in asthma will require appropriately designed studies to assess mechanisms, efficacy and safety in asthma.

  10. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  11. Pharmacological properties of cloned muscarinic receptors expressed in A9 L cells; comparison with in vitro models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Buttini, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists at cloned m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in mouse fibroblast A9 L cells have been compared with their effects in in vitro models of M1(rat superior cervical ganglion) and M3(guinea-pig ileum) muscarinic receptors. A good

  12. Pharmacological properties of cloned muscarinic receptors expressed in A9 L cells; comparison with in vitro models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Buttini, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a series of muscarinic agonists and antagonists at cloned m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in mouse fibroblast A9 L cells have been compared with their effects in in vitro models of M1(rat superior cervical ganglion) and M3(guinea-pig ileum) muscarinic receptors. A good correl

  13. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  14. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  15. TRPC Channels Mediate a Muscarinic Receptor-Induced Afterdepolarization in Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Dun; Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors on pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex induces the appearance of a slow afterdepolarization that can sustain autonomous spiking after a brief excitatory stimulus. Accordingly, this phenomenon has been hypothesized to allow for the transient storage of memory traces in neuronal networks. Here we investigated the molecular basis underlying the muscarinic receptor-induced afterdepolarization using molecular biological and electrophysiological strategies. We find that the ability of muscarinic receptors to induce the inward aftercurrent underlying the slow afterdepolarization is inhibited by expression of a Gαq-11 dominant negative and is also markedly reduced in a phospholipase C β1 (PLCβ1) knock-out mouse. Furthermore, we show, using a genetically encoded biosensor, that activation of muscarinic receptor induces the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the Gαq-11/PLCβ1 cascade plays a key role in the ability of muscarinic receptors to signal the inward aftercurrent. We have shown previously that the muscarinic afterdepolarization is mediated by a calcium-activated nonselective cation current, suggesting the possible involvement of TRPC channels. We find that expression of a TRPC dominant negative inhibits, and overexpression of wild-type TRPC5 or TRPC6 enhances, the amplitude of the muscarinic receptor-induced inward aftercurrent. Furthermore, we find that coexpression of TRPC5 and T-type calcium channels is sufficient to reconstitute a muscarinic receptor-activated inward aftercurrent in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that TRPC channels mediate the muscarinic receptor-induced slow afterdepolarization seen in pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex and suggest a possible role for TRPC channels in mnemonic processes. PMID:19675237

  16. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS, with an unconditioned stimulus (US. The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB, can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila.

  17. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  18. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  19. Scopolamine administration modulates muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptor systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Keihan Falsafi

    Full Text Available Studies on the effect of scopolamine on memory are abundant but so far only regulation of the muscarinic receptor (M1 has been reported. We hypothesized that levels of other cholinergic brain receptors as the nicotinic receptors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, known to be involved in memory formation, would be modified by scopolamine administration.C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments and divided into four groups. Two groups were given scopolamine 1 mg/kg i.p. (the first group was trained and the second group untrained in the multiple T-maze (MTM, a paradigm for evaluation of spatial memory. Likewise, vehicle-treated mice were trained or untrained thus serving as controls. Hippocampal levels of M1, nicotinic receptor alpha 4 (Nic4 and 7 (Nic7 and subunit NR1containing complexes were determined by immunoblotting on blue native gel electrophoresis.Vehicle-treated trained mice learned the task and showed memory retrieval on day 8, while scopolamine-treatment led to significant impairment of performance in the MTM. At the day of retrieval, hippocampal levels for M1, Nic7 and NR1 were higher in the scopolamine treated groups than in vehicle-treated groups.The concerted action, i.e. the pattern of four brain receptor complexes regulated by the anticholinergic compound scopolamine, is shown. Insight into probable action mechanisms of scopolamine at the brain receptor complex level in the hippocampus is provided. Scopolamine treatment is a standard approach to test cognitive enhancers and other psychoactive compounds in pharmacological studies and therefore knowledge on mechanisms is of pivotal interest.

  20. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  1. Alterations of muscarinic receptor subtypes in pathways relating to memory: Effects of lesions and transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified pharmacologically into two distinct populations designated muscarinic type-one (M-1) and mscarinic type-two (M-2). The semiquantitative technique of receptor autoradiography was used to examine the anatomical and cellular distribution, and densities of M-1 and M-2 receptors in the rate brain. Muscarinic receptors were labeled with the classical antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Differentiation of the muscarinic subtypes was accomplished by competition studies of ({sup 3}H)QNB against the relatively selective M-1 antagonist pirenzepine (PZ), and the relatively selective M-2 antagonist, AFDX-116. In addition, M-1 and M-2 receptors were directly labeled with ({sup 3}H)PZ and ({sup 3}H)AFDX-116, respectively. Cholinergic pathways from the large cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) to the cortex and from the medial septum (MS) to the hippocampus were examined by lesioning with the selective cholinergic neurotoxin, AF64A. Bilateral cerebral cortical infarction was performed in order to analyze potential changes in muscarinic receptor populations in subcortical structures that are sensitive to cortical infarction. Finally, the response of muscarinic receptors to fetal septodiagonal band transplants in the deafferentated hippocampus was examined.

  2. Muscarinic receptor antagonists, from folklore to pharmacology; finding drugs that actually work in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Bart C; Fryer, Allison D

    2011-05-01

    In the lungs, parasympathetic nerves provide the dominant control of airway smooth muscle with release of acetylcholine onto M3 muscarinic receptors. Treatment of airway disease with anticholinergic drugs that block muscarinic receptors began over 2000 years ago. Pharmacologic data all indicated that antimuscarinic drugs should be highly effective in asthma but clinical results were mixed. Thus, with the discovery of effective β-adrenergic receptor agonists the use of muscarinic antagonists declined. Lack of effectiveness of muscarinic antagonists is due to a variety of factors including unwanted side effects (ranging from dry mouth to coma) and the discovery of additional muscarinic receptor subtypes in the lungs with sometimes competing effects. Perhaps the most important problem is ineffective dosing due to poorly understood differences between routes of administration and no effective way of testing whether antagonists block receptors stimulated physiologically by acetylcholine. Newer muscarinic receptor antagonists are being developed that address the problems of side effects and receptor selectivity that appear to be quite promising in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Stimulation of acid secretion and phosphoinositol production by rat parietal cell muscarinic M sub 2 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, A.; Rochlitz, H.; Herz, A.; Paumgartner, G. (Univ. of Munich (West Germany))

    1988-04-01

    The muscarinic receptor system involved in hydrogen production by enriched rat gastric parietal cells was investigated. Muscarinic receptor density determined by (N-methyl-{sup 3}H)scopolamine binding was 8,100/cell. The receptor appeared to be of the M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor subtype, since it had a low affinity (K{sub d} 189 nM) for the M{sub 1} receptor antagonist pirenzepine compared with atropine. Receptor activation by carbachol rapidly augmented levels of polyphosphoinositides, indicating an activation of phospholipase C. The dose-response relations for the increase in inositol phosphates closely paralleled the binding of carbachol to muscarinic receptors. The inositol phosphate response was antagonized by pirenzepine with a K{sub i} of 177 nM. the stimulation of inositol phosphate levels by carbachol correlated well with the stimulation of ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake, determine as an index of acid secretion. The muscarinic agonists oxotremorine, pilocarpine, and bethanechol elicited partial increases in inositol phosphates at maximal drug concentrations, and these partial increases correlated with their ability to stimulate ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake. These data indicate that inositolpolyphosphates may be a second messenger of M{sub 2} receptors stimulating acid secretion.

  4. Identification of M(1) muscarinic receptor subtype in rat stomach using a tissue segment binding method, and the effects of immobilization stress on the muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Morishima, Shigeru; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Takashi; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2008-12-03

    Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes widely distribute in stomach tissues and are involved in many physiological functions. Although mRNA of M(1) subtype was found in gastric mucosa, the M(1) subtype has not been detected by conventional membrane binding assays. In the present study, muscarinic receptor subtypes in the rat stomach were reevaluated by using the tissue segment binding technique recently developed to recognize the inherent/native profiles of receptors without receptor environment perturbation. [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bound to muscarinic receptors in the intact segments of rat gastric mucosa and muscle layers. The muscarinic receptors in the mucosal segments were composed of M(1), M(2) and M(3) subtypes, among which the M(1) subtype selectively showed high affinity for pirenzepine. However, in the membrane preparations, binding sites with high affinity for pirenzepine could not be detected. In the muscle layer, M(2) and M(3) subtypes, but not M(1), were identified in tissue segment and conventional membrane binding assays. Western blotting analysis recognized the M(1) subtype in the membrane preparations of mucosal but not muscle layers. Chronic immobilization stress increased the M(3) subtype in mucosal and muscle layers and decreased the M(2) subtype in the muscle layer, whereas M(1) and M(2) subtypes in mucosal layer did not change after the stress. The current study shows that M(1) subtype occurs as a pirenzepine-high affinity entity in intact segments of rat gastric mucosa, but that it loses the affinity for pirenzepine upon homogenization. Careful identification of native in vivo muscarinic receptors may further elucidate their functions in stomach.

  5. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, London (England))

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  6. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-05

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling.

  7. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  8. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  9. Effect of pirenzepine and gallamine on cardiac and pulmonary muscarinic receptors in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclagan, J.; Faulkner, D.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of muscarinic antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine) and for M2 receptors (gallamine) were studied on bronchoconstriction and bradycardia elicited by stimulation of the vagal nerves and by i.v. acetylcholine (ACh) in anaesthetized rabbits. 2. Pirenzepine was equipotent as an antagonist of ACh-induced responses at postjunctional muscarinic receptors in the heart, lung and blood vessels, whereas gallamine was at least ten times less potent at pulmonary and vascular muscarinic receptors. Thus, gallamine never caused complete inhibition of bronchoconstrictor or hypotensive responses to i.v. ACh, whereas doses of pirenzepine in excess of 1 mumol kg-1 abolished all muscarinic responses. 3. In the lung, both antagonists inhibited bronchoconstriction caused by vagal stimulation and ACh-induced bronchoconstriction to the same extent (pirenzepine, mean ED50 65 +/- 22 and, 130 +/- 28 nmol kg-1 respectively; gallamine, ED50 greater than 10,000 nmol kg-1 for both responses). Enhancement of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction was never observed. 4. In the heart, however, both pirenzepine and gallamine were ten times less potent as antagonists of vagally-induced bradycardia than of ACh-induced bradycardia. This differential blockade was unaltered by propranolol (1 mg kg-1) pretreatment. 5. It is concluded that there is no evidence for M1 or M2 muscarinic receptors in the pulmonary innervation of the rabbit and the potency of the antagonists in abolishing in abolishing vagally-induced bronchoconstriction was consistent with blockade of M3 muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle. 6. The results suggest that M2 muscarinic receptors may exert an inhibitory effect on transmission in the parasympathetic nerves innervating the heart in the rabbit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2758229

  10. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited

  11. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited b

  12. Molecular Probes for Muscarinic Receptors: Derivatives of the M1-Antagonist Telenzepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karton, Yishai; Baumgold, Jesse; Handen, Jeffrey S.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Functionalized congeners of the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist telenzepine (4,9-dihydro-3-methyl-4-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)acetyl]-10H-thieno[3,4–b][1,5]benzodiazepin-10-one) were developed and found to bind to the receptor with affinities (Ki values) in approximately the nanomolar range. The derivatives contain a 10-aminodecyl group, which provides a nucleophilic functionality for further derivatization. The attachment of a spacer chain to the distal piperazinyl nitrogen was based on previous findings of enhanced affinity at muscarinic receptors in an analogous series of alkylamino derivatives of pirenzepine [J. Med. Chem. (1991) 34, 2133–2145]. The telenzepine derivatives contain prosthetic groups for radioiodination, protein cross-linking, photoaffinity labeling, and fluorescent labeling and biotin for avidin complexation. The affinity for muscarinic receptors in rat forebrain (mainly m1 subtype) was determined in competitive binding assays vs [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. A (p-aminophenyl)-acetyl derivative for photoaffinity labeling had a Ki value of 0.29 nM at forebrain muscarinic receptors (16-fold higher affinity than telenzepine). A biotin conjugate displayed a Ki value of 0.60 nM at m2-receptors and a 5-fold selectivity versus forebrain. The high affinity of these derivatives makes them suitable for the characterization of muscarinic receptors in pharmacological and spectroscopic studies, for peptide mapping, and for histochemical studies. PMID:1520727

  13. Different antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Winand, J.; Christophe, J.

    1987-11-09

    The antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors were compared. In both tissues pirenzepine (PZ) had a low affinity for muscarinic receptors labelled by (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/)NMS) (K/sub D/ values of 140 and 280nM, respectively, in pancreatic and cardiac homogenates). The binding properties of pancreatic and cardiac receptors were, however, markedly different. This was indicated by different affinities for dicyclomine, (11-(/(2-((diethylamino)-methyl)-1-piperidinyl/acetyl)-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4) benzodiazepin-6-on)(AFDX-116), 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methobromide (4-DAMP) and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptros also showed different (/sup 3/H)NMS association and dissociation rates. These results support the concept of M2 receptor subtypes have different binding kinetic properties. 20 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  14. Affinity labeling of muscarinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with a photolabile antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, G; Avissar, S; Balderman, D; Sokolovsky, M

    1982-01-01

    Highly potent photoaffinity probes for muscarinic binding sites were prepared by the incorporation of an azido group into the benzilic acid moiety in two compound, 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3QNB) and N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (4NMPB). Inactivation of muscarinic sites in rat cortex depends on the formation of a reversible complex with the azides prior to their photolytic conversion to the highly reactive nitrenes. During photolysis, radiolabeled azido-4NMPB interacted specifically and with high affinity (Kd = 1.06 nM) with the muscarinic receptors, and the ligand could be covalently incorporated into a macromolecule of about 86,000 Mr, presumably the muscarinic receptor. The incorporation was almost stoichiometric when compared to determination of receptor density by reversible ligands. Atropine (10 microM) afforded specific protection (greater than 83%) of the receptor against inactivation by azido-[3H]4NMPB. This compound and the other ligands described here (i.e., amino-4NMPB, amino-3QNB, and azido-3QNB) represent powerful potential probes for the biochemical isolation and characterization of muscarinic receptors. Images PMID:6952181

  15. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  16. The binding of (3H)AF-DX 384 to rat ileal smooth muscle muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entzeroth, M.; Mayer, N. (Department of Biochemical Research, Dr. Karl Thomae GmbH Biberach (West Germany))

    1991-01-01

    The tritiated cardioselective muscarinic antagonist AF-DX 384 (5,11-dihydro-11-(2-(-(8-dipropylamino)methyl)-1-piperidinyl-ethyl-amino-carbonyl)-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4)benzodiazepin-6-one) was used to label muscarinic receptors in the rat ileum. Saturation binding to membrane suspensions revealed a high affinity binding site with a Kd of 9.2 nM. The maximal number of binding sites labeled in this tissue (Bmax) is 237 fmol/mg protein. The association and dissociation kinetics were well represented by single exponential reactions, and the dissociation constant obtained from the ratio of rate constants was in agreement with that derived from saturation experiments. Specific binding was inhibited by muscarinic antagonists with a rank order of potencies of atropine (pKi: 8.80) greater than 4-DAMP (pKi: 8.23) = AF-DX 384 (pKi: 8.20) greater than AF-DX 116 (pKi: 7.09) = hexahydro-sila-difenidol (pKi: 6.97) greater than pirenzepine (pKi: 6.49) and is consistent with the interaction of (3H)AF-DX 384 with muscarinic receptors of the M2 subtype. It can be concluded that (3H)AF-DX 384 can be used to selectively label M2 muscarinic receptors in heterogeneous receptor populations.

  17. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Gregory I. Mashanov; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and he...

  18. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  19. Cholinergic impact on neuroplasticity drives muscarinic M1 receptor mediated differentiation into neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninghoff, Jens; Rauh, Werner; Brantl, Victor; Schloesser, Robert J; Moessner, Rainald; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Rujescu, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that canonical neurotransmitters act as regulatory signals during neuroplasticity. Here, we report that muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmission stimulates differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro. Adult neural stem cells (ANSC) dissociated from the adult mouse hippocampus were expanded in culture with basic fibroblast growth factor (BFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Carbachol (CCh), an analog of acetylcholine (ACh) significantly enhanced de novo differentiation into neurons on bFGF- and EGF-deprived stem cells as shown by the percentage of TUJ1 positive cells. By contrast, pirenzepine (PIR), a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, reduced the generation of neurons. Activation of cholinergic signaling drives the de novo differentiation of uncommitted stem cells into neurons. These effects appear to be predominantly mediated via the muscarinic M1 receptor subtype.

  20. Muscarinic receptors involved in airway vascular leakage induced by experimental gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-Yao; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Hao; Advenier, Charles; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Devillier, Philippe

    2008-04-23

    Gastro-oesophageal acid reflux may cause airway responses such as cough, bronchoconstriction and inflammation in asthmatic patients. Studies in humans or in animals have suggested that these responses involve cholinergic nerves. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the efferent vagal component on airway microvascular leakage induced by instillation of hydrochloric acid (HCl) into the oesophagus of guinea-pigs and the subtype of muscarinic receptors involved. Airway microvascular leakage induced by intra-oesophageal HCl instillation was abolished by bilateral vagotomy or by the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium. HCl-induced leakage was inhibited by pretreatment with atropine, a non-specific muscarinic receptor antagonist, and also by pretreatment with either pirenzepine, a muscarinic M(1) receptor antagonist, or 4-DAMP, a muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist. Pirenzepine was more potent than atropine and 4-DAMP. These antagonists were also studied on airway microvascular leakage or bronchoconstriction induced by intravenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh). Atropine, pirenzepine and 4-DAMP inhibited ACh-induced airway microvascular leakage with similar potencies. In sharp contrast, 4-DAMP and atropine were more potent inhibitors of ACh-induced bronchoconstriction than pirenzepine. Methoctramine, a muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist, was ineffective in all experimental conditions. These results suggest that airway microvascular leakage caused by HCl intra-oesophageal instillation involves ACh release from vagus nerve terminals and that M(1) and M(3) receptors play a major role in cholinergic-mediated microvascular leakage, whereas M(3) receptors are mainly involved in ACh-induced bronchoconstriction.

  1. Enhanced muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in the corpus striatum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Jobin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, regulate the activities of central and peripheral functions through interactions with muscarinic receptors. Changes in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. Previous reports from our laboratory on streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats showed down regulation of muscarinic M1 receptors in the brainstem, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and pancreatic islets. In this study, we have investigated the changes of acetylcholine esterase (AChE enzyme activity, total muscarinic and muscarinic M1 receptor binding and gene expression in the corpus striatum of STZ – diabetic rats and the insulin treated diabetic rats. The striatum, a neuronal nucleus intimately involved in motor behaviour, is one of the brain regions with the highest acetylcholine content. ACh has complex and clinically important actions in the striatum that are mediated predominantly by muscarinic receptors. We observed that insulin treatment brought back the decreased maximal velocity (Vmax of acetylcholine esterase in the corpus striatum during diabetes to near control state. In diabetic rats there was a decrease in maximal number (Bmax and affinity (Kd of total muscarinic receptors whereas muscarinic M1 receptors were increased with decrease in affinity in diabetic rats. We observed that, in all cases, the binding parameters were reversed to near control by the treatment of diabetic rats with insulin. Real-time PCR experiment confirmed the increase in muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression and a similar reversal with insulin treatment. These results suggest the diabetes-induced changes of the cholinergic activity in the corpus striatum and the regulatory role of insulin on binding parameters and gene expression of total and muscarinic M1 receptors.

  2. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    studies indicate that the M(4) muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtype (mAChR) modulates the activity of the dopaminergic system and that this specific mAChR subtype is involved in mediating the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline. A specific neuronal subpopulation that expresses M(4) mAChRs together...... with D(1) dopamine receptors seems to be especially important in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors. Using mutant mice that lack the M(4) mAChR only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1-M4-KO), we investigated the role of this neuronal population in the antipsychotic-like effects...

  3. Pirenzepine Promotes the Dimerization of Muscarinic M1 Receptors through a Three-step Binding Process*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilien, Brigitte; Glasser, Nicole; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Didier, Pascal; Piemont, Etienne; Chinnappan, Raja; Daval, Sandrine B.; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Mely, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors is a complex process that involves sequential receptor conformational changes, ligand translocation, and possibly ligand-induced receptor oligomerization. Binding events at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are usually interpreted from radioligand binding studies in terms of two-step ligand-induced receptor isomerization. We report here, using a combination of fluorescence approaches, on the molecular mechanisms for Bodipy-pirenzepine binding to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused muscarinic M1 receptors in living cells. Real time monitoring, under steady-state conditions, of the strong fluorescence energy transfer signal elicited by this interaction permitted a fine kinetic description of the binding process. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed us to identify discrete EGFP lifetime species and to follow their redistribution upon ligand binding. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, with EGFP brightness analysis, showed that EGFP-fused muscarinic M1 receptors predominate as monomers in the absence of ligand and dimerize upon pirenzepine binding. Finally, all these experimental data could be quantitatively reconciled into a three-step mechanism, with four identified receptor conformational states. Fast ligand binding to a peripheral receptor site initiates a sequence of conformational changes that allows the ligand to access to inner regions of the protein and drives ligand-receptor complexes toward a high affinity dimeric state. PMID:19451648

  4. Pirenzepine promotes the dimerization of muscarinic M1 receptors through a three-step binding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilien, Brigitte; Glasser, Nicole; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Didier, Pascal; Piemont, Etienne; Chinnappan, Raja; Daval, Sandrine B; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Mely, Yves

    2009-07-17

    Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors is a complex process that involves sequential receptor conformational changes, ligand translocation, and possibly ligand-induced receptor oligomerization. Binding events at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are usually interpreted from radioligand binding studies in terms of two-step ligand-induced receptor isomerization. We report here, using a combination of fluorescence approaches, on the molecular mechanisms for Bodipy-pirenzepine binding to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused muscarinic M1 receptors in living cells. Real time monitoring, under steady-state conditions, of the strong fluorescence energy transfer signal elicited by this interaction permitted a fine kinetic description of the binding process. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed us to identify discrete EGFP lifetime species and to follow their redistribution upon ligand binding. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, with EGFP brightness analysis, showed that EGFP-fused muscarinic M1 receptors predominate as monomers in the absence of ligand and dimerize upon pirenzepine binding. Finally, all these experimental data could be quantitatively reconciled into a three-step mechanism, with four identified receptor conformational states. Fast ligand binding to a peripheral receptor site initiates a sequence of conformational changes that allows the ligand to access to inner regions of the protein and drives ligand-receptor complexes toward a high affinity dimeric state.

  5. Differential activation of nitric oxide synthase through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leirós, C P; Rosignoli, F; Genaro, A M; Sales, M E; Sterin-Borda, L; Santiago BordaE

    2000-03-15

    Muscarinic receptors play an important role in secretory and vasodilator responses in rat salivary glands. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) appears to be one of the multiple effectors coupled to muscarinic receptors in both submandibular and sublingual glands although some differences have been found depending on the gland studied. First, submandibular glands had a lower basal activity of nitric oxide synthase than sublingual glands and the concentration-response curve for carbachol was bell-shaped in the former but not in sublingual glands. Second, cGMP levels displayed a similar profile to that observed for NOS activity in both glands. Third, protein kinase C also coupled to muscarinic receptor activation in the glands might have a regulatory effect on nitric oxide production since its activity was higher in basal conditions in submandibular than sublingual glands and it also increased in the presence of the agonist at a concentration that inhibited NOS activity in submandibular glands. The effects appear to be partly related to the expression of a minor population of M(1) receptors in submandibular glands absent in sublingual as determined in binding and signaling experiments with the muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine.

  6. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  7. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alfredo; Crittenden, Elizabeth L; García, Dana M

    2004-01-01

    Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl) carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion. PMID:15251036

  8. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  9. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated effects in slices from human epileptogenic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, S; Wierschke, S; Lehmann, T-N; Horn, P; Dehnicke, C; Deisz, R A

    2012-10-25

    Acetylcholine has been implicated in higher cortical functions such as learning, memory and cognition, yet the cellular effects of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation are poorly understood in the human cortex. Here we investigated the effect of the mAChR agonist carbachol (CCh) and various mAChR antagonists in human cortical slices (from tissue removed during neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy) by intracellular and extracellular recordings. CCh increased neuronal firing, which was antagonised by atropine (non-selective mAChR antagonist) and pirenzepine (M(1)/M(4) mAChRs antagonist) when applied before or after CCh application. AF-DX 116 (M(2)/M(4) mAChRs antagonist) had no effect on CCh-induced increase of firing. CCh also reduced evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP), and the CCh-induced depression of EPSP was fully reversed by atropine. Pirenzepine reversed the depression of CCh on EPSP, but failed to prevent the depression when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 prevented the CCh-induced depression of evoked EPSP when applied before CCh. CCh also depressed GABAergic transmission and this effect was antagonised by AF-DX 116. Xanomeline (M(1)/M(4) mAChR agonist) increased neuronal firing and decreased EPSP, but had no effect on GABAergic transmission. Reduction (with linopirdine) and enhancement (with retigabine) of the M-current (mediated by K(V)7 channels), increased and decreased neuronal firing, respectively, but had marginal effects on the evoked EPSP. Our results indicate that three pharmacologically distinct mAChRs modulate neuronal firing, glutamatergic and GABAergic transmissions in the human epileptogenic neocortex. The data are discussed towards possible implications of altered mAChR signalling in hyperexcitability and cognitive functions in the human neocortex. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  11. Muscarinic receptor stimulation increases tolerance of rat salivary gland function to radiation damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, RP; Vissink, A; Zeilstra, LJW; Konings, AWT

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if muscarinic receptor-stimulated activation of the PLC/PIP2 second messenger pathway prior to irradiation increases the radiotolerance of rat salivary gland. Materials and methods: Rats were treated with pilocarpine, methacholine, reserpine, methacholine plus reserpine, or

  12. NO EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE OF MUSCARINIC M(2) RECEPTORS IN FUNCTIONAL ANTAGONISM IN BOVINE TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; MEURS, H; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1 The functional antagonism between methacholine- or histamine-induced contraction and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation was evaluated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle in vitro. In addition, the putative contribution of muscarinic M(2) receptors mediating inhibition of beta-adrenoceptor-induced

  13. Chronic treatment with simvastatin upregulates muscarinic M1/4 receptor binding in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Zengin, A; Ying, W; Newell, K A; Wang, P; Yeo, W; Wong, P T-H; Yenari, M A; Huang, X-F

    2008-06-26

    Statins are increasingly being used for the treatment of a variety of conditions beyond their original indication for cholesterol lowering. We previously reported that simvastatin affected the dopaminergic system in the rat brain. This study aims to investigate regional changes of muscarinic M1/4 receptors in the rat brain after 4-week administration of simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day). M1/4 receptor distribution and alterations in the post-mortem rat brain were detected by [(3)H]pirenzepine binding autoradiography. Simvastatin (1 mg/kg/day) increased [(3)H]pirenzepine binding, predominantly in the prefrontal cortex (171%, Ppirenzepine binding were observed in the examined regions following simvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) treatment. Our results also provide strong evidence that chronic simvastatin administration, especially at a low dosage, up-regulates M1/4 receptor binding, which is likely to be independent of its muscarinic agonist-like effect. Alterations in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in the examined brain areas may represent the specific regions that mediate the clinical effects of simvastatin treatment on cognition and memory via the muscarinic cholinergic system. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the critical roles of simvastatin in treating neurodegenerative disorders, via muscarinic receptors.

  14. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    ). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M...

  15. Muscarinic receptors on airway mesenchymal cells : Novel findings for an ancient target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; Zaagsma, Johan; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Since ancient times, anticholinergics have been used as a bronchodilator therapy for obstructive lung diseases. Targets of these drugs are G-protein-coupled muscarinic M-1, M-2 and M-3 receptors in the airways, which have long been recognized to regulate vagally-induced airway smooth muscle contract

  16. A new perspective on muscarinic receptor antagonism in obstructive airways diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Oenema, Tjitske A.; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine has traditionally only been regarded as a neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system, causing bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion in asthma and COPD by muscarinic receptor activation on airway smooth muscle and mucus-producing cells. Recent studies in experimental model

  17. Muscarinic receptor stimulation increases tolerance of rat salivary gland function to radiation damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, RP; Vissink, A; Zeilstra, LJW; Konings, AWT

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if muscarinic receptor-stimulated activation of the PLC/PIP2 second messenger pathway prior to irradiation increases the radiotolerance of rat salivary gland. Materials and methods: Rats were treated with pilocarpine, methacholine, reserpine, methacholine plus reserpine, or a

  18. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exerci...

  19. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... of drug addiction...

  20. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating vasoconstriction of human umbilical vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Lereis, Virginia Andrea; Hita, Francisco Javier; Gobbi, Mauro Darío; Verdi, Marcela Gomez; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempted to pharmacologically characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating contraction of human umbilical vein (HUV). HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves were constructed for acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50: 6.16±0.04; maximum response 80.00±1.98% of the responses induced by serotonin 10 μM). The absence of endothelium did not modify the contractile responses of ACh in this tissue. The role of cholinesterases was evaluated: neither neostigmine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) nor iso-OMPA (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) modified ACh responses. When both enzymes were simultaneously inhibited, a significantly but little potentiation was observed (control: pEC50 6.33±0.03; double inhibition: pEC50 6.57±0.05). Atropine, nonselective muscarinic receptors antagonist, inhibited ACh-induced contraction (pKB 9.67). The muscarinic receptors antagonists pirenzepine (M1), methoctramine (M2) and pFHHSiD (M3) also antagonized responses to ACh. The affinity values estimated for these antagonists against responses evoked by ACh were 7.58, 6.78 and 7.94, respectively. On the other hand, PD 102807 (M4 selective muscarinic receptors antagonist) was ineffective against ACh-induced contraction. In presence of a blocking concentration of pirenzepine, pFHHSiFD produced an additional antagonism activity on ACh-induced responses. The M1 muscarinic receptors agonist McN-A-343 produced similar maximum but less potent responses than ACh in HUV. The calculated pA2 for pirenzepine against McN-A-343 induced responses was 8.54. In conclusion, the data obtained in this study demonstrate the role of M1 muscarinic receptor subtypes and suggest the involvement of M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in ACh-induced vasoconstriction in HUV rings. In addition, the vasomotor activity evoked by ACh does not seem to be modulated by endothelial factors, and their enzymatic degradation appears to have little functional relevance in this

  1. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  2. Antagonism of nucleus accumbens M(2) muscarinic receptors disrupts operant responding for sucrose under a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousens, Graham A; Beckley, Jacob T

    2007-07-19

    Diverse cholinergic signaling mechanisms regulate the excitability of striatal principal neurons and modulate striatal-dependent behavior. These effects are mediated, in part, by action at muscarinic receptors (mAChR), subtypes of which exhibit distinct patterns of expression across striatal neuronal populations. Non-selective mAChR blockade within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been shown to disrupt operant responding for food and to inhibit food consumption. However, the specific receptor subtypes mediating these effects are not known. Thus, we evaluated effects of intra-NAc infusions of pirenzepine and methoctramine, mAChR antagonisits with distinct binding affinity profiles, on operant responding for sucrose reward under a progressive ratio (PR) reinforcement schedule. Moderate to high doses of methoctramine disrupted operant responding and reduced behavioral breakpoint. In contrast, pirenzepine failed to impact operant performance at any dose tested. Methoctramine failed to affect latencies to complete appetitive-consummatory response sequences or to impact measures of acoustic startle, suggesting that its' disruptive effects on operant behavior were not consequent to gross motor impairment. Since methoctramine has a greater affinity for M(2) receptors compared to pirenzepine, which has a greater relative affinity for M(1) and M(3) receptors, these findings suggest that M(2) mAChRs within the NAc regulate behavioral processes underling the acquisition of reward.

  3. Muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the mucosal response to neural stimulation of guinea pig ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, H.V.; Tien, X.Y.; Wallace, L.J.; Cooke, H.J.

    1987-09-01

    Muscarinic receptors involved in the secretory response evoked by electrical stimulation of submucosal neutrons were investigated in muscle-stripped flat sheets of guinea pig ileum set up in flux chambers. Neural stimulation produced a biphasic increase in short-circuit current due to active chloride secretion. Atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperadine methiodide (4-DAMP) (10/sup -7/ M) were more potent inhibitors of the cholinergic phase of the response than was pirenzepine. Dose-dependent increases in base-line short-circuit current were evoked by carbachol and bethanechol; 4-hydroxy-2-butynyl trimethylammonium chloride (McN A343) produced a much smaller effect. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of McN A343 but did not alter the responses of carbachol and bethanechol. McN A343 significantly reduced the cholinergic phase of the neurally evoked response and caused a rightward shift of the carbachol dose-response curve. All muscarinic compounds inhibited (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to membranes from muscosal scrapings, with a rank order of potency of 4-DAMP > pirenzepine > McN A343 > carbachol > bethanechol. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from submucosal neurons mediates chloride secretion by interacting with muscarinic cholinergic receptors that display a high binding affinity for 4-DAMP. Activation of neural muscarinic receptors makes a relatively small contribution to the overall secretory response.

  4. Anticholinesterase Effects on Number and Function of Brain Muscarinic Receptors and Central Cholinergic Activity: Drug Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-11

    chloride; pirenzepine ;scopolamine;N-methyL- scopolamine; McN-A-343; quinpiroLe; putative neurotransmitters;dopamine;noradrenaline; glutamate;serotonin... pirenzepine /( H)QNB competition experiments revealed the presence of two muscarinic receptor subtypes :-1, . . - the high affinity site,and M-2...also to occur through activation of the M-2 type, e.g. pretreatment with pirenzepine , a selective and potent M- 1 receptor antagonist failed to block

  5. Posttranslational modifications of human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor: zooming in its functional implications

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Fernández, Wilber

    2011-01-01

    The human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) regulates many important physiological roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, and it is involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, representing attractive potential pharmacological target for intervention. However, the lack of structural information on this receptor hampered the development of new potent antagonist with increased selectivity and lower side effects. Such structural inf...

  6. Muscarinic receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction is coupled to caveolae in murine airways

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenz, Heike; Kummer, Wolfgang; Jositsch, Gitte; Wess, Jürgen; Krasteva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic bronchoconstriction is mediated by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors (MR). In heart and urinary bladder, MR are linked to caveolin-1 or -3, the structural proteins of caveolae. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich, omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. They provide a scaffold for multiple G protein receptors and membrane-bound enzymes, thereby orchestrating signaling into the cell interior. Hence, we hypothesized that airway MR signaling pathways are coupled to caveolae as well...

  7. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  8. Autoantibodies against Muscarinic Receptors in Breast Cancer: Their Role in Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, María Gabriela; Negroni, María Pía; Pelegrina, Laura Tatiana; Castro, María Ester; Fiszman, Gabriel L.; Azar, María Eugenia; Morgado, Carlos Cresta; Sales, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis) mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10−8 M) and carbachol (10−9 M) increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression. PMID:23460876

  9. Autoantibodies against muscarinic receptors in breast cancer: their role in tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Lombardi

    Full Text Available The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10(-8 M and carbachol (10(-9 M increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression.

  10. Autoantibodies against muscarinic receptors in breast cancer: their role in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, María Gabriela; Negroni, María Pía; Pelegrina, Laura Tatiana; Castro, María Ester; Fiszman, Gabriel L; Azar, María Eugenia; Morgado, Carlos Cresta; Sales, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis) mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10(-8) M) and carbachol (10(-9) M) increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression.

  11. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  12. Muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation increases cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R.; Rieks, D.; Meurs, H.; Ninaber, D. K.; Rabe, K. F.; Nanninga, J.; Kolahian, S.; Halayko, A. J.; Hiemstra, P. S.; Zuyderduyn, S.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways and is known to cause bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine also regulates aspects of remodelling and inflammation through its action on muscarinic receptors. In the present

  13. Muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation increases cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R.; Rieks, D.; Meurs, H.; Ninaber, D. K.; Rabe, K. F.; Nanninga, J.; Kolahian, S.; Halayko, A. J.; Hiemstra, P. S.; Zuyderduyn, S.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways and is known to cause bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine also regulates aspects of remodelling and inflammation through its action on muscarinic receptors. In the present stu

  14. A novel muscarinic receptor-independent mechanism of KCNQ2/3 potassium channel blockade by Oxotremorine-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Reed, Hannah; Clarke, Sophie; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-11-15

    Inhibition of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been well established, and the ion currents through these channels have been long known as M-currents. We found that this cross-talk can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by co-transfection of human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptors and KCNQ2/3 potassium channels. Application of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist Oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M) between voltage pulses to activate KCNQ2/3 channels caused inhibition of the subsequent KCNQ2/3 responses. This effect of Oxo-M was blocked by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. We also found that KCNQ2/3 currents were inhibited when Oxo-M was applied during an ongoing KCNQ2/3 response, an effect that was not blocked by atropine, suggesting that Oxo-M inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels directly. Indeed, also in oocytes that were transfected with only KCNQ2/3 channels, but not with muscarinic M1 receptors, Oxo-M inhibited the KCNQ2/3 response. These results show that besides the usual muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated inhibition, Oxo-M also inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels by a direct mechanism. We subsequently tested xanomeline, which is a chemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, and oxotremorine, which is a close analogue of Oxo-M. Both compounds inhibited KCNQ2/3 currents via activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but, in contrast to Oxo-M, they did not directly inhibit KCNQ2/3 channels. Xanomeline and oxotremorine do not contain a positively charged trimethylammonium moiety that is present in Oxo-M, suggesting that such a charged moiety could be a crucial component mediating this newly described direct inhibition of KCNQ2/3 channels.

  15. Characterization of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors solubilized from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthin, G.R.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1985-07-01

    Membranes prepared from rat cerebral cortex were solubilized in buffer containing 1% digitonin. Material present in the supernatant after centrifugation at 147,000 X g was shown to contain binding sites for both (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) and (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ). Recovery of binding sites was approximately 25% of the initial membrane-bound (/sup 3/H)QNB binding sites. The Kd values for (/sup 3/H)QNB and (/sup 3/H)PZ binding to solubilized receptors were 0.3 nM and 0.1 microM, respectively. As has been observed previously in membrane preparations, (/sup 3/H)PZ appeared to label fewer solubilized binding sites than did (/sup 3/H)QNB. Maximum binding values for (/sup 3/H)PZ and (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to solubilized receptors were approximately 400 and 950 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Competition curves for PZ inhibiting the binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB, however, had Hill slopes of 1, with a Ki value of 0.24 microM. The k1 and k-1 for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding were 3.5 X 10(6) M-1 min-1 and 0.13 min-1, respectively. The muscarinic receptor antagonists atropine, scopolamine and PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB and (/sup 3/H)PZ to solubilized receptors with Hill slopes of 1, as did the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine. The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol competed for (/sup 3/H)QNB and (/sup 3/H)PZ binding with a Hill slope of less than 1 in cerebral cortex, but not in cerebellum. GTP did not alter the interactions of carbachol or oxotremorine with the solubilized receptor. Together, these data suggest that muscarinic receptor sites solubilized from rat brain retain their abilities to interact selectively with muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists.

  16. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  17. Muscarinic 2 Receptors Modulate Cardiac Proteasome Function in a Protein Kinase G-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ranek, Mark J.; Kost, Curtis K.; Hu, Chengjun; Martin, Douglas S.; Wang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome function insufficiency and inadequate protein quality control are strongly implicated in a large subset of cardiovascular disease and may play an important role in their pathogenesis. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system can be physiologically regulated. Cardiac muscarinic 2 (M2) receptors were pharmacologically interrogated in intact mice and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Proteasome-mediated proteolysis was measured with a surrogate misfolde...

  18. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  19. The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from the rat myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized rat myocardial muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been examined at 4 degrees C. Solubilization produced only small changes in the binding of N-methylscopolamine and atropine. In contrast to the low affinity binding of pirenzepine found to be present in in the membranes, high affinity binding was detected in the soluble preparation. In both preparations, pirenzepine binding was complex. High affinity pirenzepine binding (KD approximately 3 X 10(-8)M) to the soluble myocardial receptors could be monitored directly using [3H]-pirenzepine. [3H]-pirenzepine-labelled soluble myocardial receptors have a sedimentation coefficient of 11.1 s. This indicates that [3H]-pirenzepine binds predominantly to the uncoupled form of the receptor. However, [3H]-pirenzepine-agonist competition experiments indicated that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites are capable of coupling with a guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein. Pirenzepine affinities for the soluble myocardial receptors were unaffected by their state of association with the GTP-binding proteins found in the heart. The equilibrium binding properties of the soluble cortical and myocardial receptors were very similar. However, the binding kinetics of the myocardial receptor were much slower. It appears that the membrane environment can affect the affinity of pirenzepine for the rat myocardial muscarinic receptor. Removal of the constraint by solubilization allows the expression of high affinity pirenzepine binding. PMID:3754173

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veluchamy A. Barathi

    2013-09-01

    Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2 were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error.

  1. Identification of three muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat lung using binding studies with selective antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, A.D.; El-Fakahany, E.E. (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptor population in the rat central and peripheral lung was found in competition binding experiments against ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB) using the selective antagonists pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pirenzepine displaced ({sup 3}H)QNB with low affinity from preparations of central airways indicating the absence of M{sub 1} receptors in the trachea and bronchi. Muscarinic receptors in the central airways are comprised of both M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} receptors since AF-DX 116, an M{sub 2}-selective antagonist, bound with high affinity to 70% of the available sites while HHSiD, an M{sub 3}-selective antagonist bound with high affinity to the remaining binding sites. In the peripheral lung, pirenzepine bound with high affinity to 14% of the receptor population, AF-DX 116 bound with high affinity 79% of the binding sites while HHSiD bound with high affinity to 18% of the binding sites. The presence of M{sub 1} receptors in the peripheral airways but not in the central airways was confirmed using ({sup 3}H)telenzepine, an M{sub 1} receptor ligand. ({sup 3}H)Telenzepine showed specific saturable binding to 8% of ({sup 3}H)QNB labeled binding sites in homogenates of rat peripheral lung, while there was no detectable specific binding in homogenates of rat trachea or heart.

  2. Effect of aging on airway remodeling and muscarinic receptors in a murine acute asthma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang JY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Young Kang, Sook Young Lee, Chin Kook Rhee, Seung Joon Kim, Soon Seog Kwon, Young Kyoon KimDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaBackground and objectives: The influence of aging on the development of asthma has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate age-related airway responses involving lung histology and expression of muscarinic receptors in a murine model of acute asthma. Methods: Female BALB/c mice at the ages of 6 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA for 1 month (n = 8–12 per group. We analyzed inflammatory cells and T-helper (Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and parameters of airway remodeling and expression of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue. Results: Among the OVA groups, total cell and eosinophil numbers in BAL fluid were significantly higher in the older (6-, 9-, and 12-month-old mice than in the young (6-week-old mice. Interleukin (IL 4 (IL-4 concentration increased, but IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations showed a decreased tendency, with age. IL-17 concentration tended to increase with age, which did not reach statistical significance. periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining area, peribronchial collagen deposition, and area of α-smooth muscle staining were significantly higher in the 6-month older OVA group than in the young OVA group. The expression of the M3 and M2 muscarinic receptors tended to increase and decrease, respectively, with age. Conclusion: The aged mice showed an active and unique pattern not only on airway inflammation, but also on airway remodeling and expression of the muscarinic receptors during the development of acute asthma compared with the young mice. These findings suggest that the aging process affects the pathogenesis of acute asthma and age-specific approach might be more appropriate for better asthma control in a clinical practice.Keywords: aging, asthma

  3. Muscarinic M3 receptors on structural cells regulate cigarette smoke-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E.M.; van Os, Ronald P.; Dethmers-Ausema, Albertina; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Wess, Jürgen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Anticholinergics, blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor, are effective bronchodilators for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent evidence from M-3 receptor-deficient mice (M3R-/-) indicates that M-3 receptors also regulate neutrophilic inflammation in response to cigarette smoke

  4. A fluorescence anisotropy assay for the muscarinic M1 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwiler, Kristin G; De Rosier, Therese; Hanson, Bonnie; Vogel, Kurt W

    2010-06-01

    In the search for new chemical entities that interact with G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs), assays that quantify efficacy and affinity are employed. Traditional methods for measuring affinity involve radiolabeled ligands. To address the need for homogeneous biochemical fluorescent assays to characterize orthosteric ligand affinity and dissociation rates, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay for the muscarinic M1 receptor that can be conducted in a 384-well plate. We used membranes from a muscarinic M1 cell line optimized for high-throughput functional assays and the previously characterized fluorescent antagonist BODIPY FL pirenzepine. The affinities of reference compounds were determined in the competitive FA assay and compared with those obtained with a competitive filter-based radioligand-binding assay using [(3)H] N-methylscopolamine. The IC(50) values produced from the FA assay were well-correlated with the radioligand-binding K(i) values (R(2) = 0.98). The dissociation of the BODIPY FL pirenzepine was readily monitored in real time using the FA assay and was sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator gallamine. This M1 FA assay offers advantages over traditional radioligandbinding assays as it eliminates radioactivity while allowing investigation of orthosteric or allosteric muscarinic M1 ligands in a homogeneous format.

  5. Inverse agonist activity of pirenzepine at M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeffler, L; Schmidlin, F; Gies, J P; Landry, Y

    1999-03-01

    1. The intrinsic properties of muscarinic ligands were studied through their binding properties and their abilities to modulate the GTPase activity of G proteins coupled to muscarinic M2 receptors in pig atrial sarcolemma. 2. Competition binding experiments were performed with [3H]-oxotremorine-M to assess the affinity of receptors coupled to G proteins (R*), with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]-NMS) to estimate the affinities of coupled and uncoupled receptors (R*+R) and with [3H]-NMS in the presence of GppNHp to assess the affinity of uncoupled receptors (R). 3. The ranking of Ki values for the agonist carbachol was R*pirenzepine was R*>R*+R>R (174, 155, 115 nM), suggesting inverse agonism. 4. The Vmax of the basal high affinity GTPase activity of pig atrial sarcolemma was increased by mastoparan and decreased by GPAnt-2 indicating the relevance of this activity to G proteins coupled to receptors (R*). The K(M) value (0.26-0.33 microM) was not modified by mastoparan or GPAnt-2. 5. Carbachol increased the Vmax of GTP hydrolysis (EC50 8.1+/-0.3 microM), whereas atropine and AF-DX 116, up to 1 mM, did not modify it. Pirenzepine decreased the Vmax of GTP hydrolysis (EC50 77.5+/-10.3 microM). This effect was enhanced when KCI was substituted for NaCl (EC50 11.0+/-0.8 microM) and was antagonized by atropine and AF-DX 116 (IC50 0.91+/-0.71 and 197+/-85 nM). 6. Pirenzepine is proposed as an inverse agonist and atropine and AF-DX 116 as neutral antagonists at the muscarinic M2 receptor.

  6. Differential effects of M1 muscarinic receptor blockade and nicotinic receptor blockade in the dorsomedial striatum on response reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavos, Arianna; Jih, Jane; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The present studies determined whether blockade of M1-like muscarinic or nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the dorsomedial striatum affects acquisition or reversal learning of a response discrimination. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. In the acquisition phase, a rat learned to turn to the left or to the right. In the reversal learning phase, a rat learned to turn in the opposite direction as required during acquisition. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of the M1-like muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine infused into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Experiment 2 examined the effects of the nicotinic cholinergic antagonist, mecamylamine injected into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Bilateral injections of pirenzepine at 10 µg, but not 1 µg, selectively impaired reversal learning. Analysis of the errors indicated that pirenzepine treatment did not impair the initial shift, but increased reversions back to the original response choice following the initial shift. Bilateral injections of mecamylamine, 6 or 18 µg, did not affect acquisition or reversal learning. The results suggest that activation of M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, but not nicotinic cholinergic receptors, in the dorsomedial striatum is important for facilitating the flexible shifting of response patterns. PMID:15302131

  7. Pirenzepine binding to membrane-bound, solubilized and purified muscarinic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgold, J.

    1986-05-01

    Muscarinic receptors were purified to near-homogeneity from bovine cortex, an area rich in the putative M1 subtype, and from bovine pons/medulla, an area rich in the putative M2 subtype. In both cases, the receptors were solubilized in digitonin and purified over an affinity column. Both the cortical and pons/medulla preparations yielded receptor proteins of 70,000 daltons. Pirenzepine binding was deduced from its competition with /sup 3/H-N-methyl scopolamine. The binding of pirenzepine to membrane-bound receptors from cortex was best described by a two site model, with approximately half the sites having a Ki of 6.4 x 10/sup -9/ M and the remaining sites having a Ki of 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M. Membrane-bound receptors from pons/medulla bound pirenzepine according to a one-site model with a Ki of 1.1 x 10/sup -7/ M. After solubilization the two-site binding of cortical receptors became a one-site binding, Ki = 1.1 x 10/sup -7/M. This value was still five-fold lower than that of soluble receptors from pons/medulla. After purification however the affinity of pirenzepine for the pons/medulla receptor increased so that the two putative subtypes bound pirenzepine with approximately the same affinity. These findings suggest that the different pirenzepine binding characteristics used to define muscarinic receptor subtypes are not inherent in the receptor protein itself but may be due to coupling factors associated with the receptor.

  8. Selective affinity of pirenzepine analogues for subtypes of muscarinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, J.F.; Smith, J.D.; Liu, W.S.; Gulya, K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-05

    Pirenzepine (PZ), telenzepine (TZ) and quinuclidinyl xanthene-9-carboxylate (QNX) are antimuscarinic agents containing a tricyclic ring system and a basic side chain that have been reported to have selective affinity for the M/sub 1/ subtype of receptor. They have prepared and examined seven new PZ analogues containing modifications in either the tricyclic ring system, the side-chain, or both. Affinity for M/sub 1/ type receptors was determined by displacement of specifically-bound (/sup 3/H)PZ from rat cerebral cortex homogenates. Affinity for M/sub 2/ type receptors was measured on rat heart homogenate using (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate. The ratio of the K/sub i/'s for M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptors were calculated and compared to PZ. All of the compounds had a higher affinity for M/sub 1/ than M/sub 2/ receptors. Three of the compounds were comparable to PZ in selectivity, but the more selective compounds had a weaker affinity for M/sub 1/ receptors. TZ and QNX were less selective than PZ.

  9. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  10. Affinities of pirenzepine for muscarinic cholinergic receptors in membranes isolated from bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madison, J.M.; Jones, C.A.; Tom-Moy, M.; Brown, J.K.

    1987-03-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified into subtypes based on their high (M-1 subtype) or low (M-2 subtype) affinities for the nonclassic antagonist pirenzepine, and this classification has important experimental and therapeutic implications. Because muscarinic receptors are abundant in the airways where they mediate several different cellular responses, the goal of this study was to characterize the affinities of pirenzepine for the muscarinic receptors in bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle. After isolating membrane particulates from mucosa and smooth muscle, as well as from bovine cerebral cortex (a known source of M-1 receptors), we used /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate to label muscarinic receptors in the particulates and performed competition radioligand binding assays in the presence of either atropine or pirenzepine. Receptors from all 3 tissues (mucosa, smooth muscle, and cerebral cortex) were of a relatively uniform affinity for atropine (range of KI values: 0.8 +/- 0.4 X 10(-9) to 2.4 +/- 1.7 X 10(-9) M), as would be predicted for this classic muscarinic antagonist. By contrast, affinities for pirenzepine differed depending on the tissue. In cerebral cortex, the majority of receptors were of high affinity for pirenzepine (KI = 1.8 +/- 1.4 X 10(-8) M). In both mucosa and smooth muscle, receptors were of low affinity for pirenzepine (Kl = 4.8 +/- 0.4 to 6.9 +/- 3.8 X 10(-7) M). We conclude that muscarinic cholinergic receptors in bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle are predominantly of the M-2 subtype.

  11. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  12. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibits glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke MA; Li-min YANG; Hong-zhuan CHEN; Yang LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the actions of the muscarinic agonist carbachol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells,and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:PC12 cells were treated with different concentrations of glutamate for 24 or 48 h.The cell viability was measured using MTT assay,and the expression and activation of GSK-3β were detected with Western blot.β-Catenin translocation was detected using immunofluorescence.Luciferase reporter assay and real-time PCR were used to analyze the transcriptional activity of β-catenin.Results:Glutamate (1,3,and 10 mmol/L) induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner.Moreover,treatment of the cells with glutamate (1 mmol/L) caused significant overactivation of GSK-3β and prevented β-catenin translocation to the nucleus.Pretreatment with carbachol (0.01 μmol/L) blocked glutamate-induced cell death and GSK-3β overactivation,and markedly enhanced β-catenin transcriptional activity.Conclusion:Activation of muscarinic receptors exerts neuroprotection in PC12 cells by attenuating glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation,suggesting potential benefits of muscarinic agonists for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects ...... that xanomeline inhibits D-amphetamine- and (-)-apomorphine-induced behavior in Cebus apella monkeys at doses that do not cause EPS. These data further substantiate that muscarinic receptor agonists may be useful in the pharmacological treatment of psychosis....

  14. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    , and a competitive antagonist, atropine or pirenzepine, at fixed ratios display functional partial agonism. The levels of apparent intrinsic activity of the functional partial agonist responses were shown to be dependent of the receptor density and G-protein concentration in the same manner as that determined...... agonist response, which is dependent on the agonist/antagonist ratio, is predictable from the Waud equation, describing competitive receptor/ligand interactions. In agreement with the relative antagonist potencies of pirenzepine at m1 and m5, a 10:1 ratio of carbachol and pirenzepine produced very low...

  15. Association of m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins with asymmetric synapses in the primate cerebral cortex: morphological evidence for cholinergic modulation of excitatory neurotransmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Mrzljak, L; Levey, A I; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic m1 receptors traditionally are considered to be postsynaptic to cholinergic fibers, while m2 receptors are largely presynaptic receptors associated with axons. We have examined the distribution of these receptor proteins in the monkey cerebral cortex and obtained results that are at odds with this expectation. Using immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies to recombinant m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins, we have demonstrated that both m1 and m2 receptors are prominently ...

  16. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  17. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  18. A Novel Voltage Sensor in the Orthosteric Binding Site of the M2 Muscarinic Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchad-Avitzur, Ofra; Priest, Michael F; Dekel, Noa; Bezanilla, Francisco; Parnas, Hanna; Ben-Chaim, Yair

    2016-10-04

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many signal transduction processes in the body. The discovery that these receptors are voltage-sensitive has changed our understanding of their behavior. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2R) was found to exhibit depolarization-induced charge movement-associated currents, implying that this prototypical GPCR possesses a voltage sensor. However, the typical domain that serves as a voltage sensor in voltage-gated channels is not present in GPCRs, making the search for the voltage sensor in the latter challenging. Here, we examine the M2R and describe a voltage sensor that is comprised of tyrosine residues. This voltage sensor is crucial for the voltage dependence of agonist binding to the receptor. The tyrosine-based voltage sensor discovered here constitutes a noncanonical by which membrane proteins may sense voltage.

  19. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...... be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine....

  20. Type 3 muscarinic receptors contribute to intestinal mucosal homeostasis and clearance of nippostrongylus brasiliensis through induction of Th2 cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite increased appreciation for the role of nicotinic receptors in the modulation of and response to inflammation, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to mucosal homeostasis, clearance of enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function remains relatively undefined. Uninfected and N...

  1. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems.

  2. Organophosphorus pesticides decrease M2 muscarinic receptor function in guinea pig airway nerves via indirect mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky J Proskocil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies link organophosphorus pesticide (OP exposures to asthma, and we have shown that the OPs chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion cause airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs 24 hr after a single subcutaneous injection. OP-induced airway hyperreactivity involves M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction on airway nerves independent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, but how OPs inhibit neuronal M2 receptors in airways is not known. In the central nervous system, OPs interact directly with neurons to alter muscarinic receptor function or expression; therefore, in this study we tested whether the OP parathion or its oxon metabolite, paraoxon, might decrease M2 receptor function on peripheral neurons via similar direct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intravenous administration of paraoxon, but not parathion, caused acute frequency-dependent potentiation of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction and increased electrical field stimulation (EFS-induced contractions in isolated trachea independent of AChE inhibition. However, paraoxon had no effect on vagally-induced bradycardia in intact guinea pigs or EFS-induced contractions in isolated ileum, suggesting mechanisms other than pharmacologic antagonism of M2 receptors. Paraoxon did not alter M2 receptor expression in cultured cells at the mRNA or protein level as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and radio-ligand binding assays, respectively. Additionally, a biotin-labeled fluorophosphonate, which was used as a probe to identify molecular targets phosphorylated by OPs, did not phosphorylate proteins in guinea pig cardiac membranes that were recognized by M2 receptor antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that neither direct pharmacologic antagonism nor downregulated expression of M2 receptors contributes to OP inhibition of M2 function in airway nerves, adding to the growing evidence of non-cholinergic mechanisms of OP neurotoxicity.

  3. Effect of pirenzepine, a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, on amygdala kindling in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eşkazan, E; Aker, R; Onat, F; Köseoğlu, S; Gören, M Z; Hasanoğlu, A

    1999-11-01

    Kindling, an animal model of complex partial seizures with secondary generalization, is performed by daily application of low-intensity electrical brain stimulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of muscarinic M1 receptors on amygdala kindling in the rat. Bipolar nichrome stimulation and recording electrodes were stereotaxically implanted into the right and left basolateral amygdala. Extradural recording electrodes were also placed bilaterally in the skull over the cortex. Amygdala stimulation was applied twice daily at the current intensity of afterdischarge threshold. Seizure intensity was graded by using Racine's standard five-stage scale. In the first group of experiments, saline or pirenzepine (10, 25, 50 and 100 nmol), a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 h before the electrical stimulation. In the second group of experiments, rats were kindled to full stage 5 seizures. After a recovery period, 50 nmol of pirenzepine was administered intracerebroventricularly to kindled animals. In the first group of experiments, none of the animals pretreated with the doses of 50 and 100 nmol of pirenzepine reached a stage 5 seizure. Pirenzepine significantly retarded kindling seizure development and increased the total number of stimulations required to reach the first stage 5 seizure. Afterdischarge duration was also reduced in the pirenzepine 10 nmol group as compared with that in the saline-pretreated group. In the second group, seizure stage and afterdischarge duration were not affected by pirenzepine in fully-kindled animals. The findings of this study suggest that muscarinic M1 receptors may have a critical role in the development of kindling epileptic activity, but not in already kindled seizures.

  4. Pharmacology, Distribution and Development of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes in the Optic Tectum of Rana Pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, C. M.; Pauly, J. R.; Wilkins, L. H.; Dwoskin, L. P.; Debski, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    Visually evoked behaviors mediated by the frog optic tectum require cholinergic activity, but the receptor subtypes through which acetylcholine acts are not yet identified. Using quantitative autoradiography and scintillation spectrometry, we examined the binding of [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]AF-DX 384 in the laminated optic tectum of the frog. In mammalian systems, these substances bind excitatory (m1 and m3 subtypes) and inhibitory (m2 and m4 subtypes) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively. Pharmacological analyses, including the use of specific muscarinic toxins, confirmed the subtype selectivity of the radioligands in the frog brain. Binding sites for [3H]pirenzepine were distinct from those for [3H]AF-DX 384. In the adult tectum, [3H]pirenzepine demonstrated specific binding in tectal layers 5–9. [3H]Pirenzepine binding was also present in tadpoles as young as stage V, but all sampled stages of tadpole tectum had significantly less binding when compared to adults. Lesioning of the optic nerve had no effect on [3H]pirenzepine binding. Specific [3H]AF-DX 384 binding was found in all layers of the adult tectum. All sampled tadpole stages exhibited binding sites for [3H]AF-DX 384, but the densities of these sites were also significantly higher in adults than they were in developing stages. Short-term lesions of the optic nerve reduced [3H]AF-DX 384 binding in all tectal layers of the deafferented lobe when compared to the afferented one. Long-term lesions decreased [3H]AF-DX 384 sites in both lobes. These results indicate that multiple muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites reside in the frog optic tectum at all stages of development, and their pharmacology resembles that of mammalian m1/m3, m2 and m4 subtypes. Our data indicate that few, if any, of these receptors are likely to be located on retinal ganglion cell terminals. Furthermore, the expression of inhibitory muscarinic subtypes seems to be regulated by different mechanisms than that for

  5. Effects of Modulating M3 Muscarinic Receptor Activity on Azoxymethane-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that azoxymethane (AOM)-induced liver injury is robustly exacerbated in M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R)-deficient mice. We used the same mouse model to test the hypothesis that selective pharmacological modulation of M3R activity regulates the liver injury response. Initial experiments confirmed that giving a selective M3R antagonist, darifenacin, to AOM-treated mice mimicked M3R gene ablation. Compared to vehicle controls, mice treated with the M3R antagonist had reduced...

  6. Mice Lacking M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Have Impaired Odor Discrimination and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wilson; Singh, Sanmeet; Keshav, Taj; Dewan, Ramita; Eberly, Christian; Maurer, Robert; Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Araneda, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    The cholinergic system has extensive projections to the olfactory bulb (OB) where it produces a state-dependent regulation of sensory gating. Previous work has shown a prominent role of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) in regulating the excitability of OB neurons, in particular the M1 receptor. Here, we examined the contribution of M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes to olfactory processing using mice with a genetic deletion of these receptors, the M1−/− and the M1/M3−/− knockout (KO) mice. Genetic ablation of the M1 and M3 mAChRs resulted in a significant deficit in odor discrimination of closely related molecules, including stereoisomers. However, the discrimination of dissimilar molecules, social odors (e.g., urine) and novel object recognition was not affected. In addition the KO mice showed impaired learning in an associative odor-learning task, learning to discriminate odors at a slower rate, indicating that both short and long-term memory is disrupted by mAChR dysfunction. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited decreased olfactory neurogenesis at younger ages, a deficit that was not maintained in older animals. In older animals, the olfactory deficit could be restored by increasing the number of new born neurons integrated into the OB after exposing them to an olfactory enriched environment, suggesting that muscarinic modulation and adult neurogenesis could be two different mechanism used by the olfactory system to improve olfactory processing. PMID:28210219

  7. Stereoselectivity of satropane, a novel tropane analog, on iris muscarinic receptor activation and intraocular hypotension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang ZHU; Hong-zhuan CHEN; Li-min YANG; Yong-yao CUI; Pei-li ZHENG; Yin-yao NIU; Hao WANG; Yang LU; Qiu-shi REN; Pi-jing WEI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the stereoselectivity of satropane (3-paramethylbenzene sulfonyloxy-6-acetoxy tropane), a novel tropane analog, on iris muscarinic receptor activation and intraocular hypotension. Methods: The assays for radioligand-receptor binding, the contractile responses of isolated iris muscle, the miosis response, and the intraocular hypotension of the enantiomers of satropane were investigated. Results: In the binding analysis, S(-)satropane (lesatropane) completely com-peted against the [3H]quinuclydinyl benzilate-labeled ligand at muscarinic recep-tors in the iris muscle, whereas R(+)satropane failed to completely compete. In an isolated iris contractile assay, R,S(±)satropane and S(-)satropane produced a concentration-dependent contractile response with similar efficacy and potency to that of carbachol. R(+)satropane did not induce any contractile response. In the pupil diameter measurement assay in vivo, S(-)satropane induced miosis much more effectively than pilocarpine, while R(+)satropane failed to produce any miosis. In the water loading-induced and methylcellulose-induced ocular hypertensive models, S(-)satropane, but not R(+)satropane, significantly suppressed intraocu-lar pressure at a much lower concentration than pilocarpine. Conclusion: The ago-nistic and hypotensive properties of satropane on rabbit eyes are stereoselective, with the S(-)isomer being its active form.

  8. Connexins and M3 Muscarinic Receptors Contribute to Heterogeneous Ca2+ Signaling in Mouse Aortic Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Boittin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle tone is controlled by Ca2+ signaling in the endothelial layer. Mouse endothelial cells are interconnected by gap junctions made of Connexin40 (Cx40 and Cx37, which allow the exchange of signaling molecules to coordinate their activity. Here, we investigated the role of Cx40 in the endothelial Ca2+ signaling of the mouse aorta. Methods: Ca2+ imaging was performed on intact aortic endothelium from both wild type (Cx40+/+ and Connexin40-deficient (Cx40 -/- mice. Results: Acetylcholine (ACh induced early fast and high amplitude Ca2+ transients in a fraction of endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors. Inhibition of intercellular communication using carbenoxolone or octanol fully blocked the propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ transients toward adjacent cells in WT and Cx40-/- mice. As compared to WT, Cx40-/- mice displayed a reduced propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ waves, indicating that Cx40 contributes to the spreading of Ca2+ signals. The propagation of those Ca2+ responses was not blocked by suramin, a blocker of purinergic ATP receptors, indicating that there is no paracrine effect of ATP release on the Ca2+ waves. Conclusions: Altogether our data show that Cx40 and Cx37 contribute to the propagation and amplification of the Ca2+ signaling triggered by ACh in endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors.

  9. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side...... effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel...

  10. Effects of methylmercury on muscarinic receptors in the mouse brain: A quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haesung; Yee, S.; Geddes, J.; Choi, Byung, H. (Ewha Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea) Univ. of California, Irvine (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is reported to inhibit several stages of cholinergic neurotransmission in brain tissue in-vitro and in-vivo. To examine whether or not behavioral disturbances and/or selective vulnerability of specific neuronal groups in MeHg poisoning may be related to MeHg effects on cholinergic receptors in specific regions of the brain, the density and distribution of muscarinic receptors in the brains of C57BL/6J mice were determined following repeated injections of 5 mg/kg of methylmercuric chloride (MMC). The receptor densities in six cortical laminae of seven cerebral cortical regions, hippocampus and striatum were quantitated by computer-assisted imaging system following in-vitro labeling with ({sup 3}H)-pirenzepine (M1) and ({sup 3}H)N-methyl scopolamine (M2). The results showed heterogeneous distribution of M1 and M2 sites in different regions of the brain, and significant reduction in the density of both receptor subtypes following MeHg poisoning in many cortical and subcortical regions. However, the changes in the density were variable in different laminae even in the same cortical regions. Prominent reductions in M1 densities were noted in the temporal and entorhinal cortices, CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus as compared to control, whereas the reduction in M2 receptor density was most prominently noted in the frontal, perirhinal and entorhinal cortices, and CA1 and hilar regions of the hippocampus. Thus, it is apparent that MeHg significantly affects muscarinic receptors in the mouse brain, and that these data when used in conjunction with immunocytochemical and other morphological studies would provide further insights into the mechanisms of neurotoxic effects of MeHg.

  11. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

    1984-02-01

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using /sup 3/H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine.

  12. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M.; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J.; Garraffo, H. Martin; Phillips, Karran A.; Preston, Kenzie L.; Graf, Jonathan; Grayson, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study’s objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage. PMID:28194438

  13. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J; Garraffo, H Martin; Phillips, Karran A; Preston, Kenzie L; Graf, Jonathan; Kaplan, Mariana J; Grayson, Peter C

    2017-02-09

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study's objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage.

  14. Effect of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonism on rat gastric motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Pieter; Karlsson, Lisa K C; Nielsen, Maria Astin; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Hultin, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether muscarinic and nicotinic receptors mediate nitric oxide release during motor events in the rat stomach. Isolated rat stomach volume changes were monitored in an organ bath setup with an intragastric balloon coupled to a barostat and studied in basal conditions and during electrical vagal stimulation (EVS). In conscious rats, the intragastric pressure (IGP) was measured during test meal infusion. In the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 0.1 mmol/l), EVS induced significant gastric contractions (mean +/- SEM = 0.27 +/- 0.04 ml; n = 6) that could be blocked by atropine (3 micromol/l) and hexamethonium (0.1 mmol/l). In the presence of atropine and/or hexamethonium, EVS-induced relaxations could not be blocked by L-NAME, while exogenous nitric oxide could still relax the stomach. In conscious rats, atropine (1 mg kg(-1)) initially decreased IGP, while during further distension it increased IGP. In the presence of L-NAME (30 mg kg(-1)) atropine consistently decreased IGP. L-NAME alone significantly increased IGP during the test meal infusion, but this effect was reduced in the presence of atropine. These findings indicate a role for nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the vagal-stimulation-induced activation of nitrergic nerves in the rat stomach. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Bonne, T C; Zaar, M; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-06-15

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2 = 12%) after intravenous administration of 1) no drugs (Cont), 2) propranolol (Prop), 3) glycopyrrolate (Glyc), or 4) Prop + Glyc. HR increased with exercise in all drug conditions (P 0.4) but larger during Prop (3.4 ± 1.6 l/min, P = 0.004). Our results demonstrate that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia during exercise partially relies on vagal withdrawal. Conversely, sympathoexcitation either does not contribute or increases heart rate through mechanisms other than β-adrenergic transmission. A potential candidate is α-adrenergic transmission, which could also explain why a tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes is caused by their sequestration/internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-10-01

    Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) stably expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells was measured as decreases in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity in membrane preparations after pre-treatment of cells with carbamylcholine. The extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was found to decrease to 64% following pretreatment of cells with 10 microM carbamylcholine for 30 min, and under the same conditions 51-59% of hm2 receptors were sequestered/internalized as assessed by decreases in the [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity on the cell surface. A similar reduction in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was observed by pretreatment of cells with 5 nM propylbenzylylcholine mustard, which irreversibly bound to and inactivated 58% of the hm2 receptors. When the cells were pretreated with 10 microM carbamylcholine in the presence of 0.32 M sucrose, which is known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, no sequestration/internalization of hm2 receptors was observed, and the extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity did not change. These results indicate that desensitization of hm2 receptors may be caused by reduction of receptor number on the cell surface through sequestration/internalization rather than by loss of the function of receptors.

  17. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  18. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    -established. Moreover, the M4-/- mice displayed a reduced capacity to extinguish their alcohol-seeking behavior. Taken together, alcohol consumption is elevated in M4-/- mice, indicating that the M4 receptor is involved in mediating the reinforcing effects of alcohol. The M4 receptor should be further explored......Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system...... and involved in regulation of cholinergic and dopaminergic transmission. Here we investigate, for the first time, the role of the M4 receptor in alcohol consumption using M4 knockout (M4-/-) and wild-type (M4+/+) mice. Experimentally naïve M4-/- and M4+/+ mice were trained to orally self-administer 5%, 8...

  20. SPET imaging of central muscarinic receptors with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]-I-QNB: methodological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbury, R. E-mail: r.norbury@iop.kcl.ac.uk; Travis, M.J.; Erlandsson, K.; Waddington, W.; Owens, J.; Ell, P.J.; Murphy, D.G

    2004-07-01

    Investigations on the effect of normal healthy ageing on the muscarinic system have shown conflicting results. Also, in vivo determination of muscarinic receptor binding has been hampered by a lack of subtype selective ligands and differences in methods used for quantification of receptor densities. Recent in vitro and in vivo work with the muscarinic antagonist (R,R)-I-QNB indicates this ligand has selectivity for m{sub 1} and m{sub 4} muscarinic receptor subtypes. Therefore, we used (R,R)[{sup 123}I]-I-QNB and single photon emission tomography to study brain m{sub 1} and m{sub 4} muscarinic receptors in 25 healthy female subjects (11 younger subjects, age range 26-32 years and 14 older subjects, age range 57-82 years). Our aims were to ascertain the viability of tracer administration and imaging within the same day, and to evaluate whether normalization to whole brain, compared to normalization to cerebellum, could alter the clinical interpretation of results. Images were analyzed using the simplified reference tissue model and by two ratio methods: normalization to whole brain and normalization to cerebellum. Significant correlations were observed between kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum, but not to whole brain. Both the kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum showed age-related reductions in muscarinic binding in frontal, orbitofrontal, and parietal regions. Normalization to whole brain, however, failed to detect age-related changes in any region. Here we show that, for this radiotracer, normalizing to a region of negligible specific binding (cerebellum) significantly improves sensitivity when compared to global normalization.

  1. Hyperfunction of muscarinic receptor maintains long-term memory in 5-HT4 receptor knock-out mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Segu

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from dementia of Alzheimer's type express less serotonin 4 receptors (5-HTR(4, but whether an absence of these receptors modifies learning and memory is unexplored. In the spatial version of the Morris water maze, we show that 5-HTR(4 knock-out (KO and wild-type (WT mice performed similarly for spatial learning, short- and long-term retention. Since 5-HTR(4 control mnesic abilities, we tested whether cholinergic system had circumvented the absence of 5-HTR(4. Inactivating muscarinic receptor with scopolamine, at an ineffective dose (0.8 mg/kg to alter memory in WT mice, decreased long-term but not short-term memory of 5-HTR(4 KO mice. Other changes included decreases in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the required enzyme for acetylcholine synthesis, in the septum and the dorsal hippocampus in 5-HTR(4 KO under baseline conditions. Training- and scopolamine-induced increase and decrease, respectively in ChAT activity in the septum in WT mice were not detected in the 5-HTR(4 KO animals. Findings suggest that adaptive changes in cholinergic systems may circumvent the absence of 5-HTR(4 to maintain long-term memory under baseline conditions. In contrast, despite adaptive mechanisms, the absence of 5-HTR(4 aggravates scopolamine-induced memory impairments. The mechanisms whereby 5-HTR(4 mediate a tonic influence on ChAT activity and muscarinic receptors remain to be determined.

  2. The Effects of Repeated Low-Level Sarin Exposure on Muscarinic M1 Receptor Binding, Amyloid Precursor Protein Levels and Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Muscarinic; Nerve agents; Organophosphorus; Pirenzepine ; Receptor Binding; Sarin 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...either Bmax (receptor density) or Kd (receptor affinity) following cortical M1 muscarinic receptor binding using [3H]- Pirenzepine , across all five...binding assays using [3H]- Pirenzepine (m1AChR ligand; Hammer et al., 1980), Western blotting using an antibody to APP in cortex, and neuropathological

  3. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAVERMAN, ALAN S.; TALLARIDA, RONALD J.; RUGGIERI, MICHAEL R.

    2012-01-01

    M3 muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M2 receptors participate in contraction because M3-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M2-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M3 receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M2 receptor and one by the M3 receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M2 and M3 receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M2 and the M3 receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction. PMID:12185001

  4. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    M(3) muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M(2) receptors participate in contraction because M(3)-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M(2)-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M(3) receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M(2) receptor and one by the M(3) receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M(2) and M(3) receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M(2) and the M(3) receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction.

  5. HETEROGENEOUS RECEPTOR-BINDING OF CLASSICAL QUATERNARY MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS .1. BOVINE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; ENSING, K; INTHOUT, WG; DEZEEUW, RA; ZAAGSMA, J

    1991-01-01

    In competition experiments with the teritiary radioligand [H-3]dexetimide, classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists like ipratropium bromide and N-methylscopolamine bromide distinguished two muscarinic binding sites in bovine brain (total brain minus cerebellum) membranes, in contrast to their

  6. Zebrafish M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor: cloning, pharmacological characterization, expression patterns and roles in embryonic bradycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2002-01-01

    A zebrafish M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) gene was cloned. It encodes 495 amino acids in a single exon. The derived amino acid sequence is 73.5% identical to its human homologue.Competitive binding studies of the zebrafish M2 receptor and [3H]-NMS gave negative log dissociation constants (pKi) for each antagonist as follows: atropine (9.16)>himbacine (8.05)⩾4-DAMP (7.83)>AF-DX 116 (7.26)⩾pirenzepine (7.18)⩾tropicamide (6.97)⩾methoctramine (6.82)⩾p-F-HHSiD (6.67)>carbachol (5.20...

  7. Quantitation of the Contractile Response Mediated by Two Receptors: M2 and M3 Muscarinic Receptor-Mediated Contractions of Human Gastroesophageal Smooth MuscleS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M2 receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M3 density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M2 and M3 receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M2 and M3 receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M2 muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M3 receptor predominantly mediates contraction. PMID:19126780

  8. Quantitation of the contractile response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions of human gastroesophageal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Vegesna, Anil K; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M(2) receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M(3) density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M(2) and M(3) receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M(2) muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M(3) receptor predominantly mediates contraction.

  9. Comparison of human and porcine gastric clasp and sling fiber contraction by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegesna, Anil K; Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Khayyam, Umar; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2010-04-01

    To compare the gastroesophageal junction of the human with the pig, M(2) and M(3) receptor densities and the potencies of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor subtype selective antagonists were determined in gastric clasp and sling smooth muscle fibers. Total muscarinic and M(2) receptors are higher in pig than human clasp and sling fibers. M(3) receptors are higher in human compared with pig sling fibers but lower in human compared with pig clasp fibers. Clasp fibers have fewer M(3) receptors than sling fibers in both humans and pigs. Similar to human clasp fibers, pig clasp fibers contract significantly less than pig sling fibers. Analysis of the methoctramine Schild plot suggests that M(2) receptors are involved in mediating contraction in pig clasp and sling fibers. Darifenacin potency suggests that M(3) receptors mediate contraction in pig sling fibers and that M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in pig clasp fibers. Taken together, the data suggest that both M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptors mediate the contraction in both pig clasp and sling fibers similar to human clasp and sling fibers.

  10. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonyingcharoen, Sumet; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1-40 µM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth.

  11. AMYGDALA KINDLING-INDUCED SEIZURES SELECTIVELY IMPAIR SPATIAL MEMORY .2. EFFECTS ON HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL AND GLIAL MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BELDHUIS, HJA; EVERTS, HGJ; VANDERZEE, EA; LUITEN, PGM; BOHUS, B

    1992-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is linked via hydrolysis of phosphoinositides to the protein kinase C pathway. In a preceding paper (Beldhuis, H. J. A., H. G. J. Everts, E. A. Vander Zee, P. G. M. Luiten, and B. Bohus (1992) Amygdala kindling-induced seizures selectively impair spatial memory.

  12. M1 MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS MEDIATE INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM RELEASE IN NB-OK1 HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM; BUTTINI, M; LICHTSTEINER, M; ENZ, A

    Muscarine acetylcholine receptors were characterized in NB-OK1 cells using radioligand (H-3-NMS) binding experiments and second messenger (calcium and phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover) studies. In radioligand binding experiments the displacement curves of pirenzepine (K(I) = 1.3 x 10(-8) M), AF-DX

  13. Fesoterodine, its active metabolite, and tolterodine bind selectively to muscarinic receptors in human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fuchihata, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Shiori; Osano, Ayaka; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Takeda, Masayuki; Masuyama, Keisuke; Araki, Isao; Yamada, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    To comparatively characterize the binding activity of fesoterodine, its active metabolite (5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine [5-HMT]), and tolterodine in the human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland. Muscarinic receptors in the homogenates of human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland were measured by a radioligand binding assay using [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine competed with [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride for binding sites in the bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland in a concentration-dependent manner. The affinity for muscarinic receptors of these agents was significantly greater in the bladder than in the parotid gland, suggesting pharmacologic selectivity for the bladder over the parotid gland. The bladder selectivity was larger for fesoterodine and 5-HMT than for tolterodine. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine resulted in significantly increased (two- to five-fold) values of the apparent dissociation constant for specific [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride binding in the detrusor muscle and parotid gland, with little effect on the corresponding values of the maximal number of binding sites. This finding indicates that these agents bind to the human muscarinic receptors in a competitive and reversible manner. Fesoterodine and 5-HMT bind to the muscarinic receptors with greater affinity in the human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle than in the parotid gland in a competitive and reversible manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E. (Istituto De Angeli S.p.A., Milan (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against (3H)pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when (3H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification.

  15. ERK5 activation by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors is independent of receptor internalization and β-arrestin recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Sánchez-Fernández

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are known to activate both G protein- and β-arrestin-dependent signalling cascades. The initiation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways is a key downstream event in the control of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Both G proteins and β-arrestins have been reported to mediate context-specific activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPKs. Recently, the activation of ERK5 MAPK by Gq-coupled receptors has been described to involve a direct interaction between Gαq and two novel effectors, PKCζ and MEK5. However, the possible contribution of β-arrestin towards this pathway has not yet been addressed. In the present work we sought to investigate the role of receptor internalization processes and β-arrestin recruitment in the activation of ERK5 by Gq-coupled GPCRs. Our results show that ERK5 activation is independent of M1 or M3 muscarinic receptor internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-deficient muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors are still able to fully activate the ERK5 pathway, despite their reported inability to recruit β-arrestins. Indeed, the overexpression of Gαq, but not that of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2, was found to potently enhance ERK5 activation by GPCRs, whereas silencing of β-arrestin2 expression did not affect the activation of this pathway. Finally, we show that a β-arrestin-biased mutant form of angiotensin II (SII; Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 AngII failed to promote ERK5 phosphorylation in primary cardiac fibroblasts, as compared to the natural ligand. Overall, this study shows that the activation of ERK5 MAPK by model Gq-coupled GPCRs does not depend on receptor internalization, β-arrestin recruitment or receptor phosphorylation but rather is dependent on Gαq-signalling.

  16. Alterations of muscarinic and GABA receptor binding in the posterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Kelly A; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Jew, Stephen Kum; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2007-01-30

    The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a key component of the limbic system, has been implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia because of its sensitivity to NMDA receptor antagonists. Recent studies have shown that the PCC is dysfunctional in schizophrenia, and it is now suspected to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Studies also suggest that there are abnormalities in muscarinic and GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Therefore, in the present study we used quantitative autoradiography to investigate the binding of [(3)H]pirenzepine, [(3)H]AF-DX 384 and [(3)H]muscimol, which respectively label M1/4 and M2/4 muscarinic and GABA(A) receptors, in the PCC of schizophrenia and control subjects matched for age and post-mortem interval. The present study found that [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was significantly decreased in the superficial (-24%, p=0.002) and deep (-35%, ppirenzepine binding in the deep cortical layers and [(3)H]muscimol binding in the superficial layers (rho=-0.732, p=0.003). In addition, negative correlations were also found between age and [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in both superficial and deep cortical layers (rho=-0.669 p=0.049 and rho=-0.778, p=0.014), and between age of schizophrenia onset and [(3)H]AF-DX 384 binding (rho=-0.798, p=0.018). These results for the first time demonstrated the status of M1/M4, M2/M4 and GABA(A) receptors in the PCC in schizophrenia. Whilst the exact mechanism causing these alterations is not yet known, a possible increased acetylcholine and down regulated GABA stimulation in the PCC of schizophrenia is suggested.

  17. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors act in synergy to facilitate learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Chen, Helen J; Corcoran, Kevin A; Guedea, Anita L; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Wess, Jurgen; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-11-01

    Understanding how episodic memories are formed and retrieved is necessary if we are to treat disorders in which they malfunction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the hippocampus and cortex underlie memory formation, but there is conflicting evidence regarding their role in memory retrieval. Additionally, there is no consensus on which mAChR subtypes are critical for memory processing. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that (1) encoding and retrieval of contextual memory requires mAChR in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC), (2) memory formation requires hippocampal M3 and cooperative activity of RSC M1 and M3, and (3) memory retrieval is more impaired by inactivation of multiple M1-M4 mAChR in DH or RSC than inactivation of individual receptor subtypes. Contrary to the view that acetylcholine supports learning but is detrimental to memory retrieval, we found that coactivation of multiple mAChR is required for retrieval of both recently and remotely acquired context memories. Manipulations with higher receptor specificity were generally less potent than manipulations targeting multiple receptor subtypes, suggesting that mAChR act in synergy to regulate memory processes. These findings provide unique insight into the development of therapies for amnestic symptoms, suggesting that broadly acting, rather than receptor-specific, mAchR agonists and positive allosteric modulators may be the most effective therapeutic approach. © 2016 Leaderbrand et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Identification of four areas each enriched in a unique muscarinic receptor subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoss, W.; Ellerbrock, B.R.; Goldman, P.S.; Collins, D.A.; Messer, W.S. Jr. (Univ. of Toledo College of Pharmacy, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The affinities of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were determined by autoradiography and image analysis in selected areas of the rat brain. IC{sub 50} values and Hill coefficients for the inhibition of the binding of 0.2 nM ({sup 3}H)-QNB to dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, rhomboid thalamus and substantia nigra were measured in coronal sections. Pirenzepine displayed a high affinity for receptors in the dentate gyrus and AF-DX 116, the superior colliculus. Both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 had high affinities for the substantia nigra and low affinities for the rhomboid thalamus. Gallamine displayed a 50-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Amitriptyline was less selective, showing a modest preference for substantia nigra receptors and 4-DAMP was essentially nonselective. Carbachol was the most selective agonist with a 4000-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Other agonists except RS 86 were also selective for superior colliculus receptors in the order carbachol >> arecoline > bethanechol > McN A343 = oxotremorine = pilocarpine.

  20. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ligand Binding to a Muscarinic G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Kalli; Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the detailed process of ligand binding to a receptor is pharmaceutically important for identifying druggable binding sites. With the ability to provide atomistic detail, computational methods are well poised to study these processes. Here, accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is proposed to simulate processes of ligand binding to a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), in this case the M3 muscarinic receptor, which is a target for treating many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and obesity. Long-timescale aMD simulations were performed to observe the binding of three chemically diverse ligand molecules: antagonist tiotropium (TTP), partial agonist arecoline (ARc), and full agonist acetylcholine (ACh). In comparison with earlier microsecond-timescale conventional MD simulations, aMD greatly accelerated the binding of ACh to the receptor orthosteric ligand-binding site and the binding of TTP to an extracellular vestibule. Further aMD simulations also captured binding of ARc to the receptor orthosteric site. Additionally, all three ligands were observed to bind in the extracellular vestibule during their binding pathways, suggesting that it is a metastable binding site. This study demonstrates the applicability of aMD to protein-ligand binding, especially the drug recognition of GPCRs. PMID:26537408

  1. Muscarinic receptors activity in the perirhinal cortex and hippocampus has differential involvement in the formation of recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas, Israela; Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2012-05-01

    In this work we probed the effects of post-trial infusions of the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine on object recognition memory formation. Scopolamine was infused bilaterally immediately after the sample phase in the perirhinal cortex or dorsal hippocampus and animals were tested for short-term (90 min) or long-term (24 h) memory. Results showed that scopolamine impaired short-term memory when injected in either the perirhinal cortex or hippocampus. Nevertheless, scopolamine disrupted long-term memory when administrated in the perirhinal cortex but not when applied in the hippocampus. Long-term memory was unaffected when scopolamine was infused 160 min after the sample phase or 90 min before test phase. Our data indicate that short-term recognition memory requires muscarinic receptors signaling in both the perirhinal cortex and hippocampus, whereas long-term recognition memory depends on muscarinic receptors in the perirhinal cortex but not hippocampus. These results support a differential involvement of muscarinic activity in these two medial temporal lobe structures in the formation of recognition memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The mouse defense test battery: evaluation of the effects of non-selective and BZ-1 (omega1) selective, benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, G.; Sanger, D.J.; Perrault, G.

    1996-11-01

    The behavioral effects of several benzodiazepine (BZ) (omega) receptor ligands were compared using the Mouse Defense Test Battery which has been designed to assess defensive reactions of Swiss mice confronted with a natural threat (a rat) and situations associated with this threat. Primary measures taken before, during and after rat confrontation were escape attempts, flight, risk assessment and defensive threat and attack. The drugs used included non-selective BZ (omega) full (clonazepam, clorazepate, chlordiazepoxide and diazepam) and partial (bretazenil and imidazenil) agonists, and BZ-1 (omega1) selective (abecarnil, CL 218,872 and zolpidem) receptor ligands. With the exception of clonazepam, non-selective BZ (omega) receptor compounds only partially affected flight behaviors. The drugs reduced some but not all flight measures in response to the approaching rat, whereas clonazepam attenuated all flight reactions. In contrast to their mild and inconsistent actions on flight, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor agonists displayed clear effects on risk assessment when subjects were chased by the rat. When contact was forced between the subject and the rat, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonists reduced defensive threat and attack reactions, while the partial agonists imidazenil and bretazenil only weakly attenuated defensive attack behavior. Similarly, after the rat had been removed from the test area, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonists displayed greater efficacy than the partial agonists in reducing escape attempts. Overall, results obtained with the selective BZ-1 (omega1) receptor ligands demonstrated either no clear effects or no specific action on defensive reactions. Taken together, these data demonstrate that: (1) non-selective BZ (omega) agonists displaying high intrinsic activity affect a wider range of defensive behaviors than non-selective BZ (omega) receptor partial agonists; (2) the defense system does not involve

  3. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of ...

  4. Differential regulation of human cardiac β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors by chronic β-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Motomura, S.; Deighton, N M; Zerkowski, H.-R.; Khamssi, M.; Brodde, O.-E.

    1990-01-01

    In patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting chronic β1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment increased right atrial β1-adrenoceptor number, did not affect β2-adrenoceptor number and decreased muscarinic M2-receptor number. Concomitantly, the M2-receptor-mediated negative inotropic effect of carbachol was reduced, while the β1-adrenoceptor-mediated positive inotropic effect of noradrenaline was not altered. The β2-adrenoceptor mediated positive inotropic effect of procaterol, however, w...

  5. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  6. M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonism alters sleep without affecting memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Christoph; Power, Ann E; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Kloepfer, Corinna; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Berger, Mathias; Riemann, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Preclinical studies have implicated cholinergic neurotransmission, specifically M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation, in sleep-associated memory consolidation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of administering the direct M1 mAChR agonist RS-86 on pre-post sleep memory consolidation. Twenty healthy human participants were tested in a declarative word-list task and a procedural mirror-tracing task. RS-86 significantly reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency and slow wave sleep (SWS) duration in comparison with placebo. Presleep acquisition and postsleep recall rates were within the expected ranges. However, recall rates in both tasks were almost identical for the RS-86 and placebo conditions. These results indicate that selective M1 mAChR activation in healthy humans has no clinically relevant effect on pre-post sleep consolidation of declarative or procedural memories at a dose that reduces REM sleep latency and SWS duration.

  7. Fesoterodine: a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Martin C

    2008-07-01

    Fesoterodine is a newly approved drug for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. The aim of this study was to review the preclinical and clinical data on fesoterodine. The study involved a search of the Medline database and the proceedings volumes of urological congresses. Fesoterodine functions as an orally active prodrug that is converted to the active metabolite 5-hydroxymethyltolterodine by non-specific esterases. 5-Hydroxymethyltolterodine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Fesoterodine is primarily eliminated as inactive metabolites along with significant renal excretion as the unchanged active metabolite 5-hydroxymethyltolterodine. Fesoterodine is indicated for use at doses of 4 and 8 mg once daily. In clinical studies both doses of fesoterodine were consistently superior to placebo in improving the symptoms of overactive bladder syndrome, with 8 mg/day having significantly greater effects than 4 mg/day.

  8. Evidence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the retinal centrifugal system of the chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calaza K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterize the presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR in the isthmo-optic nucleus (ION of chicks by immunohistochemistry with the M35 antibody. Some M35-immunoreactive fibers were observed emerging from the retinal optic nerve insertion, suggesting that they could be centrifugal fibers. Indeed, intraocular injections of cholera toxin B (CTb, a retrograde tracer, and double-labeling with M35 and CTb in the ION confirmed this hypothesis. The presence of M35-immunoreactive cells and the possible mAChR expression in ION and ectopic neuron cells in the chick brain strongly suggest the existence of such a cholinergic system in this nucleus and that acetylcholine release from amacrine cells may mediate interactions between retinal cells and ION terminals.

  9. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  10. Decreased cortical muscarinic receptors define a subgroup of subjects with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, E; Cowie, T F; Kanellakis, S; Sundram, S; Pantelis, C; Dean, B

    2009-11-01

    Schizophrenia is widely acknowledged as being a syndrome, consisting of an undefined number of diseases probably with differing pathologies. Although studying a syndrome makes the identification of an underlying pathology more difficult; neuroimaging, neuropsychopharmacological and post-mortem brain studies all implicate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (CHRM) in the pathology of the disorder. We have established that the CHRM1 is selectively decreased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. To expand this finding, we wanted to ascertain whether decreased cortical CHRMs might (1) define a subgroup of schizophrenia and/or (2) be related to CHRM1 genotype. We assessed cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding and sequenced the CHRM1 in 80 subjects with schizophrenia and 74 age sex-matched control subjects. Kernel density estimation showed that [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in BA9 divided the schizophrenia, but not control, cohort into two distinct populations. One of the schizophrenia cohorts, comprising 26% of all subjects with the disorder, had a 74% reduction in mean cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding compared to controls. We suggest that these individuals make up 'muscarinic receptor-deficit schizophrenia' (MRDS). The MRDS could not be separated from other subjects with schizophrenia by CHRM1 sequence, gender, age, suicide, duration of illness or any particular drug treatment. Being able to define a subgroup within schizophrenia using a central biological parameter is a pivotal step towards understanding the biochemistry underlying at least one form of the disorder and may represent a biomarker that can be used in neuroimaging.

  11. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  12. Fluorescent pirenzepine derivatives as potential bitopic ligands of the human M1 muscarinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtaoui, Chouaib; Parrot, Isabelle; Klotz, Philippe; Guillier, Fabrice; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Hibert, Marcel; Ilien, Brigitte

    2004-08-12

    Following a recent description of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused human muscarinic M1 receptors and Bodipy-labeled pirenzepine, we synthesized seven fluorescent derivatives of this antagonist in order to further characterize ligand-receptor interactions. These compounds carry Bodipy [558/568], Rhodamine Red-X [560/580], or Fluorolink Cy3 [550/570] fluorophores connected to pirenzepine through various linkers. All molecules reversibly bind with high affinity to M1 receptors (radioligand and energy transfer binding experiments) provided that the linker contains more than six atoms. The energy transfer efficiency exhibits modest variations among ligands, indicating that the distance separating EGFP from the fluorophores remains almost constant. This also supports the notion that the fluorophores may bind to the receptor protein. Kinetic analyses reveal that the dissociation of two Bodipy derivatives (10 or 12 atom long linkers) is sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator brucine, while that of all other molecules (15-24 atom long linkers) is not. The data favor the idea that these analogues might interact with both the acetylcholine and the brucine binding domains. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  13. Muscarinic M1 receptors regulate propofol modulation of GABAergic transmission in rat ventrolateral preoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Tian; Liu, Yang; Qian, Kun; Yu, Bu-Wei

    2015-04-01

    GABAergic neurons within the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) play an important role in sleep-wakefulness regulation. Propofol, a widely used systemic anesthetic, has lately been reported to excite noradrenaline (NA)-inhibited type of VLPO neurons. Present study tested if acetylcholine system takes part in the propofol modulation of GABAergic spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in mechanically dissociated rat VLPO neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique. Propofol reversibly decreased mIPSC frequency without affecting the current amplitude, indicating that propofol acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of spontaneous GABA release. The propofol action on GABAergic mIPSC frequency was completely blocked by atropine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist, and pirenzepine, a selective M1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that propofol acts on M1 receptors on GABAergic nerve terminals projecting to VLPO neurons to inhibit spontaneous GABA release. The M1 receptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission onto VLPO neurons may contribute to the regulation of loss of consciousness induced by propofol.

  14. Characterization of Prejunctional Muscarinic Receptors: Effects on the Release of VIP and Functional Responses and Receptor Expression in the Ovine Submandibular Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders T. Ryberg

    2009-01-01

    was collected out of the submandibular venous drainage before and during electrical stimulation of chorda tympani nerve in the absence and presence either of pirenzepine or methoctramine. While metchoctramine increased the output of protein, pirenzepine inhibited flow of saliva and increased protein output, vasodilatation, and VIP output. In morphological examinations, the inhibitory muscarinic M4 receptor occurred interacinarily in the gland. It is concluded that prejunctional muscarinic receptors, most likely of the M4 subtype, exert inhibitory modulation of the parasympathetic release of VIP in the ovine submandibular gland.

  15. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects......, stereotypies and arousal as well as apomorphine-induced stereotypies and arousal in drug-naive Cebus apella monkeys. Xanomeline did not induce EPS but vomiting occurred in some monkeys at high doses, in accordance with emetic events observed in Alzheimer patients following xanomeline administration. Even when...... that xanomeline inhibits D-amphetamine- and (-)-apomorphine-induced behavior in Cebus apella monkeys at doses that do not cause EPS. These data further substantiate that muscarinic receptor agonists may be useful in the pharmacological treatment of psychosis....

  16. Direct actions of organophosphate anticholinesterases on nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakry, N.M.; el-Rashidy, A.H.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    Four nerve agents and one therapeutic organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterase (anti-ChE) bind to acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, inhibit or modulate binding of radioactive ligands to these receptors, and modify events regulated by them. The affinity of nicotinic (n) ACh receptors of Torpedo electric organs and most muscarinic (m) ACh receptors of rat brain and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cultures for the OP compounds was usually two to three orders of magnitude lower than concentrations required to inhibit 50% (IC-50) of ACh-esterase activity. However, a small population of m-ACh receptors had an affinity as high as that of ACh-esterase for the OP compound. This population is identified by its high-affinity (3H)-cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)-CD) binding. Although sarin, soman, and tabun had no effect, (O-ethyl S(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl)) methyl phosphonothionate (VX) and echothiophate inhibited competitively the binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((3H)-QNB) and (3H)-pirenzepine ((3H)-PZ) to m-ACh receptors. However, VX was more potent than echothiophate in inhibiting this binding and 50-fold more potent in inhibiting carbamylcholine (carb)-stimulated (3H)-cGMP synthesis in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells--both acting as m receptor antagonist. All five OPs inhibited (3H)-CD binding, with IC-50s of 3, 10, 40, 100, and 800 nM for VX, soman, sarin, echothiophate, and tabun, respectively. The OP anticholinesterases also bound to allosteric sites on the n-ACh receptor (identified by inhibition of (3H)-phencyclidine binding), but some bound as well to the receptor's recognition site (identified by inhibition of (125I)-alpha-bungarotoxin binding). Soman and echothiophate in micromolar concentrations acted as partial agonists of the n-ACh receptor and induced receptor desensitization. On the other hand, VX acted as an open channel blocker of the activated receptor and also enhanced receptor desensitization.

  17. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  18. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  19. Differential light microscopic autoradiographic localization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the brainstem and spinal cord of the rat using (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, H.I.; Deshmukh, P.; Roeske, W.R. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Health Sciences Center); Wamsley, J.K. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City (USA). Medical Center)

    1983-07-15

    Recently, the authors demonstrated that radiolabelled pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) bound to a high affinity population of muscarinic binding sites in the rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and corpus striatum. However, in the heart, cerebellum and ileum they found little or no (/sup 3/H)PZ binding. These data suggest that (/sup 3/H)PZ labels a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors. The present study examines the light microscopic autoradiographic localization of 3-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate, (-)(/sup 3/H)QNB, an antagonist which labels muscarinic receptors with equal affinity and compares its localization to (/sup 3/H)PZ in the rat brainstem and spinal cord.

  20. Central muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in pilocarpine-induced salivation, hypertension and water intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, T L; De Luca, L A; Colombari, D S A; Menani, J V

    2008-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that pilocarpine (ACh receptor agonist) injected peripherally may act centrally producing salivation and hypertension. In this study, we investigated the effects of specific M(1) (pirenzepine), M(2)/M(4) (methoctramine), M(1)/M(3) (4-DAMP) and M(4) (tropicamide) muscarinic receptor subtype antagonists injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle (LV) on salivation, water intake and pressor responses to peripheral pilocarpine. Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulae implanted in the LV were used. Salivation was measured in rats anaesthetized with ketamine (100 mg per kg body weight) and arterial pressure was recorded in unanaesthetized rats. Salivation induced by i.p. pilocarpine (4 micromol per kg body weight) was reduced only by 4-DAMP (25-250 nmol) injected into the LV, not by pirenzepine, methoctramine or tropicamide at the dose of 500 nmol. Pirenzepine (0.1 and 1 nmol) and 4-DAMP (5 and 10 nmol) injected into the LV reduced i.p. pilocarpine-induced water intake, whereas metoctramine (50 nmol) produced nonspecific effects on ingestive behaviours. Injection of pirenzepine (100 nmol) or 4-DAMP (25 and 50 nmol) into the LV reduced i.v. pilocarpine-induced pressor responses. Tropicamide (500 nmol) injected into the LV had no effect on pilocarpine-induced salivation, pressor responses or water intake. The results suggest that central M(3) receptors are involved in peripheral pilocarpine-induced salivation and M(1) receptors in water intake and pressor responses. The involvement of M(3) receptors in water intake and pressor responses is not clear because 4-DAMP blocks both M(1) and M(3) receptors.

  1. M4 muscarinic receptor knockout mice display abnormal social behavior and decreased prepulse inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Hisatsugu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system (CNS, the muscarinic system plays key roles in learning and memory, as well as in the regulation of many sensory, motor, and autonomic processes, and is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several major diseases of the CNS, such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous studies reveal that M4 muscarinic receptor knockout (M4R KO mice displayed an increase in basal locomotor activity, an increase in sensitivity to the prepulse inhibition (PPI-disrupting effect of psychotomimetics, and normal basal PPI. However, other behaviorally significant roles of M4R remain unclear. Results In this study, to further investigate precise functional roles of M4R in the CNS, M4R KO mice were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. M4R KO mice showed no significant impairments in nociception, neuromuscular strength, or motor coordination/learning. In open field, light/dark transition, and social interaction tests, consistent with previous studies, M4R KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor activity compared to their wild-type littermates. In the open field test, M4R KO mice exhibited novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity. In the social interaction test, contacts between pairs of M4R KO mice lasted shorter than those of wild-type mice. In the sensorimotor gating test, M4R KO mice showed a decrease in PPI, whereas in the startle response test, in contrast to a previous study, M4R KO mice demonstrated normal startle response. M4R KO mice also displayed normal performance in the Morris water maze test. Conclusions These findings indicate that M4R is involved in regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, and sensorimotor gating in mice. Together with decreased PPI, abnormal social behavior, which was newly identified in the present study, may represent a behavioral abnormality related to psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia.

  2. Layer-specific processing of excitatory signals in CA1 interneurons depends on postsynaptic M₂ muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Seeger, Thomas; Nixdorf-Bergweiler, Barbara E; Alzheimer, Christian

    2011-05-02

    The hippocampus receives a diffuse cholinergic innervation which acts on pre- and postsynaptic sites to modulate neurotransmission and excitability of pyramidal cells and interneurons in an intricate fashion. As one missing piece in this puzzle, we explored how muscarinic receptor activation modulates the somatodendritic processing of glutamatergic input in CA1 interneurons. We performed whole-cell recordings from visually identified interneurons of stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum oriens (SO) and examined the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh) on EPSP-like waveforms evoked by brief glutamate pulses onto their proximal dendrites. In SO interneurons, CCh consistently reduced glutamate-induced postsynaptic potentials (GPSPs) in control rat and mice, but not in M₂ muscarinic receptor knockout mice. By contrast, the overwhelming majority of interneurons recorded in SR of control and M₂ receptor-deficient hippocampi exhibited muscarinic enhancement of GPSPs. Interestingly, the non-responding interneurons were strictly confined to the SR subfield closest to the subiculum. Our data suggest that postsynaptic modulation by acetylcholine of excitatory input onto CA1 interneurons occurs in a stratum-specific fashion, which is determined by the absence or presence of M₂ receptors in their (somato-)dendritic compartments. Thus cholinergic projections might be capable of recalibrating synaptic weights in different inhibitory circuits of the CA1 region.

  3. Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and TrkB Receptor Cooperate in the Elimination of Redundant Motor Nerve Terminals during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A.; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the overproduction of synapses but connectivity is refined by Hebbian activity-dependent axonal competition. The newborn skeletal muscle fibers are polyinnervated but, at the end of the competition process, some days later, become innervated by a single axon. We used quantitative confocal imaging of the autofluorescent axons from transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice to investigate the possible cooperation of the muscarinic autoreceptors (mAChR, M1-, M2- and M4-subtypes) and the tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the control of axonal elimination after the mice Levator auris longus (LAL) muscle had been exposed to several selective antagonist of the corresponding receptor pathways in vivo. Our previous results show that M1, M2 and TrkB signaling individually increase axonal loss rate around P9. Here we show that although the M1 and TrkB receptors cooperate and add their respective individual effects to increase axonal elimination rate even more, the effect of the M2 receptor is largely independent of both M1 and TrkB receptors. Thus both, cooperative and non-cooperative signaling mechanisms contribute to developmental synapse elimination. PMID:28228723

  4. Effect of phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase A2 on the kinetics of antagonist binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, B; Niroomand, F; Messineo, F C; Weis, A; Kübler, W; Hasselbach, W

    1994-09-15

    Activation of phospholipases during prolonged myocardial ischemia could contribute to the functional derangement of myocardial cells by altering the phospholipid environment of a number of membrane bound proteins including receptors. The present study examined the kinetics of muscarinic receptor antagonist [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding ([3H]QNB) to muscarinic receptors of highly purified sarcolemmal membranes under control conditions and after treatment with phospholipase A2 (PLA2; EC 3.1.1.4). Initial binding rates of QNB exhibited saturation kinetics, when plotted against the ligand concentration in control and PLA2 treated sarcolemmal membranes. This kinetic behaviour of QNB-binding is consistent with at least a two step binding mechanism. According to this two step binding hypothesis an unstable intermediate receptor-QNB complex (R*QNB) forms rapidly, and this form undergoes a slow conversion to the high affinity ligand-receptor complex R-QNB. The Michaelis constant Km of R-QNB formation was 1.8 nM, whereas the dissociation constant Kd obtained from equilibrium measurements was 0.062 nM. After 5 min exposure of sarcolemmal membranes to PLA2QNB binding capacity (Bmax) was reduced by 62%, and the affinity of the remaining receptor sites was decreased by 47% (Kd = 0.116 nM). This PLA2-induced increase of Kd was accompanied by a corresponding increase of Km, whereas the rate constants k2 and k-2 of the hypothetical slow conversion step (second reaction step) remained unchanged. These results suggest that binding of QNB to cardiac muscarinic receptors induces a transition in the receptor-ligand configuration, which is necessary for the formation of the final high affinity R-QNB complex. PLA2-induced changes of the lipid environment result in the inability of a part of the receptor population to undergo this transition, thereby inhibiting high affinity QNB-binding.

  5. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannals, R.F.; Langstrom, B.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 ..mu..l). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity.

  6. Muscarinic Receptor Occupancy and Cognitive Impairment: A PET Study with [11C](+)3-MPB and Scopolamine in Conscious Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kawamata, Masahiro; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Takei, Nori; Tsukada, Hideo; Domino, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) antagonist scopolamine was used to induce transient cognitive impairment in monkeys trained in a delayed matching to sample task. The temporal relationship between the occupancy level of central mAChRs and cognitive impairment was determined. Three conscious monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were subjected to positron emission tomography (PET) scans with the mAChR radioligand N-[11C]methyl-3-piperidyl benzilate ([11C](+)3-MPB). The scan sequence was pre-, 2,...

  7. Ethanol impairs muscarinic receptor-induced neuritogenesis in rat hippocampal slices: Role of astrocytes and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gennaro; Guizzetti, Marina; Dao, Khoi; Mattison, Hayley A; Costa, Lucio G

    2011-12-01

    In an in vitro co-culture system of astrocytes and neurons, stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in astrocytes had been shown to cause neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons, and this effect was inhibited by ethanol. The present study sought to confirm these earlier findings in a more complex system, in vitro rat hippocampal slices in culture. Exposure of hippocampal slices to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (1mM for 24h) induced neurite outgrowth in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which was mediated by activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. Specifically, carbachol induced a >4-fold increase in the length of the longest neurite, and a 4-fold increase in the length of minor neurites and in the number of branches. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol (50mM) resulted in significant inhibition of the effects induced by carbachol on all parameters measured. Neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons is dependent on various permissive factors that are produced and released by glial cells. In hippocampal slices carbachol increased the levels of two extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin and laminin-1, by 1.6-fold, as measured by Western blot. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol significantly inhibited these increases. Carbachol-induced increases in levels of extracellular matrix proteins were antagonized by a M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, function-blocking fibronectin or laminin-1 antibodies antagonized the effect of carbachol on neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that in hippocampal slices stimulation of muscarinic M3 receptors induces neurite outgrowth, which is mediated by fibronectin and laminin-1, two extracellular matrix proteins released by astrocytes. By decreasing fibronectin and laminin levels ethanol prevents carbachol-induced neuritogenesis. These findings highlight the importance of glial-neuronal interactions as important targets in the developmental neurotoxicity of alcohol.

  8. Antagonism of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Alters Synaptic ERK Phosphorylation in the Rat Forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, Henry H; Wang, John Q

    2016-12-28

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key transmitter in the mesocorticolimbic circuit. By interacting with muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) enriched in the circuit, ACh actively regulates various neuronal and synaptic activities. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and is subject to the regulation by dopamine receptors, although the regulation of ERKs by limbic mAChRs is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mAChRs in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation (activation) in the mesocorticolimbic system of adult rat brains in vivo. We targeted a sub-pool of ERKs at synaptic sites. We found that a systemic injection of the mAChR antagonist scopolamine increased phosphorylation of synaptic ERKs in the striatum (caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Increases in ERK phosphorylation in both forebrain regions were rapid and transient. Notably, pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist SCH23390 blocked the scopolamine-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in these brain regions, while a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride did not. Scopolamine and SCH23390 did not change the amount of total ERK proteins. These results demonstrate that mAChRs inhibit synaptic ERK phosphorylation in striatal and mPFC neurons under normal conditions. Blockade of this inhibitory mAChR tone leads to the upregulation of ERK phosphorylation likely through a mechanism involving the level of D1R activity.

  9. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  10. Acetylcholine-induced neuronal differentiation: muscarinic receptor activation regulates EGR-1 and REST expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Monica; Anelli, Tonino; Tocco, Gabriella Augusti; Lucarini, Elena; Mozzetta, Chiara; Poiana, Giancarlo; Tata, Ada Maria; Biagioni, Stefano

    2009-02-01

    Neurotransmitters are considered part of the signaling system active in nervous system development and we have previously reported that acetylcholine (ACh) is capable of enhancing neuronal differentiation in cultures of sensory neurons and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. To study the mechanism of ACh action, in this study, we demonstrate the ability of choline acetyltransferase-transfected N18TG2 clones (e.g. 2/4 clone) to release ACh. Analysis of muscarinic receptors showed the presence of M1-M4 subtypes and the activation of both IP(3) and cAMP signal transduction pathways. Muscarinic receptor activation increases early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) levels and treatments with agonists, antagonists, and signal transduction enzyme inhibitors suggest a role for M3 subtype in EGR-1 induction. The role of EGR-1 in the enhancement of differentiation was investigated transfecting in N18TG2 cells a construct for EGR-1. EGR-1 clones show increased neurite extension and a decrease in Repressor Element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) expression: both these features have also been observed for the 2/4 clone. Transfection of this latter with EGR zinc-finger domain, a dominant negative inhibitor of EGR-1 action, increases REST expression, and decreases fiber outgrowth. The data reported suggest that progression of the clone 2/4 in the developmental program is dependent on ACh release and the ensuing activation of muscarinic receptors, which in turn modulate the level of EGR-1 and REST transcription factors.

  11. Relaxation of rat distal colon by activation of muscarinic, neuronal receptors: possible involvement of P(2y)-purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, L; Ali, A; Nordgren, S; Delbro, D S

    2000-07-01

    McN-A-343, which is a ligand at muscarinic receptors on myenteric ganglia, was found to concentration-dependently (1-44 microM) elicit non-adrenergic relaxation of the longitudinal muscle of rat distal colon, having been precontracted with carbachol (1 microM). This effect was partly antagonized by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine (0.3 microM), the nerve blocker, tetrodotoxin (1 microM), or by drugs which interfere with purinergic neurotransmission (apamin [0.5 microM], reactive blue 2 [50 microM]). Blockade of nitric oxide synthase (L-NNA [100 microM]), or of the cAMP (H-89 [1 microM]), or cGMP (ODQ [10 microM]) second messenger pathways did not affect the relaxatory response to McN-A-343 (14 microM). An additional, non-neurogenic component of the relaxation to this compound on carbachol induced tone is suggested to reflect a partial antagonism of the muscarinic receptors on the gut muscle by McN-A-343.

  12. FRET-Based Detection of M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation by Orthosteric and Allosteric Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Danijela; Holdich, Jonathan; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Mistry, Rajendra; Krasel, Cornelius; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.; Challiss, R. A. John

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors that regulate a variety of physiological processes and represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. mAChRs can be stimulated by full and partial orthosteric and allosteric agonists, however the relative abilities of such ligands to induce conformational changes in the receptor remain unclear. To gain further insight into the actions of mAChR agonists, we have developed a fluorescently tagged M1 mAChR that reports ligand-induced conformational changes in real-time by changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Methods Variants of CFP and YFP were inserted into the third intracellular loop and at the end of the C-terminus of the mouse M1 mAChR, respectively. The optimized FRET receptor construct (M1-cam5) was expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Results The variant CFP/YFP-receptor chimera expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells and displayed ligand-binding affinities comparable with those of the wild-type receptor. It also retained an ability to interact with Gαq/11 proteins and to stimulate phosphoinositide turnover, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and undergo agonist-dependent internalization. Addition of the full agonist methacholine caused a reversible decrease in M1 FRET (FEYFP/FECFP) that was prevented by atropine pre-addition and showed concentration-dependent amplitude and kinetics. Partial orthosteric agonists, arecoline and pilocarpine, as well as allosteric agonists, AC-42 and 77-LH-28-1, also caused atropine-sensitive decreases in the FRET signal, which were smaller in amplitude and significantly slower in onset compared to those evoked by methacholine. Conclusion The M1 FRET-based receptor chimera reports that allosteric and orthosteric agonists induce similar conformational changes in the third intracellular loop and/or C-terminus, and should prove to be a valuable molecular reagent for

  13. FRET-based detection of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation by orthosteric and allosteric agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Markovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs are 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors that regulate a variety of physiological processes and represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. mAChRs can be stimulated by full and partial orthosteric and allosteric agonists, however the relative abilities of such ligands to induce conformational changes in the receptor remain unclear. To gain further insight into the actions of mAChR agonists, we have developed a fluorescently tagged M(1 mAChR that reports ligand-induced conformational changes in real-time by changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. METHODS: Variants of CFP and YFP were inserted into the third intracellular loop and at the end of the C-terminus of the mouse M(1 mAChR, respectively. The optimized FRET receptor construct (M(1-cam5 was expressed stably in HEK293 cells. RESULTS: The variant CFP/YFP-receptor chimera expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells and displayed ligand-binding affinities comparable with those of the wild-type receptor. It also retained an ability to interact with Gα(q/11 proteins and to stimulate phosphoinositide turnover, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and undergo agonist-dependent internalization. Addition of the full agonist methacholine caused a reversible decrease in M(1 FRET (F(EYFP/F(ECFP that was prevented by atropine pre-addition and showed concentration-dependent amplitude and kinetics. Partial orthosteric agonists, arecoline and pilocarpine, as well as allosteric agonists, AC-42 and 77-LH-28-1, also caused atropine-sensitive decreases in the FRET signal, which were smaller in amplitude and significantly slower in onset compared to those evoked by methacholine. CONCLUSION: The M(1 FRET-based receptor chimera reports that allosteric and orthosteric agonists induce similar conformational changes in the third intracellular loop and/or C-terminus, and should prove to be a

  14. Cruzipain induces autoantibodies against cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional and pathological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Giordanengo, Laura; Joensen, Lilian; Gea, Susana

    2003-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether cruzipain, a Trypanosoma cruzi immunodominant antigen, was able to induce antibodies reactive to the cardiac M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2) mAChR). Immunization with cruzipain that was devoid of enzyme activity triggered IgG antibodies against cardiac M(2) mAChR. By radioligand competition assay we proved that the anti-cruzipain IgG fraction, purified from serum, inhibited binding of the specific M(2) mAChR radioligand [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. We also demonstrated that anti-cruzipain IgG reacted against the second extracellular loop of the M(2) mAChR. The corresponding affinity-purified serum anti-M(2)e2 IgG (reacting against a synthetic peptide corresponding to this loop in humans) displayed agonist-like activity associated with specific M(2) mAChR activation - increase of cGMP, inositol phosphate accumulation and nitric oxide synthase activity - triggering a decrease in myocardial contractility. Moreover, the same IgG fraction decreased heart frequency, related to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. These results imply that cruzipain plays a role in the production of antibodies against M(2) mAChR, which have been related to the pathogenesis of dysautonomic syndrome described in Chagas' disease.

  15. Relationship between action potential sodium channels and muscarinic receptors in mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists and antagonists were tested for their ability to influence stimulated and unstimulated /sup 22/Na uptake in preparations of forebrain and hindbrain in mice in vitro. In mouse forebrain, atropine and pirenzepine decreased stimulated sodium uptake. Dicyclomine decreased stimulated uptake in both the forebrain and hindbrain. McN-A-343 decreased stimulated sodium uptake in the forebrain. The effects of sodium channel ligands on muscarinic receptors was investigated in forebrain and hindbrain preparations. In the forebrain, veratridine and aconitine appeared to inhibit the binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB in a competitive manner. Tetrodotoxin alone had not effect on binding, but enhanced the inhibition by veratridine, with no effect on aconitine inhibition. In the hindbrain, veratridine appeared to inhibit (/sup 3/H)QNB binding non-competitively and competitively. The addition of magnesium increased the K/sub i/ value in the veratridine inhibition. GTP enhanced the inhibition by veratridine. Tetrodotoxin increased the K/sub i/ value of the veratridine inhibition curve. Tetrodotoxin alone also inhibited (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Tetrodotoxin inhibited QNB binding in both a non-competitive and uncompetitive manner.

  16. Role of acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Wolfgang; Wiegand, Silke; Akinci, Sibel; Schinkel, Alfred H; Wess, Jürgen; Koepsell, Hermann; Haberberger, Rainer Viktor; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2006-01-01

    For the murine trachea, it has been reported that constriction evoked by serotonin (5-HT) is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh) released from the epithelium, owing to the sensitivity of the 5-HT response to epithelium removal, sensitivity to atropine, and insensitivity to tetrodotoxin (Moffatt et al., 2003). Consistent with this assumption, the respiratory epithelium contains ACh, its synthesizing enzyme, and the high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 (Reinheimer et al., 1996; Pfeil et al., 2003; Proskocil et al., 2004). Recently, we demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs), which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells (Lips et al., 2005). Hence, we proposed that 5-HT evokes release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs and that this epithelial-derived ACh induces bronchoconstriction. We tested this hypothesis in a well-established model of videomorphometric analysis of bronchial diameter in precision-cut murine lung slices utilizing epithelium removal to assess the role of the epithelium, OCT mouse knockout (KO) strains to assess the role of OCT isoforms, and muscarinic receptor M2/M3 double-KO mice to assess the cholinergic component of 5-HT induced bronchoconstriction, as bronchi of this strain are entirely unresponsive to cholinergic stimulation(Struckmann et al., 2003).

  17. M1 muscarinic receptor activation mediates cell death in M1-HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, E Scott; Woo, Kerhan K; Aalderink, Miranda; Fry, Sandie; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Glass, Michelle; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells have been used extensively to generate stable cell lines to study G protein-coupled receptors, such as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). The activation of M1 mAChRs in various cell types in vitro has been shown to be protective. To further investigate M1 mAChR-mediated cell survival, we generated stable HEK293 cell-lines expressing the human M1 mAChR. M1 mAChRs were efficiently expressed at the cell surface and efficiently internalised within 1 h by carbachol. Carbachol also induced early signalling cascades similar to previous reports. Thus, ectopically expressed M1 receptors behaved in a similar fashion to the native receptor over short time periods of analysis. However, substantial cell death was observed in HEK293-M1 cells within 24 h after carbachol application. Death was only observed in HEK cells expressing M1 receptors and fully blocked by M1 antagonists. M1 mAChR-stimulation mediated prolonged activation of the MEK-ERK pathway and resulted in prolonged induction of the transcription factor EGR-1 (>24 h). Blockade of ERK signalling with U0126 did not reduce M1 mAChR-mediated cell-death significantly but inhibited the acute induction of EGR-1. We investigated the time-course of cell death using time-lapse microscopy and xCELLigence technology. Both revealed the M1 mAChR cytotoxicity occurs within several hours of M1 activation. The xCELLigence assay also confirmed that the ERK pathway was not involved in cell-death. Interestingly, the MEK blocker did reduce carbachol-mediated cleaved caspase 3 expression in HEK293-M1 cells. The HEK293 cell line is a widely used pharmacological tool for studying G-protein coupled receptors, including mAChRs. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the longer term fate of these cells in short term signalling studies. Identifying how and why activation of the M1 mAChR signals apoptosis in these cells may lead to a better understanding of how mAChRs regulate cell-fate decisions.

  18. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  19. Distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain as determined in binding studies with AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, E.; Hammer, R.; Ladinsky, H.

    1987-03-02

    In vitro competition binding experiments with the selective muscarinic antagonists AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine (PZ) vs /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine as radioligand revealed a characteristic distribution of muscarinic receptor subtypes in different regions of rat brain. Based on nonlinear least squares analysis, the binding data were compatible with the presence of three different subtypes: the M/sub 1/ receptor (high affinity for PZ), the cardiac M/sub 2/ receptor (high affinity for AF-DX 116) and the glandular M/sub 2/ receptor (low affinity for PZ and AF-DX 116). The highest proportion of M/sub 1/ receptors was found in the hippocampus, while the cerebellum and the hypothalamus were the regions with the largest fraction of the cardiac M/sub 2/ and glandular M/sub 2/ receptors, respectively. In certain brain areas, depending on the relative proportions of the subtypes, flat binding curves were seen for AF-DX 116 and PZ. Based on these data, an approximate distribution pattern of the subtypes in the various brain regions is presented. 19 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  20. (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine selectively identifies a high affinity population of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1982-11-01

    The specific binding of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine was investigated in homogenates of rat cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, and heart. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine in the cerebral cortex as defined by displacement with atropine sulfate (1..mu..M) was of high affinity (K/sub d/ = 4-10 nM, receptor density = 1.06 pmoles/mg protein), stereoselective, and competitive with drugs specific for the muscarinic receptor. In contrast, few (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine binding sites were demonstrated in cerebellar and heart homogenates.

  1. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres....... Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance....

  2. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  3. Nicotine effects on muscarinic receptor-mediated free Ca[Formula: see text] level changes in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dawei; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Anbing; Sun, Wenhai; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Limin

    2016-06-01

    It was suggested that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca[Formula: see text] levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. It is assumed that, following facial nerve injury, the interactions of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in facial nerve nucleus may negatively regulate free Ca[Formula: see text] concentrations in the facial nerve nucleus, which provide important information for the repair and regeneration of the facial nerve. The present study investigated the regulatory effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury at 7, 30, and 90 days following facial nerve injury using laser confocal microscopy. The dose-dependent regulation of nicotine on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion level changes in the facial nucleus may decrease the range of free Ca[Formula: see text] increases following facial nerve injury, which is important for nerve cell regeneration. It is concluded that the negative effects of nicotine on muscarinic receptors are related to the [Formula: see text] subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  4. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate inhibitory synaptic rhythms in hippocampus and neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley E Alger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors (mAChRs powerfully affects many neuronal properties as well as numerous cognitive behaviors. Small neuronal circuits constitute an intermediate level of organization between neurons and behaviors, and mAChRs affect interactions among cells that compose these circuits. Circuit activity is often assessed by extracellular recordings of the local field potentials (LFPs, which are analogous to in vivo EEGs, generated by coordinated neuronal interactions. Coherent forms of physiologically relevant circuit activity manifest themselves as rhythmic oscillations in the LFPs. Frequencies of rhythmic oscillations that are most closely associated with animal behavior are in the range of 4-80 Hz, which is subdivided into theta (4-14 Hz, beta (15-29 Hz and gamma (30-80 Hz bands. Activation of mAChRs triggers rhythmic oscillations in these bands in the hippocampus and neocortex. Inhibitory responses mediated by GABAergic interneurons constitute a prominent feature of these oscillations, and indeed, appear to be their major underlying factor in many cases. An important issue is which interneurons are involved in rhythm generation. Besides affecting cellular and network properties directly, mAChRs can cause the mobilization of endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids, eCBs that, by acting on the principal cannabinoid receptor of the brain, CB1R, regulate the release of certain neurotransmitters, including GABA. CB1Rs are heavily expressed on only a subset of interneurons and, at lower density, on glutamatergic neurons. Exogenous cannabinoids typically disrupt oscillations in the θ and Υ ranges, which probably contributes to the behavioral effects of these drugs. It is important to understand how neuronal circuit activity is affected by mAChR-driven eCBs, as this information will provide deeper insight into circuit behavior as the effects both eCBs and exogenous cannabinoids in intacts behavior. After

  5. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  6. Selective blockade of central m1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors with pirenzepine impairs cardiovascular and respiratory function in rats with acute hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, N Ya; Matsievskii, D D

    2006-09-01

    Ultrasound studies showed that selective antagonist of central M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors pirenzepine (50 mg/kg intravenously) causes transitory hypotension and respiratory depression in anesthetized intact rats. The M1 receptor antagonist had no effect on cardiac output and portal blood flow. Pretreatment with pirenzepine increased the sensitivity of rats with acute massive hemorrhage to circulatory hypoxia. After blockade of central M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, the posthemorrhagic period was characterized by primary decompensation of blood pressure, portal blood flow, and respiration and development of low cardiac output syndrome. The animals died over the first minutes after bleeding arrest. Our results indicate that central M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors act as shock-limiting cholinergic structures under conditions of posthemorrhagic changes in systemic and portal blood flow, as well as during respiratory dysfunction.

  7. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel N-alkyl/aryl substituted thiazolidinone arecoline analogues as muscarinic receptor 1 agonist in Alzheimer's dementia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadashiva, C T; Chandra, J N Narendra Sharath; Kavitha, C V; Thimmegowda, A; Subhash, M N; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2009-12-01

    Earlier we have reported the effect of arecoline thiazolidinone and morpholino arecoline analogues as muscarinic receptor 1 agonist in Alzheimer's dementia models. To elucidate further our SAR study on the chemistry and muscarinic receptor binding efficacy, a series of novel N-alkyl/aryl substituted thiazolidinone arecoline analogues 6(a-m) were designed and synthesized from 3-pyridine carboxaldehyde by reacting with different amines in the presence of gamma-ferrite as catalyst and subjected to in vitro muscarinic receptor binding studies using male Wistar rat brain membrane homogenate and extended to in vivo pharmacological evaluation of memory and learning in male Wistar rats. Derivative 6j having diphenylamine moiety attached to nitrogen of thiazolidinone showed significant affinity for the M1 receptor binding.

  8. Role of the M2 muscarinic receptor pathway in lidocaine-induced potentiation of the relaxant response to atrial natriuretic peptide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Motonari; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mitani, Akiko; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    We earlier reported that lidocaine augments the relaxation and accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate produced by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in bovine tracheal smooth muscle contracted with methacholine. However, the mechanism of that augmentation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the role of muscarinic receptor-mediated signalling in the potentiation of ANP-induced relaxation by lidocaine. Lidocaine (100 micro M) augmented the relaxant responses to ANP in methacholine (0.3 microM)-contracted bovine tracheal smooth muscle but had no effect on the relaxant effects of ANP in preparations contracted with 100 micro M histamine. Treatment of tracheal preparations with methoctramine (0.03 microM), an M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist, enhanced ANP-induced relaxation and this treatment abolished the synergistic action of lidocaine on ANP. In radioligand-binding experiments, lidocaine concentration dependently displaced the specific binding of [3H]- N-methyl scopolamine to cloned human M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. These results suggest that lidocaine acts as an M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist, thereby potentiating the relaxant responses to ANP in the bovine tracheal smooth muscle contracted with muscarinic receptor agonists.

  9. Exploration of the orthosteric/allosteric interface in human M1 muscarinic receptors by bitopic fluorescent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Sandrine B; Kellenberger, Esther; Bonnet, Dominique; Utard, Valérie; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Ilien, Brigitte

    2013-07-01

    Bitopic binding properties apply to a variety of muscarinic compounds that span and simultaneously bind to both the orthosteric and allosteric receptor sites. We provide evidence that fluorescent pirenzepine derivatives, with the M1 antagonist fused to the boron-dipyrromethene [Bodipy (558/568)] fluorophore via spacers of varying lengths, exhibit orthosteric/allosteric binding properties at muscarinic M1 receptors. This behavior was inferred from a combination of functional, radioligand, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer binding experiments performed under equilibrium and kinetic conditions on enhanced green fluorescent protein-fused M1 receptors. Although displaying a common orthosteric component, the fluorescent compounds inherit bitopic properties from a linker-guided positioning of their Bodipy moiety within the M1 allosteric vestibule. Depending on linker length, the fluorophore is allowed to reach neighboring allosteric domains, overlapping or not with the classic gallamine site, but distinct from the allosteric indolocarbazole "WIN" site. Site-directed mutagenesis, as well as molecular modeling and ligand docking studies based on recently solved muscarinic receptor structures, further support the definition of two groups of Bodipy-pirenzepine derivatives exhibiting distinct allosteric binding poses. Thus, the linker may dictate pharmacological outcomes for bitopic molecules that are hardly predictable from the properties of individual orthosteric and allosteric building blocks. Our findings also demonstrate that the fusion of a fluorophore to an orthosteric ligand is not neutral, as it may confer, unless carefully controlled, unexpected properties to the resultant fluorescent tracer. Altogether, this study illustrates the importance of a "multifacet" experimental approach to unravel and validate bitopic ligand binding mechanisms.

  10. In vitro and ex vivo evaluation of cyclic aminoalkyl benzilates as potential emission tomography ligands for the muscarinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C A; Mulholland, G K; Perry, S E; Combs, R; Sherman, P S; Fisher, S J

    1989-01-01

    A series of muscarinic antagonists were screened as potential receptor imaging agents. (+)2 alpha-tropanyl benzilate (TRB), N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (NMPB) and several analogs amenable to labeling with positron emitting isotopes were evaluated for muscarinic binding to mouse brain tissue in vitro and ex vivo using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate as the probe. The in vitro assay directly compared the innate binding affinities of the compounds. The rank order of binding (IC50) was TRB (0.7 nm), QNB (0.8 nm), scopolamine (1.3 nm) and NMPB (1.6 nm). The ex vivo assay was used to gain information regarding the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of the compounds in live animals. Ex vivo results demonstrated that TRB was rapidly taken up into the brain and was equipotent with QNB in occupying muscarinic binding sites at early time points, but TRB binding decreased twice as fast over time as QNB binding. The results suggest TRB would be a good candidate for radiolabeling and further study.

  11. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg...

  12. Characterization of the novel positive allosteric modulator, LY2119620, at the muscarinic M(2) and M(4) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Schober, Douglas A; Xiao, Hongling; Quets, Anne; Christopoulos, Arthur; Felder, Christian C

    2014-07-01

    The M(4) receptor is a compelling therapeutic target, as this receptor modulates neural circuits dysregulated in schizophrenia, and there is clinical evidence that muscarinic agonists possess both antipsychotic and procognitive efficacy. Recent efforts have shifted toward allosteric ligands to maximize receptor selectivity and manipulate endogenous cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling. In this study, we present the pharmacological characterization of LY2119620 (3-amino-5-chloro-N-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-6-[2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethoxy] thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide), a M(2)/M(4) receptor-selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM), chemically evolved from hits identified through a M4 allosteric functional screen. Although unsuitable as a therapeutic due to M(2) receptor cross-reactivity and, thus, potential cardiovascular liability, LY2119620 surpassed previous congeners in potency and PAM activity and broadens research capabilities through its development into a radiotracer. Characterization of LY2119620 revealed evidence of probe dependence in both binding and functional assays. Guanosine 5'-[γ-(35)S]-triphosphate assays displayed differential potentiation depending on the orthosteric-allosteric pairing, with the largest cooperativity observed for oxotremorine M (Oxo-M) LY2119620. Further [(3)H]Oxo-M saturation binding, including studies with guanosine-5'-[(β,γ)-imido]triphosphate, suggests that both the orthosteric and allosteric ligands can alter the population of receptors in the active G protein-coupled state. Additionally, this work expands the characterization of the orthosteric agonist, iperoxo, at the M(4) receptor, and demonstrates that an allosteric ligand can positively modulate the binding and functional efficacy of this high efficacy ligand. Ultimately, it was the M(2) receptor pharmacology and PAM activity with iperoxo that made LY2119620 the most suitable allosteric partner for the M(2) active-state structure recently solved

  13. Ovulation requires the activation on proestrus of M₁ muscarinic receptors in the left ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M E; Flores, A; Alvarado, B E; Hernández, C G; Zárate, A; Chavira, R; Cárdenas, M; Arrieta-Cruz, I; Gutiérrez-Juárez, R

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the effects of chemically blocking type 1 muscarinic receptors (M1R) on either the left or right ovary on ovulation rate, number of ova shed and steroid hormones levels. M1R were unilaterally blocked in ovary with the M1R selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZP). PZP was delivered into the bursa ovarica of the left or right ovary of adult rats at 13:00 h on proestrus day. PZP treatment in the left but not in the right ovary blocked ovulation. PZP did not modify the number of ova shed, nor progesterone or 17β-estradiol serum levels. The surge of luteinizing hormone levels was diminished while that of follicle-stimulating hormone did not change in animals treated with PZP in the left ovary. Interestingly, treatment with either synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone or human chorionic gonadotropin 1 h after PZP administration in the left ovary restored ovulation in both ovaries. The presence of M1R protein in the theca cells of the ovarian follicles as well as in cells of the corpus luteum was detected on proestrus day. These results suggest that M1R activation in the left ovary is required for pre-ovulatory gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and ovulation. Furthermore, these results also suggest that M1R in the left ovary might be regulating ovulation asymmetrically through a stimulatory neural signal relayed to the hypothalamus via the vagus nerve to induce the GnRH secretion which then triggers ovulation.

  14. Muscarinic receptor binding increases in anterior thalamus and cingulate cortex during discriminative avoidance learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.A.; Gabriel, M.; Vogt, L.J.; Poremba, A.; Jensen, E.L.; Kubota, Y.; Kang, E. (Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Training-induced neuronal activity develops in the mammalian limbic system during discriminative avoidance conditioning. This study explores behaviorally relevant changes in muscarinic ACh receptor binding in 52 rabbits that were trained to one of five stages of conditioned response acquisition. Sixteen naive and 10 animals yoked to criterion performance served as control cases. Upon reaching a particular stage of training, the brains were removed and autoradiographically assayed for 3H-oxotremorine-M binding with 50 nM pirenzepine (OxO-M/PZ) or for 3H-pirenzepine binding in nine limbic thalamic nuclei and cingulate cortex. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding increased in the parvocellular division of the anterodorsal nucleus early in training when the animals were first exposed to pairing of the conditional and unconditional stimuli. Elevated binding in this nucleus was maintained throughout subsequent training. In the parvocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVp), OxO-M/PZ binding progressively increased throughout training, reached a peak at the criterion stage of performance, and returned to control values during extinction sessions. Peak OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp was significantly elevated over that for cases yoked to criterion performance. In the magnocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVm), OxO-M/PZ binding was elevated only during criterion performance of the task, and it was unaltered in any other limbic thalamic nuclei. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding was also elevated in most layers in rostral area 29c when subjects first performed a significant behavioral discrimination. Training-induced alterations in OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp and layer Ia of area 29c were similar and highly correlated.

  15. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  16. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  17. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  18. Mercury Vapour Long-Lasting Exposure: Lymphocyte Muscarinic Receptors as Neurochemical Markers of Accidental Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Roda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic poisoning may result in home setting after mercury (Hg vapours inhalation from damaged devices. We report a chronic, nonoccupational Hg poisoning due to 10-year indoor exposure to mercury spillage. Case Report. A 72-year-old man with polyneuropathy of suspected toxic origin. At hospitalization, toxicological clinical evaluations confirmed the altered neurological picture documented across the last decade. Periodic blood and urine Hg levels (BHg, UHg monitoring were performed from admission (t0, until 1 year later (t2, paralleled by blood neurochemical markers assessment, that is, lymphocytes muscarinic receptors (l-MRs. At t0: BHg and UHg were 27 and 1.4 microg/L, respectively (normal values: BHg 1–4.5; UHg 0.1–4.5, associated with l-MRs increase, 185.82 femtomoL/million lymphocytes (normal range: 8.0–16.0. At t1 (two days after DMSA-mobilization test, BHg weak reduction, paralleled by UHg 3.7-fold increase, was measured together with further l-MRs enhancement (205.43 femtomoL/million lymphocytes. At t2 (eight months after two cycles of DMSA chelating therapy ending, gradual improving of clinical manifestations was accompanied by progressive decrease of BHg and UHg (4.0 and 2.8 microg/L, resp. and peripheral l-MRs neurochemical marker (24.89 femtomoL/million lymphocytes. Conclusion. l-MRs modulatory effect supports their use as peripheral neurochemical marker in Hg poisoning diagnosis and chelation therapy monitoring.

  19. Blockade of muscarinic receptors impairs the retrieval of well-trained memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo eSoma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is known to play an important role in memory functions, and its deficit has been proposed to cause the cognitive decline associated with advanced age and Alzheimer’s disease (the cholinergic hypothesis. Although many studies have tested the cholinergic hypothesis for recently acquired memory, only a few have investigated the role of ACh in the retrieval process of well-trained cognitive memory, which describes the memory established from repetition and daily routine. To examine this point, we trained rats to perform a two-alternative forced-choice visual detection task. Each trial was started by having the rats pull upward a central-lever, which triggered the presentation of a visual stimulus to the right or left side of the display monitor, and then pulling upward a stimulus-relevant choice-lever located on both sides. Rats learned the task within 10 days, and the task training was continued for a month. Task performance was measured with or without systemic administration of a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR antagonist, scopolamine (SCOP, prior to the test. After 30 min of SCOP administration, rats stopped manipulating any lever even though they explored the lever and surrounding environment, suggesting a loss of the task-related associative memory. Three hours later, rats were recovered to complete the trial, but the rats selected the levers irrespective of the visual stimulus, suggesting they remembered a series of lever-manipulations in association with a reward, but not association between the reward and visual stimulation. Furthermore, an m1-AChR, but not nicotinic AChR antagonist caused a similar deficit in the task execution. SCOP neither interfered with locomotor activity nor drinking behavior, while it influenced anxiety. These results suggest that the activation of mAChRs at basal ACh levels is essential for the recall of well-trained cognitive memory.

  20. Effects of Modulating M3 Muscarinic Receptor Activity on Azoxymethane-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Sandeep; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Twadell, William; Cheng, Kunrong; Rachakonda, Vikrant; Saxena, Neeraj; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that azoxymethane (AOM)-induced liver injury is robustly exacerbated in M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R)-deficient mice. We used the same mouse model to test the hypothesis that selective pharmacological modulation of M3R activity regulates the liver injury response. Initial experiments confirmed that giving a selective M3R antagonist, darifenacin, to AOM-treated mice mimicked M3R gene ablation. Compared to vehicle controls, mice treated with the M3R antagonist had reduced survival and increased liver nodularity and fibrosis. We next assessed AOM-induced liver injury in mice treated with a selective M3R agonist, pilocarpine. After pilocarpine treatment, stimulation of post-M3R signaling in the liver was evidenced by ERK and AKT activation. In contrast to the damaging effects of the M3R antagonist, administering pilocarpine to AOM-treated mice significantly attenuated hepatic stellate cell activation, collagen deposition, bile ductule proliferation, and liver fibrosis and nodularity. As anticipated from these findings, livers from pilocarpine-treated mice exhibited reduced expression of key players in fibrosis (α1 collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, TGF-β1, PGDF, TGF-β1R, PGDFR) and decreased mRNA levels for molecules that regulate extracellular matrix formation (TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, MMP-13). Cleaved caspase-3, nitrotyrosine and BrdU immunostaining provided evidence that pilocarpine treatment reduced hepatocyte apoptosis and oxidative stress, while increasing hepatocyte proliferation. Collectively, these findings identify several downstream mechanisms whereby M3R activation ameliorates toxic liver injury. These novel observations provide a proof-of-principle that selectively stimulating M3R activation to prevent or diminish liver injury is a therapeutic strategy worthy of further investigation. PMID:23707755

  1. Mercury Vapour Long-Lasting Exposure: Lymphocyte Muscarinic Receptors as Neurochemical Markers of Accidental Intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, E.; Vecchio, S.; Apostoli, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic poisoning may result in home setting after mercury (Hg) vapours inhalation from damaged devices. We report a chronic, nonoccupational Hg poisoning due to 10-year indoor exposure to mercury spillage. Case Report. A 72-year-old man with polyneuropathy of suspected toxic origin. At hospitalization, toxicological clinical evaluations confirmed the altered neurological picture documented across the last decade. Periodic blood and urine Hg levels (BHg, UHg) monitoring were performed from admission (t0), until 1 year later (t2), paralleled by blood neurochemical markers assessment, that is, lymphocytes muscarinic receptors (l-MRs). At t0: BHg and UHg were 27 and 1.4 microg/L, respectively (normal values: BHg 1–4.5; UHg 0.1–4.5), associated with l-MRs increase, 185.82 femtomoL/million lymphocytes (normal range: 8.0–16.0). At t1 (two days after DMSA-mobilization test), BHg weak reduction, paralleled by UHg 3.7-fold increase, was measured together with further l-MRs enhancement (205.43 femtomoL/million lymphocytes). At t2 (eight months after two cycles of DMSA chelating therapy ending), gradual improving of clinical manifestations was accompanied by progressive decrease of BHg and UHg (4.0 and 2.8 microg/L, resp.) and peripheral l-MRs neurochemical marker (24.89 femtomoL/million lymphocytes). Conclusion. l-MRs modulatory effect supports their use as peripheral neurochemical marker in Hg poisoning diagnosis and chelation therapy monitoring. PMID:27872646

  2. The interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in mouse corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Dalkir, Fatma Tugce; Demirbag, Hatice Oruc; Ogulener, Nuran

    2017-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the mouse corpus cavernosum (CC). l-cysteine (endogenous H2S substrate; 10(-6)-10(-3) M), sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; exogenous H2S; 10(-6)-10(-3) M) and acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) produced concentration-dependent relaxation in isolated mouse CC tissues. Relaxations to endogenous and exogenous H2S were reduced by non-selective mAChR antagonist atropine (5 × 10(-5) M), selective M1 mAChR antagonist pirenzepine (5 × 10(-5) M) and selective M3 mAChR antagonist 4-DAMP (10(-7) M) but not by selective M2 mAChR antagonist AF-DX 116 (10(-6) M). Also, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were reduced by atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP and AF-DX 116, confirming the selective effects of mAChR antagonists. Furthermore, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were attenuated by cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (PAG, 10(-2) M) and cystathionine-β-synthase inhibitor (CBS) aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 10(-3) M). l-nitroarginine, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, augmented the inhibitory effects of mAChR antagonists and H2S enzyme inhibitors on acetylcholine-induced relaxations. In addition, the existence and localization of CSE, CBS and 3-MST were demonstrated in mouse CC. Furthermore, tissue acetylcholine release was significantly increased by l-cysteine but not by exogenous H2S. The increase in acetylcholine level was completely inhibited by AOAA and PAG. These results suggest that M1 and M3 mAChRs contributes to relaxant effect mediated by endogenous H2S but at same time l-cysteine triggers acetylcholine release from cavernosal tissue. Also, the role of NO in the interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) could not be excluded. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Different muscarinic receptor subtypes modulate proliferation of primary human detrusor smooth muscle cells via Akt/PI3K and map kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Zani, Danilo; Michel, Martin C; Simeone, Claudio; Cosciani Cunico, Sergio; Spano, Pierfranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    While acetylcholine (ACh) and muscarinic receptors in the bladder are mainly known for their role in the regulation of smooth muscle contractility, in other tissues they are involved in tissue remodelling and promote cell growth and proliferation. In the present study we have used primary cultures of human detrusor smooth muscle cells (HDSMCs), in order to investigate the role of muscarinic receptors in HDSMC proliferation. Samples were obtained as discarded tissue from men >65 years undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer and cut in pieces that were either immediately frozen or placed in culture medium for the cell culture establishment. HDSMCs were isolated from samples, propagated and maintained in culture. [(3)H]-QNB radioligand binding on biopsies revealed the presence of muscarinic receptors, with a Kd of 0.10±0.02nM and a Bmax of 72.8±0.1fmol/mg protein. The relative expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes, based on Q-RT-PCR, was similar in biopsies and HDSMC with a rank order of M2≥M3>M1>M4>M5. The cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh, 1-100μM) concentration-dependently increased [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation (up to 46±4%). This was concentration-dependently inhibited by the general muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and by subtype-preferring antagonists with an order of potency of darifenacin >4-DAMP>AF-DX 116. The CCh-induced cell proliferation was blocked by selective PI-3 kinase and ERK activation inhibitors, strongly suggesting that these intracellular pathways mediate, at least in part, the muscarinic receptor-mediated cell proliferation. This work shows that M2 and M3 receptors can mediate not only HDSM contraction but also proliferation; they may also contribute bladder remodelling including detrusor hypertrophy.

  4. Changed gene expression in subjects with schizophrenia and low cortical muscarinic M1 receptors predicts disrupted upstream pathways interacting with that receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, E; Udawela, M; Thomas, E A; Dean, B

    2016-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, compared with subjects with no history of psychiatric illness (controls), changes in gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex from two subgroups of subjects with schizophrenia, one with a marked deficit in muscarinic M1 receptors (muscarinic receptor-deficit schizophrenia (MRDS)), would identify different biochemical pathways that would be affected by their aetiologies. Hence, we measured levels of cortical (Brodmann area 9) mRNA in 15 MRDS subjects, 15 subjects with schizophrenia but without a deficit in muscarinic M1 receptors (non-MRDS) and 15 controls using Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Levels of mRNA for 65 genes were significantly different in the cortex of subjects with MRDS and predicted changes in pathways involved in cellular movement and cell-to-cell signalling. Levels of mRNA for 45 genes were significantly different in non-MRDS and predicted changes in pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation as well as cellular function and maintenance. Changes in gene expression also predicted effects on pathways involved in amino acid metabolism, molecular transport and small-molecule biochemistry in both MRDS and non-MRDS. Overall, our data argue a prominent role for glial function in MRDS and neurodevelopment in non-MRDS. Finally, the interactions of gene with altered levels of mRNA in the cortex of subjects with MRDS suggest many of their affects will be upstream of the muscarinic M1 receptor. Our study gives new insight into the molecular pathways affected in the cortex of subjects with MRDS and supports the notion that studying subgroups within the syndrome of schizophrenia is worthwhile.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 1 November 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.195.

  5. Pilocarpine protects cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis of RGC-5 cells: involvement of muscarinic receptors and HIF-1 alpha pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xu; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Yongyao; Zhu, Liang; Li, Juan; Feng, Xuemei; Shao, Biyun; Qi, Hong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2010-04-01

    The retina is the most metabolically active tissue in the human body and hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death has been implicated in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The aim of this study is to determine whether muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine, a classic antiglaucoma drug, possesses neuroprotection against cobalt chloride (CoCl(2))-mimetic hypoxia-induced apoptosis of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5 cells) and its underlying mechanisms. Cell viability was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) assays. Expressions of hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha), p53, and BNIP3 were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. After treatment of 200 microM CoCl(2) for 24 h, RGC-5 cells showed a marked decrease of cell viability by approximately 30%, increased apoptosis rate and obvious decline in MMP, which could largely be reversed by the pretreatment of 1 microM pilocarpine mainly via the activation of muscarinic receptors. Meanwhile, pretreatment of 1 microM pilocarpine could significantly prevent CoCl(2)-induced HIF-1 alpha translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus and down-regulate the expression of HIF-1 alpha, p53, and BNIP3. These studies demonstrated that pilocarpine had effective protection against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in RGCs via muscarinic receptors and HIF-1 alpha pathway. The findings suggest that HIF-1 alpha pathway as a "master switch" may be used as a therapeutic target in the cholinergic treatment of glaucoma.

  6. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  7. Muscarinic M1 receptor inhibition reduces gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and promotes gastric prostaglandin E2 synthesis in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Eskerod, O

    1995-01-01

    The selective muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, considerably stimulates duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in the rat and increases gastric luminal release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in humans. This study, therefore, looked at the effect of pirenzepine on bicarbonate secretion...... sham feeding and acid exposure (HCl 0.1 M; 20 ml; 5 min) of the duodenal bulb increased mucosal bicarbonate secretion from 191 (14) mumol/cm x h to 266 (27) mumol/cm x h (p Pirenzepine (10 mg/h intravenously) reduced basal and vagally...... stimulated gastric and basal duodenal bicarbonate secretion by about 50% (p pirenzepine. In conclusion, human gastroduodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion is regulated...

  8. Muscarinic receptors discriminated by pirenzepine are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in rat nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belleroche, J.; Gardiner, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of pirenzepine, a selective muscarinic antagonist, was tested on the oxotremorine facilitation of the K+-evoked release of [14C]-dopamine from tissue slices of rat nucleus accumbens. The effect of pirenzepine was compared with that of scopolamine and other antagonists which show no heterogeneity in their action on muscarinic receptors in order to determine whether a selective action at a single receptor subtype, M1 or M2, could be distinguished. Pirenzepine and scopolamine both antagonized the oxotremorine-induced (EC50 = 3 X 10(-7) M) facilitation of [14C]-dopamine release with pA2 values of 7.5 and 8.9 respectively. This result indicated that the high affinity pirenzepine receptor (M1) was involved in this response. Low concentrations of 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3 X 10(-10) M), N-methylscopolamine (3 X 10(-9) M) and methyl atropine (10(-8) M) also abolished this facilitatory effect of oxotremorine. PMID:2864975

  9. A rapid and versatile method to label receptor ligands using "click" chemistry: Validation with the muscarinic M1 antagonist pirenzepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Dominique; Ilien, Brigitte; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Riché, Stéphanie; Antheaune, Cyril; Hibert, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Tagged biologically active molecules represent powerful pharmacological tools to study and characterize ligand-receptor interactions. However, the labeling of such molecules is not trivial, especially when poorly soluble tags have to be incorporated. The classical method of coupling usually necessitates a tedious final purification step to remove the excess of reagents and to isolate tagged molecules. To overcome this limitation, Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, referred to as "click" chemistry, was evaluated as a tool to facilitate the access to labeled molecules. In order to validate the approach, we focused our attention on the incorporation of a fluorophore (Lissamine Rhodamine B), a nonfluorescent dye (Patent Blue VF), or biotin into a muscarinic antagonist scaffold derived from pirenzepine. The reaction performed in acetonitrile/water, in the presence of CuSO4 and Cu wire, allowed us to obtain three novel pirenzepine derivatives with high purity and in good yield. No coupling reagents were needed, and the quasi-stoichiometric conditions of the reaction enabled the straightforward isolation of the final product by simple precipitation and its use in bioassays. The affinity of the compounds for the human M1 muscarinic receptor fused to EGFP was checked under classical radioligand and FRET binding conditions. The three pirenzepine constructs display a nanomolar affinity for the M1 receptor. In addition, both dye-labeled derivatives behave as potent acceptors of energy from excited EGFP with a very high quenching efficiency.

  10. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Intracellular Calcium Dyshomeostasis Through Both Muscarinic and Nicotinic Receptors in Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripong Palee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Oxidative stress induced intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several heart diseases. Acetylcholine (ACh has been shown to suppress reactive oxygen species generation during oxidative stress. However, there is little information regarding the effects of ACh on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in the presence of oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ACh applied before or after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in isolated cardiomyocytes. Methods: Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the male Wistar rats for the intracellular Ca2+ transient study by a fluorimetric ratio technique. Results: H2O2 significantly decreased both of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh applied before, but not after, H2O2 treatment attenuated the reduction of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Both atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker significantly decreased the protective effects of acetylcholine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation. Moreover, the combination of atropine and mecamylamine completely abolished the protective effects of acetylcholine on intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Conclusion: ACh pretreatment attenuates H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ dyshomeostasis through both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  11. Changes in Autoantibodies against β1-Adrenoceptor and M2-Muscarinic Receptor during Development of Renovascular Hypertension in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming ZHI; Rong-Fang CHEN; Heng WU; Hui-Rong LIU; Rong-Rui ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    In an experimental rat's renovascular hypertension model, we studied the genesis of anticardiac β1-adrenoceptor and M2-muscarinic receptor autoantibodies in relation to the changes in immunological function during the development of renal hypertension. The biological activities of these autoantibodies were also examined. It was shown that after two weeks of operation both the frequency of occurrence and the titre of autoantibodies to cardiac β1-adrenoceptor and M2-muscarinic receptor were significantly increased as compared with the control of pre-treatment. The increased autoantibodies lasted for several weeks and then automatically decreased gradually to the pre-clipping level at 10 weeks. Meanwhile the ratio of CD4+/CD8+was also undergone an initial increase followed by gradual recovery and correlated well with the changes in antibody titre. The biological effects of these autoantibodies displayed an "agonistic-like" activities on the beating frequency of cultured neonatal cardiomyocyte. It is suggested that autoimmune mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of renal hypertension and the cardiac receptor autoantibodies might be one of the mechanisms leading to cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  13. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Further evidence for differences between non-selective and BZ-1 (omega 1) selective, benzodiazepine receptor ligands in murine models of "state" and "trait" anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, G; Sanger, D J; Perrault, G

    1996-01-01

    The behavioural effects of several BZ (omega) receptor ligands were compared in mice using the light/dark choice task, an animal model of "state" anxiety, and the free-exploration test, which has been proposed as an experimental model of "trait" anxiety. The drugs used included non-selective full (alprazolam, clorazepate, chlordiazepoxide and diazepam), partial agonists (bretazenil, imidazenil and Ro 19-8022) and BZ-1 (omega 1) selective receptor ligands (abecarnil, CL 218,872 and zolpidem). In the light/dark choice task, non-selective full agonists elicited clear anxiolytic-like effects increasing time spent in the lit box and simultaneously reducing attempts at entry into the illuminated cage followed by withdrawal responses, a measure of risk assessment. With the exception of abecarnil, both non-selective partial agonists and BZ-1 (omega 1) selective receptor ligands displayed reduced efficacy compared to the full agonists as they decreased risk assessment responses without altering time in the lit box. In addition, the weak anxiolytic-like actions displayed by selective BZ-1 (omega 1) agents were evident only at doses which reduced locomotor activity, indicating that this effect may be non-specific. In the free-exploration test, non-selective BZ (omega) receptor agonists markedly increased the percentage of time spent in the novel compartment and reduced the number of attempts to enter whereas selective BZ-1 (omega 1) receptor ligands displayed a weaker neophobia-reducing effect as they reduced risk assessment responses only. As was the case in the light/dark choice task, this latter effect was observed at locomotor depressant doses. These findings indicate that while both full and partial BZ (omega) receptor agonists are equally effective against "trait" anxiety, full agonists may be superior in reducing "state" anxiety. In addition, the lack of specific effects of selective BZ-1 (omega 1) receptor ligands in reducing both types of anxiety suggests that the BZ

  15. Alpha-lipoic acid-mediated activation of muscarinic receptors improves hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Iqbal, Ghazala; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent which readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and accumulates in the brain leading to neurodegenerative disorders, characterised by cognitive impairment. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and has a potential to improve cognitive functions. This study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ALA in AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. Effect of ALA (25mg/kg/day) was evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity (AlCl3 150 mg/kg/day) mouse model on learning and memory using behaviour tests and on the expression of muscarinic receptor genes (using RT-PCR), in hippocampus and amygdala. Following ALA treatment, the expression of muscarinic receptor genes M1, M2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChaT) were significantly improved (pnovelty preference (p<0.001) comparative to the AlCl3-treated group. Fear extinction memory was remarkably restored (p<0.001) in ALA-treated group demonstrated by reduced freezing response as compared to the AlCl3-treated group which showed higher freezing. In-silico analysis showed that racemic mixture of ALA has higher binding affinity for M1 and M2 compared to acetylcholine. These novel findings highlight the potential role of ALA in cognitive functions and cholinergic system enhancement thus presenting it an enviable therapeutic candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Effect of central muscarinic receptors on passive-avoidance learning deficits induced by prenatal pentylenetetrazol kindling in male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmotabbed, A; Mahmoodi, G; Mahmoodi, S; Mohammadi-Farani, A; Nedaei, S E; Pourmotabbed, T; Pourmotabbed, T

    2014-10-24

    Occurrence of the epileptic seizures during gestation might affect the neurodevelopment of the fetus resulting in cognitive problems for the child later in life. We have previously reported that prenatal pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindling induces learning and memory deficits in the children born to kindled mothers, later in life but the mechanisms involved in this processes are unknown. The cholinergic system plays a major role in learning and memory. The present study was performed to investigate the possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic receptors on learning and memory deficits induced by prenatal PTZ-kindling in male offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were kindled by repetitive i.p. injection of 25mg/kg of PTZ on day 13 of their pregnancy. The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinjection of scopolamine and pilocarpine, muscarinic cholinergic receptors antagonist and agonist, respectively on passive-avoidance learning of pups were tested at 12weeks of age using shuttle-box apparatus. Our data showed that the retention latencies of pups that received scopolamine (2 or 3μg) were significantly reduced compared to those received normal saline (pkindled dams and suggest a central mechanism for the cognitive and memory dysfunction, associated with seizures during pregnancy.

  17. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia.

  18. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  19. An investigation of the factors that regulate muscarinic receptor expression in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Myoung Suk; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2014-09-01

    We previously identified a group of subjects with schizophrenia who, on average, have a 75% decrease in cholinergic receptor, muscarinic 1 (CHRM1) in Brodmann's area (BA) 9. To extend this finding, we determined i) if the decrease in CHRM1 was present in another functionally related CNS region (BA6), ii) whether the marked decrease in CHRM1 was accompanied by changes in levels of other CHRMs and iii) potential factors responsible for the decreased CHRM1 expression. We measured CHRM1 and CHRM3 using in situ radioligand binding with [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]4-DAMP respectively in BA6 from 20 subjects with schizophrenia who had low levels of CHRM1 in BA9 (SzLow[(3)H]PZP), 18 subjects with schizophrenia whose levels of CHRM1 were similar to controls (SzNormal[(3)H]PZP) and 20 control subjects. Levels of CHRM1, 3 and 4 mRNA were measured using qPCR and levels of the transcription factors, SP1 and SP3, were determined using Western blots. In BA6, the density of [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was decreased in subjects with SzLow[(3)H]PZP (p<0.001) compared to controls. The density of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding, levels of CHRM1, 3 and 4 mRNA and levels of SP1 and SP3 was not significantly different between the three groups. This study shows that the previously identified decrease in CHRM1 expression is not confined to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex but is present in other cortical areas. The effect shows some specificity to CHRM1, with no change in levels of binding to CHRM3. Furthermore, this decrease in CHRM1 does not appear to be associated with low levels of CHRM1 mRNA or to simply be regulated by the transcription factors, SP1 and SP3, suggesting that other mechanisms are responsible for the decreased CHRM1 in these subjects. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Prejunctional Muscarinic Receptors in the Deep Muscular Plexus of Canine Ileum: Comparison with Smooth Muscle Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    These receptors showed a high affinity for the M,/M,-selective antagonist 4-DAMP (pK, = 7.41); in contrast, the PIK, values of pirenzepine (5.60...and oxotremorine. Based on pirenzepine (5.60), methoctramine (5.65) and AF-DX 116 (5.21) the pharmacological observations presented here, the preiunc...ito the "Guide for the tare anid Vse of having a high affinity for pirenzepine . are located postsynapr- L~aboratorv Aninials," preparedl Iw the C

  1. Why does the agonist [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP bind preferentially to the M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravasi, L. [National Institutes of Health, PET Radiochemistry Group, National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Kiesewetter, D.O.; Shimoji, K. [National Institutes of Health, PET Radiochemistry Group, National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lucignani, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Molecular Imaging, Division of Radiation Therapy, Milan (Italy); Eckelman, W.C. [National Institutes of Health, PET Department, Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molecular Tracer LLC, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Preferential binding of FP-TZTP at the M{sub 2} receptor in vivo led to investigation of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP as a potential PET tracer for Alzheimer's disease, in which a substantial reduction of M{sub 2} receptors has been observed in autopsy studies. We hereby investigated in vitro the FP-TZTP behavior to further elucidate the properties of FP-TZTP that lead to its M{sub 2} selectivity. Chinese hamster ovarian cells expressing the five subtypes of human muscarinic receptor as well as the wild type were harvested in culture to assess equilibrium binding. Specific binding was calculated by subtraction of non-specific binding from total binding. Internal specific binding was calculated by subtraction of external specific binding from the total specific binding. Saturation assays were also performed to calculate B{sub max}, K{sub i}, and IC{sub 50}. In addition, equilibrium binding and dissociation kinetic studies were performed on rat brain tissue. Selected regions of interest were drawn on the digital autoradiograms and [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP off-rates were determined by measurement of the rate of release into a buffer solution of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP from slide-bound cells that had been preincubated with [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP. At equilibrium in vitro, M{sub 2} subtype selectivity of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP was not evident. We demonstrated that ATP-dependent mechanisms are not responsible for FP-TZTP M{sub 2} selectivity. In vitro off-rate studies from rat brain tissue showed that the off-rate of FP-TZTP varied with the percentage of M{sub 2} subtype in the tissue region. The slower dissociation kinetics of FP-TZTP from M{sub 2} receptors compared with the four other muscarinic receptor subtypes may be a factor in its M{sub 2} selectivity. (orig.)

  2. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC mediates antipsychotic-like effects via the M4 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Marla L; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Shaw, David B; Knitowski, Karen M; Quets, Anne T; Chesterfield, Amy K; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Christian C

    2013-12-01

    The generation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtype-selective compounds has been challenging, requiring use of nonpharmacological approaches, such as genetically engineered animals, to deepen our understanding of the potential that members of the muscarinic receptor subtype family hold as therapeutic drug targets. The muscarinic receptor agonist 'BuTAC' was previously shown to exhibit efficacy in animal models of psychosis, although the particular receptor subtype(s) responsible for such activity was unclear. Here, we evaluate the in vitro functional agonist and antagonist activity of BuTAC using an assay that provides a direct measure of G protein activation. In addition, we employ the conditioned avoidance response paradigm, an in vivo model predictive of antipsychotic activity, and mouse genetic deletion models to investigate which presynaptic mAChR subtype mediates the antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC. Our results show that, in vitro, BuTAC acts as a full agonist at the M2AChR and a partial agonist at the M1 and M4 receptors, with full antagonist activity at M3- and M5AChRs. In the mouse conditioned avoidance response (CAR) assay, BuTAC exhibits an atypical antipsychotic-like profile by selectively decreasing avoidance responses at doses that do not induce escape failures. CAR results using M2(-/-), M4(-/-), and M2/M4 (M2/M4(-/-)) mice found that the effects of BuTAC were near completely lost in M2/M4(-/-) double-knockout mice and potency of BuTAC was right-shifted in M4(-/-) as compared with wild-type and M2(-/-) mice. The M2/M4(-/-) mice showed no altered sensitivity to the antipsychotic effects of either haloperidol or clozapine, suggesting that these compounds mediate their actions in CAR via a non-mAChR-mediated mechanism. These data support a role for the M4AChR subtype in mediating the antipsychotic-like activity of BuTAC and implicate M4AChR agonism as a potential novel therapeutic mechanism for ameliorating symptoms associated with

  3. Virus- and interferon-induced loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function and gene expression in cultured airway parasympathetic neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, D B; Xiao, H Q; Lee, N. H.; Chan-Li, Y; Fryer, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    Viral infections increase vagally mediated reflex bronchoconstriction. Decreased function of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors on the parasympathetic nerve endings is likely to contribute to increased acetylcholine release. In this study, we used cultured airway parasympathetic neurons to determine the effects of parainfluenza virus and of interferon (IFN)-gamma on acetylcholine release, inhibitory M2 receptor function, and M2 receptor gene expression. In control cultures, electrically stimu...

  4. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  5. Role of muscarinic receptors in the contraction of jejunal smooth muscle in the horse: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menozzi, Alessandro; Pozzoli, Cristina; Poli, Enzo; Bontempi, Giada; Serventi, Paolo; Meucci, Valentina; Intorre, Luigi; Bertini, Simone

    2017-07-11

    Nonselective antimuscarinic drugs are clinically useful in several pathologic conditions of horses, but, blocking all muscarinic receptor (MR) subtypes, may cause several side effects. The availability of selective antimuscarinic drugs could improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. We aimed to enlighten the role of different MR subtypes by evaluating the effects of nonselective, and selective M1, M2 and M3 MR antagonists on the contractions of horse jejunum. Segments of circular muscle of equine jejunum, were put into organ baths, connected to isotonic transducers, and the effects on ACh concentration-response curves, and on electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions of intestinal preparations, induced by nonselective or selective MR antagonists, compared to pre-drug level, were studied. Atropine (nonselective MR antagonist), pirenzepine (selective M1 antagonist), and p-FHHSiD (selective M3 antagonist) competitively antagonized ACh (pA2=9.78±0.21; 7.14±0.25 and 7.56±0.17, respectively). Methoctramine (selective M2 antagonist) antagonized ACh in a concentration-unrelated fashion; however, it competitively antagonized carbachol, a nonselective muscarinic agonist (pA2=6.42±0.23). Atropine dose-dependently reduced EFS-evoked contractions, reaching a maximal effect of -45.64±6.54%; the simultaneous block of neurokinin receptors, almost completely abolished the atropine-insensitive contractions. p-FHHSiD dose-dependently reduced EFS-induced contractions, while pirenzepine caused a minor decrease. Methoctramine, ineffective up to 10(-7)M, enhanced the contractions at 10(-6)M; the block of neurokinin receptors abolished the increase of contraction. Cholinergic contractions of horse jejunum are mainly mediated by M3 receptors; M2 selective antagonists seem to scarcely affect cholinergic, and to enhance neurokininergic contractions of equine jejunum, thus their use entails a lower risk of causing intestinal hypomotility, compared to nonselective drugs

  6. Peptide-based ELISAs are not sensitive and specific enough to detect muscarinic receptor type 3 autoantibodies in serum from patients with Sjogren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, N.; Kingman, A.; Shirota, Y.; Chiorini, J.A.; Illei, G.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The detection of autoantibodies to the muscarinic receptor type 3 (M3R) in the serum of patients with Sjogrens syndrome (SS) by ELISA is controversial. A study was undertaken to test whether modification of M3R peptides could enhance the antigenicity and increase the detection of specific

  7. Characterization of muscarinic receptor binding by the novel radioligand, [(3)H]imidafenacin, in the bladder and other tissues of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Shiori; Ito, Yoshihiko; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to directly characterize specific binding sites of tritium ([(3)H])-labeled imidafenacin, a new radioligand for labeling muscarinic receptors, in the bladder and other peripheral or central nervous tissues of rats. Muscarinic receptors in rat tissues were measured by radioligand binding assay using [(3)H]imidafenacin. Specific [(3)H]imidafenacin binding in rat tissues was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. Estimated dissociation constants (Kd values) were significantly lower in submaxillary gland and prostate and higher in heart than in bladder, indicating lower Kd values in M1 and M3 subtype- than M2 subtype-dominating tissues. Unlabeled imidafenacin and clinically used antimuscarinic agents competed with [(3)H]imidafenacin for binding sites in bladder and other tissues in a concentration-dependent manner, which indicated pharmacological specificity of [(3)H]imidafenacin binding sites. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard), an irreversible inactivating agent of M3 subtype, significantly decreased the number of [(3)H]imidafenacin binding sites in bladder, submaxillary gland, and colon, but not in heart. [(3)H]imidafenacin labeled muscarinic receptors in M1 and M3 subtype-dominating tissues with higher affinity than [N-methyl-(3)H]scopolamine methyl chloride (NMS). [(3)H]imidafenacin is a useful radioligand to label muscarinic receptors in M1- and M3-dominating tissues with high affinity.

  8. The vagal nerve stimulates activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiman, David; Libbrecht, Louis; Sinelli, Nicoletta; Desmet, Valeer; Denef, Carl; Roskams, Tania

    2002-08-01

    In the rat the hepatic branch of the nervus vagus stimulates proliferation of hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy and growth of bile duct epithelial cells after bile duct ligation. We studied the effect of hepatic vagotomy on the activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment in human and rat liver. The number of hepatic progenitor cells and atypical reactive ductular cells in transplanted (denervated) human livers with hepatitis was significantly lower than in innervated matched control livers and the number of oval cells in vagotomized rat livers with galactosamine hepatitis was significantly lower than in livers of sham-operated rats with galactosamine hepatitis. The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1-M5 receptor) was studied by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In human liver, immunoreactivity for M3 receptor was observed in hepatic progenitor cells, atypical reactive ductules, intermediate hepatocyte-like cells, and bile duct epithelial cells. mRNA for the M1-M3 and the M5 receptor, but not the M4 receptor, was detected in human liver homogenates. In conclusion, the hepatic vagus branch stimulates activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment in diseased liver, most likely through binding of acetylcholine to the M3 receptor expressed on these cells. These findings may be of clinical importance for patients with a transplant liver.

  9. Pharmacological and ionic characterizations of the muscarinic receptors modulating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E.M.; Otero, D.H.

    1985-05-01

    The muscarinic receptors that modulate acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes were characterized with respect to sensitivity to drugs that act selectively at M1 or M2 receptor subtypes, as well as to changes in ionic strength and membrane potential. The modulatory receptors appear to be of the M2 type, since they are activated by carbachol, acetylcholine, methacholine, oxotremorine, and bethanechol, but not by pilocarpine, and are blocked by atropine, scopolamine, and gallamine (at high concentrations), but not by pirenzepine or dicyclomine. The ED50S for carbachol, acetylcholine, and oxotremorine are less than 10 microM, suggesting that the high affinity state of the receptor is functional. High ionic strength induced by raising the NaCl concentration has no effect on agonist (oxotremorine) potency, but increases the efficacy of this compound, which disagrees with receptor-binding studies. On the other hand, depolarization with either KCl or with veratridine (20 microM) reduces agonist potencies by approximately an order of magnitude, suggesting a potential mechanism for receptor regulation.

  10. A novel mechanism of hippocampal LTD involving muscarinic receptor-triggered interactions between AMPARs, GRIP and liprin-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Bryony A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term depression (LTD in the hippocampus can be induced by activation of different types of G-protein coupled receptors, in particular metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and muscarinic acethycholine receptors (mAChRs. Since mGluRs and mAChRs activate the same G-proteins and isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC, it would be expected that these two forms of LTD utilise the same molecular mechanisms. However, we find a distinct mechanism of LTD involving GRIP and liprin-α. Results Whilst both forms of LTD require activation of tyrosine phosphatases and involve internalisation of AMPARs, they use different molecular interactions. Specifically, mAChR-LTD, but not mGluR-LTD, is blocked by peptides that inhibit the binding of GRIP to the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 and the binding of GRIP to liprin-α. Thus, different receptors that utilise the same G-proteins can regulate AMPAR trafficking and synaptic efficacy via distinct molecular mechanisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that mAChR-LTD selectively involves interactions between GRIP and liprin-α. These data indicate a novel mechanism of synaptic plasticity in which activation of M1 receptors results in AMPAR endocytosis, via a mechanism involving interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α.

  11. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  12. Hyposmotic membrane stretch potentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induced depolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig gastric myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Nan-Ge Jin; Lin Piao; Ming-Yu Hong; Zheng-Yuan Jin; Ying Li; Wen-Xie Xu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship betweenhyposmotic membrane stretch and muscarinic receptoragonist-induced depolarization of membrane potentialin antral gastric circular myocytes of guinea-pig.METHODS: Using whole cell patch-clamp techniquerecorded membrane potential and current in singlegastric myocytes isolated by collagena se.RESULTS: Hyposmotic membrane stretch hyperpolarizedmembrane potential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -67.9mV±1.0mV. TEA (10mmol/L), a nonselective potassiumchannel blocker significantly inhibited hyposmoticmembrane stretch-induced hyperpolarization. After KCIin the pipette and NaCI in the external solution werereplaced by CsCI to block the potassium current,hyposmotic membrane stretch depolarized the membranepotential from -60.0 mV±-1.0mV to -44.8 mV±2.3mV(P<0.05), and atropine (1 pmol/L) inhibited thedepolarization of the membrane potential. Muscarinicreceptor agonist Carbachol depolarized membranepotential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -50.3 mV±0.3mV(P<0.05) and hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated the depolarization. Carbachol inducedmuscarinic current (Icch) was greatly increased byhyposmotic membrane stretch.CONCLUSION: Hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induceddepolarization of membrane potential, which is relatedto hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase ofmuscarinic current.

  13. M1/M2 muscarinic receptor selectivity using potassium (K/sup +/)-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)-dopamine (DA) and (/sup 14/C)-acetyl-choline (ACH) in striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHaven, D.L.; Steranka, L.R.

    1986-03-05

    Raiteri et al have suggested that muscarinic receptor subtypes can be differentiated in striatal synaptosomes by the release of DA (M1) or ACh (M2). The authors attempted to replicate this finding and to characterize responses of selective and non-selective cholinergic agonists and antagonists using K+-stimulated release of transmitters from rat striatal slices. The non-selective agonists ACh, carbachol and oxotremorine stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)-DA and inhibited release of (/sup 14/C)-ACh with EC50 values of 10.6, 9.2 and 4.2 ..mu..M (DA) and 1.2, 0.77 and 0.43 ..mu..M (ACh), respectively. The M1 agonist McN-A-343-11 selectively inhibited release of DA with an EC50 value of 4.8 ..mu..M. Pilocarpine was ineffective in this system. The M1 antagonist pirenzepine reversed the effects of 10/sup -4/ M carbachol on release with an eight-fold selectivity for release of (/sup 3/H)-DA (IC50 = 0.77 ..mu..M) vs (/sup 14/C)-ACh (IC50 = 6.3 ..mu..M). These results suggest that although this system can determine relative subtype selectivities, the results obtained in this assay do not always correlate with those obtained from phosphatidyl inositol turnover or adenylate cyclase activity.

  14. Muscarinic receptor 1 agonist activity of novel N-aryl carboxamide substituted 3-morpholino arecoline derivatives in Alzheimer's presenile dementia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malviya, Manish; Kumar, Y C Sunil; Mythri, R B; Venkateshappa, C; Subhash, M N; Rangappa, K S

    2009-08-01

    Earlier we have reported the effect of arecoline thiazolidinone and morpholino arecoline derivatives as muscarinic receptor 1 agonists in Alzheimer's presenile dementia models. To elucidate further our Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) studies on the chemistry and muscarinic receptor 1 binding efficacy, a series of novel carboxamide derivatives of 2-(1-methyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-3-yl)morpholine molecule have been designed and synthesized as a new class of M1 receptor agonists with a low toxicity effect profile that enhances memory function in animal models of Alzheimer's presenile dementia and also modulates the APP secretion from rat brain cerebrocortical slices by activating M1 receptor in vitro. Results suggest that compound 9b having methyl group at the para position of the aryl group attached to the carboxamide of morpholino arecoline could emerge as a potent molecule having antidementia activity.

  15. Comparative distribution of binding of the muscarinic receptor ligands pirenzepine, AF-DX 384, (R,R)-I-QNB and (R,S)-I-QNB to human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Margaret; Owens, Jonathan; O'Brien, John; Paling, Sean; Wyper, David; Fenwick, John; Johnson, Mary; Perry, Robert; Perry, Elaine

    2002-09-01

    Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and its derivatives are being developed to investigate muscarinic receptor changes in vivo in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. This is the first study of [125I]-(R,R)-I-QNB and [125I]-(R,S)-I-QNB binding in vitro in human brain. We have compared the in vitro binding of the muscarinic ligands [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]AF-DX 384, which have selectivity for the M1 and M2/M4 receptor subtypes, respectively, to the binding of [125I]-(R,R)-I-QNB and [125I]-(R,S)-I-QNB. This will provide a guide to the interpretation of in vivo SPET images generated with [123I]-(R,R)-I-QNB and [123I]-(R,S)-I-QNB. Binding was investigated in striatum, globus pallidus, thalamus and cerebellum, and cingulate, insula, temporal and occipital cortical areas, which show different proportions of muscarinic receptor subtypes, in post-mortem brain from normal individuals. M1 receptors are of high density in cortex and striatum and are relatively low in the thalamus and cerebellum, while M4 receptors are mainly expressed in the striatum, and M2 receptors are most evident in the cerebellum and thalamus. [125I]-(R,R)-I-QNB and [125I]-(R,S)-I-QNB density distribution patterns were consistent with binding to both M1 and M4 receptors, with [125I]-(R,R)-I-QNB additionally binding to a non-cholinergic site not displaceable by atropine. This distribution can be exploited by in vivo imaging, developing ligands for both SPET and PET, to reveal muscarinic receptor changes in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies during the disease process and following cholinergic therapy.

  16. Release of prostaglandin E2 into gastric juice during stimulation of muscarinic- and gastrin receptors in dogs and in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, J; Bukhave, K; Hovendal, C P

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the causal relationship, if any, between gastric PG formation and gastric acid output, the release of PGE2 into gastric juice has been studied in eight beagle dogs with a gastric fistula, using sustained half-maximal stimulation by bethanechol and pentagastrin, and in eight duodenal...... ulcer patients, using the combined sham feeding/pentagastrin test. Immunoreactive PGE2 was determined by a method validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and PGE2 values were normalized by expressing them as ng PGE2 released per meq H+ secreted. In the dogs "steady state" PGE2 output (0.......2-18 ng/Meq H+). The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of muscarinic receptors represents the physiologic mechanism by which gastric release of PGs is regulated. Cyclic variations in gastric PG formation appear to occur in response to vagal stimulation since the peaks in PGE2...

  17. Systemic administration of arecoline reduces ethanol-induced sleeping through activation of central muscarinic receptor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Ping; Liu, Qing; Luo, Juan; Guo, Ping; Chen, Feng; Lawrence, Andrew J; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence of co-use of alcohol and areca nuts suggests a potential central interaction between arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca and a muscarinic receptor agonist, and ethanol. Moreover, the central cholinergic system plays an important role in the depressant action of ethanol and barbiturates. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arecoline on pentobarbital- and ethanol-induced hypnosis in mice. Male ICR mice were tested for locomotor activity following acute systemic administration of ethanol alone, arecoline alone, or ethanol plus arecoline. For the loss of the righting reflex (LORR) induced by pentobarbital and ethanol, sleep latency and sleeping duration were evaluated in mice treated with arecoline alone or the combination of arecoline and scopolamine or methscopolamine. Ethanol (1.0 to 3.0 g/kg, i.p.) reduced locomotor activity significantly and a declining trend was observed after treatment with arecoline (0.25 to 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), but there were no synergistic effects of ethanol and arecoline on locomotor activity. The experiments on LORR demonstrated that arecoline (0.125 to 1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) shortened the duration of sleeping induced by ethanol (4.0 g/kg, i.p.), but not pentobarbital (45 mg/kg, i.p.). In addition, alterations of sleep latency were not obvious in both pentobarbital- and ethanol-induced LORR. Statistical analyses revealed that scopolamine (centrally acting), but not methscopolamine (peripherally acting), could antagonize the effect of arecoline on the duration of ethanol-induced LORR in mice. These results suggest that central muscarinic receptor is a pharmacological target for the action of arecoline to modulate ethanol-induced hypnosis.

  18. Expression of the M3 Muscarinic Receptor on Orexin Neurons that Project to the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chen, Jennifer Y S; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Activation of central cholinergic receptors causes a pressor response in rats, and the hypothalamus is important for this response. Projections from hypothalamic orexin neurons to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are involved in sympatho-excitation of the cardiovascular system. A small population of orexin neurons is regulated by cholinergic inputs through M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3 R). To elucidate whether the M3 R on orexin neurons is involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the RVLM, we examined the presence of the M3 R on retrograde-labeled RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. The retrograde tracer was unilaterally injected into the RVLM. Within the hypothalamus, retrograde-labeled neurons were located predominantly ipsilateral to the injection side. In the anterior hypothalamus (-1.5 to -2.3 mm to the bregma), retrograde-labeled neurons were densely distributed in the paraventricular nuclei and scattered in the retrochiasmatic area. At -2.3 to -3.5 mm from the bregma, labeled neurons were located in the regions where orexin neurons were situated, that is, the tuberal lateral hypothalamic area, perifornical area, and dorsomedial nuclei. Very few retrograde-labeled neurons were observed in the hypothalamus at -3.5 to -4.5 mm from the bregma. About 19.5% ± 1.6% of RVLM-projecting neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus were orexinergic. The M3 R was present on 18.7% ± 3.0% of RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. Injection of a muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, in the perifornical area resulted in a pressor response, which was attenuated by a pretreatment of atropine. We conclude that cholinergic inputs to orexin neurons may be involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the M3 R on the orexin neurons that directly project to the RVLM.

  19. Kinetic evidence for different mechanisms of interaction of black mamba toxins MT alpha and MT beta with muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolkkonen, M; Oras, A; Toomela, T; Karlsson, E; Järv, J; Akerman, K E

    2001-01-01

    By studying the influence of two toxins from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis on the kinetics of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from rat cerebral cortex, it was revealed that these toxins, MT alpha and MT beta, interact with the receptors via kinetically distinct mechanisms. MT beta bound to receptors in a one-step, readily reversible process with the dissociation constant K(d)=5.3 microM. The binding mechanism of MTalpha was more complex, involving at least two consecutive steps. A fast receptor-toxin complex formation (K(T)=3.8 microM) was followed by a slow process of isomerisation of this complex (k(i)=1.8 x 10(-2) s(-1), half-time 39 s). A similar two-step interaction mechanism has been established for a related toxin, MT2 from the green mamba D. angusticeps (K(T)=1.4 microM, k(i)=8.3 x 10(-4) s(-1), half-time 840 s). The slow isomerisation process delays the effect of MT alpha and MT2, but increases their apparent potency compared to toxins unable to induce the isomerisation process.

  20. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 and M3 subtypes mediate acetylcholine-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangsucharit, Panot; Takatori, Shingo; Zamami, Yoshito; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Takayama, Fusako

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated pharmacological characterizations of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtypes involving ACh-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. Changes in perfusion pressure to periarterial nerve stimulation and ACh were measured before and after the perfusion of Krebs solution containing muscarinic receptor antagonists. Distributions of muscarinic AChR subtypes in mesenteric arteries with an intact endothelium were studied using Western blotting. The expression level of M1 and M3 was significantly greater than that of M2. Endothelium removal significantly decreased expression levels of M2 and M3, but not M1. In perfused mesenteric vascular beds with intact endothelium and active tone, exogenous ACh (1, 10, and 100 nmol) produced concentration-dependent and long-lasting vasodilatations. In endothelium-denuded preparations, relaxation to ACh (1 nmol) disappeared, but ACh at 10 and 100 nmol caused long-lasting vasodilatations, which were markedly blocked by the treatment of pirenzepine (M1 antagonist) or 4-DAMP (M1 and M3 antagonist) plus hexamethonium (nicotinic AChR antagonist), but not methoctramine (M2 and M4 antagonist). These results suggest that muscarinic AChR subtypes, mainly M1, distribute throughout the rat mesenteric arteries, and that activation of M1 and/or M3 which may be located on CGRPergic nerves releases CGRP, causing an endothelium-independent vasodilatation. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 and M3 subtypes mediate acetylcholine-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panot Tangsucharit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated pharmacological characterizations of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR subtypes involving ACh-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. Changes in perfusion pressure to periarterial nerve stimulation and ACh were measured before and after the perfusion of Krebs solution containing muscarinic receptor antagonists. Distributions of muscarinic AChR subtypes in mesenteric arteries with an intact endothelium were studied using Western blotting. The expression level of M1 and M3 was significantly greater than that of M2. Endothelium removal significantly decreased expression levels of M2 and M3, but not M1. In perfused mesenteric vascular beds with intact endothelium and active tone, exogenous ACh (1, 10, and 100 nmol produced concentration-dependent and long-lasting vasodilatations. In endothelium-denuded preparations, relaxation to ACh (1 nmol disappeared, but ACh at 10 and 100 nmol caused long-lasting vasodilatations, which were markedly blocked by the treatment of pirenzepine (M1 antagonist or 4-DAMP (M1 and M3 antagonist plus hexamethonium (nicotinic AChR antagonist, but not methoctramine (M2 and M4 antagonist. These results suggest that muscarinic AChR subtypes, mainly M1, distribute throughout the rat mesenteric arteries, and that activation of M1 and/or M3 which may be located on CGRPergic nerves releases CGRP, causing an endothelium-independent vasodilatation.

  2. The use of occupation isoboles for analysis of a response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtype-induced mouse stomach contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2008-06-01

    Smooth muscle contains multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes, including M2 and M3. M2 receptors outnumber M3 receptors. Based on the potency of subtype selective anticholinergics, contraction is mediated by the M3 subtype. However, results from knockout (KO) mice show that the M2 receptor mediates approximately 45% of the contractile response produced by the M3 receptor. The traditional theory of one receptor mediating a response does not allow assessment of interactions between receptors when more than one receptor participates in a response. Our study was performed using a novel analysis method based on dual receptor occupancy to determine how M2 and M3 receptor subtypes interact to mediate contraction in mouse stomach. Cumulative carbachol concentration contractile responses were determined for wild-type, M2-KO, and M3-KO stomach body smooth muscle. Using affinity constants for carbachol at M2 and M3 cholinergic receptors, the concentration values were converted to fractional receptor occupation. The resulting occupation-effect relations showed maximum effects for the M2 and M3 subtypes, respectively. These occupation-effect relations allow determination of the additive (expected) isobole based on this dual occupancy, thereby providing a curve (mathematically derived) for comparison against the experimentally derived value in wild type. The actual values determined experimentally in the wild type were not statistically significantly different from that predicted by the isobole. This confirms that the interaction between these mutually occupied receptors is additive. The new method of analysis also expands the traditional Schild theory that was based on a single receptor type to which the agonist and antagonist bind.

  3. Role of ventrolateral orbital cortex muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in modulation of capsaicin-induced orofacial pain-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Abbas Farshid, Amir; Delkhosh-Kasmaie, Fatmeh

    2017-09-29

    Acetylcholine, as a major neurotransmitter, mediates many brain functions such as pain. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and agonists into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLOC) on capsaicin-induced orofacial nociception and subsequent hyperalgesia. The right side of VLOC was surgically implanted with a guide cannula in anaesthetized rats. Orofacial pain-related behaviors were induced by subcutaneous injection of a capsaicin solution (1.5µg/20µl) into the left vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing with ipsilateral forepaw and general behavior were recorded for 10min, and then mechanical hyperalgesia was determined using von Frey filaments at 15, 30, 45 and 60min post-capsaicin injection. Alone intra-VLOC microinjection of atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) at a similar dose of 200ng/site did not alter nocifensive behavior and hyperalgesia. Microinjection of oxotremorine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 50 and 100ng/site and epibatidine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100ng/site into the VLOC suppressed pain-related behaviors. Prior microinjections of 200ng/site atropine and mecamylamine (200ng/site) prevented oxotremorine (100ng/site)-, and epibatidine (100ng/site)-induced antinociception, respectively. None of the above-mentioned chemicals changed general behavior. These results showed that the VLOC muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors might be involved in modulation of orofacial nociception and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Decreased binding capacity (Bmax) of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in fibroblasts from boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jessica; Landgren, Magnus; Fernell, Elisabeth; Lewander, Tommy; Venizelos, Nikolaos

    2013-09-01

    Monoaminergic dysregulation is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and methylphenidate and amphetamines are the most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents for treating ADHD. However, it has recently been proposed that the core symptoms of the disorder might be due to an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems. In this study, we used fibroblast cell homogenates from boys with and without ADHD as an extraneural cell model to examine the cholinergic receptor density, that is, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). We found that the binding capacity (Bmax) of [³H] Quinuclidinyl benzilate (³H-QNB) to mAChRs was decreased by almost 50 % in the children with ADHD (mean = 30.6 fmol/mg protein, SD = 25.6) in comparison with controls [mean = 63.1 fmol/mg protein, SD = 20.5, p ≤ 0.01 (Student's unpaired t test)]. The decreased Bmax indicates a reduced cholinergic receptor density, which might constitute a biomarker for ADHD. However, these preliminary findings need to be replicated in larger ADHD and comparison cohorts.

  5. Evaluation of drug-muscarinic receptor affinities using cell membrane chromatography and radioligand binding assay in guinea pig jejunum membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-xiang YUAN; Jin HOU; Lang-chong HE; Guang-de YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study if cell membrane chromatography (CMC) could reflect drug-receptor interaction and evaluate the affinity and competitive binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). Methods: The cell membrane stationary phase(CMSP) was prepared by immobilizing guinea pig jejunum cell membrane on the surface of a silica carrier, and was used for the rapid on-line chromatographic evaluation of ligand binding affinities to mAChR. The affinity to mAChR was also evaluated from radioligand binding assays (RBA) using the same jejunum membrane preparation. Results: The capacity factor (k') profiles in guinea pig jejunum CMSP were: (-)QNB (15.4)>(+)QNB (11.5)>atropine (5.35)>pirenzepine(5.26)>4-DAMP (4.45)>AF-DX 116 (4.18)>pilocarpine (3.93)>acetylcholine(1.31). These results compared with the affinity rank orders obtained from radioligand binding assays indicated that there wasa positive correlation (r2=0.8525, P<0.0001) between both data sets. Conclusion: The CMC method can be used to evaluate drug-receptor affinities for drug candidates.

  6. Methanol extract ofDesmodium gangeticumDC root mimetic post-conditioning effect in isolated perfused rat heart by stimulating muscarinic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gino A Kurian; Jose Paddikkala

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate pharmacological mimetic action of herbal extractDesmodium gangeticum (DG) roots on ischemia reperfusion injury.Methods:With the help of Langendroff perfusion technique, ischemic post condition (POC) mimetic action of DG methanol root extract was evaluated and compared by using standard drugs that acts as muscarinic receptor agonist and antagonist, namely acetylcholine (Ach) and atropine (Atr) respectively in an isolated rat heart. Results:The physiological parameters like left ventricular developed pressure, end diastolic pressure and working index of isolated rat heart showed significant recovery in DG root extract administrated rat heart, similar to the recovery by POC. Kymogram results showed muscarinic receptor agonist like action for DG methanol root extract, confirmed in rat heart by muscarnic receptor agonist (acetylcholine) and anatoginst (atropine). Administration of DG root extract prior to reperfusion showed better antioxidant status in myocardial tissue homogenate and mitochondrial, complemented by the levels of cardiac specific marker proteins in myocardial tissue and perfusate. Even though DG methanol root extract mimics its action similar to that of Ach, the myocardial protection mediated by the extract was superior to Ach, due to the presence of antioxidants in the crude extract.Conclusions: DG methanol root extract provides myocardial protection towards IRI by stimulating muscarinic receptors.

  7. Plasticity-related binding of GABA and muscarinic receptor sites in piriform cortex of rat: An autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.P.; Westrum, L.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-09-01

    This study has used the recently developed in vitro quantitative autoradiographic technique to examine the effects of olfactory bulb (OB) removal on receptor-binding sites in the deafferented piriform cortex (PC) of the rat. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR)- and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR)-binding sites in layer I of PC were localized using (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate as ligands, respectively. From the resultant autoradiograms the optical densities were measured using a Drexel-DUMAS image analysis system. The densities of BZR and MChR-binding sites were markedly increased in the PC ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral side in those subjects that were operated in adulthood (Postnatal Day 100, PN 100). Comparisons between the unoperated and PN 100 operated animals also showed significant increases in the deafferented PC. In the animals operated on the day of birth (PN 0) no significant differences were seen between the operated and the contralateral PC. The difference between the PN 0 deafferented PC and the unoperated controls shows a slight decrease in BZR density in the former group; however, in case of the MChR there is a slight increase on the side of the lesion. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of PC by OB removal appears to modulate both the BZR-binding sites that are coupled with the GABA-A receptor complex and the MChR-binding sites. The results also suggest that possibility of a role for these neurotransmitter receptor-binding sites in plasticity following deafferentation.

  8. Probing of the location of the allosteric site on m1 muscarinic receptors by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to locate the allosteric site on muscarinic receptors to which gallamine binds, 21 residues in the putative external loops and loop/transmembrane helix interfaces have been mutated to alanine. These residues are conserved in mammalian m1-m5 receptors. All mutant receptors can be expressed in COS-7 cells at high levels and appear to be functional, in that acetylcholine binding is sensitive to GTP. The gallamine binding site does not appear to involve the first, second, and most of the third extracellular loops. Tryptophan-400 and -101 inhibit gallamine binding when mutated to alanine or to phenylalanine and may form part of the allosteric site. Several mutations also affect antagonist binding. Surprisingly, tryptophan-91, a residue conserved in monoamine and peptide receptors, is important for antagonist binding. This residue, present in the middle of the first extracellular loop, may have a structural role in many G protein-coupled receptors. Antagonist binding is also affected by mutations of tryptophan-101 and tyrosine-404 to alanine or phenylalanine. In a helical wheel model, trytophan-101 and tyrosine-404, in conjunction with serine-78, aspartate-105, and tyrosine-408, form a cluster of residues that have been reported to affect antagonist binding when mutated, and they may therefore be part of the antagonist binding site. It is suggested that the allosteric site may be located close to and just extracellular to the antagonist binding site. The binding of methoctramine, an antagonist with allosteric properties, is not substantially affected by mutations at tryptophan-91, -101, and -400 and tyrosine-404, and thus these amino acids are not important for its binding. The binding of himbacine, another antagonist with allosteric properties, is affected by these mutations but in a manner different from that of gallamine or competitive antagonists. It has not been possible to determine whether methoctramine and himbacine bind exclusively to the

  9. [Effect of microinjections of a selective blocker of M1-muscarinic receptors pirenzepine into the neostriatum on the rat motor activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, K B; Kamkina, Iu V; Mysovskiĭ, D A

    2004-02-01

    In simulated discrimination conditioned reflex of active avoidance (CRAA) in T-maze, the effect of bilateral microinjections of the muscarinic receptor M1 selective blocker pirenzepine on the CRAA formation and behaviour in the "open filed" test, was studied in rats. A sharp worsening of the CRAA learning and a significant increase in the motor activity were shown to occur in rats following the microinjections as compared with control rats. The change in the motor responses seems to account for the worsening of the CRAA learning. Another reason of the phenomenon could involve a disorder in perception of conditioned signals and their poor differentiation. The data obtained and the literature data suggest a complex character of changes induced by the blockade of the M1 muscarinic receptors of the neostriatum.

  10. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...... to classical antagonists such as atropine. Here, we find that the D. melanogaster A-type mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 and D. melanogaster B-type mAChR to Gi/0. Furthermore, by comparing the second and third intracellular loops of all animal mAChRs for which the G protein coupling has been established, we could...

  11. The involvement of ventral tegmental area cholinergic muscarinic receptors in classically conditioned fear expression as measured with fear-potentiated startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greba, Q; Munro, L J; Kokkinidis, L

    2000-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contribute to the complex amygdala-based neurocircuitry that mediates fear-motivated behaviors. Because of acetylcholine's (ACh) role in DA neuronal activation, the involvement of VTA cholinergic muscarinic receptors in Pavlovian conditioned fear responding was evaluated in the present study. Fear-potentiated startle was used to assess the effects of intraVTA infused methylscopolamine on conditioned fear performance in laboratory rats. Application of this nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist to VTA neurons was observed to inhibit the ability of a conditioned stimulus (CS) previously paired with footshock to enhance the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Doses of methylscopolamine that blocked conditioned fear expression did not alter baseline sensorimotor responding. These results identify ACh neurotransmission in the VTA as a potential excitatory mechanism underlying the fear-arousing properties of threatening environmental stimuli.

  12. Muscarinic type 1 receptors mediate part of nitric oxide's vagal facilitatory effect in the isolated innervated rat right atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, K; Markos, F

    2007-02-01

    We investigated whether vagal cardiac cholinergic facilitation by nitric oxide (NO) is mediated by cardiac muscarinic receptor subtypes in the vagally innervated rat right atrium in vitro. Experiments were carried out in the presence of atenolol (4 microM). The right vagus was stimulated at 4, 8, 16, 32 Hz; pulse duration 1 ms at 20 V for 20s; vagal postganglionic activation was achieved using nicotine (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1mM) and the effect on cardiac interval (ms) assessed. Pirenzepine (1 microM), a M1 antagonist, attenuated vagally induced increase in cardiac interval. L-Arginine (0.34 mM) superfused with pirenzepine failed to reverse this attenuation, however, L-arginine applied alone reversed the reduction vagal cardiac slowing. Similarly, sodium nitroprusside (10 microM) applied alone, and not together with pirenzepine, was able to reverse the attenuation of vagal effects caused by pirenzepine. Synthetic MT7 (1 nM) toxin, a selective M1 antagonist confirmed these results. M3 antagonism using para-fluorohexahydrosiladifenidol (p-F-HHSiD) (300 nM) and M4 antagonism with PD 102807 (200 nM) did not affect the vagally induced increase in cardiac interval. Nicotine induced increase in cardiac interval was not altered by pirenzepine. These results show that antagonism of M1 receptors on cardiac vagal preganglionic fibres reduces vagal efficacy which can be recovered by either a nitric oxide synthase substrate or a NO donor.

  13. Proteoliposome-based selection of a recombinant antibody fragment against the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharni; Nomura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Abe, Hitomi; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Sato, Yumi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Asada, Hidetsugu; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Murata, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Hamakubo, Takao; Iwata, So; Nomura, Norimichi

    2014-12-01

    The development of antibodies against human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has achieved limited success, which has mainly been attributed to their low stability in a detergent-solubilized state. We herein describe a method that can generally be applied to the selection of phage display libraries with human GPCRs reconstituted in liposomes. A key feature of this approach is the production of biotinylated proteoliposomes that can be immobilized on the surface of streptavidin-coupled microplates or paramagnetic beads and used as a binding target for antibodies. As an example, we isolated a single chain Fv fragment from an immune phage library that specifically binds to the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor with nanomolar affinity. The selected antibody fragment recognized the GPCR in both detergent-solubilized and membrane-embedded forms, which suggests that it may be a potentially valuable tool for structural and functional studies of the GPCR. The use of proteoliposomes as immunogens and screening bait will facilitate the application of phage display to this difficult class of membrane proteins.

  14. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Subtypes of Muscarinic Receptors 2 (2nd) Held in Boston, Massachusetts on August 22-24 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-30

    pilocarpine CCh (1.0 mm,) stimulated incorporation of [2P] into and 4-(lo-chlorophenylcarbamyloxy)-2-butynyltrimethyl- synaptosomal phosphatidic acid in...evoked acid secretion, receptor subtype on gastric smooth muscle using selective antagonists, and have examined its regulation by guanine nucleotides...submucous plexus and their-roles in m-ucosal ion transport) 4 A. -~eli - 23 Amechanism of muscarinic excitation in dissociated smooth muscle cells

  16. A comparison of β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tissues of brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the black river and old woman creek, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jeffery A.; Baumann, Paul C.; Jones, Susan B.

    1996-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors (βARs) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors were measured in brain, gill, and heart tissues of brown bullhead catfish exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Black River, Ohio, USA, and were compared to values from Old Woman Creek, Ohio, a reference site. A decreased number of βARs were found in the gill from Black River fish, possibly indicating a compensatory response subsequent to chemical stress.

  17. Binding properties of nine 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP) analogues to M1, M2, M3 and putative M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Christophe, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We compared the binding properties of 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methiodide (4-DAMP) and nine analogues of this compound on muscarinic receptors of human neuroblastoma NB-OK1 cells (M1 subtype), rat heart (M2 subtype), rat pancreas (M3 subtype) and to the putative M4 subtype in striatum. 2. The requirements for high affinity binding were somewhat different for the four receptor subtypes. In general, the requirements of M3 receptors were more stringent than for M1, M2 or putativ...

  18. Lead generation using pharmacophore mapping and three-dimensional database searching: application to muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, D P; Dougall, I G; Meghani, P; Liu, Y J; Flower, D R

    1999-08-26

    By using a pharmacophore model, a geometrical representation of the features necessary for molecules to show a particular biological activity, it is possible to search databases containing the 3D structures of molecules and identify novel compounds which may possess this activity. We describe our experiences of establishing a working 3D database system and its use in rational drug design. By using muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists as an example, we show that it is possible to identify potent novel lead compounds using this approach. Pharmacophore generation based on the structures of known M(3) receptor antagonists, 3D database searching, and medium-throughput screening were used to identify candidate compounds. Three compounds were chosen to define the pharmacophore: a lung-selective M(3) antagonist patented by Pfizer and two Astra compounds which show affinity at the M(3) receptor. From these, a pharmacophore model was generated, using the program DISCO, and this was used subsequently to search a UNITY 3D database of proprietary compounds; 172 compounds were found to fit the pharmacophore. These compounds were then screened, and 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone (pA(2) 6.67) was identified as the best hit, with N-[2-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)cycohexyl]-2-propoxybenz amide (pA(2) 4. 83) and phenylcarbamic acid 2-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)cyclohexyl ester (pA(2) 5.54) demonstrating lower activity. As well as its potency, 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone is a simple structure with limited similarity to existing M(3) receptor antagonists.

  19. Cholinergic neurons of the pelvic autonomic ganglia and uterus of the female rat: distribution of axons and presence of muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papka, R E; Traurig, H H; Schemann, M; Collins, J; Copelin, T; Wilson, K

    1999-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) stimulates contraction of the uterus and dilates the uterine arterial supply. Uterine cholinergic nerves arise from the paracervical ganglia and were, in the past, characterized based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. However, the histochemical reaction for acetylcholinesterase provides only indirect evidence of acetylcholine location and is a nonspecific marker for cholinergic nerves. The present study: (1) reevaluated cholinergic neurons of the paracervical ganglia, (2) examined the cholinergic innervation of the uterus by using retrograde axonal tracing and antibodies against molecules specific to cholinergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and (3) examined muscarinic receptors in the paracervical ganglia using autoradiography and a radiolabeled agonist. Most ganglionic neurons were choline acetyltransferase- and vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive and were apposed by choline acetyltransferase/vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive terminals. Retrograde tracing showed that some cholinergic neurons projected axons to the uterus. These nerves formed moderately dense plexuses in the myometrium, cervical smooth muscle and microarterial system of the uterine horns and cervix. Finally, the paracervical ganglia contain muscarinic receptors. These results clearly reveal the cholinergic innervation of the uterus and cervix, a source of these nerves, and demonstrate the muscarinic receptor content of the paracervical ganglia. Cholinergic nerves could play significant roles in the control of uterine myometrium and vasculature.

  20. Autoregulation of acetylcholine release from vagus nerve terminals through activation of muscarinic receptors in the dog trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Yoshitomi, T.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of pirenzepine and gallamine on the membrane and contractile properties of smooth muscle cells and on excitatory neuro-effector transmission in the dog trachea were investigated by means of microelectrode, double sucrose gap and tension recording methods. 2. Pirenzepine (10(-7) M) and gallamine (10(-5) M) had no effect on the resting membrane potential or the input resistance of the smooth muscle cells. 3. Pirenzepine (10(-10)-10(-9) M) and gallamine (10(-7) M) enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions evoked by field stimulation in the combined presence of indomethacin (10(-5) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M). At higher concentrations pirenzepine (10(-8) M) inhibited the twitch contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Both pirenzepine and gallamine in doses over 10(-7) and 10(-5) M, respectively, reduced muscle tone. 4. Pirenzepine (10(-10)-10(-9) M) and gallamine (10(-7) M) enhanced the amplitude of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) evoked by field stimulation (single or repetitive stimulation). However, a high concentration of pirenzepine (10(-8) M) reduced the amplitude of e.j.ps. In parallel with its action on e.j.ps, pirenzepine (over 10(-9) M) reduced the response of smooth muscle cells to acetylcholine (ACh), in a dose-dependent manner. Gallamine (5 X 10(-5) M) markedly enhanced the amplitude of e.j.ps but also reduced the response of muscle cells to ACh. 5. ACh (10(-10)-10(-9) M) inhibited twitch contractions evoked by field stimulation, with a slight increase of resting tension. 6. Gallamine enhanced the summation of e.j.ps during repetitive field stimulation at a high frequency (20 Hz), but was without effect on the depression phenomena of e.j.ps observed during double stimulus experiments at different time intervals (5-60 s). 7. These results indicate that both pirenzepine and gallamine have dual actions on pre- and post-junctional muscarinic receptors in dog tracheal tissue. At low concentrations both agents potentiate excitatory

  1. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M3 receptor subtype (CHO-M3). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC50 of 14 μM. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC50 (pKb) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M3 receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC50=880 nM). In CHO-M3 cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M3 cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M3 receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action in IBS patients suffering with diarrhoea. PMID

  2. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-12-01

    1. Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. 2. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype (CHO-M(3)). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. 3. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC(50) of 14 micro M. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC(50) (pK(b)) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). 4. Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M(3) receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. 5. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC(50)=880 nM). 6. In CHO-M(3) cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. 7. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M(3) cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action

  3. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  4. Activation of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens core is necessary for the acquisition of drug reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Jose A; Sturm, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2006-05-31

    Neurotransmitter release in the nucleus accumbens core (NACore) during the acquisition of remifentanil or cocaine reinforcement was determined in an operant runway procedure by simultaneous tandem mass spectrometric analysis of dopamine, acetylcholine, and remifentanil or cocaine itself. Run times for remifentanil or cocaine continually decreased over the five consecutive runs of the experiment. Intra-NACore dopamine, acetylcholine, and drug peaked with each intravenous remifentanil or cocaine self-administration and decreased to pre-run baseline with half-lives of approximately 10 min. As expected, remifentanil or cocaine peaks did not vary between the five runs. Surprisingly, however, drug-contingent dopamine peaks also did not change over the five runs, whereas acetylcholine peaks did. Thus, the acquisition of drug reinforcement was paralleled by a continuous increase in acetylcholine overflow in the NACore, whereas the overflow of dopamine, the expected prime neurotransmitter candidate for conditioning in drug reinforcement, did not increase. Local intra-accumbens administration by reverse microdialysis of either atropine or mecamylamine completely and reversibly blocked the acquisition of remifentanil reinforcement. Our findings suggest that activation of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the NACore by acetylcholine volume transmission is necessary during the acquisition phase of drug reinforcement conditioning.

  5. Potentiation of M1 Muscarinic Receptor Reverses Plasticity Deficits and Negative and Cognitive Symptoms in a Schizophrenia Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, A; Rook, J M; Dickerson, J W; Roop, G N; Morrison, R D; Jalan-Sakrikar, N; Lamsal, A; Noetzel, M J; Poslusney, M S; Wood, M R; Melancon, B J; Stauffer, S R; Xiang, Z; Daniels, J S; Niswender, C M; Jones, C K; Lindsley, C W; Conn, P J

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficits in signaling of the M1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and also display impaired cortical long-term depression (LTD). We report that selective activation of the M1 mAChR subtype induces LTD in PFC and that this response is completely lost after repeated administration of phencyclidine (PCP), a mouse model of schizophrenia. Furthermore, discovery of a novel, systemically active M1 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0453595, allowed us to evaluate the impact of selective potentiation of M1 on induction of LTD and behavioral deficits in PCP-treated mice. Interestingly, VU0453595 fully restored impaired LTD as well as deficits in cognitive function and social interaction in these mice. These results provide critical new insights into synaptic changes that may contribute to behavioral deficits in this mouse model and support a role for selective M1 PAMs as a novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  6. Meta-analysis of anti-muscarinic receptor type 3 antibodies for the diagnosis of Sjogren syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuiwen Deng

    Full Text Available To conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic value of anti-muscarinic receptor type 3 (M3R antibodies in Sjögren syndrome (SS.Two databases, PUBMED and the Cochrane Library, were systematically searched. Approximately 2,000 participants from several studies were included in this research. STATA 11.2 software and Meta-DiSc 1.4 was used to conduct the meta-analysis.Eleven studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled DOR was 13.00 (95% CI, 6.00-26.00. The sensitivity was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.28-0.58 and the specificity was 0.95 (95%CI, 0.91-0.97. The LR+ and LR- were 7.90 (95% CI, 4.70-13.40, 0.61 (95% CI, 0.46-0.79, respectively. The AUC was 0.89 (95% CI, 0.86-0.92.The anti-M3R antibody had high specificity but relatively low sensitivity for the diagnosis of SS.

  7. Reduction in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity but not muscarinic-m2 receptor immunoreactivity in the brainstem of SIDS infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, C; Tolcos, M; Leditschke, J; Campbell, P; Rees, S

    1999-03-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmitter system is vital for several brainstem functions including cardiorespiratory control and central chemosensitivity. This study has examined aspects of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in the brainstem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and control infants. The cellular localisation and the optical density of the immunoreactivity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CHAT-IR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 (m2-IR) in the medulla was described in 14 SIDS and 9 control cases. There was a reduction in the number of CHAT-IR neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 71.2+/-8.3% vs SIDS: 46.1+/-5.3%) and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) (control: 77.2+/-5.0% vs SIDS: 52.5+/-7.4%) and reduced optical density of CHAT-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 0.20+/-0.01 vs SIDS; 0.14+/-0.02) in SIDS infants. In contrast there were no changes in the optical density of m2-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus, the DMV, or the arcuate nucleus. Hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus was observed in one SIDS infant. These results suggest that there is a specific defect in some cholinergic motor neurons in the medulla of SIDS infants. This could lead to abnormal control of cardiovascular and respiratory function and airway patency and may be one of the contributing factors in the etiology of SIDS.

  8. Effect of Daicong solution on hippocampal muscarinic receptors 1 and 3 gene expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Shumei Zhao; Qi'an Yue; Lefa Yan; Ying Gong; Rui Ji; Jingzong Gao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been previously shown that the muscarinic(M)receptor is involved in brain arousal and selective attention,mood,and motor coordination.OBJECTIVE:To explore the effects of various intragastric Daicong doses on hippocampal M1 and M3 receptor gene expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized cellular and molecular biology experiment,conducted at the Molecular Immunology Laboratory in Shandong bctween October 2006 and April 2007.MATERIALS:Fifty 22-month old Sprague Dawley rats,weighing 250-300 g were used for this experiment.Kainic acid was used to lesion the nucleus basalis to establish a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.The components of Daicong solution were as follows:ginseng,rehmannia dride rhizome,anemarrhena,and radix astragali.The solution was provided by the Affiliated Hospital to Weifang Medical College,according to preparation techniques of extracting liquid for traditional Chinese medicine(1 g crude drug/mL solution).Kainic acid was provided by Professor Xiuyan Li at Weifang Medical College.METHODS:The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups,10 rats in each group.Four groups were used for model establishment.and the fifth group served as a normal control group.Three of the model groups were intragastrically administered 5,10,and 20 g/kg/d Daicong solution,and an additional model group and nonnal control group received normal saline(10 mL/kg/d).Drugs were administered over a time period of one month.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Four days after model establishment,Morris water maze was used to measure learning and memory capabilities.RT-PCR was used to detect the effect of Daicong solution on mRNA expression of M1 and M3 receptor in the hippocampus of all groups.RESULTS:Fifty rats were included in the final analysis,without any loss.M1 and M3 receptor mRNA expression was decreased in the model group,compared to the normal control group(P<0.05).Upon Daicong administration(10 g/kg/d and 20 g/kg/d),M1 and M3

  9. Distinct interneuron types express m2 muscarinic receptor immunoreactivity on their dendrites or axon terminals in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, N; Papp, E C; Acsády, L; Levey, A I; Freund, T F

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-immunoreactive interneurons and various types of m2-positive axon terminals have been described in the hippocampal formation. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of interneurons expressing m2 receptor and to examine whether the somadendritic and axonal m2 immunostaining labels the same or distinct cell populations. In the CA1 subfield, neurons immunoreactive for m2 have horizontal dendrites, they are located at the stratum oriens/alveus border and have an axon that project to the dendritic region of pyramidal cells. In the CA3 subfield and the hilus, m2-positive neurons are multipolar and are scattered in all layers except stratum lacunosum-moleculare. In stratum pyramidale of the CA1 and CA3 regions, striking axon terminal staining for m2 was observed, surrounding the somata and axon initial segments of pyramidal cells in a basket-like manner. The co-localization of m2 with neurochemical markers and GABA was studied using the "mirror" technique and fluorescent double-immunostaining at the light microscopic level and with double-labelling using colloidal gold-conjugated antisera and immunoperoxidase reaction (diaminobenzidine) at the electron microscopic level. GABA was shown to be present in the somata of most m2-immunoreactive interneurons, as well as in the majority of m2-positive terminals in all layers. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin was absent from practically all m2-immunoreactive cell bodies and dendrites. In contrast, many of the terminals synapsing on pyramidal cell somata and axon initial segments co-localized parvalbumin and m2, suggesting a differential distribution of m2 receptor immunoreactivity on the axonal and somadendritic membrane of parvalbumin-containing basket and axo-axonic cells. The co-existence of m2 receptors with the calcium-binding protein calbindin and the neuropeptides cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was rare throughout the

  10. Discrimination of putative M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain by N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, A.B.; Creese, I.

    1986-03-01

    The EC/sub 50/ of EEDQ for the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding in vitro was approximately 3 fold lower for homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem (containing predominantly putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes respectively). Furthermore, the time-dependent loss of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding produced by 100 ..mu..M EEDQ was faster in homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem. Administration of EEDQ (20 mg/kg i.p.) irreversibly reduced the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding by 56% and 34% in hippocampus and brainstem respectively. Pirenzepine competition for the remaining (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites following in vitro and in vivo treatment with EEDQ revealed a significant increase in the proportion of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites having low affinity for pirenzepine (M/sub 2/ receptors), indicating that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ receptors) were selectively and irreversibly lost. Thus, EEDQ discriminates the same putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes that are discriminated by pirenzepine. The reduction of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding could be prevented both in vitro and in vivo by atropine or scopolamine. These data may indicate differences in the accessibility of these putative receptor subtypes to EEDQ or, alternatively, differences in the availability of carboxyl groups able to interact with EEDQ at the ligand recognition site of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptors.

  11. Depression Case Control (DeCC) Study fails to support involvement of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene in recurrent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Gaysina, Daria; Craddock, Nick; Farmer, Anne; Gray, Joanna; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Hoda, Farzana; Jones, Lisa; Knight, Jo; Korszun, Ania; Owen, Michael J; Sterne, Abram; Craig, Ian W; McGuffin, Peter

    2009-04-15

    It has been suggested that alteration in the muscarinic-cholinergic system is involved in modulation of mood. Three studies have reported linkage on chromosome 7 with major depressive disorder (MDD) in or close to a region containing the muscarinic receptor CHRM2 gene. A haplotype of SNPs located in CHRM2 (rs1824024-rs2061174-rs324650) has been significantly associated with MDD in a previous study. We report the first study investigating this gene in a large, adequately powered, clinical depression case-control sample (n = 1420 cases, 1624 controls). Our data fail to support association with the CHRM2 polymorphisms previously implicated in the genetic aetiology of depression. It is possible our failure to replicate may be a consequence of differences in definition of the MDD phenotype and/or ethnic differences.

  12. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  13. Role of muscarinic-3 receptor antibody in systemic sclerosis: correlation with disease duration and effects of IVIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Jagmohan; Kedika, Ramalinga; Mendoza, Fabian; Jimenez, Sergio A; Blomain, Erik S; DiMarino, Anthony J; Cohen, Sidney; Rattan, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with autoantibodies against muscarinic-3 receptor (M3-R). We investigated the temporal course of the site of action of these autoantibodies at the myenteric neurons (MN) vs. the smooth muscle (SM) M3-R in relation to disease duration, and determined the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in reversing these changes. Immunoglobulins purified from SSc patients (SScIgG) were used to assess their differential binding to MN and SM (from rat colon) employing immunohistochemistry (IHC). Effect of SScIgG on neural and direct muscle contraction was determined by cholinergic nerve stimulation and bethanechol-induced SM contraction. Effects of IVIG and its antigen-binding fragment F(ab')2 on SScIgG binding were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of rat colonic longitudinal SM myenteric plexus (LSMMP) lysate and to second extracellular loop peptide of M3-R (M3-RL2). SScIgG from all patients demonstrated significantly higher binding to MN than to SM. With progression of SSc duration, binding at MN and SM increased in a linear fashion with a correlation coefficient of 0.696 and 0.726, respectively (P < 0.05). SScIgG-mediated attenuation of neural and direct SM contraction also increased with disease duration. ELISA analysis revealed that IVIG and F(ab')2 significantly reduced SScIgG binding to LSMMP lysate and M3-RL2. Dysmotility in SSc occurs sequentially, beginning with SScIgG-induced blockage of cholinergic neurotransmission (neuropathy), which progresses to inhibition of acetylcholine action at the SM cell (myopathy). IVIG reverses this cholinergic dysfunction at the neural and myogenic receptors by anti-idiotypic neutralization of SScIgG.

  14. The M sub 1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 1} accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1{mu}g/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M{sub 1} mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m{sub 1} gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M{sub 1} type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M{sub 1} mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M{sub 1} mAChR densities in these cells characterized by ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10{sup 6} cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10{sup 6} cells in the LK3-8 cells.

  15. Tuning the allosteric regulation of artificial muscarinic and dopaminergic ligand-gated potassium channels by protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Christophe J.; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia N.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Trouchet, Amandine; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Nieścierowicz, Katarzyna; Sapay, Nicolas; Crouzy, Serge; Vivaudou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels enable intercellular transmission of action potential through synapses by transducing biochemical messengers into electrical signal. We designed artificial ligand-gated ion channels by coupling G protein-coupled receptors to the Kir6.2 potassium channel. These artificial channels called ion channel-coupled receptors offer complementary properties to natural channels by extending the repertoire of ligands to those recognized by the fused receptors, by generating more sustained signals and by conferring potassium selectivity. The first artificial channels based on the muscarinic M2 and the dopaminergic D2L receptors were opened and closed by acetylcholine and dopamine, respectively. We find here that this opposite regulation of the gating is linked to the length of the receptor C-termini, and that C-terminus engineering can precisely control the extent and direction of ligand gating. These findings establish the design rules to produce customized ligand-gated channels for synthetic biology applications. PMID:28145461

  16. Presynaptic muscarinic M(2) receptors modulate glutamatergic transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ji-Dong; Hazra, Rimi; Dabrowska, Joanna; Muly, E Chris; Wess, Jürgen; Rainnie, Donald G

    2012-03-01

    The anterolateral cell group of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST(ALG)) serves as an important relay station in stress circuitry. Limbic inputs to the BNST(ALG) are primarily glutamatergic and activity-dependent changes in this input have been implicated in abnormal behaviors associated with chronic stress and addiction. Significantly, local infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) receptor agonists into the BNST trigger stress-like cardiovascular responses, however, little is known about the effects of these agents on glutamatergic transmission in the BNST(ALG). Here, we show that glutamate- and ACh-containing fibers are found in close association in the BNST(ALG). Moreover, in the presence of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, eserine, endogenous ACh release evoked a long-lasting reduction of the amplitude of stimulus-evoked EPSCs. This effect was mimicked by exogenous application of the ACh analog, carbachol, which caused a reversible, dose-dependent, reduction of the evoked EPSC amplitude, and an increase in both the paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation, suggesting a presynaptic site of action. Uncoupling of postsynaptic G-proteins with intracellular GDP-β-S, or application of the nicotinic receptor antagonist, tubocurarine, failed to block the carbachol effect. In contrast, the carbachol effect was blocked by prior application of atropine or M(2) receptor-preferring antagonists, and was absent in M(2)/M(4) receptor knockout mice, suggesting that presynaptic M(2) receptors mediate the effect of ACh. Immunoelectron microscopy studies further revealed the presence of M(2) receptors on axon terminals that formed asymmetric synapses with BNST neurons. Our findings suggest that presynaptic M(2) receptors might be an important modulator of the stress circuit and hence a novel target for drug development.

  17. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression.

  18. SPET imaging of central muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with iodine-123 labelled E-IQNP and Z-IQNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuhara, K.; Farde, L.; Halldin, C.; Karlsson, P.; Swahn, C.G.; Olsson, H.; Sedvall, G. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstroem, K.A. [Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Larsson, S.A.; Schnell, P.-O. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); McPherson, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Nuclear Medicine Group, TN (United States); Savonen, A.; Hiltunen, J. [MAP Medical Technologies Oy, Tikkakoski (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP) is a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist and the racemic ligand contains eight stereoisomers. In a single-photon emission tomography (SPET) study in monkeys we recently confirmed that [{sup 123}I]E-(R,R)-IQNP ([{sup 123}I]E-IQNP) is a radioligand with modest selectivity for the M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} subtypes, whereas [{sup 123}I]Z-(R,R)-IQNP ([{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP) is non-subtype selective. In the present SPET study, E- and Z-IQNP were examined in human subjects. SPET examination was performed on three male subjects after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP and in another three after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP. The binding potential (BP) for [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP was calculated using several quantitative approaches with the cerebellum as a reference region. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure radioligand metabolism in plasma. Following [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP, the radioactivity was high in the neocortex and striatum, intermediate in the thalamus and low in the pons and cerebellum, which is consistent with the rank order for the regional density of M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} subtypes in vitro. For all regions, peak equilibrium was identified within the 48-h data acquisition. The simplified reference tissue approach using SPET data from 0 to 48 h was the most reliable in this limited series of subjects. Following injection of [{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP, radioactivity was high in the neocortex and striatum, intermediate in the thalamus and pons and low in the cerebellum, which is in agreement with the density of M{sub 1}, M{sub 2} and M{sub 4} subtypes as measured in vitro. Quantitative analyses provided indirect support for specific M{sub 2} binding of Z-IQNP in the cerebellum. The high selectivity of [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP for M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} receptors allowed the use of cerebellum as a reference region devoid of specific binding, and

  19. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Kentaro; Kume, Hiroaki; Oguma, Tetsuya; Shigemori, Wataru; Tohda, Yuji; Ogawa, Emiko; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs) play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM), a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM)-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors. PMID:27657061

  20. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Fukunaga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM, a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC, significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors.

  1. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh, which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic and allergen-induced (extrinsic airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax or minimally (AIRmin to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation.

  2. Immunohistochemical localisation of cholinergic muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1r) in the guinea pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding the location of cholinergic muscarinic receptor 1 (M1r) in the ENS, even though physiological data suggest that M1rs are central to cholinergic neurotransmission. This study localised M1rs in the ENS of the guinea pig ileum and human colon using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR in human colon. Double labelling using antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify neuron subytpes bearing M1r. M1r immunoreactivity (IR) was present on neurons in the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. The two antibodies gave similar M1r-IR patterns and M1r-IR was abolished upon antibody preabsorption. M1r-IR was present on cholinergic and nNOS-IR nerve cell bodies in both guinea pig and human myenteric neurons. Presynaptic M1r-IR was present on NOS-IR and VAChT-IR nerve fibres in the circular muscle in the human colon. In the submucosal ganglia, M1r-IR was present on a population of neurons that contained cChAT-IR, but did not contain NPY-IR or calretinin-IR. M1r-IR was present on endothelial cells of blood vessels in the submucosal plexus. The localisation of M1r-IR in the guinea pig and human ENS shown in this study agrees with physiological studies. M1r-IR in cholinergic and nitrergic neurons and nerve fibres indicate that M1rs have a role in both cholinergic and nitrergic transmission. M1r-IR present in submucosal neurons suggests a role in mediating acetylcholine's effect on submucosal sensory and secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. M1r-IR present on blood vessel endothelial cells suggests that M1rs may also mediate acetylcholine's direct effect on vasoactivation.

  3. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. (Univ of Medical, Newark, NJ (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  4. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  5. Activation of muscarinic receptors in rat parotid acinar cells induces AQP5 trafficking to nuclei and apical plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gota; Bragiel, Aneta M; Wang, Di; Pieczonka, Tomasz D; Skowronski, Mariusz T; Shono, Masayuki; Nielsen, Søren; Ishikawa, Yasuko

    2015-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of aquaporin-5 (AQP5) in rat parotid acinar cells in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation remains unclear. Immunoconfocal and immunoelectron microscopy were used to visualize the distribution of AQP5 in parotid acinar cells. Western blotting was used to analyze AQP5 levels in membranes. To clarify the characteristics of membrane domains associated with AQP5, detergent solubility and sucrose-density flotation experiments were performed. Under control conditions, AQP5 was diffusely distributed on the apical plasma membrane (APM) and apical plasmalemmal region and throughout the cytoplasm. Upon mAChR activation, AQP5 was predominantly located in the nucleus, APM and lateral plasma membrane (LPM). Subsequently, localization of AQP5 in the nucleus, APM and LPM was decreased. Prolonged atropine treatment inhibited mAChR agonist-induced translocation of AQP5 to the nucleus, APM and LPM. AQP5 levels were enhanced in isolated nuclei and nuclear membranes prepared from parotid tissues incubated with mAChR agonist. mAChR agonist induced AQP5 levels in both soluble and insoluble nuclear fractions solubilized with Triton X-100 or Lubrol WX. Small amounts of AQP5 in nuclei were detected using low-density sucrose gradient. When AQP5 was present in the nuclear membrane, nuclear size decreased. The activation of mAChR induced AQP5 translocation to the nucleus, APM and LPM, and AQP5 may trigger water transport across the nuclear membrane and plasma membrane in rat parotid acinar cells. AQP5 translocates to the nuclear membrane and may trigger the movement of water, inducing shrinkage of the nucleus and the start of nuclear functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1995-01-01

    inhibitors of the binding of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), pirenzepine (PZ), and oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) to tissue membrane preparations. In the [3H]-Oxo-M binding assay, receptor affinities in the low nanomolar range were measured for 4a (IC50 = 0.010 microM), 4b (IC50 = 0.003 microM), 4c (IC50...

  7. Development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620, to probe the human M(2) and M(4) muscarinic receptor allosteric binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Xiao, Hongling; Christopoulos, Arthur; Felder, Christian C

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we characterized a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) potentiator, LY2119620 (3-amino-5-chloro-N-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-6-[2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethoxy]thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide) as a novel probe of the human M2 and M4 allosteric binding sites. Since the discovery of allosteric binding sites on G protein-coupled receptors, compounds targeting these novel sites have been starting to emerge. For example, LY2033298 (3-amino-5-chloro-6-methoxy-4-methyl-thieno(2,3-b)pyridine-2-carboxylic acid cyclopropylamid) and a derivative of this chemical scaffold, VU152100 (3-amino-N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4,6-dim​ethylthieno[2,3-b]pyridine carboxamide), bind to the human M4 mAChR allosteric pocket. In the current study, we characterized LY2119620, a compound similar in structure to LY2033298 and binds to the same allosteric site on the human M4 mAChRs. However, LY2119620 also binds to an allosteric site on the human M2 subtype. [(3)H]NMS ([(3)H]N-methylscopolamine) binding experiments confirm that LY2119620 does not compete for the orthosteric binding pocket at any of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Dissociation kinetic studies using [(3)H]NMS further support that LY2119620 binds allosterically to the M2 and M4 mAChRs and was positively cooperative with muscarinic orthosteric agonists. To probe directly the allosteric sites on M2 and M4, we radiolabeled LY2119620. Cooperativity binding of [(3)H]LY2119620 with mAChR orthosteric agonists detects significant changes in Bmax values with little change in Kd, suggesting a G protein-dependent process. Furthermore, [(3)H]LY2119620 was displaced by compounds of similar chemical structure but not by previously described mAChR allosteric compounds such as gallamine or WIN 62,577 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-δ-4-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole). Our results therefore demonstrate the development of a radioligand, [(3)H]LY2119620 to probe specifically the human M2 and M4 muscarinic

  8. Nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are recruited by acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission within the locus coeruleus during the organisation of post-ictal antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-10-01

    Post-ictal antinociception is characterised by an increase in the nociceptive threshold that accompanies tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (TCS). The locus coeruleus (LC) receives profuse cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Different concentrations (1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL) of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine and the nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine were microinjected into the LC of Wistar rats to investigate the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the severity of TCS and the post-ictal antinociceptive response. Five minutes later, TCS were induced by systemic administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (64mg/kg). Seizures were recorded inside the open field apparatus for an average of 10min. Immediately after seizures, the nociceptive threshold was recorded for 130min using the tail-flick test. Pre-treatment of the LC with 1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL concentrations of both atropine and mecamylamine did not cause a significant effect on seizure severity. However, the same treatments decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. In addition, mecamylamine caused an earlier decrease in the post-ictal antinociception compared to atropine. These results suggest that muscarinic and mainly nicotinic cholinergic receptors of the LC are recruited to organise tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception.

  9. NSC23766, a widely used inhibitor of Rac1 activation, additionally acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Magdolna; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Wittig, Karola; Voigt, Niels; Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard; Dobrev, Dobromir; Levy, Finn Olav; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules interfering with Rac1 activation are considered as potential drugs and are already studied in animal models. A widely used inhibitor without reported attenuation of RhoA activity is NSC23766 [(N(6)-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl]amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2-methyl-4,6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride]. We found that NSC23766 inhibits the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR)-induced Rac1 activation in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Surprisingly, NSC27366 concomitantly suppressed the carbachol-induced RhoA activation and a M2 mAChR-induced inotropic response in isolated neonatal rat hearts requiring the activation of Rho-dependent kinases. We therefore aimed to identify the mechanisms by which NSC23766 interferes with the differentially mediated, M2 mAChR-induced responses. Interestingly, NSC23766 caused a rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curve for the positive inotropic response without modifying carbachol efficacy. To analyze the specificity of NSC23766, we compared the carbachol and the similarly Giβγ-mediated, adenosine-induced activation of Gi protein-regulated potassium channel (GIRK) channels in human atrial myocytes. Application of NSC23766 blocked the carbachol-induced K(+) current but had no effect on the adenosine-induced GIRK current. Similarly, an adenosine A1 receptor-induced positive inotropic response in neonatal rat hearts was not attenuated by NSC23766. To investigate its specificity toward the different mAChR types, we studied the carbachol-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells expressing M1, M2, or M3 mAChRs. NSC23766 caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curves at all mAChRs. Thus, NSC23766 is not only an inhibitor of Rac1 activation, but it is within the same concentration range a competitive antagonist at mAChRs. Molecular docking analysis at M2 and M3 mAChR crystal

  10. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1995-01-01

    = 0.011 microM), and 4d (IC50 = 0.0008 microM). Pharmacological effects (EC50 or Ki values) and intrinsic activities (per cent of maximal carbachol responses) were determined using five recombinant human mAChRs (m1-m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R......]QNB (brain) and [3H]Oxo-M (brain) binding data, were shown to be predictive of pharmacologically determined intrinsic activities at m1-m5, the same rank order of intrinsic activity being observed at all five mAChRs (4a > 4d > 4b > 4c). It is concluded that within this class of high-affinity mAChR (m1-m5...

  11. The effects of microinjection of the selective blocker of muscarinic M1 receptors pirenzepine into the neostriatum on the motor behavior of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, K B; Kamkina, Yu V; Mysovskii, D A

    2005-07-01

    A discrimination conditioned active avoidance reflex (CAAR) model in a T maze was used in 18 rats to study the effects of bilateral microinjections of the selective muscarinic M1 receptor blocker pirenzepine into the neostriatum on the acquisition of the CAAR and behavior in an open field test. There was sharp degradation of learning of the CAAR and a significant improvement in motor activity both in the open field test and in the maze itself in rats given bilateral microinjections (pirenzepine, 0.004 mg) into the neostriatum as compared with intact controls. This suggests that changes in motor behavior (a sharp increase in locomotor activity) may be among the reasons for difficulty in learning the CAAR in rats after pirenzepine microinjections. Another reason for difficulty in learning the CAAR in these animals may be impairment of the perception of the conditioned signals (a flashing light) and poor differentiation. This is particularly indicated by the delay in the start chamber (double that seen in intact animals) on presentation of conditioned signals despite the high level of motor activity. These results and published data provide evidence for the complex nature of changes induced by blockade of muscarinic M1 receptors in the neostriatum.

  12. Muscarinic receptor activation determines the effects of store-operated Ca(2+)-entry on excitability and energy metabolism in pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Oliver; Taubenberger, Nando; Huchzermeyer, Christine; Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Benninger, Felix; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In various cell types, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+)-stores results in store-operated Ca(2+)-entry (SOCE) across the cellular membrane. However, the effects of SOCE on neuronal membrane excitability and mitochondrial functions in central neurons are not well defined. We investigated such cellular downstream effects in pyramidal neurons of rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures by applying electrophysiological and fluorescence imaging techniques. We report that SOCE is associated with (i) elevations of Ca(2+)-concentration in individual neuronal mitochondria ([Ca(2+)](m)). In addition, SOCE can result in (ii) hyperpolarizing neuronal membrane currents, (iii) increase in extracellular K(+)-concentration ([K(+)](o)), (iv) mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and (v) changes in intracellular redox state (NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence), the latter reflecting responses of energy metabolism. These additional downstream effects of SOCE required concomitant muscarinic receptor activation by carbachol or acetylcholine, and were suppressed by agonist washout or application of antagonist, atropine. We conclude that muscarinic receptor activation determines the downstream effects of SOCE on neuronal membrane excitability and energy metabolism. This mechanism might have significant impact on information processing and neurometabolic coupling in central neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ligand binding and functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on the TE671/RD human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencherif, M.; Lukas, R.J. (Division of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Cells of the TE671/RD human clonal line express a finite number ((Bmax) of about 350 fmol/mg of membrane protein) of apparently noninteracting, high-affinity binding sites (KD of 0.07 nM and a Hill coefficient close to unity, nH = 0.94) for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) radio antagonist, tritium-labeled quinuclidinyl benzilate ({sup 3}H-QNB). The rank order potency of selective antagonists that inhibit specific {sup 3}HQNB binding is: atropine greater than 4-DAMP (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide) greater than pirenzepine greater than methoctramine greater than AFDx-116 (11-2(2-((diethylamino)methyl)-1-(piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepin-6-one). Functional studies indicate that phosphoinositide (PIns) hydrolysis in TE671/RD cells is increased by carbachol (EC50 of 10 microM), but not by nicotine (to concentrations as high as 1 mM). Agonist-stimulated PIns metabolism is inhibited by antagonists with the same rank order potency as for inhibition of {sup 3}HQNB binding. Functional responses are augmented in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, are strongly inhibited after 24-hr exposure to cholera toxin, but are only slightly inhibited after long-term exposure to pertussis toxin or forskolin. These studies identify a pharmacologically-defined M3-subtype of mAChR strongly coupled via a cholera toxin-sensitive mechanism to PIns hydrolysis in these cells. Within 1 hr of treatment of TE671/RD cells with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP or with 10 microM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), there is a 30 to 50% decrease in carbachol-stimulated PIns responsiveness that recovers to control values after 5 days of continued drug treatment. However, a comparable and more persistent inhibition of mAChR function is observed on cell treatment with 20 nM PMA.

  14. The Beneficial Effect of Fesoterodine, a Competitive Muscarinic Receptor Antagonist on Erectile Dysfunction in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz-Oral, Didem; Bayatli, Nur; Gur, Serap

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the possible role of fesoterodine (a competitive muscarinic receptor antagonist) on erectile dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A total of 16 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into control and diabetic groups. Diabetes was induced by a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (25-35 mg/kg). In vivo erectile responses were evaluated by the stimulation of cavernosal nerves, and measurements were repeated after the intracavernosal injection of fesoterodine (1 µM) in rats. The relaxation responses to fesoterodine were examined via incubation with various inhibitors. The relaxant responses of corpus cavernosum (CC) strips were observed in the presence or the absence of fesoterodine (10 µM). Intracavernous administration of fesoterodine restored in vivo erectile response at 5.0- and 7.5-V levels, except for 2.5 V in diabetic rats. Basal intracavernosal pressure (5.4 ± 0.9 mm Hg) in diabetic rats was markedly increased after injection of fesoterodine (33.9 ± 7.9 mm Hg, P fesoterodine resulted in a relaxation of CC in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reduced in diabetic rats. Nifedipine (l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) inhibited maximum fesoterodine-induced relaxation by 58%. The nonselective K(+) channel blocker tetraethylammonium and glibenclamide incubation did not change the relaxant response to fesoterodine. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine (10 µM), electrical field stimulation (10 Hz), and sodium nitroprusside (0.01 µM) in diabetic rats were increased after incubation with fesoterodine (10 µM). Fesoterodine improved erectile function and relaxation of isolated strips of rat CC. The underlying mechanism of fesoterodine is likely due to the blocking of l-type calcium channels independent of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. Further investigations are warranted to fully elucidate the restorative effects of fesoterodine on overactive

  15. Blueberry treatment antagonizes C-2 ceramide-induced stress signaling in muscarinic receptor-transfected COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James A; Bielinski, Donna F; Fisher, Derek R

    2010-03-24

    Previous research has shown that muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) show loss of sensitivity in aging and AD and are selectively sensitive to oxidative stress (OS). Thus, COS-7 cells transfected (tn) with MAChR subtype M1 show > OS sensitivity [as reflected in the ability of the cell to extrude or sequester Ca(2+) following depolarization (recovery) by oxotremorine (oxo) and exposure to dopamine (DA) or amyloid beta (Abeta)] than M3-transfected COS-7 cells. Blueberry (BB) extract pretreatment prevented these deficits. Research has also indicated that C2 ceramide (Cer) has several age-related negative cellular effects (e.g., OS). When these cells were treated with Cer, the significant decrements in the ability of both types of tn cells to initially respond to oxo were antagonized by BB treatment. Present experiments assessed signaling mechanisms involved in BB protection in the presence or absence of DA, Abeta, and/or Cer in this model. Thus, control or BB-treated M1 and M3 tn COS-7 cells were exposed to DA or Abeta(42) in the presence or absence of Cer. Primarily, results showed that the effects of DA or Abeta(42) were to increase stress (e.g., PKCgamma, p38MAPK) and protective signals (e.g., pMAPK). Cer also appeared to raise several of the stress and protective signals in the absence of the other stressors, including PKCgamma, pJNK, pNfkappaB, p53, and p38MAPK, while not significantly altering MAPK, or Akt. pArc was, however, increased by Cer in both types of transfected cells. The protective effects of BB when combined with Cer generally showed greater protection when BB extract was applied prior to Cer, except for one protective signal (pArc) where a greater effect was seen in the M3 cells exposed to Abeta(42.) In the absence of the Abeta(42) or DA, for several of the stress signals (e.g., pNfkappaB, p53), BB lowered their Cer-induced increases in M1- and M3-transfected cells. We are exploring these interactions further, but it is clear that increases in ceramide

  16. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  17. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects.

  18. Cigarette Smoke Disturbs the Survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs Partially through Muscarinic Receptors-Dependent Mechanisms in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of smoking related airway inflammation including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, how cigarette smoke directly impacts systematic CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets, especially by modulating muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MRs, has yet to be well elucidated.Circulating CD8+ Tc/Tregs in healthy nonsmokers (n = 15, healthy smokers (n = 15 and COPD patients (n = 18 were evaluated by flow cytometry after incubating with anti-CD3, anti-CD8, anti-CD25, anti-Foxp3 antibodies. Peripheral blood T cells (PBT cells from healthy nonsmokers were cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE alone or combined with MRs agonist/antagonist for 5 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using Ki-67/Annexin-V antibodies to measure the effects of CSE on the survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs.While COPD patients have elevated circulating percentage of CD8+ T cells, healthy smokers have higher frequency of CD8+ Tregs. Elevated percentages of CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with declined FEV1 in COPD. CSE promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of CD8+ T cells, while facilitated both the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. Notably, the effects of CSE on CD8+ Tc/Tregs can be mostly simulated or attenuated by muscarine and atropine, the MR agonist and antagonist, respectively. However, neither muscarine nor atropine influenced the apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs.The results imply that cigarette smoking likely facilitates a proinflammatory state in smokers, which is partially mediated by MR dysfunction. The MR antagonist may be a beneficial drug candidate for cigarette smoke-induced chronic airway inflammation.

  19. Cigarette Smoke Disturbs the Survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs Partially through Muscarinic Receptors-Dependent Mechanisms in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Long; Meng, Zhao-Ji; Xiong, Xian-Zhi; Liu, Hong-Ju; Xin, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Jian-Chu

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc) are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of smoking related airway inflammation including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, how cigarette smoke directly impacts systematic CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets, especially by modulating muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MRs), has yet to be well elucidated. Circulating CD8+ Tc/Tregs in healthy nonsmokers (n = 15), healthy smokers (n = 15) and COPD patients (n = 18) were evaluated by flow cytometry after incubating with anti-CD3, anti-CD8, anti-CD25, anti-Foxp3 antibodies. Peripheral blood T cells (PBT cells) from healthy nonsmokers were cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) alone or combined with MRs agonist/antagonist for 5 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using Ki-67/Annexin-V antibodies to measure the effects of CSE on the survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs. While COPD patients have elevated circulating percentage of CD8+ T cells, healthy smokers have higher frequency of CD8+ Tregs. Elevated percentages of CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with declined FEV1 in COPD. CSE promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of CD8+ T cells, while facilitated both the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. Notably, the effects of CSE on CD8+ Tc/Tregs can be mostly simulated or attenuated by muscarine and atropine, the MR agonist and antagonist, respectively. However, neither muscarine nor atropine influenced the apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. The results imply that cigarette smoking likely facilitates a proinflammatory state in smokers, which is partially mediated by MR dysfunction. The MR antagonist may be a beneficial drug candidate for cigarette smoke-induced chronic airway inflammation.

  20. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; impaired vs normal left ventricular function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van den Heuvel; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); G.L. Bartels; M. van der Ent (Martin); W.J. Remme (Willem)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown. METHO

  1. In vitro studies on the effect of beta-carbolines on the activities of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase and on the muscarinic receptor binding of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skup, M; Oderfeld-Nowak, B; Rommelspacher, H

    1983-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) activity and muscarinic receptor binding of homogenates from several brain structures were inhibited by beta-carbolines. The inhibition was of the noncompetitive type in the case of the enzyme and of the mixed type in the case of the receptor binding. This effect was most strongly manifested by pyridoindoles(harmane, norharmane), i.e., carbolines containing an aromatic C ring than by the corresponding piperidoindoles (tetrahydroharmane, tetrahydronorharmane), i.e., those with a reduced C ring. The activity of choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6) was not altered. These data are further evidence of the interactions between indoleamine derivatives and the cholinergic system. The results are discussed in terms of their possible biological significance.

  2. Iodine-123 labelled Z-(R,R)-IQNP: a potential radioligand for visualization of M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, K.A. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Nuclear Medicine Sections, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C.; Okubo, Yoshiro; Nobuhara, Kenji; Swahn, C.G.; Karlsson, P.; Larsson, S.; Schnell, P.O.; Farde, L. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Nuclear Medicine Sections, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Savonen, A.; Hiltunen, Jukka [MAP Medical Technologies Oy, Tikkakoski (Finland); McPherson, D.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Nuclear Medicine Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), TN (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Z-(R)-1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl (R)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (Z-IQNP) has high affinity to the M{sub 1}and M {sub 2} muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes according to previous in vitro and in vivo studies in rats. In the present study iodine-123 labelled Z-IQNP was prepared for in vivo single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies in cynomolgus monkeys. SPET studies with Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP demonstrated high accumulation in monkey brain (>5% of injected dose at 70 min p.i.) and marked accumulation in brain regions such as the thalamus, the neocortex, the striatum and the cerebellum. Pretreatment with the non-selective mAChR antagonist scopolamine (0.2 mg/kg) inhibited Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP binding in all these regions. The percentage of unchanged Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP measured in plasma was less than 10% at 10 min after injection, which may be due to rapid hydrolysis, as has been demonstrated previously with the E-isomer of IQNP. Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP showed higher uptake in M {sub 2}-rich regions, compared with previously obtained results with E-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP. In conclusion, the radioactivity distribution from Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP in monkey brain indicates that Z-[ {sup 123}I]IQNP binds to the M {sub 1}- and M {sub 2}-rich areas and provides a high signal for specific binding, and is thus a potential ligand for mAChR imaging with SPET. (orig.)

  3. The agonist-specific voltage dependence of M2 muscarinic receptors modulates the deactivation of the acetylcholine-gated K(+) current (I KACh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Alamilla, Javier; Sanchez-Chapula, José A; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been shown that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) display intrinsic voltage sensitivity. We reported that the voltage sensitivity of M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R) is also ligand specific. Here, we provide additional evidence to understand the mechanism underlying the ligand-specific voltage sensitivity of the M2R. Using ACh, pilocarpine (Pilo), and bethanechol (Beth), we evaluated the agonist-specific effects of voltage by measuring the ACh-activated K(+) current (I KACh) in feline and rabbit atrial myocytes and in HEK-293 cells expressing M2R-Kir3.1/Kir3.4. The activation of I KACh by the muscarinic agonist Beth was voltage insensitive, suggesting that the voltage-induced conformational changes in M2R do not modify its affinity for this agonist. Moreover, deactivation of the Beth-evoked I KACh was voltage insensitive. By contrast, deactivation of the ACh-induced I KACh was significantly slower at -100 mV than at +50 mV, while an opposite effect was observed when I KACh was activated by Pilo. These findings are consistent with the voltage affinity pattern observed for these three agonists. Our findings suggest that independent of how voltage disturbs the receptor binding site, the voltage dependence of the signaling pathway is ultimately determined by the agonist. These observations emphasize the pharmacological potential to regulate the M2R-parasympathetic associated cardiac function and also other cellular signaling pathways by exploiting the voltage-dependent properties of GPCRs.

  4. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells.

  5. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis implicates a threonine residue in TM6 in the subtype selectivities of UH-AH 37 and pirenzepine at muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J; Seidenberg, M

    2000-08-01

    The structural basis for the selectivity of the antagonist UH-AH 37 at human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated by expressing mutant receptors in COS-7 cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction between UH-AH 37 and [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine in equilibrium assays is competitive and that the high affinity of UH-AH 37 for the M(5) subtype, compared to M(2), is due to an epitope in the sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) or the third outer loop of the receptor. By mutating each nonconserved residue in this region of M(2) and M(5) to its counterpart in the other receptor, we identified a threonine residue in the middle of TM6 uniquely responsible for the higher affinity of the M(5) receptor (M(1), M(3), and M(4) receptors also carry a threonine at that location and also have high affinity for UH-AH 37). The mutant receptor in which the corresponding alanine of the M(2) receptor was replaced by threonine, M(2)(401)ala --> thr, expressed enhanced affinity for pirenzepine as well as for UH-AH 37. The chick M(2) receptor, which expresses anomalously high affinity for pirenzepine, differs from its mammalian counterparts by the presence of a threonine at this position. Affinities of AF-DX 116 and 4-DAMP, as well as the allosteric potency of UH-AH 37, were not sensitive to the M(2)(401) ala --> thr mutation. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Direct excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: roles in cellular excitability, inhibitory transmission and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; Ball, Jackson; Stoll, Kurt E; Satpute, Vaishali C; Mitchell, Samantha M; Pauli, Jordan L; Holloway, Benjamin B; Johnston, April D; Nathanson, Neil M; Deisseroth, Karl; Gerber, David J; Tonegawa, Susumu; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-08-15

    Parvalbumin-containing (PV) neurons, a major class of GABAergic interneurons, are essential circuit elements of learning networks. As levels of acetylcholine rise during active learning tasks, PV neurons become increasingly engaged in network dynamics. Conversely, impairment of either cholinergic or PV interneuron function induces learning deficits. Here, we examined PV interneurons in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their modulation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). HC PV cells, visualized by crossing PV-CRE mice with Rosa26YFP mice, were anatomically identified as basket cells and PV bistratified cells in the stratum pyramidale; in stratum oriens, HC PV cells were electrophysiologically distinct from somatostatin-containing cells. With glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically blocked, mAChR activation enhanced PV cell excitability in both CA1 HC and PFC; however, CA1 HC PV cells exhibited a stronger postsynaptic depolarization than PFC PV cells. To delete M1 mAChRs genetically from PV interneurons, we created PV-M1 knockout mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. The elimination of M1 mAChRs from PV cells diminished M1 mAChR immunoreactivity and muscarinic excitation of HC PV cells. Selective cholinergic activation of HC PV interneurons using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs technology enhanced the frequency and amplitude of inhibitory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Finally, relative to wild-type controls, PV-M1 knockout mice exhibited impaired novel object recognition and, to a lesser extent, impaired spatial working memory, but reference memory remained intact. Therefore, the direct activation of M1 mAChRs on PV cells contributes to some forms of learning and memory.

  8. Effects of toluene exposure on signal transduction: toluene reduced the signaling via stimulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, Hirofumi; Haga, Tatsuya; Honma, Takeshi

    2002-07-01

    The organic solvent toluene is used widely in industry and is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). To clarify the mechanisms of CNS toxicity following toluene exposure, especially with respect to the G protein-coupling of receptors, we determined the effects of toluene on the activation of Gi by stimulating human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We first examined whether toluene affects the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by Gi. The attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was reduced in a medium containing toluene. Next, we determined the effects of toluene on carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding using membrane fractions of CHO cell expressing hm2 receptors. Carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was markedly reduced when assayed using reaction buffers containing toluene. However, carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was essentially unchanged following pretreatment of the cells with a toluene-saturated medium prior to membrane isolation. Toluene pretreatment and the toluene itself did not alter the characteristics of the binding of carbamylcholine and [3H]N-methylscopolamine to hm2 receptors. On the contrary of the effect of toluene for [35S]GTPgammaS binding, the effect of toluene for attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was irreversible. These observations indicate that toluene acts as an inhibitor of the signal transduction via hm2 receptor stimulation in CHO cells, and at least two mechanisms exist in the inhibition mechanisms by toluene.

  9. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  10. 3D Reconstructed Cyto-, Muscarinic M2 Receptor, and Fiber Architecture of the Rat Brain Registered to the Waxholm Space Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eSchubert

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution multiscale and multimodal 3D models of the brain are essential tools tounderstand its complex structural and functional organization. Neuroimaging techniquesaddressing different aspects of brain organization should be integrated in a reference spaceto enable topographically correct alignment and subsequent analysis of the various datasetsand their modalities. The Waxholm Space (http://software.incf.org/software/waxholm-space is apublicly available 3D coordinate-based standard reference space for the mapping and registrationof neuroanatomical data in rodent brains. This paper provides a newly developed pipelinecombining imaging and reconstruction steps with a novel registration strategy to integrate newneuroimaging modalities into the Waxholm Space atlas. As a proof of principle, we incorporatedlarge scale high-resolution cyto-, muscarinic M2 receptor, and fiber architectonic images of ratbrains into the 3D digital MRI based atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat in Waxholm Space. Wedescribe the whole workflow, from image acquisition to reconstruction and registration of thesethree modalities into the Waxholm Space rat atlas. The registration of the brain sections intothe atlas is performed by using both linear and non-linear transformations. The validity of theprocedure is qualitatively demonstrated by visual inspection, and a quantitative evaluation isperformed by measurement of the concordance between representative atlas-delineated regionsand the same regions based on receptor or fiber architectonic data. This novel approach enablesfor the first time the generation of 3D reconstructed volumes of nerve fibers and fiber tracts, orof muscarinic M2 receptor density distributions, in an entire rat brain. Additionally, our pipelinefacilitates the inclusion of further neuroimaging datasets, e.g. 3D reconstructed volumes ofhistochemical stainings or of the regional distributions of multiple other receptor types, intothe Waxholm Space

  11. Antinociceptive effects of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 are absent in CB1(-/-) and not CB2(-/-) mice in models of acute and persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, Nova M H; Liang, Annie; Kane, Stefanie A; Urban, Mark O

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested a role for both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in modulation of nociception. To further examine the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in antinociception, we evaluated the efficacy of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, CP 55,940, in models of acute, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain in control mice, CB1 receptor knockout mice, and CB2 receptor knockout mice. In control C57BL/6 mice, administration of CP 55,940 (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed complete Freund's adjuvant-induced tactile allodynia, reversed tactile allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation model and inhibited the noxious heat-evoked tail withdrawal response. In addition to its antinociceptive effects, CP 55,940 produced an impairment of motor coordination in the rotarod test. The antinociceptive effects produced by CP 55,940 and associated motor deficits were found to be completely abolished in CB1 receptor knockout mice. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of CP 55,940 in all pain models were fully retained in CB2 receptor knockout mice, along with the associated motor deficits. The results suggest that the antinociceptive effects of CP 55,940 in models of acute and persistent pain, along with the associated motor deficits, are mediated by CB1 receptors, and likely not CB2 receptors.

  12. The potency and efficacy of anticholinergics to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats correlates with their rank order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erosa-Rivero, Helena B; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2014-06-01

    Extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) caused by antipsychotic therapy are currently treated with anticholinergics that lack selectivity for the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Since these receptors are heterogeneously expressed among the different classes of striatal neurons and their afferents, it can be expected that their simultaneous blockade will cause distinct, sometimes opposed, effects within the striatal circuitry. In order to test the hypothesis that the differential blockade of the muscarinic receptor subtypes would influence their potency and efficacy to prevent EPS, here we tested four anticholinergics with varying order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes, and compared their dose-response curves to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in male rats. Drugs were applied into the lateral ventricle 15 min before haloperidol (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Catalepsy was measured in the bar test at 15 min intervals during 5 h. The preferential M1/M4 antagonist pirenzepine (3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 nmol) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.9-8.1], and latency: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.7-8.6]. Pirenzepine had the steepest dose-response curve, producing maximal inhibition (84 ± 5%) at the dose of 10 nmol, while its effect tended to reverse at higher doses (62 ± 11%). The purported M1/M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (30, 100, and 300 nmol) also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 29.5 nmol [95% CI, 7.0 to 123.0], and latency: ED50 = 28.5 nmol [95% CI, 2.2 to 362.0]. However, the curve for 4-DAMP had a less pronounced slope, reaching its maximal effect (63 ± 14%) at the dose of 300 nmol. The M2/M4 antagonist AF-DX 116 (10, 30, and 300 nmol) only caused a partial inhibition of catalepsy (30 ± 11%) at the dose of 30 nmol, but this changed to a non-significant increment (15 ± 10%) at the dose of 100 nmol. The alleged M4 antagonist tropicamide (30, 100, 300, and

  13. Activation of nematode G protein GOA-1 by the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype. Functional coupling of G-protein-coupled receptor and G protein originated from evolutionarily distant animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaba, Masaomi; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kojima, Katsura; Ozaki, Mamiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2006-12-01

    Signal transduction mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins regulates a wide variety of physiological functions. We are interested in the manipulation of G-protein-mediating signal transduction using G-protein-coupled receptors, which are derived from evolutionarily distant organisms and recognize unique ligands. As a model, we tested the functionally coupling GOA-1, G alpha(i/o) ortholog in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2), which is one of the mammalian G alpha(i/o)-coupled receptors. GOA-1 and M2 were prepared as a fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. The affinity of the fusion protein for GDP was decreased by addition of a muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine and the guanosine 5'-[3-O-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was increased with an increase in the carbamylcholine concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These effects evoked by carbamylcholine were completely abolished by a full antagonist, atropine. In addition, the affinity for carbamylcholine decreased under the presence of GTP as reported for M2-G alpha(i/o) coupling. These results indicate that the M2 activates GOA-1 as well as G alpha(i/o).

  14. Comparison of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthin, G.R.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1984-03-01

    The properties of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ( (/sup 3/H)QNB) binding and (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ( (/sup 3/H)PZ) binding to various regions of rat brain were compared. (/sup 3/H)PZ appeared to bind with high affinity to a single site, with a Kd value of approximately 15 nM in the cerebral cortex. The rank order of potencies of muscarinic drugs to inhibit binding of either (/sup 3/H)QNB or (/sup 3/H)PZ was QNB greater than atropine . scopolamine greater than pirenzepine greater than oxotremorine greater than bethanechol. Muscarinic antagonists (except PZ) inhibited both (/sup 3/H)PZ and (/sup 3/H)QNB binding with Hill coefficients of approximately 1. PZ inhibited (/sup 3/H)QNB binding in cortex with a Hill coefficient of 0.7, but inhibited (/sup 3/H)PZ binding with a Hill coefficient of 1.0. Hill coefficients for agonists were less than 1. The density of (/sup 3/H)PZ binding sites was approximately half the density of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding sites in cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In pons-medulla and cerebellum, the densities of (/sup 3/H)PZ binding sites were 20 and 0%, respectively, relative to the densities of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding sites. When unlabeled PZ was used to compete for (/sup 3/H)QNB binding, the relative number of high-affinity PZ binding sites in cortex, pons and cerebellum agreed with the relative number of (/sup 3/H)PZ binding sites in those regions. The binding of (/sup 3/H)PZ and (/sup 3/H)QNB was nonadditive in cortex. GTP inhibited high-affinity oxotremorine binding, but not PZ binding. Together, these data suggest that (/sup 3/H)PZ binds to a subset of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding sites. Whether this subset reflects the existence of subtypes of muscarinic receptors or is a consequence of coupling to another membrane protein remains to be seen.

  15. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion - Relation To D Cell/Somatostatin -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Takeuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1~M5, and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1~M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT and M1-M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 µg/kg was given s.c. to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analogue was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analogue, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect

  16. Muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists differentially mediate acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preference and quinine-conditioned flavor avoidance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Francis M; Olsson, Kerstin; Vig, Vishal; Yenko, Ira; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Kohen, Ilanna; Aminov, Alon; Dindyal, Trisha; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Rats display both conditioned flavor preference (CFP) for fructose, and conditioned flavor avoidance (CFA) following sweet adulteration with quinine. Previous pharmacological analyses revealed that fructose-CFP expression was significantly reduced by dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 antagonists, but not NMDA or opioid antagonists. Fructose-CFP acquisition was significantly reduced by DA D1, DA D2 or NMDA antagonists, but not opioid antagonists. Quinine-CFA acquisition was significantly enhanced and prolonged by DA D1, NMDA or opioid, but not DA D2 antagonists. Cholinergic interneurons and projections interact with DA systems in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Further, both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling have been implicated in sweet intake and development of food-related preferences. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic administration of muscarinic (scopolamine: SCOP) or nicotinic (mecamylamine: MEC) cholinergic receptor antagonists mediated fructose-CFP expression, fructose-CFP acquisition and quinine-CFA acquisition. For fructose-CFP expression, rats were trained over 10 sessions with a CS+ flavor in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin and a CS- flavor in 0.2% saccharin. Two-bottle choice tests with CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 0.2% saccharin occurred following vehicle, SCOP (0.1-10mg/kg) and MEC (1-8mg/kg). For fructose-CFP acquisition, six groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg), MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) or a limited intake vehicle control 0.5h prior to 10 CS+ and CS- training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS+ and CS- choice tests in 0.2% saccharin. For quinine-CFA acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg) or MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) 0.5h prior to 8 one-bottle CS- (8% fructose+0.2% saccharin: FS) and CS+ (fructose+saccharin+quinine (0.030%: FSQ) training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS- and CS+ choice tests in fructose-saccharin solutions. Fructose-CFP expression was

  17. Asparagine, valine, and threonine in the third extracellular loop of muscarinic receptor have essential roles in the positive cooperativity of strychnine-like allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, J; Krejcí, A; Dolezal, V

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated allosteric interactions of four closely related strychnine-like substances: Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde (WGA), propargyl Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde, strychnine, and brucine with N-methylscopolamine (NMS) on M(3) subtype of muscarinic receptor genetically modified in the second or the third extracellular loop to corresponding loops of M(2) subtype (M(3)o2 and M(3)o3 chimera). The M(3)o2 chimeric receptor The exhibited no change in either affinity of strychnine, brucine, and WGA or in cooperativity of brucine or WGA, whereas both parameters for propargyl-WGA changed. In contrast, there was a change in affinity of all tested modulators (except for brucine) and in their cooperativity in the M(3)o3 chimera. Directions of affinity changes in both chimeras were always toward values of the donor M(2) subtype, but changes in cooperativity were variable. Compared with the native M(3) receptor, strychnine displayed a slight increase in positive cooperativity and propargyl-WGA a robust decrease in negative cooperativity at M(3)o2 chimera. Similar changes were found in the M(3)o3 chimera. Interestingly, cooperativity of brucine and WGA at the M(3)o3 chimera changed from negative to positive. This is the first evidence of constitution of positive cooperativity of WGA by switching sequences of two parental receptors, both exhibiting negative cooperativity. Gradual replacement of individual amino acids revealed that only three residues (NVT of the o3 loop of the M(2) receptor) are involved in this effect. Data suggest that these amino acids are essential for propagation of a conformation change resulting in positive cooperativity induced by these modulators.

  18. Rebuilding a macromolecular membrane complex at the atomic scale: case of the Kir6.2 potassium channel coupled to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapay, Nicolas; Estrada-Mondragon, Argel; Moreau, Christophe; Vivaudou, Michel; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-09-01

    Ion channel-coupled receptors (ICCR) are artificial proteins built from a G protein-coupled receptor and an ion channel. Their use as molecular biosensors is promising in diagnosis and high-throughput drug screening. The concept of ICCR was initially validated with the combination of the muscarinic receptor M2 with the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir6.2. A long protein engineering phase has led to the biochemical characterization of the M2-Kir6.2 construct. However, its molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. In particular, it is important to determine how the activation of M2 by its agonist acetylcholine triggers the modulation of the Kir6.2 channel via the M2-Kir6.2 linkage. In the present study, we have developed and validated a computational approach to rebuild models of the M2-Kir6.2 chimera from the molecular structure of M2 and Kir6.2. The protocol was first validated on the known protein complexes of the μ-opioid Receptor, the CXCR4 receptor and the Kv1.2 potassium channel. When applied to M2-Kir6.2, our protocol produced two possible models corresponding to two different orientations of M2. Both models highlights the role of the M2 helices I and VIII in the interaction with Kir6.2, as well as the role of the Kir6.2 N-terminus in the channel opening. Those two hypotheses will be explored in a future experimental study of the M2-Kir6.2 construct.

  19. DIFFERENT EFFECTS OF MUSCARINIC AGONISTS IN RAT SUPERIOR CERVICAL-GANGLION AND HIPPOCAMPAL SLICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM

    1991-01-01

    In this study the effects of muscarinic antagonists and agonists on M1 muscarinic receptors in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglion and the rat hippocampal slice were investigated. Oxotremorine and APE but not pilocarpine, McN-A-343 or 4-Cl-McN-A-343 induced small M2 muscarinic

  20. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease - impaired vs normal left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, AFM; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Bartels, GL; van der Ent, M; Remme, WJ

    1999-01-01

    Aims In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown. Methods and Results Twenty-four patients who req

  1. Structural Insight into Specificity of Interactions between Nonconventional Three-finger Weak Toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Paramonov, Alexander S; Chugunov, Anton O; Janickova, Helena; Dolejsi, Eva; Dolezal, Vladimir; Utkin, Yuri N; Tsetlin, Victor I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Efremov, Roman G; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2015-09-25

    Weak toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) belongs to the group of nonconventional "three-finger" snake neurotoxins. It irreversibly inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and allosterically interacts with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using site-directed mutagenesis, NMR spectroscopy, and computer modeling, we investigated the recombinant mutant WTX analogue (rWTX) which, compared with the native toxin, has an additional N-terminal methionine residue. In comparison with the wild-type toxin, rWTX demonstrated an altered pharmacological profile, decreased binding of orthosteric antagonist N-methylscopolamine to human M1- and M2-mAChRs, and increased antagonist binding to M3-mAChR. Positively charged arginine residues located in the flexible loop II were found to be crucial for rWTX interactions with all types of mAChR. Computer modeling suggested that the rWTX loop II protrudes to the M1-mAChR allosteric ligand-binding site blocking the entrance to the orthosteric site. In contrast, toxin interacts with M3-mAChR by loop II without penetration into the allosteric site. Data obtained provide new structural insight into the target-specific allosteric regulation of mAChRs by "three-finger" snake neurotoxins.

  2. Structural Insight into Specificity of Interactions between Nonconventional Three-finger Weak Toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Shulepko, Mikhail A.; Paramonov, Alexander S.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Janickova, Helena; Dolejsi, Eva; Dolezal, Vladimir; Utkin, Yuri N.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Efremov, Roman G.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2015-01-01

    Weak toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) belongs to the group of nonconventional “three-finger” snake neurotoxins. It irreversibly inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and allosterically interacts with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using site-directed mutagenesis, NMR spectroscopy, and computer modeling, we investigated the recombinant mutant WTX analogue (rWTX) which, compared with the native toxin, has an additional N-terminal methionine residue. In comparison with the wild-type toxin, rWTX demonstrated an altered pharmacological profile, decreased binding of orthosteric antagonist N-methylscopolamine to human M1- and M2-mAChRs, and increased antagonist binding to M3-mAChR. Positively charged arginine residues located in the flexible loop II were found to be crucial for rWTX interactions with all types of mAChR. Computer modeling suggested that the rWTX loop II protrudes to the M1-mAChR allosteric ligand-binding site blocking the entrance to the orthosteric site. In contrast, toxin interacts with M3-mAChR by loop II without penetration into the allosteric site. Data obtained provide new structural insight into the target-specific allosteric regulation of mAChRs by “three-finger” snake neurotoxins. PMID:26242733

  3. Presynaptic muscarinic and adenosine receptors are involved in 2 Hz-induced train-of-four fade caused by antinicotinic neuromuscular relaxants in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mw; Bornia, Ecs; Correia-de-Sá, P; Alves-Do-Prado, W

    2011-11-01

    1. Train-of-four fade (TOF(fade) ) is a clinically useful parameter to monitor the degree of block of neuromuscular transmission in curarized patients. Experimentally, TOF(fade) has been attributed to the blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerve terminals. There is less information regarding the involvement of coexistent presynaptic receptors (e.g. muscarinic M(1) and M(2) , adenosine A(1) and A(2A) ) in the TOF(fade) produced by antinicotinic agents. 2. In the present study, we evaluated the TOF(fade) caused by antinicotinic neuromuscular relaxants (hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine, vecuronium and rocuronium) as the ratio of the muscle tension produced in the rat diaphragm by the fourth to the first stimulus (T(4) /T(1) ) of a train-of-four stimuli delivered to the phrenic nerve trunk at a frequency of 2 Hz. 3. All antinicotinic agents, except hexamethonium, decreased the amplitude of muscle tension during the first stimulus. Hexamethonium, (5.47 mmol/L), d-tubocurarine- (1.1 μmol/L), vecuronium (4.7 μmol/L)- and rocuronium (9.8 μmol/L)-induced TOF(fade) was attenuated by 10 nmol/L pirenzepine (an M(1) receptor antagonist), 1 μmol/L methoctramine (an M(2) receptor antagonist) and 2.5 nmol/L 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (an A(1) receptor antagonist). Blockade of the A(2A) receptor with 10 nmol/L ZM241385 partially reversed the TOF(fade) induced by d-tubocurarine, vecuronium and rocuronium, but not that caused by the 'pure' neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium, unless one increased the concentration of ZM241385 to 50 nmol/L. 4. The data indicate that presynaptic M(1) , M(2) , A(1) and A(2A) receptors play a role in neuromuscular TOF(fade) caused by antinicotinic neuromuscular relaxants. Such interplay depends on adenosine tonus and on the affinity of neuromuscular blocking agents for neuronal versus muscular nicotinic receptors.

  4. No changes in lymphocyte muscarinic receptors and platelet monoamine oxidase-B examined as surrogate central nervous system biomarkers in a Faroese children cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Debes, Frodi

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Blood samples from 7-year-old exposed children were analyzed for platelet M....../or PCB exposure, whereas these markers are significantly altered in sustained exposure scenarios, as shown by clinical studies in drug addicts or patients treated with psychopharmacological agents....

  5. Muscarinic presynaptic modulation in GABAergic pallidal synapses of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Aceves, José J; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E; Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is central for basal ganglia processing. It expresses muscarinic cholinergic receptors and receives cholinergic afferents from the pedunculopontine nuclei (PPN) and other regions. The role of these receptors and afferents is unknown. Muscarinic M1-type receptors are expressed by synapses from striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Because axons from SPNs project to the GPe, one hypothesis is that striatopallidal GABAergic terminals may be modulated by M1 receptors. Alternatively, some M1 receptors may be postsynaptic in some pallidal neurons. Evidence of muscarinic modulation in any of these elements would suggest that cholinergic afferents from the PPN, or other sources, could modulate the function of the GPe. In this study, we show this evidence using striatopallidal slice preparations: after field stimulation in the striatum, the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine significantly reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) from synapses that exhibited short-term synaptic facilitation. This inhibition was associated with significant increases in paired-pulse facilitation, and quantal content was proportional to IPSC amplitude. These actions were blocked by atropine, pirenzepine, and mamba toxin-7, suggesting that receptors involved were M1. In addition, we found that some pallidal neurons have functional postsynaptic M1 receptors. Moreover, some evoked IPSCs exhibited short-term depression and a different kind of modulation: they were indirectly modulated by muscarine via the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Thus pallidal synapses presenting distinct forms of short-term plasticity were modulated differently. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. A comparison of the effects of a subtype selective and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonist in two CO(2) models of experimental human anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J E; Papadopoulos, A; Seddon, K; Nutt, D J

    2009-03-01

    Studies in human volunteers that can demonstrate proof of concept are attractive in that possible mechanisms and potential new drug treatments can be examined. We have been developing models of anxiety disorders using the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min to model generalised anxiety disorder, as well as using the previously reported 35% CO(2) as a model for panic anxiety. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover study in 12 healthy volunteer subjects, we compared a full agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor that binds to four alpha-subtypes of the receptor (alpha-1,-2,-3,-5) (alprazolam 1 mg), with zolpidem (5 mg), an agonist selective for the alpha-1 subtype of the gamma amino butyric acid-receptor subtype A (GABA-A) receptor, which is a widely used hypnotic drug. Compared with placebo, both drugs significantly attenuated peak CO(2)-induced changes in subjective feelings after the inhalation of 7.5% CO(2) for 20 min. However, there were fewer significant differences after a single vital capacity inhalation of 35% CO(2), where zolpidem was less efficacious than alprazolam at reducing CO(2)-induced symptoms. In conclusion, our results show that zolpidem shows some anxiolytic efficacy in the 7.5% CO(2) model, similar to alprazolam, and this is the first report of such an effect of zolpidem in a model of anxiety. These and other studies of benzodiazepines in clinical and volunteer studies suggest a definite role of the GABA-A receptor in CO(2)-induced anxiety, and it would be of interest to examine other GABA-A receptor subtype selective drugs, which are now in early phase clinical studies and are showing selective efficacy in pharmacodynamic studies.

  7. Intracellular localization of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor through clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization is mediated by a C-terminal tryptophan-based motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwada, Junsuke; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-07-15

    The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-mAChR, encoded by CHRM1) is a G-protein-coupled membrane receptor that is activated by extracellular cholinergic stimuli. Recent investigations have revealed the intracellular localization of M1-mAChR. In this study, we observed constitutive internalization of M1-mAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells without agonist stimulation. Constitutive internalization depended on dynamin, clathrin and the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex. A WxxI motif in the M1-mAChR C-terminus is essential for its constitutive internalization, given that replacement of W(442) or I(445) with alanine residues abolished constitutive internalization. This WxxI motif resembles YxxΦ, which is the canonical binding motif for the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 complex. The M1-mAChR C-terminal WxxI motif interacted with AP-2 μ2. W442A and I445A mutants of the M1-mAChR C-terminal sequence lost AP-2-μ2-binding activity, whereas the W442Y mutant bound more effectively than wild type. Consistent with these results, W442A and I445A M1-mAChR mutants selectively localized to the cell surface. By contrast, the W442Y receptor mutant was found only at intracellular sites. Our data indicate that the cellular distribution of M1-mAChR is governed by the C-terminal tryptophan-based motif, which mediates constitutive internalization.

  8. Activation of muscarinic receptors increases the activity of the granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus--a calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőszeghy, Áron; Vincze, János; Rusznák, Zoltán; Fu, Yuhong; Paxinos, George; Csernoch, László; Szücs, Géza

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine modulates the function of the cochlear nucleus via several pathways. In this study, the effects of cholinergic stimulation were studied on the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration of granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Ca(2+) transients were recorded in Oregon-Green-BAPTA 1-loaded brain slices using a calcium imaging technique. For the detection, identification and characterisation of the Ca(2+) transients, a wavelet analysis-based method was developed. Granule cells were identified on the basis of their size and localisation. The action potential-coupled character of the Ca(2+) transients of the granule cells was established by recording fluorescence changes and electrical activity simultaneously. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbamyl-choline (CCh) significantly increased the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients (from 0.37 to 6.31 min(-1), corresponding to a 17.1-fold increase; n = 89). This effect was antagonised by atropine, whereas CCh could still evoke an 8.3-fold increase of the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients when hexamethonium was present. Using immunolabelling, the expression of both type 1 and type 3 muscarinic receptors (M1 and M3 receptors, respectively) was demonstrated in the granule cells. Application of 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (an M3-specific antagonist) prevented the onset of the CCh effect, whereas an M1-specific antagonist (pirenzepine) was less effective. We conclude that cholinergic stimulation increases the activity of granule cells, mainly by acting on their M3 receptors. The modulation of the firing activity of the granule cells, in turn, may modify the firing of projection neurones and may adjust signal processing in the entire DCN.

  9. Helix 8 and the i3 loop of the muscarinic M3 receptor are crucial sites for its regulation by the Gβ5-RGS7 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Tayou, Junior; Levay, Konstantin; Schuchardt, Brett J; Bhat, Vikas; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Farooq, Amjad; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2015-02-01

    The muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) is a Gq-coupled receptor and is known to interact with many intracellular regulatory proteins. One of these molecules is Gβ5-RGS7, the permanently associated heterodimer of G protein β-subunit Gβ5 and RGS7, a regulator of G protein signaling. Gβ5-RGS7 can attenuate M3R-stimulated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores or enhance the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. Here we show that deletion of amino acids 304-345 from the central portion of the i3 loop renders M3R insensitive to regulation by Gβ5-RGS7. In addition to the i3 loop, interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8. According to circular dichroism spectroscopy, the peptide corresponding to amino acids 548-567 in the C-terminus of M3R assumes an α-helical conformation. Substitution of Thr553 and Leu558 with Pro residues disrupts this α-helix and abolished binding to Gβ5-RGS7. Introduction of the double Pro substitution into full-length M3R (M3R(TP/LP)) prevents trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. Using atropine or other antagonists as pharmacologic chaperones, we were able to increase the level of surface expression of the TP/LP mutant to levels comparable to that of wild-type M3R. However, M3R-stimulated calcium signaling is still severely compromised. These results show that the interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8 and the central portion of the i3 loop.

  10. Towards better non-selectivity: the role of 5-HT7 receptors in therapeutic efficacy of a second-generation antipsychotic, lurasidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Bieńkowski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of currently available antipsychotic medications is far from satisfactory with many patients showing incomplete therapeutic response even after many trials with different antipsychotic drugs. Hence, there is an ongoing interest in searching for pharmacological mechanisms, which could potentiate therapeutic response to antipsychotic drugs and/or reduce its typical side effects. The primary aim of this mini-review is to summarize available evidence supporting the role of serotonin receptors, especially 5-HT7 receptors, in therapeutic effects of a second-generation antipsychotic drug, lurasidone.

  11. Brain choline acetyltransferase and muscarinic receptor sites, brain and liver cholinesterases in precocial Acomys cahirinus and altricial rat during post-natal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, H; Pintor, A; Fortuna, S; Bisso, G M

    1988-01-01

    Brain choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase with its molecular forms, and muscarinic receptor sites, as well as liver total cholinesterases were evaluated during the first postnatal month in pups of a precocial (Acomys cahirinus) and altricial (rat) murid species. At birth the levels of brain cholinergic markers were higher in the Acomys than in the rat, but in adulthood the differences were smaller or even reversed. The postnatal increase up in the markers to weaning was considerably more pronounced in the rat. However, substantial variations in the patterns of development of the three cholinergic markers within and between species were observed. Liver cholinesterases were considerably higher in Acomys than in rats at all ages investigated. These and literature data are discussed in relation to postnatal, post-conception and post-organogenesis age of pups belonging to the two species. The variability of the ontogenetic patterns between the enzymes suggests that there is some biological control of individual rates of maturation and that it is necessary to be careful in broadly interpreting growth patterns across organs within the same species and across species.

  12. Evidence of common and specific genetic effects: association of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene with alcohol dependence and major depressive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen C; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Stock, Heather; Budde, John; Allen, Rebecca; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kwon, Jennifer M; Wu, William; Dick, Danielle M; Rice, John; Jones, Kevin; Nurnberger, John I; Tischfield, Jay; Porjesz, Bernice; Edenberg, Howard J; Hesselbrock, Victor; Crowe, Ray; Schuckit, Mark; Begleiter, Henri; Reich, Theodore; Goate, Alison M; Bierut, Laura J

    2004-09-01

    Several correlated phenotypes, alcohol dependence, major depressive syndrome, and an endophenotype of electrophysiological measurements, event-related oscillations (EROs), have demonstrated linkage on the long arm of chromosome 7. Recently, we reported both linkage and association between polymorphisms in the gene encoding the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) and EROs. In this study, we evaluated whether genetic variation in the CHRM2 gene is also a risk factor for the correlated clinical characteristics of alcoholism and depression. The CHRM2 gene contains a single coding exon and a large 5' untranslated region encoded by multiple exons that can be alternatively spliced. Families were recruited through an alcohol dependent proband, and multiplex pedigrees were selected for genetic analyses. We examined 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the CHRM2 gene in these families. Using the UNPHASED pedigree disequilibrium test (PDTPHASE), three SNPs (one in intron 4 and two in intron 5) showed highly significant association with alcoholism (P=0.004-0.007). Two SNPs (both in intron 4) were significantly associated with major depressive syndrome (P=0.004 and 0.017). Haplotype analyses revealed that the most common haplotype (>40% frequency), T-T-T (rs1824024-rs2061174-rs324650), was under-transmitted to affected individuals with alcohol dependence and major depressive syndrome. Different complementary haplotypes were over-transmitted in alcohol dependent and depressed individuals. These findings provide strong evidence that variants within or close to the CHRM2 locus influence risk for two common psychiatric disorders.

  13. Sequestration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Facilitation by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) and attenuation by a dominant-negative mutant of GRK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Kurose, H; Nagao, T

    1994-12-23

    Sequestration of m2 receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes), which was assessed as loss of N-[3H]methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) binding activity from the cell surface, was examined in COS 7 and BHK-21 cells that had been transfected with expression vectors encoding the m2 receptor and, independently, vectors encoding a G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) (beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1) or a GRK2 dominant-negative mutant (DN-GRK2). The sequestration of m2 receptors became apparent when the cells were treated with 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. In this case, approximately 40% or 20-25% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on COS 7 or BHK-21 cells, respectively, were sequestered with a half-life of 15-25 min. In cells in which GRK2 was also expressed, the sequestration became apparent in the presence of 10(-7) M carbamylcholine. Approximately 40% of the [3H]NMS binding sites on both COS 7 and BHK-21 cells were sequestered in the presence of 10(-6) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine. When DN-GRK2 was expressed in COS 7 cells, the proportion of [3H]NMS binding sites sequestered in the presence of 10(-5) M or higher concentrations of carbamylcholine was reduced to 20-30%. These results indicate that the phosphorylation of m2 receptors by GRK2 facilitates their sequestration. These results are in contrast with the absence of a correlation between sequestration and the phosphorylation of beta-adrenergic receptors by the GRK2 and suggests that the consequences of phosphorylation by GRK2 are different for different receptors.

  14. Research on adverse drug events. I. Muscarinic M3 receptor binding affinity could predict the risk of antipsychotics to induce type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, J S; Prous, J

    2005-06-01

    Antipsychotics are associated with a wide range of adverse effects, several of which may represent a serious health risk to patients. There is an increased concern about metabolic disturbances associated with antipsychotics, including weight gain, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances and, in particular, those related to the induction of abnormal glucose metabolism and diabetes. The present article aimed to identify those receptor(s) that are most likely to be involved with or mediate antipsychotics-induced diabetes. Two independent measures taken from literature to indicate the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with 25 typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs were considered, along with their binding affinities to 21 specific receptors (obtained from the resources of Prous Science Integrity). A range of both exploratory and predictive statistical analyses were applied, including principal component factorial analysis, multivariable linear regression analysis, and discriminant analysis. Binding affinities (pKi) to human neurotransmitter receptors and monoaminergic transporters were used as independent variables (predictors). Measures to determine the risk to induce new-onset type 2 diabetes associated with each antipsychotic, logistic regression odds-ratio (dOR) and a discrete scale-based risk (three levels: 'low,' 'moderate,' 'high'), were used as the dependent variables (criteria). Similarly, parallel analyses were also conducted for other measures (average effective therapeutic dose) or adverse effects (weight gain, extrapyramidal side effects, hyperprolactinemia, anticholinergic, hypotension, and sedation) associated with antipsychotics, where underlying mechanisms have been previously established and, therefore, serve as positive-control references. Affinity for the cholinergic muscarinic M3 receptor subtype was presented as the best predictor for

  15. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira L. López-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR and 2 (m2AChR in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1 an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2 analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  16. 胆碱能M受体:膀胱过度活动症治疗的关键%The muscarinic receptor:the keypoint of overactive bladder's therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑吉琼

    2012-01-01

    膀胱过度活动症(overactive bladder,OAB)是一种以尿急症状为特征的症候群,常伴有尿频和夜尿症状,可伴或不伴有急迫性尿失禁.存在于膀胱逼尿肌的胆碱能M受体是介导OAB发生的关键.抗胆碱能药物是目前临床治疗OAB最基本的药物,在抑制膀胱逼尿肌不自主收缩、改善OAB症状方面发挥了重要作用.本文从分子结构、受体选择性、药代动力学、临床特点和药物不良反应等方面对目前常用的5种商品化的抗胆碱能药物进行综述.%Overactive bladder (OAB) is defined as a syndrome which represented by the characteristics of urgency, usually with frequency and nocturia,and with or without urge urinary incontinence. The muscarinic receptor, which locates in the detrusor of bladder, has been considered to be a key mediator of OAB. As the first-line medication in the management of OAB, the antimuscarinic agent plays an important role in inhibiting involuntary contraction of detrusor and relieving OAB symptoms. We herein review the molecular structure, receptor selectivity, pharmacokinetics, clinical application and adverse event of the five antimuscarinic agents commercially available in the market.

  17. Individual and combined manipulation of muscarinic, NMDA, and benzodiazepine receptor activity in the water maze task: implications for a rat model of Alzheimer dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, D P; Ighanian, K; Boon, F

    2000-06-15

    Recent evidence indicates that Alzheimer disease typically involves different degrees of impairment in a variety of neurotransmitter systems, behaviors, and cognitive abilities in different patients. To investigate the relations between neurotransmitter system, behavioral, and cognitive impairments in an animal model of Alzheimer disease we studied spatial learning in a Morris water maze in male Long-Evans rats given neurochemical agents that targeted muscarinic cholinergic, NMDA, or benzodiazepine systems. Naive rats given a single agent or a combination of agents were severely impaired in place responding and had behavioral strategy impairments. Rats made familiar with the required water maze behavioral strategies by non-spatial pretraining performed as well as controls if given a single agent. Non-spatially pretrained rats with manipulation of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems had a specific place response impairment but no behavioral strategy impairments. The results suggest that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA, or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems may model some aspects of human Alzheimer disease (impairments in navigation in familiar environments), but not other aspects of this disorder (global dementia leading to general loss of adaptive behavior). Previous research suggests that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and serotonergic systems may provide a better model of global dementia. The water maze testing and detailed behavioral analysis techniques used here appear to provide a means of investigating the contributions of various combinations of neurotransmitter system impairments to an animal model of Alzheimer disease.

  18. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release...... using M (5) (-/-) mice backcrossed to the C57BL/6NTac strain. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Sensitization of the locomotor response is considered a model for chronic adaptations to repeated substance exposure, which might be related to drug craving and relapse. The effects of amphetamine on locomotor activity......-induced hyperactivity and dopamine release as well as amphetamine sensitization are enhanced in mice lacking the M(5) receptor. These results support the concept that the M(5) receptor modulates effects of addictive drugs....

  19. Antagonism by 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetraline and other serotonin agonists of muscarinic M1-type receptors coupled to inositol phospholipid breakdown in human IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.J. (Astra Research Centre AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden) Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); Ahlgren, P.C. (Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); O' Neill, C. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    IMR-32 and SK-N-MC cells were found to contain ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate specific binding sites inhibited by pirenzepine in a manner suggesting the presence of both M1-type and M2-type muscarinic receptor recognition sites. Neither cell had detectable ({sup 3}H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites. Carbachol stimulated the rate of inositol phospholipid breakdown in IMR-32 and SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells with an EC{sub 50} value of about 50 {mu}M in both cases. Pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown in both cells with Hill slopes of unity and IC{sub 50} values of 15 nM (IMR-32) and 12 nM (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT competitively inhibited carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown with pA{sub 2} values of 5.78 (IMR-32) and 5.61 (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT agonists 5-MeODMT and buspirone at micromolar concentrations inhibited carbachol-stimulated breakdown in IMR-32 cells. The inhibition by 8-OH-DPAT and 5-MeODMT was not affected by preincubation with (-)alprenolol. 5-HT was without effect on either basal or carbachol-stimulated breakdown. It is concluded that IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells express muscarinic M1-type but not serotoninergic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. 8-OH-DPAT acts as a weak antagonist at these muscarinic receptors.

  20. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte;

    2014-01-01

    an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central...... PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801...

  1. Differential effects of the muscarinic M1 receptor agonist RS-86 and the acetylcholine-esterase inhibitor donepezil on REM sleep regulation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Christoph; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Riemann, Dieter; Berger, Mathias

    2006-06-01

    Broad evidence from preclinical and clinical research indicates that cholinergic neurotransmission contributes significantly to the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. However, a potential role of different acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtypes for the regulation of three main aspects of REM sleep, (1) REM onset, (2) REM maintenance, and (3) generation of REMs, are not clear. In the present double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study, we investigated the differential effects of the M1 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) agonist RS-86 and the ACh-esterase inhibitor donepezil to further specify the AChR subtype function on REM sleep regulation in n = 20 healthy volunteers. We found that RS-86 selectively shortened REM latency (multivariate analysis of variance post hoc contrast p = 0.024 compared to placebo, not significant for donepezil) and that donepezil specifically enhanced the duration of REM sleep (% sleep period time, p = 0.000 compared to placebo; p = 0.003 compared to RS-86) and the number of REMs (p = 0.000 compared to placebo; p = 0.000 compared to RS-86). These results provide evidence that the onset of REM sleep is, in part, mediated by M1 mAChR activity, whereas the maintenance of REM sleep and the number of REMs are mediated by non-M1, but presumably M2 mAChR activity. These findings are of interest for the understanding of sleep regulation and of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's dementia and depressive disorders, whose etiopathology may involve alterations in cholinergic neurotransmission.

  2. Predictive value of pre-procedural autoantibodies against M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor for recurrence of atrial fibrillation one year after radiofrequency catheter ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Changhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidences have suggested that autoantibodies against muscarinic-2 acetylcholine receptor (anti-M2-R may play an important role in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF. Predictive value of pre-procedural anti-M2-R for the recurrence of AF after radiofrequency catheter ablation is still unclear. Methods Totally 76 AF patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function were prospectively enrolled and subjected to ablation after the detection of serum anti-M2-R by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. These patients were given follow-up examination for one year after ablation. Risk estimation for the recurrence of AF was performed using the univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results In AF group, serum anti-M2-R was significantly higher than that in the control group in terms of frequency (40.8% versus 11.7%; p p p = 0.009 and titer (1:132 versus 1:94; p = 0.012 for autoantibodies. During one-year follow-up examination after ablation, the recurrence of AF was observed in 25 (32.9% patients. Multivariate analysis showed that pre-procedural serum anti-M2-R was an independent predictor for the recurrence of AF at the time point of 12 months after ablation (odds ratio: 4.701; 95% confidence interval: 1.590-13.894; p = 0.005. Conclusions In AF patients, the frequency and titer of serum anti-M2-R were significantly higher than those in the control group with sinus rhythm. Pre-procedural serum anti-M2-R was an independent predictor for the recurrence of AF one year after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

  3. Anxiolytic effects of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors agonist oxotremorine in chronically stressed rats and related changes in BDNF and FGF2 levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Liberto, Valentina; Frinchi, Monica; Verdi, Vincenzo; Vitale, Angela; Plescia, Fulvio; Cannizzaro, Carla; Massenti, Maria F; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2017-02-01

    In depressive disorders, one of the mechanisms proposed for antidepressant drugs is the enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Previously, we showed that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist oxotremorine (Oxo) increases neuronal plasticity in hippocampal neurons via FGFR1 transactivation. Here, we aimed to explore (a) whether Oxo exerts anxiolytic effect in the rat model of anxiety-depression-like behavior induced by chronic restraint stress (CRS), and (b) if the anxiolytic effect of Oxo is associated with the modulation of neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), and phosphorylated Erk1/2 (p-Erk1/2) levels in the dorsal or ventral hippocampus and in the medial prefrontal cortex. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: control unstressed, CRS group, CRS group treated with 0.2 mg/kg Oxo, and unstressed group treated with Oxo. After 21 days of CRS, the groups were treated for 10 days with Oxo or saline. The anxiolytic role of Oxo was tested by using the following: forced swimming test, novelty suppressed feeding test, elevated plus maze test, and light/dark box test. The hippocampi and prefrontal cortex were used to evaluate BDNF and FGF2 protein levels and p-Erk1/2 levels. Oxo treatment significantly attenuated anxiety induced by CRS. Moreover, Oxo treatment counteracted the CRS-induced reduction of BDNF and FGF2 levels in the ventral hippocampus and medial prefrontal cerebral cortex CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that Oxo treatment ameliorates the stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and rescues FGF2 and BDNF levels in two brain regions involved in CRS-induced anxiety, ventral hippocampal formation, and medial prefrontal cortex.

  4. Research progress of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tumors%毒蕈碱胆碱受体与肿瘤关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何花; 张淑香

    2015-01-01

    非神经元性胆碱能信号通路与肿瘤关系密切,许多肿瘤细胞表达胆碱能自分泌环。肿瘤细胞自分泌及旁分泌乙酰胆碱,作用于自身或邻近细胞的烟碱胆碱受体及毒蕈碱胆碱受体,调节肿瘤细胞的增殖、血管发生及凋亡。毒蕈碱胆碱受体是 G 蛋白耦联受体,主要有 M1R-M5R 共5个亚型。研究发现毒蕈碱胆碱受体在肺癌、结肠癌、黑色素瘤、乳腺癌、卵巢癌、前列腺癌、胃癌和脑星形细胞瘤等多种恶性肿瘤中均有表达,与肿瘤细胞的增殖、迁移、血管发生、凋亡有密切关系,其中尤以毒蕈碱胆碱受体3最为重要,这为肿瘤的治疗提供了一个新的研究方向。%Non-neuronal cholinergic system is closely related with tumor.Many tumor cells express a cholinergic autocrine loop.Acetylcholine secreted by the tumor or neighboring cells interacts with nicotinic cholinergic receptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (MRs)expressed on the tumor cells to stimulate tumor cells proliferation,angiogenesis,and apoptosis.MRs are G-protein-coupled receptors and five subtypes have been identified.Researches have found that MRs are expressed in a variety of tumors, such as lung cancer,colon cancer,melanoma,breast cancer,ovarian cancer,prostate cancer,gastric cancer, and brain cancer.M3R is the most important one.This may provide a new direction for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Molecular organization of the complex between the muscarinic M3 receptor and the regulator of G protein signaling, Gbeta(5)-RGS7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Simone L; Wang, Qiang; Levay, Konstantin; Buchwald, Peter; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2010-06-22

    The complex of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), Gbeta(5)-RGS7, can inhibit signal transduction via the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R). RGS7 consists of three distinct structural entities: the DEP domain and its extension DHEX, the Ggamma-like (GGL) domain, which is permanently bound to Gbeta subunit Gbeta(5), and the RGS domain responsible for the interaction with Galpha subunits. Inhibition of the M3R by Gbeta(5)-RGS7 is independent of the RGS domain but requires binding of the DEP domain to the third intracellular loop of the receptor. Recent studies identified the dynamic intramolecular interaction between the Gbeta(5) and DEP domains, which suggested that the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer could alternate between the "open" and "closed" conformations. Here, we identified point mutations that weaken DEP-Gbeta(5) binding, presumably stabilizing the open state, and tested their effects on the interaction of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 with the M3R. We found that these mutations facilitated binding of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 to the recombinant third intracellular loop of the M3R but did not enhance its ability to inhibit M3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization. This led us to the idea that the M3R can effectively induce the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer to open; such a mechanism would require a region of the receptor distinct from the third loop. Indeed, we found that the C-terminus of M3R interacts with Gbeta(5)-RGS7. Truncation of the C-terminus rendered the M3R insensitive to inhibition by wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7; however, the open mutant of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 was able to inhibit signaling by the truncated M3R. The GST fusion of the M3R C-tail could not bind to wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7 but could associate with its open mutant as well as with the separated recombinant DEP domain or Gbeta(5). Taken together, our data are consistent with the following model: interaction of the M3R with Gbeta(5)-RGS7 causes the DEP domain and Gbeta(5) to dissociate from each other and bind to the C-tail, and the DEP

  6. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  7. Immunohistochemical localisation of pre-synaptic muscarinic receptor subtype-2 (M2r) in the enteric nervous system of guinea-pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2008-04-01

    The cholinergic muscarinic 2 receptor (M2r) is known to be present on smooth muscle cells in the intestine. Pharmacological studies also suggest that M2rs regulate transmitter release from nerves in the enteric nervous system. This study localised M2rs in the guinea-pig ileum using different antibodies and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Double labelling with antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify the type of nerves bearing M2r. Guinea-pig ileum were fixed, prepared for sections and wholemounts and incubated with antisera against the M2r sequence. Tissue was double labelled with antibodies against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), common choline acetyltransferase (cChAT), substance P (SP), synaptophysin and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Immunofluorescence was viewed using confocal microscopy. Abundant M2r-immunoreactivity (IR) was present on the surface of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle cells. M2r-IR was present in many but not all nerve fibres in the circular muscle and ganglia. M2r-IR was present in VAChT-IR and cChAT-IR cholinergic nerve fibres and SP-IR nerve fibres in the myenteric ganglia and submucosal ganglia. M2r-IR was present on a few nNOS-IR nerve fibres and around nNOS-IR neurons in the myenteric ganglia. In the circular muscle and deep muscular plexus, M2r-IR was present in many VAChT-IR and SP-IR nerve fibres and in few nNOS-IR nerves. M2rs are not only present on muscle cells in the intestine, but also on nerve fibres. M2rs may mediate cholinergic reflexes via their location on muscle and also via neural transmission. The pre-synaptic location supports pharmacological studies suggesting M2rs mediate neurotransmitter release from nerve fibres. The presence of M2rs on VAChT-IR, SP-IR and nNOS-IR-containing nerve fibres suggests M2rs may regulate ACh, SP and nitric oxide release.

  8. Serum IgA against type 3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is a novel marker in diagnosis of Sj(o)gren's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-ni; GUO Jian-ping; HE Jing; LIU Xia; YIN Fang-mi; DING Yan; YAO Hai-hong; KANG Ai-jun; LI Zhan-guo

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibodies against type 3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) are involved in the pathogenesis of Sj(o)gren's syndrome (SS), but the clinical value of them in SS patients has been controversial. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect IgA antibodies against M3R; (2)evaluate the value of IgA antibodies against the second extracellular loop of M3R205-220 (c2M3RP) in diagnosis of SS.Methods To increase the ELISA sensitivity, c2M3RP was coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by the glutaraldehyde method and a 96-well microplate was treated by ultraviolet rays before coated. Concentrations of anti-c2M3RP, anti-SSA, and anti-SSB were measured in the sera of 240 individuals: 91 patients with primary SS and 149 controls (16 secondary SS, 27 systemic lupus erythematosus, 40 rheumatoid arthritis and 66 healthy controls).Diagnostic properties of anti-c2M3RP were determined by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis.Results The prevalence of serum IgA anti-c2M3RP antibodies in patients with pSS (46%, 42/91) was significantly higher than that in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (19%, 5/27), in rheumatoid arthritis (15%, 6/40) and in healthy controls (5%, 3/66). However, there was no significant difference between the two SS groups (P=0.727). The diagnostic performance of IgA anti-M3RP antibodies was similar to anti-SSA assay, but had 22% higher sensitivity than anti-SSB. By analyzing of IgA anti-c2M3RP antibodies, combination of anti-SSA and anti-SSB resulted in increased sensitivity, whereas their specificity was not significantly changed.Conclusions The improved anti-c2M3RP ELISA is a novel, sensitive, and specific serological test for the diagnosis of SS. The combined application of anti-c2M3RP, anti-SSA and anti-SSB tests can improve the laboratory diagnosis of SS.The IgA anti-c2M3RP antibodies may serve as a novel diagnostic marker for SS.

  9. L-Satropane Prevents Retinal Neuron Damage by Attenuating Cell Apoptosis and Aβ Production via Activation of M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Lu; Tang, Ya-Bin; Song, Yun; Lu, Juan-Juan; Hou, Li-Na; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Cui, Yong-Yao

    2017-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists have been used to treat glaucoma due to their intraocular pressure-lowering effects. Recently, it has been reported that retinal mAChRs activation can also stimulate neuroprotective pathways. In our study, we evaluated the potential neuroprotective effect of L-satropane, a novel mAChR agonist, on retinal neuronal injury induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). CoCl2-induced hypoxia injury in cultured cell models and I/R-induced retinal neuronal damage in rats in vivo were used to evaluate the abilities of L-satropane. In detail, we measured the occurrence of retinal pathological changes including molecular markers of neuronal apoptosis and Aβ expression. Pretreatment with L-satropane protects against CoCl2-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 and primary retinal neuron (PRN) cells in a dose-dependent manner by increasing retinal neuron survival. CoCl2 or I/R-induced cell apoptosis by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2 expression, which resulted in an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and upregulating caspase-3 expression/activity was significantly reversed by L-satropane treatment. In addition, L-satropane significantly inhibited the upregulation of Aβ production in both retinal neurons and tissue. We also found that I/R-induced histopathological retinal changes including cell loss in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) and increased TUNEL positive retinal ganglion cells in GCL and thinning of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) were markedly improved by L-satropane. The effects of L-satropane were largely abolished by the nonselective mAChRs antagonist atropine and M1-selective mAChR antagonist pirenzepine. These results demonstrated that L-satropane might be effective in preventing retinal neuron damage caused by CoCl2 or I/R. The neuroprotective effects of L-satropane may be attributed to decreasing cell apoptosis and Aβ production through activation

  10. Involvement of bradykinin B2 and muscarinic receptors in the prolonged diuretic and antihypertensive properties of Echinodorus grandiflorus (Cham. & Schltdl.) Micheli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, Thiago Buno Lima; Barboza, Lorena Neris; Araújo, Valdinei de Oliveira; Gasparotto, Francielly Mourão; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes

    2016-10-15

    -EG. The 7-day treatment with ES-EG resulted in increased plasma nitrite levels. All other parameters were not affected by treatment with ES-EG. Our results suggest that the mechanisms through which Echinodorus grandiflorus extracts induce prolonged diuresis and reduce blood pressure in normotensive and 2K1C rats are mainly related to activation of muscarinic and bradykinin receptors with direct effects on prostaglandins and nitric oxide pathways. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. The effect of interference with muscarinic receptor on drug addiction and its relationship with dopamine%干预胆碱M受体对药物成瘾的影响及其与多巴胺的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昕鹤; 田琳; 刘佳琳; 李新旺

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a disease with central nervous system dysfunction.Muscarinic receptor belong to cholinergic system,has five subtypes,M1-M5 receptors.Behavioral research show that interference with M receptor could affect drug addiction behavior.Both opioids and psychoactive drugs could active central DA system.And M receptor regulating dopamine system in various brain areas,implicate there is a potential way that M receptor affect addiction behavior through interaction with DA system.Activing M2 and M4 receptor could inhibit DA system activating,and active M5 receptor could facilitate DA system activating,in corresponding to the effect of intervened with M2、M4、M5 receptor in drug addiction behavioral research.These evidences prove that M receptor regulating DA system in drug addiction behavior,and M receptor could be new neural target for treatment of drug addiction.%药物成瘾是一类精神及行为障碍,涉及到中枢神经系统的病变.毒蕈碱受体(Muscarinic receptor,M受体)属于胆碱能受体,分5种亚型.行为学研究表明,干预M受体能有效影响药物成瘾行为,但其神经机制还亟待探索.阿片类药物与精神活性药物均能激活中枢多巴胺系统,而M受体与多巴胺系统在多个脑区产生了交互作用.其中激动M2及M4受体抑制了多巴胺系统功能,而激动M5受体增强了多巴胺系统功能,与干预M2、M4、M5受体对药物成瘾行为的影响相对应.以上证据提示,干预M受体可能通过影响多巴胺系统对药物成瘾起作用.

  12. Induction of Anti-Hebbian LTP in CA1 Stratum Oriens Interneurons: Interactions between Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and M1 Muscarinic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Le Duigou, C.; Savary, E.; Kullmann, D M.; Miles, R.

    2015-01-01

    An anti-Hebbian form of LTP is observed at excitatory synapses made with some hippocampal interneurons. LTP induction is facilitated when postsynaptic interneurons are hyperpolarized, presumably because Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+)-permeable glutamate receptors is enhanced. The contribution of modulatory transmitters to anti-Hebbian LTP induction remains to be established. Activation of group I metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) is required for anti-Hebbian LTP induction in interneurons with cell...

  13. Distinct Agonist Regulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine M2-M3 Heteromers and Their Corresponding Homomers*

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanoglou, Despoina; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Each subtype of the muscarinic receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors is activated by similar concentrations of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine or closely related synthetic analogs such as carbachol. However, pharmacological selectivity can be generated by the introduction of a pair of mutations to produce Receptor Activated Solely by Synthetic Ligand (RASSL) forms of muscarinic receptors. These display loss of potency for acetylcholine/carbachol alongside a concurrent gain in pote...

  14. C(8) substituted 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-enes and C(8) substituted 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ones: novel muscarinic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Goo; Bodor, Erik T; Wang, Chen; Harden, T Kendall; Kohn, Harold

    2003-05-22

    Expedient syntheses of C(8) substituted 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-enes and C(8) substituted 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ones are reported to begin with 2,5-disubstituted pyridines. Catalytic reduction of the pyridine to the piperidine followed by treatment with ethyl acrylate and Dieckmann cyclization gave diastereomeric mixtures of C(8) substituted 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-enes, which were separable by chromatography. We found that the catalytic reduction (PtO2, H2) procedure provided the cis-substituted piperidine but that pyridine reduction was accompanied by competitive cleavage of the C(2) pyridyl substituent. Accordingly, an alternative route was devised that afforded a diastereomeric mixture of the cis- and trans-2,5-disubstituted piperidine. Treatment of the substituted pyridine with m-CPBA gave the pyridine N-oxide, which was reduced to the piperidine by sequential reduction with ammonium formate in the presence of Pd-C followed by NaBH3CN. Addition of ethyl acrylate completed the synthesis of the substituted piperidine. The overall four-step reaction gave higher yields (57%) than the two-step procedure (13%) with little cleavage of the C(2) pyridyl substituent. Acid decarboxylation of the bicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-enes provided the C(8) substituted 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ones. Structural studies revealed diagnostic 13C NMR signals that permit assignment of the orientation of the C(8) substituent. Pharmacological investigations documented that 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-enes efficiently bind to the human M1-M5 muscarinic receptors and function as antagonists. We observed that exo-8-benzyloxymethyl-3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-ene (3) displayed the highest affinity, exhibiting Ki values at all five muscarinic receptors that were approximately 10-50 times lower than carbachol and approximately 30-230 times lower than arecoline. Receptor selectivity was observed for 3. Compound 3 contained

  15. Palmitoylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes: reduction in their ability to activate G proteins by mutation of a putative palmitoylation site, cysteine 457, in the carboxyl-terminal tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, M K; Haga, T

    1997-04-15

    A putative palmitoylation site, Cys457, of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor) was eliminated by conversion to alanine or stop codon by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant m2 receptor C457A was not metabolically labeled with [3H] palmitic acid when expressed in Sf9 cells, whereas the wild-type m2 receptor was labeled under the same conditions. These results confirm that the Cys457 is the palmitoylation site. The rate of palmitoylation was markedly accelerated by addition of agonist, indicating that the palmitoylation reaction is affected by conformational changes of the receptor induced by agonist binding. The m2 receptor mutants without palmitoylation were purified and reconstituted with G proteins into phospholipid vesicles. Both mutants were good substrates of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and the phosphorylation was stimulated by agonist and G protein beta gamma subunits, as was the case for wild-type receptors. The mutant receptors interacted with and activate Gi2 and G(o). However, the rate of [35S] GTP gamma S binding to Gi2 was half as much for the mutants as that for the wild type, and the proportion of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding sites was significantly less for mutants (42-42%) compared to wild type (62%). These results indicate that the palmitoylation of m2 receptors is not an absolute requirement for their interaction with G proteins but enhances the ability of the receptors to interact with G proteins.

  16. Functionalized Congener Approach to Muscarinic Antagonists: Analogues of Pirenzepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karton, Yishai; Bradbury, Barton J.; Baumgold, Jesse; Paek, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine (5,11-dihydro-11-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was derivatized to explore points of attachment of functionalized side chains for the synthesis of receptor probes and ligands for affinity chromatography. The analogues prepared were evaluated in competitive binding assays versus [3H]-N-methylscopolamine at four muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1AChR-m4AChR) in membranes from rat heart tissue and transfected A9L cells. 9-(Hydroxymethyl)pirenzepine, 8-(methylthio)pirenzepine, and a series of 8-aminosulfonyl derivatives were synthesized. Several 5-substituted analogues of pirenzepine also were prepared. An alternate series of analogues substituted on the 4-position of the piperazine ring was prepared by reaction of 4-desmethylpirenzepine with various electrophiles. An N-chloroethyl analogue of pirenzepine was shown to form a reactive aziridine species in aqueous buffer yet failed to affinity label muscarinic receptors. Within a series of aminoalkyl analogues, the affinity increased as the length of the alkyl chain increased. Shorter chain analogues were generally much less potent than pirenzepine, and longer analogues (7–10 carbons) were roughly as potent as pirenzepine at m1 receptors, but were nonselective. Depending on the methylene chain length, acylation or alkyl substitution of the terminal amine also influenced the affinity at muscarinic receptors. PMID:2066986

  17. Dysfunctional muscarinic M(2) autoreceptors in vagally induced bronchoconstriction of conscious guinea pigs after the early allergic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TenBerge, REJ; Krikke, M; Teisman, ACH; Roffel, AF; Zaagsma, J

    1996-01-01

    We studied the function of autoinhibitory muscarinic M(2) receptors on vagal nerve endings in the airways of conscious, unrestrained, ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs after the early and late allergic reaction. For this purpose, the effects of the selective muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist gallam

  18. Expression of muscarinic binding sites in primary human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, D; Razon, N; Sokolovsky, M; Soreq, H

    1984-05-01

    The expression of muscarinic binding sites was examined in a collection of primary brain tumors of different cellular origins and various degrees of dedifferentiation, as compared to control specimens. Eleven gliogenous tumors were examined, all of which contained substantial amounts of muscarinic binding sites. Most of the other tumor types examined did not display detectable binding of [3H]N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ([3H]4NMPB). Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of homogeneous antagonist sites in both normal forebrain and glioblastoma multiforme, with Kd values of 1.2 nM and 0.9 nM, respectively. The density of muscarinic binding sites varied between tumors from different patients, and also between specimens prelevated from different areas of the same tumor. This variability, as well as the average density of binding sites, appeared to be larger in highly malignant tumors than in less malignant ones. In contrast, the density of muscarinic receptors from control specimens was invariably high, but within the same order of magnitude. To test whether the muscarinic binding activity in the brain tumors is correlated to other cholinoceptive properties, cholinesterase activity was also examined. Individual data for density of [3H]4NMPB binding sites were then plotted against corresponding values of cholinesterase activity. The pattern of distribution of these values was clearly different in tumor specimens, when compared to that observed in samples derived from non-malignant brain. Our observations indicate that human brain cells of gliogenous origin are capable of expressing muscarinic binding sites, and that, if a correlation exists between muscarinic receptors and cholinesterase levels in gliogenous tumors, it differs from that of non-malignant brain tissue.

  19. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-min LIANG; Su-yun LI; Ling-ling LAI; Juergen HESCHELER; Ming TANG; Chang-jin LIU; Hong-yan LUO; Yuan-long SONG; Xin-wu HU; Jiao-ya XI; Lin-lin GAO; Bin NIE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Ica- L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of Ica-L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action.IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-Lcurrent by 71.2 %±9.2 % (n=8) and 11.3 %±2.5 % (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5 %±3.5 % (n=5) and 82.7 %±10.4 % (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on ICa-L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  1. Flurbiprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, reduces the brain arachidonic acid signal in response to the cholinergic muscarinic agonist, arecoline, in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Villacreses, Nelly E; Lee, Ho-Joo; Bell, Jane M; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2007-11-01

    Cholinergic muscarinic receptors, when stimulated by arecoline, can activate cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) to release arachidonic acid (AA) from membrane phospholipid. This signal can be imaged in the brain in vivo using quantitative autoradiography following the intravenous injection of radiolabeled AA, as an increment in a regional brain AA incorporation coefficient k*. Arecoline increases k* significantly in brain regions having muscarinic M(1,3,5) receptors in wild-type but not in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 knockout mice. To further clarify the roles of COX enzymes in the AA signal, in this paper we imaged k* following arecoline (5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline in each of 81 brain regions of unanesthetized rats pretreated 6 h earlier with the non-selective COX inhibitor flurbiprofen (FB, 60 mg/kg s.c.) or with vehicle. Baseline values of k* were unaffected by FB treatment, which however reduced by 80% baseline brain concentrations of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)), eicosanoids preferentially derived from AA via COX-2 and COX-1, respectively. In vehicle-pretreated rats, arecoline increased the brain PGE(2) but not TXB(2) concentration, as well as values for k* in 77 of the 81 brain regions. FB-pretreatment prevented these arecoline-provoked changes. These results and those reported in COX-2 knockout mice suggest that the AA released in brain following muscarinic receptor-mediated activation is lost via COX-2 to PGE(2) but not via COX-1 to TXB(2), and that increments in k* following arecoline largely represent replacement by unesterified plasma AA of this loss.

  2. Interaction of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M₂ subtype with G protein Gα(i/o) isotypes and Gβγ subunits as studied with the maltose-binding protein-M₂-Gα(i/o) fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Nemoto, Reiko; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Haga, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    We expressed the fusion proteins of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2 receptor) with a maltose-binding protein (MBP) and various G protein α subunits (Gα(i1-i3/o)) at its N- and C-terminals, respectively (MBP-M2-Gα(i/o)), in Escherichia coli, and examined the effect of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) on the receptor-Gα interaction as assessed by agonist- and GDP-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding of the fusion proteins. We found that (i) Gβγ promoted both the agonist-dependent and -independent [(35)S]GTPγS binding with little effect on the guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, (ii) the specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding activity was much greater for MBP-M2-Gα(oA) than for MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) in the absence of Gβγ, whereas Gβγ preferentially promoted the agonist-dependent decrease in the affinity for GDP of MBP-M2-Gα(i1-i3) rather than of MBP-M2-Gα(oA), and (iii) the proportion of agonist-dependent [(35)S]GTPγS binding was roughly 50% irrespective of species of Gα and the presence or absence of Gβγ. These results demonstrate that receptor-Gα fusion proteins expressed in E. coli could be useful for studies of receptor-G interaction.

  3. 豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞毒蕈碱受体的表达及功能研究%Expression and function of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴康棋; 葛亮; 方强; 蒙明森; 鄢俊安; 李为兵

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究毒蕈碱受体在豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞(ICC)上的表达,初步探讨ICC在胆碱能神经递质传递中的作用.方法 将20只豚鼠随机分成对照组和实验组,进行输尿管肌条实验,观察在卡巴胆碱作用下输尿管肌条的收缩幅度和频率的变化;10只豚鼠,将输尿管进行固定、撕片和荧光染色,检测豚鼠输尿管毒蕈碱受体亚型(M1~M5)在ICC上的表达情况.结果 卡巴胆碱作用后,实验组肌条的收缩幅度为0 g,频率为0次/分,对照组的幅度为(0.106±0.021)g,频率为(4.900±0.875)次/分,两组差异显著(P<0.01).免疫荧光双标显示,输尿管ICC仅表达M2、M3受体亚型.结论 胆碱能神经可能通过ICC来调控输尿管平滑肌.%Objective To study the expression of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and to discuss preliminarily on the role of ICC in the transmission of cholinergic neurotransmitter. Methods Twenty guinea pigs were randomly divided into control and experiment group. The changes of ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency were observed after applying ureteral muscle strip experiment in vitro. Fixation, tear film and fluorescence staining were performed on the ureters of 10 guinea pigs. The expressions of the muscarinic receptors subtypes (M1 ~ Ms) in ICC of guinea-pig ureters were detected. Results Statistical differences were observed between the two group in ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency, which were (0) g and (0) per minute in experiment group and (0. 106 ±0. 021) g and ( 4. 900 ± 0. 875 ) per minute in control group ( P < 0. 01 ) . Immunofluorescence double labeling showed that ureteral ICC only expressed M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. Conclusion Cholinergic nerve may regulate ureteral smooth muscle by ICC.

  4. Evaluation and metabolite studies of {sup 125}I- and {sup 123}I-labelled E-(R,R)-IQNP: potential radioligands for visualization of M{sub 1} muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Kim A.; Halldin, Christer; Hiltunen, Jukka; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Ito, Hiroshi; Ginovart, Nathalie; Hall, Haakan; McPherson, Daniel W.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ); Larsson, Stig; Schnell, Per-Olof; Farde, Lars

    1998-04-01

    A new ligand for the M{sub 1} muscarinic receptor subtype, E-(R,R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (E-IQNP), was labelled with {sup 125}I and {sup 123}I for autoradiographic studies on human whole-brain cryosections and SPET studies, respectively, in Cynomolgus monkey. Autoradiography demonstrated E-[{sup 125}I]IQNP binding in M{sub 1} receptor-rich regions such as the neocortex and the striatum. The binding was displaceable by the selective M{sub 1} antagonist biperiden. In vivo single photon emission tomography (SPET) studies with E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP demonstrated a high accumulation of radioactivity in the monkey neocortex. Rapid hydrolysis of the quinuclidinyl ester to the free acid was found to be a major biotransformation route for E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP. The free acid of E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP does not pass the blood-brain barrier, but the plasma concentration was high as compared to the total radioactivity in brain. It is thus necessary to correct for the high concentration of radioactive metabolites in parenchymal blood (CBV) to obtain accurate values for E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP binding in brain.

  5. Muscarinic toxins from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolkkonen, M; Van Giersbergen, P L; Hellman, U; Wernstedt, C; Oras, A; Satyapan, N; Adem, A; Karlsson, E

    1995-12-01

    Three new toxins acting on muscarinic receptors were isolated from the venom of the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis. They were called muscarinic toxins alpha, beta, and gamma (MT alpha, MT beta, and MT gamma). All of the toxins have four disulphide bonds and 65 or 66 amino acids. The sequences of MT alpha and MT beta were determined. The muscarinic toxins, of which about 12 have been isolated from venoms of green and black mambas, have 60-98% sequence identity with each other, and are similar to many (about 180) other snake venom components, such as alpha-neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and fasciculins. In contrast to the alpha-neurotoxins, muscarinic toxins do not bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The binding constants of MT alpha and MT beta were determined for human muscarinic receptors of subtypes m1-m5 stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The toxins are less selective than the earlier discovered muscarinic toxins from the green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps. MT alpha and the muscarinic toxin MT4 from D. angusticeps differ only in a region of three amino acids (residues 31-33), which are Leu-Asn-His in MT alpha and Ile-Val-Pro in MT4. This difference causes a pronounced shift in subtype selectivity. MT alpha has high affinity to all subtypes, with Ki (inhibition constant) values of 23 nM (m1; pKi = 7.64 +/- 0.10), 44 nM (m2; pKi = 7.36 +/- 0.06), 3 nM (m3; pKi = 8.46 +/- 0.14), 5 nM (m4; pKi = 8.32 +/- 0.07), and 8 nM (m5; pKi = 8.09 +/- 0.07). MT4 has high affinity only to m1 (Ki = 62 nM) and m4 (87 nM) receptors, and low (Ki > 1 microM) affinity to m2, m3, and m5. The region at positions 31-33 evidently plays an important role in the toxin-receptor interaction. MT beta has low affinity for m1 and m2 receptors (Ki > 1 microM) and intermediate affinity for m3 (140 nM; pKi = 6.85 +/- 0.03), m4 (120 nM; pKi = 6.90 +/- 0.06), and m5 (350 nM; pKi = 6.46 +/- 0.01). The low affinity of MT beta may reflect a tendency for spontaneous inactivation.

  6. Carbachol exhibited positive inotropic effect on rat ventricular myocytes via M2 muscarinic receptors%氨甲酰胆碱通过M2胆碱能受体对大鼠心肌细胞发挥正性肌力作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔香丽; 陈还珍; 吴博威

    2007-01-01

    .52) pA/pF (P<0.01) and that in reverse mode from (1.11±0.49) pA/pF in the control group to (1.53±0.52) pA/pF (P<0.01), respectively. CCh had no effect on ICa,L. The stimulatory effect of CCh on INa/Ca was blocked by application of atropine, a non-selective M muscarinic receptor antagonist, and methoctramine,a selective M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist. CCh (100 μmol/L) increased cell shortening from (3.00±0.67) μm in the control group to (3.55±1.21) μm. Ca2+ transient was also increased from 203.8±50.0 in the control group to 234.8±64.3 in 100 μmol/L CCh group. KBR7943, a selective inhibitor of reverse mode Na+/Ca2+ exchange, did not change the baseline level of cell shortening and Ca2+ transient,while completely abolished CCh-induced increments of both Ca2+ transient and cell shortening. CCh increased cell shortening and Ca2+transient in the presence of nicardipine, indicating that the positive inotropic effect of CCh was through activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange.Calcium sensitivity was not changed by CCh. Both atropine and methoctramine abolished the positive inotropic effects of CCh,demonstrating that CCh induced positive inotropism via the M2 muscarinic receptor. The results suggest that CCh increases cell contraction and Ca2+ transient in rat ventricular myocytes. This positive inotropic effect of CCh is through activation of reverse mode Na+/Ca2+ exchange, and M2 receptors are involved in mediating CCh-induced contraction.

  7. GTP effects in rat brain slices support the non-interconvertability of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, D.G. Jr.; Horvath, E.; Traber, J.; Van Rooijen, L.A.A.

    1988-01-01

    GTP (guanosine-5'-triphosphate) markedly reduced high-affinity /sup 3/H-oxotremorine-M binding to M/sub 2/ receptors on brain slices in autoradiographic experiments while /sup 3/H-pirenzepine binding to M/sub 1/ receptors was largely unaffected. The distribution of M/sub 1/ receptors so labelled was also not altered by GTP to include former M/sub 2/-rich regions, thus indicating that GTP could not, by itself, interconvert high agonist-affinity M/sub 2/ receptors to M/sub 1/ receptors. 18 references, 1 figure.

  8. Muscarinic responses of gastric parietal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, J.M.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.R.; Hersey, S.J.; Sachs, G. (Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Isolated rabbit gastric glands were used to study the nature of the muscarinic cholinergic responses of parietal cells. Carbachol stimulation of acid secretion, as measured by the accumulation of aminopyrine, was inhibited by the M1 antagonist, pirenzepine, with an IC50 of 13 microM; by the M2 antagonist, 11,2-(diethylamino)methyl-1 piperidinyl acetyl-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido 2,3-b 1,4 benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116), with an IC50 of 110 microM; and by the M1/M3 antagonist, diphenyl-acetoxy-4-methylpiperidinemethiodide, with an IC50 of 35 nM. The three antagonists displayed equivalent IC50 values for the inhibition of carbachol-stimulated production of 14CO2 from radiolabeled glucose, which is a measure of the turnover of the H,K-ATPase, the final step of acid secretion. Intracellular calcium levels were measured in gastric glands loaded with FURA 2. Carbachol was shown to both release calcium from an intracellular pool and to promote calcium entry across the plasma membrane. The calcium entry was inhibitable by 20 microM La3+. The relative potency of the three muscarinic antagonists for inhibition of calcium entry was essentially the same as for inhibition of acid secretion or pump related glucose oxidation. Image analysis of the glands showed the effects of carbachol, and of the antagonists, on intracellular calcium were occurring largely in the parietal cell. The rise in cell calcium due to release of calcium from intracellular stores was inhibited by 4-DAMP with an IC50 of 1.7 nM, suggesting that the release pathway was regulated by a low affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state; Ca entry and acid secretion are regulated by a high affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state, inhibited by higher 4-DAMP concentrations, suggesting that it is the steady-state elevation of Ca that is related to parietal cell function rather than the (Ca)i transient.

  9. Deficits in avoidance responding after paradoxical sleep deprivation are not associated with altered [3H]pirenzepine binding to M1 muscarinic receptors in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Karin M; Hipólide, Débora C; Nobrega, José N; Bueno, Orlando F A; Tufik, Sergio; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela M

    2003-07-04

    Previous work had indicated that animals that were sleep-deprived and then trained on a passive avoidance task show poor retention of the task 24 h later after being allowed to sleep freely again. Cholinergic involvement is suggested by the fact that this effect is prevented by treatment with the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine during sleep deprivation. The observation that similar deficits are observed in non-deprived rats after treatment with M1-selective antagonist compounds such as dicyclomine or pirenzepine cause similar impairments, and gave rise to the hypothesis that sleep deprivation might induce significant reductions in M1 binding in brain areas involved in learning and memory processes. Rats were deprived of sleep for 96 h and then either immediately killed, or allowed to recover sleep for 24 h before being killed. [3H]pirenzepine binding to M1 sites was examined by quantitative autoradiography in 39 different brain areas in cage controls, sleep-deprived and sleep-recovered animals (N=8 per group). No significant differences among groups were found in any brain region. A separate group of animals was subjected to the sleep deprivation procedure and then trained in a simple avoidance task. Animals were then allowed to sleep and retested 24 h later. This group showed a significant impairment in the avoidance task compared to cage controls, in agreement with previous observations. These data suggest that proactive learning/memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation cannot be attributed to altered M1 binding either immediately after deprivation (when avoidance training occurs) or after sleep has recovered (when acquisition/retention are tested). The possibility remains that alterations in M1 function occur at post-membrane second messenger systems.

  10. Role of M1 receptor in regulation of gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gajdus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:The subject of this study is determination of the influence of drugs on gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction induced by activation of muscarinic receptors M1. Experiments tested interactions between a receptor agonist, carbachol and muscarinic receptor antagonists, atropine and pirenzepine.Material/Methods:Testing was conducted on tissues isolated from rat’s stomach. Male Wistar rats with weight between 220 g and 360 g were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of urethane (120 mg/kg. The stomach was dissected, and later the gastric fundus was isolated. Tissue was placed in a dish for insulated organs with 20 ml in capacity, filled with Krebs fluid. Results contained in the study are average values ± SE. In order to determine statistical significance, the principles of receptor theory were used (Kenakin modification.Results:According to tests, carbachol, in concentrations ranging between 10–8 M to 10–4 M, in a dosage-dependent way induces gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction. Presented results indicate that carbachol meets the conditions posed to full agonists. On the other hand, atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, causes a concentration-dependent shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol to the right, maintaining maximum reaction. According to analysis of the curve determined, we can deduce that atropine meets the conditions posed to competitive antagonists. The use of pirenzepine, a competitive receptor agonist M1, causes shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol to the right, maintaining maximum reaction.Conclusions:From the testing conducted on the preparation of the gastric fundus we can deduce that atropine causes shift of concentration-effect curves for carbachol to the right. A similar effect is released by pirenzepine, selectively blocking muscarinic receptors of M1 type. The results indicate that in the preparation of the gastric fundus smooth muscle, M1 type

  11. Role of M1 receptor in regulation of gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdus, Marta; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek; Glaza, Izabela; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Rafał; Olkowska, Joanna

    2011-09-14

    The subject of this study is determination of the influence of drugs on gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction induced by activation of muscarinic receptors M1. Experiments tested interactions between a receptor agonist, carbachol and muscarinic receptor antagonists, atropine and pirenzepine. Testing was conducted on tissues isolated from rat's stomach. Male Wistar rats with weight between 220 g and 360 g were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of urethane (120 mg/kg). The stomach was dissected, and later the gastric fundus was isolated. Tissue was placed in a dish for insulated organs with 20 ml in capacity, filled with Krebs fluid. Results contained in the study are average values ± SE. In order to determine statistical significance, the principles of receptor theory were used (Kenakin modification). According to tests, carbachol, in concentrations ranging between 10(-8) M to 10(-4) M, in a dosage-dependent way induces gastric fundus smooth muscle contraction. Presented results indicate that carbachol meets the conditions posed to full agonists. On the other hand, atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, causes a concentration-dependent shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol) to the right, maintaining maximum reaction. According to analysis of the curve determined, we can deduce that atropine meets the conditions posed to competitive antagonists. The use of pirenzepine, a competitive receptor agonist M1, causes shift of concentration-effect curve (for carbachol) to the right, maintaining maximum reaction. From the testing conducted on the preparation of the gastric fundus we can deduce that atropine causes shift of concentration-effect curves for carbachol to the right. A similar effect is released by pirenzepine, selectively blocking muscarinic receptors of M1 type. The results indicate that in the preparation of the gastric fundus smooth muscle, M1 type receptors occur also postsynaptically.

  12. DYSFUNCTION OF MUSCARINIC M(2) RECEPTORS AFTER THE EARLY ALLERGIC REACTION - POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTION TO BRONCHIAL HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN ALLERGIC GUINEA-PIGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; SANTING, RE; HAMSTRA, JJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1995-01-01

    1 Using a guinea-pig model of allergic asthma, in which the animals display early (0-5 h) and late phase (8-23 h after antigen challenge) bronchoconstrictor reactions, the function of prejunctional inhibitory Mt and postjunctional Mg receptors in isolated tracheal preparations have been investigated

  13. Presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system and occurrence of up- and down-regulation in expression of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: new aspects of importance regarding Achilles tendon tendinosis (tendinopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjur, Dennis; Danielson, Patrik; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2008-02-01

    Limited information is available concerning the existence of a cholinergic system in the human Achilles tendon. We have studied pain-free normal Achilles tendons and chronically painful Achilles tendinosis tendons with regard to immunohistochemical expression patterns of the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2)R), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). M(2)R immunoreactivity was detected in the walls of blood vessels. As evidenced via parallel staining for CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin, most M(2)R immunoreactivity was present in the endothelium. M(2)R immunoreactivity also occured in tenocytes, which regularly immunoreact for vimentin. The degree of M(2)R immunoreactivity was highly variable, tendinosis tendons that exhibit hypercellularity and hypervascularity showing the highest levels of immunostaining. Immunoreaction for ChAT and VAChT was detected in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens, particularly in aberrant cells. In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA for ChAT is present in tenocytes in tendinosis specimens. Our results suggest that autocrine/paracrine effects occur concerning the tenocytes in tendinosis. Up-regulation/down-regulation in the levels of M(2)R immunoreactivity possibly take place in tenocytes and blood vessel cells during the various stages of tendinosis. The presumed local production of acetylcholine (ACh), as evidenced by immunoreactivity for ChAT and VAChT and the detection of ChAT mRNA, appears to evolve in response to tendinosis. These observations are of importance because of the well-known vasoactive, trophic, and pain-modulating effects that ACh is known to have and do unexpectedly establish the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in the Achilles tendon.

  14. The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) induces angiogenesis via allosteric modulation of the M3 muscarinic receptor in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeay, Samuel; Clere, Nicolas; Hilairet, Grégory; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Bernard, Philippe; Quignard, Jean-François; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; Lapied, Bruno; Faure, Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) has been reported to inhibit AChE (acetylcholinesterase) and to possess potential carcinogenic properties with excessive vascularization. In the present paper, we demonstrate that DEET specifically stimulates endothelial cells that promote angiogenesis which increases tumor growth. DEET activates cellular processes that lead to angiogenesis including proliferation, migration and adhesion. This is associated with an enhancement of NO production and VEGF expression in endothelial cells. M3 silencing or the use of a pharmacological M3 inhibitor abrogates all of these effects which reveals that DEET-induced angiogenesis is M3 sensitive. The experiments involving calcium signals in both endothelial and HEK cells overexpressing M3 receptors, as well as binding and docking studies demonstrate that DEET acts as an allosteric modulator of the M3 receptor. In addition, DEET inhibited AChE which increased acetylcholine bioavailability and binding to M3 receptors and also strengthened proangiogenic effects by an allosteric modulation.

  15. 大鼠慢性阻塞性肺疾病模型气道和肺组织M受体水平及溴化异丙托品的影响%Effect of ipratropium bromide on airway and pulmonary muscarinic receptors in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚婉贞; 王国扬; 朱红; 孙永昌; 赵鸣武

    2001-01-01

    目的观察大鼠慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)模型气道和肺组织M受体水平,以及吸入溴化异丙托品对M受体的影响及其规律。 方法通过长期吸入高浓度SO2气体的方法(250?ppm, 5?h/d, 5?d/wk, 共7?wk)建立COPD模型, 大鼠在密闭箱内吸入雾化的0.025%溴化异丙托品溶液10?ml(2次/d, 20?min/次),采用放射配基结合法,分别测定正常大鼠、吸入和未吸入异丙托品大鼠气道和肺组织的M受体。 结果支气管肺病理学及肺功能检查显示,大鼠长期吸入高浓度SO2气体可引起与人类COPD相似的病理生理改变。COPD大鼠气道和肺组织M受体的密度(0.038±0.011?pmol/mg蛋白质)及亲和力(Kd, 23±11?pmol/L)与正常大鼠相比(分别为0.030±0.008,29±19)无明显变化(P>0.05)。吸入异丙托品30天后,气道和肺组织M受体密度显著升高(P0.05). Densities of the muscarinic receptors were not changed after inhalation of ipratropium bromide for 5 days, but increased significantly after inhalation for 30 days, as compared with those of the untreated COPD rats. The muscarinic receptors returned the normal levels at day 6 after cessation of ipratropium bromide treatment. There were no differences among different groups of rats in equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd). Conclusion A rat model of COPD with pathophysiologic changes similar to the human counterpart was developed using chronic SO2 exposure. There was no significant change in the number and function of muscarinic receptors in airway and lung tissues of the COPD rats, but upregulation of the muscarinic receptors was observed after long-term inhalation of ipratropium bromide.

  16. M2受体抗体在肺源性心脏病发病中大鼠心脏结构影响的实验研究%Effects of muscarinic receptor M2 antibody on heart structure in rats with cor pulmonale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学军; 王小慧; 钱力; 吴博威; 刘慧荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of muscarinic receptor M2 antibody on the heart structural in established rat models of cor pulmonale. Methods A total of 60 rats were randomly allocated into 5 groups (n=12 each): hypoxia group, cyclosporine A group, nicardipine group, control group and active immunized group, respectively. In these groups, the level of serum muscarinic receptor M2 antibody was measured, and the changes in heart structure were observed with light and electronic microscopes for computation of relevant parameters. Results The positive rate of muscarinic receptor M2 antibody was 67% and 100%, respectively, in hypoxia and active immunized groups, with statistical difference (P0.05). There was a remarkable alteration in heart structure in both hypoxia and active immunized groups as compared control group. No structural difference was revealed in cyclosporine A group as compared with control group (P>0.05). Conclusion Muscarinic receptor M2 antibody plays a pivotal role in the pathological change of heart structure.%目的 通过建立肺源性心脏病大鼠模型观察M2受体抗体对心脏结构的影响.方法 60只wistar大鼠随机分为5组(每组12只):单纯缺氧组、环孢素A组、尼卡地平组、对照组、主动免疫组,测定各组大鼠血清中M2受体抗体的含量,光镜及电镜下观察各组大鼠心脏结构改变并计算相关指标.结果 M2受体抗体在单纯缺氧组为67%,主动免疫组为100%,与对照组(阳性率为8%)比较差异均有统计学意义(P0.05);与对照组比较,单纯缺氧组及主动免疫组心脏结构有明显变化,环孢索A组与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论M2受体抗体在引起心脏结构病理改变的过程中具有重要作用.

  17. The effect of indomethacin on the muscarinic induced contractions in the isolated normal guinea pig urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama’i Mohammad S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of prostaglandin depletion by means of COX-inhibition on cholinergic enhanced spontaneous contractions. Methods The urethra and bladder of 9 male guinea pigs (weight 270–300 g were removed and placed in an organ bath with Krebs’ solution. A catheter was passed through the urethra through which the intravesical pressure was measured. The muscarinic agonist arecaidine, the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin, and PGE2 were subsequently added to the organ bath. The initial average frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions in the first 2 minutes after arecaidine application were labelled Fini and Pini, respectively. The steady state frequency (Fsteady and amplitude (Psteady were defined as the average frequency and amplitude during the 5 minutes before the next wash out. Results Application of 1 μM PGE2 increased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions without affecting frequency. 10 μM of indomethacin reduced amplitude but not frequency. The addition of indomethacin did not alter Fini after the first application (p = 0.7665. However, after the second wash, Fini was decreased (p = 0.0005. Fsteady, Psteady and Pini were not significantly different in any of the conditions. These effects of indomethacin were reversible by PGE2 addition.. Conclusions Blocking PG synthesis decreased the cholinergically stimulated autonomous contractions in the isolated bladder. This suggests that PG could modify normal cholinergically evoked response. A combination of drugs inhibiting muscarinic receptors and PG function or production can then become an interesting focus of research on a treatment for overactive bladder syndrome.

  18. The effects of pH on the affinity of pirenzepine for muscarinic receptors in the guinea-pig ileum and rat fundus strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, R. B.; Chan, M.

    1982-01-01

    1 Dose-ratios obtained with pirenzepine on the guinea-pig ileum at 30 degrees C are indistinguishable from those obtained at 37 degrees C. 2. In 0.1 M NaCl at 37 degrees C the pKa of pirenzepine for the loss of its last ionizable proton is 8.2. The ionization of pirenzepine is therefore markedly affected by changes in pH in the physiological range. 3 In experiments with pirenzepine on guinea-pig ileum and rat fundus made over a range of pH, the dose-ratio increases with the proportion of the protonated form present. As expected, the slope of the graph of dose-ratio against proportion protonated depends on the concentration of antagonist. The changes in pH produce only small effects on dose-ratios obtained with pirenzepine monomethiodide. These effects of pH can account for some of the differences between estimates of the affinity of pirenzepine. 4 The logarithm of the affinity constant of the protonated form of pirenzepine for the receptors in guinea-pig ileum is estimated to be 6.93, compared with 6.94 for the receptors in rat fundus. However, for the non-protonated form the values appear to be below 5 for the ileum compared with about 6.4 for the rat fundus. PMID:6897199

  19. Muscarinic modulation of sodium current by activation of protein kinase C in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Ma, J Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1996-05-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channels by protein kinase C (PKC) decreases peak Na+ current and slows macroscopic inactivation, but receptor-activated modulation of Na+ currents via the PKC pathway has not been demonstrated. We have examined modulation of Na+ channels by activation of muscarinic receptors in acutely-isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. Application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol reduced peak Na+ current and slowed macroscopic inactivation at all potentials, without changing the voltage-dependent properties of the channel. These effects were mediated by PKC, since they were eliminated when the specific PKC inhibitor (PKCI19-36) was included in the pipette solution and mimicked by the extracellular application of the PKC activator, OAG. Thus, activation of endogenous muscarinic receptors on hippocampal neurons strongly modulates Na+ channel activity by activation of PKC. Cholinergic input from basal forebrain neurons may have this effect in the hippocampus in vivo.

  20. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  1. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudkins, R.L. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (United States)); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. (Sterling Research Group, Malvern, PA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  2. Ibudilast: a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor in brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Schwenkgrub

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibudilast (IBD is a non-selective (3, 4, 10, 11 phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitor, used mainly as a bronchodilator for the treatment of bronchial asthma. PDE play a central role in cellular function (e.g. differentiation, synaptic plasticity and inflammatory response by metabolizing cyclic nucleotides. The results from preclinical and clinical studies indicate that IBD has a broader range of action through suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, toll-like receptor 4 blockade (TLR-4, inhibition of a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, up-regulation the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10, and promotion of neurotrophic factors (GDNF, NGF, NT-4. Recent data indicate that the efficacy of IBD appears to be independent from PDE inhibition activity and rather linked to glial activity attenuation. Additional advantages of IBD, such as crossing the blood–brain barrier, good tolerance and activity by oral administration, makes it a promising therapeutic candidate for treating neuroinflammatory conditions, where the currently available treatment remains unsatisfying due to poor tolerability and/or sub-optimal efficacy. IBD has no direct receptor affinity with exemption of some undefined effect on adenosine receptors that makes the drug devoid of its receptors-mediated adverse effects. Current article provides an overview of the pharmacology of IBD with a focus on preclinical and clinical data supporting its potential neuroprotective benefits for neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain, medication overuse headache, stroke, opioid, alcohol and methamphetamine abuse.

  3. The role of muscarinic receptor subtypes on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human detrusor and overactive detrusor associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Yamanishi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of antimuscarinic antagonists on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human bladder and detrusor overactivity associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (DO/BPH. Samples of human bladder muscle were obtained from patients undergoing total cystectomy for bladder cancer (normal bladder, and those undergoing retropubic prostatectomy for BPH. All of the patients with DO/BPH had detrusor overactivity according to urodynamic studies. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 10-ml organ baths containing Krebs solution, and concentration–response curves for carbachol were obtained in the presence of antimuscarinic antagonists (4-DAMP, methoctramine, pirenzepine, tolterodine, solifenacin, trospium, propiverine, oxybutynin, and imidafenacin or vehicle. All antagonists competitively antagonized concentration–response curves to carbachol with high affinities in normal bladder. The rank order of mean pA2 values was as follows: trospium (10.1 > 4-DAMP (9.87, imidafenacin (9.3 > solifenacin (8.8 > tolterodine (8.6 > oxybutynin (8.3 > propiverine (7.7 > pirenzepine (7.4 > methoctramine (6.6. The effects of these antimuscarinic antagonists did not change when tested with DO/BPH bladder, suggesting that each antimuscarinic antagonist has a similar effect in this condition. Schild plots showed a slope corresponding to unity, except for propiverine with DO/BPH detrusor. In conclusion, M3-receptors mainly mediate contractions in human bladder strips with normal state and DO/BPH.

  4. Nicotinic and muscarinic agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors stimulate a common pathway to enhance GluN2B-NMDAR responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Miledi, Ricardo; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms by which nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic systems facilitate learning and memory largely remain to be elucidated. This study identified a common signaling pathway stimulated by cognitive-enhancing drugs targeted to nicotinic and m1 muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. Stimulation of this signaling pathway induces significant increases in glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl D-aspartate 2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated responses at...

  5. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  6. Intracellular calcium level is an important factor influencing ion channel modulations by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuto; Echigo, Ryousuke; Kashima, Kousuke; Minami, Hanae; Watanabe, Megumi; Nishikawa, Yuiko; Muranishi, Miho; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2013-05-28

    Signaling pathways involving phospholipase C (PLC) are involved in various neural functions. Understanding how these pathways are regulated will lead to a better understanding of their roles in neural functions. Previous studies demonstrated that receptor-driven PLCβ activation depends on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), suggesting the possibility that PLCβ-dependent cellular responses are basically Ca(2+) dependent. To test this possibility, we examined whether modulations of ion channels driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are sensitive to [Ca(2+)]i using cultured hippocampal neurons. Muscarinic activation triggered an inward current at -100 mV (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) in a subpopulation of neurons. This current response was suppressed by pirenzepine (an M1-preferring antagonist), PLC inhibitor, non-selective cation channel blocker, and lowering [Ca(2+)]i. Using the neurons showing no response at -100 mV, effects of muscarinic activation on K(+) channels were examined at -40 mV. Muscarinic activation induced a transient decrease of the holding outward current. This current response was mimicked and occluded by XE991, an M-current K(+) channel blocker, suppressed by pirenzepine, PLC inhibitor and lowering [Ca(2+)]i, and enhanced by elevating [Ca(2+)]i. Similar results were obtained when group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were activated instead of muscarinic receptors. These results clearly show that ion channel modulations driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are dependent on [Ca(2+)]i, supporting the hypothesis that cellular responses induced by receptor-driven PLCβ activation are basically Ca(2+) dependent.

  7. Carbachol augments Na/Ca exchange current via M2 muscarinic receptors in guinea pig ventricular myocytes%氨甲酰胆碱通过M2毒蕈碱受体增加豚鼠心肌细胞钠钙交换电流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔香丽; 陈还珍; 武冬梅; 吴博威

    2004-01-01

    Stimulation of cardiac mAChRs by carbachol (CCh) produces a biphasic inotropic response. The mechanisms of the positive inotropic response by higher concentration of CCh appear to be paradoxical. This article was aimed to study the mechanism of the positive inotropic effect of CCh in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. The effects of CCh on L-type calcium current (ICa) and Na/Ca exchange current (INa/Ca) were observed in voltage-clamped guinea pig ventricular myocytes by using Axon 200A amplifier. The results showed that CCh (100 μmol/L) increased both forword mode and reverse mode INa/Ca from (1.2±0.1) pA/pF to (2.0±0.3) pA/pF for forward mode (P<0.01) and from (1.3+0.5) pA/pF to (2.1+0.8) pA/pF for reverse mode (P<0.01), respectively. CCh had no effect on ICa. The stimulating effect of CCh on INa/Ca could be blocked by application of atropine, a nonselective blocker of muscarinic receptors,which means that the stimulating effect of CCh is through the activation of muscarinic receptors. We made a further study by using methoctramine, a selective antagonist of M2 muscarinic receptors. It completely abolished INa/Ca induced by 100 μmol/L CCh, indicating that the effect of CCh on INa/Ca was mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors. It is generally accepted that contraction in cardiac myocytes results from elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Ca2+ enters the cells through two pathways: L-type Ca2+ channels and, less importantly, reverse mode Na/Ca exchange. The calcium influx via both pathways promotes the contraction of cardiac myocytes.Because CCh had no effect on L-type Ca2+ current, the increase in Na/Ca exchange current might be the main factor in the positive inotropism of CCh. These results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of CCh in guinea pig heart is through stimulation of Na/Ca exchange and is mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors.%本文旨在研究氨甲酰胆碱(carbachol,CCh)对豚鼠心肌的正性变力性机制.用Axon200A膜片钳

  8. Muscarinic Control of MIN6 Pancreatic β Cells Is Enhanced by Impaired Amino Acid Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marcy L.; Wauson, Eric M.; McGlynn, Kathleen; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown recently that the class C G protein-coupled receptor T1R1/T1R3 taste receptor complex is an early amino acid sensor in MIN6 pancreatic β cells. Amino acids are unable to activate ERK1/2 in β cells in which T1R3 has been depleted. The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol activated ERK1/2 better in T1R3-depleted cells than in control cells. Ligands that activate certain G protein-coupled receptors in pancreatic β cells potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Among these is the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, the major muscarinic receptor in β cells. We found that expression of M3 receptors increased in T1R3-depleted MIN6 cells and that calcium responses were altered. To determine whether these changes were related to impaired amino acid signaling, we compared responses in cells exposed to reduced amino acid concentrations. M3 receptor expression was increased, and some, but not all, changes in calcium signaling were mimicked. These findings suggest that M3 acetylcholine receptors are increased in β cells as a mechanism to compensate for amino acid deficiency. PMID:24695728

  9. Relationship of Three-Dimensional Structure of Muscarinic Antagonists to Antimuscarinic Activity: Structure of Thiodeacylaprophen Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    anisotropic thermal parameters and /v"- CH3 H-atom parameters have been deposited with the British Librar%(VI) HaC -(VIII) pirenzepine Document Supply...the the standard M I muscarinic receptor subtype chloride ions. The figure was drawn using the SYBYL programs antagonist pirenzepine [compound (VIII

  10. Distribution of Like-muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M2 in the Brain of Three Castes of Polyrhachis vicina%毒蕈碱Ⅱ型乙酰胆碱受体类似物在拟黑多刺蚁三个品级脑中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜翠萍; 奚耕思; 梁爱萍; 欧阳霞辉

    2008-01-01

    The cholincrgic system plays an important role in the central nervous system of insects and is closely related to the complex behavior of insects.The immunohistoehemieal technique was performed to detect the expression of like-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 in the brain of three castes of Polyrhachis vicina.A positive expression of like-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 was observed in the mushroom body,central body and antennal lobes of the ant brain;but there is great diversity in their location and intensity among worker,queen and male ants.It is speculated that like-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 plays a critical role in the central nervous system,in terms of projecting visual information and olfactory information into the protocerebrum and integrating many inputs.%昆虫脑内胆碱能系统在中枢神经系统中起着重要作用,其与昆虫的复杂行为密切相关.本文选取有复杂行为的膜翅目社会性昆虫拟黑多刺蚁为研究材料,用免疫组织化学方法,对毒蕈碱Ⅱ型乙酰胆碱受体类似物在拟黑多刺蚁工蚁、雌蚁和雄蚁脑中进行定位检测.结果表明,毒蕈碱Ⅱ型乙酰胆碱受体类似物在拟黑多刺蚁前脑蕈形体、中央体和中腩嗅叶中普遍存在,但不同品级表达区域和强弱存在差异.这意味着毒蕈碱Ⅱ型乙酰胆碱受体类似物在拟黑多刺蚁视觉信息、嗅觉信息的整合输出中起着重要作用.

  11. The muscarinic system, cognition and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Sean P; Gurvich, Caroline T; Rossell, Susan L

    2015-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence has implicated the central muscarinic system as contributing to a number of symptoms of schizophrenia and serving as a potential target for pharmaceutical interventions. A theoretical review is presented that focuses on the central muscarinic system's contribution to the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. The aim is to bridge the void between pertinent neuropsychological and neurobiological research to provide an explanatory account of the role that the central muscarinic system plays in the symptoms of schizophrenia. First, there will be a brief overview of the relevant neuropsychological schizophrenia literature, followed by a concise introduction to the central muscarinic system. Subsequently, we will draw from animal, neuropsychological and pharmacological literature, and discuss the findings in relation to cognition, schizophrenia and the muscarinic system. Whilst unifying the multiple domains of research into a concise review will act as a useful line of enquiry into the central muscarinic systems contribution to the symptoms of schizophrenia, it will be made apparent that more research is needed in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Muscarinic agonists and potassium currents in guinea-pig myenteric neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J; North, R A; Tokimasa, T

    1989-01-01

    1. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from single neurones of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus in vitro. Using single electrode voltage clamp techniques, four distinct potassium currents were described and the effects of muscarinic agonists on these currents were studied. 2. A calcium-dependent potassium current (gKCa) was present in AH neurones at rest, and was much increased following a brief depolarization (50 ms, to 0 mV). Muscarinic agonists reduced both the resting current and the current evoked by depolarization. Pirenzepine competitively antagonized the suppression by muscarine of the calcium-dependent potassium current (or after-hyperpolarization) following an action potential. The dissociation equilibrium constant for pirenzepine was about 10 nM. 3. The conductance of AH neurones increased two to three fold when they were hyperpolarized negative to -90 mV. This inward rectification was blocked by extracellular caesium (2 mM) or rubidium (2 mM), but not by tetraethylammonium (TEA, 40 mM), 4-aminopyridine (100 microM) or cobalt (2 mM). The inward rectification was unaffected by muscarinic agonists. 4. When AH neurones were depolarized from very negative holding potentials (less than -80 mV) a brief outward current was recorded with a duration of about 200 ms. This transient or A current was completely blocked by 4-aminopyridine (100 microM) but was not affected by tetrodotoxin (300 nM), TEA (40 mM) or cobalt (2 mM). Muscarinic agonists did not affect the A current. 5. In S neurones, and in AH neurones in calcium-free solutions, the potassium conductance (in TEA and caesium) behaved according to constant field assumptions. This background conductance was suppressed by muscarinic agonists. 6. It is concluded that the depolarization by muscarinic agonists of myenteric AH neurones is due to a suppression of both a calcium-dependent potassium conductance and a background potassium conductance. Muscarinic depolarization of S neurones

  13. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  14. Effects of anti-peptide antibody against human M2 muscarinic receptors on the cAMP content in rat ventricles%心肌M2胆碱受体抗体对大鼠心房及心室肌cAMP含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琳; 李香珍; 冯羡菊; 王文泽; 张琳; 陈爱莲

    2001-01-01

    目的:了解心肌M2胆碱受体抗体(M2-Ab)对大鼠心房和心室肌cAMP含量的影响,并与M2胆碱受体激动剂卡巴可(Carb)的作用进行了对比观察。方法:采用离体生化放射免疫分析法测定M2-Ab及M2胆碱受体激动剂Carb对心肌cAMP含量的影响。结果:①M2-Ab及Carb两者均可剂量依赖性抑制异丙肾上腺素(Isoproterenol,Iso)所刺激的大鼠心房及心室肌cAMP的增加。卡巴可浓度为2 μmol/L,10 μmol/L,50 μmol/L时可分别抑制Iso所刺激的cAMP含量(8.5±1.2)%,(16.2±1.4)%,(29.5±2.1)%,而M2-Ab浓度为50 nmol/L,100 nmol/L,400 nmol/L时,可分别抑制(6.1±0.6)%,(17.3±1.8)%,(31.7±3.1)%(P<0.01)。②Carb(10 μmol/L)及M2-Ab(100 nmol/L)两者可分别抑制基础cAMP(49.2±4.3)%和(64.3±5.1)%。③M受体阻断剂阿托品(Atr)(1.5 μmol/L)不但可阻断Carb对Iso的抑制反应,亦能阻断M2-Ab的这种反应。而相应的抗原性肽段也能阻断M2-Ab的这种反应。结论:M2-Ab抑制Iso引起的心室肌细胞cAMP生成量的增加反应,类似于M受体激动剂Carb,两者效应均通过作用于M2受体途径实现。%Aim:To study the effects of anti-peptide antibodies(M2-Ab) against the second extracellular loop of human muscarinic receptor 2 on the cAMP content in rat atria and ventricles.These effects were compared with those of the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (Carb).Methods:Radioimmunoassay technique,was used for determining the effects of anti-pepitide antibodies and carb on cAMP content in rat ventricles.Result:①both Carb and M2-Ab were able to inhibit the isoproterenol (Iso) stimulated cAMP production in rat atria and ventricles.Carb at 2μmol/L,10μmol/L and 50μmol/L decreased Iso-stimulated cAMP production by (8.5±1.2)%,(16.2±1.4)% and (29.5±2.1)%,respectively;whereas M2-Ab at 50nmol/L,100nmol/L and 400nmol/L decreased it by (6.1±0.6)%,(17.3±1.8)% and (31.7±3.1)% (P<0.01),respectively.②Both Carb and M2-Ab

  15. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  16. Non-Selective Lexical Access in Different-Script Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jihye; Jiang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Lexical access in bilinguals is known to be largely non-selective. However, most studies in this area have involved bilinguals whose two languages share the same script. This study aimed to examine bilingual lexical access among bilinguals whose two languages have distinct scripts. Korean-English bilinguals were tested in a phoneme monitoring task…

  17. Muscarinic regulation of Kenyon cell dendritic arborizations in adult worker honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrin, Scott E; Herlihy, J Daniel; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2011-09-01

    The experience of foraging under natural conditions increases the volume of mushroom body neuropil in worker honey bees. A comparable increase in neuropil volume results from treatment of worker honey bees with pilocarpine, an agonist for muscarinic-type cholinergic receptors. A component of the neuropil growth induced by foraging experience is growth of dendrites in the collar region of the calyces. We show here, via analysis of Golgi-impregnated collar Kenyon cells with wedge arborizations, that significant increases in standard measures of dendritic complexity were also found in worker honey bees treated with pilocarpine. This result suggests that signaling via muscarinic-type receptors promotes the increase in Kenyon cell dendritic complexity associated with foraging. Treatment of worker honey bees with scopolamine, a muscarinic inhibitor, inhibited some aspects of dendritic growth. Spine density on the Kenyon cell dendrites varied with sampling location, with the distal portion of the dendritic field having greater total spine density than either the proximal or medial section. This observation may be functionally significant because of the stratified organization of projections from visual centers to the dendritic arborizations of the collar Kenyon cells. Pilocarpine treatment had no effect on the distribution of spines on dendrites of the collar Kenyon cells.

  18. Long-Acting Muscarinic Antagonists for Difficult-to-Treat Asthma: Emerging Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkhi, Adeeb; Tabatabaian, Farnaz; Casale, Thomas B

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a complex disease where many patients remain symptomatic despite guideline-directed therapy. This suggests an unmet need for alternative treatment approaches. Understanding the physiological role of muscarinic receptors and the parasympathetic nervous system in the respiratory tract will provide a foundation of alternative therapeutics in asthma. Currently, several long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are on the market for the treatment of respiratory diseases. Many studies have shown the effectiveness of tiotropium, a LAMA, as add-on therapy in uncontrolled asthma. These studies led to FDA approval for tiotropium use in asthma. In this review, we discuss how the neurotransmitter acetylcholine itself contributes to inflammation, bronchoconstriction, and remodeling in asthma. We further describe the current clinical studies evaluating LAMAs in adult and adolescent patients with asthma, providing a comprehensive review of the current known physiological benefits of LAMAs in respiratory disease.

  19. Effects of the muscarinic antagonists atropine and pirenzepine on olfactory conditioning in the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Lozano, V; Gauthier, M

    1998-04-01

    One-trial conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) in honeybees was used to examine the qualitative effects of two muscarinic antagonists, atropine and pirenzepine, on the acquisition and retrieval of memory following intracranial injection. The main result of this study is that atropine, at a relatively high concentration of 10(-2) M, impairs memory retrieval but not acquisition of memory after a single olfactory conditioning trial (at this concentration, there is no effect of atropine on the sensorimotor components of the PER). This result is in agreement with the effects of scopolamine, reported in a previously published article. Pirenzepine, at the same concentration as atropine, had no effect on either acquisition or retrieval of memory. These results suggest that blockade of muscarinic-like receptors, except those that bind to pirenzepine, induces solely an impairment of memory retrieval.

  20. Changes of nerve growth factor and M3 subtype muscarinic receptor in the seminal vesicle of diabetic rats%糖尿病大鼠精囊组织中神经生长因子和胆碱能M3受体的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海娥; 肖敦振

    2011-01-01

    Objective; To investigate the effect of diabetic autonomic neuropathy on the seminal vesicle and search for the theoretical evidence for the prevention and treatment of diabetic infertility by observing changes in the contents of the nerve growth factor (NGF) and muscarinic M3 receptor in the seminal vesicle of diabetic rats. Methods-. Diabetic models were established in 10 of the 15 male adult SD rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin ( STZ) , and the other 5 were included in a normal control group. Eight weeks after modeling, seminal vesicles were collected from the rats for HE and immunohistochemicl staining. Results: Compared with the normal controls, the diabetic models showed a decreased number of smooth muscle cells, thinner cytoplasm of glandular epithelial cells and disordered structure in the seminal vesicle. The intensity of NCF-positive staining was significantly enhanced, but that of M3 markedly reduced in the diabetic group. There were statistically significant differences in the mean integrated optical density ( L4 ) of muscarinic M3 receptors and NCF between the control and diabetic groups (0.018 7 ± 0.002 4 tu 0.010 0 ± 0.001 5 and 0. 020 9 ±0.008 5 vs 0.041 2 ±0.011 7, P<0.01). Conclusion: The changes in the expressions of NGF and M3 receptors in the seminal vesicle of diabetic rats suggest that diabetes mellitus may induce autonomic neuropathy of the seminal vesicle. Natt J Androl,2011, 17 (11): 1002-1006%目的:观察糖尿病大鼠精囊组织中神经生长因子(NGF)和胆碱能毒蕈碱M3受体含量的变化,以探讨糖尿病自主神经病变对精囊的影响,为糖尿病不育的临床防治提供理论依据.方法:成年雄性普通级SD大鼠15只,随机分为正常对照组5只和糖尿病模型组10只.链脲佐菌素(STZ)制备糖尿病模型成功后饲养8周,取精囊组织进行苏木精-伊红(HE)染色和免疫组化染色.结果:与正常对照组相比,糖尿病模型组HE染色可见大鼠精囊平滑肌

  1. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  2. Muscarinic depolarization of layer II neurons of the parasubiculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Glasgow

    Full Text Available The parasubiculum (PaS is a component of the hippocampal formation that sends its major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The PaS receives strong cholinergic innervation from the basal forebrain that is likely to modulate neuronal excitability and contribute to theta-frequency network activity. The present study used whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings to determine the effects of cholinergic receptor activation on layer II PaS neurons. Bath application of carbachol (CCh; 10-50 µM resulted in a dose-dependent depolarization of morphologically-identified layer II stellate and pyramidal cells that was not prevented by blockade of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Bath application of the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 µM, but not the M2-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1 µM, blocked the depolarization, suggesting that it is dependent on M1 receptors. Voltage-clamp experiments using ramped voltage commands showed that CCh resulted in the gradual development of an inward current that was partially blocked by concurrent application of the selective Kv7.2/3 channel antagonist XE-991, which inhibits the muscarine-dependent K(+ current I M. The remaining inward current also reversed near EK and was inhibited by the K(+ channel blocker Ba(2+, suggesting that M1 receptor activation attenuates both I M as well as an additional K(+ current. The additional K(+ current showed rectification at depolarized voltages, similar to K(+ conductances mediated by Kir 2.3 channels. The cholinergic depolarization of layer II PaS neurons therefore appears to occur through M1-mediated effects on I M as well as an additional K(+ conductance.

  3. Muscarinic Depolarization of Layer II Neurons of the Parasubiculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Stephen D.; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The parasubiculum (PaS) is a component of the hippocampal formation that sends its major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The PaS receives strong cholinergic innervation from the basal forebrain that is likely to modulate neuronal excitability and contribute to theta-frequency network activity. The present study used whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings to determine the effects of cholinergic receptor activation on layer II PaS neurons. Bath application of carbachol (CCh; 10–50 µM) resulted in a dose-dependent depolarization of morphologically-identified layer II stellate and pyramidal cells that was not prevented by blockade of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Bath application of the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 µM), but not the M2-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1 µM), blocked the depolarization, suggesting that it is dependent on M1 receptors. Voltage-clamp experiments using ramped voltage commands showed that CCh resulted in the gradual development of an inward current that was partially blocked by concurrent application of the selective Kv7.2/3 channel antagonist XE-991, which inhibits the muscarine-dependent K+ current IM. The remaining inward current also reversed near EK and was inhibited by the K+ channel blocker Ba2+, suggesting that M1 receptor activation attenuates both IM as well as an additional K+ current. The additional K+ current showed rectification at depolarized voltages, similar to K+ conductances mediated by Kir 2.3 channels. The cholinergic depolarization of layer II PaS neurons therefore appears to occur through M1-mediated effects on IM as well as an additional K+ conductance. PMID:23520542

  4. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  5. Central activation of the sympathetic nervous system including the adrenals in anaesthetized guinea pigs by the muscarinic agonist talsaclidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walland, A; Pieper, M P

    1998-04-01

    Talsaclidine, a novel M1-receptor selective muscarinic agonist for cholinergic substitution therapy of Alzheimer's disease, activates the sympathetic nervous system in guinea pigs and dogs at the orthosympathic ganglia and the paraganglionic adrenals. Results from guinea pigs provide indirect evidence for an additional central site of action. The present investigation in anaesthetized and vagotomized guinea pigs intended to demonstrate central activation of the sympathetic nervous system directly by comparing the blood pressure effects of intracerebroventricular and intravenous injections of small doses of talsaclidine. Increasing doses of 0.2 and 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine were injected alternately into the third cerebral ventricle and intravenously in 6 guinea pigs before and after blockade of peripheral muscarinic receptors with 1 mg/kg ipratropium bromide i.v. In another group of 6 animals the injections were given into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris using the same protocol. In both groups central administration of talsaclidine caused dose-related hypertension while intravenous injections were hypotensive. Ipratropium bromide, a peripheral antimuscarinic drug, reversed this hypotensive action of intravenous talsaclidine into hypertension, but did not inhibit the effects of central administration. In contrast, atropine, an antimuscarinic drug which passes the blood-brain barrier, abolished the effect of 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine injected into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris of 8 guinea pigs. The hypertensive effect of a first injection of 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris of 6 guinea pigs was approximately twice as large as that of a second given 90 min after bilateral adrenalectomy. Sham operation in another 6 animals was not inhibitory. The results demonstrate that talsaclidine, a selective muscarinic M1-receptor agonist, activates central parts of the sympathetic nervous system, including central projections of the adrenals by an action