WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-science students so-called

  1. Awareness survey of so-called Dappou drugs or Kiken drugs (New Psychoactive Substances) among University Students in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Fuse-Nagase, Yasuko; SAITO, Fukumi; HIROHARA, Toshie; MIYAKAWA, Happei

    2015-01-01

    Background Spread of new psychoactive substances (NPS) is a worldwide problem. In Japan, NPSs with psychoactive ingredients are called as “dappou drugs” or “kiken drugs.” Their potential effect on the Japanese society cannot be ignored. Findings We conducted an awareness survey of So-called Dappou Drugs or Kiken Drugs among the students of Ibaraki University, a national university in Japan, in April 2014. 3976 students (2425 men, 1406 women and 145 unspecified) participated in this study. 281...

  2. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic…

  3. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  4. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 April 2002) The Science The so called 'Face on Mars' can be seen slightly above center and to the right in this THEMIS visible image. This 3-km long knob, located near 10o N, 40o W (320o E), was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. A similar-size hill in Phoenix, Arizona resembles a camel lying on the ground, and Phoenicians whimsically refer to it as Camelback Mountain. Like the hills and knobs of Mars, however, Camelback Mountain was carved into its unusual shape by thousands of years of erosion. The THEMIS image provides a broad perspective of the landscape in this region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. Many of these knobs, including the 'Face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today. Many of the hills and ridges in this area also show unusual deposits of material that occur preferentially on the cold, north-facing slopes. It has been suggested that these deposits were 'pasted' on the slopes, with the distinct, rounded boundary on their upslope edges being the highest remaining point of this pasted-on layer. In several locations, such as in the large knob directly south of the 'Face', these deposits occur at several different heights on the hill. This observation suggests the layer once draped the entire knob and has since been removed from all but the north

  5. Non-Science Oriented Students and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a module called "Energy and the Human Being" within the framework of a program aimed at non-science-oriented students in senior high schools in Israel. Finds that students' attitudes toward science were positive and their understanding of the scientific concepts involved was…

  6. Vascular malformation (so-called hemangioma) of Scarpa's ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardeschi, D; Dunnebier, EA; Sauvaget, E; Herman, P; Wassef, M; Huy, PTB

    2004-01-01

    Vascular malformations of the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA) arising from the capillary plexus surrounding Scarpa's ganglion are rare tumors. We report a case of so-called "hemangioma" of the CPA which was operated on via a trans-labyrinthine approach based on a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular s

  7. Vascular malformation (so-called hemangioma) of Scarpa's ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardeschi, D; Dunnebier, EA; Sauvaget, E; Herman, P; Wassef, M; Huy, PTB

    2004-01-01

    Vascular malformations of the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA) arising from the capillary plexus surrounding Scarpa's ganglion are rare tumors. We report a case of so-called "hemangioma" of the CPA which was operated on via a trans-labyrinthine approach based on a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular

  8. Indiana secondary students' evolution learning experiences and demarcations of science from non-science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has documented students' conceptual difficulties learning evolution and how student learning may be related to students' views of evolution and science. This mixed methods study addressed how 74 high school biology students from six Indiana high schools viewed their evolution learning experiences, the demarcations of science from non-science, and evolution understanding and acceptance. Data collection entailed qualitative and quantitative methods including interviews, classroom observations, surveys, and assessments to address students' views of science and non-science, evolution learning experiences, and understanding and acceptance of evolution. Qualitative coding generated several demarcation and evolution learning experience codes that were subsequently used in quantitative comparisons of evolution understanding and acceptance. The majority of students viewed science as empirical, tentative but ultimately leading to certain truth, compatible with religion, the product of experimental work, and the product of human creativity. None of the students offered the consensus NOS view that scientific theories are substantiated explanations of phenomena while scientific laws state relationships or patterns between phenomena. About half the students indicated that scientific knowledge was subjectively and socio-culturally influenced. The majority of students also indicated that they had positive evolution learning experiences and thought evolution should be taught in secondary school. The quantitative comparisons revealed how students who viewed scientific knowledge as subjectively and socio-culturally influenced had higher understanding than their peers. Furthermore, students who maintained that science and religion were compatible did not differ with respect to understanding but had higher acceptance than their peers who viewed science and religion as conflicting. Furthermore, students who maintained that science must be consistent with their

  9. A Histopathological Study of the so-called Buruli ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    山下, 裕人; 千馬, 正敬; 板倉, 英世

    1980-01-01

    A histopathological study of the so-called "Buruli ulcer" was reported. The patient was a 10-year-old African boy in Kenya suffering from ulcer formation. The ulcer was 10cm in diameter and located over the left hip. It was undermined and covered by overhanged epithelia at the ulcer edge. There was edema or lytic change in the dermis which formed gaps between the epidermis and dermis in adjacent regions. Microscopically, inflammatory cells infiltration, granulation tissue, fibrosis, and sever...

  10. [Once again the so-called Testament of Hippocrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideras, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This study is dealing with the so-called Testament of Hippocrates, a short ethic about the doctor's background, knowledge, character, appearance and behaviour towards the patient. Along with the three well-known Greek manuscripts the author is looking at two other by now unknown codices, so that the two Greek versions are accompanied by a third and larger version. After a careful consideration of the relations between the different versions he is discussing all readings of the codices explaining the terms within the background of the history of medicine. At the end he is presenting a reconstruction of the Greek original together with a German translation.

  11. Thoughts on the so-called radius-capitellum axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Mueller, H.A.; Wagner, H.; Baetz, W.

    1982-02-01

    We have studied 438 patients radiologically in order to observe the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'. In about a quarter of people with normal elbows the axis passes lateral to the middle portion of the capitellum, so that even when there is marked deviation, there is no certainty that the humero-radial joint is abnormal. Deviation of the axis can be caused by changes in the shape of the capitellum or of the radius, or by distension of the capsule of the elbow joint, or by various changes in muscular pull.

  12. SoSTI Course: An Elective Science Course for Thai Upper Secondary School Non-Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Phonphok, Nason; White, Orvil L.; Musikul, Kusalin

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to develop the interdisciplinary SoSTI (science of sound in traditional Thai musical instruments) course for Thai non-science upper secondary school students to study the students' attitudes toward science before and after studying from the course. The SoSTI course development is based on the interdisciplinary concept model and…

  13. Investigation of CT picture in so-called loose shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Shigehito; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Akira; Moriishi, Takeji; Takada, Keiichi

    1985-03-01

    CT picture of the shoulder joint was analyzed in 124 shoulders (114 patients). A line perpendicular to a given line between the precornu of acetabular tegmen (A) and the postcornu of acetabular tegmen (B) was drawn and the intersection where the line and the caput humeri meet (C) was obtained. The angle of CAB was defined as the backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen. The angular aperture was 26.2 +- 1.9 in 16 so-called loose shoulders, 17.3 +- 1.0 in 28 loose shoulders restricted to the inward rotation, and 12.2 +- 0.4 in 80 normal shoulders, showing a distinct correlation between the angular aperture and the degree of loose shoulder. An increased backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen was considered greatly attributable to the forward glenohumeral movement resulting from malformation of the acetabular tegmen and flaccidity of the joint. Glenoid osteotomy was thus performed in 9 patients, 6 of whom underwent CT scanning before and after osteotomy. Coronal and transverse CT images of the shoulder joint disclosed a noticeable improvement of the glenohumeral alignment. The angular aperture shown on CT seems to be of major importance not only in the diagnosis of so-called loose shoulder but also in surgical choice. (Namekawa, K.).

  14. Emotional distance to so-called difficult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Jette Joost

    2012-01-01

    patient, the avoidance strategy did not necessarily represent the terminal stage, since a nurse could revert to the compromise strategy. Some of the nurses experienced painful emotions regarding these interactions. Conclusions: The avoidance strategy (emotional distance) resulted in important social......Scand J Caring Sci; 2011 Emotional distance to so-called difficult patients Purpose: To explore nurses' relationships with patients they regard as being difficult. How do nurses feel about such patients and relate to them, and what are the consequences for nurse and patient? Design and methods....... Patients' case records were studied and four meetings with the staff were arranged to discuss the findings. Data collection lasted 18 months in all. Findings: Three strategies were identified: persuasion, avoidance (emotional distance), and compromise. Interestingly, in the relationship with a particular...

  15. Insight into the so-called spatial reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Kokubo, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko; Shigaki, Keizo

    2013-10-01

    Up to now, there have been a great number of studies that demonstrate the effect of spatial topology on the promotion of cooperation dynamics (namely, the so-called “spatial reciprocity”). However, most researchers probably attribute it to the positive assortment of strategies supported by spatial arrangement. In this paper, we analyze the time course of cooperation evolution under different evolution rules. Interestingly, a typical evolution process can be divided into two evident periods: the enduring (END) period and the expanding (EXP) period where the former features that cooperators try to endure defectors’ invasion and the latter shows that perfect C clusters fast expand their area. We find that the final cooperation level relies on two key factors: the formation of the perfect C cluster at the end of the END period and the expanding fashion of the perfect C cluster during the EXP period. For deterministic rule, the smooth expansion of C cluster boundaries enables cooperators to reach a dominant state, whereas, the rough boundaries for stochastic rule cannot provide a sufficient beneficial environment for the evolution of cooperation. Moreover, we show that expansion of the perfect C cluster is closely related to the cluster coefficient of interaction topology. To some extent, we present a viable method for understanding the spatial reciprocity mechanism in nature and hope that it will inspire further studies to resolve social dilemmas.

  16. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    of tissue is very variable. (c) Substances Soluble in Ether, Alcohol, and Aceton.-In this group are found varying amounts of fatty acids, both saturated and unsaturated, some neutral fats, cholesterin and many unidentified lipoidal bodies. This group causes either hemolysis or inhibition, of hemolysis. In other words, it is anticomplementary as well as hemolytic in the majority of preparations. At the same time, in some preparations it is, to a certain extent, antigenic. This great variation in the amounts of these substances in given extracts renders their presence in the antigen preparation undesirable. It is not denied, however, that, when added in adequate quantities, some of these substances may improve the activity of the antigenic lipoids. (d) Substances Insoluble in Aceton.-This group of substances consists of phosphatids. The best known among them is, of course, lecithin. Besides lecithin, however, there must be various other phosphatids present in this fraction. It will be noticed that the precipitate formed by mixing the ethereal solution with aceton contains a certain amount of lipoids insoluble in ether as well as in alcohol. Before the fractionation in aceton, all lipoids were soluble in ether or ethyl alcohol. Further analytical work on the nature of the phosphatids contained in this fraction is necessary. This fraction, in general, is more constant in amount in the various liver extracts. Biologically considered, it is the most important. It is usually non-hemolytic, frequently anticomplementary, but much more strongly antigenic than the other fractions. The antigenic strength varies with different preparations, being almost absent in the extracts derived from fatty livers. An aceton insoluble fraction may be strongly antigenic without any other auxiliary effects, or may be accompanied by an anticomplementary property. This fraction does not cause the so-called non-specific reaction with an active human serum. For these reasons it is recommended (as

  17. Estonian Science and Non-Science Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldo, Indrek; Reiska, Priit

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the attitudes and beliefs towards studying mathematics by university level students. A total of 970 randomly chosen, first year, Estonian bachelor students participated in the study (of which 498 were science students). Data were collected using a Likert-type scale questionnaire and analysed with a respect to field of…

  18. Putting Students on the Hot Seat to Stimulate Interest in Biology in Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Samantha R.

    2012-01-01

    The Hot Seat is a discussion-based activity that requires students enrolled in a biology course for non-majors to pose a question to the class that is related to the current lecture topic and facilitate a brief class discussion. This paper describes the Hot Seat, how it is assessed, and how it has influenced students' attitudes toward the course…

  19. Using the Theme of Mass Extinctions to Teach Science to Non-Science Major College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The general public is heavily exposed to "news" and commentary---and arts and entertainment---that either inadvertently misrepresents science or even acts to undermine it. Climate change denial and evolution denial is well funded and pervasive. Even university-educated people get little exposure to the aims, methods, debates, and results of scientific inquiry because unless they earn degrees in science they typically only take one or two introductory science courses at the university level. This presentation reports the development of a new, non-science major Seattle University course on mass extinctions throughout earth history. Seattle University is an urban, Jesuit Catholic university. The topic of mass extinctions was chosen for several reasons: (1) To expose the students to a part of current science that has rich historical roots yet by necessity uses methods and reasoning from geology, geophysics, oceanography, physics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy. This multidisciplinary course provides some coverage of sciences that the student would not typically ever see beyond secondary school. (2) To enable the students to learn enough to follow some of the recent and current debates within science (e.g., mass extinctions by asteroid impact versus massive volcanism, ocean anoxia, and ocean acidification), with the students reading some of the actual literature, such as articles in Science, Nature, or Nature Geoscience. (3) To emphasize the importance of "deep time" as evolutionary biological processes interact with massive environmental change over time scales from hundreds of millions of years down to the seconds and hours of an asteroid or comet strike. (4) To show the effects of climate change in the past, present, and future, due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. (5) To help the student critically evaluate the extent to which their future involves a human-caused mass extinction.

  20. Improving Teaching of Reading, Writing, and Spelling Words with the So-Called Long Vowel Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschow, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    Investigating 1,908 words which contain the five so-called long vowel sounds, this study analyzes, describes, and summarizes their phoneme-grapheme correspondences together with their implicate and variant spelling patterns for purposes of assisting in the development of a more scientific teaching methodology. (JC)

  1. ARE THE SO-CALLED POISONOUS FOOD-COMBINATIONS REALLY POISONOUS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libin T CHENG

    2009-01-01

    @@ The idea that to eat certain two foods simultaneously is to get poisoned has been entertained by柄Chinese people for many years. There are about 184 pairs of the so-called poisonous food-combinations, and 180 of them are mentioned in Chinese Ancient Materia Medica, Ben-Tsao-Gung-Mu (本草纲目) or other books. (1a,2a) This belief was based upon some personal sketch, old-fashioned doctors' notes, stories and other false facts. Although these statements were originated without any experimental ground, yet many of the Chinese, even at present time, still believe them firmly. Whenever any poisoning outbreak occurs accidentally after having taken the so-called poisonous food-combination, they always attribute the cause of the poisoning to the two foods served simultaneously.

  2. Constructivism, the so-called semantic learning theories, and situated cognition versus the psychological learning theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Juan José; Rodríguez Moneo, María

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the perspective of situated cognition, which gave rise both to the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning and has probably become the most representative standpoint of constructivism, is examined. We consider the claim of situated cognition to provide alternative explanations of the learning phenomenon to those of psychology and, especially, to those of the symbolic perspective, currently predominant in cognitive psychology. The level of analysis of situated cognition (i.e., global interactive systems) is considered an inappropriate approach to the problem of learning. From our analysis, it is concluded that the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning which originated in situated cognition can hardly be considered alternatives to the psychological learning theories, and they are unlikely to add anything of interest to the learning theory or to contribute to the improvement of our knowledge about the learning phenomenon.

  3. The History of the So-Called Lense-Thirring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, H.

    2008-09-01

    Some historical documents, especially the Einstein-Besso manuscript from 1913, an extensive notebook by Thirring from 1917, and a correspondence between Thirring and Einstein from 1917 reveal that most of the credit for the so-called Lense-Thirring effect belongs to Einstein. I also comment on the later history of the problem of a correct centrifugal force inside a rotating mass shell which was resolved only relatively recently.

  4. On the history of the so-called Lense-Thirring effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Herbert

    2007-11-01

    Some historical documents, especially the Einstein Besso manuscript from 1913, an extensive notebook by H. Thirring from 1917, and the correspondence between Thirring and Einstein in the year 1917 reveal that most of the merit for the so-called Lense-Thirring effect of general relativity belongs to Einstein. Besides telling this “central story” of the effect, we give a short “prehistory”, with contributions by E. Mach, B. and I. Friedlaender, and A. Föppl, followed by the later history of the problem of a correct centrifugal force inside a rotating mass shell, which was resolved only relatively recently.

  5. So-called embryonal hyperplasia of Bowman's capsular epithelium: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, K; Hajikano, H; Sakaguchi, H

    1991-01-01

    The so-called embryonal hyperplasia of Bowman's capsular epithelium (EHBCE) is a rather specific lesion occurring in kidneys of patients maintained on chronic dialysis. It consists of poorly differentiated cells proliferating around sclerosed or obsolescent glomeruli. In this study, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural characterization of EHBCE was performed. The poorly differentiated cells in the lesion exhibited a positive reaction for vimentin and a negative one for cytokeratin (PKK 1) and epithelial membrane antigen. On ultrastructural examination, specialized junctions between adjoining cells, microvilli-like structures on their surfaces, and immature basal folds were observed. These observations suggest that the cells of EHBCE may be associated with the anlage of glomerular epithelium. The background in which neoplasms like renal cell carcinoma or atypical epithelium of cyst wall develop in end-stage kidneys of adult patients on long-term dialysis may cause such a proliferation of poorly differentiated cells in young or paediatric age group patients.

  6. So-called "papillary and cystic neoplasm of the pancreas." An immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, T; Fukayama, M; Koike, M; Tabata, I; Okamoto, A

    1987-05-01

    A case of so-called "papillary and cystic neoplasm of the pancreas" (PCNP) was reported and investigated immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. A tumor of the pancreatic head in a 21-year-old female was curatively resected. The tumor was cystic and histologically consisted of uniform cells in papillary and solid structure. Although there was no immunoreactivity for pancreaticogut hormones or secretory products of the pancreas in the tumor cells, most of the tumor cells were diffusely immunoreactive for neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Some neurosecretory granules were detected in the tumor cells ultrastructurally. Both facts suggested endocrine cell character of the tumor. Certain cases of PCNP might show a differentiation to endocrine cells.

  7. Learning Styles of Non-Science and Non-Technology Students on Technical Courses in an Information Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, Noraizan; Bahry, Farrah Diana Saiful; Yusop, Zulkefli Mohd; Abdullah, Szarina

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted among students with some or no background in science and technology subjects (non S&T students) who enrolled in the Faculty of Information Management in a Malaysian public university during semester 2009/2010. It aims to identify students' learning styles on technical courses in order to provide inputs to instructors'…

  8. Nursing so-called monsters: on the importance of abjection and fear in forensic psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jean Daniel; Gagnon, Marilou; Holmes, Dave

    2009-01-01

    Forensic psychiatric nurses work with individuals who may evoke feelings of empathy as well as feelings of disgust, repulsion, and fear. The main objective of this theoretical paper is to engage the readers in a theoretical reflection regarding the concepts of abjection and fear since they both apply to the experiences of caring for mentally ill individuals in forensic psychiatric settings. Our contention is with the potential impact of feelings such as disgust, repulsion, and fear on the therapeutic relationship and, more particularly, with the boundaries imposed on this relationship when these feelings are unrecognized by nurses. Acknowledging that patients may evoke feelings of disgust, repulsion, and fear is essential if nurses wish to understand the implications of these emotions in the therapeutic process. In forensic psychiatric settings, caring for so-called "monsters" in the face of abjection and fear is not an easy task to achieve given the lack of theoretical understanding regarding both concepts. Given the actual state of knowledge in forensic nursing, we argue that theoretical (conceptual) analyses, as well as ethical and political discussions, are paramount if we wish to understand the specificities of this complex field of nursing practice.

  9. [Differential indications for so-called "lateral release" in treatment of chondropathia patellae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, W; Buhmann, H W; Leib, S

    1996-03-01

    The success rate of the operation of lateral release for pain caused by the patella is reported as being between 14% and 99%. The choice between arthroscopic or open procedures does not seem to affect the results. The wide ranges of results probably reflects differences in patients selection or the method and investigations of follow up. The early term outcome usually show better results than long term follow up. This study evaluates the indications for the operation of lateral releases and discusses the result of 36 out of a total of 42 patients who were follow up for 3 years later surgery. We found that an insufficiency of dysplasia of the vastus medialis, the laxity of the capsule and soft ligaments, and a strong lateral retinaculum were important factors in the indication for this procedure. The quadriceps angle was also of prime importance, but the minor forms of patellar dysplasia played only a minor role. In the so-called hyperpression syndrome, where the patella has a strong tendency to move laterally, the simple lateral release is the single most successful operation. The indication for procedures additionally to the lateral release is examined. We found that in a case with an insufficiently guided patella, a weak capsule and ligaments, an additional capsule roughing should be performed. The presence of early degenerative changes in the joint predisposes to poor results in operations such as abrasion and pride drilling. The results in our study were assessed using the Lysholm score. Our results show that the most successful technique was the combination of an arthroscopy and an extraarticular open operation controlled by arthroscopic means. This technique was not associated with major complications such as haemarthrosis and consecutive prolonged postoperative rehabilitation. Overall we achieved a rate of 83% of good or satisfactory results at more than 3 years using the indications and techniques described above.

  10. So-Called Giftedness and Teacher Education: Issues of Equity and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli Smith, Laura; Campbell, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    The education of students identified as "gifted" has had a highly problematic history, having been judged as conceptually confused, socially and ethnically discriminatory, and educationally exclusive. Despite this, it is argued that contemporary research and scholarship critiquing the concepts of giftedness and gifted education…

  11. So-Called Giftedness and Teacher Education: Issues of Equity and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli Smith, Laura; Campbell, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    The education of students identified as "gifted" has had a highly problematic history, having been judged as conceptually confused, socially and ethnically discriminatory, and educationally exclusive. Despite this, it is argued that contemporary research and scholarship critiquing the concepts of giftedness and gifted education…

  12. Reappraisal of the intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in patients with the so-called "normal pressure hydrocephalus" syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuquillo, J; Rubio, E; Codina, A; Molins, A; Guitart, J M; Poca, M A; Chasampi, A

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-four shunt-responsive patients were selected from a prospective protocol directed to study patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Patients with gait disturbances, dementia, non-responsive L-Dopa Parkinsonism, urinary or faecal incontinence and an Evans ratio greater or equal to 0.30 on the CT scan were included in the study. As a part of their work-up all patients underwent intracranial pressure monitoring and hydrodynamic studies using Marmarou's bolus test. According to mean intracranial pressure (ICP) and the percentage of high amplitude B-waves, patients were subdivided in the following categories: 1) Active hydrocephalus (mean ICP above 15 mmHg), which is in fact no tone normal pressure hydrocephalus; 2) Compensated unstable hydrocephalus, when mean ICP was below 15 mmHg and B-waves were present in more than 25% of the total recording time and 3) Compensated stable hydrocephalus when ICP was lower or equal to 15 mmHg and beta waves were present in less than 25% of the total recording time. The majority of the patients in this study (70%) presented continuous high or intermittently raised ICP (active or unstable compensated hydrocephalus group). Mean resistance to outflow of CSF (Rout) was 38.8 mm Hg/ml/min in active hydrocephalus and 23.5 mm Hg/ml/min in the compensated group (Students t-test, p less than 0.05). Higher resistance to outflow was found in patients with obliterated cortical sulci and obliterated Sylvian cisterns in the CT scan. No statistically significant correlation was found when plotting the percentage of beta waves against pressure volume index (PVI), compliance or Rout. An exponential correlation was found when plotting beta waves against the sum of conductance to outflow and compliance calculated by PVI method (r = 0.79). Patients with the so-called normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome have different ICP and CSF dynamic profiles. Additional studies taking into consideration these differences are necessary

  13. Astronomical references in the planning of ancient roads I. The case of the so-called Great Hopewell Road

    CERN Document Server

    Magli, Giulio

    2007-01-01

    Possible astronomical references in the planning of the so-called Great Hopewell Road, a 90 Kilometres straight road composed by two parallel earth embankments which connected the Hopewell ceremonial centres of Newark and Chillicothe, Ohio, are investigated. It turns out that a very peculiar, although simple, astronomical combination took place in alignment with the road during its construction (II BC-I AD), namely the rising of the bright star Capella and the setting of the bright star Fomalhaut. The possibility of a non-fortuitous connection with the direction of the road is proposed and analysed.

  14. Glycoproteomics using so-called ‘fluid-biopsy’ specimens in the discovery of lung cancer biomarkers. Promise and challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Ed; Askin, Frederic; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cancer in the US and worldwide. In spite of the rapid progression in personalized treatments, the overall survival rate of lung cancer patients is still suboptimal. Over the past decade, tremendous efforts have been focused on the discovery of protein biomarkers to facilitate the early detection and monitoring lung cancer progression during treatment. In addition to tumor tissues and cancer cell lines, a variety of biological material has been studied. Particularly in recent years, studies using fluid-based specimen or so-called “fluid-biopsy” specimen have progressed rapidly. Fluid specimens are relatively easier to collect than tumor tissue, and they can be repeatedly sampled during the disease progression. Glycoproteins have long been recognized to play fundamental roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus the discussion on recent advances of glycoproteomics, particularly in the identification of potential protein biomarkers using so-called fluid-based specimens in lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to summarize current strategies, achievements and perspectives in the field. This insight will highlight the discovery of tumor-associated glycoprotein biomarkers in lung cancer and their potential clinical applications. PMID:23112109

  15. Acute kidney injury and critical limb ischaemia associated with the use of the so called "legal high" 3-fluorophenmetrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Michael; Wong-Morrow, Wei San; Beaumont, Anthony; Farmer, Chris K T

    2017-07-15

    Until the law in the United Kingdom (UK) changed in May 2016 so called "legal highs" or "new psychoactive substances" were freely available in high street shops across the UK. Following prohibition these drugs are still easily purchased illegally via the internet. We report a case of a patient who self-administered 3-fluorophenmetrazine intravenously with catastrophic consequences. Adverse effects were almost immediate with symptoms of malaise and tachycardia. Two days post administration he was transferred to the intensive therapy unit with acute kidney injury and irreversible four limb ischaemia. He required a period of renal replacement therapy and bilateral lower limb amputation. This case highlights the fact that new psychoactive substances have many unintended adverse effect which have not been previously described. Multiple routes of administration are used by people taking these agents including intravenously. Medical practitioners should always consider ingestion of new psychoactive substances in the differential diagnosis of acutely ill patients.

  16. The so-called "Spanish model" - tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nick K; Sebrié, Ernesto M; Fernández, Esteve

    2011-12-07

    To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005) in 2006 and have increased since then. The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy.

  17. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005) in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy. PMID:22151884

  18. Functional class (so called “part of speech” assignment as a kind of meaning-bound word syntactic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Wajszczuk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional class (so called “part of speech” assignment as a kind of meaning-bound word syntactic information The traditional division of the lexicon into parts of speech which seems to satisfy the requirements of a syntactic description, on the one hand, and a word formation description, on the other hand, cannot be looked upon as a result of a strict classification covering the totality of the lexicon and being based on a coherent set of criteria. Making the criteria more precise or correcting them is an issue of extreme importance and urgency in the work on the theory of language. Such achievements can help solve many other problems, in particular, syntactic ones. The article presents a scheme of several preliminary steps of an amelioration program (a scheme which has been improved compared to the author’s earlier attempts going in the same direction. The program is based on combinability characteristics of words, i.e. on those properties that are responsible for the tasks to be accomplished by a given class of expressions in making up a higher order unit, i.e. a syntagm (the author emphasizes this point: it is syntagm rather than sentence which is the category the recommended approach is focusing on, and that, importantly, determine the limits of syntactic rules, i.e. the ins and outs of the rules (the limits concerning the overall stock of words.

  19. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Nick K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005 in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy.

  20. The so-called "Pre-Levantine" phase and the chronology of the Levantine Rock Painting. A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo Saura, Miguel Ángel

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of the principles on which the so-called "prelevantine phase" is based and the discussion about the neolithic material culture parallels for levantine art allow its attribution to Epipaleolithic groups of hunters and gatherers. In the same way, the data on the process of transition between the Epipaleolithic and the Neolithic, and the relationship between the levantine style and the schematic rock painting seem to support a pre-neolithic chronology of the levantine art, related to non-producing ways of living.

    El rechazo de las bases en las que se sustenta la llamada "fase pre-levantina" y la discusión de los paralelos mobiliares neolíticos propuestos para el arte levantino dejan expedito el camino para su adscripción a los grupos de cazadores y recolectores epipaleolíticos. Asimismo, los datos con que contamos sobre el proceso de transición Epipaleolítico/Neolítico, y la relación entre el estilo levantino y la pintura rupestre esquemática parecen abogar también por una cronología pre-neolítica de lo levantino, asociado a unos modos de vida no productores.

  1. Letter to Editor. Is it possible to support cognitive behavioral therapy, led remotely, by determining so-called therapeutic tasks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter to the Editor, the authors comment recent publications about the attempts to remote realizations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT in the treatment of anxiety disorders in elderly. The distinguished clinical situation is a part of a wider problem that can be named as “global crisis of aging populations”. The use of CBT in many geriatric clinical situations is very effective, however, such therapy is very time-consuming, what hamper its widespread utilizations in practice. The authors therefore propose to support this form of treatment by determining so-called ‘therapeutic tasks’. They derive the rationale for the proposed method from the analysis of the acting elements of various, new forms of CBT in combination with the analysis of sources of psychological resistance (resilience of those older people who are doing well. The essence of the method proposed by the authors is assigning tasks which facilitate to patients’ remembering of their ‘trajectory of life’. The patients are then much more aware of unresolved psychological conflicts. The next tasks aid the patients to search for solutions to such mental problems and create a balanced imagery of their lives.

  2. Do liquid films rupture due to the so-called hydrophobic force or migration of dissolved gases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I; Nguyen, Anh V

    2009-04-09

    Liquid films between hydrophobic (water-repellent) interfaces are not stable. The film rupture has been attributed to the so-called hydrophobic attraction. In this paper microinterferometry experiments show that gases inherently dissolved in water have a significant effect on the film rupture. Specifically, films of ultrapure deionized water in contact with degassed oil (squalene) were stable for as long as 35 min, while the water films in contact with nondegassed oil had a lifetime of seconds. These films ruptured at film thicknesses of approximately 150 nm. The degassed oil was also purposely left in contact with air. The oil-in-water emulsion films formed between degassed oil left in contact with air for a long period of time did not last longer than a few seconds and ruptured at significantly high thicknesses (about 800 nm). The degassing effect did not change the interfacial potential (about -65 mV) and the electrical double-layer repulsion between the squalene-water interfaces. Migration of dissolved gases between oil and water caused the rupture phenomena observed.

  3. Origin of the color of Cv. rhapsody in blue rose and some other so-called "blue" roses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnet, Jean-François

    2003-08-13

    Flowers of the rose cultivar Rhapsody in Blue display unusual colors, changing as they age, from a vivid red-purple to a lighter and duller purple, which are based on tonalities corresponding to hue angles between 340 and 320 degrees in the CIELAB scale. Unexpectedly, the chemical basis of these colors is among the simplest, featuring cyanin (cyanidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside), the most frequent anthocyanin in flowers, as the sole pigment and quercetin kaempferol glycosides as copigments at a relatively low copigment/pigment ratio (about 3/1), which usually produces magenta or red shades in roses. This color shift to bluer shades is coupled with the progressive accumulation of cyanin into vacuolar anthocyanic inclusions (AVIs), the occurrence of which increases as the petals grow older. In addition to the normal lambda(max) of cyanin at approximately 545 nm, the transmission spectra of live petals and of epidermal cells exhibit a second lambda(max) in the 620-625 nm range, the relative importance increasing with the presence of AVIs. In petals of fully opened flowers, the only pigmented structures in the vacuoles of epidermal cells are AVIs; their intense and massive absorption in the 520-640 nm area produces a much darker and bluer color than measured for the vacuolar solution present at the very first opening stage. Cyanin is probably "trapped" into AVIs at higher concentrations than would be possible in a vacuolar solution and in quinonoidal form, appearing purple-blue because of additional absorption in the 580-630 nm area. Quite similar pigmentation features were found in very ancient rose cultivars (cv. L'Evêque or Bleu Magenta), also displaying this type of so-called "blue" color.

  4. Usefulness of K-Point Injection for the Nonspecific Neck Pain in So-Called K-Point Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Jae; Ahn, Myun Whan; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Dong Yeol

    2016-12-01

    Shoichi Kokubun introduced his successful experience with local anesthetic injection at the occipital insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in K-point syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of K-point injection and investigate factors affecting treatment results. K-point injection was performed in 58 patients with K-point syndrome at Yeungnam University Medical Center. The syndrome was associated with cervical whiplash injury in 10 patients and was of nonspecific origin in the rest. One milliliter of 2% lidocaine mixed with 1 milliliter of dexamethasone was injected in 50 patients and 2 milliliters of 1% lidocaine alone in the rest. Initially, the severity of local tenderness at the K-point and other tender points was examined and the degree of immediate pain relief effect was assessed within 1 hour after injection. Early effect within 1 month after the injection and current effect were evaluated in 27 patients using a modified Kim's questionnaire with regard to the duration of improvement, degree of improvement in pain and daily living activities, and satisfaction. Of the total 58 patients, 44 (75.8%) apparently had immediate pain relief after K-point injection. The only factor associated with successful immediate pain relief was the whiplash injury associated with traffic accident (TA). The early pain control effect was associated with the immediate effect. The current effect was associated with the early effect alone. Satisfaction with the K-point injection was related to early successful pain relief. K-point injection would be useful for early pain relief in nonspecific neck pain syndrome so called K-point syndrome, but not for current pain relief. Especially, it was very effective for early pain control in the whiplash injury associated with TA.

  5. Usefulness of K-Point Injection for the Nonspecific Neck Pain in So-Called K-Point Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Jae; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Dong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoichi Kokubun introduced his successful experience with local anesthetic injection at the occipital insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in K-point syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of K-point injection and investigate factors affecting treatment results. Methods K-point injection was performed in 58 patients with K-point syndrome at Yeungnam University Medical Center. The syndrome was associated with cervical whiplash injury in 10 patients and was of nonspecific origin in the rest. One milliliter of 2% lidocaine mixed with 1 milliliter of dexamethasone was injected in 50 patients and 2 milliliters of 1% lidocaine alone in the rest. Initially, the severity of local tenderness at the K-point and other tender points was examined and the degree of immediate pain relief effect was assessed within 1 hour after injection. Early effect within 1 month after the injection and current effect were evaluated in 27 patients using a modified Kim's questionnaire with regard to the duration of improvement, degree of improvement in pain and daily living activities, and satisfaction. Results Of the total 58 patients, 44 (75.8%) apparently had immediate pain relief after K-point injection. The only factor associated with successful immediate pain relief was the whiplash injury associated with traffic accident (TA). The early pain control effect was associated with the immediate effect. The current effect was associated with the early effect alone. Satisfaction with the K-point injection was related to early successful pain relief. Conclusions K-point injection would be useful for early pain relief in nonspecific neck pain syndrome so called K-point syndrome, but not for current pain relief. Especially, it was very effective for early pain control in the whiplash injury associated with TA. PMID:27904721

  6. A conceptual framework for an ecosystem services-based assessment of the so-called "emergency stabilization" measures following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sandra; Prats, Sergio; Ribeiro, Cristina; Verheijen, Frank; Fleskens, Luuk; Keizer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires have become a major environmental concern in many Southern European countries over the past few decades. This includes Portugal, where, on average, some 100 000 ha of rural lands are affected by wildfire every year. While policies, laws, plans and public expenditure in Portugal continue to be largely directed towards fire combat and, arguably, to a lesser extent fire prevention, there has only recently been increasing attention for post-fire land management. For example following frequent and several large wildfires during the summer of 2010, so-called emergency stabilization measures were implemented in 16 different burnt areas in northern and central Portugal, using funds of the EU Rural Development Plan in Portugal (PRODER). The measures that were implemented included mulching (i.e. application of a protective layer of organic material), seeding and the construction of log barriers. However, the effectiveness of the implemented measures has not been monitored or otherwise assessed in a systematic manner. In fact, until very recently none of the post-fire emergency stabilization measures contemplated under PRODER seem to have been studied in an exhaustive manner in Portugal, whether under laboratory or field conditions. Prats et al. (2012, 2013, 2014) tested two of these measures by field trials, i.e. hydro-mulching and forest residue mulching. The authors found both measures to be highly effective in terms of reducing overland flow and especially erosion. It remains a challenge, however, to assess the effectiveness of these and other measures in a broader context, not only beyond overland flow and sediment losses but also beyond the spatio-temporal scale that are typical for such field trials (plots and the first two years after fire). This challenge will be addressed in the Portuguese case study of the RECARE project. Nonetheless, the present study wants to be a first attempt at an ecosystem services-based assessment of mulching as a post

  7. Dissimilation, assimilation and vowel reduction. Constraint interaction in East Slavic dialects with so-called dissimilative akan'e and jakan'e.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an Optimality Theory-based analysis of  the unstressed vocalism in Russian. It is argued that an account of the so-called dissimilative akan’e and jakan’e patterns in terms of dissimilation alone is simplistic and that the vowel patterns in question arise as a result of complex interaction of three factors, viz. dissimilation, assimilation and vowel reduction.

  8. Dissimilation, Assimilation and Vowel Reduction: Constraint Interaction in East Slavic Dialects with so-called Dissimilative Akan’e and Jakan’e

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Nesset

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Optimality Theory-based analysis of  the unstressed vocalism in Russian. It is argued that an account of the so-called dissimilative akan’e and jakan’e patterns in terms of dissimilation alone is simplistic and that the vowel patterns in question arise as a result of complex interaction of three factors, viz. dissimilation, assimilation and vowel reduction.

  9. If only Derrida missed that flight... About the assessment of the "academic achievements" of the so-called "American Anthropology" by Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account recent critiques of "underdevelopment", "positivism", "methodological backwardness" and other failings attributed to socalled "American Anthropology" by some of the authors from the Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Anthropology of Folklore, I analyse the context in which colleagues and students may be tempted to explain common sense political connection between polyphone ethnography, neo-romanticism and nationalism as counter-intuitive history of the discipline. I already pointed that the important transformative differences in the attitudes towards structuralism between European anthropologists, especially Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Anthropology of Folklore and so called "American Anthropology", are the consequence of a pure coincidence – the fact that French structuralism and French poststructuralism were launched simultaneously at the American interdisciplinary intellectual scene ("Theory" at the same conference. This ironic concurrence would not be much more than one entertaining episode for students, historians of anthropology and historians of ideas, if there were no attempts (more and more frequent and increasingly fluently articulated to compare different intellectual traditions as they were elements of the same unilineal evolution of the discipline. Belgrade Structural-semiotic School (further called only SS and especially its spiritus movens and most prominent representative Prof. Kovačević started in recent years to criticise some "American Anthropology" measuring its academic "achievement" (the author’s term in comparative perspective and taking as an analytical unit uncritically generalized traditions marked with a single term of "postmodern anthropology" on the one hand, and "anthropology" on the other. Belgrade SS School did develop globally original, although badly promoted and never fully used, battery for the synchronic analysis of the folklore phenomena, but this was done only after

  10. A Case of Hyalinizing Clear Cell Carcinoma, So-Called Clear Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified, of the Minor Salivary Glands of the Buccal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamanishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC, so-called clear cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified (CCC (NOS, of the salivary glands is a rare and low-grade malignant tumor. We report a case of HCCC so-called CCC (NOS (referred to as HCCC of the minor salivary gland of the buccal mucosa. A 52-year-old woman had presented with a gradually growing and indolent mass in the right buccal mucosa for about two years. The first biopsy histopathologically suggested the possibility of malignancy derived from the minor salivary glands. A month later, she visited our hospital. The tumor measured approximately 1.5 cm in diameter and was elastic hard, smooth, and well movable. Image examinations demonstrated internal homogeneity of the lesion, which had a smooth margin, in the right buccal mucosa. Complete tumor resection followed by covering with a polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue spray was performed without surgical flap reconstruction. Histopathological findings revealed proliferating tumor cells with clear cytoplasm surrounded by hyalinizing stroma in the submucosal minor salivary glands. Immunohistochemical stains revealed these tumor cells to be positive for epithelial cell markers but negative for myoepithelial ones. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of HCCC. Good wound healing and no evidence of local recurrence and metastasis have been shown since surgery.

  11. Einstein's physical geometry at play: inertial motion, the boostability assumption, the Lorentz transformations, and the so-called conventionality of the one-way speed of light

    CERN Document Server

    Valente, Mario Bacelar

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Einstein's view of geometry as physical geometry is taken into account in the analysis of diverse issues related to the notions of inertial motion and inertial reference frame. Einstein's physical geometry enables a non-conventional view on Euclidean geometry (as the geometry associated to inertial motion and inertial reference frames) and on the uniform time. Also, by taking into account the implications of the view of geometry as a physical geometry, it is presented a critical reassessment of the so-called boostability assumption (implicit according to Einstein in the formulation of the theory) and also of 'alternative' derivations of the Lorentz transformations that do not take into account the so-called 'light postulate'. Finally it is addressed the issue of the eventual conventionality of the one-way speed of light or, what is the same, the conventionality of distant simultaneity (within the same inertial reference frame). It turns out that it is possible to see the (possible) conventionali...

  12. Save from oblivion – the melancholy of the intellectual in the so-called “literature of retribution” (1946–1948

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Kozłowska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the so-called “literature of retribution”, produced between 1946–1948. Postwar literary criticism accused intellectual characters of passivity, self-centeredness and reserve towards contemporary socio-political transformations. The only issue perceived by critics was the attempt to establish the role of the intelligentsia in times of historic breakthrough. My article shows that this way of interpreting the literature of retribution is insufficient. It becomes obvious that the interpretative key used by the literary critics of the 1940s was Marxist ideology, and that their conclusions narrow the scope of the issues touched upon in these novels. These literary works do not only relate the experiences of one social class – they deal with universal issues, those connected with human existence in general and the relationship between the individual, society and the world. The category I use to extract the universal issues from the literary works analysed here is melancholy. The use of the melancholic perspective enriched the traditional interpretation of the “literature of retribution” by lending it a new context and allowing the rehabilitation of the intellectuals it portrayed.

  13. Secretion of interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor by spindle cell sarcoma complicating Castleman's disease (so-called 'vascular neoplasia').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Hitoshi; Katano, Harutaka; Ishiko, Tositaka; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Kogi, Mieko; Kasuga, Naoki; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Mori, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    So-called 'vascular neoplasia' (VN) is a rare tumour of unknown origin that complicates hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease (CD). This paper reports a case of VN complicating CD of hyaline vascular type, in which neoplastic cells were shown to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this case, VN first occurred in the retroperitoneum of a 60-year-old male. The lesion showed typical morphology, with three distinct areas: (1) a lymph node-like area with regressively transformed lymph follicles showing hyaline vascular changes and with a hypervascular interfollicular region filled with slit-like vascular channels; (2) an area composed of spindle cell sarcoma; and (3) an area showing angiolipomatous hamartoma. A proportion of the cells in the spindle cell area showed severe pleomorphism. Subcutaneous recurrence after 8 months was composed purely of pleomorphic spindle cells. A karyotypic analysis of the recurrent tumour showed 47, XXY with some instability. Supernatant from primary culture contained high levels of IL-6 and VEGF, suggesting high secretion of these cytokines from neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, p53 overexpression was identified only in the pleomorphic spindle cells of the primary lesion and metastatic tumour. No features suggestive of vascular origin were shown on immunohistochemical or electron microscopic analysis of the neoplastic cells. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected by immunohistochemistry or PCR analysis. High levels of IL-6 and/or VEGF have been reported to play a role in CD. This is the first case report that clarifies the site of such cytokine production, showing the possibility of CD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon.

  14. Limits and Perspectives of cultivation of Biomass crops in marginal areas of Campania Region: the case of the so called "Terra dei Fuochi".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnano, Massimo; Fioretnino, Nunzio

    2017-04-01

    The definition of a soil contamination is a 2 step process, based on screening values and risk analysis. The variability of values of screening values across Europe casts some doubts about the ecological and toxicological meaning of such values. In the case of agricultural soils, the situation is more unclear since there is not a clear process for evaluation of the suitability of a soil for food production. Different methods have been proposed (i.e metal bioavailability by using different extracting agents), but the final response is given by plant analyses that can assess if the contaminants have been accumulated in edible organs. The study case of the so called Terra dei Fuochi (plainy area of Campania Region, Southern Italy) is presented, since in this area the LIFE-Project Ecoremed was developed with the aim to identify the contaminated soils in the perspective of their phytoremediation with biomass crops that could be used as source of renewable energy, thus avoiding competition for land between energy and food crops. At the end of assessment activities, the contaminated agricultural soils in this area resulted too few (about 30 ha) for satisfying the exigence of a bio-refinery. Therefore in Terra dei Fuochi area there aren't perspectives for biomass crops, because there is an intense production of high-value, healthy and safe vegetables and water buffalo mozzarella cheese, that are exported worldwide. Instead other marginal areas are very spread in internal hilly arable land of Southern Italy where 100,000 ha of durum wheat are not sustainable both from economic and environmental points of view. In particular, yields are very low (2-3 t/ha) and income (4-600 €/ha) doesn't cover the cultivation costs; soils are vulnerable to soil losses due to water erosion (not covered from tillage in August to germination in November) in the months in which rainfall erosivity is higher. A reasonable percentage of this area (i.e. 10%) could be used for producing biomasses

  15. Relationship between selected indoor volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC, and the prevalence of mucous membrane symptoms in single family homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Atsuko [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Kawai, Toshio; Eitaki, Yoko; Kanazawa, Ayako [Osaka Occupational Health Service Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2-3-8 Tosahori, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0001 (Japan); Morimoto, Kanehisa; Nakayama, Kunio [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Shibata, Eiji [Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, 21 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195 (Japan); Tanaka, Masatoshi [Fukushima College, 1 Miyashiro Chigoike, Fukushima 960-0181 (Japan); Takigawa, Tomoko [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Yoshimura, Takesumi; Chikara, Hisao [Fukuoka Institute of Health and Environmental Sciences, 39 Mukaizano, Dazaifu 818-0135 (Japan); Saijo, Yasuaki [Asahikawa Medical College, 1-1-1 Midorigaoka Higashi 2 jo, Asahikawa 078-8510 (Japan); Kishi, Reiko, E-mail: rkishi@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Kita 15, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Microorganisms are known to produce a range of volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC (MVOC). Chamber studies where humans were exposed to MVOC addressed the acute effects of objective and/or subjective signs of mucosal irritation. However, the effect of MVOC on inhabitants due to household exposure is still unclear. The purpose of this epidemiological study was to measure indoor MVOC levels in single family homes and to evaluate the relationship between exposure to them and sick building syndrome (SBS). All inhabitants of the dwellings were given a self-administered questionnaire with standardized questions to assess their symptoms. Air samples were collected and the concentrations of eight selected compounds in indoor air were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - selective ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM). The most frequently detected MVOC was 1-pentanol at a detection rate of 78.6% and geometric mean of 0.60 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Among 620 participants, 120 (19.4%) reported one or more mucous symptoms; irritation of the eyes, nose, airway, or coughing every week (weekly symptoms), and 30 (4.8%) reported that the symptoms were home-related (home-related symptoms). Weekly symptoms were not associated with any of MVOC, whereas significant associations between home-related mucous symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol (per log{sub 10}-unit: odds ratio (OR) 5.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1 to 14.8) and 2-pentanol (per log{sub 10}-unit: OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0 to 4.9) were obtained after adjustment for gender, age, and smoking. Associations between home-related symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol remained after mutual adjustment. However, concentrations of the selected compounds in indoors were lower than the estimated safety level in animal studies. Thus, the statistically significant association between 1-octen-3-ol may be due to a direct effect of the compounds or the associations may be being associated with other offending compounds. Additional studies are needed

  16. [How to distinguish science from non science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiseri, D

    1991-01-01

    The questions discussed in this article concern the demarcation between scientific theories and non scientific theories. The problem is not only an epistemological one, but it implies also ethical and social consequences. For example, is it acceptable for an European country to allow the practice of non-traditional medicines which are not yet considered officially as scientific? According to Karl Popper, the author discusses the following points: 1. Is there a logical asymmetry between the verification and the falsification of a theory? 2. The criterion of falsifiability demarcates science from non-science. 3. There is no automatic method to find new theories. 4. The facts of science are discovered by scientists through theories. 5. The scientific method is only one and it consists of these three steps: problems-theories-refutations. The article's core is that the rational physician is the one who kills (falsifies) his own diagnosis instead of his own patients.

  17. A Sustainable Energy Laboratory Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Stephen A.; Loxsom, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Sustainable energy is growing in importance as the public becomes more aware of climate change and the need to satisfy our society's energy demands while minimizing environmental impacts. To further this awareness and to better prepare a workforce for "green careers," we developed a sustainable energy laboratory course that is suitable for high school and undergraduate students, especially non-science majors. Thirteen hands-on exercises provide an overview of sustainable energy by demonstrating the basic principles of wind power, photovoltaics, electric cars, lighting, heating/cooling, insulation, electric circuits, and solar collectors. The order of content presentation and instructional level (secondary education or college) can easily be modified to suit instructor needs and/or academic programs (e.g., engineering, physics, renewable and/or sustainable energy).

  18. Computer-based Astronomy Labs for Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. B. E.; Murray, S. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1998-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate two laboratory exercises, Kepler's Third Law and Stellar Structure, which are being developed for use in an astronomy laboratory class aimed at non-science majors. The labs run with Microsoft's Excel 98 (Macintosh) or Excel 97 (Windows). They can be run in a classroom setting or in an independent learning environment. The intent of the labs is twofold; first and foremost, students learn the subject matter through a series of informational frames. Next, students enhance their understanding by applying their knowledge in lab procedures, while also gaining familiarity with the use and power of a widely-used software package and scientific tool. No mathematical knowledge beyond basic algebra is required to complete the labs or to understand the computations in the spreadsheets, although the students are exposed to the concepts of numerical integration. The labs are contained in Excel workbook files. In the files are multiple spreadsheets, which contain either a frame with information on how to run the lab, material on the subject, or one or more procedures. Excel's VBA macro language is used to automate the labs. The macros are accessed through button interfaces positioned on the spreadsheets. This is done intentionally so that students can focus on learning the subject matter and the basic spreadsheet features without having to learn advanced Excel features all at once. Students open the file and progress through the informational frames to the procedures. After each procedure, student comments and data are automatically recorded in a preformatted Lab Report spreadsheet. Once all procedures have been completed, the student is prompted for a filename in which to save their Lab Report. The lab reports can then be printed or emailed to the instructor. The files will have full worksheet and workbook protection, and will have a "redo" feature at the end of the lab for students who want to repeat a procedure.

  19. Critical Reflections on the Impact(s of the So-Called ‘Teacher Incentive’ on Zimbabwe’s Public Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munyaradzi Mawere

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available For some decades, Zimbabwe’s public education has been ranked one of the best in Southern Africa, Africa and the world-over. This was chiefly a result of high quality teachers, high quality supervision of examinations adopted from its colonial master (Britain, and good working conditions for education practitioners, among other reasons. This reality, however, has turned the otherwise since the turn of the new millennium and especially in the recent years due to economic meltdown in the country and mass exodus of qualified teachers to ‘greener pastures’. Confronted with its deepening and crippling economic levels, the government of Zimbabwe has clearly indicated that it is unable to provide conducive conditions for the practitioners in public education, a situation that resulted in a series of strikes by practitioners which threatened to paralyse all the teaching-learning activities in the country. It is out of this background that the system of incentives to teachers was introduced to augment the meagre salaries earned by teachers so that public education in the country would not face liquidation or total paralysis. Yet, while the introduction of incentives in public education seems to have boosted morale of some teachers, it has deflated that of the majority of the practitioners in the profession. This paper examines the problems and/or impact of teacher incentives on education quality and stakeholders, that is, students, teachers, parents/guardians and the Ministry of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture.

  20. Pathological aspects of so called "hilar cholangiocarcinoma"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Ibarrola-de Andrés, Carolina; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) arising from the large intrahepatic bile ducts and extrahepatic hilar bile ducts share clinicopathological features and have been called hilar and perihilar CC as a group. However, “hilar and perihilar CC” are also used to refer exclusively to the intrahepatic hilar type CC or, more commonly, the extrahepatic hilar CC. Grossly, a major distinction can be made between papillary and non-papillary tumors. Histologically, most hilar CCs are well to moderately differentiated conventional type (biliary) carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, CK7, CK20, CEA and MUC1 are normally expressed, being MUC2 positive in less than 50% of cases. Two main premalignant lesions are known: biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) and intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract (IPNB). IPNB includes the lesions previously named biliary papillomatosis and papillary carcinoma. A series of 29 resected hilar CC from our archives is reviewed. Most (82.8%) were conventional type adenocarcinomas, mostly well to moderately differentiated, although with a broad morphological spectrum; three cases exhibited a poorly differentiated cell component resembling signet ring cells. IPNB was observed in 5 (17.2%), four of them with an associated invasive carcinoma. A clear cell type carcinoma, an adenosquamous carcinoma and two gastric foveolar type carcinomas were observed. PMID:23919110

  1. [About the so-called "Geserick sign"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Geserick et al. were the first who reported about fractures of the medial and basal wall of the orbita, originating from blunt occipital trauma leading to consecutive contrecoup lesions of the bulbus/orbita complex. A case history with (survived) occipital craniocerebral trauma and monocle hematoma (48-year-old drunken homeless person, found unconscious in a small street of the redlight quarter) is presented. The question was whether the injuries were caused by falling or inflicted by an assailant.

  2. Zum Problem der terminologisch-konzeptuellen Äquivalenz zwischen zwei Sprach- und Kulturgemeinschaften: die sogenannten „differenzen“ zwischen den Sachen. On the problem of the terminological-conceptual equivalence between two language and culture communities: the so called "differences in the matter"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Harry Drößiger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues concerning terminological-conceptual equivalence between so called “systems of concepts” of two language and culture communities in the context of the work of a translator or the translatability of terminologies. Based on several studies (mostly concerning legal terminology carried out in the last few years in MA papers of students of the study program Interpreting/Translation of Vilnius University some of the general questions of terminology work can be pointed out that are connected to the problem of the so called terminological “gap” and need to be reassessed. On the basis of the studies concerning the language combination German-Lithuanian not only “pure” linguistic differences between those two languages but also “differences in the matter” (i.e. differences between the language and culture communities always were identifiable. The examples presented in this article should demonstrate how those gaps in “systems of concepts” can be dealt with so that it can be useful in the work of an interpreter or a translator who stands between those two languages and cultures.

  3. [On Atomic Nuclear Fusion Processes at Low-Temperatures. An Enhancement of the Probability of Transition through a Potential Barrier Due to the So-Called Barrier Anti-Zeno Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiot, V A

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in quantum mechanics the act of observing the experiment can affect the experimental findings in some cases. In particular, it happens under the so-called Zeno effect. In this work it is shown that in contrast to the "standard" Zeno-effect where the act of observing a process reduces the probability of its reality, an inverse situation when a particle transmits through a potential barrier (a so-called barrier anti-Zeno effect) can be observed, the observation of the particle essentially increases the probability of its transmission through the barrier. The possibility of using the barrier anti-Zeno effect is discussed to explain paradoxical results of experiments on "cold nuclear fusion" observed in various systems including biological ones. (According to the observers who performed the observations, the energy generation, which could not be explained by any chemical processes, as well as the change in the isotope and even element composition of the studied object may occur in these systems.

  4. Container design testing for the final repository Konrad - experiences with respect to so called ''old'' containers; Bauartpruefungen an Behaeltern fuer das Endlager KONRAD. Erfahrungen bezueglich sog. ''Alt''-Behaelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noack, Volker; Voelzke, Holger; Nieslony, Gregor; Kovacs, Oliver; Hagenow, Peter [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The Konrad ore mine is a final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in Germany. The demand for final storage suitable containers is increasing. The authors describe tests of so called ''old'' containers for qualification with respect to the appropriateness for final disposal. BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialpruefung) has test facilities for drop tests and fire tests. The testing requirements for all available container types are discussed, including the boundary conditions with respect to the supposed waste properties, conditioning and loading. The project of container design testing is aimed to the possibility of a continuous recording of a large amount of waste packages for the final repository Konrad that allows a short-term backtracking of the relevant data for quality assurance.

  5. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr ∙ m(2), respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr ∙ m(2) is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  6. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-12-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments, worksheets, and interactive classroom learning techniques such as Peer Instruction (PI) and SCALE-UP.2 It was found that the new course showed an increase in students' class participation, attendance, and overall interest, with most rating their science experience as very positive.

  7. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching Space Weather to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W. B., III

    2016-12-01

    Undergraduate Space Weather education is an important component of creating a society that is knowledgeable about space weather and its societal impacts. The space physics community has made great strides in providing academic education for students, typically physics and engineering majors, who are interested in pursuing a career in the space sciences or space weather. What is rarely addressed, however, is providing a broader space weather education to undergraduate students as a whole. To help address this gap, I have created an introductory space weather course for non-science majors, with the idea of expanding exposure to space weather beyond the typical physics and engineering students. The philosophy and methodologies used in this course will be presented, as well as the results of the first attempts to teach it. Using an approach more tailored to the non-scientist, courses such as this can be an effective means of broadening space weather education and outreach.

  8. A case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disorder, so-called polymorphous subtype, of the mandible, with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Fukunaga, Shuichi; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kojima, Masaru; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2013-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with the development of lymphomas in immunocompromised patients. Recently, age-related immune impairment has been recognized as a predisposing factor in the development of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) in elderly patients without any known immunodeficiency or prior lymphoma. In approximately 70% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, such as the skin, lung, tonsil and stomach. However, age-related EBV-associated B cell (EBV + B cell) LPD is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 71-year-old Japanese man who developed an EBV + B cell LPD resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL)--so-called polymorphous subtype-of the mandible. Histopathologically, infiltration of large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells into granulation tissue with marked necrosis was found in the mandibular bone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the large atypical Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were CD3-, CD15-, CD20+, CD30+ and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1)+. In situ hybridization (ISH) demonstrated EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) + in numerous Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells. EBNA-2 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using an extract from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the polymorphous subtype of age-related EBV + B cell LPD affecting the mandible.

  9. Methotrexate-related Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disorder--so-called "Hodgkin-like lesion"--of the oral cavity in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Tanaka, Akio; Shigematu, Hisao; Kojima, Masaru; Sakashita, Hideaki; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-12-01

    Patients affected by autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, dermatomyositis) who are treated with methotrexate (MTX) sometimes develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). In approximately 40% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, and have included the gastrointestinal tract, skin, lung, kidney, and soft tissues. However, MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 69-year-old Japanese woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed MTX-LPD resembling Hodgkin's disease--so-called "Hodgkin-like lesion"--in the left upper jaw. Histopathologically, large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were found to have infiltrated into granulation tissue in the ulcerative oral mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that the large atypical cells were positive for CD20, CD30 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) and negative for CD15. EBV was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) with EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for LMP-1 and EBNA-2 in material taken from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD (MTX-EBVLPD), "Hodgkin-like lesion", of the oral cavity in a patient with RA.

  10. The Public Health Impact of the So-Called "Fluad Effect" on the 2014/2015 Influenza Vaccination Campaign in Italy: Ethical Implications for Health-Care Workers and Health Communication Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, Roberto; Martini, Mariano; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Watad, Abdulla

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza, causing complications, hospitalizations and deaths, generates a serious socio-economic burden, especially among elderly and high-risk subjects, as well as among adult individuals. Despite the availability and active free-of charge offer of influenza vaccines, vaccine coverage rates remain low and far from the target established by the Ministry of Health. Notwithstanding their effectiveness, vaccines are victims of prejudices and false myths, that contribute to the increasing phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy and loss of confidence. Media and, in particular, new media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) play a major role in disseminating health-related information. They are extremely promising devices for delivering health education and promoting disease prevention, including immunization. However, they can also have a negative impact on population's health attitudes and behaviors when channeling wrong, misleading information. During the 2014/2015 influenza vaccination campaign, the report of four deaths allegedly caused by administration of an adjuvanted influenza vaccine, Fluad - the so-called "Fluad case" - received an important media coverage, which contributed to the failure of the vaccination campaign, dramatically reducing the influenza vaccine uptake. In the extant literature, there is a dearth of information concerning the effect of the "Fluad case". The current study aims at quantifying the impact of the "Fluad effect" at the level of the Local Health Unit 3 (LHU3) ASL3 Genovese, Genoa, Italy. Ethical implications for health-care workers and health communication practitioners are also envisaged.

  11. Designing Inductive Instructional Activities in a Teacher Training Program to Enhance Conceptual Understandings in Science for Thai Science and Non-Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narjaikaew, Pattawan; Jeeravipoonvarn, Varanya; Pongpisanou, Kanjana; Lamb, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are viewed as the most significant factor affecting student learning. However, research in science education showed that teachers often demonstrate misunderstandings of science very similar to students. The purpose of this research was to correct conceptual difficulties in science of Thai primary school science and non-science teachers…

  12. O PROJETO PARA O PAVILHÃO BRASILEIRO NA EXPO’ 92 EM SEVILHA E A CHAMADA “ARQUITETURA PAULISTA” / The project for the Brazil Pavilion in Expo’92 in Seville and the so called “Paulista architecture”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fiorin

    2012-11-01

    , buildings with large spans, constructed in reinforced concrete. These architects were the heirs of the so called “Paulista architecture”, which was characterised by the work undertaken from the 60’s by important architects such as Vilanova Artigas and Paulo Mendes da Rocha. The modern references adopted by the winning project, from the architects Ângelo Bucci, Álvaro Puntoni and José Oswaldo Vilela, sparked controversies because of the difficulty of resuming the teachings of the old modern masters when faced with new times. These controversies were related to the end of the military dictatorship in Brazil and the process of opening markets, and by the relevance of a re-evaluation of the so-called “Paulista architecture”.

  13. Undergraduate non-science majors' descriptions and interpretations of scientific data visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Sandra Signe

    Professionally developed and freely accessible through the Internet, scientific data maps have great potential for teaching and learning with data in the science classroom. Solving problems or developing ideas while using data maps of Earth phenomena in the science classroom may help students to understand the nature and process of science. Little is known about how students perceive and interpret scientific data visualizations. This study was an in-depth exploration of descriptions and interpretations of topographic and bathymetric data maps made by a population of 107 non-science majors at an urban public college. Survey, interviews, and artifacts were analyzed within an epistemological framework for understanding data collected about the Earth, by examining representational strategies used to understand maps, and by examining student interpretations using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. The findings suggest that the majority of students interpret data maps by assuming iconicity that was not intended by the maps creator; that students do not appear to have a robust understanding of how data is collected about Earth phenomena; and that while most students are able to make some kinds of interpretations of the data maps, often their interpretations are not based upon the actual data the map is representing. This study provided baseline information of student understanding of data maps from which educators may design curriculum for teaching and learning about Earth phenomena.

  14. Should applicants to Nottingham University Medical School study a non-science A-level? A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James David

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that studying non-science subjects at A-level should be compulsory for medical students. Our admissions criteria specify only Biology, Chemistry and one or more additional subjects. This study aimed to determine whether studying a non-science subject for A-level is an independent predictor of achievement on the undergraduate medical course. Methods The subjects of this retrospective cohort study were 164 students from one entry-year group (October 2000, who progressed normally on the 5-year undergraduate medical course at Nottingham. Pre-admission academic and socio-demographic data and undergraduate course marks were obtained. T-test and hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were undertaken to identify independent predictors of five course outcomes at different stages throughout the course. Results There was no evidence that the choice of science or non-science as the third or fourth A-level subject had any influence on course performance. Demographic variables (age group, sex, and fee status had some predictive value but ethnicity did not. Pre-clinical course performance was the strongest predictor in the clinical phases (pre-clinical Themes A&B (knowledge predicted Clinical Knowledge, p Conclusion This study of one year group at Nottingham Medical School provided no evidence that the admissions policy on A-level requirements should specify the choice of third or fourth subject.

  15. The Effect of a Computer Program Designed with Constructivist Principles for College Non-Science Majors on Understanding of Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielard, Valerie Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to learn what effect a computer program would have on academic achievement and attitude toward science of college students enrolled in a biology class for non-science majors. It became apparent that the instructor also had an effect on attitudes toward science. The researcher designed a computer program,…

  16. Lens Inquiry: An Astronomy Lab for Non-science Majors at Hartnell Community College

    CERN Document Server

    Putnam, Nicole M; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Lai, David K; Moth, Pimol

    2010-01-01

    We describe a three hour inquiry activity involving converging lenses and telescopes as part of a semester-long astronomy lab course for non-science majors at Hartnell Community College in Salinas, CA. Students were shown several short demonstrations and given the chance to experiment with the materials, after which there was a class discussion about the phenomena they observed. Students worked in groups of 2-4 to design their own experiments to address a particular question of interest to them and then presented their findings to the class. An instructor-led presentation highlighted the students' discoveries and the lab's content goals, followed by a short worksheet-based activity that guided them in applying their new knowledge to build a simple telescope using two converging lenses. The activity was successful in emphasizing communication skills and giving students opportunities to engage in the process of science in different ways. One of the biggest challenges in designing this activity was covering all ...

  17. Using a dynamic, introductory-level volcanoes class as a means to introduce non-science majors to the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    At the University of California, San Diego, I teach a quarter-long, introductory Earth Science class titled "Volcanoes," which is, in essence, a functional class in volcanology designed specifically for non-majors. This large-format (enrollment ~ 85), lecture-based class provides students from an assortment of backgrounds an opportunity to acquire much-needed (and sometimes dreaded) area credits in science, while also serving as an introduction to the Earth Science major at UCSD (offered through Scripps Institution of Oceanography). The overall goal of the course is to provide students with a stimulating and exciting general science option that, using an inherently interesting topic, introduces them to the fundamentals of geoscience. A secondary goal is to promote general science and geoscience literacy among the general population of UCSD. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material. The majority of students in the class (>80%) are non-science majors and very few students (significantly, students have very little background—background that is necessary for understanding the processes involved in volcanic eruptions. Second, many non-science students have built-in anxieties with respect to math and science, anxieties that must be considered when designing curriculum and syllabi. It is essential to provide the right balance of technical information while remaining in touch with the audience. My approach to the class involves a dynamic lecture format that incorporates a wide array of multimedia, analogue demonstrations of volcanic processes, and small-group discussions of topics and concepts. In addition to teaching about volcanoes—a fascinating subject in and of itself—I take the opportunity in the first two weeks to introduce students to basic geology, including tectonics, earth materials, surface processes, and geologic time. In fact, this is a vital segment of the class, as the students

  18. Non-science majors gain valuable insight studying clinical trials literature: an evidence-based medicine library assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Janet S; Martin, Lucy; Curtin, Dara; Penhale, Sara; Trueblood, Nathan A

    2004-12-01

    When faced with a diagnosis, it is empowering to be able to assess the evidence of treatment effectiveness and safety. To teach this skill to non-science majors, we assigned the "Responsible Patienthood Project" (RPP). For the RPP, students studied an array of disease and treatment literature: the final product of their work was a poster presentation, in which they did an in-depth analysis of one primary article, thus encouraging critical evaluation of experimental design, methods, and conclusions. Post-RPP, there was a 35% decrease in the student perception that they would unquestioningly accept a recommended treatment for a hypothetical diagnosis, and a 40% increase in the perception that they would consult a combination of resources, including primary articles. We recommend this project based on our results that suggest 1) non-science majors are able to successfully access and assess primary scientific literature, 2) students felt empowered by the RPP, and 3) skills in information gathering, via library instruction, may serve as a particularly helpful lifelong learning tool.

  19. Biological Science as an Audio-Tutorial System of Instruction for the Non-Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacket, Dorothy; Holt Imy V.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an audiotutorial program in Biological Science offered to non-science majors at Western Michigan University and reports the results of an evaluative investigation relating to this program. (JR)

  20. Developing Scientific Literacy in Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrich, C.; Holt, S.; Philips, J.; Laprise, S.; Simons, L.

    2004-12-01

    We present a three-tiered interdisciplinary program designed for business students at Babson College. At the foundation level, we introduce fundamental ideas in physical and biological science as they relate to a particular theme. In the intermediate tier, we discuss the technologies that arise from the broad understanding of science developed at the previous level, and their impact on society. In the optional advanced tier, we further explore the relationship between science and society. At all levels, the broader impact of technological and scientific progress is explored through discussion of current events, works of art, and popular culture.

  1. On so called “paradoxical monocular stereoscopy”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Doorn, A.J. van; Kappers, A.M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Human observers are apparently well able to judge properties of 'three-dimensional objects' on the basis of flat pictures such as photographs of physical objects. They obtain this 'pictorial relief' without much conscious effort and with little interference from the (flat) picture surface. Methods

  2. [So-called "spontaneous" lesions of the popliteal artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miani, S; De Monti, M; Boneschi, M; Giordanengo, F

    1997-11-01

    The term "spontaneous", when attributed to a stenotic or obliterative arterial lesion, could seem ambiguous and doesn't completely explain the anatomical substrate that is the basis of this morbid condition. However, it is true that injuries can occur without the patient being aware of any traumatic event, and can cause a symptomatology arising suddenly and, apparently, "spontaneously". In this study, three cases of patients observed for acute or chronic lower limb ischemia are presented. All patients were male, young and underwent an angiographic examination that demonstrated, in an otherwise normal arterial tree, filling defects or obstruction involving the popliteal artery. Two patients underwent a reconstructive surgical procedure. The third was medically treated. CAT or MNR examinations were performed in order to exclude developmental defect such as an anomalous course of popliteal artery determined by a displacement due to medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. Actually in these three cases, a definite etiology of the arterial damage was not demonstrated and therefore it is suggested that a physical effort could have injured an already weakened arterial structure.

  3. Philosophy in the so-called big science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Poznański

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Both our understanding of the term “science”, and that which it is employed to refer to, have undergone significant changes over the centuries. The 20th century, in particular, has seen important transformations within science and, in consequence, heated debate. One important transformation, rarely noticed by philosophers of science, has been the emergence of large-scale research projects of the sort often referred to as “big science”. Such projects require science to be organized, and function, in quite new ways. Their influence upon science, construed as an activity and an institution, has been very great indeed - as has been their impact on our understanding of what it is that such activities ultimately produce (theories, hypotheses. The aim of this article is to identify and spell out the philosophical aspects of this scenario as it pertains to science. I begin with an outline of the historical development of big science. Then, with reference to other scholars, I try to establish a definition of it. I briefly point to some developments in 20th century philosophy of science, and argue for the need to construct a distinctive philosophy of big science itself. The latter, I claim, should construe the philosophy of science in terms broad enough to be adequate for the analysis of a number of issues emerging in the context of the most developed branches of the natural sciences. I review a selection of these issues in the last part of my article.

  4. On the so called rogue waves in nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Charles Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we examine the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations. Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions, and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  5. On the so-called Boy or Girl Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G

    2010-01-01

    A quite old problem has been recently revitalized by Leonard Mlodinow's book The Drunkard's Walk, where it is presented in a way that has definitely confused several people, that wonder why the prevalence of the name of one daughter among the population should change the probability that the other child is a girl too. I try here to discuss the problem from scratch, showing that the rarity of the name plays no role, unless the strange assumption of two identical names in the same family is taken into account. But also the name itself does not matter. What is really important is `identification', meant in an acceptation broader than usual, in the sense that a child is characterized by a set of attributes that make him/her uniquely identifiable (`that one') inside a family. The important point of how the information is acquired is also commented, suggesting an explanation of why several people tend to consider the informations "at least one boy" and "a well defined boy" (elder/youngest or of a given name) equiva...

  6. Pubic inguinal pain syndrome: the so-called sports hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marta; Bombini, Grazia; Campanelli, Giampiero

    2014-03-01

    The "sportsman's hernia" commonly presents as a painful groin in those sports that involve kicking and twisting movements while running, particularly in rugby, football, soccer, and ice hockey players. Moreover, sportsman's hernia can be encountered even in normally physically active people. The pain experienced is recognized at the common point of origin of the rectus abdominis muscle and the adductor longus tendon on the pubic bone and the insertion of the inguinal ligament on the pubic bone. It is accepted that this chronic pain caused by abdominal wall weakness or injury occurs without a palpable hernia. We proposed the new name "pubic inguinal pain syndrome." In the period between January 2006 and November 2013 all patients afferent in our ambulatory clinic for chronic groin pain without a clinically evident hernia were assessed with medical history, physical examination, dynamic ultrasound, and pelvic and lumbar MRI. All patients were proposed for a conservative treatment and then, if it was not effective, for a surgical treatment. Our etiopathogenetic theory is based on three factors: (1) the compression of the three nerves of the inguinal region, (2) the imbalance in strength of adductor and abdominal wall muscles caused by the hypertrophy and stiffness of the insertion of rectus muscle and adductor longus muscle, and (3) the partial weakness of the posterior wall. Our surgical procedure includes the release of all three nerves of the region, the correction of the imbalance in strength with the partial tenotomy of the rectus and adductor longus muscles, and the repair of the partial weakness of the posterior wall with a lightweight mesh. This treatment reported excellent results with complete relief of symptoms after resumption of physical activity in all cases.

  7. Solitary Fibrous Tumors and So-Called Hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Penel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed the literature data regarding the spectrum of tumors including solitary fibrous tumor and hemangiopericytoma with special focus on definition of the disease, discussion of the criteria for malignancy, and the key elements of standard treatment of localized disease. We have discussed the emerging concepts on the tumor biology and the different systemic treatments (chemotherapy and molecular-targeted therapies.

  8. [The controversy about so-called "active euthanasia"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, K

    1996-09-17

    In the past few years, the discussion about the right to kill severely ill patients for humanitarian reasons--once called euthanasia and after World War II in the German speaking countries as euphemism called 'aktive Sterbehilfe' (active help to die)--has become more intensive. Actually, only the Netherlands do officially practice euthanasia. But the variant that consists in putting a pharmaceutical at the patient's disposal in order to kill himself is very well known in other countries, e.g. in Switzerland, where the pressure on the legislator to also legalize euthanasia grows. Taking into account medico-ethical reasons, historical experiences, alarming euthanasia ideas in bioethics and social philosophy, the danger due to the impossibility to control the development in this field, and the insidious extension of euthanasia indications, the author rejects firmly the idea of legalized euthanasia. These problems are related to those that occur in fixing the moment of death of potential organ donors. A lack of organs in transplantation medicine should not lead physicians to explant organs from donors in a dying condition. For physicians who take care of potential organ donors and who have to look after their interests towards transplantation teams, it is often too difficult to cope with this task. Local ethical commissions should support them.

  9. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  10. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  11. Science of Food and Cooking: A Non-Science Majors Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Deon T.; Bachman, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emphasis on the science of food and cooking has been observed in our popular literature and media. As a result of this, a new non-science majors course, The Science of Food and Cooking, is being taught at our institution. We cover basic scientific concepts, which would normally be discussed in a typical introductory chemistry course, in the…

  12. Discovery of the Collaborative Nature of Science with Undergraduate Science Majors and Non-Science Majors through the Identification of Microorganisms Enriched in Winogradsky Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jasmine; Pinedo, Catalina Arango; Forster, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    Today's science classrooms are addressing the need for non-scientists to become scientifically literate. A key aspect includes the recognition of science as a process for discovery. This process relies upon interdisciplinary collaboration. We designed a semester-long collaborative exercise that allows science majors taking a general microbiology course and non-science majors taking an introductory environmental science course to experience collaboration in science by combining their differing skill sets to identify microorganisms enriched in Winogradsky columns. These columns are self-sufficient ecosystems that allow researchers to study bacterial populations under specified environmental conditions. Non-science majors identified phototrophic bacteria enriched in the column by analyzing the signature chlorophyll absorption spectra whereas science majors used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify the general bacterial diversity. Students then compiled their results and worked together to generate lab reports with their final conclusions identifying the microorganisms present in their column. Surveys and lab reports were utilized to evaluate the learning objectives of this activity. In pre-surveys, nonmajors' and majors' answers diverged considerably, with majors providing responses that were more accurate and more in line with the working definition of collaboration. In post-surveys, the answers between majors and nonmajors converged, with both groups providing accurate responses. Lab reports showed that students were able to successfully identify bacteria present in the columns. These results demonstrate that laboratory exercises designed to group students across disciplinary lines can be an important tool in promoting science education across disciplines.

  13. Social justice pedagogies and scientific knowledge: Remaking citizenship in the non-science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jane L.

    This dissertation contributes to efforts to rethink the meanings of democracy, scientific literacy, and non-scientist citizenship in the United States. Beginning with questions that emerged from action research and exploring the socio-political forces that shape educational practices, it shows why non-science educators who teach for social justice must first recognize formal science education as a primary site of training for (future) non-scientist citizens and then prepare to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship offered by formal science education. This model of citizenship defines (and limits) appropriate behavior for non-scientist citizens as acquiescing to the authority of science and the state by actively demarcating science from non-science, experts from non-experts, and the rational from the irrational. To question scientific authority is to be scientifically illiterate. This vision of 'acquiescent democracy' seeks to end challenges to the authority of science and the state by ensuring that scientific knowledge is privileged in all personal and public decision-making practices, producing a situation in which it becomes natural for non-scientist citizens to enroll scientific knowledge to naturalize oppression within our schools and society. It suggests that feminist and equity-oriented science educators, by themselves, are unable or unwilling to challenge certain assumptions in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship. Therefore, it is the responsibility of non-science educators who teach for social justice to articulate oppositional models of non-scientist citizenship and democracy in their classrooms and to challenge the naturalized authority of scientific knowledge in all aspects of our lives. It demonstrates how research in the field of Science & Technology Studies can serve as one resource in our efforts to intervene in the dominant model of scientifically literate citizenship and to support a model of

  14. The German law ''KonTraG'' is not sufficient for the energy trading. The importance of the so-called soft factors in successful risk management; Das KonTraG genuegt nicht im Energiehandel. Die Bedeutung der weichen Faktoren im erfolgreichen Risikomanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaden, E.

    2000-03-20

    The following article deals with the wholescale trading of energy. The energy market in Central Europe is under development with respect to liquidity, transparency, variety of products and standardisation of contracts. It is true that especially the big energy providers have prepared the organisations by way of significant input of own and consulting capacities to match the new German legal requirements for a sufficient risk management, but the long term success of trading in volatile markets will mainly depend on the so-called soft factors such as strategy, attitude in leadership and communication, personnel policy and most important of all the way how to manage price risk positions day by day. These soft factors can very hardly be implemented and controlled by any law, consulting or auditing. (orig.) [German] Der Verfasser eroertert den Engergie-Grosshandel. Hier ist der Markt zur Zeit in Mitteleuropa in Bezug auf Liquiditaet, Transparenz, Produktvielfalt und Standardisierung in der Entwicklungsphase. Zwar haben sich insbesondere die grossen Energiegesellschaften mit viel Eigen- und Beratungsaufwand auf die Erfuellung der neuen gesetzlichen Risikomanagement-Anforderungen vorbereitet, aber beim Handel in volatilen Maerkten sind besonders die durch Gesetz, Beratung und Wirtschaftspruefung schwer in den Griff zu bekommenden so genannten weichen Faktoren wie Strategie, Fuehrungs- und Kommunikationsverhalten, Personalpolitik und als wichtigstes das Preisrisiko-Steuerungsverhalten fuer den langfristigen Erfolg massgebend. (orig.)

  15. Impact of backwards faded scaffolding approach to inquiry-based astronomy laboratory experiences on undergraduate non-science majors' views of scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Daniel J.

    This study explored the impact of a novel inquiry-based astronomy laboratory curriculum designed using the Backwards Faded Scaffolding inquiry teaching framework on non-science majoring undergraduate students' views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). The study focused on two aspects of NOSI: The Distinction between Data and Evidence (DvE), and The Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). Participants were 220 predominately non-science majoring undergraduate students at a small, doctoral granting, research-extensive university in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States. The student participants were enrolled in an introductory astronomy survey course with an associated laboratory section and were selected in two samples over consecutive fall and spring semesters. The participants also included four of the graduate student instructors who taught the laboratory courses using the intervention curriculum. In the first stage, student participant views of NOSI were measured using the VOSI-4 research instrument before and after the intervention curriculum was administered. The responses were quantified, and the distributions of pre and posttest scores of both samples were separately analyzed to determine if there was a significant improvement in understanding of either of the two aspects of NOSI. The results from both samples were compared to evaluate the consistency of the results. In the second stage, the quantitative results were used to strategically design a qualitative investigation, in which the four lab instructors were interviewed about their observations of how the student participants interacted with the intervention curriculum as compared to traditional lab activities, as well as their suggestions as to how the curriculum may or may not have contributed to the results of the first stage. These interviews were summarized and analyzed for common themes as to how the intervention curriculum influenced the students' understandings of the two aspect of

  16. Discovery of the Collaborative Nature of Science with Undergraduate Science Majors and Non-Science Majors through the Identification of Microorganisms Enriched in Winogradsky Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Ramirez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s science classrooms are addressing the need for non-scientists to become scientifically literate. A key aspect includes the recognition of science as a process for discovery. This process relies upon interdisciplinary collaboration. We designed a semester-long collaborative exercise that allows science majors taking a general microbiology course and non-science majors taking an introductory environmental science course to experience collaboration in science by combining their differing skill sets to identify microorganisms enriched in Winogradsky columns. These columns are self-sufficient ecosystems that allow researchers to study bacterial populations under specified environmental conditions. Non-science majors identified phototrophic bacteria enriched in the column by analyzing the signature chlorophyll absorption spectra whereas science majors used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify the general bacterial diversity. Students then compiled their results and worked together to generate lab reports with their final conclusions identifying the microorganisms present in their column. Surveys and lab reports were utilized to evaluate the learning objectives of this activity. In pre-surveys, nonmajors’ and majors’ answers diverged considerably, with majors providing responses that were more accurate and more in line with the working definition of collaboration. In post-surveys, the answers between majors and nonmajors converged, with both groups providing accurate responses. Lab reports showed that students were able to successfully identify bacteria present in the columns. These results demonstrate that laboratory exercises designed to group students across disciplinary lines can be an important tool in promoting science education across disciplines. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory

  17. Engaging Non-Science Majors Through Citizen Science Projects In Inquiry-Based Introductory Geoscience Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Rhodes, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although inquiry-based/problem-based methods have been successfully incorporated in undergraduate lecture classes, a survey of commonly used laboratory manuals indicates that few non-major geoscience laboratory classes use these strategies. The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences faculty members have developed a successful introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors that challenges traditional teaching methodology as illustrated in most laboratory manuals. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ active learning methods to engage and challenge students. Crucial to establishing an open learning environment is capturing the attention of non-science majors from the moment they enter the classroom. We use catastrophic ‘gloom and doom’ current events to pique the imagination with images, news stories, and videos. Once our students are hooked, we can further the learning process with use of other teaching methods: an inquiry-based approach that requires students take control of their own learning, a cooperative learning approach that requires the participation of all team members in peer learning, and a problem/case study learning approach that primarily relies on activities distilled from current events. The final outcome is focused on creating innovative methods to communicate the findings to the general public. With the general public being the audience for their communiqué, students are less intimated, more focused, and more involved in solving the problem. During lab sessions, teams of students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential communication skills while exploring real-world scenarios. These activities allow students to use scientific reasoning and concepts to develop solutions for scenarios such as volcanic eruptions, coastal erosion/sea level rise, flooding or landslide hazards, and then creatively communicate their solutions to the public. For example, during a two

  18. Testing a Model of the Relationship of Demographic, Affective, and Fitness Variables to Academic Achievement among Non-Science Majors at an Independent University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Andrew Martin

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of specific attributes of college students to their academic achievement at an independent university in central Florida. Academic achievement was measured as the numeric score on the final exam in a survey-of-science course (EDS 1032) required for non-science majors. Attribute sets included personological, affective, and fitness variables. A hypothesized diagram of the direct and indirect effects among these attributes relative to academic achievement was developed and tested using data collected Spring 2014 from 168 students in four sections of EDS 1032 at Florida Institute of Technology. Multiple regression results revealed that 19% of the variance in a students' academic achievement was due to the influence of these three sets of research factors; this was found to be statistically significant. The results of mediation analyses also indicated that three variables had significant direct effects on academic achievement, namely gender, number of academic credits, and sports motivation. In addition, gender had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via stress, and the number of academic credits had a significant indirect effect on academic achievement via sports motivation. These findings indicated that female students scored roughly six points higher than male students on this final exam. Also, gender's influence on academic achievement was partially attributable to the student's level of stress (e.g., male students with high levels of stress had lower grades on this final exam than female students with the same level of stress). In addition, it was found that students taking more academic credits were likely to score higher on this final exam than those students taking fewer credits. Further, as students' level of sports amotivation increased, the strength of the relationship between the number of student academic credits and academic achievement decreased. These results support Self

  19. Middle infrared (wavelength range: 8 μm-14 μm) 2-dimensional spectroscopy (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7 kg, total cost: less than 10,000 USD) so-called hyperspectral camera for unmanned air vehicles like drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We developed the palm size (optical unit: 73[mm]×102[mm]×66[mm]) and light weight (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7[kg]) middle infrared (wavelength range: 8[μm]-14[μm]) 2-dimensional spectroscopy for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) like drone. And we successfully demonstrated the flights with the developed hyperspectral camera mounted on the multi-copter so-called drone in 15/Sep./2015 at Kagawa prefecture in Japan. We had proposed 2 dimensional imaging type Fourier spectroscopy that was the near-common path temporal phase-shift interferometer. We install the variable phase shifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected imaging optical systems. The variable phase shifter was configured with a movable mirror and a fixed mirror. The movable mirror was actuated by the impact drive piezo-electric device (stroke: 4.5[mm], resolution: 0.01[μm], maker: Technohands Co.,Ltd., type:XDT50-45, price: around 1,000USD). We realized the wavefront division type and near common path interferometry that has strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. Without anti-mechanical vibration systems, the palm-size Fourier spectroscopy was realized. And we were able to utilize the small and low-cost middle infrared camera that was the micro borometer array (un-cooled VOxMicroborometer, pixel array: 336×256, pixel pitch: 17[μm], frame rate 60[Hz], maker: FLIR, type: Quark 336, price: around 5,000USD). And this apparatus was able to be operated by single board computer (Raspberry Pi.). Thus, total cost was less than 10,000 USD. We joined with KAMOME-PJ (Kanagawa Advanced MOdule for Material Evaluation Project) with DRONE FACTORY Corp., KUUSATSU Corp., Fuji Imvac Inc. And we successfully obtained the middle infrared spectroscopic imaging with multi-copter drone.

  20. Burned after reading: the so-called list of Alexandrian librarians in P. Oxy. X 1241 Brûlée après lecture : la liste dite des Bibliothécaires d'Alexandrie dans le P.Oxy. X 1241 Burned after reading; la cosiddetta lista di bibliotecari alessandrini in P.Oxy. X 1241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Murray

    2012-06-01

    être réexaminée, car il semble probable que nous ayons affaire à une œuvre littéraire manquée.This article calls into question the value and reliability of the contents of P.Oxy. X 1241, the so-called list of Alexandria Librarians. Rather than treating the list of grammarians at col. i.5-ii.30 by itself, as scholars have done ever since the papyrus was published, this paper considers the document in its entirety. This closer reading of P.Oxy. X 1241 demonstrates that there is clear thematic continuity between the list of grammarians and the military catalogues that follow which has never been observed before, precisely because the two parts have always been treated separately. Challenges to three crucial assumptions of the original editors, B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt emerge: (1 Is the list at col. i.5-ii.30 in fact a list of the heads of the Alexandrian library? (2 Is the work a copy or compilation of some earlier scholarly piece that dates back to the Hellenistic period, and not a product of a circa second century CE scholar/grammarian? (3 Do the contents of the papyrus reflect the work of a competent scholar/grammarian who was well enough informed about the chronology of the Ptolemaic period to produce an historically accurate account of the succession of individuals connected to the Ptolemaic court and the Alexandrian Library? While it is true to say that in its content and use of learned citations P.Oxy. X 1241 shares many similarities with Hellenistic and Imperial prose catalogues, the strategies of learned discourse deployed by the author in the military catalogue do not conform to the norms of reliable scholarly examples. Accordingly, the value of the text as documentary evidence of the history of the Alexandrian library needs to be reconsidered as it seems likely that we are dealing with a failed literary work.Questo articolo mette in dubbio il valore e l’attendibilità del contenuto di P.Oxy. X 1241, la cosiddetta lista dei bibliotecari

  1. Using Social Networks to Educate Seismology to Non-Science Audiences in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Linkimer, L.

    2013-12-01

    5,6) showed a jump of nearly 25,000 followers. We see the RSN Facebook page as an opportunity to engage non-science audiences and encourage the population to participate in reporting seismic observations and thus providing intensity data for felt earthquakes. This approach to science education might transform the view of geological processes for Costa Ricans and might positively alter the current perception towards hazards.

  2. Case studies of community college non-science majors: Effects of self-regulatory interventions on biology self-efficacy and biological literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Matthew J.

    Science literacy has been at the heart of current reform efforts in science education. The focus on developing essential skills needed for individual ability to be literate in science has been at the forefront of most K--12 science curricula. Reform efforts have begun to stretch into the postsecondary arena as well, with an ever increasing dialogue regarding the need for attention to science literacy by college students, especially non-science majors. This study set out to investigate how the use of self-regulatory interventions (specifically, goal setting, concept mapping, and reflective writing) affected student biology self-efficacy and biological literacy. This study employed a qualitative research design, analyzing three case studies. Participants in the study received ten self-regulatory interventions as a set of portfolio assignments. Portfolio work was qualitatively analyzed and coded for self-efficacy, as well as evidence of biological literacy. A biology self-efficacy survey was administered pre- and post- to provide a means of self-efficacy data triangulation. Literacy data was supported via a biological literacy rubric, constructed specifically for this study. Results indicated that mastery experiences were the source of biology self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for specific tasks increased over time, and changes in self-efficacy were corroborated by the self-efficacy survey. Students were found to express biological literacy at nominal, functional, or conceptual levels depending on the specific task. This was supported by data from the biological literacy rubric scores. Final conclusions and implications for the study indicated the need for further research with more samples of students in similar and different contexts. Given the fact that the literature in this area is sparse, the results obtained here have only begun to delve into this area of research. Generalization to other biology courses or contexts outside of the one presented in this study was

  3. The Research and Reflection on the Transformation of"Problem Students" in Higher Vocational Colleges%高职院校"问题学生"的转化研究及思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮小燕

    2015-01-01

    由于各种原因,高职院校大多数教师把精力放在优秀的学生身上,而缺少对"问题学生"教育问题的思考和相应的对策研究.本文主要从对"问题学生"的界定和转化方面来阐述对这个问题的研究和思考.%For various reasons, in higher vocational colleges in our country, most teachers pay most of their attention on the so-called excellent students who do well in academic study and least on the so-called problem students. This article is mainly fo-cused on the research and reflection on how to educate the so-called problem students on the basis of exploring the defini-tion and transformation of the so-called problem students.

  4. Engineering Students' Experiences from Physics Group Work in Learning Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential…

  5. Using Internet-Based Robotic Telescopes to Engage Non-Science Majors in Astronomical Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, K. J.; Coble, K.; Slater, T. F.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Responding to national science education reform documents calling for students to have more opportunities for authentic research experiences, several national projects have developed online telescope networks to provide students with Internet-access to research grade telescopes. The nature of astronomical observation (e.g., remote sites, expensive equipment, and odd hours) has been a barrier in the past. Internet-based robotic telescopes allow scientists to conduct observing sessions on research-grade telescopes half a world away. The same technology can now be harnessed by STEM educators to engage students and reinforce what is being taught in the classroom, as seen in some early research in elementary schools (McKinnon and Mainwaring 2000 and McKinnon and Geissinger 2002), middle/high schools (Sadler et al. 2001, 2007 and Gehret et al. 2005) and undergraduate programs (e.g., McLin et al. 2009). This project looks at the educational value of using Internet-based robotic telescopes in a general education introductory astronomy course at the undergraduate level. Students at a minority-serving institution in the midwestern United States conducted observational programs using the Global Telescope Network (GTN). The project consisted of the use of planetarium software to determine object visibility, observing proposals (with abstract, background, goals, and dissemination sections), peer review (including written reviews and panel discussion according to NSF intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria), and classroom presentations showing the results of the observation. The GTN is a network of small telescopes funded by the Fermi mission to support the science of high energy astrophysics. It is managed by the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University and is controlled using SkyNet. Data includes course artifacts (proposals, reviews, panel summaries, presentations, and student reflections) for six semesters plus student interviews. Using a grounded theory approach

  6. Improving scientific learning and supporting civic engagement for undergraduate non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alana Presley

    In prior research focusing on teaching and learning science, a definitive trend toward a new approach for undergraduate non-major science courses has emerged. Instruction should be refocused from information-transfer to giving students experiences that allow them to explore and engage in their new knowledge and find ways to integrate it into their everyday lives. One technique is to focus class material on real issues of interest and relevance. Course development that allows for civic engagement and self discovery connects learning to the lives of students and their communities. This study used a quasi-- experimental design to see if students who engaged in their learning had improved learning gains, increased motivation, and ability to relate it to their lives. The results showed that students were more motivated to connect the subject to their lives when they engaged through civic engagement projects. Techniques used in this research can be used in the future to develop science courses that focus on the needs of 21st century learners.

  7. A Different Kind of Science for the Non-Science Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Hector

    This paper reports on a small scale study undertaken at the University of Iowa to examine whether students perceive a difference as to the value of learning in General Education Requirement (GER) science classes compared to learning in science application courses. It also explores the need for a different approach to the teaching of science…

  8. Developing New Pedagogy to Teach Planet Formation to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Molly; Impey, Chris David; Buxner, Sanlyn

    2016-06-01

    A first order understanding of planet formation and the scientific concepts therein is critical in order for undergraduate students to understand our place in the Universe. Furthermore, planet formation integrates the topics of gravity, angular momentum, migration, and condensation in a “story-book” fashion where students can apply these concepts to a specific event. We collected syllabi and course topics from over 30 undergraduate general-education astrobiology courses from around the globe in order to determine the extent to which professors address planet formation. Additionally, we were looking to see if faculty had developed specific or original pedagogy to teach this topic. We find on average, instructors spend ½ of a lecture discussing planet formation or they leave it out all together. In the classes where planet formation is taught more extensively, instructors use PowerPoint slides or occasional videos to teach the topic. We aim to develop new pedagogy that will allow us to better determine learning gains and student understanding of this critical topic. If students in an astrobiology class are unable to understand how our own Solar System forms, it is significantly more challenging to make parallels (or find differences) between our home in the Universe and extrasolar planetary systems.

  9. How to Improve the Students' Writing Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽梅

    2012-01-01

    In our country,the traditional English teaching attaches the great importance to the grammar.But when the students try to write using the grammar rules,they usually translate the words one by one,which is the "so-called Chinese English ".Besides,the most exercises are about reading comprehension,So the students' writing ability is poor.Then how to arouse students ' interest in learning English ?

  10. Providing a Scientific Foundation in Climate Studies for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Moran, J. M.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Lambert, J.; Blair, B. A.; Hopkins, E. J.; O'Neill, K. L.; Hyre, H. R.; Nugnes, K. A.; Moses, M. N.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change has become a politically charged topic, creating the necessity for a scientifically literate population. Therefore, the American Meteorological Society (AMS), in partnership with NASA, has produced an introductory level, climate science course that engages students, allows for course flexibility, and boosts scientific knowledge about climate. This course shares NASA’s goal of observing, understanding, and modeling the Earth system, to discover how it is changing, to better predict change, and to understand the consequences for life. In Spring 2010, AMS Climate Studies was piloted to determine the most effective method to foster an understanding of some of the more difficult concepts of climate science. This study was offered as part of the NASA grant. This presentation will report the results of that study. Faculty and students from fourteen colleges and universities throughout the country evaluated the course using pre- and post-test questions, which included multiple choice and short answer questions, weekly course content evaluations, and an extensive post-course evaluation. The large majority of participating teachers rated the overall course, scientific content, internet delivery, and study materials as ‘good’, the most positive response available. Feedback from faculty members as well as suggestions from NASA reviewers were used to enhance the final version of the textbook and Investigations Manual for the Fall 2010 academic semester. Following the proven course work of AMS Weather and AMS Ocean Studies, AMS Climate Studies is a turnkey package utilizing both printed and online materials. It covers topics such as the water in Earth’s climate system, paleoclimates, along with climate change and public policy. The Investigations include 30 complimentary lab-style activities including the Conceptual Energy Model, which explores the flow of energy from space to Earth. Additionally, the course website features Current Climate Studies where

  11. Science and Non-Science Undergraduate Students' Critical Thinking and Argumentation Performance in Reading a Science News Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A scientifically literate person should be able to engage and critique science news reports about socioscientific issues from a variety of information sources. Such engagement involves critical thinking and argumentation skills to determine if claims made are justified by evidence and explained by reasonable explanations. This study explored…

  12. Healthcare and biomedical technology in the 21st century an introduction for non-science majors

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, George R; Samuel, Solomon Praveen

    2014-01-01

    This textbook introduces students not pursuing degrees in science or engineering to the remarkable new applications of technology now available to physicians and their patients and discusses how these technologies are evolving to permit new treatments and procedures.  The book also elucidates the societal and ethical impacts of advances in medical technology, such as extending life and end of life decisions, the role of genetic testing, confidentiality, costs of health care delivery, scrutiny of scientific claims, and provides background on the engineering approach in healthcare and the scientific method as a guiding principle. This concise, highly relevant text enables faculty to offer a substantive course for students from non-scientific backgrounds that will empower them to make more informed decisions about their healthcare by significantly enhancing their understanding of these technological advancements. This book also: ·         Presents scientific concepts from modern medical science using r...

  13. Scientific reasoning abilities of non-science majors in physics-based courses

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, J Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have found that non-STEM majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower pre-instruction on the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. The majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget's theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Pre-scores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of...

  14. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  15. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  16. The Art of Astronomy: A New General Education Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; van Zee, Liese

    2017-01-01

    The Art of Astronomy is a new general education course developed at Indiana University. The topic appeals to a broad range of undergraduates and the course gives students the tools to understand and appreciate astronomical images in a new way. The course explores the science of imaging the universe and the technology that makes the images possible. Topics include the night sky, telescopes and cameras, light and color, and the science behind the images. Coloring the Universe: An Insider's Look at Making Spectacular Images of Space" by T. A. Rector, K. Arcand, and M. Watzke serves as the basic text for the course, supplemented by readings from the web. Through the course, students participate in exploration activities designed to help them first to understand astronomy images, and then to create them. Learning goals include an understanding of scientific inquiry, an understanding of the basics of imaging science as applied in astronomy, a knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum and how observations at different wavelengths inform us about different environments in the universe, and an ability to interpret astronomical images to learn about the universe and to model and understand the physical world.

  17. 08, with the 20th commemoration of the so-called Battle Of Cuito ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Willem Scholtz

    historian‟s perception is also influenced by all the facts he has marshalled. “The .... In the following review, I have to stress that I do not care what researchers‟ political ..... While they do bring forth a host of very valuable information, it seems as if he ..... Fidel Castro's 1977 Southern Africa tour: A report to Honecker. 3 April.

  18. A qualitative investigation into the so-called ministry of deliverance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Janse van Rensburg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the book“The occult debate” (Janse van Rensburg, 1999 it has become clear that epistemological views on occultism within the reformed tradition have drastically diverged. During the General Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church in 2007, the report of the Algemene Taakspan vir Leer en Aktuele Sake (ATLASon a ministry of deliverance denied the existence of the devil and claimed that it would be un-scientific to embark on an empirical research in this regard, because of the impossibility to verify information gathered in this manner. However, it is the hypothesis of this article that qualitative information could assist in attaining a clearer under-standing of the need for a ministry of deliverance. In this article the methodology of the qualitative research is explained and the narratives of participants are revealed. Thereafter the respon-ses of the participants are evaluated.

  19. Digestion of so-called resistant starch sources in the human small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Hagedoorn, RE; de Graaff, R; Elzinga, H; Tabak, S; Yang, YX; Stellaard, F

    2000-01-01

    Background: Resistant starch sources, which are only partially digested in the small intestine, can be used to increase colonic availability of short-chain fatty acids. Objective: To study the characteristics of the fermentation of resistant starch, the digestion of resistant starch in the small int

  20. The So-called Overseas Ethnography%所谓"海外民族志"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铭铭

    2011-01-01

    @@ 我曾跟一个国个同行聊天,他问起我教什么课.我提到的几门,如"人类学原著选读"、"社会人类学与中国研究"之类,他都比较熟悉,故面无表情,但我一提到"海外民族志",他面露茫然.

  1. An Exegetic Study of the So-Called Proposition of Confucian Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Since Wang Guowei and Cai Yuanpei introduced the concepts of aesthetics and aesthetic education, respectively, to China in the early twentieth century, there has been a strong tendency in many of the aesthetic discussions to examine ancient texts and materials using modern concepts of aesthetics. In particular, sentences with the character-word…

  2. Theoretical foundations of the so-called cross-reference structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    1999-01-01

    A discussion of the concept of "structure" related to the concept of "cross-reference". On the basis of the distribution structures a completely new way of viewing the lexicographical cross-references of all sorts is presented.......A discussion of the concept of "structure" related to the concept of "cross-reference". On the basis of the distribution structures a completely new way of viewing the lexicographical cross-references of all sorts is presented....

  3. [Assessment of the coronary circulation regulation by means of the so-called isometric contraction index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaszek, W; Löwe, H R; Rentsch, W; Pankau, H; Günther, K

    1976-08-01

    The index of isometric contraction formed from the quotient period of isometric contraction in the erect position by period of isometric contraction in lying position gives the possibility to separate between cardially sufficient and cardially insufficient patients with adequately disturbed regulation of the cardiac circulation. The recognition of early stages of the disturbed left-ventricular function is possible. The use of an adequate exact technique in gaining the primary data is to be presumed. Corrections of the frequency of the index of isometric contraction do not improve the evidence. In the borderline region of the index of isometric contraction with values between 1.03 and 1.1 in questionable cases a further differentiation into still normal or already latent insufficient will do by the analysis of the trend of the index of isometric contraction after the application of medicaments. The determination of the change of the direction of the index of isometric contraction after peroral application of nitroglycerin would be justifiable in routine work after the recognition of the initiaction increases in patients with latent heart insufficiency, in patients with a healthy heart it decreases. The clinical value of the index of isometric contraction as a simple test of the circulatory function is highly to be estimated.

  4. Cause of death--so-called designed event acclimaxing timed happenings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cause-of-death as an established global medical institution faces its greatest challenge in the commonplace observation that the healthy do not necessarily survive and the diseased do not necessarily die. A logical analysis of the assumed relationships between disease and death provides some insights that allow questioning the taken-for-granted relationship between defined disease/s and the final common parameter of death. Causalism as a paradigm has taken leave of all advanced sciences. In medicine, it is lingering on for anthropocentric reasons. Natural death does not come to pass because of some (replaceable missing element, but because the evolution of the individual from womb to tomb has arrived at its final destination. To accept death as a physiologic event is to advance thanatology and to disburden medical colleges and hospitals of a lot of avoidable thinking and doing.

  5. Informal value transfer systems and criminal organizations: A study into so-called underground banking networks

    OpenAIRE

    Passas, N.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a preliminary study into what is commonly called 'underground banking systems'. As the conventional banking industry is increasingly being regulated many fear that criminal organizations may turn to alternatives, such as underground banking systems - or informal value transfer systems (IVTS). The methods for this project consistes in a combination of archival, legal and historical analyses with unstructered interviews with regulators, law enforcement agent...

  6. Informal value transfer systems and criminal organizations : A study into so-called underground banking networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passas, N.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a preliminary study into what is commonly called 'underground banking systems'. As the conventional banking industry is increasingly being regulated many fear that criminal organizations may turn to alternatives, such as underground banking systems - or informal

  7. Modification of radiosensitivity by the so-called tissue recovery stimulator, 1; Radiosensitizing effects of solcoseryl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashok; Kimura, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Takashi (Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)); Sugahara, Tsutomu

    1992-12-01

    The effect of solcoseryl on the growth, radiosensitization and ability of V79 cells to recover from X-ray-induced damage has been observed. Solcoseryl at 0.8 mg/ml was the optimal concentration for the stimulation of cell growth. Increased sensitivity to X-irradiation was found in the shoulder region of V79 cells treated before and after irradiation with solcoseryl (0.8 mg/ml). The Dq and extrapolation number (n) decreased. Solcoseryl treatment apparently dose not reduce split dose recovery or inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage. Flow cytofluorometry studies of the cell cycle distribution and mitotic index show that solcoseryl inhibits the expression of radiation-induced cell arrest in the G[sub 2] phase of the cell cycle. Although this action increases radiation sensitization, additional mechanisms probably exist. (author).

  8. Modification of radiosensitivity by the so-called tissue recovery stimulator. I. Radiosensitizing effects of solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Kimura, H; Aoyama, T; Sugahara, T

    1992-12-01

    The effect of solcoseryl on the growth, radiosensitization and ability of V79 cells to recover from X-ray-induced damage has been observed. Solcoseryl at 0.8 mg/ml was the optimal concentration for the stimulation of cell growth. Increased sensitivity to X-irradiation was found in the shoulder region of V79 cells treated before and after irradiation with solcoseryl (0.8 mg/ml). The Dq and extrapolation number (n) decreased. Solcoseryl treatment apparently does not reduce split dose recovery or inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage. Flow cytofluorometry studies of the cell cycle distribution and mitotic index show that solcoseryl inhibits the expression of radiation-induced cell arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Although this action increases radiation sensitization, additional mechanisms probably exist.

  9. [Regarding respiration and the so-called "animal heat." An historical sketch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, A

    2001-01-01

    According to Aristotle and Galen, the essential function of the respiration phenomenon was to cool the blood. Towards the middle of the XVI Century, Miguel Servet suggested, in his treatise Christianismi restitutio..., that the inspired air could have other functions besides cooling the blood. Later, Joseph Black thought that respiration was a combustion. In the light of the advances in chemistry achieved in the XVII Century, the English scientist Adair Crawford and the French chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier conceived, in the second half of that century, the first general and quantitative theories on the origin of animal heat. Both these authors had the conviction that the "inflammable element", which will be called oxygen, was not formed in the pulmonary territory, but could be absorbed by the blood. Oxygen, foreseen by Mayow at the end of XVII Century, was discovered by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Lavoisier gave the name of oxygen to this gas and firmly established that the respiration phenomenon consists essentially in a process of combustion. The mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, native of Turin, suggested that animal heat originates in all breathing tissues. This phenomenon was verified and described in detail by the biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani, professor at the University of Pavia. Dissemination, in the scientific world, of the new chemical nomenclature and of the respiratory theory, closely related to it, was based fundamentally on the works "Méthode de nomenclature chimique..." (1787) and "Traité élémentaire de chimie..." (1789). During the XIX Century, studies on the phenomenon of animal respiration continued and fundamental discoveries in this subject were attained, such as conversion of hemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin once oxygen had been fixed. Now it is possible to study the regulating mechanisms of the energetic metabolism of the myocardium in vivo, which allows decisive interventions in certain cardiopathies, such as in acute ischemic cardiopathy.

  10. Development of the so-called third stage laser Thomson scattering diagnostics of plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Katsunori; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Hisano, Taishi; Uchino, Kiichirou; Miyazaki, Koichi

    2003-10-01

    In the recent review article,^1) we indicated that the incoherent laser Thomson scattering (LTS) diagnostics of plasmas for measurements of electron densities and temperatures (or more generally EEDFs) be classified as having evolved from the first stage where a whole Thomson spectrum be obtained during a single laser pulse from plasmas having electron density of above 10^18 m-3, through the second stage where data accumulation be prerequisite for ne below 10^18 m-3, and to the third stage where a strong suppression of stray light in addition to the data accumulation be necessary to measure at an extremely small size of less than 100 μm near to material surfaces. The third stage LTS was first demonstrated for a PDP (plasma display panel)-like discharge three years ago employing a triple grating polychromator. In order to further expand its applicable ranges, we are pursuing a more general approach by taking into account such factors as laser divergence, stray light suppression and other aspects. The present status is presented. 1) K. Muraoka, K. Uchino, Y. Yamagata, Y. Noguchi, M. Mansour, P. Suanpoot, S. Narishige, and M. Noguchi, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11 (2002) A143.

  11. Informal value transfer systems and criminal organizations : A study into so-called underground banking networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passas, N.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a preliminary study into what is commonly called 'underground banking systems'. As the conventional banking industry is increasingly being regulated many fear that criminal organizations may turn to alternatives, such as underground banking systems - or informal

  12. Theory and experiment in so-called pulse-interval pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, I C

    1981-01-01

    Moore [1980] has criticised the conclusions of Whitfield [1979] who used an alternating pulsatile stimulus [Seebeck, 1843], and found that the predominating interpulse intervals produced in a single auditory nerve fibre did not correspond to the perceived pitch. Moore's criticism depends on an assumption he makes that is not in fact borne out by the experiments.

  13. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beghi M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Massimiliano Beghi,1,2 Paola Beffa Negrini,1 Cecilia Perin,1,3 Federica Peroni,1,3 Adriana Magaudda,4 Cesare Cerri,1,3 Cesare Maria Cornaggia1,3 1Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, 2Department of Mental Health, “Guido Salvini” Hospital, Garbagnate Milanese, Milan, Italy; 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Istituti Clinici Zucchi, Carate Brianza, Monza and Brianza, Italy; 4Epilepsy Center, Department of Neuroscience, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Abstract: In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of “neurotic” type; their goal is to lead to a “split”, either vertical (dissociation or horizontal (repression. The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial. PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological. Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. Keywords: epilepsy, PNES, defense mechanisms, comorbidity

  14. ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T

    1909-03-01

    The foregoing and earlier data taken together demonstrate that an active immunity lasting several years can be produced in guinea-pigs, by the injection of toxin-antitoxin mixtures which have no recognizable harmful effect either immediate or remote. They also show, what might have been anticipated, that under the same conditions mixtures which produce local lesions and which, therefore, contain an excess of toxin produce a much higher degree of immunity than the neutral mixtures, and that an excess of antitoxin reduces the possibility of producing an active immunity, and may extinguish it altogether. There is, therefore, a certain definite relation between the components of the mixture and the degree of immunity producible. Furthermore, toxin-antitoxin mixtures do not change materially within five days at room temperature. They are apparently more efficacious at the end of forty-eight hours than immediately after preparation. The experiments finally prove that a relatively high degree of active immunity can be induced by a harmless procedure, whereas the use of toxin alone leading to very severe local lesions is incapable of producing more than an insignificant protection. The method, therefore, invites further tests in regard to its ultimate applicability to the human being. Unless the subcutis of the guinea-pig reacts to toxin-antitoxin mixtures in a manner peculiar to itself, a practical, easily controlled method for active immunization can be worked out which should afford a larger protection than the serum alone and avoid the complications associated with horse serum. That proportion of toxin and antitoxin which would produce the highest desirable immunity consistent with the least discomfort would have to be carefully worked out for the human subject. From the nature of the immunity induced it is obvious, however, that such a method of immunization cannot take the place of a large dose of antitoxin in exposed individuals who must be protected at once. It would be applicable only as a general protective measure without reference to any immediate danger, since it would take several weeks, perhaps longer, to perfect the attainable immunity. Passing to the theoretical aspects of the facts observed, we find no publications bearing directly upon the subject before us. Madsen has, however, approached it very closely in his experiments on the immunization of animals with mixtures not fully balanced, or, in other words, in which the "toxones" were still free. He found that the injection of such mixtures in rabbits, goats and horses produces an active immunity. He makes the significant remark that perhaps in the immunizing capacity we may possess the keenest reagent for a poison which is not able to exert any toxic action in the body. This is fully borne out by the experiments described, for in these we pass beyond the visible spectrum, so to speak, of the toxin-antitoxin effects, and we are able to recognize toxic action only by the lasting immunizing effects. Another publication which touches upon some phases of the same problem is that of Morgenroth on the union between toxin and antitoxin. Morgenroth brought out the fact that a given toxin-antitoxin mixture is more toxic when injected directly into the circulation than when injected under the skin. Thus, an L(+) dose of 0.78 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin applied subcutaneously was of the same toxicity as 0.68 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin injected into the circulation. When the mixture had stood twenty-four hours this (L(+)) dose was still 0.78 c.c. subcutaneously, but it had risen to 0.74 c.c. when introduced by the intracardiac route. The author makes two deductions from these results. He assumes that the velocity of reaction between toxin and antitoxin is slow, and that the union is not completed until the mixture has stood twenty-four hours. Hence, the L(+) dose of toxin injected into the blood is higher after twenty-four hours than immediately after mixing the toxin and antitoxin. He furthermore explains the fact that the subcutaneous L(+) dose remains the same

  15. Kondratiev cycles and so-called long waves. The early research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThis paper recalls some early work of the Dutch pioneers of long-wave research which anticipated many of the contemporary debates. Various explanations which have been advanced for the existence of long waves are reviewed, and the applicability of long-wave theories in a number of

  16. Prescriptivism, Linguistic Variation, and the So-Called Privilege of the Nonnative Speaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Betsy J.

    This paper responds to Claire Kramsch's essay on the demise of the notion of the idealized native speaker as the model for second language learning and implications for second languages and cultures education. Focusing on French, this paper suggests that it is not certain whether the elevation of the native speaker model ever was as real or…

  17. [Techniques of radiotherapy in so-called operable carcinoma of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierquin, B

    1973-06-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy alone in carcinoma of the breast are determined by the possibilities of durable cure of the tumoral process using locoregional treatment. It seems undisputable that the risk of metastases at a distance from the tumor is related to the topographical as well as volum extension of lymph node involvement. Such risk is low with N-; it rapidly increases with lower axillary N+; it predominates with medial mammary N+; it becomes almost constant with upper axillary (subclavian) and supraclavicular N+. This explains why dose distribution should aim at curing, even at the price of some cosmetic or functional risk, tumoral lesions of the mammary gland, of the lower axillary area and, to a certain extent, of the medial mammary area. On the contrary, it is illusory to deliver an overdosage at ultrahigh dose-rates to the sub- and supraclavicular areas, where the chances for durable cure are almost nul if lymph nodes are invaded. This explains why curative radiotherapy alone appears only indicated in little developed cancers in their mammary (T1 or T2) as well as lymph node (N0 or N1 a) aspects. This also explains why such a responsability implies for the radiotherapist absolutely perfect technical conditions of spotting, centring and dose-measurements; careful protection of all healthy structures surrounding the target-volumes should, in particular, be obtained (for instance, accurate delimitation of beams, use of lead shields or even compensatory wedges should provide appropriate protection to the lung parenchyma, pectoral muscle, head of the humerus, laryngotracheal system). Finally, it is in the axillary area that the major technical hazards are encountered with: an insufficient dose is liable to cause lymph node recurrence, an excessive dose is liable to provoke irreversible muscular, articular, vascular or nervous sequelae. Provided a high level of technicity, it should be admitted to-day that a durable locoregional cure can be obtained in the vast majority of cases with but minimal tissue sequelae.

  18. Rhizophores in Rhizophora mangle L: an alternative interpretation of so-called ''aerial roots''

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Nanuza L. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora mangle L., one of the most common mangrove species, has an aerial structure system that gives it stability in permanently swampy soils. In fact, these structures, known as "aerial roots" or "stilt roots", have proven to be peculiar branches with positive geotropism, which form a large number of roots when in contact with swampy soils. These organs have a sympodial branching system, wide pith, slightly thickened cortex, collateral vascular bundles, polyarch stele and endarch protoxylem, as in the stem, and a periderm produced by a phellogen at the apex similar to a root cap. They also have the same type of trichosclereid that occurs in the stem, with negative geotropism, unlike true Rhizophora roots, which do not form trichosclereids at all. On the other hand, these branches do not form leaves and in this respect they are similar to roots. These peculiar branches are rhizophores or special root-bearing branches, analogous to those found in Lepidodendrales and other Carboniferous tree ferns that grew in swampy soils.

  19. How Real Is the So-called China Threat to U.S. Backyard?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The nascent U. S. nervous screams at Chinese activities in Latin America catch the eye with their dubious timing, hysterical content and relevance to China-U. S. relations. Why such a fuss over normal Chinese moves in that region? Can the imports of Chinese goods there possibly imply any imaginary security risk to the United States? Is there any ground for skepticism about Chinese intentions?How should China interact with the United States in that region?These are all upshots of closer Chinese ties with the United States and its southern neighbors, fresh issues that claim removal of misunderstandings between Washington and Beijing.

  20. Looking at Intelligence from So-Called Noncognitive Traits: Be Open to Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ziegler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within this commentary, I will try to extend the views presented in Johnson’s, as well as Hunt and Jaeggi’s, commentaries. Both commentaries address the issue of intelligence development. I will try to broaden the discussion by including noncognitive traits as predictors of cognitive development. These ideas are founded within the environmental enrichment hypothesis and the Openness-Fluid-Crystallized-Intelligence (OFCI model.

  1. Could post-liver transplantation course be helpful for the diagnosis of so called cryptogenic cirrhosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles; Yilmaz, Funda; Johanet, Catherine; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Gigou, Michelle; Trichet, Catherine; Féray, Cyrille; Ballot, Eric; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Castaing, Denis; Bismuth, Henri; Samuel, Didier; Guettier, Catherine

    2005-10-01

    Cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) is diagnosed in 5-30% of cirrhotic patients overall and 7% of patients who undergo liver transplantation for cirrhosis. In our series of patients transplanted for CC, pre-transplant clinical and histological data and the post-transplant course were reexamined in an attempt to identify the aetiology. Among the 881 patients transplanted in our centre between 1987 and 2000, 28 patients with a median age of 46 yr (range: 18-69) at transplantation were initially classified as having CC. Two patients were excluded because of intense ischaemic lesions caused by chemoembolization prevented histological analysis of the native liver (n = 1) and because of cryptic HBV infection (n = 1). Among the remaining 26 patients, four groups were individualized: (i) patients with chronic inflammatory liver disease with autoimmune features (n = 14, 54%); (ii) patients with features suggestive of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n = 3, 11.5%); (iii); patients with incomplete septal cirrhosis (ISC) and vascular liver disease (n = 3), and (iv) patients with unresolved CC (n = 6, 23%). In the autoimmune liver disease group, the median International Autoimmune Hepatitis score was 12.5 (range: 11-19) after reevaluation and review of the post-transplantation course was helpful to confirm the diagnosis with the occurrence of active graft hepatitis in nine patients, with autoantibodies in five patients. The vascular group was characterized by lesions of obliterative portal venopathy and ISC in all native livers. Diagnosis of NAFLD was based on the clinical background of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes and the presence of steatosis or steatohepatitis in native livers and graft biopsies. A definite aetiological diagnosis can be achieved in the majority of patients initially diagnosed with CC. Autoimmune liver disease emerged as the main aetiology (14 of 26 patients, 54%) and frequently recurred on the grafted liver (nine cases). In all cases a precise diagnosis is obviously of practical interest for better management of post-transplant survey and treatment.

  2. On the so-called rogue waves in the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y Charles

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we exam the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations). Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions,and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  3. On the origin of the so-called Meckelian ossicles in the nasal skull of odontocetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, M; van Bree, P J

    1990-01-01

    Although Cave (1987) accepts the theory that the Meckelian ossicles originate from the maxilloturbinals, evidence given in his study in fact supports the opinion of Klima and van Bree (1985) that the Meckelian ossicles arise from elements of the nasal floor, solum nasi, of the embryonic nasal capsule, in particular from the lamina transversalis anterior and the cartilago paraseptalis.

  4. So-called "immature dentinoma": a case presentation and histological comparison with ameloblastic fibrodentinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Y

    1994-02-01

    The existence of the "dentinoma" as an independent entity has not been fully accepted, recently being regarded as an ameloblastic fibroma with formation of dentin and named an ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. However, there are histological differences between the several cases reported previously as "immature dentinoma" and the ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. This paper presents a case report of a dentin-forming intraosseous benign tumor without any histological features of ameloblastic fibroma. The patient was a 30-year-old woman with a rather well-circumscribed intraosseous lesion of the mandibular left premolar area. Histologically, the lesion consisted of dentin-like tissue with a tubular structure and globular calcifications, numerous epithelial strands and islands without enamel organ-like structure, and a cellular fibrous component without a primitive dental papilla-like appearance. The present case and a review of the literature suggest that epithelial elements in odontogenic fibroma-like lesions may occasionally have an inductive effect for dentin or dentin-like tissue formation.

  5. The So-Called “Islamic Terrorism”: A Tale of the Ambiguous Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Surya Atmaja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available "What does the term "terrorism" mean." Why does the term “terrorism” often identified as Islam? "If terrorism is an ism that affects "terror" that it generates, while Islam which literally means "peace", then the two terms certainly mismatch! Such question and statement show Muslims’ concern over frequent phenomena of "terrorism" using Islamic religious symbols. The research undertaken proved that there are three explanations. First, a close tripartite network connection between “terrorism experts” and the circles of power policy holders who are also supported by senior journalists in the international media influence. Second, a long tradition of Orientalist studies in the study of the Middle East region and the study of religion in the Arab culture. Figures such as Bernard Lewis, Noah Feldman, Raphael Patai and other Middle East experts often sit with other experts in the field of terrorism (the first factor and become main advisors and expert staff for the US government in the formulation of action to counter terror. It was the catalyst for the transmission of viewpoint which then decorated orientalist discourse of Islamic terrorism in the process of political policies. Third, a lot of Islamic terrorism discourse refers to the long tradition of cultural stereotypes and biased representations of the media that often portray Islam and Muslims as ‘the enemy’. The reason is that it reflects the perspective of socio-Western culture that fears and worries the other oriental parties which has been stereotyped since the imperial era. Many also argue that the dichotomy of the orientalist views are deliberately preserved as a form of new style imperialism

  6. [The so-called "chocolate cyst"--frequently misinterpreted as ovarian endometriosis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B; Schindler, A E

    1996-09-01

    Limitation of morphological diagnostic and possible misinterpretations are shown in a patient with anamnestic ovarian endometriosis. In cases of "chocolate cysts" it is necessary to differentiate between ovarian endometriosis and functional cysts. Hints for the existence of a functional cyst are an atypical past history or perioperative findings. Biochemical analysis of the cyst fluid may lead to a correct diagnosis.

  7. [Pathomorphological changes in the organs of cattle dying in so-called sudden death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelev, V; de Pino, A M

    1984-01-01

    Studied were morphologically the organs of 10 cattle originating from two provinces of Cuba that suddenly succumbed ( muerte subita ). There were hemorrahagic diathesis, and histologically--general activation of the reticulo-endothelial system, nonsuppurative encephalomyocarditis, interstitial nonsuppurative hepatitis, nephritis, and pneumonia as well as catarrhal hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. In all cases there were among the lymphoid proliferations diffusely disseminated eosinophile leukocytes ( hyperergia ). This finding showed that the disease had run a subacute or chronic course which was made acute by the action of some stress factors (continuous running, intoxications oligoelement disturbances, etc.). The finding was also characteristic of reactive processes taking place under the action of some specific virus that probably took part in the etiology of the disease and required an intermediary host that remained unknown at the time.

  8. Editorial: Hurricane Katrina rekindles thoughts about fallacies of a so-called “natural” disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Glantz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to disasters, people have to be careful about making sweeping generalizations, because they will not necessarily be evaluated for their validity. Myths of all kinds, like unfounded rumors, are very misleading and can have dangerous long-lasting consequences for societies, as well as for the victims of natural hazard-related disasters in the distant, as well as near-term, future.

  9. Did Sutton and Boveri propose the so-called Sutton-Boveri chromosome hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.-C.P. Martins

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The "Sutton-Boveri chromosome hypothesis" attempted to establish a parallel between cytological chromosome behavior and the principles followed by Mendelian factors. Today, this hypothesis is well accepted; however, it was not completely accepted at its proposal (1902-3. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the meaning of the chromosome hypothesis based on the original scientific works, taking into account the scientific context of that time. The negative treatment this hypothesis received is evaluated. I conclude that it was unfair to include Boveri's name beside that of Sutton's as one of the proponents of the chromosome hypothesis of Mendelian heredity, because he did not publish any hypothesis of that kind during the relevant period (1902-1903. Moreover, no coherent chromosome hypothesis existed during that period. Sutton and other researchers of that time were strongly influenced both by cytological knowledge grounded in observations and theoretical presuppositions that led to interpretations with no observational basis. The chromosome hypothesis was not proposed as a result of experimental cytological research.

  10. Did Sutton and Boveri propose the so-called Sutton-Boveri chromosome hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins L.A.-C.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Sutton-Boveri chromosome hypothesis" attempted to establish a parallel between cytological chromosome behavior and the principles followed by Mendelian factors. Today, this hypothesis is well accepted; however, it was not completely accepted at its proposal (1902-3. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the meaning of the chromosome hypothesis based on the original scientific works, taking into account the scientific context of that time. The negative treatment this hypothesis received is evaluated. I conclude that it was unfair to include Boveri's name beside that of Sutton's as one of the proponents of the chromosome hypothesis of Mendelian heredity, because he did not publish any hypothesis of that kind during the relevant period (1902-1903. Moreover, no coherent chromosome hypothesis existed during that period. Sutton and other researchers of that time were strongly influenced both by cytological knowledge grounded in observations and theoretical presuppositions that led to interpretations with no observational basis. The chromosome hypothesis was not proposed as a result of experimental cytological research.

  11. Spatial abilities, Earth science conceptual understanding, and psychological gender of university non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Alice A. (Jill)

    Research has shown the presence of many Earth science misconceptions and conceptual difficulties that may impede concept understanding, and has also identified a number of categories of spatial ability. Although spatial ability has been linked to high performance in science, some researchers believe it has been overlooked in traditional education. Evidence exists that spatial ability can be improved. This correlational study investigated the relationship among Earth science conceptual understanding, three types of spatial ability, and psychological gender, a self-classification that reflects socially-accepted personality and gender traits. A test of Earth science concept understanding, the Earth Science Concepts (ESC) test, was developed and field tested from 2001 to 2003 in 15 sections of university classes. Criterion validity was .60, significant at the .01 level. Spearman/Brown reliability was .74 and Kuder/Richardson reliability was .63. The Purdue Visualization of Rotations (PVOR) (mental rotation), the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (spatial perception), the Differential Aptitude Test: Space Relations (DAT) (spatial visualization), and the Bem Inventory (BI) (psychological gender) were administered to 97 non-major university students enrolled in undergraduate science classes. Spearman correlations revealed moderately significant correlations at the .01 level between ESC scores and each of the three spatial ability test scores. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that PVOR scores were the best predictor of ESC scores, and showed that spatial ability scores accounted for 27% of the total variation in ESC scores. Spatial test scores were moderately or weakly correlated with each other. No significant correlations were found among BI scores and other test scores. Scantron difficulty analysis of ESC items produced difficulty ratings ranging from 33.04 to 96.43, indicating the percentage of students who answered incorrectly. Mean score on the ESC was 34

  12. Rio De Janeiro to Claremont: Promoting Intercultural Competence through Student-Driven Online Intercultural Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, Juanita C.; Welch, Patrick McDermott

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the process by which the authors created a Virtual Learning Community for cultural and linguistic exchange between college students of Portuguese in the United States and undergraduate and graduate students of English in Brazil. In addition to describing the way the so-called tandem model for telecollaboration was adapted to…

  13. Student Needs and Motives When Attending a University: Exploring the Syrian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fattal, Anas; Ayoubi, Rami

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring student needs and motives to pursue higher education in Syria. Based on the model of student buyer behavior developed by Kotler and Fox in 1995, the study focuses on the first step of this model, so-called motives. The study results are based on qualitative data collected by means of semi-structured styles of…

  14. Study of Citizen Competences among Students of a Private University in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorza, Eloisa Heredia; Escorza, Yolanda Heredia; Medina-Aguilar, Graciela; Cordero-Diaz, Mary Ana; Martinez, Roman Martinez; Leon, Sergio Alberto Lopez

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the narratives of a group of college students in so-called "Citizen Experience Reports" (REC). These reports provide an account of experiences carried out by students during their social service. The objective was to analyze these narratives and identify the level of development of related skills concerning…

  15. Guaranteed Student Loans. Comparisons of Single State and Multistate Guaranty Agencies. Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    A comparison was made of the practices of so-called multistate guaranty agencies with those of single state guaranty agencies, both operating under the provisions of the Stafford Student Loan Program (formerly the Guaranteed Student Loan Program). It expands on earlier results and provides data on trends in the growth of guaranteed loans and…

  16. Old Texts and Opera--Inciting Students to Read

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyshyn, Yaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Eleventh grade English class "special students" with a fourth or fifth grade level of reading ability are won over by an enterprising teacher reading stories by Boccaccio, Chaucer and Shakespeare and introducing them to opera. The so called difficult kids often have more aptitude and talent than given credit for by shortsighted teachers and…

  17. The Impact of Transformational Leadership, Experiential Learning, and Reflective Journaling on the Conservation Ethic of Tertiary-Level Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Bradley Robert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of transformational leadership, experiential learning, and reflective journaling on the conservation ethic of non-science majors in a general education survey course was investigated. The main research questions were: (1) Is the Conservation of Biodiversity professor a transformational leader? (2) Is there a difference in the…

  18. Elementary School Teachers' Knowledge of Model Functions and Modeling Processes: A Comparison of Science and Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to: (a) understand practicing teachers' knowledge of model functions and modeling processes, (b) compare the similarities and differences between the knowledge of science and non-science major teachers, and (c) explore the possible reasons for the similarities and differences between the knowledge of these 2 groups. A 4-point…

  19. Student progression on time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    The paper discusses and problematizes the ways, in which recent Danish university reform challenges the ideals of the ‘Nordic model’. The aim of the so-called ‘speed-up’ reform (in Danish ‘studiefremdriftsreformen’) is to cut the time available for students to complete their university studies....... Starting in mid 2014 students will be obliged to sign up for exams for at least 60 ECTS a year. If a student flunks or in other ways gets more than 30 ECTS delayed, the state grants will stop until the student has regained the missing ECTS. Simultaneously, we see a major change in what is meant...... by flexibility. Before the reform, the system was increasingly required to facilitate transfer of credits and make it easier for students to compose more personalized learning portfolios, which can include courses from different institutions and study programmes. The latter is very much in line with the ideas...

  20. Student progression on time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    The paper discusses and problematizes the ways, in which recent Danish university reform challenges the ideals of the ‘Nordic model’. The aim of the so-called ‘speed-up’ reform (in Danish ‘studiefremdriftsreformen’) is to cut the time available for students to complete their university studies...... by flexibility. Before the reform, the system was increasingly required to facilitate transfer of credits and make it easier for students to compose more personalized learning portfolios, which can include courses from different institutions and study programmes. The latter is very much in line with the ideas....... Starting in mid 2014 students will be obliged to sign up for exams for at least 60 ECTS a year. If a student flunks or in other ways gets more than 30 ECTS delayed, the state grants will stop until the student has regained the missing ECTS. Simultaneously, we see a major change in what is meant...

  1. Finding Out What They Really Think: Assessing Non-Science Majors' Views of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Parra, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    As institutions of higher learning are increasingly held accountable for student outcomes, faculty are faced with the challenge to clearly articulate and assess what students should learn in their courses. We report on the assessment of a liberal studies learning outcome related to the nature of science, which involved 178 students from 41…

  2. Finding Out What They Really Think: Assessing Non-Science Majors' Views of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Parra, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    As institutions of higher learning are increasingly held accountable for student outcomes, faculty are faced with the challenge to clearly articulate and assess what students should learn in their courses. We report on the assessment of a liberal studies learning outcome related to the nature of science, which involved 178 students from 41…

  3. When Science and Information Literacy Meet: An Approach to Exploring the Sources of Science News with Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majetic, Cassie; Pellegrino, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The skill set associated with lifelong scientific literacy often includes the ability to decode the content and accuracy of scientific research as presented in the media. However, students often find decoding science in the media difficult, due to limited content knowledge and shifting definitions of accuracy. Faculty have developed a variety of…

  4. Results of the 2004 DesignShare POE Program: Students and Teachers Tell Us what They Really Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackney, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    DesignShare/School Construction News (DS/SCN) Jurists have often critically reflected on their desire to know more about how teachers and students really experience so-called innovative award-winning schools. Through the DesignShare Post-Occupancy Evaluation Program, the intention is to give voice to the individuals whose lives are directly…

  5. The teacher's role in college level classes for non-science majors: A constructivist approach for teaching prospective science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdullah Othman

    1997-12-01

    This interpretive research set out to investigate the characteristics of an exemplary college science instructor who endeavors to improve teaching and learning in a physical science course for prospective teachers. The course was innovative in the sense that it was designed to meet the specific needs of prospective elementary teachers who needed to have models of how to teach science in a way that employed materials and small group activities. The central purpose for this study is to understand the metaphors that Mark (a pseudonym), the chemistry instructor in the course, used as referents to conceptualize his roles and frame actions and interactions in the classroom. Within the theoretical frame of constructivism, human cognitive interests, and co-participation theories, an ethnographic research design, described by Erickson (1986), Guba and Lincoln (1989), and Gallagher (1991), was employed in the study. The main sources of data for this study were field notes, transcript analysis of interviews with the instructor and students, and analyses of videotaped excerpts. Additional data sources, such as student journals and the results of students' responses to the University/Community College Student Questionnaire which was developed by a group science education researchers at Florida State University, were employed to maximize that the assertions I constructed were consistent with the variety of data. Data analyses and interpretation in the study focused on identifying the aspects which the instructor and the researcher might find useful in reflecting to understand what was happening and why that was happening in the classroom. The analysis reveals how the instructor used constructivism as a referent for his teaching and the learning of his students. To be consistent with his beliefs and goals that prospective teachers should enjoy their journey of learning chemistry, Mark, the driver in the journey, used the roles of controller, facilitator, learner, and entertainer

  6. "They Don't Know What It Means to Be a Student": Inclusion and Exclusion in the Nexus between "Global" and "Local"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Line Torbjørnsen

    2016-01-01

    This article will show how the global educational policy expectations of being a "self-managing learner" unfold in the context of two school organisations in Norway, and contribute to the exclusion of so-called newly arrived minority language students. The theoretical framework is Niklas Luhmann's theory of the global educational system,…

  7. Making Sense of Scientific Biographies: Scientific Achievement, Nature of Science, and Storylines in College Students' Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the educative value of scientific biographies will be explored, especially for non-science major college students. During the "Scientist's life and thought" course, 66 college students read nine scientific biographies including five biologists, covering the canonical scientific achievements in Western scientific history.…

  8. University Students' Understanding of Chemistry Processes and the Quality of Evidence in Their Written Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Eulsun; Choi, Aeran; Pestel, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a process-oriented chemistry laboratory curriculum for non-science majors. The purpose of this study is both to explore university students' understanding of chemistry processes and to evaluate the quality of evidence students use to support their claims regarding chemistry processes in a process-oriented chemistry laboratory…

  9. University Students' Understanding of Chemistry Processes and the Quality of Evidence in Their Written Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Eulsun; Choi, Aeran; Pestel, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a process-oriented chemistry laboratory curriculum for non-science majors. The purpose of this study is both to explore university students' understanding of chemistry processes and to evaluate the quality of evidence students use to support their claims regarding chemistry processes in a process-oriented chemistry laboratory…

  10. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Students' Feelings regarding the Use of Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj-Sharma, Rawatee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparative study of two groups of learners--group 1 (25 non-science students) and group 2 (25 A-level physics students). It explores the extent to which their feelings and emotions in conjunction with their knowledge about nuclear energy impacts and influences their views and feelings about the use of…

  11. Making Sense of Scientific Biographies: Scientific Achievement, Nature of Science, and Storylines in College Students' Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyoung

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the educative value of scientific biographies will be explored, especially for non-science major college students. During the "Scientist's life and thought" course, 66 college students read nine scientific biographies including five biologists, covering the canonical scientific achievements in Western scientific history.…

  12. Mesial temporal lobe morphology in intractable pediatric epilepsy: so-called hippocampal malrotation, associated findings, and relevance to presurgical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, James L; Awwad, Reem; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer J; Miles, Lili; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Diagnostic criteria for hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL) on brain MRI typically include a rounded hippocampus, vertical collateral sulcus, and architectural blurring. Relationship to epileptogenesis remains speculative, and usefulness for surgical guidance is unknown. The study was performed to determine the prevalence of hippocampal rotational anomalies in a cohort of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy undergoing evaluation for surgery and to determine the significance of this finding in the context of surgical planning. METHODS Forty-eight surgically treated children with intractable epilepsy were compared with matched healthy subjects; reviewers were blinded to surgical side. Each temporal lobe was evaluated for rounded hippocampus, blurring, vertical collateral sulcus, wide choroidal fissure, enlarged temporal horn, low fornix, hippocampal signal, and findings of hippocampal sclerosis. A mesial temporal lobe (MTL) score was calculated by summing the number of features, and the collateral sulcus angle (CSA) was measured in each temporal lobe. Surgical side, pathological diagnosis, and imaging findings elsewhere in the brain were tabulated. Presence of HIMAL, associated imaging features, and MTL score were compared between sides, between epilepsy and control groups, in relationship to side of surgery, and in relationship to postoperative outcome. RESULTS Only 3 epilepsy patients (6.2%) and no controls exhibited all 3 features of HIMAL (p = 0.12). Eight of 48 (16.7%) epilepsy versus 2 of 48 (4.6%) control subjects had both a rounded hippocampus and vertical collateral sulcus (suggesting HIMAL) (p = 0.045). In control and epilepsy subjects, most findings were more prevalent on the left, and the left CSA was more vertical (p Epilepsy subjects had higher MTL scores (z = -2.95, p = 0.002) and more acute CSAs (p = 0.04) than controls. Only lateralizing raw MTL score had a significant association with surgical side (p = 0.03, OR 7.33); however, this was not significant when hippocampal sclerosis cases were excluded. HIMAL findings were more prevalent and MTL scores were higher in patients with resections involving the temporal lobes. On group analysis, HIMAL findings did not predict eventual surgical side and did not predict outcome, although the numbers are small. In 4 patients the abnormally rotated hippocampus was resected and showed hippocampal sclerosis and/or dysplastic changes on histopathology. All of these patients had a good outcome after surgery. CONCLUSIONS While increased in prevalence in children with intractable epilepsy, imaging findings of HIMAL did not have preoperative lateralizing utility in this group. Findings of HIMAL (including round hippocampus, architectural blurring, and vertical collateral sulcus) did not predict outcome after surgery, although the small number of patients with these findings limits evaluation. In the small number of patients in which the malrotated hippocampus was removed, outcome was good. Further research is needed to continue to define this association in children with intractable epilepsy, focusing on a temporal lobe cohort.

  13. Should Europe follow the US and declare obesity a disease?: a discussion of the so-called utilitarian argument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul; Hansen, Anne Katrine Kleberg

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the American Medical Association (AMA) decided to recognize obesity as a disease. One of the main arguments presented in favor of this was broadly ‘utilitarian’: the disease label would, it was claimed, provide more benefits than harms and thereby serve the general good. Several individu......In 2013, the American Medical Association (AMA) decided to recognize obesity as a disease. One of the main arguments presented in favor of this was broadly ‘utilitarian’: the disease label would, it was claimed, provide more benefits than harms and thereby serve the general good. Several...

  14. The so-called verba hamzata, verba infirma and verba mediae geminatae in the dialect of Baghdad

    OpenAIRE

    Siwiec, Paweł

    2003-01-01

    Even the earliest Arab grammarians emphasized the distinctiveness of the verb stems with hamza and w or y as one of the root consonants. Similar attention was paid to the verbs of which the second and third radical are identical. A quite substantial part of Sībawaihi’s (750-793) Al-Kitāb deals with these issues. Sībawaihi presents in detail all the possible phonetic changes that result from such configurations of consonants in the Arabic verb stems. He does not limit himself to a rigid and st...

  15. Self-reported hard physical work combined with heavy smoking or overweight may result in so-called Modic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kjaer, Per; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the MRI finding of "Modic changes" has been identified as pathologic spinal condition that probably reflects a vertebral inflammatory process (VIP), which coincides with spinal pain in most. We hypothesized that heavy smoking in combination with macro- or repeated microtraum...... and secondary prevention of LBP, because blue collar workers, who are most likely to experience the consequences of LBP, also are those who are most likely to smoke....

  16. Once again: The so-called open access system in power supply. Noch einmal: Zum sogenannten Netzzugang Dritter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaue, S.

    1993-04-20

    The author discusses the following arguments: Since article 103, sub-section 5, sentence 2, no. 4 (common carriage) of the GWB (German law against restraints on competition) already fully defines the right of access of third parties to power transmission networks, there is no need any more to give a justification in terms of regulatory policy of the relevant EC Directive being adopted as German national law. Also, the other argument says, there are already many decisions by the European Court of Justice and the German Constitutional Court, relating to cartels and competition, defining for many cases already the obligation of the market-dominating undertaking to allow third-parties and competitors access to their power transmission network in the domestic market. (orig./HP).

  17. Towards the issue on practical function of the medieval so called «reliquaries» of Еastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokorina Nina A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A specific type of items – horn tubes, common in the Khazar Kaganate and adjacent territories is considered. The author makes a conclusion that the term “reliquary” often used to denote them does not correspond to the initial purpose of these items. During the life of the owner, they had not been containers designed to store objects of worship. Written, visual, archaeological and ethnographic sources testify to the use of these items by pastoral peoples of Eurasian steppes as devices to inflate leather boat analogs when crossing rivers. At the same time, they were naturally objects of worship, as the means of saving lives at crossings. They were often placed in burials, playing the role of repositories for sacred objects, and were also used in burial rites as items necessary for the afterlife.

  18. On the problem of practical destination of so-called “reliquaries“ in medieval eastern europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokorina Nina A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A specific type of items – horn tubes, common in the Khazar Kaganate and adjacent territories is considered. The author makes a conclusion that the term “reliquary” often used to denote them does not correspond to the initial purpose of these items. During the life of the owner, they had not been containers designed to store objects of worship. Written, visual, archaeological and ethnographic sources testify to the use of these items by pastoral peoples of Eurasian steppes as devices to inflate leather boat analogs when crossing rivers. At the same time, they were naturally objects of worship, as the means of saving lives at crossings. They were often placed in burials, playing the role of repositories for sacred objects, and were also used in burial rites as items necessary for the afterlife.

  19. Self-reported hard physical work combined with heavy smoking or overweight may result in so-called Modic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendix Tom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the MRI finding of "Modic changes" has been identified as pathologic spinal condition that probably reflects a vertebral inflammatory process (VIP, which coincides with spinal pain in most. We hypothesized that heavy smoking in combination with macro- or repeated microtrauma could lead to VIP. The objectives were to investigate if combinations of self-reported heavy smoking, hard physical work, and overweight would be more strongly linked with VIP than with other spinal conditions, such as degenerated discs and non-specific low back pain (LBP. Methods Secondary analysis was made of a data base pertaining to a population-based cross-sectional study. A population-generated cohort of 412 40-yr old Danes provided questionnaire information on smoking, weight, height, type of work, and LBP. MRI was used to determine the presence/absence of disc degeneration and of VIP. Associations were tested between three explanatory variables (type of work, smoking, and body mass index and four outcome variables (LBP in the past year, more persistent LBP in the past year, disc degeneration, and VIP. Associations with these four outcome variables were studied for each single explanatory variable and for combinations of two at a time, and, finally, in a multivariable analysis including all three explanatory variables. Results There were no significant associations between the single explanatory variables and the two pain variables or with disc degeneration. However, VIP was found in 15% of non-smokers vs. 26% of heavy smokers. Similarly, VIP was noted in 11% of those in sedentary jobs vs. 31% of those with hard physical work. Further, the prevalence of VIP in those, who neither smoked heavily nor had a hard physical job was 13%, 25% in those who either smoked heavily or had a hard physical job, and 41% in those who both smoked heavily and worked hard. The odds ratio was 4.9 (1.6–13.0 for those who were both heavy smokers and had a hard physical job as compared to those who were classified as "neither". Similar but weaker findings were noted for the combination of overweight and hard physical work but not for the combination of smoking and overweight. Conclusion Hard physical work in combination with either heavy smoking or overweight is strongly associated with VIP. If this finding can be reproduced in other studies, it may have consequences in relation to both primary and secondary prevention of LBP, because blue collar workers, who are most likely to experience the consequences of LBP, also are those who are most likely to smoke.

  20. On the mechanism of the so-called uncoupling effect of medium- and short-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönfeld, P.; Wojtczak, A. B.; Geelen, M.J.H.; Kunz, W.; Wojtczak, L.

    1988-01-01

    Octanoate applied to rat liver mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate or succinate (plus rotenone) under resting-state (State 4) conditions stimulates oxygen uptake and decreases the membrane potential, both effects being sensitive to oligomycin but not to carboxyatractyloside. Octanoate

  1. [Can meta-medicine bridge the gap between para-medicine and so-called school medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzy, K H

    1990-02-28

    The concept of metamedicine is analogous to the concept of metaphysics. According to Kants perception, medicine has its origin in the human mind ("Gemüt") which is the source of all kinds of arts. Controversally to Kant, Fichte established I and non-I as a subject-object relationship. School philosophy, psychology and biology tend to banish the "subject" into mysticism but it comes up again in modern physics. Medicine as "art of healing" can only happen between subjects (physician and patient). Considering "metamedical" points of view, it cannot exist without the I/you respectively the you/I relationship. Following Plato, this means "loving-science" and is common to all kinds of medicine.

  2. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  3. Completion of cathode strip chamber (CSC) installation on the so-called YE+2 wheel of CMS on March 2005.

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee

    2005-01-01

    The pictures have been taken in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5, in March 2005 and show the status of cathode strip chamber (CSC) assembly on the yoke disk YE+2. The chambers are labelled ME+3 and their installation has been completed on March 16th, 2005.

  4. Rheumatic diseases at the court of the Medici of Florence: the so-called “gout” of the Medici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fornaciari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the archive documents several members of the Medici family of Florence suffered from gout. The word “gout”, with which the Renaissance physicians indicated pain episodes localised to hands, feet, spine and shoulders, was in general improperly used, and hint other nosological entities. A paleopathological investigation carried out on the skeletal remains of the Grand Dukes of Florence and their relatives, revealed the true nature of the diseases they suffered from, allowing to diagnose two cases of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH, a case of rheumatoid arthritis in an advanced stage, and a case of gout.

  5. On the mechanism of the so-called uncoupling effect of medium- and short-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönfeld, P.; Wojtczak, A. B.; Geelen, M.J.H.; Kunz, W.; Wojtczak, L.

    1988-01-01

    Octanoate applied to rat liver mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate or succinate (plus rotenone) under resting-state (State 4) conditions stimulates oxygen uptake and decreases the membrane potential, both effects being sensitive to oligomycin but not to carboxyatractyloside. Octanoate

  6. On the Persistance of Dualism in our so-called Unified Neurosciences: The case of the autonomic nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pattyn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the historical overview of descriptions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS is applied as a case study to serve the demonstration of the persistence of dualisms in our current framework of neurosciences. First, the four main views on the ANS are briefly summarised, with an emphasis on the latest one, being the neurovisceral integration perspectives, striving for an integrative view on cognition, emotion regulation and physiological adaptation. Second, an explanation is offered on why we are so reluctant to give up the explanatory framework of dualisms, based on both developmental psychology accounts and postmodernism philosophy. To conclude, an attitude based on positivism and epistemological anarchism is suggested for scientists.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive phenomenon in a so-called 'symptomarme schizophrenie': from the viewpoint of structural dynamics in defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, H

    1996-01-01

    (1)'Antieidos' is a formlessness that results from the reverse intentionality of the life formation and is considered to be a principle of obsessive psychosis. 'Internal emptiness' is supposed to exist in the nucleus of schizophrenia. 'Antieidos' and 'internal emptiness' are in close proximity, partly overlapping each other. Obsessive psychosis and some types of simple schizophrenia are considered to have a common intentionality for the obsessive-compulsive phenomenon from the viewpoint of defensive structural dynamics. (2) The obsessive-compulsive phenomenon and the hypochondriacal phenomenon that coexist in simple schizophrenia are considered to be a 'noema' (something in which a meaning is given to the intended experience) that results from 'noesis' (action of consciousness seen in the intended experience) which has a defensive intentionality and as a result masks the basic disturbance in schizophrenia. Complementarity between the obsessive-compulsive phenomenon and the hypochondriacal phenomenon structured in this way can form one type of disease in the nonself-introspective category of simple schizophrenia.

  8. How do young people from so called “rough area” perceive the society where they are evolving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Belgacem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What young people see from the society they are evolving in gives us a clue about and an understanding of the reasons why they sometimes become violent. Young people are revolted because they feel like a lot of things are unfair; they miss “moral values” and “points of reference”, as if nothing made “sense” anymore. Then, consumer society leads some young people into confusing reality with fictional fact and ultimately creates envy and jealousy. With the evolution of society and the fact that traditional rites “disappear”, young people are faced with the only rite that still exists to “jump” from childhood to grow-up world: school. But those who are not going to school will have to find and search for other “ rites of passage ” and we think that this is a major risk for young people, because this is where they could be “separated” from the society. Having to deal with this evolution, young people have some problems finding people they can identify themselves with.

  9. How do young people from so called “rough area” perceive the society where they are evolving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Belgacem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What young people see from the society they are evolving in gives us a clue about and an understanding of the reasons why they sometimes become violent. Young people are revolted because they feel like a lot of things are unfair; they miss “moral values” and “points of reference”, as if nothing made “sense” anymore. Then, consumersociety leads some young people into confusing reality with fictional fact and ultimately creates envy and jealousy. With the evolution of society and the fact that traditional rites “disappear”, young people are faced with the only rite that still exists to “jump” from childhood to grow-up world: school. But those who are not going to school will have to find and search for other “ rites of passage ” and we think that this is a major risk for young people, because this is where they could be “separated” from the society. Having to deal with this evolution, young people have some problems finding people they can identify themselves with.

  10. Current results of an arachnological survey of some sandstone rock sites in Bohemia (so-called "rock cities"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžička, Vlastimil

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The spider fauna of the Adrspach-Teplice rockswas investigated. Some records on spider fauna of other nine sandstone rock areas are included. The phenomenon of "rock cities" manifests itself in three aspects: (1 In the bottom parts are microclimatically cold spaces, frequently hosting northern ot mountain species of invertebrates, which here have an azonal occurence. (2 the sun exposed tops of rocks can host thermophilous species. (3 Some species are limited to the surface of rocks and boulders. These are referred to as lithophilous or lithobiont species.

  11. Causes and Countermeasures of Helping Poor Students to Learn English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏

    2012-01-01

    In English teaching,there is a common phenomenon:at the beginning of English learning,students are enthusiastic and full of interest; then polarization appears after a period of study.Some of the students become discouraged and lose confidence in learning English,and gradually become the so-called poor learners.Therefore,teachers should make careful analysis,find out the causes and regulate countermeasures to improve teaching methods,so that every student can get a comprehensive and healthy development.

  12. [Innovations in education for the digital student].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, P; Vervoorn, J M

    2012-06-01

    A significant percentage of today's teaching staff received their professional training before the revolution in information and communication technology took place. Students, by contrast, are so-called 'digital natives': they grew up surrounded by digital technology. Present day students are used to multi-tasking and expect to be facilitated in using educationalfacilities regardless of time and place. Adapting higher education to present day students' study behaviour and expectations requires reconsideration of educationalform and methods. Several types of staff can be distinguished in their attitude towards technological innovation in education. Among them are staff who are reluctant in accepting innovations. Dental schools face the challenge of finding supportfor innovations with all their teaching staff and to better adapt to the twenty-first century student. In order to introduce technological innovations successfully, students need to become involved and sufficient attention must be paid to qualifying instructors.

  13. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyereh Aminisani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Competency-based education has been recommended in training and education of public health to reduce the gap between traditional teaching and the competencies required in practice. Epidemiology as a fundamental of public health science has come to attention. The aim of this study was to introduce a complementary core competency program for Master of Science (MSc in epidemiology students in Iran. Methods: A workgroup in the department of statistics and epidemiology of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences including five epidemiologists and three biostatisticians prepared an outline of complementary core competencies for epidemiology MSc students. In the first step several discussion rounds were done to review the current curriculum, then the workgroup sought students’ opinions to find out about their needs. In addition, a review of the current literature around the topic was done. In the final step the program components were developed by the workgroup and initially implemented. Results: A complementary program consists of eight domains: general knowledge, problem finding, data analysis and interpretation, communications, management, consultation, leadership skills and professionalism. This program focused on basic competencies and those competencies outside the major field for a graduate of epidemiology to enhance their knowledge, attitude and skills. The program was scheduled to run in the third semester and approximate time for completion was three months. Conclusion: The development and initial implementation of the complementary core competency program was successful and the authors will attempt to extend the program and evaluate the implementation phase.

  14. Generation 1.5--a different kind of millennial student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Emily J

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to so-called "millennial students" in recent years, particularly regarding their relationship to technology, learning, and communication. Less notice has been taken of another kind of millennial student increasingly represented in our classrooms --those who were born in another country, but received a significant amount of their schooling here. Often referred to as Generation 1.5 because they have language characteristics in common with first- and second-generation immigrants, these bilingual students are a valuable resource for the physician assistant (PA) profession. However, just as teaching native-born millennial students may require some adjustment of instructional methods, Generation 1.5 students will require PA educators to pay closer attention to some aspects of teaching and learning. This article will discuss some of the particular challenges that Generation 1.5 students face and will argue that these challenges can be met in ways that are likely to help other nontraditional students as well.

  15. An Analysis of Metaphors Used by Students to Describe Energy in an Interdisciplinary General Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    The meaning of the term energy varies widely in scientific and colloquial discourse. Teasing apart the different connotations of the term can be especially challenging for non-science majors. In this study, undergraduate students taking an interdisciplinary, general science course (n?=?49) were asked to explain the role of energy in five contexts:…

  16. Effects of Node-Link Mapping on Non-Science Majors' Meaningful Learning and Conceptual Change in a Life-Science Survey Lecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Martinez, Jayne Irene

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of node-link mapping on students' meaningful learning and conceptual change in a 1-semester introductory life-science course. This study used node-link mapping to integrate and apply the National Research Council's (NRC, 2005) three principles of human learning: engaging students' prior…

  17. Enhancing the Educational Astronomical Experience of Non-Science Majors With the Use of an iPad and Telescope (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R. M.; Burin, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    General Education (GE) classes are designed to broaden the understanding of all college and university students in areas outside their major interest. However, most GE classes are lecture type and do not facilitate hands-on experimental or observational activities related to the specific subject matter. Utilizing several astronomy application programs (apps), currently available for the iPad and iPhone, in conjunction with a small inexpensive telescope allows students unique hands-on experiences to explore and observe astronomical objects and concepts independently outside of class. These activities enhance the student's overall GE experience in a unique way not possible prior to the development of this technology.

  18. An Analysis of Metaphors Used by Students to Describe Energy in an Interdisciplinary General Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael

    2015-04-01

    The meaning of the term energy varies widely in scientific and colloquial discourse. Teasing apart the different connotations of the term can be especially challenging for non-science majors. In this study, undergraduate students taking an interdisciplinary, general science course (n = 49) were asked to explain the role of energy in five contexts: radiation, transportation, generating electricity, earthquakes, and the big bang theory. The responses were qualitatively analyzed under the framework of conceptual metaphor theory. This study presents evidence that non-science major students spontaneously use metaphorical language that is consistent with the conceptual metaphors of energy previously identified in the discourse of students in introductory physics, biology, and chemistry courses. Furthermore, most students used multiple coherent metaphors to explain the role of energy in these complex topics. This demonstrates that these conceptual metaphors for energy have broader applicability than just traditional scientific contexts. Implications for this work as a formative assessment tool in instruction will also be discussed.

  19. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and…

  20. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and…

  1. High energy astroparticle physics for high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Maria; Classen, Lew; Holler, Markus; Hütten, Moritz; Raab, Susanne; Rautenberg, Julian; Schulz, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    The questions about the origin and type of cosmic particles are not only fascinating for scientists in astrophysics, but also for young enthusiastic high school students. To familiarize them with research in astroparticle physics, the Pierre Auger Collaboration agreed to make 1% of its data publicly available. The Pierre Auger Observatory investigates cosmic rays at the highest energies and consists of more than 1600 water Cherenkov detectors, located near Malarg\\"{u}e, Argentina. With publicly available data from the experiment, students can perform their own hands-on analysis. In the framework of a so-called Astroparticle Masterclass organized alongside the context of the German outreach network Netzwerk Teilchenwelt, students get a valuable insight into cosmic ray physics and scientific research concepts. We present the project and experiences with students.

  2. Index of satisfaction in engineering courses in Portugal based on the students perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Raquel; Gonçalves, A. Manuela; Vasconcelos, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we describe and characterize the student's allocation satisfaction in the Portuguese public higher education system through the students' point of view, namely, in the academic engineering programs, extending previous studies of the author's team. We compare the ratio provided by the Portuguese Education Ministry through the Institutions' point of view, demand satisfaction index with the ratio proposed, applicant's satisfaction index, for the so called post-Bologna period. The data used in this paper covers the years from 2007 to 2013, provided by the Portuguese Education Institute. Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed in order to assess whether there are significant differences between the ratios.

  3. "Did You Say 50% of My Grade?"--Teaching Introductory Physics to Non-Science Majors through a Haunted Physics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Several years ago I attended an AAPT Haunted Physics Workshop taught by Dr. Tom Zepf from Creighton University. Dr. Zepf's highly successful Haunted Physics Lab at Creighton was put on every October by his physics majors. I found the concept of exhibiting physics projects in a "fun" way to students, faculty, and the public very exciting, so an…

  4. Analysis of the relationship between food habits and health students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podrigalo L.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes nutrition of students, based on the assessment of frequency of consumption of basic food products. The study involved 50 students aged 21-22 years. Set that the nutrition of the majority of students is irrational, in the daily life of young people there is a number of risk factors associated with inadequate intake of healthy food products. Have far-reaching enough food habits due to the consumption of so-called "food waste". The analysis of the correlation relationship between nutrition, mental performance and lifestyle factors, confirmed that a violation of the rules of a healthy diet affects the performance efficiency, increases the likelihood of bad habits. Slow food culture, lack of knowledge of young people on healthy food cause the need for appropriate health education.

  5. Student Media Usage Patterns and Non-Traditional Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Zawacki-Richter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2,338 students at German universities participated in a survey, which investigated media usage patterns of so-called traditional and non-traditional students (Schuetze & Wolter, 2003. The students provided information on the digital devices that they own or have access to, and on their usage of media and e-learning tools and services for their learning. A distinction was made between external, formal and internal, informal tools and services. Based on the students’ responses, a typology of media usage patterns was established by means of a latent class analysis (LCA. Four types or profiles of media usage patterns were identified. These types were labeled entertainment users, peripheral users, advanced users and instrumental users. Among non-traditional students, the proportion of instrumental users was rather high. Based on the usage patterns of traditional and non-traditional students, implications for media selection in the instructional design process are outlined in the paper.

  6. Epistemologies and scientific reasoning skills among undergraduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollohan, Katherine N.

    Non-cognitive factors such as students' attitudes and beliefs toward a subject and their proficiency in scientific reasoning are important aspects of learning within science disciplines. Both factors have been studied in relation to science education in various discplines. This dissertation presents three studies that investigate student epistemologies and scientific reasoning in the domain of biology education. The first study investigated students' epistemic viewpoints in two introductory biology courses, one for science majors and one for non-science majors. This quantitative investigation revealed that the majors exhibited a negative shift in their attitudes and beliefs about biology and learning biology during a semester of introductory instruction. However, the non-science majors did not exhibit a similar shift. If fact, the non-science majors improved in their attitudes and beliefs during a semester of instruction, though not significantly so. The second study expands epistemological research to a population that has often been left out of this work, that is, intermediate-level biology majors. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected to reveal that junior and senior ranked students for the most part were able to characterize their views about biology and learning biology, and were able to associate factors with their epistemic improvement. Finally, the third study expands epistemology research further to determine if scientific reasoning and student attitudes and beliefs about learning science (specifically biology) are related. After a description of how various science and engineering majors compare in their scientific reasoning skills, this study indicated that among intermediate level biology majors there is no relationship between scientific reasoning skills and epistemologies, nor is there a relationship with other educational factors, including the number of courses taken during an undergraduate career, cumulative GPA, and standardized test

  7. [Critical assessment of a new endoscopic anatomic concept for the so-called cardia in the sense of the notions of Parmenides and Martin Heidegger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegler, M; Asari, R; Cosentini, E P; Wrba, F; Schoppmann, S F

    2014-04-01

    Current endoscopic anatomy interposes the gastric cardia between the tubular oesophagus and the proximal stomach. In contrast to that, recent evidence unfolds a different view. Using "PubMed" and "Scopus" searches, we examined if the novel understanding regarding the cardia goes in line with the concept of unfolding, as described by Heidegger based on the ancient didactic poetry of Parmenides. What has been taken as gastric cardia in fact represents reflux-damaged, dilated, columnar lined oesophagus (CLO): dilated distal oesophagus (DDO). Due to its macroscopic gastric appearance it cannot be discriminated from the stomach by endoscopy. Differentiation between DDE and proximal stomach requires the histopathology of measured multi-level biopsies obtained from the DDO and the proximal stomach. Cardaic, onxytocardiac mucosa and intestinal metaplasia (IM; Barrett's oesophagus) define CLO and thus the oesophageal location, while oxyntic mucosa (OM) of the proximal stomach verifies a gastric biopsy location. Endoscopically visible CLO and DDO define the morphological manifestation of reflux: the squamo-oxyntic gap (SOG). Biopsies obtained from the level of the diaphragmatic impressions allow differentiation between an enlarged hiatus with normal anatomic content (CLO; oesophagus) vs. hernia with abnormal content (OM; stomach). Non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus exists in 10 %-17 % of asymptomatic and in 20 %-100 % (with increasing CLO length) of reflux symptom-positive individuals (annual cancer risk: 0.2 %-0.7 %). These data justify biopsy of an endoscopically normal appearing squamocolumnar junction for the exclusion of Barrett's oesophagus and cancer risk. In the absence of contraindications, cancer risk-based therapy of dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus includes radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ± endoscopic resection. The perception of the cardia as reflux damaged DDO mirrors the concept of unfolding, as described by the interpretation of the didactic poem of Parmenides by Heidegger. Our data recommend to omit the term "cardia" and allocate morphology either to the oesophagus (CLO, DDO) or to the proximal stomach or indicate that allocation is impossible (i. e.. tumour-induced). Future studies will have to test the value of this novel concept for diagnosis, treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cancer prevention.

  8. Multi-Acupuncture Point Injections and Their Anatomical Study in Relation to Neck and Shoulder Pain Syndrome (So-Called Katakori) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Hayato; Yamazaki, Hajime; Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Suyama, Kaori; Tanaka, Osamu; Sawada, Makoto; Ito, Miho; Ito, Kenji; Akamatsu, Tadashi; Masuda, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Sakabe, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Katakori is a symptom name that is unique to Japan, and refers to myofascial pain syndrome-like clinical signs in the shoulder girdle. Various methods of pain relief for katakori have been reported, but in the present study, we examined the clinical effects of multi-acupuncture point injections (MAPI) in the acupuncture points with which we empirically achieved an effect, as well as the anatomical sites affected by liquid medicine. The subjects were idiopathic katakori patients (n = 9), and three cadavers for anatomical investigation. BL-10, GB-21, LI-16, SI-14, and BL-38 as the WHO notation were selected as the acupuncture point. Injections of 1 mL of 1% w/v mepivacaine were introduced at the same time into each of these points in the patients. Assessment items were the Pain Relief Score and the therapeutic effect period. Dissections were centered at the puncture sites of cadavers. India ink was similarly injected into each point, and each site that was darkly-stained with India ink was evaluated. Katakori pain in the present study was significantly reduced by MAPI. Regardless of the presence or absence of trigger points, pain was significantly reduced in these cases. Dark staining with India ink at each of the points in the anatomical analysis was as follows: BL-10: over the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle and rectus capitis posterior major muscle fascia; GB-21: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; LI-16: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; SI-14: over the rhomboid muscle fascia; and BL-38: over the rhomboid muscle fascia. The anatomical study suggested that the drug effect was exerted on the muscles above and below the muscle fascia, as well as the peripheral nerves because the points of action in acupuncture were darkly-stained in the spaces between the muscle and the muscle fascia.

  9. Smoking Ban Policies in Italy and the Potential Impact of the So-Called Sirchia Law: State of the Art after Eight Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Gualano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present work is to describe the state of the art of tobacco habits in Italy, eight years after the law was introduced. Methods. Time series analyses, based on estimates of smoking prevalence/consumption derived from the openly available data of national surveys performed during the 2001–2013 period, were performed. Data have been expressed in percentage of smokers and daily cigarettes consumption. Time changes are expressed as expected annual percentage change (EAPC. Results. Over time, the percentage of Italian smokers shows a constant and statistically significant decrease (from 28.9% in 2001 to 20.6% in 2013, EAPC = −2.6%, and P<0.001. Regarding data stratified by gender, we found a stronger reduction among men (EAPC = −2.9%, P<0.001 than in women (EAPC = −2.5%, P<0.001. Similarly, the consumption of tobacco smoking, measured as the number of daily cigarettes smoked, registered a downward trend (P<0.001. No join point (time point when a significant trend change is detected resulted from the trend analysis. Conclusions. Data show a constant decrease of tobacco consumption in Italy, with no join point related to the introduction of the banning law. These findings require to reflect on the priorities of the smoking banning policies that may be focused on other intervention activities such as to increase the price of cigarettes.

  10. [Levels of trace elements in the fruits and vegetables from the so-called Land of fires in Campania Region (Southern Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mauro; Cavallo, Stefania; Rosato, Guido; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Miedico, Oto; Pellicanò, Roberta; Soprano, Vittorio; Baldi, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUZIONE: una vasta area compresa tra le province di Napoli e Caserta nella regione Campania ha negli ultimi anni attirato l'attenzione dei mass media a causa degli interramenti illeciti di rifiuti di varia origine nei campi o del loro abbandono lungo le strade. A tali pratiche illecite si aggiunge il fenomeno dei roghi incontrollati di questo materiale, motivo per il quale la zona è stata soprannominata "Terra dei fuochi". OBIETTIVI: ricerca di elementi in tracce presenti nei prodotti alimentari di origine vegetale prodotti nella Terra dei fuochi. DISEGNO E SETTING: piano di monitoraggio per il rilevamento dei livelli di alcuni metalli tossici ed essenziali nei vegetali coltivati in Campania nella Terra dei fuochi. La determinazione dei microelementi è stata effettuata dopo mineralizzazione della sostanza organica mediante microonde, utilizzando la spettrometria di massa a plasma induttivamente accoppiato (ICP-MS). RISULTATI: durante l'attività di monitoraggio sono stati raccolti 65 campioni di ortaggi e 49 campioni di frutta in 43 comuni rientranti nella Terra dei fuochi. Il contenuto medio di metalli tossici, cadmio e piombo nei prodotti ortofrutticoli è risultato ben lontano dai limiti massimi fissati dalla normativa europea. I valori delle concentrazioni sono significativamente inferiori rispetto a quanto riscontrato in zone ad alto impatto ambientale a causa della presenza di impianti industriali. CONCLUSIONI: la presenza di elementi tossici o potenzialmente tali nei campioni vegetali prodotti nella Terra dei fuochi è attribuibile a una varietà di fattori ambientali rilevanti (caratteristiche geologiche dell'area, inquinamento del suolo, dell'atmosfera e delle acque di irrigazione, pratiche illecite di smaltimento dei rifiuti industriali); non sembra, tuttavia, sussistere un rischio per la salute dei consumatori. Resta comunque l'allerta per la loro presenza nell'ambiente e la necessità che le attività di monitoraggio continuino.

  11. New approach based on solid-phase extraction for the assessment of organic compound pollutions in so-called pharmaceutically pure water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Marta; Wolska, Lidia; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2008-07-01

    The application of a new kind of technique involving solid-phase extraction coupled with thermal desorption (SPE-TD) to the qualitative analysis of water used in pharmaceutical products was evaluated. Comparative analyses performed by the purge and trap (PT) technique were also conducted. The application of this SPE-TD technique resulted in the isolation of a large number of compounds from the water sample. The SPE-TD technique is applied to less volatile compounds, whereas the PT technique is used for more volatile and nonpolar ones. These two techniques should be applied in order to achieve complete identification and quantitative determination. Additionally, an attempt to identify organic compounds in pharmaceutical products was also conducted. The compounds present in such products include aldehydes, ketones, hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters. The influence of storage on the quality of water was also investigated. For samples characterized by a longer storage time, qualitatively richer chromatograms were obtained, which confirmed that components were released from the packaging (especially polyethylene) which entered the stored product.

  12. La patrimonialisation des produits dits de terroir Heritage-making and the enhancement of so-called ‘terroir’ products: when rural meets urban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Delfosse

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aujourd’hui, le phénomène de patrimonialisation des produits agro-alimentaires concerne des campagnes rêvées à forte identité, mais aussi des espaces apparemment « sans qualité », des espaces « en creux ». La patrimonialisation des produits de terroir passe par différents processus : par le biais de fêtes, de la mise en art, de la gastronomie, ainsi que par des modes de vente comme le marché… Ces processus à l’œuvre montrent que la relation au monde rural est complexe. En effet, la patrimonialisation des produits de terroir peut aussi bien être le fait d’acteurs ruraux que d’acteurs urbains, de politiques de territoire urbaines que rurales. Les produits de terroir apparaissent comme un dénominateur commun réunissant, au moins occasionnellement, anciens, nouveaux habitants, voire habitants temporaires de territoires qui se dessinent. Ce phénomène est analysé à partir de trois exemples pris dans la région Rhône-Alpes: la fête de la fourme et des Côtes du Forez et la stratégie d’affirmation d’une petite ville, Montbrison, comme capitale d’un pays, le Forez ; Bourg-en-Bresse et sa volaille, ou comment des produits de terroir peuvent contribuer à affirmer une urbanité ; enfin, l’analyse de la création d’une marque territoriale pour affirmer l’existence d’un espace « sans nom », situé à l’ombre de métropoles et la nécessité de protéger sa ruralité face au phénomène de résidentialisation.Today, the enhancement of food heritage concerns not only rural areas with cultural identities but also areas which seem « without quality » or « hollowed out». The enhancement of local products (produits de terroir entails various processes such as festivals, art events, local gastronomy and sales outlets provided by local markets. These processes reveal just how complex the links with local places are. In fact, local product enhancement can result as much from rural activities (local players, rural policies as urban ones (city people and city policies. Local products appear as a common denominator uniting, albeit occasionally, old residents, new residents or temporary residents of emerging territories. The present study considers this aspect of local products in the context of three examples from the Rhone-Alpes region in France.

  13. Reflections on Ethical Dilemmas in Working with So-Called "Vulnerable" and "Hard-to-Reach" Groups: Experiences from the Foodways and Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Karolina; Douglas, Flora; McArdle, Karen; Carlisle, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on ethical limitations and dilemmas encountered during fieldwork of the Foodways and Futures project (2013-2016). Foodways and Futures is a qualitative action research project aimed at exploring the food choices of former homeless young people (aged 16-25) in Aberdeenshire. In Scotland, where over 13,000 young people become…

  14. [Implementation of paragraph 11b of the German Animal Welfare Act on the basis of the so-called "Quality Breeding" Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, J

    2004-03-01

    Enforcement of paragraph 11b of the German Animal Welfare Act is a responsibility of breeders and their organisations as well as executive local authorities. The Report on Defective Breeds of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture describes numerous breeding traits which are in conflict with animal welfare and gives valuable information for fancy or pet breeding. Yet a selection has to be made for taking legal actions, following specific criteria. With four examples different cases are presented, each requiring a different approach by the veterinarian authorities. Court decisions in Hessen concerning bans on breeding white cats and crested ducks show that the paragraph 11b is executable.

  15. S-100 Negative Granular Cell Tumor (So-called Primitive Polypoid Non-neural Granular Cell Tumor) of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Yeshwant B; Dodson, Thomas B

    2016-10-05

    Four cases of cutaneous S-100 negative granular cell tumor were described in 1991. Until now, only 3 cases of oral involvement have been documented in English literature. Two additional cases of oral S-100 negative granular cell tumor are described. Immunohistochemical markers were applied to exclude other lesions that may show the presence of granular cells. The clinical findings were correlated with the histopathological and immunohistochemical features to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis. S-100 negative granular cell tumors are erythematous polypoid masses commonly mistaken for granulation tissue or a pyogenic granuloma. Any part of the oral cavity may be affected. Histopathologically, the lesions consist of sheets, nests, and fascicles of granular cells that are S-100 negative. The granular cells are non-reactive to SMA, HMB45, Melan A, and CD163. The intracytoplasmic granules are diffusely and strongly positive to NKI/C3. The cell lineage of the S-100 negative granular cell tumor is obscure. Absence of staining with CD163 excludes a histiocytic lineage. Absence of staining with S-100 excludes a neural origin. Absence of staining with S-100 and key melanoma markers HMB45 and Melan A also excludes a melanocytic origin. In this context, positive reactivity with NKI/C3 is indicative of presence of intracytoplasmic lysosomal granules only. Greater awareness of this lesion in the oral cavity will result in better characterization of its biologic potential.

  16. Reconsideration of the so-called Oligocene fauna in the asphaltic deposits of Buton (Malay Archipelago) — 3. Report on Diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhold, Th.

    1952-01-01

    Several samples of asphaltic marls from the Island of Buton have been analysed on diatoms. These samples after their treatment with solvents to eliminate the asphalt content appeared to consist of greyish or yellowish white marls. Despite the vigorous treatment with several solvents, by which the as

  17. Reconsideration of the so-called Oligocene fauna in the asphaltic deposits of Buton (Malay Archipelago) — 2. Young-Neogene Foraminifera and calcareous Algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyzer, F.G.

    1952-01-01

    Miopliocene marls from the island of Buton yield a large marine foraminiferal fauna and some calcareous algae. Three-hundred and thirthy-three species have been identified. Two genera, twenty-three species and four varieties are described as new. The existence of mud-volcanoes in young neogene time

  18. Reconsideration of the so-called Oligocene fauna in the asphaltic deposits of Buton (Malay Archipelago) — 1. Mio-Pliocene Mollusca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beets, C.

    1952-01-01

    Ever since his first experience with the remarkable “Upper Oligocene” molluscan fauna of the Isle of Buton, the present writer has endeavoured to find more convincing evidence for its age. One of the most tempting problems was why this fauna showed so few relationships to other fossil faunas or to t

  19. SO-CALLED MIDDLE TRIASSIC "CLARAIA" (BIVALVIA) FROM GUANGXI, SOUTH CHINA%广西中三叠世的"克氏蛤"之订正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金华; 小松俊文

    2002-01-01

    描述报道广西中三叠世地层中一类形态相似于克氏蛤(Claraia)的双壳纲化石,经研究,发现海扇科的关键特征丝梳,认为不属于克氏蛤,而可能是Periclaraia属的一个新种;并初步探讨化石层的生态环境,认为可能是相对隔离的盆地中央区.新种是由海扇类进入隔离环境后经特化形成的;新种与克氏蛤的表面相似性是生活习性的相似性导致的形态趋同现象.

  20. The Impact of New Media on 20th-Century Astronomy: From Individual Records to Catalogs, Data Centers, Information Hubs and so-called `Virtual Observatories'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, André

    Astronomy is largely a virtual science. Most of our knowledge of the universe is derived from photons reaching us from the outer space. And because of the finite speed of light, we do not observe the objects the way they are, but the way they were when the photons we are collecting actually left them. What we have thus in our data files is nothing other than a huge and complex virtuality of prior stages, differenciated as a function of the distance in space and time of the various sources. Thus the job of astronomers is to work on that space-time mosaicked virtual universe in order to figure out what is exactly the real universe and to understand the place and rôle of man in it. As a result of the huge amount of data accumulated, but also by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have been pioneering the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This talk will offer a few comments on the impact and changing sociology of astronomy information handling over the past century, drifting from individual measurements or records to catalogs and data centers, and moving now from information hubs to those advanced digital research facilities called `virtual observatories'.

  1. Reconsideration of the so-called Oligocene fauna in the asphaltic deposits of Buton (Malay Archipelago) — 1. Mio-Pliocene Mollusca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beets, C.

    1952-01-01

    Ever since his first experience with the remarkable “Upper Oligocene” molluscan fauna of the Isle of Buton, the present writer has endeavoured to find more convincing evidence for its age. One of the most tempting problems was why this fauna showed so few relationships to other fossil faunas or to

  2. Multi-Acupuncture Point Injections and Their Anatomical Study in Relation to Neck and Shoulder Pain Syndrome (So-Called Katakori) in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Suyama, Kaori; Tanaka, Osamu; Sawada, Makoto; Ito, Miho; Ito, Kenji; Akamatsu, Tadashi; Masuda, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Sakabe, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Katakori is a symptom name that is unique to Japan, and refers to myofascial pain syndrome-like clinical signs in the shoulder girdle. Various methods of pain relief for katakori have been reported, but in the present study, we examined the clinical effects of multi-acupuncture point injections (MAPI) in the acupuncture points with which we empirically achieved an effect, as well as the anatomical sites affected by liquid medicine. The subjects were idiopathic katakori patients (n = 9), and three cadavers for anatomical investigation. BL-10, GB-21, LI-16, SI-14, and BL-38 as the WHO notation were selected as the acupuncture point. Injections of 1 mL of 1% w/v mepivacaine were introduced at the same time into each of these points in the patients. Assessment items were the Pain Relief Score and the therapeutic effect period. Dissections were centered at the puncture sites of cadavers. India ink was similarly injected into each point, and each site that was darkly-stained with India ink was evaluated. Katakori pain in the present study was significantly reduced by MAPI. Regardless of the presence or absence of trigger points, pain was significantly reduced in these cases. Dark staining with India ink at each of the points in the anatomical analysis was as follows: BL-10: over the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle and rectus capitis posterior major muscle fascia; GB-21: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; LI-16: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; SI-14: over the rhomboid muscle fascia; and BL-38: over the rhomboid muscle fascia. The anatomical study suggested that the drug effect was exerted on the muscles above and below the muscle fascia, as well as the peripheral nerves because the points of action in acupuncture were darkly-stained in the spaces between the muscle and the muscle fascia. PMID:26046784

  3. Multi-Acupuncture Point Injections and Their Anatomical Study in Relation to Neck and Shoulder Pain Syndrome (So-Called Katakori in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Terayama

    Full Text Available Katakori is a symptom name that is unique to Japan, and refers to myofascial pain syndrome-like clinical signs in the shoulder girdle. Various methods of pain relief for katakori have been reported, but in the present study, we examined the clinical effects of multi-acupuncture point injections (MAPI in the acupuncture points with which we empirically achieved an effect, as well as the anatomical sites affected by liquid medicine. The subjects were idiopathic katakori patients (n = 9, and three cadavers for anatomical investigation. BL-10, GB-21, LI-16, SI-14, and BL-38 as the WHO notation were selected as the acupuncture point. Injections of 1 mL of 1% w/v mepivacaine were introduced at the same time into each of these points in the patients. Assessment items were the Pain Relief Score and the therapeutic effect period. Dissections were centered at the puncture sites of cadavers. India ink was similarly injected into each point, and each site that was darkly-stained with India ink was evaluated. Katakori pain in the present study was significantly reduced by MAPI. Regardless of the presence or absence of trigger points, pain was significantly reduced in these cases. Dark staining with India ink at each of the points in the anatomical analysis was as follows: BL-10: over the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle and rectus capitis posterior major muscle fascia; GB-21: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; LI-16: over the supraspinatus muscle fascia; SI-14: over the rhomboid muscle fascia; and BL-38: over the rhomboid muscle fascia. The anatomical study suggested that the drug effect was exerted on the muscles above and below the muscle fascia, as well as the peripheral nerves because the points of action in acupuncture were darkly-stained in the spaces between the muscle and the muscle fascia.

  4. Antemortem diagnosis with multiple random skin biopsies and transbronchial lung biopsy in a patient with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, the so-called Asian variant lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Tomotaka; Saraya, Takeshi; Ishii, Haruyuki; Goto, Hajime

    2014-03-14

    A 59-year-old, previously healthy man presented to our hospital, with a 3-month history of high fever, nocturnal sweating and exertional dyspnoea. Aggressive diagnostic procedures such as multiple random skin biopsies and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) led to an antemortem diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL), which showed abundant CD20 atypical lymphocytes aggregated in lumina of small vessels. The 29 cases diagnosed with IVLBCL during their lifetime by TBLB were reviewed. Their clinical features included respiratory symptoms (hypoxaemia, dyspnoea and dry cough) and persistent fever. IVLBCL patients show various radiological patterns (ground glass opacities, multiple centrilobular nodules, interlobular septal thickening, interstitial shadows and thickening of bronchovascular bundles), suggesting lymphatic or haematological spread. Antemortem diagnosis of IVLBCL is difficult, but a multidisciplinary approach, with aggressive multiple random skin biopsies and/or TBLB, should be considered in patients with respiratory symptoms that are refractory to antibiotics or prednisolone treatment.

  5. The So-Called Moderate Justices on the Rehnquist Court: The Role of Stare Decisis in Salient and Closely-Divided Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Douglas Foote

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A major question that has puzzled political scientists is what factors influence the decisions of US Supreme Court justices. Despite 20th Century statutory reforms that have led to a fundamental weakening of institutional cohesion on the Supreme Court, the norm of stare decisis continues to serve as a constraint to moderate decision-makers under certain external conditions. Evaluate voting behavior on the Rehnquist Court to discover which justices are indeed demonstrating moderate behavior. Approach: This research makes a unique contribution by expanding the US Supreme Court Justice-Centered Rehnquist Database (1986-2000 to include two new variables to measure the level of salience in each case. Therefore, allowing researchers to better access the impact of issue salience in closely divided precedent-setting cases. Both the New York Times and Congressional Quarterly indicators are used to gauge case salience. The analysis focuses on the existing academic and law review literature on the role of precedent and issue salience which may place constraints on the Court. The jurisprudential styles of Justices O’Connor, Kennedy, Souter, and White are analyzed to ascertain similar moderate behavior traits. Since the data is binary, the logistic regression method is applied within the parameters of the moderate judicial model to illuminate the degree of moderate behavior. Results: The findings reveal that Justice Kennedy does not neatly fit the moderate judicial model. Instead, O’Connor was the only justice that consistently demonstrated moderate voting behavior. Interestingly, only Justice White was more likely to maintain precedent in cases that were both salient and closely divided. Conclusion: This work helps close the glaring gap in the prevailing literature by developing a political model which predicts the conditions in which moderate justices are likely to uphold or not uphold precedent. In addition, it provides a more accurate assessment of the current relevance of the norm of stare decisis to the Legal Model.

  6. New assessment forms of educational outcomes of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyanskaya E.N.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of practice-oriented training assessment system applies not only to quality control in vocational education, but becomes one of the control elements of the teacher education system. The article discusses so called assessment for learning. The author believes that the purpose of assessment for learning is to provide research and reflexive independence of students which provides the opportunity to adjust the educational outcomes, forms of students training and evaluation tools. The basic features of assessment for learning are considered from this point of view. The article discusses use of internet-services in assessment for learning , risks and provides procedure of assessment for learning and describes in detail such specific procedures as criteria-based assessment, construction of tests and mindmaps, cumulative assessment.

  7. Students' Pre-Instructional Beliefs and Reasoning Strategies About Astrobiology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Prather, Edward E.; Slater, Timothy F.

    The purpose of this study is to identify and document student beliefs and reasoning difficulties concerning topics related to astrobiology. This was accomplished by surveying over two thousand middle school, high school, and college (science and non-science majors) students. Students were surveyed utilizing student-supplied response questions focused on the definition of life and its limitations. Careful, inductive analysis of student responses revealed that the majority of students correctly identify that liquid water is necessary for life and that life forms can exist without sunlight. However, many students incorrectly state that life cannot survive without oxygen. Furthermore, when students are asked to reason about life in extreme environments, they most often cite complex organisms (such as plants, animals, and humans) rather than the more ubiquitous microorganisms. Results of this study were used to inform the development of astrobiology curriculum materials.

  8. Dark Triad of Croatian Management Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bogdanovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches the so-called “dark triad” personality traits of management student populations, because of their potential to generate dysfunctional organizational behavior and processes. Namely, the dark triad with characteristics such as lack of empathy, willingness to manipulate others (for self-betterment, antagonism, and belief in one’s own superiority can represent a real organizational threat. The goal of this paper is to stimulate thinking and discussion around this issue. The paper is based on questionnaire measurement that adopts the standardized short dark triad measurement instrument of Jones and Paulhus (2012 who measure the scales of Machiavellianism (9 items, narcissism (9 items and psychopathy (9 items. The sample included 150 students of professional management studies at the Faculty of Economics, University of Split in Croatia. Results of the Croatian students are compared with the results of 387 students in Canada. The results suggest significant statistical differences in the “dark triad” variables between the Canadian and Croatian samples. The practical implications of this paper are in raising awareness and stimulating the thinking of managers around the potential of the “dark triad” traits of engaged human resources to create organizational crisis, and to make preventive and responsive actions to manage the “toxic triad” threat.

  9. Learning About Energy Resources Through Student Created Video Documentaries in the University Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2010-12-01

    Students enrolled in an undergraduate non-science majors’ Energy Perspectives course created 10-15 minute video documentaries on topics related to Energy Resources and the Environment. Video project topics included wave, biodiesel, clean coal, hydro, solar and “off-the-grid” energy technologies. No student had any prior experience with creating video projects. Students had Liberal Arts academic backgrounds that included Anthropology, Theater Arts, International Studies, English and Early Childhood Education. Students were required to: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write a narrative, 4) construct a project storyboard, 5) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 6) record the narrative, and 7) construct the video documentary. This study describes the instructional approach of using student created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors’ science course. Two knowledge survey instruments were used for assessment purposes. Each instrument was administered Pre-, Mid- and Post course. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries. Results showed students acquired enhanced technology skills especially with regard to research techniques, writing skills and video editing. The second survey assessed students’ content knowledge acquired from each documentary. Results indicated students’ increased their content knowledge of energy resource topics. Students reported very favorable evaluations concerning their experience with creating “Ken Burns” video project documentaries.

  10. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  11. ORAL TEST: A POWERFUL TOOL FOR ASSESSING STUDENTS' ACTUAL ACHIEVEMENT IN LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Ahsanu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and testing are inseparable elements in pedagogical world irrespective of the course a teacher teaches. Phrased differently, there is no teaching without testing and vice versa. The results of testing should ideally motivate students in learning and give better perspectives to teachers on _how to devise a better teaching-learning. Accordingly, a teacher needs a sort of test that can sufficiently assess students' actual achievement in learning, in their given courses. One of which is so-called "Oral Test", the test that can give a feel of confidence that the test really measures what is purported to measure and provide relatively consistent results over the time (validity and reliability respectively, which, in the end can opaquely discriminate the proficiency levels amongst the students. Thus, this paper is a humble attempt to juxtapose leaching and testing and to run a critical diagnosis on the fruitfulness of oral test, the test type worth trying.

  12. A study of motivation and satisfaction of students in E-learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Todorova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Higher education is evolving in the context of the so-called "information society" and it aims to teach the younger generation to deal with the chaotic and the difficult to predict flow of knowledge and new information along with transmission of sound knowledge verified by tradition. E-learning (EL provides enormous freedom of the learner in terms of means, place, time and rhythm of learning. Data, as well as analysis of the results of the conducted study among different students (BSc, MSc, Ph.D. students from an engineering university in Sofia - UCTM are presented in this publication. The aim of this study is to measure motivation and students’ satisfaction in active e-learning environment. The extent to which EL has been adopted in different academic practices has been discussed. The opinion of students of the present willingness of the university for the active introduction of EL in training has been asked for and evaluated.

  13. Bringing the Cosmos Down to Earth: Assessing Student Learning in a Non-major Online Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.

    2011-09-01

    While there has been much attention paid to improving astronomy courses for non-science majors in the past decade, a fundamental question remains: How do we know that they are in fact learning in these courses? Online courses provide a fresh vehicle for testing new approaches to assessing student learning, especially assignments which focus on the higher levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Coupling this with assignments which engage the students with the material by making it relevant to their own lives leads to new methodologies for assessing student learning.

  14. Research Skills and Ethics--A Graduate Course Empowering Graduate Students for Productive Research Careers in Graduate School and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a course for first-year graduate students that teaches the fundamental so-called "soft skills" required for success in graduate school and beyond. Topics covered are ethics, laboratory safety and waste management, chemical information retrieval and literacy, experimental design, scientific record keeping, statistics, career development, and communications, including technical writing and oral presentation. Whenever possible students are put in direct contact with local technical experts and available resources. The course, well regarded by both students and faculty, has now been taught at Northeastern University for five years in the summer academic quarter to graduate students in chemistry and related departments (pharmacy and chemical engineering) who have successfully completed their first-year course work.

  15. Investigating the Relationship between Students' Science Knowledge and Their Reported Sources of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Romine, J.; Impey, C.; Nieberding, M.

    2015-11-01

    Building on a 25 year study of undergraduate students' science literacy, we have been investigating where students report getting information about science. In this study, we investigated the relationship between students' basic science knowledge, responses about studying something scientifically, and where they report gaining information about science. Data for this study was collected through an online survey of astronomy courses during 2014. Responses were collected from a total of 400 students through online surveys. Most survey respondents were non-science majors in the first two years of college who had taken 3 or fewer college science courses. Our results show a relationship between students who report online searches and Wikipedia as reliable sources of information and lower science literacy scores, although there was no relationship between science knowledge and where students report getting information about science. Our results suggest that information literacy is an important component to overall science literacy.

  16. Perspectives in Quantum Physics: Epistemological, Ontological and Pedagogical. An investigation into student and expert perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics, with implications for modern physics instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Baily, Charles

    2011-01-01

    A common learning goal for modern physics instructors is for students to recognize a difference between the experimental uncertainty of classical physics and the fundamental uncertainty of quantum mechanics. Our studies suggest this notoriously difficult task may be frustrated by the intuitively realist perspectives of introductory students, and a lack of ontological flexibility in their conceptions of light and matter. We have developed a framework for understanding and characterizing student perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics, and demonstrate the differential impact on student thinking of the myriad ways instructors approach interpretive themes in their introductory courses. Like expert physicists, students interpret quantum phenomena differently, and these interpretations are significantly influenced by their overall stances on questions central to the so-called measurement problem: Is the wave function physically real, or simply a mathematical tool? Is the collapse of the wav...

  17. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph P; Israel, Natalie; Rowland, Kimberly; Lovelace, Matthew J; Saunders, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested "The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery" to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of non-science majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution) in academic year 2014-15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI) and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  18. Resilience of students and their readiness for professional functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichurin V.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in structure of specialist’s psychological readiness for professional functioning important place is taken by formation of the so-called professionally significant personality’s features. Person’s resilience shall be related to them as well. The purpose is to clear up the existing tendencies in respect to resilience and its components in students. Material and methods: in the research 130 students of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V.Lazaryan, participated. From them 73 were boys and 57 - girls. Their age was 17-20 years old. Diagnostic of resilience level and its components (commitment, control, challenge was conducted with the help of resilience questionnaire by S. Maddy, adapted by D. Leontyev and Ye. Rasskazova. Results: we determined indicators of resilience, characteristic for modern students. The received results permit to speak about psychological readiness of modern students for professional functioning by factor of resilience. Conclusions: 1 absolute majority of students have high indicators of resilience and indicators within standards; 2 boys and girls have statistically significant differences by factor “involvement”.

  19. Caracterization of the motor profile of students with autistic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Matiko Okuda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thematic focus: The motor abnormalities may be part of so-called comorbidities that can coexist with autistic disorder. Objective: To characterize the motor profile of students with autistic disorder. Method: the study included six children with autistic disorder in elementary school, male, aged 5 years and 5 months and 10 years and 9 months. After signing the consent form by parents or guardians, the students were submitted to the Motor Development Scale for assessment of fine motor, gross motor performance, balance, body scheme, spatial organization, temporal organization and laterality. Results: The results revealed a significant difference between the motor age and chronological age. According to the classification of the Scale of Motor Development, students in this study showed motor development lower than expected for age. Conclusion: The students with autistic disorder in this study presented a profile of Developmental Coordination Disorder in comorbidity, showing that participants of this research presented difficulties in activities that required skills such as handwriting. Thus, motor and psychomotor needs of these students were focused on educational and clinical environment to reduce the impact of behavioral and social manifestations.

  20. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  1. 差生转化策略初探%A Preliminary Exploration on Strategies to Transform Backward Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文萍

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes and researches the situation of the so-called "backward students" in daily teaching. Teachers should impartially view the problems of"backward students"and analyze them, so as to make them students with good moral con-duct and academic performance.%本文根据日常教学中针对所谓的"后进生"的情况做出分析研究.我们应平等、公正、尊重地看待"后进生"身上的种种情况并加以分析,使之成为品行端正、学习成绩良好的学生.

  2. Lab-on-a-chip workshop activities for secondary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mohammad M. N.; Tarn, Mark D.; Choudhury, Tahmina A.; Hewitt, Laura C.; Mayo, Ashley J.; Rubin, Theodore A.; Waller, Mathew R.; Christensen, Martin G.; Dawson, Amy; Pamme, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The ability to engage and inspire younger generations in novel areas of science is important for bringing new researchers into a burgeoning field, such as lab-on-a-chip. We recently held a lab-on-a-chip workshop for secondary school students, for which we developed a number of hands-on activities that explained various aspects of microfluidic technology, including fabrication (milling and moulding of microfluidic devices, and wax printing of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices, so-called μPADs), flow regimes (gradient formation via diffusive mixing), and applications (tissue analysis and μPADs). Questionnaires completed by the students indicated that they found the workshop both interesting and informative, with all activities proving successful, while providing feedback that could be incorporated into later iterations of the event. PMID:26865902

  3. SkyGlowNet: Multi-Disciplinary Independent Student Research in Environmental Light at Night Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; DeBenedetti, J. C.; Flurchick, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    SkyGlowNet uses Internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) to monitor sky brightness over school sites. The data are used professionally and in STEM outreach to study natural and artificial sources of sky brightness, light pollution, energy efficiency, and environmental and health impacts of artificial night lighting. The iSBM units are owned by participating institutions and managed by faculty or students via proprietary Internet links. Student data are embargoed for two semesters to allow students to analyze data and publish results, then they are moved to a common area where students from different institutions can collaborate. The iSBM units can be set to operate automatically each night. Their data include time, sky brightness, weather conditions, and other related parameters. The data stream can be viewed and processed online or downloaded for study. SkyGlowNet is a unique, multi-disciplinary, real science program aiding research for science and non-science students.

  4. An investigation of factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlenga, Francis Howard

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe. The study was conducted at one of the Primary School Teachers' Colleges in Zimbabwe. A sample of two hundred and thirty-eight female student teachers was used in the study. Of these one hundred and forty-two were non-science majors who had been randomly selected, forty-one were science majors and forty-five were math majors. Both science and math majors were a convenient sample because the total enrollment of the two groups was small. All the subjects completed a survey questionnaire that had sixty-eight items. Ten students from the non-science majors were selected for individual interviews and the same was done for the science majors. A further eighteen were selected from the non-science majors and divided into three groups of six each for focus group interviews. The same was done for the science majors. The interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Data from the survey questionnaires were analyzed using Binary Logistic Regression which predicted factors that affected students' choice of science as a major. The transcribed interview data were analyzed used using domain, taxonomic and componential analyses. Results of the study indicated that elementary female students' choice of science as a major at college level is affected by students' attitudes toward science, teacher behavior, out-of-school experiences, role models, gender stereotyping, parental influence, peer influence, in-school experiences, and societal expectations, namely cultural and social expectations.

  5. [What does the medical student learn in pathology in Germany, China and the USA?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, O

    2001-01-01

    From the point of view of a medical student who studied at a couple of universities in Germany, one semester at a medical school in the USA, and who was involved in an exchange-program with a Chinese university, the importance of pathology as a main part of the medical course is stressed.--In Germany and the USA, pathology is a central subject in the medical course studies. After studying how the human body functions correctly (anatomy, physiology etc.), the medical student learns the pathological basics of diseases. Then clinical training, including electives or rotations, starts, where the student enters clinical settings and learns how to treat these diseases. As medicine is going to be more and more specialized, this will sooner or later also have consequences on the system of medical teaching. In the USA, for example, it is to a certain extent possible to specialize during clinical rotations already. For this reason, pathology is going to be even more important in the future.--In China there are two medical systems that exist independently: Our so-called Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The biggest difference in traditional medicine seems to be that diseases are treated without any (western) knowledge of their pathological background, but with the empirical knowledge of 5000 years of Chinese Medicine (so-called "black-box-system").--In conclusion, pathology is fundamental to the understanding of diseases in humans in Western Medicine. The facts taught are, of course, the same everywhere. There are differences as far as the teaching methods are concerned, both between the different countries and within Germany. Most important is the attitude of both medical students and teaching staff.

  6. Student Entrepreneurship in Hungary: Selected Results Based on GUESSS Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S. Gubik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates students’ entrepreneurial activities and aims to answer questions regarding to what extent do students utilize the knowledge gained during their studies and the personal connections acquired at universities, as well as what role a family business background plays in the development of students’ business start-ups. Research Design & Methods: This paper is based on the database of the GUESSS project investigates 658 student entrepreneurs (so-called ‘active entrepreneurs’ who have already established businesses of their own. Findings: The rate of self-employment among Hungarian students who study in tertiary education and consider themselves to be entrepreneurs is high. Motivations and entrepreneurial efforts differ from those who owns a larger company, they do not necessarily intend to make an entrepreneurial path a career option in the long run. A family business background and family support play a determining role in entrepreneurship and business start-ups, while entrepreneurial training and courses offered at higher institutions are not reflected in students’ entrepreneurial activities. Implications & Recommendations: Universities should offer not only conventional business courses (for example, business planning, but also new forms of education so that students meet various entrepreneurial tasks and problems, make decisions in different situations, explore and acquaint themselves with entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides literature overview of youth entrepreneurship, describes the main characteristics of students’ enterprises and contributes to understanding the factors of youth entrepreneurship.

  7. Moral Perceptions of College Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Eric

    This thesis argues that college-level science education is in need of explicit moral focuses centered on society's use of scientific knowledge. Many benefits come with scientific advancements but unfortunately the misuse of scientific knowledge has led to planetary crises that should be a concern for all who inhabit the Earth (e.g., climate change). The teaching of the misuses of science is often left out of college science classrooms and the purpose of this thesis is to see what effect college science students' education has had on their moral perception of these pressing issues. To evaluate how college science students morally perceive these global issues within their educational experiences, two focus group interviews were conducted and analyzed. Students converged on three themes when thinking of society's misuse of science: 1) there is something wrong with the way science is communicated between science and non-science groups; 2) misusing science for private benefit is not right, and 3) it is important for people to comprehend sustainability along different scales of understanding and action. This thesis concludes that although to some extent students were familiar with moral features that stem from society's misuse of science, they did not attribute their learning of those features from any of their required coursework within their programs of study.

  8. Changes in the Social Responsibility Attitudes of Engineering Students Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Canney, Nathan E

    2016-10-01

    This research explored how engineering student views of their responsibility toward helping individuals and society through their profession, so-called social responsibility, change over time. A survey instrument was administered to students initially primarily in their first year, senior year, or graduate studies majoring in mechanical, civil, or environmental engineering at five institutions in September 2012, April 2013, and March 2014. The majority of the students (57 %) did not change significantly in their social responsibility attitudes, but 23 % decreased and 20 % increased. The students who increased, decreased, or remained the same in their social responsibility attitudes over time did not differ significantly in terms of gender, academic rank, or major. Some differences were found between institutions. Students who decreased in social responsibility initially possessed more positive social responsibility attitudes, were less likely to indicate that college courses impacted their views of social responsibility, and were more likely to have decreased in the frequency that they participated in volunteer activities, compared to students who did not change or increased their social responsibility. Although the large percentage of engineering students who decreased their social responsibility during college was disappointing, it is encouraging that courses and participation in volunteer activities may combat this trend.

  9. Volunteering among Higher Education Students. Focusing on the Micro-level Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAJNALKA FÉNYES

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In our paper, we intend to examine the micro-level factors affecting the volunteering of higher education students. Althoughseveral theories and research studies approach this phenomenon, a relatively small amount of studies examines the volunteeringof higher education students. Based on the literature, the young generation today participates in new types of volunteering, inwhich their motivation is not dominantly altruistic. These results call our attention to the necessity for new measurements andindicators of volunteering. The new approach in our research is that we differentiated between the voluntary work of studentsand the voluntary extracurricular activities of students. Among micro-level factors affecting volunteering, we examine the effectsof demographic variables and the students’ social background. However, based on the literature, we suppose that the effect ofreligiosity and values (which are related to the motivations of volunteering of students as well are more pronounced. Regressionmodels are used to examine these effects both on voluntary work and on extracurricular activities of students. Our databases areregional (first, we examine the voluntary activities of students at the University of Debrecen, then the extracurricular activities ofstudents in the so-called Partium region, but our goal is to show general tendencies of volunteering of higher education students,taking into account the possible regional differences as well.

  10. Teaching ASTRO 101 Students the Art of Scientific Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleigh, Sharon P.; Slater, Stephanie; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Going beyond asking students to simply memorize facts about the universe, a longstanding challenge in teaching astronomy centers on successfully teaching students about the nature of science. As introductory astronomy survey courses, known widely as ASTRO 101, can sometimes be the last science course non-science majoring undergraduates take, many faculty hope to emphasize the scientific enterprise as a broad field in inquiry making valuable contributions to civilization as a whole, rather than as an isolated study of objects far from Earth. Scholars have long proposed that an understanding of the nature of science as a human endeavor requires explicit instruction. In other words, students successfully learning the facts of astronomy does not in any way ensure that students will learn anything about the nature of how astronomy is done. In a purposeful effort to improve students' understanding about the practices and discourse of astronomy, scholars working with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education research are developing a suite of carefully designed instructional sequences—called Scientific Argumentation—focused on teaching students the differences between data and evidence, how to communicate and defend evidence-based conclusions, and how to be informed skeptics of scientific claims. Early results show students moving from naïve understandings of scientific practices to more informed understandings as well as demonstrating enhanced value for science in general as an worthwhile human endeavor with far reaching benefits.

  11. Rhetorical meta-language to promote the development of students' writing skills and subject matter understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelger, Susanne; Sigrell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most significant factors for students' development of writing skills. For feedback to be successful, however, students and teachers need a common language - a meta-language - for discussing texts. Not least because in science education such a meta-language might contribute to improve writing training and feedback-giving. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore students' perception of teachers' feedback given on their texts in two genres, and to suggest how writing training and feedback-giving could become more efficient. Sample: In this study were included 44 degree project students in biology and molecular biology, and 21 supervising teachers at a Swedish university. Design and methods: The study concerned students' writing about their degree projects in two genres: scientific writing and popular science writing. The data consisted of documented teacher feedback on the students' popular science texts. It also included students' and teachers' answers to questionnaires about writing and feedback. All data were collected during the spring of 2012. Teachers' feedback, actual and recalled - by students and teachers, respectively - was analysed and compared using the so-called Canons of rhetoric. Results: While the teachers recalled the given feedback as mainly positive, most students recalled only negative feedback. According to the teachers, suggested improvements concerned firstly the content, and secondly the structure of the text. In contrast, the students mentioned language style first, followed by content. Conclusions: The disagreement between students and teachers regarding how and what feedback was given on the students texts confirm the need of improved strategies for writing training and feedback-giving in science education. We suggest that the rhetorical meta-language might play a crucial role in overcoming the difficulties observed in this study. We also discuss how training of writing skills may contribute to

  12. 'Even now it makes me angry': health care students' professionalism dilemma narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E; Endacott, Ruth; Ternan, Edwina

    2014-05-01

    Medical students encounter situations during workplace learning in which they witness or participate in something unprofessional (so-called professionalism dilemmas), sometimes having a negative emotional impact on them. Less is known about other health care students' experiences of professionalism dilemmas and the resulting emotional impact. To examine dental, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy students' narratives of professionalism dilemmas: the types of events they encounter ('whats') and the ways in which they narrate those events ('hows'). A qualitative cross-sectional study. Sixty-nine health care students (29 dentistry, 13 nursing, 12 pharmacy, 15 physiotherapy) participated in group/individual narrative interviews. Data were analysed using framework analysis (examining the 'whats'), linguistic inquiry and word count software (examining the 'hows' by dilemma type and student group) and narrative analysis (bringing together 'whats' and 'hows'). In total, 226 personal incident narratives (104 dental, 34 nursing, 39 pharmacy and 49 physiotherapy) were coded. Framework analysis identified nine themes, including 'Theme 2: professionalism dilemmas', comprising five sub-themes: 'student abuse', 'patient safety and dignity breaches by health care professionals', 'patient safety and dignity breaches by students', 'whistleblowing and challenging' and 'consent'. Using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (liwc) software, significant differences in negative emotion talk were found across student groups and dilemma types (e.g. more anger talk when narrating patient safety and dignity breaches by health care professionals than similar breaches by students). The narrative analysis illustrates how events are constructed and the emotional implications of assigning blame (an ethical dimension) resulting in emotional residue. Professionalism dilemmas experienced by health care students, including issues concerning whistleblowing and challenging, have implications for

  13. Preparing dental students for careers as independent dental professionals: clinical audit and community-based clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Llewelyn, J; Ash, P J; Chadwick, B L

    2011-05-28

    Community-based clinical teaching programmes are now an established feature of most UK dental school training programmes. Appropriately implemented, they enhance the educational achievements and competences achieved by dental students within the earlier part of their developing careers, while helping students to traverse the often-difficult transition between dental school and vocational/foundation training and independent practice. Dental school programmes have often been criticised for 'lagging behind' developments in general dental practice - an important example being the so-called 'business of dentistry', including clinical audit. As readers will be aware, clinical audit is an essential component of UK dental practice, with the aims of improving the quality of clinical care and optimising patient safety. The aim of this paper is to highlight how training in clinical audit has been successfully embedded in the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff.

  14. Exclusively reflexive verbs in Spanish: a study of its acquisition among English speaking students at university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrón Barroso, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze whether the syntactic and semantic behavior of the so called quasi-reflexive or mandatory reflexive verbs in Spanish such as enterarse, quejarse, burlarse, acordarse, fijarse or jactarse can be learned and assimilated in a native-like manner by English native speakers who have reached an advance or an intermediate level of Spanish. The experiment carried out consisted of a grammaticality judgment task with six quasi-reflexive verbs forms and eighteen fillers. Three different groups of participants performed the task: a control group of native speakers of Spanish, a graduate student group with a high level of Spanish and an undergraduate student group with an intermediate level of Spanish. The data gathered and their statistical analyses seem to prove that there is a significant difference in the way native and non native speakers of Spanish judge grammatical and agrammatical quasi-reflexive verbs constructions in Spanish.

  15. How volunteering helps students to develop soft skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanzyanova, Albina

    2017-06-01

    It is widely recognised that tertiary education does not provide all of the knowledge and skills required to succeed in modern societies. Personal and interpersonal skills - so-called "soft skills" - are also needed to complement professional skills and expertise, and become an essential part of an individual's personality. One way of acquiring soft skills is volunteering with associations and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). This paper discusses the involvement of French third-level students in voluntary activities and the skills they acquire as a result. The author presents the findings of a study involving a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Results show that many students develop skills linked to their future professional career, that they reflect on this consciously and feel enriched by the experience. The author argues that "non-professional" activities like volunteering can be actively incorporated into students' learning process, making their overall experience of higher education more active, enjoyable and relevant. Learning through action was found to be the most important factor in the acquisition of soft skills. This article aims to contribute to research on the educational dimension of volunteering, demonstrating that it benefits both personal and professional development.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and At-Risk Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Maria Chong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationships between emotional intelligence (EI and the delinquent behavior (DB of the students. The level of DB reported by the students is categorized under the headings of crime, drugs, vandalism, pornography and sexual behavior, other misbehavior, and dishonesty. Meanwhile, EI is investigated by looking at the level of EI domains, such as self-awareness, self-regulation, self-motivation, empathy, social skills, maturity, and spiritual awareness. Data were gathered from a sample of 300 secondary school students aged 15 to 18 years in Selangor. The schools they attended were selected from the so-called “hardcore schools,” which were identified by Schools Division in the State of Selangor. Two instruments, namely, surveys on the “Behavior of Students” and “Malaysian Emotional Quotient Inventory (R–Adolescence (MEQI,” were utilized to collect the research data and were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The data showed that the highest delinquency among the adolescents was misbehavior in school, followed by crime, vandalism, pornography, dishonesty, and drugs. Results also revealed a negative linear relationship between EI (r = −.208, n = 300, p = .001 and DB, implying that adolescents with better EI had lower levels of delinquency. Multiple regression analysis revealed that EI is a significant predictor of DB and self-awareness is the main factor of DB. This study contributes to the knowledge of the importance of EI in understanding DB. EI can be used to identify and discriminate emotional skills among those adolescents who exhibit DB. Addressing the role of EI as a predictor would probably prove to be effective in reducing DB.

  17. Student Mastery of the Sun-Earth-Moon System in a Flipped Classroom of Pre-service Elementary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    One of the current trends in pedagogy at all levels(K-college) is the so-called ‘flipped classroom’, in which students prepare for a class meeting through self-study of the material. It is based on a rejection of the classic model of the faculty member as the ‘sage on the stage’ instead, responsibility for learning shifts to the individual student. The faculty member takes on the role of learning facilitator or mentor, and focuses the students’ learning by crafting and administering timely formative assessments (in multiple formats and applied multiple times) that aid both students and the faculty member in tracking the students’ mastery of the learning outcomes. In a flipped, freshman-only, section of SCI 111 Elementary Earth-Physical Sciences (a required introductory science course for pre-service elementary school teachers) the students learned through a combination of individual and group hands-on in-class activities, technology (including PowerPoint presentations and short videos viewed prior to attending class), in-class worksheets, and in-class discussions. Students self-differentiated in how they interacted with the available teaching materials, deciding which activities to spend the most time on based on their individual needs (based on an online quiz taken the night before the class period, and their personal self-confidence with the material). Available in-class activities and worksheets were developed by the faculty member based on student scores on the online quiz as well as personal messages submitted through the course management system the night before the class meeting. While this placed a significant burden on the faculty member in terms of course preparation, it allowed for just-in-time teaching to take place. This poster describes the results of student mastery of content centered on the sun-earth-moon system (specifically seasons, moon phases, and eclipses) as compared to traditional classroom sections.

  18. Introducing Second Year Chemistry Students to Research Work through Mini-Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; Phillips, David N.

    1998-07-01

    In these so-called "mini-projects" second year students in an Applied Chemistry degree course gain their first insight to studying a chemistry-based problem prior to undertaking a major chemistry project at third year. They cover a range of topics including industrially based problems, improving current experiments in the second year Analytical Chemistry unit, or developing new experiments for future cohorts in Inorganic/Analytical Chemistry units. The class is divided into groups of 3 students, with each group being quite deliberately structured to include students of a range of ability. The program consists of one week for literature searching and four weeks of experimental work Each group is required to submit a joint written report and give an oral presentation to the whole class. The mini-projects provide an alternative experience for students to complement the standard laboratory exercises encountered in other sections of the course. They serve to introduce students on how to work in group situations, while also providing an insight to the type of work they will meet in their future employment. The assessment is based on self and peer assessment within each group, with the contribution of the class supervisor being only one-quarter of the total assessment. Valuable feedback has been obtained from student comments and the vast majority of comments reflect very favourably on the overall concept.

  19. Cultural Mythology Analysisof Media texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article presents the cultural mythology analysis of media texts: identification and analysis of mythologizing (including in the framework of the so-called folk sources - fairy tales, urban legends, etc. plot, those types of characters, etc. in media texts. In particular, the audience (for example, students offered by critical analysis to answer the question why so many entertainment media texts so popular with a mass audience? The author thinks that the media texts relating to the mass / popular culture, have success with the audience is not due to the fact that they supposedly only target people with low aesthetic taste, subject to psychological pressure, easy to believing the lie, etc., but because their authors respect and learning needs of the audience, including - information, compensatory, hedonistic, recreational, moral, aesthetic, etc.

  20. Gender stereotypes among women engineering and technology students in the UK: lessons from career choice narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Abigail; Dainty, Andrew; Bagilhole, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In the UK, women remain under-represented in engineering and technology (E&T). Research has, therefore, investigated barriers and solutions to women's recruitment, retention and progression. Recruitment into the sector may be supported by exploring the career decisions of women and men who have chosen to study E&T. Triangulating quantitative and qualitative data from E&T students at a UK university, this paper examines the gendered nature of career choice narratives. It finds that women often maintain contradictory views; upholding gendered stereotypes about women's suitability for the so-called masculine work, yet also subscribing to ideals that the sector is accessible to all who wish to work in it. This is explained using an individualist framework in which women construct an autonomous sense of self, yet are also shaped by a gendered self. Women's discourse around career choice, therefore, reveals the problematic nature of gender norms for achieving gender equity in E&T.

  1. Widening participation in EIE programmes across Europe for students with disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grout, Ian; Grindei, Laura; Ward, Tony;

    2015-01-01

    Widening participation in higher education is a major component of governmental level education policy within Europe. It consists of an attempt to increase not only the numbers of young people entering higher education, but also the proportion from so-called “under-represented groups” (those from...... lower income families and some ethnic minorities (socio-economically disadvantaged), along with individuals with disabilities and mature students). The policies developed must align both with the European wide directives which all European countries should follow and the creation of the European Higher...... Education Area (EHEA). In this paper, widening participation in higher education is discussed in relation to the results from the SALEIE (Strategic ALignment of Electrical and Information Engineering in European Higher Education Institutions) project and specific responses from a survey amongst the partner...

  2. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy; Part II: Analysis of Student Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E. E.; Consiglio, D.; Rudolph, A. L.; Brissenden, G.

    2011-09-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on a national study of the teaching and learning of astronomy in general education, non-science major, introductory astronomy courses (Astro 101). We report here on the analysis of how individual student characteristics affect student learning in these classes, and whether the demonstrated positive effect of interactive learning strategies on student learning differs based on these characteristics. This analysis was conducted using data from nearly 2000 students enrolled in 69 Astro 101 classes taught across the country. These students completed a 15-question demographic survey, in addition to completing the 26-question Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) pre- and post-instruction. The LSCI was used to determine student learning via a normalized gain calculated for each student. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine how ascribed characteristics (personal demographic and family characteristics), obtained characteristics (academic achievement and student major), and the use of interactive learning strategies predict student learning in these classes. The results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies even after controlling for individual characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies are the same for strong and weak students, men and women, across ethnicities, and regardless of primary language. The research strongly suggests all students benefit from interactive learning strategies.

  3. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy Part II: Analysis of Student Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Consiglio, D.; Gonzaga, V.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on a national study of the teaching and learning of astronomy in general education, non-science major, introductory college astronomy courses (Astro 101). The results show dramatic improvement in student learning with increased use of interactive learning strategies even after controlling for individual student characteristics. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all categories of students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  4. Student Confidence & Student Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesniak, Amy L.; Heaton, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    The author always felt that her classroom was missing something. Although she was incorporating the NCTM Standards in her math classroom, she longed to use other teaching strategies to deepen students' understanding of the "how"as well as the "why." The author wanted "and needed" to implement cooperative learning into her classroom. The biggest…

  5. Student Commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  6. Students 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, P. Sven

    2008-01-01

    Every professor encounters difficult students. Some students are simply uninterested, while others are more troublesome. The aggressive passive-aggressive student, the interrupter, the hijacker, the shy student--most faculty members are familiar with them all. In this article, the author offers a few tips on how faculty members should approach…

  7. Factual accuracy and the cultural context of science in popular media: Perspectives of media makers, middle school students, and university students on an entertainment television program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Evan; Osborne, Jonathan; Patterson, Alexis D

    2017-07-01

    Popular media influences ideas about science constructed by the public. To sway media productions, public policy organizations have increasingly promoted use of science consultants. This study contributes to understanding the connection from science consultants to popular media to public outcomes. A science-based television series was examined for intended messages of the creator and consulting scientist, and received messages among middle school and non-science university students. The results suggest the consulting scientist missed an opportunity to influence the portrayal of the cultural contexts of science and that middle school students may be reading these aspects uncritically-a deficiency educators could potentially address. In contrast, all groups discussed the science content and practices of the show, indicating that scientific facts were salient to both media makers and audiences. This suggests popular media may influence the public knowledge of science, supporting concerns of scientists about the accuracy of fictional television and film.

  8. Get Your Students to do the Outreach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. J.

    2010-08-01

    Five radio shows; a full-page color spread in the campus newspaper; YouTube videos; an interactive activity at the local children's museum; a star party for a dorm; children's books; an outing with Boy Scouts. This is just a sampling of group projects planned and executed in a single semester by students in an introductory course for non-science majors. Everyone in the class joins a group self-organized around common interests to produce a product or activity that communicates some aspect of astronomy to a segment of the general population. These projects give the students a creative outlet to merge some of their outside interests with the course material, a practical exposure to scientific communication, an opportunity for peer instruction including peer evaluation, and a chance to hone their skills in managing group dynamics. The semester long effort begins with everyone in the class submitting individual ideas for subjects and presentation methods. After these ideas are categorized, students begin organizing the groups on a web discussion board. They articulate learning goals for the intended audience and describe how they plan to evaluate the success of the project and the attainment of these goals. The group members seek outside advice from people in other groups during one week of the course discussion section. They submit a progress report and then a first draft, the latter also sent to a different group for review. After feedback from the instructor and a week of the teaching assistant's (TA's) office hours devoted to scheduled meetings with each group, the students draft the final versions or make presentations near the end of the semester.

  9. Students' exposure and career aspirations in ecology: A study using semi-structured interviews to gain knowledge of public school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather C.

    Ecology as a field is dominated by white males, McCarter (2003) has noted that women and minorities are underrepresented in the discipline of ecology across the United States. The contribution of this research is to assess and quantify, in a scientific manner, students' exposure, and career aspirations towards ecology; 226 student responses were coded from semi-structured interviews. The main objectives of this study, using student interviews, were the following: (1) assess the importance of exposure to ecology and ecological related topics to: gender, ethnicity, region, grades in science, grades in non-science, grade level, and interest in ecology career. (2) determine if early exposure to ecology (i.e. gained in high school) and ecological related topics is related to an increased interest of students continuing in an ecologically related field and (3) assess if high school students who have been involved in more outdoor related activities such as camping, hiking, hunting, and/or fishing, will be more likely to be interested in an ecological career. Overall, the results indicated that students interviewed for this study generally responded in a positive manner, and were generally interested in ecology. Some students were even interested in pursuing a career in ecology. The study revealed significant differences in the exposure of ecology between school locations, girls and boys, and whites and non-whites. The results of this research and avenues for future research are discussed.

  10. Student Mentors' system in the Higher European Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Medina-Rojas, Silvia; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Gascó, Gabriel; Moratiel, Ruben; Antón, Jose Manuel; Durán-Altisent, Jose Maria; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2013-04-01

    For several years the Spanish University has been experiencing changes that affect not only the educational area but also innovation and investigation in the classroom. Even the use of so-called New Technologies has been focus of much attention in the Higher Educational System, student mentoring has been revealed as an important factor in the first university courses. In this sense, we carried out a first step in a senior student mentor project in order to facilitate adaptation of the new students, providing information, advice and guidance on different academic and social aspects. Here, we understand mentoring as a relationship between a more senior student (mentor) and a few junior lesser experienced students (mentees). Mentoring is intended to develop and grow the skills, knowledge, confidence, and cultural understanding of the mentees aiming to help them succeed. Consequently, this work arises from our concern about students need. A test has been designed to assess students interest in the three fundamental aspects of mentoring: academic, social and administrative orientation. The test involved 16 questions related to these three different aspects on mentoring, evaluating each question from 1 (none) to 4 (totally). Surveys have been conducted on this topic at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) with students on different levels and modules of degrees in Agricultural Engineering. The same activity has been applied to the new degrees that have started at 2010-11 course in the Bologna Plan's requirements and are replacing the precedents progressively. We have analysed the answers performing a multifactor analysis of variance for each question. It constructs various tests and graphs to determine which questions have statistically significant interactions, given sufficient data. The F-tests in the ANOVA table allowed identifying the significant ones. For each significant factor, the Multiple Range Tests (MRT) tells which means are significantly different

  11. The Use of a Virtual Online Debating Platform to Facilitate Student Discussion of Potentially Polarising Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Paul D; Tzioumis, Vicky; Degeling, Chris; Johnson, Jane; Brown, Robert; Sands, Mike; Starling, Melissa J; Phillips, Clive J C

    2017-09-02

    The merits of students exchanging views through the so-called human continuum exercise (HCE) are well established. The current article describes the creation of the virtual human continuum (VHC), an online platform that facilitates the same teaching exercise. It also reports feedback on the VHC from veterinary science students (n = 38). First-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students at the University of Sydney, Australia, trialed the platform and provided feedback. Most students agreed or strongly agreed that the VHC offered: a non-threatening environment for discussing emotive and challenging issues; and an opportunity to see how other people form ideas. It also made them think about how to express their ideas and make arguments; and left them feeling more comfortable about expressing their views using it than they would discussing ideas face-to-face (98%, 84%, 79% and 76%, respectively). All respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the VHC encouraged them to consider other opinions. These data suggest that the transition of the HCE to an online platform facilitates dialogue on difficult ethical issues in a supportive environment.

  12. The impact of different college science courses on students' attitude towards science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohic, Helene

    2015-08-01

    For non-science majors, a general education course in college is often the last science course they will ever take. General education courses are often regarded by students as a right of passage in which they have no interest. Thus strict coursework might aggravate students against the matter taught, and decrease their general interest in the subject. To test whether general education courses killed the students' interest in science, we administered a science attitude inventory at the beginning and at the end of an introductory astronomy course. We compared the gain/loss in science attitude with that experienced by students of a writing course as a baseline. Finally, we evaluated the gain/loss in science attitude for students enrolled in a general education seminar on science and society, where no formal science knowledge was taught, but where the students discussed the different aspects of the relation between science and society.We find that the science and society seminar had a more positive impact on students' attitude towards science than the astronomy class, which decreased the students' confidence in their ability to understand science. This study (once tested on a larger scale) could serve as a guideline for educational policies aiming to foster a positive attitude in the population of college graduates.

  13. Capturing Student Interest in Astrobiology through Dilemmas and Paradoxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    2005-12-01

    Traditionally, many non-science majoring undergraduates readily reveal fairly negative opinions about their introductory science survey courses that serve as general education distribution requirements. Often seen as unimportant and unrelated to helping them acquire knowledge and skills for the workplace, such general education courses carry nicknames such as "Physics for Poets" (PHYSICS101), "Bugs for Thugs" (BIOLOGY101), "Rocks for Jocks" (GEOLOGY101), and "Moons for Goons" or "Scopes for Dopes" (ASTRONOMY101). In response, many faculty are experimenting with more modern science course offerings as general education courses in an effort to improve students' attitudes, values, and interests. One might think that ASTROBIOLOGY has natural curb appeal for students. However, despite the seemingly innate appeal of a course on extraterrestrial life, when it comes right down to it, an astrobiology course is still a natural science course at its core. As such, it can suffer from the same student apathy that afflicts traditional science courses if students can not find some personal relevance or interest in the topics. One approach to more fully engaging students is to couch core course concepts in terms of what Grant Wiggin and Jay McTighe (2004, 2000) call "essential questions." Essential questions are intended create enduring understanding in students and help students find deeply meaningful personal relevance to concepts. In response, we have created a series of probing essential questions that tie central concepts in astrobiology to dilemmas, paradoxes, and moral questions with the goal of intellectually engaging our students in the human-side of the astrobiology enterprise.

  14. Reaching the Students: A New Approach to Enhancing Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, B. J.; Burnham, C. C.

    2002-05-01

    Most NSF supported programs directed at improving science literacy among university students who are not majoring in SMET normally target instruction in introductory science or math classes. Unfortunately these efforts seldom reach the vast majority of students at a university because students can fulfil their science requirement by taking several other classes or class sections that are not impacted by the NSF program. Ideally it would be desirable to address the issues of science literacy and science anxiety among non-science majors in a single class that is required of essentially all undergraduates. We describe such a program which is being tested at NMSU. The targeted class is the university's freshman level English class. The idea behind this effort is to provide students with the skills they will need to be successful in their science classes in a less threatening humanities environment. We describe the problems that this approach raises, suggest solutions to these problems, and then discuss the overall status of this effort.

  15. Measuring Student Understanding of the Process of Scientific Research through Three Modes of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok, Michelle; Rector, T.; Young, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have continued to develop "Research-Based Science Education" (RBSE) curriculum and assessment for a semester-long program in which undergraduate non-science majors participate in authentic research. The instruction is mainly astronomy-based, but can be used in any introductory science course. Currently, the curriculum is being used by five universities over an assortment of introductory science and astronomy classrooms. The primary goal of the RBSE curriculum is to develop a student's understanding of the nature and process of scientific research. We will present trends and misconceptions discovered based upon our analysis of Fall 2011 semester student responses to several types of assessments including weekly assigned reflective journal questions on the nature of science and pre/post semester concept maps. Additionally, gains observed from a pre/post semester survey of participatory students’ confidence on their science process skills abilities will be discussed.

  16. Extravertebral gas and fluid effusions associated with vertebral collapse containing a vacuum cleft possibly result from a pumping phenomenon: a new evidence of the dynamic hydro-pneumatical nature of the so-called vacuum phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulier, B

    2013-01-01

    We report two very unusual observations in which gas and fluid effusions were transiently and unexpectedly found in the extravertebral spaces of patients presenting with painful necrotic vertebral collapse containing a vacuum cleft. We hypothesize that gas and/or fluid which progressively may replace vacuum in vertebral compression fractures could be secondarily pumped through extravertebral and retroperitoneal spaces. Although being rare, these observations may represent a potential missing link in the imaging snapshots of the cyclic and dynamic vacuum phenomenon.

  17. Did the savannah « flourished » 3000 years ago in the so-called Sangha River Interval of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest ? A retrospective study using stable isotopes and phytoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentaleb, Ilham; Freycon, Vincent; Gillet, Jean-François; Oslisly, Richard; Brémond, Laurent; Favier, Charly; Fontugne, Michel; Droissart, Vincent; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Guillou, Gaël; Martin, Céline; Morin-Rivat, Julie; Ngomanda, Alfred; de Saulieu, Geoffroy; Sebag, David; Subitani, Sandrine; Wonkam, Christelle; Ngeutchoua, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    We aim to improve our knowledge of the dynamic of the vegetation in Central Africa during the last 5 kyrs and to discuss the main hypothesis described in the literature - humans versus climatic impacts- both suggested as responsible of the Congo basin rainforest decline observed between 3 and 2.5 kyrs. We use the carbon isotopic composition of well-dated Central African soils to reconstruct the dynamic of the vegetation cover. We will discuss the carbon isotopic composition of the soil organic carbon methodology for reconstructing palaeovegetation in the light of Rayleigh distillation model. We showed that numerous sites exhibit a carbon isotopic ratios reflecting the Rayleigh distillation but few sites recorded real vegetation changes. Our study suggests that the vegetation of the Guineo-Congolian Region was disturbed between 3000 and 2000 BP (Before Present) without an extreme savannah expansion. We discussed the two hypotheses human versus climate impacts that may conduct to such new physiography of the vegetation. We suggest that the climate hypothesis is more likely than the human impact to explain the reduction of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest 3000 years ago.

  18. 让曹雪芹哭笑不得的"旷世知音"——兼与刘再复先生商榷%A So-called "Incomparable Soul Mate" of CAO Xue-qin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    轩辕春梅

    2011-01-01

    刘再复先生给今年即将再版的梁归智的作序,他的题目直言"周汝昌是中国文学第一天才的旷世知音".刘先生的"首先如此肯定曹雪芹的无比崇高地位的是周汝昌先生"的论断是错误的.纵观周汝昌研红的一生及成果只能证明他"根本不懂",在研究上他一生都是在证假为真,都是在曲解、颠覆的思想内容、艺术构思.周汝昌其实不是考证派,而是典型的索隐派;他的一切所谓的考证,其实都打着索隐派的烙印,他也把自己定位为索隐派.他的索隐其实都是脱离了文本的"悟证",是猜笨谜,乱索隐.因此,他绝对不能被称为中国文学第一天才曹雪芹的旷世知音.

  19. TOWARDS THE PROBLEM OF THE SO CALLED «COMPOUND FUTURE II» SEMANTICS IN THE OLD RUSSIAN LANGUAGE (ON THE MATERIAL OF THE LIFE OF ST. ANDREW THE FOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana A. Penkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an analysis of semantic and syntactic peculiarities of the budet + l-form construction in the Life of the St. Andrew the Fool. The usage of the construction in question in this manuscript doesn’t coincide with what is typical for the majority of Old Russian texts, original or translated, so that it allows us to delineate three uses of the budet + l-form construction and to conclude that the latter was not restricted to conditional clauses, but could be used more widely: not only as a reference to any time earlier than some future moment, but also as a marker of pure resultativity in the future or even as a marker of supposition. Obviously, budet + l-form construction wasn’t just a relative future form, but rather a perfect form which could acquire modal and evidential semantic components. 

  20. 带着枷锁歌唱——论"文革"时期几部电影音乐作品%"Singing in Chains": On Music Soundtracks for Several Films During the So-called "Cultural Revolution"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项筱刚

    2009-01-01

    @@ 引言 从1969年至1972年,中国出现了一个"蔚为壮观"的"八亿人民八部戏"的文化现象.电影生产的停滞越来越无法满足广大电影受众的审美文化需求.从1973年起中国电影开始出现转机,两年左右相继产生了76部故事片.

  1. Adam Smith's "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" and the so-called "Adam Smith Problem"%亚当·斯密的《道德感情论》与所谓"斯密问题"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱绍文

    2010-01-01

    (The Theory of Moral Sentiments)是亚当·斯密所出版的第一本著作,是斯密时代的"道德哲学"的一部分,从其全部内容来说也就是近代市民社会的社会科学."Sentiments"一词不是汉语中的"情操",而是指"感情"或"情感"."亚当·斯密问题"是一个莫须有的伪命题.亚当·斯密在中为刚从封建专政黑暗的中世纪枷锁中解放出来的中下层市民社会倡导的道德规律,公平、公正和正义,必将像太阳那样照亮人间.

  2. Student movement in Chile, situated learning and digital activism. Commitment, social change and technological uses in teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Peña

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available From the student movement emerged in Chile in 2011, the article reflects on the school as a learning space of audiovisual digital technologies and how this process can impact on the political communication dimension of a social movement. To do this, it is described and analyzed the case of a school where formal education in languages and digital technologies is overlapping with the use of applications and resources of the social web and so-called "social media" (youtube, blogs, social networks by high school students who become student leaders. Data are generated through key informant interviews and a selection of videos created for the students and uploaded to the Internet. The content of the interviews is approached from the concept of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991 and videos from the concept of video activism (Askanius, 2013; Mateos & Rajas, 2014. The results show that concrete use of digital tools obtained in formal educational spaces in a context of mobilization processes, generates new experiences of non-formal learning, which allow both students and teachers to reflect on their communicative practices and improve them. They also show an uncritical use of digital tools, which is a wake-up call on the need to incorporate privacy and self-care topics in internet within the contents to be developed by the school as space for digital learning.

  3. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and quantitative analyses, this study revealed that those students with more extended and better-organized knowledge structures, as well as those who more frequently used higher-order information processing modes, were more oriented towards achieving a higher-level informal reasoning quality. The regression analyses further showed that the "richness" of the students' knowledge structures explained 25 % of the variation in their rebuttal construction, an important indicator of reasoning quality, indicating the significance of the role of students' sophisticated knowledge structure in SSI reasoning. Besides, this study also provides some initial evidence for the significant role of the "core" concept within one's knowledge structure in one's SSI reasoning. The findings in this study suggest that, in SSI-based instruction, science instructors should try to identify students' core concepts within their prior knowledge regarding the SSI, and then they should try to guide students to construct and structure relevant concepts or ideas regarding the SSI based on their core concepts. Thus, students could obtain extended and well-organized knowledge structures, which would then help them achieve better learning transfer in dealing with SSIs.

  4. Studying Student Motivations in an Astronomy Massive Open Online Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Matthew; Impey, Chris David; Buxner, Sanlyn; Formanek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are large-scale, free classes open to anyone around the world and are are part of an educational industry that includes a growing number of universities. Although they resemble formal classes, MOOCs are of interest to instructors and educational researchers because they are unique learning environments where various people--particularly adult learners--learn science. This research project examined learners in an astronomy MOOC in order to better understand the motivations of MOOC learners. Using a well-tested instrument that examines student motivations for learning, we wanted to compare the motivations of MOOC learners to previous results in undergraduate classrooms. Our results show that our MOOC learners scored high in intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy, and self-determination. They differed from learners in traditional formal educational environments by having lower grade and career-related motivations. These results suggest that MOOC learners have characteristics of learners in so called “free-choice” learning environments, similar to other life-long learners.

  5. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the

  6. ESTIMATION OF SPORTS-TECHNICAL READINESS OF STUDENTS OF METHODICAL BRANCH «FOOTBALL» MSUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamonin Andrey Valentinovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Increase of sports-technical skill in sports occurs on the basis of last achievements of the theory and physical training and sports practice. Development of football isn't possible without search and introduction in training process of optimum pedagogical models of perfection of physical and technical readiness of football players. Such pedagogical models should be applied, as in groups of initial preparation, so at the subsequent grade levels, including in student's football. Modern training process (pedagogical model, should be under construction on objective indicators of physical, technical and special readiness (so-called feedback. However, the estimation of sports-technical readiness at sports schools on football is reduced only to testing of speed, jumps, juggling, dribbling and a shoot for goal. The same criteria are applied and in student's football. Unfortunately, the given control exercises not in a condition to the full to reflect level of physical and technical readiness of the football player. For more objective estimation of special readiness it is necessary to use the test tasks revealing a level of development of coordination abilities of game structure game and competitive activity (game in football. It will allow trainers to have fuller picture of readiness of the football player, in respect of its professional (football skills. As a result coach have possibility to trace level of a condition of the various parties of sports readiness (physical, technical and coordination student's youth engaged in football at each stage of long-term preparation.

  7. Video Creation: A Tool for Engaging Students to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Students today process information very differently than those of previous generations. They are used to getting their news from 140-character tweets, being entertained by You-Tube videos, and Googling everything. Thus, traditional passive methods of content delivery do not work well for many of these millennials. All students, regardless of career goals, need to become scientifically literate to be able to function in a world where scientific issues are of increasing importance. Those who have had experience applying scientific reasoning to real-world problems in the classroom will be better equipped to make informed decisions in the future. The problem to be solved is how to present scientific content in a manner that fosters student learning in today's world. This presentation will describe how the appeal of technology and social communication via creation of documentary-style videos has been used to engage students to learn scientific concepts in a university non-science major course focused on energy and the environment. These video projects place control of the learning experience into the hands of the learner and provide an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills. Students discover how to locate scientifically reliable information by limiting searches to respected sources and synthesize the information through collaborative content creation to generate a "story". Video projects have a number of advantages over research paper writing. They allow students to develop collaboration skills and be creative in how they deliver the scientific content. Research projects are more effective when the audience is larger than just a teacher. Although our videos are used as peer-teaching tools in the classroom, they also are shown to a larger audience in a public forum to increase the challenge. Video will be the professional communication tool of the future. This presentation will cover the components of the video production process and instructional lessons

  8. 面对“问题“学生的思考%In the Face of“Problem”Students Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国强

    2014-01-01

    “Problem students”refers to those who there is a deviation in the aspect of learning,thoughts or behavior of students,the show is disgusted,discipline and fight,or even stealing.“Problem”students is not innate,but is corroded by the bad social ethos,dysfunctional family education and social education,students internal psychological activities by malignant expansion of various negative factors in the process of physical and mental development,gradually formed the so-called underachiever,now the title should be a“problem”students more appropriate.%“问题”学生是指那些在学习、思想或行为方面存在偏差的学生,表现为厌学、违纪、打架,甚至偷盗。“问题”学生不是天生的,而是受不良的社会风气侵蚀,不正常的家庭教育和社会教育的影响,通过学生内部的心理活动即身心发展过程中各种消极因素恶性膨胀,逐渐形成所谓双差生或后进生的,现在的称谓应该是”问题”学生更为合适。

  9. Astr 101 Students' Attitudes Towards Essays On Transits, Eclipses And Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2012-05-01

    Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL offers a one semester introductory astronomy course each semester. We teach over 110 primarily non-science major students each semester. We use proven active learning strategies such lecture tutorials, think-pair-share questions and small group discussions to help these students develop and retain a good understanding of astrophysical concepts. Occasionally, we offer projects that allow students to explore course topics beyond the classroom. We hope that such projects will increase students' interest in astronomy. We also hope that these assignments will help students to improve their critical thinking and writing skills. In Spring 12, we are offering three short individual essay assignments in our face-to-face sections. The essays focus on transits, eclipses and occultations to highlight the 2012 transit of Venus. For the first essay, students will find images of transit and occultation events using the Astronomy Picture of the Day website and describe their chosen events. In addition, students will predict how variations in certain physical and orbital parameters would alter their particular events. The second essay involves transits, eclipses and occultations observed by spacecraft. Students will describe their transit event, their spacecraft's mission, orbital path, how the orbital path was achieved, etc. The third essay deals with transiting exoplanets. Students will choose at least two exoplanets from an exoplanet database, one of which has been discovered through the transit method. This essay will enable students to learn about detecting exoplanets and how they compare with our solar system. Details of the essay assignments and students' reactions to them will be presented at the meeting.

  10. A Sustainable Energy Laboratory Course for Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Stephen A.; Loxsom, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable energy is growing in importance as the public becomes more aware of climate change and the need to satisfy our society's energy demands while minimizing environmental impacts. To further this awareness and to better prepare a workforce for "green careers," we developed a sustainable energy laboratory course that is suitable…

  11. Students developing resources for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Michael; Evans, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula. Students quickly adapt to using multimedia learning resources, but these need to be well designed, learner-centred and interactive for students to become significantly engaged. One way to ensure that students become committed users and that resources become distinct elements of the learning cycle is to involve students in resource design and production. Such an approach enables resources to accommodate student needs and preferences, but also provides opportunities for them to develop their own teaching and training skills. The aim of the medical student research project was to design and produce an electronic resource that was focused on a particular anatomical region. The views of other medical students were used to decide what features were suitable for inclusion and the resulting package contained basic principles and clinical relevance, and used a variety of approaches such as images of cadaveric material, living anatomy movies and quizzes. The completed package was assessed using a survey matrix and found to compare well with commercially available products. Given the ever-diversifying arena of multimedia instruction and the ability of students to be fully conversant with technology, this project demonstrates that students are ideal participants and creators of multimedia resources. It is hoped that such an approach will help to further develop the skill base of students, but will also provide an avenue of developing packages that are student user friendly, and that are focused towards particular curricula requirements. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  12. KEPUASAN MAHASISWA TERHADAP “SERVICE QUALITY” DI FAKULTAS TEKNIK UNIVERSITAS DIPONEGORO MENGGUNAKAN METODE “STUDENT SATISFACTION INVENTORY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Fanani R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available College is a service industry providing service activities of higher education, where quality of service andproduct have must be committed to customer satisfaction orientation. Diponegoro University as one of TheState University which is located in Semarang Central Java become research object at this research about thequality of service education.This research uses Student Satisfaction Inventory method which was developed by Noel Levitz. This methodmeasure service quality based on eleven dimension, there are Academic Advising, Campus Climate, CampusLife, Campus Support Services, Concern for the Individual, Instructional Effectiveness, Recruitment andFinancial Aid Effectiveness, Registration Effectiveness, Campus Safety and Security, Service Excellence, andStudent Centeredness.The research was done by survey of student satisfaction. The sample are student of Technical Faculty UNDIPwhich is taken proportionally from 8 study program of Engineering Faculty in UNDIP. There are two differentscore for each item on the survey, the importance score, and the satisfaction score. The assessment of qualityservice education based on the difference in the importance score and satisfaction score, so called withperformance gap score.The result shows that the highest importance score is campus supports service (4.65, the highest satisfactionscore is campus climate (3.29 and the highest performance gap is campus support services (1.61. Value oftotal mean performance gap is 1.44. According to the guidelines provided by Noel Levitz, a performance gapbetween zero and 1.50 indicates that the institution (UNDIP is almost meeting students expectation. From theperspective of engineering students, Electrical Engineering student feel most satisfied to service educationgiven by UNDIP than student from other engineering majors. The other result of this research indicates thatthere are 14 variables from 66 variables has high priority to be improved.

  13. Student Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  14. Undocumented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the plight of undocumented immigrant students in the United States. Fights have been waged in various state legislatures over the past few years concerning whether undocumented immigrant students should be able to benefit from in-state tuition rates at public colleges and universities. But a story in The Wall Street Journal…

  15. STUDENT PLACEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    batches of Mekelle University, only 172 graduates fulfill the selection criteria. For these students, their code number, their freshman CGPA, the departments they ... getting good jobs after graduation (PRLog, ... reasons most students choose competitive ... their interest (without influence of external ..... Journal of Educational.

  16. Developing Student Science and Information Literacy through Contributions to the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Wiki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Farley, I.; Geary, A.

    2016-12-01

    Introductory-level Earth science courses provide the opportunity for science and non-science majors to expand discipline-specific content knowledge while enhancing skill sets applicable to all disciplines. The outcomes of the student work can then benefit the education and outreach efforts of an international organization - in this case, a wiki devoted exclusively to the geosciences, managed by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). The course Environment Earth at Penn State Brandywine is a general education science course with the overarching course goal for students to understand, communicate examples, and make informed decisions relating to big ideas and fundamental concepts of Earth science. To help accomplish this goal, students carry out a semester-long digital engaged scholarship project that benefits the users of the SEG Wiki (http://wiki.seg.org/). To begin with developing the literacy of students and their ability to read, interpret, and evaluate sources of scientific news, the first assignment requires students to write an annotated bibliography on a specific topic that serves as the foundation for a new SEG Wiki article. Once students have collected and summarized information from reliable sources, students learn how writing for a wiki is different than writing a term paper and begin drafting their wiki page. Students peer review each other's work for content and clarity before publishing their work on the SEG wiki. Students respond positively to this project, reporting a better understanding of and respect towards the authors of online wiki pages, as well as an overall satisfaction of knowing their work will benefit others. Links to student-generated pages and instructional materials can be found at: http://sites.psu.edu/segwiki/.

  17. Where Students Get Their Information about Science and Technology and Assessment of That Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Llull, J.; Impey, C. D.; Tijerino, K.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS)

    2013-06-01

    The changing landscape of where people get information has created challenges and opportunities for undergraduate science instructors. The perception that students are relying less on their textbooks and more on online content has created questions about how to engage with students in science courses. We report on our work investigating where undergraduate non-major astronomy students report getting their information about science as well as their general interest in science and technology. Through pilot surveys and in-depth interviews, we have refined a survey that asks students about their general interest in science, where they get their information about science, and what it means to study something scientifically. Our work shows that our students report getting a lot of information about science from in-class presentations but turn first to the internet when they want to learn something new about science. Overall, students rate their knowledge of science higher than their knowledge of technology due to coursework that covers science but not technology. Students who are more interested in science in general also self-report higher knowledge in science and are rated higher in their understanding about how to study something scientifically. Students who are less interested in science and rate themselves less knowledgeable about science turn first to online sources when learning something new related to science. Our work has implications for instructors who engage non-science major students and those working to improve science literacy of those students. This work is supported in part through an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate Research Internship. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the

  18. Impact of OpenCourseWare Publication on Higher Education Participation and Student Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Carson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The free and open publication of course materials (OpenCourseWare or OCW was initially undertaken by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT and other universities primarily to share educational resources among educators (Abelson, 2007. OCW, however, and more in general open educational resources (OER1, have also provided well-documented opportunities for all learners, including the so-called “informal learners” and “independent learners” (Carson, 2005; Mulder, 2006, p. 35. Universities have also increasingly documented clear benefits for specific target groups such as secondary education students and lifelong learners seeking to enter formal postsecondary education programs.In addition to benefitting learners, OCW publication has benefitted the publishing institutions themselves by providing recruiting advantages. Finally enrollment figures from some institutions indicate that even in the case of the free and open publication of materials from online programs, OCW does not negatively affect enrollment. This paper reviews evaluation conducted at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH, and Open Universiteit Nederland (OUNL concerning OCW effects on higher education participation and student recruitment.

  19. Student Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Paul J.; Pace, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    Includes "Keeping the Customer Satisfied--VICA [Vocational Industrial Clubs of America] Shows Quality at Work" (Paul J. Bamford) and "TSA [Technology Student Association]--More than Just Another Club" (Kevin L. Pace). (JOW)

  20. Increasing Student Success in Large Survey Science Courses via Supplemental Instruction in Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Nossal, S.; Watson, L.; Timbie, P.

    2010-05-01

    Large introductory astronomy and physics survey courses can be very challenging and stressful. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Physics Learning Center (PLC) reaches about 10 percent of the students in four introductory physics courses, algebra and calculus based versions of both classical mechanics and electromagnetism. Participants include those potentially most vulnerable to experiencing isolation and hence to having difficulty finding study partners as well as students struggling with the course. They receive specially written tutorials, conceptual summaries, and practice problems; exam reviews; and most importantly, membership in small groups of 3 - 8 students which meet twice per week in a hybrid of traditional teaching and tutoring. Almost all students who regularly participate in the PLC earn at least a "C,” with many earning higher grades. The PLC works closely with other campus programs which seek to increase the participation and enhance the success of underrepresented minorities, first generation college students, and students from lower-income circumstances; and it is well received by students, departmental faculty, and University administration. The PLC staff includes physics education specialists and research scientists with a passion for education. However, the bulk of the teaching is conducted by undergraduates who are majoring in physics, astronomy, mathematics, engineering, and secondary science teaching (many have multiple majors). The staff train these enthusiastic students, denoted Peer Mentor Tutors (PMTs) in general pedagogy and mentoring strategies, as well as the specifics of teaching the physics covered in the course. The PMTs are among the best undergraduates at the university. While currently there is no UW-Madison learning center for astronomy courses, establishing one is a possible future direction. The introductory astronomy courses cater to non-science majors and consequently are less quantitative. However, the basic structure

  1. College Students' Conceptions of Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, and Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Halverson, Kristy; Freyermuth, Sharyn

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined 96 undergraduate non-science majors' conceptions of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning. This study was performed at a large, Midwest, research extensive university. Participants in the study were asked to answer 23 questions relating to stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning in an on-line assessment before and after instruction. Two goals of the instruction were to: (1) help students construct accurate scientific ideas, and (2) enhance their reasoning about socioscientific issues. The course structure included interactive lectures, case discussions, hands-on activities, and independent projects. Overall, students' understandings of stem cells, stem cell research, and cloning increased from pre-test to post-test. For example, on the post-test, students gained knowledge concerning the age of an organism related to the type of stem cell it possesses. However, we found that some incorrect ideas that were evident on the pre-test persisted after instruction. For example, before and after instruction several students maintained the idea that stem cells can currently be used to produce organs.

  2. Student perception as moderator for student wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Petegem, Karen; Aelterman, Antonia; Rosseel, Yves; Creemers, Bert

    2007-01-01

    Student motivation as well as student perception of interpersonal teacher behaviour are linked to the sense of wellbeing at student level. However, while most of the variance in the measurement of student wellbeing was situated at student level, eleven percent of variance was found at classroom leve

  3. Inspiring students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In a recent letter (April p18) commenting on my Lateral Thoughts article "Postmodern physics, bathtub style" (January p48) it was suggested that we should teach a physics course based on sex, beer and music, as these would interest most students.

  4. Students Questioning Students (SQS): A Technique to Invite Students' Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    Gifted/talented secondary-school students used the Students Questioning Students method in their mathematics classes. The method stimulated higher-order thinking, made students more attentive listeners, and improved their public speaking self-confidence. The paper offers suggestions for implementing the method and includes three pages of letters…

  5. Using student generated blogs to create a global perspective on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Students in an introductory Global Climate Change college course develop a global perspective on climate change causes, impacts, and mitigation through the use of student generated content in the form of blogging. The students are from diverse backgrounds and mostly non-science majors. They each create a blog for an assigned country. They are immersed in active learning through daily activities that teach them to use numerical data to create and analyze graphs for their blogs. Students are familiarized with other science skills as well, such as how to critically evaluate their sources. This method of using student generated content and active learning encourages students to immerse themselves in the viewpoint of people living in other countries. This creates a tangible understanding of the global stakes of climate change and fosters an emotional involvement in what otherwise might have been an abstract or intimidating topic. The front page of the course blog opens with a world map and a feed from each student's blog. Upon clicking on a country on the world map, the reader is taken to the blog page created by the student in charge of that country. The United States is reserved as a sample page created by the instructor. Throughout the semester, students follow a series of assignments that build their knowledge of the geography, climate, and culture of their assigned country, and these appear as tabs, or informational pages, on their blog. Students are taught to use Excel and they each create temperature and precipitation graphs that compare the climate of a city in their assigned country to that of their home city. Students then write their first blog post on their country's contribution to climate change and how that compares to other countries in the world by importing carbon dioxide emissions data into Excel and creating their own graphs to be used as images in their blog post. The second blog post covers potential climate change impacts on their assigned country

  6. Cet article vise à aborder la relation biographique comme rémunération d’une « injustice » commise à l’égard de l’écrivain biographié ou de son entourage. À travers l’analyse de trois exemples d’écrits biographiques — Alabama Song de Gilles Leroy sur Zelda Fitzgerald, La vocation du bonheur de Karin Reschke sur Henriette Vogel et Le médecin de Lord Byron de Paul West sur John Polidori — où il s’agit de réparer un oubli non mérité, une occultation volontaire ou encore une méprise fondamentale, je tenterai de cerner les enjeux d’une entreprise qui, à distance, vise à réhabiliter des figures historiques tout autant qu’à s’inscrire en faux contre les forces qui les marginalisent, notamment au sein des biographies des « héros » de l’histoire littéraire. This paper endeavours to consider the relationship between the biographer and the writer-biographee as a form of reparation for an injustice committed toward the latter and his/her entourage. I will examine three examples of biographical works—Alabama Song by Gilles Leroy on Zelda Fitzgerald, La vocation du bonheur by Karin Reschke on Henriette Vogel and Lord Byron’s Doctor by Paul West on John Polidori—in which the aim is to redress an undeservedly overlooked detail, an intentional oversight or a fundamentally mistaken assessment of the subject. In so doing, I will attempt to delimit the challenges of the biographical endeavour that seeks, from a distance, to rehabilitate historical figures as much as to denounce the forces that have marginalised them, in particular in the biographies of the so-called “heroes” of literary history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dion

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cet article vise à aborder la relation biographique comme rémunération d’une « injustice » commise à l’égard de l’écrivain biographié ou de son entourage. À travers l’analyse de trois exemples d’écrits biographiques — Alabama Song de Gilles Leroy sur Zelda Fitzgerald, La vocation du bonheur de Karin Reschke sur Henriette Vogel et Le médecin de Lord Byron de Paul West sur John Polidori — où il s’agit de réparer un oubli non mérité, une occultation volontaire ou encore une méprise fondamentale, je tenterai de cerner les enjeux d’une entreprise qui, à distance, vise à réhabiliter des figures historiques tout autant qu’à s’inscrire en faux contre les forces qui les marginalisent, notamment au sein des biographies des « héros » de l’histoire littéraire. This paper endeavours to consider the relationship between the biographer and the writer-biographee as a form of reparation for an injustice committed toward the latter and his/her entourage. I will examine three examples of biographical works—Alabama Song by Gilles Leroy on Zelda Fitzgerald, La vocation du bonheur by Karin Reschke on Henriette Vogel and Lord Byron’s Doctor by Paul West on John Polidori—in which the aim is to redress an undeservedly overlooked detail, an intentional oversight or a fundamentally mistaken assessment of the subject. In so doing, I will attempt to delimit the challenges of the biographical endeavour that seeks, from a distance, to rehabilitate historical figures as much as to denounce the forces that have marginalised them, in particular in the biographies of the so-called “heroes” of literary history.

  7. The Student as a Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monypenny, Phillip

    1968-01-01

    There are a variety of approaches to the limitation of discretion: in loco parentis, constitutional, contract, and trust for fiduciary theories. What has made these principles so far a matter of logical assertion rather than of law is that the courts have chosen not to review a college's use of discretionary authority regarding its students. Only…

  8. Sustainability, Student Affairs, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kathleen G.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are developing both the next generation of leaders as well as state-of-the-art technology that allow climate reduction aspirations and triple bottom-line outcomes to become realities. Divisions of student affairs play a crucial role in the sustainability movement in colleges and universities. The technology-savvy,…

  9. The Student as a Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monypenny, Phillip

    1968-01-01

    There are a variety of approaches to the limitation of discretion: in loco parentis, constitutional, contract, and trust for fiduciary theories. What has made these principles so far a matter of logical assertion rather than of law is that the courts have chosen not to review a college's use of discretionary authority regarding its students. Only…

  10. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    able to develop a (basic) plan to evacuate people from the affected regions. Based on the abilities of your group you can vary the task in many different ways, such as adding information on traffic and public or private transportation to the scenario. Didactic Aspects: Nevertheless it cannot be aim of such a project to develop of a real-life evacuation plan, as this would exceed your student's abilities by far. The focus should rather be on the process of dealing with the problem and developing solutions to it, than on the mere product e.g. a complete plan. This approach corresponds with recent tendencies in German didactics of teaching geography at school favoring the so-called "prozessorientiertes Experimentieren"(see: Lethmate, Otto and Wilhelmi for further reference) as part of training your students (geographic) skills. Applied to the presented task of developing an evacuation plan, you should encourage your students to give argumentative proof for the decisions they make in order to compare their results from a problem solving perspective. Overview: What: process- driven role-play "planning evacuation in case of an eruption of a potentially active volcano (Laacher See)" For whom: adjustable from German form 8-11 (age: 14- 17 years) Time: depending on the prior knowledge of volcanoes a min. of 45-90 minutes. Sources: Lethmate, J.: Sind geographische Experimente Experimente? Praxis Geographie 33, Heft 3, S. 42-43 Otto, K.-W. u.a.: Das geographische Experiment im Kontext empirischer Lehr-Lernforschung, Geographie und ihre Didaktik 38 (2010) H.3, S. 133-145 Wilhelmi, V.: Die experimentelle Lernform. Herausforderung des kompetenzorientierten Geographieunterrichts, Praxis Geographie 42, Heft 7-8, 2012, S. 4-8

  11. Neuromyths in Music Education: Prevalence and Predictors of Misconceptions among Teachers and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Kopiez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, educational neuroscience has become increasingly important in the context of instruction, and its applications have been transformed into new teaching methods. Although teachers are interested in educational neuroscience, communication between scientists and teachers is not always straightforward. Thus, misunderstandings of neuroscientific research results can evolve into so-called neuromyths. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of such music-related neuromyths among music teachers and music students. Based on an extensive literature research, 26 theses were compiled and subsequently evaluated by four experts. Fourteen theses were selected, of which seven were designated as scientifically substantiated and seven as scientifically unsubstantiated (hereafter labeled as “neuromyths”. One group of adult music teachers (n = 91 and one group of music education students (n = 125 evaluated the theses (forced-choice discrimination task in two separate online surveys. Additionally, in both surveys person-characteristic variables were gathered to determine possible predictors for the discrimination performance. As a result, identification rates of the seven scientifically substantiated theses were similar for teachers (76% and students (78%. Teachers and students correctly rejected 60 and 59%, respectively, of the seven neuromyths as scientifically unsubstantiated statements. Sensitivity analysis by signal detection theory revealed a discrimination performance of d' = 1.25 (SD = 1.12 for the group of teachers and d' = 1.48 (SD = 1.22 for the students. Both groups showed a general tendency to evaluate the theses as scientifically substantiated (teachers: c = −0.35, students: c = −0.41. Specifically, buzz words such as “brain hemisphere” or “cognitive enhancement” were often classified as correct. For the group of teachers, the best predictor of discrimination performance was having read a large

  12. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Monday 8 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (3/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (1-2/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. GREY The GRID 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Wednesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (1-2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Thursday 11 August 09:15 - 11:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (3-4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 G. KALMUS The ILC Story 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (5/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. VENEZIANO String theory: has Einstein's dream come true? 11:00  Discussion...

  13. COURSE OF MATHEMATICS IN THE FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS BACHELOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grushevsky S. P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of actualization of the problems of formation of professional competence in the process of studying the course of "Mat-mathematics" on the example of economic specialties. Noting the fact that economic specialty is the specialty that integrates information from the mathematical, natural, gum humanitarian and socio-economic subjects, and the approach to the selection of the content of the mathematics course must be focused on the mate-automatic machine for all cycles, forms of relevant abilities and skills. Therefore, the importance of the problem of developing these tasks and exercises that would help to create such skills for effective application of the theoretical material and the development of research skills. In this article we have discussed some of the design techniques and examples of using the so-called mo-practical problems. The efficiency of the use of model problems in the study of mathematics teaching clarifies the fact that most knowledge activity of students achieved in the research of the issues directly related to their willing profession. They are developed in accordance with the program of the mathematics course and cover all of its major sections. Model-specific tasks may be offered to students in the form of the model calculations, the execution of which should last for a long time, in the form of records insistent or control work directly in the classroom, in the form of term papers, etc. This article also contains the justification of the need of development of didactic materials, designed to optimize student learning professional mathematical competencies

  14. A Writing Assignment For Astr 101 Students Inspired By The "Visions Of The Universe" Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2011-01-01

    The "Visions of the Universe" exhibit was created by the American Library Association, Space Telescope Science Institute and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy. The exhibit consists of 12 posters. Smaller versions of the posters can be downloaded from http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/visions/ for use at institutions that were not part of the exhibit display. We arranged to display these smaller versions at Joliet Junior College. To encourage ASTR 101 and Life in the Universe students to expand their interest in astronomy via these posters, in Spring 2010 we designed a short essay assignment that counted as one homework. This assignment involved exploring a poster topic further via the internet. In addition to learning about the topic, students were asked to critique the webpage they chose as their reference, and to recommend whether or not their chosen webpage would be a suitable resource for non-science majors. We will provide details of the assignment, and report on which exhibit topics were most popular, which websites students referred to and which they recommended for introductory astronomy courses.

  15. Student-on-Student Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Frances E.

    2011-01-01

    No school board member, administrator, or teacher wants to see a student suffering from taunts of the student's peers, but with budget cutbacks, reductions in force, and increased class size, teachers and administrators are stretched too thin to easily identify, investigate, and remedy student-on-student harassment. But school districts must…

  16. International Students: A Vulnerable Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Mark; Thomas, Peter; Chui, Wing Hong

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of international students at The University of Toledo, where international students comprise approximately 10% of the student population. It highlights problems international students experience such as adapting to a new culture, English language problems, financial problems and lack of understanding from the…

  17. Virginia Tech student receives Student Leadership Award

    OpenAIRE

    Dickerson, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The Outstanding Undergraduate Student Leader Award is one of 10 University Student Leadership Awards given annually by Virginia Tech's Department of Student Activities in the Division of Student Affairs to recognize outstanding members, extraordinary achievements by an organization, advisers, volunteerism, and service-learning experiences.

  18. Communication strategies: Implications for EFL university students [İletişim stratejileri: İngilizceyi yabancı dil olarak öğrenen üniversite öğrencilerine yönelik çıkarımlar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şaziye YAMAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral communication is an interactive process in which an individual alternately takes the roles of speaker and listener. Thus, rather than focusing on each skill separately, these skills should be considered integratedly. In order for students to overcome the burdens in listening and speaking skills, they need to develop communicative competence, especially strategic competence. With reference to speaking, strategic competence points out the ability to know how to keep a conversation going, how to terminate the conversation, and how to clear up communication breakdowns and comprehension problems (Shumin, 1994. Therefore, the aim of this quantitative study is to investigate both speaking and listening strategies (so called “communication strategies” used by EFL students to cope with problems during communication so they can be integrated into language teaching in order to develop students’ strategic competence. Two hundred ninety-one Turkish EFL university students participated in this study. Researchers used the “Communication Strategy Inventory”, a 5 point Likert-type scale developed by Yaman, Irgin and Kavasoglu (2011. The findings of this study revealed that EFL students used negotiation for meaning, compensatory, and getting the gist strategies in communication. It also found that female students used communication strategies more than males and advanced level students.

  19. From board to bedside - training the communication competences of medical students with role plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Katharina; Graessel, Elmar; Simon, Cosima; Donath, Carolin

    2014-07-05

    Role plays and standardized patients are often used in medical education and have proven to be effective tools for enhancing the communication skills of medical students. Most course concepts need additional time and teaching staff, and there are only a few studies about role plays in the preclinical segment. We developed a highly consolidated concept for the curricular course of 2nd-year medical students, including ten role plays about five subjects: anamnesis, shared decision making, prevention, breaking bad news, and so-called "difficult interactions". Before the course, all students were asked about their expectations and attitudes toward the course. After the course, all students rated the course, their individual learning progress, whether their expectations had been fulfilled, and re-evaluated their attitudes. Questionnaires were self-report measures and had a quantitative and a short qualitative section and were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Group differences (sex, age, role played) were evaluated with t tests at a Bonferonni-corrected significance level of p = .03 and the non-parametric U-tests. Implementing this practical course concept is possible without incurring additional costs. This paper not only shows how that can be done but also provides 5 examples of role scripts for different training subjects. The course concept was highly appreciated by the students. More than 75% felt that they had learned important communication techniques and would be better able to handle difficult situations. Playing the doctor's role was felt to be more useful than playing the patient's role. Women admitted a higher degree of shyness in the beginning and gave higher ratings to their learning progress than men. Students' most frequent wish in the qualitative analysis was to be able to play the doctor's role at least once. The students' answers showed a differentiated pattern, thus suggesting that the influence of social desirability was minimal. Practical skills

  20. Using Multiple Methods to teach ASTR 101 students the Path of the Sun and Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2015-01-01

    It seems surprising that non-science major introductory astronomy students find the daily path of the Sun and shadows created by the Sun challenging to learn even though both can be easily observed (provided students do not look directly at the Sun). In order for our students to master the relevant concepts, we have usually used lecture, a lecture tutorial (from Prather, et al.) followed by think-pair-share questions, a planetarium presentation and an animation from the Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project to teach these topics. We cover these topics in a lecture-only, one semester introductory astronomy course at Joliet Junior College. Feedback from our Spring 2014 students indicated that the planetarium presentation was the most helpful in learning the path of the Sun while none of the four teaching methods was helpful when learning about shadows cast by the Sun. Our students did not find the lecture tutorial to be much help even though such tutorials have been proven to promote deep conceptual change. In Fall 2014, we continued to use these four methods, but we modified how we teach both topics so our students could gain more from the tutorial. We hoped our modifications would cause students to have a better overall grasp of the concepts. After our regular lecture, we gave a shorter than usual planetarium presentation on the path of the Sun and we asked students to work through a shadow activity from Project Astro materials. Then students completed the lecture tutorial and some think-pair-share questions. After this, we asked students to predict the Sun's path on certain days of the year and we used the planetarium projector to show them how well their predictions matched up. We ended our coverage of these topics by asking students a few more think-pair-share questions. In our poster, we will present our approach to teaching these topics in Fall 2014, how our Fall 2014 students feel about our teaching strategies and how they fared on related test questions.

  1. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 6 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. CERUTTI (CERN) Presentation of the Summer Student Programme D. Heagerty (CERN) Computer rules O. ULLALAND (CERN) Workshops presentation 10:15 - 11:00 D. SCHLATTER (CERN) Introduction to CERN 11:15 Film on CERN Thursday 7 July 09:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 14:45 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Facility 15:00 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Visit Friday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physi...

  2. Student Club

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    They know where the work is, but where’s all the fun? CERN’s new student club provides a much-needed social outlet for all young people coming to CERN for any length of time. Some of the participants on the trip to Chamonix enjoy the breath-taking scenery.For many young people, their time at CERN can be filled not only with exciting opportunities but also anxious uncertainty. Whether your stay is for just a few months or a few years, it can be quite daunting to arrive at a new place and try to find your way around – and let’s face it, CERN is not an easy place to find your way around! Much of their time here is spent on doing analysis or technical work on the experiments or the LHC; but even at the end of the day or on weekends there are few social outlets at CERN geared just towards young people. Fortunately, some young people have decided to come together and make their time here not just productive, but fun! Doctoral student, Omer Khalid, Marie Curie fell...

  3. Feminist Physics Education: Deconstructed Physics and Students' Multiple Subjectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammula, Diane Crenshaw

    Physics is one of the least diverse sciences; in the U.S. in 2010, only 21% of bachelors degrees in physics were awarded to women, 2.5% to African Americans, and 4% to Hispanic Americans (AIP, 2012). Though physics education reform efforts supporting interactive engagement have doubled students' learning gains (Hake, 1998), gender and race gaps persist (Brewe et al., 2010; Kost, Pollock, & Finkelstein, 2009). When students' subjectivities align with presentations of physics, they are more likely to develop positive physics identities (Hughes, 2001). However, both traditional and reformed physics classrooms may present physics singularly as abstract, elite, and rational (Carlone, 2004). Drawing from feminist science, I argue that binaries including abstract / concrete, elite / accessible, and rational / emotional are hierarchal and gendered, raced and classed. The words on the left define conventional physics and are associated with middle class white masculinity, while the words on the right are associated with femininity or other, and are often missing or delegitimized in physics education, as are females and minorities. To conceptualize a feminist physics education, I deconstructed these binaries by including the words on the right as part of doing physics. I do not imply that women and men think differently, but that broadening notions of physics may allow a wider range of students to connect with the discipline. I used this conceptual framework to modify a popular reformed physics curriculum called Modeling Instruction (Hestenes, 1987). I taught this curriculum at an urban public college in an introductory physics course for non-science majors. Twenty-three students of diverse gender, race, ethnic, immigrant and class backgrounds enrolled. I conducted an ethnography of the classroom to learn how students negotiate their subjectivities to affiliate with or alienate from their perceptions of physics, and to understand how classroom experiences exacerbate or

  4. Assessing Student Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Student affect--the attitudes, interests, and values that students exhibit and acquire in school--can play a profoundly important role in students' postschool lives, possibly an even more significant role than that played by students' cognitive achievements. If student affect is so crucial, then why don't teachers assess it? One deterrent is that…

  5. Establishing the Empirical Relationship Between Non-Science Majoring Undergraduate Learners' Spatial Thinking Skills and Their Conceptual Astronomy Knowledge. (Spanish Title: Estableciendo Una Relación Empírica Entre el Razonamiento Espacial de los Estudiantes de Graduación de Carreras no Científicas y su Conocimento Conceptual de la Astronomía.) Estabelecendo Uma Relação Empírica Entre o RacioCínio Espacial dos Estudantes de Graduação EM Carreiras Não Científicas e Seu Conhecimento Conceitual da Astronomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2013-12-01

    The astronomy education community has tacitly assumed that learning astronomy is a conceptual domain resting upon spatial thinking skills. As a first step to formally identify an empirical relationship, undergraduate students in a non-major introductory astronomy survey class at a mediumsized, Ph.D. granting, mid-western US university were given pre- and post-astronomy conceptual diagnostics and spatial reasoning diagnostics, Instruments used were the "Test Of Astronomy Standards" and "What Do You Know?" Using only fully matched data for analysis, our sample consisted of 86 undergraduate non-science majors. Students' normalized gains for astronomy surveys were low at .26 and .13 respectively. Students' spatial thinking was measured using an instrument designed specifically for this study. Correlations between the astronomy instruments' pre- to post-course gain scores and the spatial assessment instrument show moderate to strong relationships suggesting the relationship between spatial reasoning and astronomy ability can explain about 25% of the variation in student achievement. La comunidad de educación en astronomía ha supuesto de forma tácita que el aprendizaje de la astronomía consiste en un dominio conceptual fundamentado en el razonamiento espacial. Como un primer paso para identificar formalmente una relación empírica entre estas dos cosas, utilizamos como muestra los estudantes de graduación de carreras no científicas de un curso experimental en una universidad norteamericana del medioeste de porte mediano con programa de Doctorado em curso, en el cual estos estudiantes se sometieron a un diagnóstico de razonamiento espacial y conceptos astronómicos antes e después del mismo. Las herramientas utilizadas fueron el Test Of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) y el cuestionario What do you know? Utilizando solo los datos completamente consistentes para este análisis, nuestra muestra consistió en 86 estudantes de graduación. Las mejoras, depués de

  6. Industrial Arts Student Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James D.

    1980-01-01

    A national survey attempted to identify (1) the number and size of student organizations in industrial arts, (2) the perceptions that principals and guidance personnel had of the student organizations, and (3) the activities offered to student organization members. (LRA)

  7. College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Facts for Families Guide College Students with ADHD No. 111; Updated December 2013 Many students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) attend college. College students with ADHD face ...

  8. Field trips and their effect on student achievement in and attitudes toward science: A comparison of a physical versus a virtual field trip to the Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Lesley Cochran

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of physical and virtual field trips on students' achievement in estuarine ecology and their attitudes toward science. The study also assessed the effect of students' learning styles, the interaction between group membership and learning styles, and the effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's (1956) taxonomy. Working with a convenient sample of 67 freshmen and sophomore non-science majors, students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (physical, n = 32 and virtual, n = 35). Prior to treatment, students' learning styles were determined, students were pre-assessed on the two targeted measures, and all students attended four consecutive, in-class, 75-minute lectures on estuarine ecology and the Indian River Lagoon (IRL). Pre-assessed data indicated no significant differences between the groups on the two dependent measures. On the weekend following the lecture series, the physical field trip group engaged in a set of predetermined activities at the IRL for 2 hours in the morning. Later that afternoon, the virtual field trip group participated in a 2-hour virtual trip to the IRL that exactly matched the physical field trip activities. This virtual trip incorporated the CD-ROM The Living Lagoon: An Electronic Field Trip. Following each trip, students were post-assessed using the same pre-assessment instruments. MANCOVA results indicated no significant differences on all research factors (i.e., group membership, learning style, and group-learning style interaction). Data analysis also revealed that there was no significant effect of group membership on students' ability to answer questions at different levels of Bloom's taxonomy. These findings imply that educators can integrate virtual field trips that are structured in the same manner as their corresponding physical field trips without significantly impacting student achievement or attitudes.

  9. Moving from Student Development to Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett-Karam, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    By using a reconstructionist and critical theory approach, a review of student development theories demonstrates the problematic nature of such ideas as they continue to be used to shape student affairs practice in community colleges.

  10. Computer Support for Knowledge Management within R&D and the Teaching of Bachelor Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Svetsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Knowledge plays a key role within research, development and education. One of the major challenges for knowledge management is to select the right knowledge from numerous sources, including know - how of individuals, and to transform it into useful, practicable knowledge. The focus should always be on supporting strategic organisational goals. In this context, from the organisation’s strategic point of view, it is very important to link an institutional knowledge management system with the knowledge management systems of individuals. This paper presents personalised IT - support for knowledge management within industrial R&D and especially for teaching and learning. The support is based on the use of a long term developed in - house software that enables individuals (managers and teachers to process and manage knowledge on their desktop computers in a user friendly way. Within the implementation of “Technology - enhanced learning” at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, a pre - programmed work environment called BIKE (Batch Information and Knowledge Editor was developed. However, this desktop environment works also as a teacher’s personalized knowledge management system. It is programmed by the lead author of this paper who is a teacher; therefore the outcomes into teaching bachelor students are implemented directly into the classroom. The paper also presents how such IT - support complements, at a personalized level, the existing organizational knowledge management tool known as the university’s Academic Information System. Some examples from teaching are presented, communication channels (teacher - student forums were also mentioned as a part of the teacher’s knowledge management personalised system. In this case, the BIKE environment is demonstrated as an alternative to learning management systems based on the so called WEB 2.0 technologies.

  11. Comments on Students' Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liftig, Inez Fugate

    2000-01-01

    Points out the importance of teaching writing and the teacher's responsibility. Recommends providing feedback to student writings. Provides a sample student survey and responses to the feedback. (YDS)

  12. Benchmarking in Student Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Robert E.; Schwarzmueller, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of benchmarking in student affairs, focusing on issues related to student housing. Provides examples of how benchmarking has influenced administrative practice at many institutions. (EV)

  13. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Ana C.

    likely to withdraw from the course than occasional or non-SI participants. In biology, no relationship between SI participation, gender, and student ethnic background was found. In chemistry, female students were significantly more likely to attend SI regularly than males. Chemistry minority students had significantly higher representation among occasional SI participants. An important implication involved the use of pedagogical approaches that make lecture classrooms more interactive and encourage student motivation and engagement. This study could be replicated in other science and non-science courses that offer SI sessions. Additional factors in the success of SI programs and student motivation can be added, such as SI leaders' experience and major. Follow-up studies on students who completed the courses included in this study can be conducted to determine whether they reenrolled in other science courses, continued attending SI sessions, and gained self-regulated learning skills.

  14. Supporting Deaf Students--and All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuknis, Christina; Santini, Joseph; Appanah, Thangi

    2017-01-01

    Two faculty members and a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University, the world's only university for the deaf, explain the concept of Deaf-Gain, which reframes the idea of hearing loss into one of gaining deafness and recognizes the contributions that deaf people make to society. This narrative assumes that deaf students and all students bring…

  15. Student Participation in Developing Student Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefson, Kristina; Pobiega, Jenny; Strahlman, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Sweden has a high level of student influence. At Lund University, students are not viewed as counterparts but partners in the university's activities. Lund University has carried out Student Satisfaction Surveys (barometers) since the 1990s and an overview has shown that an evaluation culture has grown during the past decade. It is, however, time…

  16. Interdisciplinary graduate student symposium organized by students for students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Goulet-Hanssens, A.; de Boef, M.; Hudson, E.; Pandzic, E.

    2010-12-01

    The volcanic tipping-point: is there evidence for an eruption trigger at the Valles supercaldera? What is the role of groundwater in a northern peatland, Schefferville, Quebec? What are the lower wind profiles of a landfalling hurricane? These are just a few of the research questions discussed at the 7th Annual Graduate Student Research Symposium (IGSRS): A universe of ideas, 25 - 26 March 2010, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Canada. Each year the symposium hosts ~ 80 graduate students from multiple fields in the Faculty of Science. This event was initiated in 2004 by a group of graduate students who realized that our scientific futures depend on communication in interdisciplinary science. The conference is novel in that it is now in the 8th year and continues to be organized by students for students. The objectives of the IGSRS are to provide students the opportunity to (1) communicate in an interdisciplinary group, (2) enrich their own research by exchanging ideas with researchers from different scientific backgrounds, (3) give and receive valuable feedback on presentation formats and (4) develop skills to network with other researchers and industry personnel. The students are asked to present either in poster or oral format to an interdisciplinary audience. Presentation feedback on clarity to an interdisciplinary audience, scientific merit and presentation style is provided from their peers and judges who are academics or employed in industry. Preliminary results from formative evaluations for 2006 indicate 88% of the students attended for 1) experience in presenting to an interdisciplinary group and to 2) meet student researchers from other disciplines. Out of this majority 68 % of the students were scientifically stimulated by conversations with their peers (26 % were neutral). Feedback on the student poster presentation format is low (36 %) and due to poor scheduling by the organizers. Formative evaluations given by the judges to the symposium organizers

  17. Learning the Lord’s Prayer in Gothic: A Personal Best Achievement for American High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oliphant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Young Friends,. . . Just as we know the word AMERICA goes back to someone’s name, so we know our “American Language,” as Noah Webster called it, goes back to earlier sources. The most recent of these is of course British English. But we also go back to Old English (before 1066 and even to so-called primitive Germanic, as represented by a translation of the Lord’s Prayer from the original Greek into fourth century Gothic.As a snapshot of our linguistic past, this Gothic translation is quite short (10 lines. But since many students, including me, have over the years learned these 10 lines by heart, I feel a brief look at this early text may stimulate your curiosity, enough so to encourage memorization of, say, the first five lines (only 20 words.Our Gothic text will be followed by a word-by-word treatment that includes phonetic transcriptions of its Gothic pronunciation, its English translation, and some information about its linguistic history. Then we’ll finish with some encouraging words about textual memorization, along with raising a key question for you and your friends to ponder, namely, is Gothic truly a “primitive language”?

  18. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. WELLS The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (1/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 2 August 09:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 4 August 09:15 - 11:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 A. WEINSTEIN Gravitation Waves 12:00 Discussion Session 16:30 - 18:00 Poster Session Friday 5 August 09:15 - 11:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JA...

  19. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 18 July 09:15 - 11:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) 11:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 F. RADEMAKERS ROOT 11:15 - 12:00 L. ROSSI Super-conducting magnet technology for particle accelerators and detectors 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) 10:15 - 12:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (1-2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (3/3) 10:15 -...

  20. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 25 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (2-3/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 27 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (5-6/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J-P. DELAHAYE The CLIC Concept and Technology for an e+e-Collider at the Energy Frontier 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw data to Physics Results (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN Fr...

  1. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (2/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 12 July  09:15 - 11:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (1-2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (1/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 R. LANDUA (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 1...

  2. 中职学校数学“潜能生”的成因及转化措施初探%Cause of Formation of Secondary Vocational School "Potential Students of Mathematics" and Transformation Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锡凤

    2013-01-01

    因为受社会环境、家庭氛围、智力差异、学习方法、个性品质以及教师的教学方式等诸多因素的影响,必然会有一部分学生成为所谓的数学“潜能生”,面向这样的学生,最大限度地满足他们的数学需要,让他们学习有价值的数学.我们数学教师就要剖析原因,采取积极地措施,对他们进行教育和转化,在数学上也能有成功的体验,这就是我们必须研究的课题.%Because of the social environment, family atmosphere, differences in intelligence, personality, learning methods and teaching methods and many other factors, there must be a part of the students to become the so-called "potential students of mathematics", facing such students, the maximum to meet their mathematics needs, let them learn valuable mathematics. Our maths teacher is to analyze the reason, take active measures, their education and transformation in mathematics, also can have a successful experience in mathematics, this is the issue that we must study.

  3. The relationship of parental influence on student career choice of biology and non-biology majors enrolled in a freshman biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, Mitzie Leigh

    Recent declines in science literacy and inadequate numbers of individuals entering science careers has heightened the importance of determining why students major in science or do not major in science and then choose a science-related career. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental influences and student career choices of both males and females majoring and not majoring in science. This study specifically examined the constructs of parental occupation, parental involvement, and parental education levels. Aspects indicated by the participants as being influencers were also examined. In addition, differences between males and females were examined. A total of 282 students participated in the study; 122 were science majors and 160 were non-science majors. The data was collected through the use of a student information survey and the Modified Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scale. The findings suggest that students indicated the desire to help others, peers, salary, and skills as influencing their career choice. In regard to the various parental influences, mother's occupation was the only construct found as a statistically significant influencer on a student's decision to major in science. The results of this study can help educators, administrators, and policy makers understand what influences students to pursue science-related careers and possibly increase the number of students entering science-related careers. The results of the study specifically provide information that may prove useful to administrators and educators in the health science fields, particularly nursing fields. The findings provide insight into why students may choose to become nurses.

  4. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  5. Periodic Table of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  6. Student-as-Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatmya, Duhita; Brown, Russell C.; Johnson, Alexandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Two significant metaphors in the education discourse describing student and teacher roles in academic achievement are Student-as-Product, and Student-as-Consumer. These fail to take into account the importance of students' active engagement in their own learning. Current policy initiatives around education reform reflect these deficits as well.…

  7. Students Evaluation of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawabieh, Ahmad M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how students evaluate their faculty and the effect of gender, expected grade, and college on students' evaluation. The study sample consisted of 5291 students from Tafila Technical University Faculty evaluation scale was used to collect data. The results indicated that student evaluation of faculty was high (mean =…

  8. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  9. Periodic Table of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  10. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  11. Improving Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The…

  12. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  13. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  14. Kinesthetic Astronomy: Significant Upgrades to the Sky Time Lesson that Support Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Zawaski, M.

    2004-12-01

    This paper will report on a significant upgrade to the first in a series of innovative, experiential lessons we call Kinesthetic Astronomy. The Sky Time lesson reconnects students with the astronomical meaning of the day, year, and seasons. Like all Kinesthetic Astronomy lessons, it teaches basic astronomical concepts through choreographed bodily movements and positions that provide educational sensory experiences. They are intended for sixth graders up through adult learners in both formal and informal educational settings. They emphasize astronomical concepts and phenomenon that people can readily encounter in their "everyday" lives such as time, seasons, and sky motions of the Sun, Moon, stars, and planets. Kinesthetic Astronomy lesson plans are fully aligned with national science education standards, both in content and instructional practice. Our lessons offer a complete learning cycle with written assessment opportunities now embedded throughout the lesson. We have substantially strengthened the written assessment options for the Sky Time lesson to help students translate their kinesthetic and visual learning into the verbal-linguistic and mathematical-logical realms of expression. Field testing with non-science undergraduates, middle school science teachers and students, Junior Girl Scouts, museum education staff, and outdoor educators has been providing evidence that Kinesthetic Astronomy techniques allow learners to achieve a good grasp of concepts that are much more difficult to learn in more conventional ways such as via textbooks or even computer animation. Field testing of the Sky Time lesson has also led us to significant changes from the previous version to support student learning. We will report on the nature of these changes.

  15. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  16. EDITORIAL: Student undergraduate laboratory and project work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dieter

    2007-05-01

    will be the typical learning environment for physics students in the future. However, the details of this change should be based on a better understanding of the learning process in a students' lab. A deeper insight is given by the contribution of Claudia von Aufschnaiter and Stefan von Aufschnaiter in 'University students' activities, thinking and learning during laboratory work'. A second important alteration has taken place in physics education during the last decade. The so-called new media have changed the world of learning and teaching to an unprecedented extent. Learning with new media is often much more related to physics labwork than to traditional lectures or seminars (e.g. small learning groups, problem based learning, a high level of interactivity). We need to take these new tools into consideration as suitable amendment (blended learning) or substitution (e-learning, distance learning) of labwork courses. The developments with presumably the highest impact on physics education are modelling tools, interactive screen experiments and remote labs. Under 'modelling tools', all computer programs are summarized which enable the simulation of a physical process based on an explicit or implicit given formula. Many commercial program packages are available. The application of modelling tools in labwork courses permits a tight binding of theory and experiment. This is particularly valid and necessary in the case of project work. An interactive screen experiment (ISE) is a computer assisted representation of a physical experiment. When watching a video clip of an experiment students are forced to be passive observers. In the case of an ISE they can manipulate the setup on the screen with the help of a hand-like mouse pointer and the computer will show the appropriate result. The ISE consists of a large number of digital photos taken from the real experiment. From an epistemological point of view an ISE has the character of an experiment and can be used to discover or

  17. Use of Web 2.0 by students in the Faculty of Information Science and Communications at Mzuzu University, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winner D. Chawinga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years, advancements in Internet technologies have led to the emergence of new technologies such as Web 2.0, which have taken various sectors including higher education by storm. Web 2.0 technologies are slowly but surely penetrating higher education in developing countries with much hype, according to the literature. This justifies the need for original research that aims at demystifying the application and exploiting the promises that come along with these so-called versatile technologies.Objectives: The specific objectives of the study were to ascertain students’ awareness of and familiarity with Web 2.0 technologies, to determine the purposes for which students use Web 2.0 technologies, and to identify the factors that affect students’ use or non-use of Web 2.0 technologies.Method: A mixed-methods approach was adopted. Firstly, a questionnaire was sent to 186 students; secondly, the curricula of the two departments in the Faculty of Information Science and Communication (ISC were analysed; finally, follow-up interviews were conducted with seven lecturers in the Faculty of ISC.Results: The study found that students use Web 2.0 technologies to search for information, to communicate with lecturers, to submit assignments and to communicate with friends on academic work. Wikipedia, WhatsApp, Google Apps and YouTube are the Web 2.0 technologies most used by students. Poor bandwidth (Internet connection coupled with the absence of Wi-Fi (wireless Internet connection prevents the successful adoption of Web 2.0 by students.Conclusion: Web 2.0 can have a profound impact on undergraduate students and lecturers in teaching and learning. The research results indicated a high awareness of a wide range of Web 2.0 technologies, with social networks being the commonly used one. There is a need for more training to increase awareness of and familiarity with new Web 2.0 technologies. The problem of poor bandwidth needs to be addressed

  18. The influence of world view on African-American college students' decisions to study science: An interpretive investigation of four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradford F.

    In the United States, African Americans are underrepresented among employed Ph.D. holding scientists; they comprise less than 2% of the scientific population and 12% of the United States population. Educational theorists, focusing on the career choices of African Americans as the cause of underrepresentation, have identified many factors that are associated with the underrepresentation of African Americans in science. Some of these factors are: lack of interest in science, poor academic preparation, high interest in social-oriented careers, poor educational and career planning, unfavorable images of scientists, impoverished family backgrounds, and lack of confidence in ability. This plethora of factors indicates that there is yet equivocation in literature as to the cause of underrepresentation. The objective of this study is to deepen current understanding, by providing explanations for the career decisions of African American students. Adopting a theoretical framework which maintains that human behavior is directed by world view and that world view is shaped by environment, the present study seeks to analyze the world view contents of three African American college students: two science majors and one non-science major. The aim of this study is to analyze the world view contents of the students to identify the salient world view images and assumptions that influence their career decisions. The research employs interpretive methodology and a case study design. Primary methods of data collection are interview and interview analysis. The dissertation reports the results of interviews, which include explanations for each respondent's career decisions; and the influence of three factors (expectation of monetary gain, the impact of role models, and respondents' level of self-confidence in ability) on the respondents' career decisions. Findings indicate that the science major has a greater capacity, than the non-science majors, to accommodate world view images and

  19. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  20. Students, Butterflies, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    It is not always easy for a teacher to relate to his or her students. To communicate with students, it is important for a teacher to relate the subject that he or she is trying to teach is something that the students know, or at least to something that the students care about. In this article, the author, a genetics teacher, relates how he used…

  1. Supporting Transparency between Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    The paper presents the results of a case study that explores the potentials of weblogs and social bookmarking to support transparency in a university course. In the course, groups of students used weblogs and social bookmarking in their work. The objective of the case was to empower students...... students in a course, but that the challenge is to create a balance between personal tools and tools for collaborative group work that are also suitable for transparency between students....

  2. Students in Action Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Theresa; Mottiar, Ziene; Quinn, Bernadette; Gorman, Catherine; Griffin, Kevin; Craggs, Ruth; Quinn, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The Students in Action Project in the School of Hospitality Management and Tourism was established in 2012 as a way of engaging students and working with stakeholders in a destination. The overall aim of the project was to immerse students in an active collaborative learning environment within the destination to identify ways in which tourism could be enhanced. In the 2014/2015 academic year the project involved over 300 students from a variety of programmes and modules working with local sta...

  3. Students, Butterflies, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    It is not always easy for a teacher to relate to his or her students. To communicate with students, it is important for a teacher to relate the subject that he or she is trying to teach is something that the students know, or at least to something that the students care about. In this article, the author, a genetics teacher, relates how he used…

  4. Online Learning for Students from Diverse Backgrounds: Learning Disability Students, Excellent Students and Average Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Shonfeld

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The perceived contribution of science education online course to pre-service students (N=121 from diverse backgrounds - students with learning disabilities (25 LD students, 28 excellent students and 68 average students is presented in this five years research. During the online course students were asked to choose a scientific subject; to map it and to plan teaching activities; to carry out the proposed activities with students in a classroom experience; and to reflect the process. The assumption was that adapting the online course by using information and communication technology following formative assessment will improve students' self-learning ability as well as broaden their science knowledge, their lab performance and teaching skills. Data were collected using quantitative and qualitative tools including: pre and post questionnaires and nine (three students from each group depth interviews upon completion of the course. Findings, based on students` perceived evaluation, pinpointed on the advantages of the online course for students of the three groups. LD students’ achievements were not inferior to those of their peers, excellent students and average students. Yet, it carefully reports on a slight but explicitly marginal perceived evaluation of the LD students in comparison to excellent students and average students regarding: forum participation, authentic task and water lab performance. The article discusses the affordance of the online course via additional features that can be grouped into two categories: knowledge construction and flexibility in time, interaction and knowledge. Further research is suggested to extend the current study by examine the effect of other courses and different contents and by considering various evaluation methods of online courses, such as: observation, the think aloud, text and tasks analysis, and reflection.

  5. Who Uses Student Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Most personal student information stays local. Districts, states, and the federal government all collect data about students for important purposes like informing instruction and providing information to the public. But the type of data collected, and who can access them, is different at each point. This graphic shows how student data--from…

  6. Learning from Student Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kobie

    2016-01-01

    Just as adults' personal lives and data are increasingly inhabiting online spaces, so are students. While this shift brings many benefits and the possibility of learning tailored to individual students' needs, it is also brings new challenges. Students create an electronic trail of information that creates an obvious concern: How can they enjoy…

  7. Students See the Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalada, Lawrence T.; Unruh, Roy; Cooney, Timothy; Foltz, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Suggests using activities from "Physics Resources and Instructional Strategies for Motivating Students" designed to promote student understanding of physics principles. The activities are part of a learning cycle in which student explorations of concrete phenomena precede the introduction or development of abstract concepts. (SAH)

  8. The ideal student is

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林芬

    2004-01-01

    Many teachers believe that the responsibility for learning hes with the students. If a long reading assignment is given, teachers expect students to be familiar with the information in the reading even if they do not discuss it in class or give an examination. (Courses are not designed merely for students to pass exams). The i

  9. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  10. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  11. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  12. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  13. Integrity in Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Banta, Trudy W.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for integrity in practice and theory has been part of the evolution of student personnel work all the way back to the turn of the 20th century. This chapter seeks to take stock of the question of integrity in relation to one of the core knowledge bases used by those engaged in student affairs work today--student development. The authors…

  14. Student Veterans Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  15. Expanding Student Assessment Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartscher, Beth; Carter, Andrea; Lawlor, Anna; McKelvey, Barbara

    This paper describes an approach for expanding assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of content. The targeted population consisted of elementary and junior high school students in two schools in a growing middle-class community in north central Illinois. The elementary school enrolled 467 students and the junior…

  16. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  17. On Developing Students Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟兰

    2015-01-01

    With the development of English teaching, English teaching methods have been paid more and more attention to. Language learning is a complicated process, creative thinking is very important for students to learn language. According to analyzing several factors of affecting students' thinking, the author points out five areas of suggestions on developing students' thinking in this paper.

  18. Alternatives to Student Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, David

    2012-01-01

    Seven years ago, James A. Garfield High School in East Los Angeles set a school record with 613 student suspensions, out of a total enrollment of 5,000 students. The school, made famous by the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver", was no stranger to the high rates of student discipline all too common within the Los Angeles Unified School…

  19. Nursing students and Haiku.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  20. Teachers, Let Students Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigford, Aretha Butler

    1988-01-01

    To improve oral communication skills of their students, teachers should provide opportunities for students to talk in class. Teachers are advised to: begin early, be sensitive to the individuality of students' speech patterns, and stress that there are different kinds of speech patterns for different situations. (JDD)

  1. All Students Are Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Linda

    2012-01-01

    As co-headmaster of Boston Arts Academy, the author tells the stories of two students whose passion and talent in the arts helped them become more successful in academic subjects. Boston Arts Academy accepts students on the basis of auditions, regardless of their previous academic or discipline records. Yet a large majority of its students go on…

  2. Student Consumerism at College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, Hilda

    1982-01-01

    As colleges are forced to compete for students, the voice of the student as consumer grows louder. Recommendations of the Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education regarding how colleges, school districts, and information centers can furnish prospective students with information that they need as educational consumers are discussed.…

  3. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  4. Student Absenteeism: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Joyce; Fleischer, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Internationally there is concern about levels of student absenteeism. Research underpinning this article consisted of a survey of academic staff and 25 interviews with first year students in a well regarded "new" university in Britain. The article explores the issue of poor attendance and why a significant number of students seem to have…

  5. Vietnamese Students Employability Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Nguyen Minh

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to investigate if the International University (IU) students' core competencies can meet the requirements set by employers, what are the differences in core competencies in final year students (or undergraduates), and how they view themselves compared with ex-students after one or two years in working environment, how…

  6. Toward Renewal in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Charles W.

    1972-01-01

    Student affairs has made substantial contributions to the physical, moral, and social development of students. However, student affairs professionals must assume their central role in the intellectual development of students by serving as true educators. (Author)

  7. Becoming a Smart Student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Ulla

    and favoured by the teacher are at risk of being ostracized by peers, of encountering greater pressure for classroom performance and of suffering reduced learning opportunities.The study inspires teachers to create wiggle room for their students by becoming aware of the conventional definitions of the smart......When teachers and students interact in everyday academic activities, some students are ascribed social roles as “smart”, which lead other students to contest these roles. Such struggles around what it means to be smart and which students come to be viewed as smart are a pertinent problem...... for students, teachers and educational scholars, because they create social inequities in schools.This studye xplores how smart student roles evolve over the course of fourth -, fifth -, and sixth form classes in a Danish primary school. Theoretically, the study draws from the frameworks of “social...

  8. THE PROBLEM OF MOTIVATION AND METHODS OF ITS INCREASE AT STUDENTS OF NOT LANGUAGE TRAINING DIRECTION IN TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Danilova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article is devoted to such an actual today issue as increasing of motivation of students learning foreign languages in non-language faculties of a contemporary university. The authors identify the main reasons causing the low level of language preparation among students of non-linguistic directions of preparation, which include – lack of motivation for the implementation of utterance (dominated by a strong belief that in real life it is not useful; small vocabulary; poor knowledge (or ignorance of grammar of the language being studied; the fear of making a mistake (“psycholo gical barrier”. Materials and Methods: the methodological basis of the research are scientific methods such as observation and experiment. In addition, the authors used some other methods such as study of students’ performance (written, examinations, tests, essays, dictations, summaries, etc.; method of pedagogical experiment; modeling. Results: in order to change this situation, the authors suggest to activate the teaching and speech activity of students at two levels: 1 motivation and impelling (to form among students sustained motive (need to speak and 2 tentatively and research (to train the ability to independently select and apply language and speech means appropriated to conditions and social environment. One must skillfully combine both traditional and innovative approaches and methods in the teaching of foreign languages, among which the authors identify a number of basic: the so-called gambling technology (business and role-playing games, information and communication technologies (presentations, projects, online tutorials, webinars, Internet communication with foreign counterparts, meetings and discussions with native speakers, participate in competitions and others. Their alternation on pairs will maintain the attention and interest of students at a high level. Discussion and Conclusions: it is noted that a key role in this process is

  9. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  10. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  11. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  12. Profiling Expelled Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warnie Richardson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, demographic trends exist respecting students expelled for violent behavior. The data collected from 104 confidential student files were used to profile each of the following: A. The violent student, B. The nature of school violence, and C. How schools are dealing with violent students. The student expelled for violent behavior is typically male, between the ages of 15 and 18, has a history of previous suspension and has average to below-average academic skills. The incidents of violence occur in common areas of the school, are rarely directed toward staff and teachers, involve a weapon, and are classified as aggravated assaults. Schools are directly involving the police, expelling students for extended periods of time

  13. Mapping student online actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Jensen, Pia; Udby, Linda

    their problem solving strategy. In this study, we use web analytics software to track student online behavior by recording what particular objects on particular web-pages students click on and when each click occurs. For each recorded session, we create networks based on student clicks: A directed link between...... are hypertext navigability (in-text and navigation bar) and socalled wiki-problems some of which have associated hints and solutions. For these problems, students actively choose whether and when to show problem hints and solutions during problem solving. Students might also navigate the page as part...... two nodes, 1 and 2, is drawn, if the object represented by node 2 is clicked right af the object represented by node 1. Preliminary analysis of these networks show two general types of behavior: In one type, there is little interaction with the online contents. The student navigates to the page...

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  15. Lessons in Student Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The tools students have at their ready to do well are really amazing: engaging, thorough, and colorful textbooks; the Internet, of course; faculty who know how to teach and offer a plethora of information; and seemingly endless possibilities for optimal learning environments. Yet with all these improved “mousetraps” there is one factor that, if missing, will keep each of these silent – and the student will learn little or naught: motivation. Indeed, if the student is not motivated to learn, a...

  16. Pseudohomosexuality in feminist students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Z

    1976-04-01

    The author describes the influence of the feminist movement on the intellectual, social, and sexual behavior of feminist college students. The complex interrelationship between sexual political ideology and actual sexual behavior creates confusion and anxiety for some vulnerable students in their attempts to evolve a satisfactory sexual identity. A series of vignettes illustrates the struggle of such students, who initially expressed concern over actual or potential lesbianism and its connection to the movement, to resolve their conflicts concerning feminism and sexual preference.

  17. Academic Dishonesty: Are Business Students Different from Other College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigated academic dishonesty and how business students stand on the issue as compared with other college students. They found in their study that nonbusiness students are more likely to cheat than are business students. In general, students who are members of Greek social organizations, undergraduates, male, and…

  18. Academic Dishonesty: Are Business Students Different from Other College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigated academic dishonesty and how business students stand on the issue as compared with other college students. They found in their study that nonbusiness students are more likely to cheat than are business students. In general, students who are members of Greek social organizations, undergraduates, male, and…

  19. Examining Student Immobility: A Study of Irish Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Mairéad; Darmody, Merike

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores student mobility among Irish higher education students. It specifically focuses on the profile of "stayers", that is, students who have no plans to study abroad, thus addressing an underexplored topic in existing literature on student mobility. The article aims to identify factors that impact on students' decisions…

  20. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  1. Lessons in Student Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errol Craig Sull

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The tools students have at their ready to do well are really amazing: engaging, thorough, and colorful textbooks; the Internet, of course; faculty who know how to teach and offer a plethora of information; and seemingly endless possibilities for optimal learning environments. Yet with all these improved “mousetraps” there is one factor that, if missing, will keep each of these silent – and the student will learn little or naught: motivation. Indeed, if the student is not motivated to learn, and his or her motivation is not kept up throughout a course, there is little the student will take away from the course.

  2. International Students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut ÖZER

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are over three million international students worldwide, and in recent years higher education institutions compete with each other in order to receive these students to their institutions. International students are now one of the most important indicator of the internationalization of the higher education systems and institutions. In this context, the detection of the status of this indicator in our higher education system and institutions is of great importance as our higher education system shows a large expansion. This study, discusses the status of international students in our country.

  3. Students' perceived supervisory needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, S; Wittkopp, J

    1982-07-01

    One hundred and ninety-one students from six Michigan University speech-language pathology training programs completed a 43-item questionnaire concerning their perceived supervisory needs in five areas: lesson plan and report writing, supervisor observation, conferencing, professional responsibility, and general supervisory practices. Selection criteria for students were academic status, university attended, and earned clinical clock hours. Student's perceptions of positive and negative supervisory practices differed significantly as a function of earned clinical clock hours and site of training. However, there were no differences in perception between undergraduate and graduate students.

  4. Urine Trouble: Drug Testing of Students and Teachers in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Non-individualized (so-called "random") drug testing in public schools presents issues of Constitutional law on both the federal and state levels, particularly with regard to citizens' freedom from "unreasonable searches and seizures." The trend toward increasing acceptance of such testing by the courts (and particularly the U.S. Supreme Court)…

  5. Upholding Standards of Academic Writing of Chinese Students in China English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing

    2012-01-01

    While the emergence of the plural forms of English widely acknowledges the sociolinguistic realities in many countries and regions, it might also have an equally profound impact on English teaching and learning in those areas. The trend is for pedagogical models no longer to privilege so-called Standard English based on native varieties but to be…

  6. The Use of a Digital Environment to Improve First Year Science Students' Symbol Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacoma, Sietske; Drijvers, Paul; Boon, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dutch universities complain that freshmen in studies such as chemistry, physics, economics and mathematics do not master the required algebraic skills. In the worldwide discussions on mathematics education, mastery of algebra is also a prevalent issue. Often a distinction is made between basis procedures and algebraic reasoning, so-called symbol…

  7. Upholding Standards of Academic Writing of Chinese Students in China English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing

    2012-01-01

    While the emergence of the plural forms of English widely acknowledges the sociolinguistic realities in many countries and regions, it might also have an equally profound impact on English teaching and learning in those areas. The trend is for pedagogical models no longer to privilege so-called Standard English based on native varieties but to be…

  8. Students halls – humane lifestyle for students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Seljak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of students at the University of Ljubljana (Slovenia, the shortage of student’s accommodation in student’s halls has increased. Alongside the necessity for building new accommodation capacities an opportunity has emerged for the enforcement of new living standards that should replace outdated guidelines from the sixties. During the preparation of the project we analysed all the important elements of students accommodation in students halls. Analyses of the present conditions in existing halls were performed, including positive and negative elements. We also conducted a comparative research of student’s halls in various European countries. In conclusion a list of recommendations with real guidelines was prepared that could be used by investors when proposing new development of such buildings, as well as architects and planners.

  9. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  10. At-Risk Students Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Montana's definition of a basic system of quality public elementary and secondary schools includes educational programs for at-risk students (20-9-309, MCA). State statute defines an at-risk student as a "student who is affected by environmental conditions that negatively impact the student's educational performance or threaten a student's…

  11. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  12. Student attendance and student achievement: a tumultuous and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2001-12-21

    Dec 21, 2001 ... This paper investigates the impact of student attendance and student achievement at Kigali ... performance at all levels of education. .... year (below that limit, students were simply debarred from taking semester exams).

  13. A Meditation in Which Consideration Is Given to the Past and Future Engagement of Social Science Generally and Critical Physical Education and Sports Scholarship in Particular with Various Scientific Debates, Including the So-Called "Obesity Epidemic" and Contemporary Manifestations of Biological Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Michael

    2011-01-01

    My purpose in this paper is to consider the relationship between, on the one hand, critical social science and, on the other hand, existing and emerging sciences of the body. Taking my lead from the sociologist, Steve Fuller, I discuss the ways in which some social scientists, both within and outside physical education and sport, have engaged with…

  14. Novas técnicas cirúrgicas para o tratamento da atresia pulmonar com comunicação interventricular e anomalias de artérias pulmonares incluindo o assim chamado truncus tipo IV New surgical techniques for treatment of pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and pulmonary arteries anomalies including the so-called tipo IV truncus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Barbero-Marcial

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Entre janeiro de 1975 e outubro de 1986, 42 pacientes com atresia pulmonar e comunicação interventricular, com idade entre 2 e 18 anos, foram submetidos a correção parcial, ou total. Foram divididos em: tipo A com todos os segmentos broncopulmonares conectados às artérias pulmonares (AP's, 34 pacientes; tipo B com alguns dos segmentos broncopulmonares conectados às AP's, 6 pacientes; tipo C com todos os segmentos broncopulmonares conectados às colaterais sistêmico-pulmonares, 2 pacientes. A correção foi planejada em uma a três etapas. No tipo A, 17 foram corrigidos em uma etapa, com três óbitos; em 9, na primeira etapa, as AP's foram reconstruídas e o Blalock (BT, realizado, tendo ocorrido um óbito. Em 2, a segunda etapa de correção total foi realizada, sem óbitos. No tipo B, a primeira etapa de unificação das colaterais intra ou extra-hilares foi realizada em 6 casos, sem óbitos; em 2, a segunda etapa da correção total foi realizada, com um óbito. No tipo C, 2 pacientes foram operados; 1 em três etapas; a primeira constou de construção de segmento arterial intermediário entre as artérias lobares e o BT; a segunda compreendeu unificação das colaterais contralaterais e a terceira, restabelecimento da continuidade ventrículo direito - circulação pulmonar; o paciente teve boa evolução. No segundo caso, a correção foi realizada após somente uma intervenção prévia. A evolução foi satisfatória. Estudos hemodinâmicos seriados foram realizados em 32 pacientes. As técnicas propostas permitem obter condições para correção total com adequada relação pós-operatória das pressões ventrículo direito - ventrículo esquerdo.Fourty-two patients with pulmonary atresia and interventricular septal defect were submited to a partial or total correction, between January 1975 and October 1986, with a range of 2 months to 18 years of age. Three groups were identified: Group A: 34 patients with all bronco-pulmonary segments connected to pulmonary arteries (PA; Group B: 6 patients with some of the bronco-pulmonary segments connected to PA's; Group C: 2 patients with all bronco-pulmonary segments connected to systemic pulmonary collaterals. One to three stages were utilized to perform the proper correction. In Group A 17 were treated in one stage, with 3 deaths; 9 were submitted to a first stage where the pulmonary arteries were reconstructed with an additional Blalock-Taussig (BT shunt, with 1 death. In two of them a second stage for total correction was performed, with no death. In the remaining 8 patients the collateral circulation was ligated and a BT shunt performed, with 1 hospital death. In Group B the first stage joining the intra or extra-pulmonary collaterals was obtained in 6 cases, without death. In two of them a total correction was performed, with 1 death. In group C a three stage operation was done in 1 patient. In the first stage an intermediate arterial segment was constructed between the lobar arteries and the BT shunt. In the second stage the contra-lateral collaterals were joined. The third stage was the establishment of the continuity between the right ventricle and the reconstructed pulmonary circulation with a good result. In the other patient of this group, until now, only the first stage was done. Serial hemodynamic studies were carried out in 32 patients. These proposed techniques demonstrate the possibility of total correction with appropriate righ-to-left ventricular pressure relation.

  15. What is the essence of the so-called century lasting difficult problem in classic physics, the “problem of turbulence”%号称经典物理留下的世纪难题“湍流问题”的实质是什么?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 张涵信

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence has always been viewed as a century lasting difficult problem in classic physics, hence it is also viewed as a very important basic scientific problem. In this paper, starting from a brief review of the history of turbulence research, we analyze why there seems is a gap separating researches on homogeneous isotropic turbulence and researches on real turbulence, why the former did not make substantial contribution to solving problems of real turbulence, while the latter should be the main focus of the further basic research of turbulence, and how the real turbulence problem can be solved gradually. In conclusions, we list several points worth attention in the turbulence research.%一直以来,湍流都被认为是经典物理留下的世纪难题,因而也被认为是一个重大的基础科学问题.本文简单回顾湍流研究历史,分析了均匀各向同性湍流的研究和真实湍流的研究间为何存在鸿沟.为何前者不能解决真实湍流问题,而后者则是今后应重点开展的湍流基础研究,和如何逐步解决真实的湍流问题.在结论中提出了今后湍流研究中值得注意的几个方面.

  16. The conflict-prone relation hydroelectric power contra environmental protection. Legal control options between interests of hydropower utilization and environmental concerns under special consideration of the so-called pumped-storage power plant; Das Konfliktverhaeltnis Wasserkraft contra Umweltschutz. Rechtliche Steuerungsmoeglichkeiten zwischen Wasserkraftnutzungsinteressen und Umweltschutzbelangen unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung des sog. Pumpspeicherkraftwerks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Kristina

    2012-07-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration evaluates the conflict-prone relationship between hydroelectric power and environmental protection on European, German and Swiss level. The author investigates the possibility whether the Union legal regulations or the constitutional regulations of the Basic Law and the Federal Constitution of Switzerland as well as the simple legal regulation of the Federal Act of the Protection of Nature, Water Resources Act, Construction Law, Renewable Energy Law, and the Swiss Law an Water Pollution Control may contribute to the solution of this conflict-prone relationship.

  17. Actual development of the conversion of energy sources of minor value in so-called bio coal. A comparison of pyrolysis process with the HTC process; Aktuelle Entwicklung bei der Konversion von minderwertigen Energietraegern in die so genannte Biokohle. Ein Vergleich von Pyrolyse- und HTC-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neudeck, Diana; Roedger, Jan-Markus [HAWK Hochschule fuer angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Goettingen (Germany); Loewen, Achim

    2012-07-01

    The conversion of biomass with low quality into biochar through pyrolysis or hydro-thermal carbonization is suitable to substitute lignite and hard coal as a fuel and thereby improve the carbon footprint of a firing plant: Additionally there is the possibility to apply biochar to fields. Carbon compounds, stabilized by the carbonization process, could simultaneously increase crop yields and sequester carbon for mid- and long term. This paper compares the two processes pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization regarding input-material, process-parameters, product-properties and possible applications for each product. The aim is to give an overview which process with given parameters leads to which final product and application. (orig.)

  18. In Which Sense Did Carl Marx Talk about "Mutual Recognition" between Subjects——A topic originating in the so-called "Honneth's puzzle"%马克思在何意义上谈主体间的"相互承认"——从所谓"霍耐特式困惑"说开去

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹平林

    2009-01-01

    黑格尔哲学中蕴含着丰富的主体间相互承认的思想,并对现代社会理论产生了重大影响.霍耐特认为,马克思继承了黑格尔的承认思想,但又将其"还原为劳动而自我实现的维度",从而产生了一个矛盾--以道德动机还是以利益关系来解释社会冲突.霍耐特的这一"困惑"涉及到很多问题,要清晰地阐述这些问题,必须重新分析马克思的问题意识和发问方式,从而厘清其思想的内在逻辑,才能认识马克思的独特贡献.

  19. Esse tal Nicolau: representações sociais de mulheres sobre o exame preventivo do câncer cérvico-uterino Ese tal Nicolau: representaciones sociales de mujeres al respecto del examen preventivo del cáncer cérvico-uterino That so-called papanicolaou: women's social representations about the screening test for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio Éder Dias da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivos identificar as representações sociais de mulheres sobre o câncer do colo do útero, e descrever a relação dessas representações sociais para o cuidado preventivo. A abordagem utilizada foi do tipo qualitativo-exploratório, adotando a teoria das representações sociais como suporte teórico-conceitual. Duas técnicas de coleta foram utilizadas para obtenção dos dados: a livre associação de palavras e a entrevista semidirigida com perguntas abertas. Para a interpretação dos dados foi utilizada a técnica de análise temática. A pesquisa teve como resultado duas unidades temáticas: câncer cérvico-uterino - uma ferida tratável e o preventivo - o fazer por temer. Observou-se que as mulheres temem muito o câncer cérvico-uterino e, por esse motivo, admitem a importância da realização do exame preventivo, considerando-o como um ato de cuidado com a própria saúde.Esta investigación tiene como objetivo identificar las identificar las representaciones sociales de mujeres sobre el cáncer del cuello uterino; y describir la relación de esas representaciones sociales para el cuidado preventivo. El abordaje utilizado fue cualitativa - exploratoria, adoptando como soporte teórico conceptual la teoría de las representaciones sociales. Para obtención de los datos se utilizaron tres técnicas de recolección: la asociación libre de palabras, la entrevista semi dirigida con preguntas abiertas y la observación libre. Para la interpretación de esos datos, fue utilizada la técnica de análisis de contenido temático. La investigación tuvo como resultado de las unidades temáticas: cáncer cérvico-uterino: una herida tratable y el preventivo: El hacer por temer. Durante toda la investigación, se observo que las mujeres temen mucho tener cáncer cérvico - uterino, y por ese motivo, admiten la importancia de la realización del examen preventivo y lo consideran como un acto de cuidado con la propia salud.This research aims to identify women's social representations of women regarding cervical cancer and describe the relationship of these social representations with preventive care. The study used a qualitative-exploratory approach, with the theory of social representations as the theoretical-conceptual support. Data collection was performed using two techniques: the free association of words and the semi-directed interview with open questions. The thematic analysis technique was used for data interpretation. The research resulted in two thematic units: cervical cancer: an early treatable wound and the screening test: taking because of fearing. It was observed that women have great fear of having cervical cancer and, therefore, recognize the importance of the screening test and see it as an act of self-care towards their health.

  20. Students' Mathematical Noticing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Joanne; Hohensee, Charles; Rhodehamel, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Even in simple mathematical situations, there is an array of different mathematical features that students can attend to or notice. What students notice mathematically has consequences for their subsequent reasoning. By adapting work from both cognitive science and applied linguistics anthropology, we present a focusing framework, which treats…

  1. Swanky Suites, More Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    Leaders at Indiana University of Pennsylvania had heard the horror stories: Students would be accepted here, visit the campus, take one look at the outdated dormitories, and decide to go someplace else. Something had to be done. So they made the bold move to replace all student housing, bed for bed--at a cost of $270-million. The public university…

  2. Assess Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Terri; Konrad, Moira; Alber-Morgan, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    Determining what constitutes good writing is difficult, though many say they know it when they see it. Although this approach may have support in the literature, there are other efficient and valid ways to assess students' writing. To obtain a complete picture of a student's writing skills, it is important that teachers take a balanced approach to…

  3. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  4. Automated Student Model Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  5. Teaching Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" includes students enrolled in primary grades through high school. These students are also known as Digital Natives, Generation Why, the Net Generation, Generation Me, and i-Kids. The generation includes ages ranging from approximately 7 to 30. This is the generation who have always had technology integrated into their…

  6. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  7. Gamification and Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick; Doyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The literature suggests that gamified learning interventions may increase student engagement and enhance learning. We empirically investigate this by exploring the impact of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on the participation and performance of over 100 undergraduate students in an online gamified learning intervention. The paper makes a…

  8. California's English Learner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

  9. Considering Student Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  10. Videotaping Students' Booktalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Provides a detailed description of a class project in which each student is videotaped while presenting a booktalk. Included are a list of appropriate books, a checklist for students to use in identifying the important characteristics of a booktalk, and an evaluation form for presentations. (CLB)

  11. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  12. Students as Cartographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a project in which students created a wall-sized map of Vermont to celebrate the state bicentennial. Suggests that the minimum of instructions the students received and democratic discussion and voting made the project an experience in cooperative learning and communication. Explains that the project incorporated art, history, geography,…

  13. Administrators Confront Student "Sexting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Cellphone-savvy students have created instructional and disciplinary challenges for educators for years. But the recent emergence of "sexting" by adolescents over their mobile phones caught many school administrators off guard, and the practice is prompting efforts around the country to craft policy responses. Students' sharing of nude or…

  14. Sexting and Student Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Eamonn

    2010-01-01

    Cell phones are ubiquitous on campus, and the anytime anywhere nature of teenage communications means that students see no separation between life inside and outside of school, at least when it comes to activities such as texting. Allowing cell phones on campus will have students in possession of cell phones with sexually oriented messages,…

  15. International Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    This article, with a focus on North American postsecondary education, identifies international students as a strategic enrollment management institutional priority; presents themes in the international student retention, satisfaction, and success research literature; and describes related best practices. It also presents the findings from an…

  16. Plagiarism explainer for students

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A

    2016-01-01

    A slide deck to serve as an explainer of plagiarism in academic settings, with a personal viewpoint. For my students.Also on SpeakerDeck:https://speakerdeck.com/labarba/plagiarism-explainer-for-students(The slide viewer on SpeakerDeck is much nicer.)

  17. Improving Student Question Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  18. Understanding the Hispanic Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes cultural differences of Hispanic students in family structure, language, motivation, mysticism, machismo, touching, and time concepts which may lead to problems in the classroom. Suggests strategies teachers may employ to increase opportunities for positive school experiences for Hispanic students through recognition and acknowledgement…

  19. Gamification and Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick; Doyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The literature suggests that gamified learning interventions may increase student engagement and enhance learning. We empirically investigate this by exploring the impact of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on the participation and performance of over 100 undergraduate students in an online gamified learning intervention. The paper makes a…

  20. Students as Environmental Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smearsoll, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Teaching the children of today about nature is important as they become increasingly removed from the natural world. Children should be exposed to environmental issues so that they will become environmentally aware adults. This article describes a project in which high school biology students teach preschool students about a local environmental…

  1. Instilling Hope in Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashant, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Why is hope such an important concept for schools to consider? Research has clearly demonstrated that more hopeful students perform better in school and in life than less hopeful students. Hopeful thought reflects the belief that one can find pathways to desired goals and become motivated to use those pathways. As a result, hope drives the…

  2. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  3. Chinese Students' Constructive Nationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Last June the author, a teacher of political theory at Tsinghua University, was asked by a Canadian television crew to get hold of some students for a special on modern China. During the discussion, the author observed that his Chinese students express a thoughtful and informed nationalism, and a distrust of Western-style democracy. Some of the…

  4. Summer Technical Students 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    About 100 technical and doctoral students arrive each year, undergraduates and post-graduates who are preparing diploma or doctoral theses in applied science and technology. They spend up to two years at the Laboratory, as technical students as part of their formal training for a recognised degree or its equivalent.

  5. Defining Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

    2011-01-01

    Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other. As measured by…

  6. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  7. Teaching Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" includes students enrolled in primary grades through high school. These students are also known as Digital Natives, Generation Why, the Net Generation, Generation Me, and i-Kids. The generation includes ages ranging from approximately 7 to 30. This is the generation who have always had technology integrated into their…

  8. Help for Stressed Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Denise Clarke; Simon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The authors argue that increased focus and pressure for high academic achievement, particularly among more highly-motivated and successful students, may have serious negative consequences. They present a number of strategies designed to help reduce both causes and consequences associated with academic stress and improve students' mental and…

  9. Moral Teachers, Moral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Rick

    2003-01-01

    Argues that schools will largely fail in their efforts to improve the moral and emotional growth of students if they do not attend to the moral and ethical development of teachers, especially urban teachers, who suffer from depression and disillusionment, the two primary causes of which are isolation and stress induced by problem students.…

  10. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  11. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  12. CBI students: target hit!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    The students on the third Challenge Based Innovation (CBI) @CERN course have been working on their society-oriented projects since September. Last Thursday, 10 December, they finally presented all their proofs-of-concept and prototypes to a packed audience at IdeaSquare.   CBI students presenting their projects at IdeaSquare (Image: Carlos Yarza/IED Barcelona). Twenty-seven students from four universities and over ten countries have been working on the CERN CBI course since last September. Labour mobility, food safety, literacy and water safety are the four projects that the students have been working on. Thanks to help and inspiration from a wide range of people working at CERN, especially in the Knowledge Transfer group, the students have redefined and focused their original challenges and have developed four concepts to solve societal challenges: * Team Bohr developed a concept for encouraging labour mobility and talent exchange in Europe, combining data analysis and existing online ...

  13. Bringing Students To Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gilbert

    2013-05-01

    The Telescopes In Education (TIE) Program was the pioneer in robotic astronomy. The first users came online in the spring of 1993. The TIE program was dedicated to K-14 students with the hope of inspiring them to develop a greater appreciation for math, science, and engineering through their participation in astronomy. The program was very successful through 2005 when NASA felt there were enough robotic telescopes in the community to support the students into the future. During the 12 years of supported operations, TIE had over one hundred thousand student operations. TIE then started working with Universities in Australia to help move their students towards careers in the sciences and engineering. We discovered that students in the middle schools were the ones that should be focused on, to successfully bring them into the sciences and engineering. We have crafted a system that should be very successful in this endeavor.

  14. Mapping student online actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Jensen, Pia; Udby, Linda

    The Virtual Neutrons for Teaching project (vnt.nmi3.org) has converted traditional text book material into a wiki-style online text book that contains the same text and equations as the traditionally styled text book but has added features due to the online nature. Two of these features...... are hypertext navigability (in-text and navigation bar) and socalled wiki-problems some of which have associated hints and solutions. For these problems, students actively choose whether and when to show problem hints and solutions during problem solving. Students might also navigate the page as part...... their problem solving strategy. In this study, we use web analytics software to track student online behavior by recording what particular objects on particular web-pages students click on and when each click occurs. For each recorded session, we create networks based on student clicks: A directed link between...

  15. Researching with undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard; Mogensen, Kevin; Hjort-Madsen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a particular case of undergraduate students working on subprojects within the framework of their supervisors' (the authors') research project during Autumn Semester 2012 and Spring Semester 2013. The article's purpose is to show that an institutionalized focus on students...... as "research learners" rather than merely curriculum learners proves productive for both research and teaching. We describe the specific university learning context and the particular organization of undergraduate students' supervision and assistantships. The case builds on and further enhances a well......-established and proven university model of participant-directed, problem-oriented project work. We explore students' and researchers' experiences of being part of the collaboration, focusing on learning potentials and dilemmas associated with the multiple roles of researcher and student that characterized...

  16. Preparing Students for Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    : USA, China, Korea, Mexico, Chile and others. We describe our experiences of working on industrial projects with international teams and analyse the development and trends in student mobility. The growing popularity of these programmes and the increasing number of the students joining our international......A. Friesel. Preparing Students for Globalization Working with International Teams with Projects // Electronics and Electrical Engineering. - Kaunas: Technologija, 2019. - No. 6(102). - P. 111-114. This paper summarizes the activities, contents and overall outcomes of our experiences...... with international students studying at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering (in short - IHK); in particular students coming for one semester exchange program under Erasmus-programme. IHK's participation in EU-supported programmes like EIE-Surveyor and ELLEIEC, both ERASMUS thematic networks, have...

  17. Instructor-Student and Student-Student Rapport in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Brandi N.; Martin, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between instructors and their students, and between students, to determine their roles in building positive relationships and an overall positive classroom environment. Of particular interest was the examination of instructor rapport with students and rapport between students. Students (N = 232) reported on…

  18. The Healthy College Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Adams O’Connell PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the impact of health behaviors on morbidity often focus on the limited impact of a single behavior or a limited group of behaviors. In this study, we examine college student behaviors and investigate the link of these behaviors with a 2-week illness profile. Through self-reported surveys, we measure acute illness and a general illness burden, a cumulative measure of major and minor ailments. We explore how daily routines correlate with these illness measures. Eighty-four students from a random sample of 90 students attending a small liberal arts school completed the survey for a response rate of 93%. Living arrangements, exercise, sleep patterns, eating preferences and habits, and “social” behaviors were all significantly associated with illness burden. Students living in “singles” and those who got regular exercise and an average of 7 hr of sleep per night reported less illness. Most interesting is the effect of social behaviors. Students who greet others with a handshake reported higher illness rates, as did students who share food and/or drinks. While we can conceptualize why these behaviors would lead to a greater illness burden, students who engaged more frequently in these behaviors also reported being “happier.” In trying to reduce illness among college students, we might suggest less handshaking and food and beverage sharing, but these actions are ways in which college students express and maintain friendships. College administrators are challenged to discover ways to reduce illness while maintaining the positive aspects of local student culture. This study begins to explore some ways to balance health and camaraderie.

  19. Undergraduate students' perceived academic environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study revealed that four dimensions of the academic environment as ... teaching and commitment expected of students; personal attention given to students; ... Two other dimensions - freedom in students' learning and the relationship with ...

  20. Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Garvine, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Inquiry into the initial attitudes toward mental illness of students taking an abnormal psychology class indicates students' concerns and preconceptions and provides a basis for shaping the course to respond to student needs. (JH)

  1. Online Student Ratings: Will Students Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Trav

    This study focused on response rates to online student ratings of faculty at Brigham Young University, Utah, where concerns about response rates have contributed to a long period for testing and implementation of the online system (more than 5 years). The first pilot study, in 1997, included 36 courses and yielded a response rate of about 40%. The…

  2. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  3. 三學生、京學生與宋朝政治%Students of the “Three Universities” and“Capital College” and the Pollitics of the Song Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王曾瑜

    2010-01-01

    The present paper studies the meaning of the so - called “three universities ( Imperial University, Literal Arts Academy and Military Academy)” and that of the“Capital College.” It points out that the Song period three universities, especially the Imperial University, played the role of a “supervisory organ without censorship”in the political living of that time, which embodied the control of the public opinion over power and influence, a brilliant democratic tint in the Song Dynasty autocratic society. Its significance was distinctlty demonstrated in the two historically shining movements of patriotic students in the Jingkang year of Northern Song ( AD 1126 ) and the Longxing reign of Southern Song ( AD 1163—1164 ) . But the Song governmental schools at all levels were unable to prevent them from becoming corrupt bureaucrat or-gans, the Imperial University and even all the three universities were not holy and pure academic halls, and any kinds of corrupt and degenerate phenomena were bound to breed about and develop.

  4. ISEF Students 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2016-01-01

    From 11 to 17 June, CERN hosted the 10 young students who won the CERN Special Award at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) 2016). These winners were selected from the 1700 high-school students who participated in the competition. The competition, which is a programme of the Society for Science and the Public, is the world's largest pre-university science competition. It offers high school students from across the globe a chance to showcase their research into a range of fields.

  5. [Students as teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, A.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    and addressing their problems. Empirical studies support these theories and show that high levels of satisfaction are associated with near-peer teaching without compromising the learning outcome. In addition, student teachers achieve a substantial learning benefit from teaching. Much more research is needed......The concept of near-peer teaching is reviewed in this article. Theories of learning support the rationale for using students as teachers by explaining how near-peers as opposed to experts may have a superior understanding of the needs of the taught students and a better basis for identifying...

  6. Cobol for students

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    COBOL for Students has established itself as one of the most successful teaching texts on COBOL programming and is now in its fourth edition. The first part of the book concentrates on the fundamentals of the language and takes students to the point where they can write modestly sized programs using sequential files. Part two assumes competence in elementary COBOL and explains design and other programming techniques which should be part of the professional programmer's repertoire. Part three extends the student's knowledge of the language by explaining some of the more advanced features of COB

  7. Effectively Measuring Student Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Z. Posner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With a worldwide sample of students (N = 77, 387, this paper reviews and analyses the psychometric properties of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory [1]. Modest to strong internal reliability coefficients are found across a number of different dimensions. Predictive validity of the instrument is supported, with the instrument being able to differentiate between effective and ineffective leaders using both self-reported and observer (constituent data. Few significant differences are found on the basis of respondent gender, ethnicity, nationality, or institutional level (high school versus college. Implications for developing student leaders and future research are offered.

  8. Chinese students' great expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative...... to study abroad, the article shows how personal, professional and even national goals are closely interwoven. Students expect education abroad to be a personally transformative experience, but rather than defining their goals of individual freedom and creativity in opposition to the authoritarian political...

  9. Empowering Students in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ann-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) identify potential benefits for students with disabilities taking part in a physical activity program with same-age typical peers on a Midwest university campus and (b) to determine if the program impacted the students with disabilities empowerment. Empowerment theory was used to determine how transition students’ attitudes change over the course of the semester while participating in a workout buddy program with same-age college peers. The program was structured to provide a sense of empowerment to students to make their own decisions and learn for themselves so they do not feel a lack of power in their lives. This study implemented elements of a quantitative design but a majority utilized a qualitative design based on the assumptions of the Interpretivist paradigm. The quantitative design elements focused on the analysis of two questionnaires: Sports Questionnaire and the Perceived Control Scale Questionnaire. The analysis of the focus group data revealed the following themes as positive effects of the intervention: positive effect on empowerment, how happy the program made the students, what benefits the students gained from the program, the student’s familiarity with university students, and the environment, and, lastly, the students ability to ask for assistance when need. Findings from the study determined that the empowerment of the students with disabilities was impacted while participating in the program. In general, the findings of gaining empowerment were similar to previous studies in that students with disabilities are able to gain empowerment from participation in fitness and recreation programs. The researcher noted during focus groups that some of the Best of Both Worlds (BOBW) students were not confident in starting conversations with their university peers. Although the BOBW students felt a sense of losing empowerment with this specific instance, there was an overall positive impact on the BOBW students

  10. Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment (SHINE) Students - Student Representatives' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahud, D. M.; Niembro, T.

    2014-12-01

    The SHINE workshop is an annual meeting of solar and heliospheric scientists which, in addition to aiming to improve understanding of solar disturbances and their propagation to, and effect, on the Earth (shinecon.org), is dedicated to actively supporting students. This dedication is substantiated in part through the National Science Foundation (NSF) providing funding for student attendance to the workshop, which enables student participation. Another example of SHINE's commitment to its student members is the incorporation of a Student Day prior to the workshop since 2003, entirely organized and run by two student representatives. While there are variations in format from year to year, Student Day consists of tutorials and research talks exclusively by student volunteers to an audience of only students. The day is intended to provide a low-stress environment for students to learn about the various topics addressed during the workshop, to ask questions freely, and to engage in scientific discussion with other students which hopefully is a catalyst for collaboration. As a result of positive experiences, over the past decade student attendance and participation in the workshop have increased. At the SHINE 2014 workshop, nearly a third of attendees were students. SHINE student visibility has increased over the years, with student posters being advertised at breakfast, inclusion of a student day summary by the student representatives during a plenary session, and continued support from the steering committee. Students are also promoting a broader impact of SHINE sciences via increased social media presence. From a student representative's perspective, SHINE has built and fostered a healthy student community and encourages students to engage in shaping the future of the field.

  11. The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Anne Guerin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

  12. Citation Behaviour of Information Science Students II: Postgraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Maria Elizabeth; Oppenheim, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of student citation behaviours in the Department of Information Science, Loughborough University. The research methods were citation analysis of student dissertation bibliographies from 1998 to 2003, a survey of student's attitudes to citation behaviour and a test of student citation accuracy. The results…

  13. Showing Automatically Generated Students' Conceptual Models to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A student conceptual model can be defined as a set of interconnected concepts associated with an estimation value that indicates how well these concepts are used by the students. It can model just one student or a group of students, and can be represented as a concept map, conceptual diagram or one of several other knowledge representation…

  14. Student for Student: Peer Learning in Music Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Anna; Duke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Students of piano and saxophone were asked to explore what peer learning meant to them. Following instrumental-based discussions, and with no intervention from faculty, the students developed a series of videos intended for use with incoming students. This article analyses the students' discussions and videos, and describes the complexity of…

  15. Changes in Student Teachers' Intention to Teach during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. Grady; Greiman, Bradley C.; Murphy, T. H.; Ricketts, John C.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of the student teaching experience, a student teacher's intention to teach can increase, decrease, or remain the same. The purpose of this study was to explore differences in student teachers that were representative of each category. Teaching intention of 103 student teachers at four universities in 2005-2006 exhibited little…

  16. Bowie State University Student Support Services Admitted Student Survey 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Wanda E.

    TRIO programs offer support services to students beginning at the 7th grade and continuing through to graduate school. Student Support Services projects provide instruction, tutoring, counseling, learning skills, and writing skills to primarily low income and first generation or disabled college students. Student Support Services projects are…

  17. Collective Student Trust: A Social Resource for Urban Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if collective student trust functions as a resource for urban elementary students. Methods: Data from 1,646 students nested in 56 elementary schools in an urban school district were used to test the hypothesized effect of collective student trust on school identification, self-regulated…

  18. Improving Student Engagement of Health Services Management Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowers, LaToya L.

    2016-01-01

    This capstone provides readers with an analysis of the role student engagement has in higher education. Student engagement has been studied extensively by many authors, and each has provided a framework for understanding the various approaches to increasing engagement of students. This paper approaches the topic of student engagement by examining…

  19. Using Student Scholarship To Develop Student Research and Writing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Mark E.; Badura, Amy S.; Davis, Stephen F.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the use of student publications in journals as a teaching tool. Explores the use of this technique in three contexts: (1) enabling students to understand experimental methodology; (2) teaching students about statistics; and (3) helping students learn more about the American Psychological Association (APA) writing style. (CMK)

  20. Nontraditional Student Engagement: Increasing Adult Student Success and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Linda G.

    2011-01-01

    Today, more than any other time in history, student demographics of college and university students in the United States are experiencing rapid and profound changes. Along with these increases in nontraditional student enrollment comes an increasing percentage of working nontraditional college students with a multitude of commitments that serve to…

  1. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Six Items Predict Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapport between students and teachers leads to numerous positive student outcomes, including attitudes toward the teacher and course, student motivation, and perceived learning. The recent development of a Professor-Student Rapport scale offers assessment of this construct. However, a Cronbach's [alpha] of 0.96 indicated item redundancy, and the…

  2. The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Anne Guerin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

  3. Development of student engineering competitions "STUDENT FORMULA SAE» in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashchenko A.F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the direction of the educational level of students in Ukrainian higher technical educational institutions. The advantages and attractiveness of the student engineering competition "Formula Student". The evolution of the development of the Ukrainian engineering team "Formula Student" for example, the team of Odessa National Polytechnic University.

  4. The modern Danish student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassesen, Berit

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A study based on diaries written by 82 students at Roskilde University (Simonsen & Ulriksen, 1998) concluded that the attitudes regarding choice of education and educational activities of the "modern Danish student" are characterized by 1) an orientation towards the individualized...... and personal aspects, 2) an internally motivated and existential "personal growth" orientation, 3) a process - rather than result-oriented attitude towards educational activities, 4) a short-term "here- and now" motivation, and 5) an ambivalent attitude towards who is responsible for the result of the learning...... by Simonsen and Ulriksen (91% correspondence). Students from other faculties, however, differed in their attitudes from the ones reported by Simonsen and Ulriksen. For example, the attitudes of medical students only showed a 45% correspondence. Their attitudes were found to be more long-term career...

  5. Persuading Students To Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how Eugene M. Lang, a philanthropist known for tackling large problems in education, is financing Project Pericles to encourage colleges to promote civic-mindedness among their students. (EV)

  6. Students' reasoning about interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Benjamin D.; Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Sawtelle, Vashti; Svoboda, Julia; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    We present case-study data of undergraduates describing the relationship between scientific disciplines. Rather than viewing biology, chemistry, and physics as existing in disconnected silos, or as overlapping only in narrow regions of common interest, these students exhibit a range of nuanced views about disciplinary relationships. Some students describe hierarchical arrangements that order the disciplines by degree of system complexity or by the scale used to examine a particular system. In other instances students want physics embedded in a context that positions its relationship to biology via analogy, or reference the way in which general physical principles like energy conservation or entropy maximization impose constraints on biological systems. We argue that these case studies illustrate the varied resources that students possess for seeking coherence across disciplines, as well as the potential barriers to interdisciplinary learning that such views might create when adopted to the exclusion of others.

  7. The Foreign Student Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical introduction and 313-item annotated bibliography address foreign student infrastructure, highlighting academic experiences and performance; adaptation problems; policies (institutional, industrialized nations, Third World nations); educational studies (attitudinal, behavioral, disciplinary, historical, statistical); issues (non-return,…

  8. Student Theatre in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Davis

    1998-01-01

    Chronicles one English-as-a-foreign-language teacher's experiences directing an all-student cast from North-East Normal University, Chang Chun, in three performances of an English translation of Moliere's The Miser. (Author/VWL)

  9. Student interaction in workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evers, Winie

    2014-01-01

    A kind of teaching for active learning has been experimented with at SDU Sønderborg as part of the course Supply Chain Dynamics. In this course the students learn about complex systems, system dynamics as well as supply chain instability and oscillation, the course lecturer invited the author...... to experiment with novel workshop methods and techniques, where objects are used to illustrate and model business issues (Heinemann et al, 2011, Buur et al, 2013). The idea was to see how students could be engaged in a different and more interactive way to learn about these topics, by assigning the students...... teaching should reflect this diversity by embracing and experimenting with multiple forms, including activation of students by students’ interaction and manipulation with objects....

  10. Evaluation of Student Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechnyr, Ronald J.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Truax scales of accurate empathy, nonpossessive warmth, and genuineness provides a useful, concrete and objective way to evaluate and train students in clinical field settings. (Author)

  11. Student Investigations Using Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witters, Weldon L.; Bush, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    Three different problems are given for student investigation in determining amino acid compositions, floral pigments, and water soluble amino acids by using the techniques of Roll Chromotography, DISC Chromotography, Thin Layer, and Paper Chromotography. (BR)

  12. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  13. Reinventing Student Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    1991-01-01

    Describes innovative student teaching programs, noting assumptions about power, knowledge, and language of teaching. The paper discusses contrasting relationships (consonance, critical dissonance, and collaborative resonance), arguing that programs based on collaborative university-school relationships provide unique learning opportunities. The…

  14. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...... an enhanced feeling of progress and that they can change their study behaviour in a positive direction. The study discusses the difference between coaching and supervision, for instance power imbalances and contrary to earlier research into coaching of doctoral students this study indicates that coaching can...

  15. Student Power in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Thierry M. Luescher is Senior Researcher and Assistant Director: ... relation to university governance, national politics, citizenship and democracy in Africa. ... the book Student Politics in Africa: Representation and Activism, published as.

  16. OF ART STUDENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was made to investigate the effects of the use of computers by the Art students of the. Kwame Nkrumah ... vestigated included among others, the computer 's ability or otherwise to surpass humans in crea- ..... Digital Vision. Henry N.

  17. Student Preferences in Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard C.; Sullivan, James L. F.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study in which 245 university students ranked their preferences among typographical variants of typeface, size, emphasis, and interline space in 16 paragraphs. Six references are listed. (CHC)

  18. Burnout in university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carmen Cecilia Caballero D; Edgar Breso Esteve; Orlando González Gutierréz

    2015-01-01

      In order to provide a better understanding and characterization of the nature of academic burnout in university students, a review of the concept, its evolution and extrapolation of the work context...

  19. The Metaphorical Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carger, Chris Liska

    1996-01-01

    The "patient" metaphor still thrives in teaching. Carl Rogers' concept of client, connoting a collaborative rather than directive relationship, may be more useful to conceptualize the relationship between teachers and students. (SK)

  20. Sleep and Student Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Eric R. Eide; Mark H. Showalter

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relationship between sleep and student performance on standardized tests. We model test scores as a nonlinear function of sleep, which allows us to compute the hours of sleep associated with maximum test scores. We refer to this as “optimal” hours of sleep. We also evaluate how the sleep and student performance relationship changes with age. We use the Panel Study of Income Dynamics-Child Development Supplement, which includes excellent control variables that are not usually av...