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  1. Factors influencing student nurse decisions to report poor practice witnessed while on placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, R; Smith, K; Nimmo, S; Rice, A M; McMillan, L

    2015-07-01

    While it is commonly accepted that nursing care is generally of a good standard, it would be naïve to think that this is always the case. Over recent years, concern about aspects of the quality of some nursing care has grown. In tandem with this, there is recognition that nurses do not always report poor practice. As future registrants, student nurses have a role to play in changing this culture. We know, however, relatively little about the factors that influence student decisions on whether or not to report. In the absence of a more nuanced understanding of this issue, we run the risk of assuming students will speak out simply because we say they should. To explore influences on student decisions about whether or not to report poor clinical practice, which is a result of deliberate action and which is witnessed while on placement. Qualitative interviews were conducted with thirteen pre-registration nursing students from the UK. Participants included both adult and mental health nurses with an age range from 20 to 47. Data were analysed to identify key themes. Category integrity and fit with data were confirmed by a team member following initial analysis. Four themes. The first of these, 'I had no choice' described the personal and ethical drivers which influenced students to report. 'Consequences for self' and 'Living with ambiguity' provide an account of why some students struggle to report, while 'Being prepared' summarised arguments both for and against reporting concerns. While there is a drive to promote openness in health care settings and an expectation that staff will raise concerns the reality is that the decision to do this can be very difficult. This is the case for some student nurses. Our results suggest ways in which educationalists might intervene to support students who witness poor practice to report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Influence of Poor Handwriting on Students' Score Reliability in Mathematics

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    Emaikwu Sunday Oche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influence of poor handwriting on students' score reliability in mathematics. The design of the study was survey research. A sample of 200 students and 150 teachers randomly selected from secondary schools in North Central Nigeria was used in this study. The instrument for data collection was a structured questionnaire. The reliability of the instrument using Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.94. Four research questions were answered and three hypotheses were tested. The result indicated that when students find it difficult to write legibly, it affects their overall achievement in school mathematics and hence weakens their educational progress. It was revealed that even though many teachers see handwriting as a skill that students should be taught to enable students to do well in school mathematics, nevertheless, teachers' attitudes contribute significantly to student's poor handwriting habits in schools. The paper maintains that home is one of the factors that contribute to the incidence of poor handwriting and not school location as hitherto envisaged. Based on this finding, it is recommended that teachers should teach handwriting and also emphasize its importance in schools. School authority should organize seminars on how to teach handwriting. Moreover, parents need to create time to teach their children good handwriting at home so as to complement the teachers' efforts. Above all, word-processing programs and assistive technology is undeniably boons to students with writing problem in mathematics.

  3. Prevalence and factors influencing depression among elderly living in the urban poor locality of Bengaluru city

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    T V Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Indian elderly population is currently the second largest in the world. Mental disorders have got high prevalence and low priority among elderly in most of the countries around the world, of which depression being the most common treatable condition. In India, there is scarcity of research on prevalence and factors influencing depression among elderly from urban poor locality by adopting a geriatric depression scale-15 (GDS-15 scale. Objectives: (1 To find out the prevalence of geriatric depression, (2 to find out the factors associated with depression. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted at urban poor locality of Bengaluru on 100 elderly people by applying GDS-15 Kannada version to assess the prevalence of depression and information regarding the sociodemographic characteristics, financial status, and comorbid conditions were collected. Results: The prevalence of depression assessed by using GDS-15 Kannada version was found to be 36%. Depression was more among 12 (70.6% from medium standard of living index (SLI group compared to 24 (28.9% from high SLI group, which was shown to be statistically significant. Among the elderly with depression, 31 (86.1% had some medical comorbidities when compared with 33 (51.6% elderly without depression, which was found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The current research has shown prevalence of depression according to GDS-15 (Kannada version as 36% and influenced by SLI, hold on assets, insomnia and comorbidities, which needs to be confirmed by undertaking further studies.

  4. From approach to inhibition: the influence of power on responses to poor performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Amanda J; Ormiston, Margaret E; Moon, Henry

    2010-03-01

    This article examines how relative differences in power affect responses to poor performers in organizations. We predicted that higher power individuals would engage in approach-related behaviors, whereas lower power individuals would be inhibited when responding to poor performers. Results from a scenario study and a field study generally supported this prediction, indicating that power was positively related to training or confronting a poor performer and negatively related to compensating for or rejecting a poor performer. A second scenario study investigated the effect of the interaction of power and emotion on individual responses to poor performers. Results showed that the type of emotion expressed moderated the effect of power on inhibition-related responses. We discuss implications for managing poor performers with relative power differences.

  5. Research on Influence of Social Transformation on Rural Poor Aged People

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    Ma Xuesong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available China is in the acceleration period of social transformation. In this period, Chinese rural area is experiencing profound change in political system, production mode, living style, family structure and income composition, which is the progress of society. Meanwhile, due to the complexity and persistence of social transformation, it results in rural poor aged people and causes some difficulties for rural poor aged people to get rid of poverty. Problems and difficulties in the social transformation process must be solved and overcome in the process of social transformation

  6. Influence of socioeconomic status and family support on disability, depressive symptoms, and perceived poor health in older Korean adults

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    Insook Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This purpose of this study is to identify factors associated with older Korean adults’ disability, depressive symptoms, and perceived poor health, with a focus on their socioeconomic status and family support. This is a secondary data analysis of the initial survey data from a home visiting center in 2009. The data were analyzed using frequencies, percentages, and multivariate logistic regression. We observed significant differences in perceived health between men and women based on their socioeconomic status. Type of medical insurance was strongly associated with depressive symptoms among the men and women. Results also indicated that being unschooled was significantly related to perceived poor health among women. Family support also influenced their health status, particularly their depressive symptoms. This study suggests that interventions for reducing health inequalities should target older adults with Medicaid and have poor family support, taking a gender-specific approach.

  7. Nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for poorly water-soluble bioactive compounds: Influence of formulation parameters on Polymethoxyflavone crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Jinkai; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2011-01-01

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) extracted from citrus peel exhibit potent anti-cancer activity, but are highly hydrophobic molecules with poor solubility in both water and oil at ambient and body temperature, which limits their bioavailability. The possibility of encapsulating PMFs within nanoemulsion-based delivery systems to facilitate their application in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products was investigated. The influence of oil type (corn oil, MCT, orange oil), emulsifier type (β-lactogl...

  8. Influence of Solid Drug Delivery System Formulation on Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Dissolution and Permeability

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    Marko Krstić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of drugs have a low dissolution rate, which is a limiting step for their absorption. In this manuscript, solid dispersions (SD, solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (S-SMEDDS and solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (S-SNEDDS were evaluated as potential formulation strategies to increase the dissolution rate of carbamazepine. Influence of increased dissolution rate on permeability of carbamazepine was evaluated using PAMPA test. In S-SMEDDS and S-SNEDDS formulations, the ratio of liquid SMEDDS/SNEDDS and solid carrier (Neusilin® UFL2 was varied, and carbamazepine content was constant. In SD formulations, the ratio of carbamazepine and Neusilin® UFL2, was varied. Formulations that showed the best dissolution rate of carbamazepine (SD_1:6, SMEDDS_1:1, SNEDDS_1:6 were mutually compared, characterization of these formulations was performed by DSC, PXRD and FT-IR analyses, and a PAMPA test was done. All formulations have shown a significant increase in dissolution rate compared to pure carbamazepine and immediate-release carbamazepine tablets. Formulation S-SMEDDS_1:1 showed the fastest release rate and permeability of carbamazepine. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR analyses confirmed that in S-SMEDDS and S-SNEDDS carbamazepine remained in polymorph form III, and that it was converted to an amorphous state in SD formulations. All formulations showed increased permeability of carbamazepine, compared to pure carbamazepine.

  9. Nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for poorly water-soluble bioactive compounds: Influence of formulation parameters on Polymethoxyflavone crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Jinkai; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2012-06-01

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) extracted from citrus peel exhibit potent anti-cancer activity, but are highly hydrophobic molecules with poor solubility in both water and oil at ambient and body temperature, which limits their bioavailability. The possibility of encapsulating PMFs within nanoemulsion-based delivery systems to facilitate their application in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products was investigated. The influence of oil type (corn oil, MCT, orange oil), emulsifier type (β-lactoglobulin, lyso-lecithin, Tween, and DTAB), and neutral cosolvents (glycerol and ethanol) on the formation and stability of PMF-loaded nanoemulsions was examined. Nanoemulsions (r emulsifier types, except DTAB. Lipid droplet charge could be altered from highly cationic (DTAB), to near neutral (Tween), to highly anionic (β-lactoglobulin, lyso-lecithin) by varying emulsifier type. PMF crystals formed in all nanoemulsions after preparation, which had a tendency to sediment during storage. The size, morphology, and aggregation of PMF crystals depended on preparation method, emulsifier type, oil type, and cosolvent addition. These results have important implications for the development of delivery systems for bioactive components that have poor oil and water solubility at application temperatures.

  10. Poor Comprehenders in English-Only and English Language Learners: Influence of Morphological Analysis during Incidental Word Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Shulley, Leah

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether weakness in using morphological analysis to infer new word meanings during reading is a source of poor text comprehension and the relative importance of psycholinguistic and cognitive factors as contributors of poor text comprehension in English-only and English language learners. Thirty-seven poor comprehenders and…

  11. Maternal health in resource-poor urban settings: how does women's autonomy influence the utilization of obstetric care services?

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    Ezeh Alex C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite various international efforts initiated to improve maternal health, more than half a million women worldwide die each year as a result of complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth. This research was guided by the following questions: 1 How does women's autonomy influence the choice of place of delivery in resource-poor urban settings? 2 Does its effect vary by household wealth? and 3 To what extent does women's autonomy mediate the relationship between women's education and use of health facility for delivery? Methods The data used is from a maternal health study carried out in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya. A total of 1,927 women (out of 2,482 who had a pregnancy outcome in 2004–2005 were selected and interviewed. Seventeen variable items on autonomy were used to construct women's decision-making, freedom of movement, and overall autonomy. Further, all health facilities serving the study population were assessed with regard to the number, training and competency of obstetric staff; services offered; physical infrastructure; and availability, adequacy and functional status of supplies and other essential equipment for safe delivery, among others. A total of 25 facilities were surveyed. Results While household wealth, education and demographic and health covariates had strong relationships with place of delivery, the effects of women's overall autonomy, decision-making and freedom of movement were rather weak. Among middle to least poor households, all three measures of women's autonomy were associated with place of delivery, and in the expected direction; whereas among the poorest women, they were strong and counter-intuitive. Finally, the study showed that autonomy may not be a major mediator of the link between education and use of health services for delivery. Conclusion The paper argues in favor of broad actions to increase women's autonomy both as an end and as a means to facilitate improved

  12. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing.

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    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP.Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG, blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, confocal microscopy (CM, turbidity, and clot lysis assays.The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8. Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05. The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers.IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process.

  13. Influence of neutrophile granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) on poor prognosis of elderly AECOPD patients during hospital stay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Rong Cui

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the influence of neutrophile granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio(NLR) to the poor prognosis of elderly AECOPD patients during the stay in hospital.Method:A total of 133 cases elderly patients with AECOPD admitted in our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014 were selected, and divided them into death group (31 cases) and survival group (102 cases) according to in-hospital death occurrence; To compare the on admission general clinical data, therapy method, lung function, blood routine examination [white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophile granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio(NLR)], C-reactive protein (CRP), blood gas analysis and blood biochemical indexes in both groups, and drew ROC curve for a analysis of the clinical value of NLR in the prediction of death.Results: Among 133 cases of elderly AECOPD patients: the proportion of combined pulmonary heart disease and mechanical ventilation in death group was higher than that in survival group, PaCO2, WBC count, neutrophil count, NLR, CRP level in death group was higher, but lymphocyte count, serum albumin(ALB) in death group was lower; multiple logistic regression analysis showed that NLR presented independent positive correlation with the in-hospital death in elderly AECOPD patients; ROC curve analysis showed that the ROCAUC of NLR to the in-hospital death in elderly AECOPD patients was 0.787, the best diagnostic node value was 7.3, sensitivity and specificity were 77.4% and 74.5% respectively; bounded by NLR(7.3), divided patients into NLR 7.3 group and NLR<7.3 group, hospital stays, CRP level and mortality in NLR 7.3 group were higher than that in NLR<7.3 group.Conclusion:NLR was the high risk factor of the in-hospital death in elderly AECOPD patients, early detection of NLR level had a certain difference to the evaluation for short-term prognosis of elderly AECOPD patients and guide treatment.

  14. CERN as a Non-School Resource for Science Education

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2000-01-01

    As a large international research laboratory, CERN feels it has a special responsibility for outreach, and has many activities directed towards schools, including organized visits, an on-site museum, hands-on experiments, a Summer intern programme for high-school teachers, lecture series and webcasts. Ongoing activities and future plans are reviewed, and some ideas stimulated by this workshop are offered concerning the relevance of CERN's experience to Asia, and the particular contribution that CERN can make as a non-school resource for science education.

  15. Influence of residual catalyst on the properties of conjugated polyphenylenevinylene materials: Palladium nanoparticles and poor electrical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Nyberg, R.B.; Jørgensen, M.

    2004-01-01

    polymer material prepared by two different routes: the palladium route and the condensation route. The performance in a device application of the two polymer materials was, however, very different, and the palladium route was demonstrated to give poor films with low breakdown voltages and short circuits....

  16. The influence of travel time on emergency obstetric care seeking behavior in the urban poor of Bangladesh: a GIS study

    OpenAIRE

    Panciera, Rocco; Khan, Akib; Rizvi, Syed Jafar Raza; Ahmed, Shakil; Ahmed, Tanvir; Islam, Rubana; Adam, Alayne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Availability of Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) is crucial to avert maternal death due to life-threatening complications potentially arising during delivery. Research on the determinants of utilization of EmOC has neglected urban settings, where traffic congestion can pose a significant barrier to the access of EmOC facilities, particularly for the urban poor due to costly and limited transportation options. This study investigates the impact of travel time to EmOC facilities on th...

  17. The influence of travel time on emergency obstetric care seeking behavior in the urban poor of Bangladesh: a GIS study

    OpenAIRE

    Panciera, Rocco; Khan, Akib; Rizvi, Syed Jafar Raza; Ahmed, Shakil; Ahmed, Tanvir; Islam, Rubana; Adam, Alayne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Availability of Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) is crucial to avert maternal death due to life-threatening complications potentially arising during delivery. Research on the determinants of utilization of EmOC has neglected urban settings, where traffic congestion can pose a significant barrier to the access of EmOC facilities, particularly for the urban poor due to costly and limited transportation options. This study investigates the impact of travel time to EmOC facilities on th...

  18. The influence of travel time on emergency obstetric care seeking behavior in the urban poor of Bangladesh: a GIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, Rocco; Khan, Akib; Rizvi, Syed Jafar Raza; Ahmed, Shakil; Ahmed, Tanvir; Islam, Rubana; Adams, Alayne M

    2016-08-22

    Availability of Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) is crucial to avert maternal death due to life-threatening complications potentially arising during delivery. Research on the determinants of utilization of EmOC has neglected urban settings, where traffic congestion can pose a significant barrier to the access of EmOC facilities, particularly for the urban poor due to costly and limited transportation options. This study investigates the impact of travel time to EmOC facilities on the utilization of facility-based delivery services among mothers living in urban poor settlements in Sylhet, Bangladesh. A cross-sectional EmOC health-seeking behavior survey from 39 poor urban clusters was geo-spatially linked to a comprehensive geo-referenced dataset of EmOC facility locations. Geo-spatial techniques and logistic regression were then applied to quantify the impact of travel time on place of delivery (EmOC facility or home), while controlling for confounding socio-cultural and economic factors. Increasing travel time to the nearest EmOC facility is found to act as a strong deterrent to seeking care for the urban poor in Sylhet. Logistic regression results indicate that a 5-min increase in travel time to the nearest EmOC facility is associated with a 30 % decrease (0.655 odds ratio, 95 % CI: 0.529-0.811) in the likelihood of delivery at an EmOC facility rather than at home. Moreover, the impact of travel time varies substantially between public, NGO and private facilities. A 5-min increase in travel time from a private EmOC facility is associated with a 32.9 % decrease in the likelihood of delivering at a private facility, while for public and Non-Government Organizations (NGO) EmOC facilities, the impact is lower (28.2 and 28.6 % decrease respectively). Other strong determinants of delivery at an EmOC facility are the use of antenatal care and mother's formal education, while Muslim mothers are found to be more likely to deliver at home. Geospatial evidence points to

  19. The Influence of Family Socialisation on the Success of Girls from Poor Urban Communities in Brazil at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marília

    2015-01-01

    The principle focus of this article is to understand the influence of socialisation in the family on the success of girls at school. Eight low-income families with children of both sexes in the city of São Paulo, Brazil were studied through interviews and observation methods. It was found that socialisation in the family favoured in girls, and not…

  20. The Influence of Family Socialisation on the Success of Girls from Poor Urban Communities in Brazil at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marília

    2015-01-01

    The principle focus of this article is to understand the influence of socialisation in the family on the success of girls at school. Eight low-income families with children of both sexes in the city of São Paulo, Brazil were studied through interviews and observation methods. It was found that socialisation in the family favoured in girls, and not…

  1. Provider performance in treating poor patients - factors influencing prescribing practices in lao PDR: a cross-sectional study

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    Petzold Max

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-pocket payments make up about 80% of medical care spending at hospitals in Laos, thereby putting poor households at risk of catastrophic health expenditure. Social security schemes in the form of community-based health insurance and health equity funds have been introduced in some parts of the country. Drug and Therapeutics Committees (DTCs have been established to ensure rational use of drugs and improve quality of care. The objective was to assess the appropriateness and expenditure for treatment for poor patients by health care providers at hospitals in three selected provinces of Laos and to explore associated factors. Methods Cross-sectional study using four tracer conditions. Structured interviews with 828 in-patients at twelve provincial and district hospitals on the subject of insurance protection, income and expenditures for treatment, including informal payment. Evaluation of each patient's medical record for appropriateness of drug use using a checklist of treatment guidelines (maximum score = 10. Results No significant difference in appropriateness of care for patients at different income levels, but higher expenditures for patients with the highest income level. The score for appropriate drug use in insured patients was significantly higher than uninsured patients (5.9 vs. 4.9, and the length of stay in days significantly shorter (2.7 vs. 3.7. Insured patients paid significantly less than uninsured patients, both for medicines (USD 14.8 vs. 43.9 and diagnostic tests (USD 5.9 vs. 9.2. On the contrary the score for appropriateness of drug use in patients making informal payments was significantly lower than patients not making informal payments (3.5 vs. 5.1, and the length of stay significantly longer (6.8 vs. 3.2, while expenditures were significantly higher both for medicines (USD 124.5 vs. 28.8 and diagnostic tests (USD 14.1 vs. 7.7. Conclusions The lower expenditure for insured patients can help reduce

  2. Influence of the intermediate digestion phases of common formulation lipids on the absorption of a poorly water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossena, Greg A; Charman, William N; Boyd, Ben J; Porter, Christopher J H

    2005-03-01

    The influence of different model intestinal phases (modelled on those likely to be produced in vivo after the digestion of commonly used formulation lipids) on the absorption profile of cinnarizine has been studied. Combinations of C8, C12, or C18:1 fatty acid and monoglyceride and simulated endogenous intestinal fluid were formulated to provide examples of liquid (L1), lamellar (L(alpha)), and cubic (C) liquid crystalline phases. Phases containing cinnarizine were dosed intraduodenally and absorption was assessed in an anesthetized rat model. Bile duct ligation was performed to inhibit the effects of digestion/dilution on the phase structure. Absorption from the L(alpha) phases (C8 and C12 lipids) was statistically higher (p absorption. Experiments in bile intact rats with the C8 L(alpha) and C18:1 C phase highlighted that the absorption-modifying properties of these phases were influenced by dilution in the endogenous bile milieu, with absorption from L(alpha) phase reducing (possibly through precipitation of solubilized drug) and increasing in the case of the C18:1 C phase, possibly through the coexistence of L1 and C upon dilution permitting more efficient transfer of solubilized drug.

  3. AHP Analysis of the Factors Influencing Credit for Temporarily Poor Farmers: Based on the Survey of Rongchang County of Chongqing Municipality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji; ZHOU; Binrui; ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of the influence on credit for farmers,this paper takes the temporarily poor farmers in Rongchang County of Chongqing Municipality as the respondents,and employs the expert survey method and on-site analysis to analyze the reasons and put forward three hypotheses. Using the AHP model,we carry out the empirical analysis of three major hypotheses concerning the credit for farmers. The study demonstrates that the state’s unclear definition of property rights of farmers and farmers’ lack of collateral are the primary factor influencing the credit for farmers,followed by insufficient targeted financial and technical support for the farmers who are engaged in the agricultural sector affected by the nature; farmers do not really get the assistance for them to use the natural resources to develop the rural economy,so that the banks complicate the loan procedures and increase the requirements of loans for farmers in order to ensure the capital liquidity and safety,thus further deepening the plight of credit for farmers.

  4. Integrating petrography, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to constrain the influence and distribution of groundwater contributions to baseflow in poorly productive aquifers: insights from Gortinlieve catchment, Co. Donegal, NW Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, John; Chelliah, Merlyn; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cassidy, Rachel; Flynn, Raymond

    2014-12-01

    Identifying groundwater contributions to baseflow forms an essential part of surface water body characterisation. The Gortinlieve catchment (5 km(2)) comprises a headwater stream network of the Carrigans River, itself a tributary of the River Foyle, NW Ireland. The bedrock comprises poorly productive metasediments that are characterised by fracture porosity. We present the findings of a multi-disciplinary study that integrates new hydrochemical and mineralogical investigations with existing hydraulic, geophysical and structural data to identify the scales of groundwater flow and the nature of groundwater/bedrock interaction (chemical denudation). At the catchment scale, the development of deep weathering profiles is controlled by NE-SW regional scale fracture zones associated with mountain building during the Grampian orogeny. In-situ chemical denudation of mineral phases is controlled by micro- to meso-scale fractures related to Alpine compression during Palaeocene to Oligocene times. The alteration of primary muscovite, chlorite (clinochlore) and albite along the surfaces of these small-scale fractures has resulted in the precipitation of illite, montmorillonite and illite-montmorillonite clay admixtures. The interconnected but discontinuous nature of these small-scale structures highlights the role of larger scale faults and fissures in the supply and transportation of weathering solutions to/from the sites of mineral weathering. The dissolution of primarily mineral phases releases the major ions Mg, Ca and HCO3 that are shown to subsequently form the chemical makeup of groundwaters. Borehole groundwater and stream baseflow hydrochemical data are used to constrain the depths of groundwater flow pathways influencing the chemistry of surface waters throughout the stream profile. The results show that it is predominantly the lower part of the catchment, which receives inputs from catchment/regional scale groundwater flow, that is found to contribute to the

  5. Influence of gender roles and rising food prices on poor, pregnant women’s eating and food provisioning practices in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal malnutrition in Bangladesh is a persistent health issue and is the product of a number of complex factors, including adherence to food 'taboos’ and a patriarchal gender order that limits women’s mobility and decision-making. The recent global food price crisis is also negatively impacting poor pregnant women’s access to food. It is believed that those who are most acutely affected by rising food prices are the urban poor. While there is an abundance of useful quantitative ...

  6. Influence of gender roles and rising food prices on poor, pregnant women’s eating and food provisioning practices in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal malnutrition in Bangladesh is a persistent health issue and is the product of a number of complex factors, including adherence to food 'taboos’ and a patriarchal gender order that limits women’s mobility and decision-making. The recent global food price crisis is also negatively impacting poor pregnant women’s access to food. It is believed that those who are most acutely affected by rising food prices are the urban poor. While there is an abundance of useful quantitative research centered on maternal nutrition and food insecurity measurements in Bangladesh, missing is an understanding of how food insecurity is experienced by people who are most vulnerable, the urban ultra-poor. In particular, little is known of the lived experience of food insecurity among pregnant women in this context. This research investigated these lived experiences by exploring food provisioning strategies of urban, ultra-poor, pregnant women. This knowledge is important as discussions surrounding the creation of new development goals are currently underway. Methods Using a focused-ethnographic approach, household food provisioning experiences were explored. Data from participant observation, a focus group discussion and semi-structured interviews were collected in an urban slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Interviews were undertaken with 28 participants including 12 pregnant women and new mothers, two husbands, nine non-pregnant women, and five health care workers. Results The key findings are: 1) women were aware of the importance of good nutrition and demonstrated accurate, biomedically-based knowledge of healthy eating practices during pregnancy; 2) the normative gender rules that have traditionally constrained women’s access to nutritional resources are relaxing in the urban setting; however 3) women are challenged in accessing adequate quality and quantities of food due to the increase in food prices at the market. Conclusions Rising food prices and resultant food

  7. Influence of Fever and Hospital-Acquired Infection on the Incidence of Delayed Neurological Deficit and Poor Outcome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Logan Douds

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although fever and infection have been implicated in the causation of delayed neurological deficits (DND and poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, the relationship between these two often related events has not been extensively studied. We reviewed these events through of our retrospective database of patients with SAH. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of DND and poor outcome. A total of 186 patients were analyzed. DND was noted in 76 patients (45%. Fever was recorded in 102 patients (55%; infection was noted in 87 patients (47%. A patient with one infection was more likely to experience DND compared to a patient with no infections (adjusted OR 3.73, 95% CI 1.62, 8.59. For those with more than two infections the likelihood of DND was even greater (adjusted OR 4.24, 95% CI 1.55, 11.56. Patients with 1-2 days of fever were less likely to have a favorable outcome when compared to their counterparts with no fever (adjusted OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06, 0.62. This trend worsened as the number of days febrile increased. These data suggest that the presence of infection is associated with DND, but that fever may have a stronger independent association with overall outcome.

  8. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: influence of pore size on release rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug-silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased.

  9. The Influence of Malnutrition and Micronutrient Status on Anemic Risk in Children under 3 Years Old in Poor Areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Hui; Chang, Suying; Zhao, Liyun; Fu, Ping; Yu, Wentao; Man, Qingqing; Scherpbier, Robert; Pan, Lili; Duan, Yifan; Yin, Shi-an

    2015-01-01

    Background Malnutrition and anemia affect large numbers of young children living in poor areas of China. Multi-micronutrient deficiencies may be related to the prevalence of anemia in different populations, and identifying the risk factors that render children susceptible to anemia is the first step in combating anemia effectively. Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1370 children under 3 years old were selected based on probability proportional to size sampling principles from poor counties of China. Basic characteristics data were collected by questionnaire; then anthropometrics and hemoglobin were measured in the field and anemia prevalence evaluated. Venous blood was drawn from children aged 12–35 months (N = 553) to evaluate micronutrient status. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for children’s anemia. Results Among children aged 0–35 months, the prevalence of stunting, low body weight and wasting was 17.5%, 8.6% and 5.1%, respectively, and 25.6% of the children were affected by anemia, with more anemic infants and younger children than older children (P children aged 12–35 months affected by iron deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, folic acid deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. For children aged 0–11 months who were breastfed, the mothers’ anemic status was the only factor associated with the child’s anemia (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2–5.4, P children aged 12–35 months, multivariate logistic regression indicated that anemia was significantly associated with iron and vitamin B12 deficiency (OR = 5.3; 95% CI: 1.9–14.5, P anemia was higher in children under 2 years old and requires urgent intervention. An effective intervention strategy should include iron and vitamin B12 supplements, improving dietary diversity and controlling breastfeeding mothers' anemia. PMID:26488490

  10. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: Influence of pore size on release rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0 nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7 nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug–silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0 nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0 nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0 nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased. - Highlights: • Exploitation of 3D cubic mesoporous silica (16 nm) as a carrier was completed. • The release rate of CEL increased on increasing the pore size of carriers. • The crystallinity

  11. The Influence of Malnutrition and Micronutrient Status on Anemic Risk in Children under 3 Years Old in Poor Areas in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and anemia affect large numbers of young children living in poor areas of China. Multi-micronutrient deficiencies may be related to the prevalence of anemia in different populations, and identifying the risk factors that render children susceptible to anemia is the first step in combating anemia effectively.In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1370 children under 3 years old were selected based on probability proportional to size sampling principles from poor counties of China. Basic characteristics data were collected by questionnaire; then anthropometrics and hemoglobin were measured in the field and anemia prevalence evaluated. Venous blood was drawn from children aged 12-35 months (N = 553 to evaluate micronutrient status. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for children's anemia.Among children aged 0-35 months, the prevalence of stunting, low body weight and wasting was 17.5%, 8.6% and 5.1%, respectively, and 25.6% of the children were affected by anemia, with more anemic infants and younger children than older children (P <0.01. There were 26.5%, 12.8%, 14.1% and 20.0% of the children aged 12-35 months affected by iron deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, folic acid deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency, respectively. For children aged 0-11 months who were breastfed, the mothers' anemic status was the only factor associated with the child's anemia (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2-5.4, P < 0.05. For children aged 12-35 months, multivariate logistic regression indicated that anemia was significantly associated with iron and vitamin B12 deficiency (OR = 5.3; 95% CI: 1.9-14.5, P < 0.01 and monotonous diet (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.7, P < 0.05 after adjusting for age and gender.The prevalence of anemia was higher in children under 2 years old and requires urgent intervention. An effective intervention strategy should include iron and vitamin B12 supplements, improving dietary diversity and controlling breastfeeding

  12. Influence of maternal height and weight on low birth weight: a cross-sectional study in poor communities of northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Revilane Parente de Alencar; Florêncio, Telma Maria Toledo; Benedito Silva, Ana Amelia; Sesso, Ricardo; Cavalcante, Jairo Calado; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with an increased risk of mortality, adverse metabolic conditions, and long-term chronic morbidities. The relationship between LWB and short maternal stature coupled with nutritional status was investigated in poor communities. A cross-sectional population-based study involving 2226 mother-child pairs was conducted during the period 2009-2010 in shantytowns of Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil. Associations between LBW and maternal sociodemographics, stature and nutritional status were investigated. The outcome variable was birth weight (160.4 cm) (OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 0.96 - 1.09, p = 0.078). Children from short-statured mothers weighed an average of 125 g less than those from taller mothers (3.18 ± 0.56 kg vs. 3.30 ± 0.58 kg, respectively p = 0.002). Multivariate analyses showed that short stature, age < 20 y (OR: 3.05, 95% CI:1.44 - 6.47) or were underweight (OR: 2.26, 95% CI:0.92 - 5.95) increased the risk of LBW, while overweight (OR: 0.38, 95% CI:0.16 - 0.95) and obesity (OR: 0.39, 95% CI:0.11 - 1.31) had lower risk for LBW. In taller mothers, lower income and underweight were associated with LBW (OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.07 - 3.29 and 2.85, 95% CI:1.09 - 7.47, respectively), and obese mothers showed a trend of increased risk of LBW (OR: 1.66, 95% CI:0.84 - 3.25). Overweight was found to have a protective effect in short-statured mothers, indicating that a surplus of energy may diminish the risk of LBW. Short-statured younger mothers, but not taller ones, showed higher risk of LBW. The mother being underweight, regardless of stature, was associated with LBW.

  13. Atomic diffusion in metal poor stars. The influence on the Main Sequence fitting distance scale, subdwarfs ages and the value of Delta Y/ Delta Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaris, M.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Weiss, A.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of atomic diffusion on the Main Sequence (MS) of metal-poor low mass stars is investigated. Since diffusion alters the stellar surface chemical abundances with respect to their initial values, one must ensure - by calibrating the initial chemical composition of the theoretical models - that the surface abundances of the models match the observed ones of the stellar population under scrutiny. When properly calibrated, our models with diffusion reproduce well within the errors the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of Hipparcos subdwarfs with empirically determined T_eff values and high resolution spectroscopical [Fe/H] determinations. Since the observed surface abundances of subdwarfs are different from the initial ones due to the effect of diffusion, while the globular clusters stellar abundances are measured in Red Giants, which have practically recovered their initial abundances after the dredge-up, the isochrones to be employed for studying globular clusters and Halo subdwarfs with the same observational value of [Fe/H] are different and do not coincide. This is at odds with the basic assumption of the MS-fitting technique for distance determinations. However, the use of the rather large sample of Hipparcos lower MS subdwarfs with accurate parallaxes keeps at minimum the effect of these differences, for two reasons. First, it is possible to use subdwarfs with observed [Fe/H] values close to the cluster one; this minimizes the colour corrections (which are derived from the isochrones) needed to reduce all the subdwarfs to a mono-metallicity sequence having the same [Fe/H] than the cluster. Second, one can employ objects sufficiently faint so that the differences between the subdwarfs and cluster MS with the same observed value of [Fe/H] are small (they increase for increasing luminosity). We find therefore that the distances based on standard isochrones are basically unaltered when diffusion is taken properly into account. On the other hand, the absolute ages

  14. Exploiting the Poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp Justesen, Mogens; Bjørnskov, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While extant research has focused on the causes and consequences of corruption at the macro-level, less effort has been devoted to understanding the micro-foundation of corruption. We argue that poor people are more likely to be victims of corrupt behavior by street-level bureaucrats as the poor ...

  15. Inference in `poor` languages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  16. 老年期全面惊厥性癫持续状态预后不良的影响因素%To Explore the Influence Factors of senile Comprehensive Convulsive status Epilepticus of poor Prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单玉民

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨老年期全面惊厥性癫持续状态预后不良的影响因素。方法对2013年6月至2014年6月我院收治的60例全面惊厥性癫患者资料进行回顾性分析。结果60例患者中病死7例,占11.7%,均死于多器官功能障碍综合征(MODS);53例生存患者中,32例出现不同程度的复发,21例得到完全控制,复发率为53.3%,治愈率为35.0%。结论老年期全面惊厥性癫持续状态预后不良的影响因素有MODS、原发病未根除以及机体的自身因素等。%Objective To explore the influence factors of senile comprehensive convulsive status epilepticus of poor prognosis.Methods In 2013 June to 2014 June in our hospital 60 cases of epilepsy patients comprehensive retrospective analysis..Results 7 patients died,60 death patients accounted for 11.7%,al died of multiple organ failure comprehensive disorder syndrome multiple organ(MODS);53 cases of survivors,32 cases occurred different degrees of recurrence,21 cases got complete control,the cure rate was 35.0%,the recurrence rate was 53.3%. Conclusion The influence factors of senile comprehensive convulsive status epilepticus of poor prognosis of MODS,the primary disease was not eradicated and the body's own factors etc.

  17. Poor school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Sunil; Kulkarni, Madhuri

    2005-11-01

    Education is one of the most important aspects of human resource development. Poor school performance not only results in the child having a low self-esteem, but also causes significant stress to the parents. There are many reasons for children to under perform at school, such as, medical problems, below average intelligence, specific learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, emotional problems, poor socio-cultural home environment, psychiatric disorders and even environmental causes. The information provided by the parents, classroom teacher and school counselor about the child's academic difficulties guides the pediatrician to form an initial diagnosis. However, a multidisciplinary evaluation by an ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, counselor, clinical psychologist, special educator, and child psychiatrist is usually necessary before making the final diagnosis. It is important to find the reason(s) for a child's poor school performance and come up with a treatment plan early so that the child can perform up to full potential.

  18. The Poor Pay More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folse, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a sociology experiential learning assignment where students learned why people living in poverty can sometimes pay more for products than people with better incomes. Focuses specifically on the rent to own concept. States students achieved the goal of learning how life constraints of poverty can hinder the poor from overcoming their…

  19. Becoming poor in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing to poverty, counteract risk-averse economic behaviour and serve as a substitute for the ... so focus their attention on the vulnerable non-poor (World Bank 2009, Hanlon et al. 2010,. Adato and .... The influx of low cost foreign clothing ... other loans they lost the business as well as the car and valuable household items.

  20. Influences of Low Temperature and Poor Light on the Stoma Characteristics of Fruit Vegetables Crops%低温弱光对果菜类蔬菜作物气孔特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于龙凤; 安福全; 李富恒; 谭大海

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The research aimed to study the influences of low temperature and poor light on the stoma characteristics of fruit vegetables crops. [ Method] By comparing the low temperature and poor light group whose temperature was 15 ℃/8 ℃ and illumination was 4 000 lx with the control group whose temperature was 25 ℃/18 ℃ and illumination was 1 1 000 lx, the difference of stoma characteristics in the tomato,chili, eggplant, cucumber, squash, melon was studied. [Result] After the low temperature and poor light treatment, the stomatal opening ratio and the opening degree of tomato, chili, eggplant, cucumber, squash and melon leave were bigger than that in CK group, and the difference was very significant. The stomatal conductance (Gs) in the treatment group was smaller than that in CK group. Gs of eggplant, squash and melon leave in the treatment group had the significant difference with CK group. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) in the treatment group was bigger than that in CK group. Ci of tomato and melon leave in the treatment group had the significant difference with CK group. [ Conclusion]The research provided the theory basis for the high yielding stress resistance cultivation of fruit vegetables crops.%[目的]研究低温弱光对果菜类蔬菜作物气孔特性的影响.[方法]通过比较低温弱光处理组(温度为15℃/8℃,光照为4 000lx)与对照组(温度为25℃/18℃,光照为11 000 lx),研究番茄、辣椒、茄子、黄瓜、西葫芦、甜瓜气孔相关特性的差异.[结果]低温弱光处理后,番茄、辣椒、茄子、黄瓜、西葫芦、甜瓜叶片的气孔开张比和开张度均比CK组大,且差异极显著;气孔导度(Gs)比CK组小,其中处理组茄子、西葫芦、甜瓜叶片的气孔导度与CK组差异显著;胞间CO浓度(Ci)比CK组大,其中处理组番茄、甜瓜叶片的胞间CO浓度与CK组差异显著.[结论]该研究为果菜类蔬菜作物的高产抗逆栽培提供了理论依据.

  1. Banker to the Poor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bangladeshi economist Muhammad Yunus has been awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize for making small loans to the poorest of the poor through his Grameen Bank. Grameen, meaning "rural" or "village" in Bangla language, is the world's first microcreditor on this scale. By offering microcredit to the impoverished, Yunus helps those desperately struggling in poverty be more accessible to small business startup. The 66-year-old banker allows those who borrow to change their lives through self-employment, by u...

  2. Poor ovarian reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Rekha Jirge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor ovarian reserve (POR is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women.

  3. Alcohol, Drugs a Poor Halloween Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161762.html Alcohol, Drugs a Poor Halloween Mix When you're under the influence, carving pumpkins and other holiday fun can lead ...

  4. Urban poor program launched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The government of the Philippines has launched a program to deal with the rapidly growing urban poor population. 60 cities (including Metro Manila) are expected to increase their bloated population by 3.8% over 1990 which would be 27.7 million for 1991. Currently there is an exodus of people from the rural areas and by 2000 half the urban population will be squatters and slum dwellers. Basic services like health and nutrition are not expected to be able to handle this type of volume without a loss in the quality of service. The basic strategy of the new program is to recruit private medical practitioners to fortify the health care delivery and nutrition services. Currently the doctor/urban dweller ration is 1:9000. The program will develop a system to pool the efforts of government and private physicians in servicing the target population. Barangay Escopa has been chosen as the pilot city because it typifies the conditions of a highly populated urban area. The projects has 2 objectives: 1) demonstrate the systematic delivery of health and nutrition services by the private sector through the coordination of the government, 2) reduce mortality and morbidity in the community, especially in the 0-6 age group as well as pregnant women and lactating mothers.

  5. Poor sleep in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Marie Bøe Lunde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is a frequent symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Sleep may be influenced by MS-related symptoms and adverse effects from immunotherapy and symptomatic medications. We aimed to study the prevalence of poor sleep and the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on sleep quality in MS- patients. METHODS: A total of 90 MS patients and 108 sex-and age- matched controls were included in a questionnaire survey. Sleep complaints were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and a global PSQI score was used to separate good sleepers (≤ 5 from poor sleepers (>5. Excessive daytime sleepiness, the use of immunotherapy and antidepressant drugs, symptoms of pain, depression, fatigue and MS-specific health related quality of life were registered. Results were compared between patients and controls and between good and poor sleepers among MS patients. RESULTS: MS patients reported a higher mean global PSQI score than controls (8.6 vs. 6.3, p = 0.001, and 67.1% of the MS patients compared to 43.9% of the controls (p = 0.002 were poor sleepers. Pain (p = 0.02, fatigue (p = 0.001, depression (p = 0.01 and female gender (p = 0.04 were associated with sleep disturbance. Multivariate analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.02, use of immunotherapy (p = 005 and a high psychological burden of MS (p = 0.001 were associated with poor sleep among MS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep is common in patients with MS. Early identification and treatment of modifiable risk factors may improve sleep and quality of life in MS.

  6. 偏远山区视力不良小学生矫正现状及相关影响因素%Condition and Influencing Factors of Vision Correction among Pupils with Poor Vision in Remote Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立煌; 许敏; 何一宁; 罗沛宜; 田亭; 成佩霞; 杨宝霞; 周亮

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解偏远地区视力不良小学生矫正状况及其相关影响因素,并提出相关建议.方法采用分层整群抽样方法,共调查4~6年级40个班(1967名)学生,调查内容包括视力检查和问卷调查两方面.结果视力不良患病率为27.96%;未矫正率为67.86%;在对未矫正率影响因素的单因素分析结果中,年级、父母是否长期在外打工、有无远处看不清楚的情况及有没有跟照顾的人说、家里经济状况、是否定期进行检查方面,在未矫正率上差异有统计学意义(P <0.05).多因素 Logistic 回归分析结果中,父亲长期在外打工、未定期检查方面,视力是矫正的危险因素,有过看远处不清楚的情况是矫正的保护因素.结论偏远地区小学生视力不良未矫正现状不容乐观,其影响因素可能涉及学生家庭一般情况、家长是否在外打工、学生对于近视的认知程度等,需要及时干预.%Objectives To investigate the condition and influencing factors of vision correction among pupils with poor vision in remote areas,and to provide related suggestions.Methods Using the stratified random cluster sam-pling method,we investigated 40 classes (1 967)students from 4th grade to 6th grade.The investigation content in-cluded visual test and questionnaire survey.Results The prevalence of visual impairment among primary school students was 27.96%,and the uncorrected rate was 67.86%.Different grade levels,whether parents worked outside for a long time,whether they had the symptoms,their family economics and whether they examined their vision regularly showed varied uncorrected rates (P <0.05 ).Father working outside and irregularly vision examinations were risk factors of the visual impairment correction;the presence of the symptom was the protective factors of the correction.Conclusions The uncorrected rate of the visual impairment in the investigated groups was high,and its influencing

  7. Safety Umbrella for Rural Poor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For lower-income farmers in China,from those living in the generally well-off coastal regions in the east,to those in the relatively poor landlocked interior in the west,the recent news from Beijing no doubt brought smiles to tired and worried faces:the Central Government has decided to extend the safety net,literally dubbed the basic living guarantee system,to all the rural poor from this year.

  8. Supporting Non-School Leaver Students in Their First Year of University Study: Results of a Transition Focused Peer-to-Peer Intensive Mentoring Program Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ashleigh; Dwyer, Angela

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of an intensive mentoring program trial designed to address retention issues with first year students in Justice degrees. The purpose of the program was to reduce student attrition, specifically for non-school leaver Justice students, by creating a culture of student cooperation and support. In line with previous…

  9. Poor smokers, poor quitters, and cigarette tax regressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remler, Dahlia K

    2004-02-01

    The traditional view that excise taxes are regressive has been challenged. I document the history of the term regressive tax, show that traditional definitions have always found cigarette taxes to be regressive, and illustrate the implications of the greater price responsiveness observed among the poor. I explain the different definitions of tax burden: accounting, welfare-based willingness to pay, and welfare-based time inconsistent. Progressivity (equity across income groups) is sensitive to the way in which tax burden is assessed. Analysis of horizontal equity (fairness within a given income group) shows that cigarette taxes heavily burden poor smokers who do not quit, no matter how tax burden is assessed.

  10. 广西云南贫困县小学生饮食相关影响因素分析%Dietary nutritional related influencing factors of primary school students in poor moutain area of Guangxi and Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈秀华; 唐文静; 毛绚霞; 黄婧妍; 蔡威

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dietary conditions of primary school students in poor mountain area in order to provide baseline data for the nutrition related aids.Methods Nine primary schools in the representative poor counties in Guangxi and Yunnan provinces were selected,1 868 students and their parents were separately investigated by a questionnaire.Results About 83.81% of the family considered that basically the problem of food and clothing was solved.Every family spent 263.37 yuan on food monthly,the Engel coefficient was 0.51±0.24.About 79.40% of families had only two meals every day.All the schools had dining room and provide the students with lunch and dinner,every meal cost about 1.2-3.0 yuan.Only 10.61% of the students pass the nutrition knowledge exam,far less than the children of the same age in Shanghai City.About 81.8% of the students "never eat eggs" or "seldom eat eggs",92.9% of the students had pocket money with 26.91±34.83 yuan per month.About 24.25% of the students eat snacks every day.Conclusion Basically the problem of food and clothing is solved in Chinese poor counties.It is time to provide nutrition education for the students to develop a good eating habit,which is also necessary to make the government's nutrition plan more beneficial.%目的 了解贫困地区小学生饮食营养相关影响因素现状,为进一步加强营养相关援助提供基线资料.方法 在广西和云南各选取1个国家级贫困县,对9所小学全体学生共1 868名及其家长进行问卷调查.结果 83.81%的家庭认为已经或基本解决温饱问题.家庭每月用于购买食物的费用为263.37元,恩格尔系数为0.51±0.24.79.40%的家庭每天只吃两餐.学校均设有食堂为学生提供午餐和晚餐,每餐一般控制在1.2 ~3.0元.受调查地区小学生的营养知识及格率仅为10.61%,81.8%的学生“从来不吃”或“很少吃”鸡蛋.92.9%的学生平均每月零花钱有(26.91±34.83)元.24.25

  11. 农村地区儿童养育者喂养行为影响因素研究%Qualitative investigation on influencing factors of feeding behavior in poor rural areas of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程黎明; 戴耀华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feeding knowledge mastered by caregivers and their feeding behaviors on children under 3 years old in rural areas of China, and to explore the influencing factors of caregivers' feeding behaviors. Methods Three counties including Huize in Yunnan, Pan in Guizhou and Luonan in Shaanxi were selected as the study areas. Group discussion was made to investigate the feeding knowledge and behaviors of caregivers of children under 3 years old and of local health workers. Results 336 subjects participated in the discussion, and local caregivers had enough knowledge about the breastfeeding. But low rate existed in early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding. There were 95.0% health workers preferring to initiation of breastfeeding one hour after delivery, and all of mothers and grandmothers preferring to that three days after delivery. When infants were thirsty, there were only 4.0% mothers, 0.9%grandmothers and 11.5% health workers selecting breastfeeding. The time and ways to add complementary food were not appropriate,which was related with the local customs and lack of scientific feeding knowledge. Conclusion The feeding behaviors of caregivers were influenced by multiple factors. Targeted intervention should be implemented to increase feeding knowledge of caregivers, to correct their improper behaviors and to improve the feeding conditions of children under 3 years old in rural areas in China.%目的 探讨中国贫困农村地区3岁以下儿童养育者喂养知识的掌握情况、具体的喂养行为及其影响因素.方法 采用专题小组讨论法,以云南会泽县、贵州盘县、陕西洛南县为研究地点,对3岁以下儿童母亲/孕妇、祖母、卫生工作者进行访谈.结果 336人参加了专题讨论,其中当地养育者对母乳喂养的知识掌握情况较好,但早开奶与纯母乳喂养状况不理想.有95.0%的卫生工作者选择产后1小时开奶,母

  12. Analysis of Factors Influencing the Poor Academic Performance of Ethnic Minority Students in Science%少数民族理科学习困境的因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑新蓉; 王学男

    2015-01-01

    __摘_理科教育质量事关少数民族学生认知发展、就业前途以及社会和谐与稳定。本文分析影响少数民族理科教育质量的主要因素:民族地区语言-教学模式处于新的探索阶段,理科教师的语言转换能力难度较大,理科课程标准难度过高,理科教师的招聘与配置不足,以及缺乏语言与文化适宜的教育资源等。应兼顾民族地区社会经济与自然生态的特殊发展需求,理科教育需定位于培养学生的基本科学素养,以及解决生产生活问题的实际能力。建议开设“语言与文化适宜的教学法”等课程,提高民族地区教师的教学能力和语言转化能力;加强基于教育与心理的实证研究与理科教学实践探索。%The quality of science education matters to the cognitive development and career prospects of ethnic minority students,as well as the stability and harmony of the whole society.This article analyzed the key factors which influence the quality of science education of ethnic minority students:the language-teaching mode in ethnic minority area is still in the initial exploratory stage,and science teachers have diffi-culty in language transformation;the curriculum standard for science education is too high,and the re-cruitment of science teachers is still inadequate;and there is a shortage of language and culture appropriate educational resources.Therefore,science education should give consideration to special development needs of social economics and natural environment,and aim at developing students’basic scientific knowledge and skill of solving problems in work and daily life.This article suggests setting up courses such as Lan-guage and Culture Relevant Teaching Methods for teachers in ethnic minority areas to improve their teach-ing and language transformation ability.Moreover,the empirical study based on pedagogy and psychology and practical science education exploration should be

  13. Is Decentralisation in Ghana pro-poor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Obeng-Odoom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a popular belief among decentralists that if local governments have the power to generate and spend revenue, without relying on central government funding, their expenditure will be pro-poor and will improve the lives of local people. Such views have influenced recent calls for greater decentralisation in developing countries in general and Africa in particular. However, evidence from Ghana casts some doubts on this view. A brief comparison of the expenditure and revenue patterns of the poorest and richest local governments there suggests that local governments are not inherently pro-poor and that locally generated funds might be used in ways that do not reflect the needs of the locality as a whole. Thus the fiscal devolution view of decentralisation appears to be out of kilter with reality. To discuss this issue, the three sections in this paper summarise the assumptions and perceived benefits of decentralisation, describe decentralisation in Ghana, and analyse the revenue and expenditure patterns of the Kumasi Metropolitan Authority and the Kasena Nankana District Assembly.

  14. Testosterone for Poor Ovarian Responders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Davis, Susan R; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    ovarian stimulation with a duration varying from 5 to 21 days. Nevertheless, the key question to be asked is whether, based on ovarian physiology and testosterone pharmacokinetics, a short course of testosterone administration of more than 10 mg could be expected to have any beneficial effect...... on reproductive outcome. The rationale for asking this question lies in the existing scientific evidence derived from basic research and animal studies regarding the action of androgens during folliculogenesis, showing that their main effect in follicular development is defined during the earlier developmental...... stages. In addition, extreme testosterone excess is not only likely to induce adverse events but has also the potential to be ineffective and even detrimental. Thus, evidence from clinical studies is not enough to either "reopen" or "close" the "androgen chapter" in poor responders, mainly because...

  15. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets.

  16. Social Support and Parenting in Poor, Dangerous Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballo, Rosario; McLoyd, Vonnie C.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated how stressful environmental conditions influence the relation between mothers' social support and parenting strategies among poor, African American single mothers and their young adolescent children. Findings indicated that as neighborhood conditions worsened, the positive relation between emotional support and mothers'…

  17. Standard and Poor's%穷与富

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Ritter

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recently,a listener from China asked why the financial company Standard and "Poor's"has a name that includes the word poor. In Chinese culture,businesses have names that suggest success and wealth.

  18. Poor People's Income to Be Increased

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Duoduo

    2005-01-01

    @@ During the period of the 11 th FiveYear Program, Chinese govern ment will be inclined to take policies to realize a balanced economic growth, equalized opportunities and social justice so as to avoid that the poor people become extremely poor and the gap between poor and wealthy become larger, according to the analysts.

  19. Poor People's Income to Be Increased

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen; Duoduo

    2005-01-01

      During the period of the 11 th FiveYear Program, Chinese govern ment will be inclined to take policies to realize a balanced economic growth, equalized opportunities and social justice so as to avoid that the poor people become extremely poor and the gap between poor and wealthy become larger, according to the analysts.……

  20. 新疆贫困地区0~6岁儿童营养不良状况及影响因素分析%Prevalence of malnutrition and its influencing factors among children aged 0-6 years in poor areas of Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏学燕; 葩丽泽·买买提; 张格祥; 王蕾蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the status of malnutrition and its influencing factors among children aged 0-6 years in poor areas of Xinjiang,and to provide evidence for nutrition improvement measures.Methods One-on-one field survey used the nutrition questionnaire of children in poor areas of China made by Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety of China CDC.Z scores were calculated according to WHO growth standards.Nutritional status and its influencing factors were evaluated and analyzed.Results The overall malnutrition rates were 15.1%,12.0% and 11.9%,the prevalence of stunting were 12.8%,11.2% and 10.4% in 2007-2009,respectively.Logistic regression analysis revealed that children's own situation (such as Macrosomia,etc),the acquired family care factors (such as breast feeding,parents' education level,etc.) and related diseases had more visible impact on their nutritional status.Conclusion Malnutrition in children aged 0 to 6 years in poor areas of Xinjiang should be payed more attention.In the process of formulating policies and implementing measure for the improvement of the population nutrition in this area,we should focus on maternity nutrition,advocate breasffeeding,pay more attention to rational nutrition of preschoolers.Meanwhile we need to strengthen construction of nutrition surveillance system,increase the awareness of the health of the social public.%目的 分析新疆贫困地区0~6岁儿童营养不良状况及影响因素,为制定相关营养改善措施提供依据.方法 使用中国疾病预防控制中心营养与食品安全所制定的中国贫困地区儿童营养调查问卷,对从新疆贫困地区分层随机整群抽取的1 816名0~6岁儿童及其抚养人进行一对一的现场问卷调查.以WHO推荐的儿童生长发育标准计算各项指标的Z评分,评价儿童营养状况及其影响因素.结果 新疆贫困地区0~6岁儿童2007-2009年总体营养不良率分别为15.1%,12.0%和11.9%.Logistic回归分析

  1. BIRTH CONTROL, CULTURE AND THE POOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIESSMAN, CATHERINE KOHLER

    EVIDENCE FROM STUDIES INDICATE THAT THE POOR DESIRE TO CONTROL THEIR FAMILY SIZE AND PREFER TO USE BIRTH CONTROL DEVICES (PILLS OR INTERUTERINE DEVICES) WHICH ARE NOT COITUS-CONNECTED AND ANTITHETICAL TO THEIR SEXUAL ATTITUDES AND TRADITIONS. CONTRARY TO THE BELIEF THAT THE POOR ARE LESS LIKELY TO UTILIZE EXISTING HEALTH FACILITIES OR TO TAKE PART…

  2. Social exclusion of the poor people

    OpenAIRE

    Konečná, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical part is devoted to the social exclusion of poor people and its requisites. The introductory chapters explain what is the social exclusion of poor people, and what is the problem with poverty. There are also analyzed the different legal standards. The practical part is aimed at socially excluded people, their social life and their comparison.

  3. Using Qualitative Methods with Poor Children in Urban Ethiopia: Opportunities & Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekola, Bethlehem; Griffin, Christine; Camfield, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the advantages and challenges of using qualitative methods to elicit poor children's perspectives about threats and positive influences on their wellbeing. It draws on research carried out by the author on the subjective experiences of poor children in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia in terms of their understandings of…

  4. Using Qualitative Methods with Poor Children in Urban Ethiopia: Opportunities & Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekola, Bethlehem; Griffin, Christine; Camfield, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the advantages and challenges of using qualitative methods to elicit poor children's perspectives about threats and positive influences on their wellbeing. It draws on research carried out by the author on the subjective experiences of poor children in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia in terms of their understandings of…

  5. Tackling poor parenting: a public health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Judith

    2003-01-01

    The adverse consequences associated with poor parenting persist down the generations and are a problem for society as well as individuals. The author cites evidence suggesting that in many cases poor parenting is associated with socioeconomic deprivation, including health inequalities. She argues that most parents (especially mothers, as the main child carers) are motivated to do their best for their children but that many families struggle against poverty. Poor parenting skills may be a product of poverty and social exclusion rather than the fault of individual parents. A public health approach, based on partnership with parents to meet their expressed needs in appropriate ways, could offer a constructive way forward.

  6. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to identify and characterize groups with poor mental health defined by the SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS-12) scale. Methods: The study is based on the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2005 and includes 10,082 participants (16 years or older). Data were...... health were further characterized by being a heavy smoker, and having a BMI below 25. Women with poor mental health were further characterized by being 16-44 years old and sedentary in leisure time. CONCLUSIONS THE PREVALENCE OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IS HIGHER AMONG WOMEN THAN MEN, AND DIFFERENT FACTORS...

  7. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  8. How School Taught Me I Was Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author recounts how school taught him that he was poor. For him, third grade was the year in which he learned in school that he was poor. The author's story reminds everyone that all children do not experience school in the same way. Their social class (in the case described in this article), as well as their race, gender,…

  9. Should Rich and Poor Live Apart?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    If Beijing real estate mogul Ren Zhiqiang had his way, the rich and poor in China would live apart and there would be a clear distinction between the two. The outspoken businessman made his views known at a recent conference dealing with the real estate industry, and had the audience seeing red. Ren said in the past, the whole of China was a poor community, and now that some people had led others to become wealthier,

  10. Status of malnutrition and its influencing factors in children under 5 years of age in poor areas of China in 2009%2009年中国贫困地区5岁以下儿童营养不良状况及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于冬梅; 刘爱东; 于文涛; 张兵; 张继国; 贾凤梅; 李婕; 赵丽云

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the status of malnutrition and its influencing factors in children less than 5 years of age in poor areas of China in 2009. Methods Multistage stratified random cluster sampling method used in the national survey was performed. The subjects of the study were 7818 children less than S years of age in poor areas. The contents of the investigation included questionnaire survey, anthropometric measurement, biochemical tests and dietary survey. Z-scores were calculated according to WHO growth standards. The prevalence of malnutrition was calculated by WHO Anthro V 3. 2. 2 software. Data processing and multiple factors analysis were finished by non condition logistic regression in software SAS 9. 12. Results The prevalence of stunting, underweight and wasting in children under 5 year-old in poor areas of China were IS. 9% , 7. 8% and 3. 7% , respectively. Excluding other influencing factors, the results suggested that the low birth weight(OR = 1. 975,95% CI = 1. 515 - 2. 575 ) , household income less than 2000 Yuan per capita per year( OR = 1. 813 ,95% CI = 1. 364 -2. 409) , not cared by father/mother( OR = 1. 190,95% CI = 1. 022 - 1. 387 ) and no sanitary drinking water ( OR = 1.282,95% CI - 1.120 - 1.466) are the most important factors making the child more likely to become malnutrition. Compared to the child whose mother was professional personnel, cadre or army-woman, the child whose mother was farmer( OR =5. 384,95% CI = 2. 490 - 11. 642) , migrant worker (OR =4.244,95% CI = 1.953-9. 222 ) , rural handicraft worker or individual-owned businesswoman (OR =4. 872,95% CI = 2. 169 - 10. 947 ) and household wife( OR = 5. 331 ,95% CI - 2. 438 - 11. 654 ) was easy to become malnutrition. The nearest medical institution at a distance of not more than 1 km is a protective factor for malnutrition( OR = 1. 246,95% CI = 1. 100 -1.411). The risk of malnutrition would be increased when food supplements were started from the 9th month after birth(Ofl =1

  11. An economic system that crushes the poor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maake J. Masango

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on economic structures that crush the poor, especially global economic structures that trap and keep people in poverty. The concept of poverty occupies centre stage in South Africa and many other developing countries. There is no longer a middle class. One is either rich or poor. Globalisation has created a system or program that continues to crush the poor, while also breeding greed and selfishness. The rich always accumulate resources while the poor struggle to make ends meet. These problems are created by the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and Structural Adjustment Programs, to name a few. These structures have introduced a system of inequality that widens the gap between the rich and the poor because of self-interest, which continues to crush the latter. The end result is that the concept of Ubuntu or Botho among African communities is destroyed. Injustice becomes the order of the day.

  12. Monetary policy and the well-being of the poor

    OpenAIRE

    Christina D. Romer; David Romer

    1999-01-01

    Poverty is arguably the most pressing economic problem of our time. And because rising inequality, for a given level of income,> implies greater poverty, the distribution of income is also a central concern. At the same time, monetary policy is one of the modern age's most potent tools for managing the economy. Given the importance of poverty and the influence of monetary policy, it is natural to ask if monetary policy can be used as a tool to help the poor.> In a presentation at the Federal ...

  13. The poorly explored impact of uncontrolled asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Schatz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control; however, despite the availability of effective and safe medications, for many patients asthma remains uncontrolled. One reason for this is the fear of long-term side effects from the regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Adverse...... effects of poorly controlled asthma (for example, obesity, pneumonia, and risks to the fetus) can be perceived as side effects of ICSs. Poorly controlled asthma adversely affects children's cardiovascular fitness, while children with well-controlled asthma perform at the same level as their peers...... and concentration are negatively affected in patients with untreated asthma, and patients with asthma are at greater risk for depression. Also, poorly controlled asthma increases the risks of severe asthma exacerbations following upper respiratory and pneumococcal pulmonary infections. ICSs used to improve asthma...

  14. On the Influence of Tourism on Fenghuang on the Poor A perspective of Human.Development Index%凤凰旅游对贫困人口的影响分析——基于人类发展指数的视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明月; 麻学锋

    2011-01-01

    At the direction of the poor' 2000-2009 annual development in Fenghuang county, the influence of tourism on poverty population is analyzed and expressed by Human Development Index. According to the analysis of the indexes, the main results are as following; during this ten years, human development index of the poor in Fenghuang has risen steadily, income index has first grown slowly, then gone up rapidly, education index has risen rapidly first, then increased slowly, even with a slight decline, and life expectancy index has developed in a rapid way. Thus, the effect preliminary inquiry of the poor' development and changement in Fenghuang are based on the angle of human development index ,so that it can offer a new perspective to objectively and comprehensively analyze and study the effect caused by Fenghuang tourism.%文章从贫困人口发展的方向,对凤凰县2000-2009年旅游对贫困人口的影响进行解析,并应用人类发展指数对其进行表达。通过各项指数的实证分析,得出的主要结论是:近中年凤凰贫困人口人类发展水平稳步提升,收入水平先缓慢提高,然后大幅增长;教育程度先迅速上升后缓慢提高,甚至稍有下降;预期寿命稳步延长。由此,从人类发展指数的角度对贫困人口发展水平状况及其变动进行了初步探讨,为客观综合分析凤凰旅游对贫困人口的影响提供了一种新的视角。

  15. Poor sleep quality and resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Rosa Maria; Palagini, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo; Virdis, Agostino; Di Giulio, Alessia; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Riemann, Dieter; Taddei, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to determine the relationship between sleep quality and treatment-resistant hypertension (RH). In our cross-sectional cohort study, 270 consecutive essential hypertensive patients were recruited at the Outpatient Hypertension Unit, University of Pisa, Italy. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y2) were administered to all subjects. RH was defined as office blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg with three or more antihypertensive drugs or controlled BP with four or more drugs. Poor sleep quality was defined as PSQI >5, depressive symptoms as BDI >10, and trait anxiety as STAI-Y2 >40. Patients with other sleep disorders were excluded. Complete data were available for 222 patients (50.9% men; mean age, 56.6±12.5 y; RH, 14.9%). Poor sleep quality had a prevalence of 38.2% in the overall population. RH was associated with poor sleep quality, increased sleep latency and reduced sleep efficiency. No significant relationship was found between RH and short sleep duration or depressive symptoms and trait anxiety. Poor sleep quality was more prevalent in resistant vs nonresistant hypertensive women (70.6% vs 40.2%; P=.02) but not in resistant vs nonresistant men (43.8% vs 29.2%; P=.24). In women poor sleep quality was an independent predictor of RH, even after adjustment for cardiovascular and psychiatric comorbidities (odds ratio [OR], 5.3 [confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-27.6), explaining 4.7% of its variance. In men age, diabetes mellitus (DM), and obesity were the only variables associated with RH. Poor sleep quality is significantly associated with resistance to treatment in hypertensive women, independent of cardiovascular and psychiatric confounders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pneumonia severity scores in resource poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Rylance

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical prognostic scores are increasingly used to streamline care in well-resourced settings. The potential benefits of identifying patients at risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome, delivering appropriate higher level clinical care, and increasing efficiency are clear. In this focused review, we examine the use and applicability of severity scores applied to patients with community acquired pneumonia in resource poor settings. We challenge clinical researchers working in such systems to consider the generalisability of existing severity scores in their populations, and where performance of scores is suboptimal, to promote efforts to develop and validate new tools for the benefit of patients and healthcare systems.

  17. Resilient Parenting: Overcoming Poor Parental Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Wendy J.; Combs-Orme, Terri

    2007-01-01

    This study identified groups of mothers with varying patterns of adaptive functioning and bonds with their own parents. These patterns were related to mothers' parenting of their own children to understand how some mothers avoid repeating the cycle of poor parenting. Data from 210 new mothers were analyzed before hospital discharge about bonding…

  18. Expansion for Who, Markets or The Poor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk KENDIRLI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine the impacts of expansionary monetary policies executed by the Federal Reserve on poverty in the United States of America. It has been discussed in various studies that the Fed’s expansionary monetary policies create a less positive impact on economy as a whole than financial sector. In this study, the expansionary effects of expansionary policies on the poor living in America will be discussed. The main thesis of the study is that the poor living in the United States benefited less from expansionary monetary policies than either financial sector or the US economy as a whole. When discussing the thesis of the study both employed and unemployed poor will be discussed. Therefore, it will be questioned that the decrease in the unemployment rate is the indicator of the fight against poverty.Indicators such as indices and interest rates in the financial markets, and indicators such as growth rates and unemployment rates in the overall economy are regarded as essential indicators but as for poverty it’s hard to find such regarded indicators. Unfortunately, there are not too many statistics about the poor living in the United States in the reports of the international organizations. Thus the main trouble of the study is that international comparisons are almost impossible. Therefore, various indicators produced by the U.S. government agencies of various indicators will be used in this study.

  19. Text comprehension strategy instruction with poor readers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bos, K.P.; Aarnoudse, C.C.; Brand-Gruwel, S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of teaching text comprehension strategies to children with decoding and reading comprehension problems and with a poor or normal listening ability. Two experiments are reported. Four text comprehension strategies, viz., question generation,

  20. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  1. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  2. Text comprehension strategy instruction with poor readers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bos, K.P.; Aarnoudse, C.C.; Brand-Gruwel, S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of teaching text comprehension strategies to children with decoding and reading comprehension problems and with a poor or normal listening ability. Two experiments are reported. Four text comprehension strategies, viz., question generation, summa

  3. Runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2012-01-01

    More recently, research on enhancing the situational awareness of pilots, especially in poor visibility flight conditions, gains more and more interests. Since pilots may not be able to spot the runway clearly in poor visibility conditions, such as fog, smoke, haze or dim lighting conditions, aviation landing problem can occur due to the (unexpected) presence of objects on the runway. Complicated and trivial instruments, switches, bottoms, plus sudden happenings are enough for the pilots to take care of during landing approach. Therefore, an automatic hazard detection approach that combines non-linear Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) image enhancement, edge detection with basic edge pattern analysis, and image analysis is investigated. The effect of applying the enhancement method is to make the image of the runway almost independent from the poor atmospheric conditions. The following smart edge detection process extracts edge information, which can also reduce the storing space, the comparison and retrieval time, and the effect of sensor noise. After analyzing the features existing in the edge differences occurring in the runway area by digital image processing techniques, the existing potential hazard will be localized and labeled. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective in runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions.

  4. Cost valuation in resource-poor settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutton, G.; Baltussen, R.M.P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Methods of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) have largely been developed for application in Western country settings. Little attention has been paid to the methodological issues in cost valuation in resource-poor settings, where failing exchange rates and severe market distortions require further

  5. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  6. Health and economic expansion in poor lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenbaum, W

    1973-01-01

    Economic progress in poor lands remains a major goal as current efforts continue to yield limited advance for the nations where most of the world's people continue to live in poverty. The income gap between poor lands and the rich world continue to grow. Effective solutions require new approaches in three areas of science: the process of economic development, the dynamics of population growth, and the function of the health of man. Neither history or theory provides economic progress a basis for policy or programs in any of these areas. The motivation and attitudes of man are essential elements in the process of population and production change, an emphasis which contrasts with the more conventional concern with a nation's material and physical resources in the process of economic and demographic advance. Health programs thus offer a major contribution to the process of economic and population development. Improved health in poor areas is a joint product of inputs from other professions as much as from the medical and public health sciences proper. In fact, improved health in developing lands may itself derive for the most part from expanding production relative to population. The basic contribution of the health sciences in poor lands is the involvement of health interventions with attitude changes essential to economic progress and to the rates of growth of production and population. Analysis of the interdependence of health, demographic and economic progress is suggested for India, Appalachia and South Africa and reported for Ethiopia, guatemala and St. Lucia.

  7. Child spacing and contraception among the poor in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan K Pillai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vijayan K Pillai1, Rashmi Gupta21School of Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA; 2Department of Social Work, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: For decades, family planning programs have targeted women in developing countries. These programs bestow a great deal of autonomy on women with respect to fertility decision making. It is well known that a number of close relatives in multigenerational and extended family systems influence women’s fertility decisions with respect to child spacing and contraceptive use. One approach toward a systematic study of fertility decision making is to explicitly consider the husband’s influences on fertility decision making. This study examines the effects of a selected number of factors on the desired birth interval lengths. We interviewed husbands and wives separately from 165 randomly selected households from two poor neighborhoods in the city of Kitwe, Zambia. Three ordinal birth interval groups were obtained for both husbands and wives separately. The effect of selected factors on the likelihood of influencing the three groups was examined using ordinal logistic regression methods. Data from husbands and wives were analyzed separately. Qualitative methods such as semistructured interviews were used to gather extensive information on the various factors that husbands and wives perceive to influence their child spacing decisions. We found differences in accounts with respect to child spacing between husbands and wives, likely due to a lack of communication. A gender-sensitive approach is necessary to promote spacing methods among poor couples in Zambia.Keywords: child spacing, contraceptive use, correspondence analysis, couple decision making

  8. Parenting Efficacy and the Early School Adjustment of Poor and Near-Poor Black Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Aurora P.; Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study investigates whether maternal educational attainment, maternal employment status, and family income affect African American children's behavioral and cognitive functioning over time through their impacts on mothers' psychological functioning and parenting efficacy in a sample of 100 poor and near-poor single…

  9. Current stress and poor oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliou, A.; Shankardass, K.; Nisenbaum, R; Quiñonez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Methods Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25–64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and ...

  10. A quest for pro-poor globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Nissanke, Machiko; Thorbecke, Erik

    2006-01-01

    While the opportunities offered by globalization can be large, the question is often raised whether the actual distribution of gains is fair and, in particular, whether the poor benefit proportionately less from globalization and could under some circumstances actually be hurt by it. The paper discusses channels and transmission mechanisms through which the process of globalization affects different aspects and dimensions of poverty in the developing world. It examines how these numerous chan...

  11. A quest for pro-poor globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Nissanke, Machiko; Thorbecke, Erik

    2006-01-01

    While the opportunities offered by globalization can be large, the question is often raised whether the actual distribution of gains is fair and, in particular, whether the poor benefit proportionately less from globalization and could under some circumstances actually be hurt by it. The paper discusses channels and transmission mechanisms through which the process of globalization affects different aspects and dimensions of poverty in the developing world. It examines how these numerous chan...

  12. Looking at women's poverty in poor households

    OpenAIRE

    Baysu, Gülseli

    2002-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. This thesis analyzes the internal dynamics of women’s poverty, and how women experience and cope with poverty in poor households. It mainly deals with two points, one regarding the conceptualization of women’s poverty as content and context, and the other regarding the method of investigation. As for the former, women’s poverty is defined as unequal access to resources (social as well as material), responsibilities (particularly the one...

  13. Poorly differentiated (anaplastic) seminoma of the testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, A G; Vugrin, D; Batata, M; Hajdu, S; Whitmore, W F

    1984-05-01

    Anaplastic seminoma constitutes approximately 17% of total experience with seminoma at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Among 25 previously untreated patients, 11 (44%) were clinical Stage I, and 14 (56%) were clinical Stage II or III. Treatment of these 25 patients with the same regimens employed for classical seminoma yielded an overall 80% 5-year apparent cure rate. Survival rates were poor in eight previously treated patients referred with recurrence.

  14. 湘西贫困农村留守儿童孤独感现状及其影响因素%The status quo and influencing factors of loneliness of left behind children in poor rural areas of western hunan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭芬; 杨青

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To probe into the status quo and influencing factors of rural left behind children’s loneli-ness.Methods:A cluster sampling method was used to collect 985 pupils from fourth to sixth grade in poor ru-ral areas of western Hunan,and the children’s loneliness scale was used as a measurement tool.Results:The de-tection rate of left behind children’s loneliness was 13.8%;the single factor analysis showed that the loneli-ness of boys was stronger than that of girls(P =0.01 9);the score of loneliness under 9 years old children was significantly higher than that of children older than 12 years(P =0.007).The scores of children in the 10 year old group were higher than those in the 1 1 year old group(P =0.040)and the 12 year old above group(P =0.003);the children in fourth grade felt more loneliness than fifth grade(P =0.000)and sixth grade(P =0.000), and the children in fifth grade felt more than sixth grade(P =0.047).The loneliness of those who stayed for more than 5 years was significantly higher than those in other groups(P <0.05);the loneliness was the most prominent among those who had not been visited by parents for more than 4 years(P <0.05).Logistic regres-sion analysis showed that female and high grade were the protective factors of children’s loneliness(P =0.025, P =0.000).Conclusions:Loneliness of left behind children in poor rural areas in western Hunan was high.We should encourage boys to express their emotions,strengthen their parent child communication,and strengthen their peer relationships to improve emotional support of left behind children and reduce the loneliness.%[目的]探讨农村留守儿童孤独感现状及其影响因素。[方法]采取方便整群抽样方法抽取湘西贫困农村985名四年级~六年级小学生,以儿童孤独感量表为测量工具进行调查。[结果]留守儿童孤独感检出率为13.8%;单因素分析显示男童比女童孤独感更强(P =0.019);9岁以下组儿童

  15. Origins of carbon enhanced metal poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Mahavir; Frenk, Carlos; Cooke, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nature of carbon-enhanced metal poor (CEMP) stars in Milky Way (MW) analogues selected from the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. The stellar evolution model in EAGLE includes the physics of enrichment by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, winds from massive stars, and type I and type II supernovae (SNe). In the simulation, star formation in young MW progenitors is bursty due to efficient stellar feedback, which causes poor metal mixing leading to the formation of CEMP stars with extreme abundance patterns. In this scenario, two classes of CEMP stars emerge: those mostly enriched by low-metallicity type II SNe with low Fe yields that drive galactic outflows, and those mostly enriched by AGB stars when a gas-poor progenitor accretes pristine gas. The first class resembles CEMP-no stars with high [C/Fe] and low [C/O], the second class resembles CEMP-s stars overabundant in s-process elements and high values of [C/O]. This scenario explains several trends seen in data: (i) the in...

  16. Diaspora, dispute and diffusion: bringing professional values to the punitive culture of the Poor Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie

    2004-09-01

    From the 1870s to the 1920s Poor Law institutions in England developed from destinations of last resort to significant providers of health-care. As part of this process a general professionalisation of Poor Law work took place. The change was facilitated by wider social, philosophical and political influences in nineteenth century England. The introduction of trained nurses into the Poor Law was part of a diaspora of both ideas and people from voluntary institutions and organisations. Unrecognised in 1834, nurses eventually became the most numerous class of workhouse officers. This was not accomplished without dispute and acrimony. As a group and as individuals nurses were often at the centre of disputes. Utilising a social history framework and drawing on contemporary written sources, including Poor Law and nursing journals, this paper highlights the role played by Poor Law nurses in the diffusion of values and attitudes that helped to transform the workhouse regime from one of punishment to therapy.

  17. Parenting Efficacy and the Early School Adjustment of Poor and Near-Poor Black Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Aurora P; Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Bentler, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study investigated whether maternal educational attainment, maternal employment status, and family income affect African-American children's behavioral and cognitive functioning over time through their impacts on mothers' psychological functioning and parenting efficacy in a sample of 100 poor and near-poor single black mothers and their 3- and 4-year-old focal children. Results indicate that education, working status, and earnings display statistically significant, negative, indirect relations with behavior problems and, with the exception of earnings, statistically significant, positive, indirect relationships with teacher-rated adaptive language skills over time. Findings suggest further that parenting efficacy may mediate the link between poor and near-poor single black mothers' depressive symptoms and their preschoolers' subsequent school adjustment. Implications of these findings for policy and program interventions are discussed.

  18. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXIES: THE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, M. E. [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria–Universidad de La Laguna, CIE Canarias: Tri-Continental Atlantic Campus, Canary Islands (Spain); Almeida, J. Sánchez; Muñoz-Tuñón, C. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nuza, S. E.; Kitaura, F.; Heß, S., E-mail: mfilho@astro.up.pt [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed bibliographical observational data and theoretical predictions, in order to probe the environment in which extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies (XMPs) reside. We have assessed the H i component and its relation to the optical galaxy, the cosmic web type (voids, sheets, filaments and knots), the overdensity parameter and analyzed the nearest galaxy neighbors. The aim is to understand the role of interactions and cosmological accretion flows in the XMP observational properties, particularly the triggering and feeding of the star formation. We find that XMPs behave similarly to Blue Compact Dwarfs; they preferably populate low-density environments in the local universe: ∼60% occupy underdense regions, and ∼75% reside in voids and sheets. This is more extreme than the distribution of irregular galaxies, and in contrast to those regions preferred by elliptical galaxies (knots and filaments). We further find results consistent with previous observations; while the environment does determine the fraction of a certain galaxy type, it does not determine the overall observational properties. With the exception of five documented cases (four sources with companions and one recent merger), XMPs do not generally show signatures of major mergers and interactions; we find only one XMP with a companion galaxy within a distance of 100 kpc, and the H i gas in XMPs is typically well-behaved, demonstrating asymmetries mostly in the outskirts. We conclude that metal-poor accretion flows may be driving the XMP evolution. Such cosmological accretion could explain all the major XMP observational properties: isolation, lack of interaction/merger signatures, asymmetric optical morphology, large amounts of unsettled, metal-poor H i gas, metallicity inhomogeneities, and large specific star formation.

  19. Parenting Efficacy and the Early School Adjustment of Poor and Near-Poor Black Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Aurora P.; Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study investigated whether maternal educational attainment, maternal employment status, and family income affect African-American children’s behavioral and cognitive functioning over time through their impacts on mothers’ psychological functioning and parenting efficacy in a sample of 100 poor and near-poor single black mothers and their 3- and 4-year-old focal children. Results indicate that education, working status, and earnings display statistically significan...

  20. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  1. Making agriculture work for the poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin; Chimhowu, Admos

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarises recent work on poverty, agriculture and land. First, we report on panel data analysis in five countries – Vietnam, Uganda, India, Nicaragua and Ethiopia. We focus on rural exits from poverty, their relation with agricultural growth trends, and the contingent factors...... that supported these exits. We suggest that three ‘pillars’ can help to make agriculture work for the rural poor – infrastructure, education and information. Second, we summarise recent CPRC work on land tenure, focusing on the relationship between tenure and agricultural productivity....

  2. Internally heated convection beneath a poor conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Goluskin, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider convection in an internally heated layer of fluid that is bounded below by a perfect insulator and above by a poor conductor. The poorly conducting boundary is modelled by a fixed heat flux. Using solely analytical methods, we find linear and energy stability thresholds for the static state, and we construct a lower bound on the mean temperature that applies to all flows. The linear stability analysis yields a Rayleigh number above which the static state is linearly unstable ($R_L$), and the energy analysis yields a Rayleigh number below which it is globally stable ($R_E$). For various boundary conditions on the velocity, exact expressions for $R_L$ and $R_E$ are found using long-wavelength asymptotics. Each $R_E$ is strictly smaller than the corresponding $R_L$ but is within 1%. The lower bound on the mean temperature is proven for no-slip velocity boundary conditions using the background method. The bound guarantees that the mean temperature of the fluid, relative to that of the top boundary, gr...

  3. Abundances In Very Metal Poor Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, J G; McWilliam, A; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Wasserburg, G J; Ivans, I I; Dehn, M; Karlsson, T; Melendez, J; Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; William, Andrew Mc; Shectman, Steve; Thompson, Ian; Ivans, Inese; Dehn, Matthias; Karlsson, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detailed composition of 28 extremely metal-poor dwarfs, 22 of which are from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, based on Keck Echelle spectra. Our sample has a median [Fe/H] of -2.7 dex, extends to -3.5 dex, and is somewhat less metal-poor than was expected from [Fe/H](HK,HES) determined from low resolution spectra. Our analysis supports the existence of a sharp decline in the distribution of halo stars with metallicity below [Fe/H] = -3.0 dex. So far no additional turnoff stars with [Fe/H]}<-3.5 have been identified in our follow up efforts. For the best observed elements between Mg and Ni, we find that the abundance ratios appear to have reached a plateau, i.e. [X/Fe] is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H], except for Cr, Mn and Co, which show trends of abundance ratios varying with [Fe/H]. These abundance ratios at low metallicity correspond approximately to the yield expected from Type II SN with a narrow range in mass and explosion parameters; high mass Type II SN progenitors are requir...

  4. Aromatase Inhibitors for IVF Poor Responders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.B. Quintero; L.C Giudice; L.M. Westphal

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether letrozole enhanced follicular recruitment, embryo numbers, and pregnancy rates in poor responders undergoing IVF.Methods We reviewed all IVF cycles between January 2002 and September 2003 using letrozole at Stanford University Medical Center. The entry criteria were the requirement of at least 450 IU/d of injectable gonadotropins in a prior failed cycle,which was used as a control.Results A total of 27 charts were reviewed revealing information on 54 cycles. The number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization embryo quality and embryos transferred yielded no statistical significance, although there appeared to be a trend toward higher numbers of each in the letrozole group. The clinical pregnancy rate was 9/27 (33.3%, P<0. 001)with a viable pregnancy rate of 7/27 (25.9%, P=0.002) in the letrozole cycle.Conclusion Our study is one of the first to evaluate letrozole with in vitro fertilization.Although this study showed no difference in number of oocytes or embryos, 25.9% of these "poor responding" patients achieved a pregnancy after a failed cycle at our center.

  5. Poor Response to Periodontal Treatment May Predict Future Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, A; Lampa, E; Lind, L

    2017-07-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but whether the response to the treatment of periodontal disease affects this association has not been investigated in any large prospective study. Periodontal data obtained at baseline and 1 y after treatment were available in 5,297 individuals with remaining teeth who were treated at a specialized clinic for periodontal disease. Poor response to treatment was defined as having >10% sites with probing pocket depth >4 mm deep and bleeding on probing at ≥20% of the sites 1 y after active treatment. Fatal/nonfatal incidence rate of CVD (composite end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure) was obtained from the Swedish cause-of-death and hospital discharge registers. Poisson regression analysis was performed to analyze future risk of CVD. During a median follow-up of 16.8 y (89,719 person-years at risk), those individuals who did not respond well to treatment (13.8% of the sample) had an increased incidence of CVD ( n = 870) when compared with responders (23.6 vs. 15.3%, P 4 mm, and number of teeth, the incidence rate ratio for CVD among poor responders was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.53; P = 0.007) as opposed to good responders. The incidence rate ratio among poor responders increased to 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.73; P = 0.002) for those with the most remaining teeth. Individuals who did not respond well to periodontal treatment had an increased risk for future CVD, indicating that successful periodontal treatment might influence progression of subclinical CVD.

  6. "Sleep disparity" in the population: poor sleep quality is strongly associated with poverty and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirav P; Grandner, Michael A; Xie, Dawei; Branas, Charles C; Gooneratne, Nalaka

    2010-08-11

    Little is known about the social determinants of sleep attainment. This study examines the relationship of race/ethnicity, socio-economic status (SES) and other factors upon sleep quality. A cross-sectional survey of 9,714 randomly selected subjects was used to explore sleep quality obtained by self-report, in relation to socioeconomic factors including poverty, employment status, and education level. The primary outcome was poor sleep quality. Data were collected by the Philadelphia Health Management Corporation. Significant differences were observed in the outcome for race/ethnicity (African-American and Latino versus White: unadjusted OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.24-2.05 and OR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.37-1.98, respectively) and income (below poverty threshold, unadjusted OR = 2.84, 95%CI 2.41-3.35). In multivariable modeling, health indicators significantly influenced sleep quality most prominently in poor individuals. After adjusting for socioeconomic factors (education, employment) and health indicators, the association of income and poor sleep quality diminished, but still persisted in poor Whites while it was no longer significant in poor African-Americans (adjusted OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.47-2.58 versus OR = 1.16, 95% CI 0.87-1.54, respectively). Post-college education (adjusted OR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31-0.71) protected against poor sleep. A "sleep disparity" exists in the study population: poor sleep quality is strongly associated with poverty and race. Factors such as employment, education and health status, amongst others, significantly mediated this effect only in poor subjects, suggesting a differential vulnerability to these factors in poor relative to non-poor individuals in the context of sleep quality. Consideration of this could help optimize targeted interventions in certain groups and subsequently reduce the adverse societal effects of poor sleep.

  7. Poor EFL Learners’ Metacognitive Reading Strategies: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Farahian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the reading difficulty of some foreign language (FL learners who were unsuccessful at English reading comprehension. It was hoped that a case study would yield a more comprehensive picture of the group of learners’ nature of problem. Through a purposive sampling, twenty five English as Foreign language (EFL poor readers whose progress in reading comprehension courses was a matter of concern were selected. In the light of Li and Munby’s (1996 study, the learners’ awareness of metacognitive strategies and the type of metacognitive strategies employed by the participants were investigated. Interview and questionnaire were the principal sources of data gathering in the study. The analysis of data showed that the majority of the participants lacked or were not aware of the metacognitive awareness necessary for efficient reading. Only a few had a shallow awareness of these types of strategies.  The data also provided evidence that since the participants were too much concerned with the language itself, they ignored or were not aware of metacognitive knowledge and strategies. It was also assumed that the social environment where the participants grow up may have had a great influence on their being detail-oriented. Keyword: Metacognition, Metacognitive reading strategies, EFL learners, Poor EFL readers

  8. Toward ab initio extremely metal poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Jeremy S; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Extremely metal poor stars have been the focus of much recent attention owing to the expectation that their chemical abundances can shed light on the metal and dust yields of the earliest supernovae. We present our most realistic simulation to date of the astrophysical pathway to the first metal enriched stars. We simulate the radiative and supernova hydrodynamic feedback of a 60 Msun Population III star starting from cosmological initial conditions realizing Gaussian density fluctuations. We follow the gravitational hydrodynamics of the supernova remnant at high spatial resolution through its freely-expanding, adiabatic, and radiative phases, until gas, now metal-enriched, has resumed runaway gravitational collapse. Our findings are surprising: while the Population III progenitor exploded with a low energy of 10^51 erg and injected an ample metal mass of 6 Msun, the first cloud to collapse after the supernova explosion is a dense surviving primordial cloud on which the supernova blastwave deposited metals on...

  9. Making agriculture work for the poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin; Chimhowu, Admos

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarises recent work on poverty, agriculture and land. First, we report on panel data analysis in five countries – Vietnam, Uganda, India, Nicaragua and Ethiopia. We focus on rural exits from poverty, their relation with agricultural growth trends, and the contingent factors that sup......This paper summarises recent work on poverty, agriculture and land. First, we report on panel data analysis in five countries – Vietnam, Uganda, India, Nicaragua and Ethiopia. We focus on rural exits from poverty, their relation with agricultural growth trends, and the contingent factors...... that supported these exits. We suggest that three ‘pillars’ can help to make agriculture work for the rural poor – infrastructure, education and information. Second, we summarise recent CPRC work on land tenure, focusing on the relationship between tenure and agricultural productivity....

  10. The rich, the poor, and the law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter H. Reinstorf

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the social and religious dynamics of parables of Jesus in which “rich” and “poor” are juxtaposed. It focuses on Luke 16:19-31 (the parable of the rich man and the poor beggar Lazarus and on Luke 18:9-14 (the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector. The core of the exploration relates to questions concerning “wealth” and “poverty” in a limited-good society such as first-century Palestine. The article aims to expose the legitimisation provided by the Israelite elite to ensure the collection of taxes placed on the peasant population by the Roman Empire.

  11. Pfizer donates drug to South Africa's poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article reports on Pfizer's AIDS drug donation to South Africa. The donated drug, Diflucan, treats cryptococcal meningitis, a lethal brain infection that occurs in one out of 10 HIV patients. Its daily dose in South Africa costs about US$15, far more than poor people can afford. The HIV and AIDS Treatment Action Campaign, an advocacy group, had lobbied New York-based Pfizer for a year to reduce the drug's price. The donation offered hope among activists that other pharmaceutical companies would follow suit and offer HIV- and AIDS-related drugs at a discount or for free. After the announcement of the donation, the group is now lobbying Glaxo Wellcome, maker of Zidovudine. The group is asking to make the drug available for free to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Glaxo Wellcome, however, has no plans of offering Zidovudine for free, although the drug was offered 75% cheaper in developing nations.

  12. The PMS project Poor Man's Supercomputer

    CERN Document Server

    Csikor, Ferenc; Hegedüs, P; Horváth, V K; Katz, S D; Piróth, A

    2001-01-01

    We briefly describe the Poor Man's Supercomputer (PMS) project that is carried out at Eotvos University, Budapest. The goal is to develop a cost effective, scalable, fast parallel computer to perform numerical calculations of physical problems that can be implemented on a lattice with nearest neighbour interactions. To reach this goal we developed the PMS architecture using PC components and designed a special, low cost communication hardware and the driver software for Linux OS. Our first implementation of the PMS includes 32 nodes (PMS1). The performance of the PMS1 was tested by Lattice Gauge Theory simulations. Using SU(3) pure gauge theory or bosonic MSSM on the PMS1 computer we obtained 3$/Mflops price-per-sustained performance ratio. The design of the special hardware and the communication driver are freely available upon request for non-profit organizations.

  13. Discrimination, poor mental health, and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2016-08-01

    Discrimination is a major public health issue. Discrimination is known and well recognized to be associated with poor physical and mental health, as well as creating social divisions and fear that undermines the success of society and economic progress. Policies to eradicate discrimination and prejudice in the public sphere, and in public life, need thoughtful and careful planning and engagement by all public institutions and in the way they conduct their business. This forms the basis of social justice. Employers, politicians, and public servants, as well as other stakeholders, irrespective of their professional status, all have ethical responsibilities to uphold such actions and policies, values, and supporting behaviours, as a core principle of successful societies.

  14. Breastfeeding Practices among Poor Women in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Danny V; Hernández, Bernardo; Gagnier, Marielle C; Johanns, Casey; Desai, Sima S; Haakenstad, Annie; McNellan, Claire R; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Zyznieuski, Nicholas; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-08-01

    Breastfeeding is an effective intervention to reduce pediatric morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of practices and predictors of breastfeeding among the poor in Mesoamerica has not been well described. We estimated the prevalence of ever breastfeeding, early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, and breastfeeding between 6 mo and 2 y of age using household survey data for the poorest quintile of families living in 6 Mesoamerican countries. We also assessed the predictors of breastfeeding behaviors to identify factors amenable to policy interventions. We analyzed data from 12,529 children in Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico (Chiapas State), Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador using baseline survey data from the Salud Mesoamérica 2015 Initiative. We created multivariable Poisson regression models with robust variance estimates to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% CIs for breastfeeding outcomes and to control for sociodemographic and healthcare-related factors. Approximately 97% of women in all countries breastfed their child at least once, and 65.1% (Nicaragua) to 79.0% (Panama) continued to do so between 6 mo and 2 y of age. Breastfeeding in the first hour of life varied by country (P < 0.001), with the highest proportion reported in Panama (89.8%) and the lowest in El Salvador (65.6%). Exclusive breastfeeding also varied by country (P = 0.037), ranging from 44.5% in Panama to 76.8% in Guatemala. For every 20% increase in the proportion of peers who exclusively breastfed, there was an 11% (aRR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.18) increase in the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. Our study revealed significant variation in the prevalence of breastfeeding practices by poor women across countries surveyed by the Salud Mesoamérica 2015 initiative. Future interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding should consider ways to leverage the role of the community in supporting individual women. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. "Managing" the poor: neoliberalism, Medicaid HMOs and the triumph of consumerism among the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskovsky, J

    2000-10-01

    In order to explore the contradictions of neoliberal health policy, this article examines Medicaid managed care in Philadelphia. At the federal and state levels, government is increasingly promoting private-sector market-based strategies over policies formerly associated with the welfare state, arguing that the former are the most effective means of achieving economic growth and guaranteeing social welfare. A prime example of this shift, Medicaid managed care is a policy by which states contract with private-sector health maintenance organizations to provide health coverage to the poor. Drawing on ethnographic and historical data, this paper shows how Pennsylvania's Medicaid managed care program has created access barriers for poor Philadelphians. It also illustrates how ideologies that justify this policy shift serve to mask its detrimental effects on the poor. By contrasting the state's consumerist model with one group's protest efforts, this article calls into question the neoliberal ideology that undergirds health and welfare "reform."

  16. Poor-data and data-poor species stock assessment using a Bayesian hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Cortés, Enric; Andrews, Kate; Guo, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Appropriate inference for stocks or species with low-quality data (poor data) or limited data (data poor) is extremely important. Hierarchical Bayesian methods are especially applicable to small-area, small-sample-size estimation problems because they allow poor-data species to borrow strength from species with good-quality data. We used a hammerhead shark complex as an example to investigate the advantages of using hierarchical Bayesian models in assessing the status of poor-data and data-poor exploited species. The hammerhead shark complex (Sphyrna spp.) along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States is composed of three species: the scalloped hammerhead (S. lewini), the great hammerhead (S. mokarran), and the smooth hammerhead (S. zygaena) sharks. The scalloped hammerhead comprises 70-80% of the catch and has catch and relative abundance data of good quality, whereas great and smooth hammerheads have relative abundance indices that are both limited and of low quality presumably because of low stock density and limited sampling. Four hierarchical Bayesian state-space surplus production models were developed to simulate variability in population growth rates, carrying capacity, and catchability of the species. The results from the hierarchical Bayesian models were considerably more robust than those of the nonhierarchical models. The hierarchical Bayesian approach represents an intermediate strategy between traditional models that assume different population parameters for each species and those that assume all species share identical parameters. Use of the hierarchical Bayesian approach is suggested for future hammerhead shark stock assessments and for modeling fish complexes with species-specific data, because the poor-data species can borrow strength from the species with good data, making the estimation more stable and robust.

  17. Poor mental health status and aggression are associated with poor driving behavior among male traffic offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoli N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nasrin Abdoli,1,2 Vahid Farnia,3 Ali Delavar,4 Alirez Esmaeili,5 Fariborz Dortaj,4 Noorali Farrokhi,4 Majid Karami,6 Jalal Shakeri,3 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,7 Serge Brand7,8 1International University of Imam Reza, Mashhad, 2Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, 3Substance Abuse Prevention Research Center, Psychiatry Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, 4Allameh Tabataba’i University, Tehran, 5Police University, Tehran, 6Baharestan Research Center, Kermanshah Transportation Terminal, Kermanshah, Iran, 7Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Basel, 8Department of Sport and Health Science, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: In Iran, traffic accidents and deaths from traffic accidents are among the highest in the world, and generally driver behavior rather than either technical failures or environmental conditions are responsible for traffic accidents. In the present study, we explored the extent to which aggressive traits, health status, and sociodemographic variables explain driving behavior among Iranian male traffic offenders. Method: A total of 443 male driving offenders (mean age: M =31.40 years, standard deviation =9.56 from Kermanshah (Iran took part in the study. Participants completed a questionnaire booklet covering sociodemographic variables, traits of aggression, health status, and driving behavior. Results: Poor health status, such as symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and social dysfunction, and also higher levels of trait aggression explained poor driving behavior. Multiple regressions indicated that poor health status, but not aggression, independently predicted poor driving behavior. Conclusion: Results suggest that health status concerns are associated with poor driving behavior. Prevention and intervention might therefore focus on drivers reporting poor mental health status

  18. The lithium isotopic ratio in very metal-poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lind, Karin; Asplund, Martin; Collet, Remo; Magic, Zazralt

    2013-01-01

    Un-evolved, very metal-poor stars are the most important tracers of the cosmic abundance of lithium in the early universe. Combining the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis model with Galactic production through cosmic ray spallation, these stars at [Fe/H]<-2 are expected to show an undetectably small 6Li/7Li isotopic signature. Evidence to the contrary may necessitate an additional pre-galactic production source or a revision of the standard model of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We revisit the isotopic analysis of four halo stars, two with claimed 6Li-detections in the literature, to investigate the influence of improved model atmospheres and line formation treatment. For the first time, a combined 3D, NLTE (non-local thermodynamic equilibrium) modelling technique for Li, Na, and Ca lines is utilised to constrain the intrinsic line-broadening and to determine the Li isotopic ratio. We discuss the influence of 3D NLTE effects on line profile shapes and assess the realism of our modelling using the Ca excitation...

  19. Intimate partner victimization, poor relationship quality, and depressive symptoms during young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, Monica A; Manning, Wendy D; Giordano, Peggy C; Copp, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 927), we examined physical victimization, poor quality, and depression among young adults in casually dating, exclusively dating, cohabiting, and marital relationships. In multivariate models, victimization was a risk factor for depression with the inclusion of prior depression, family factors reflecting the intergenerational transmission of violence, sociodemographic background, and relationship characteristics including union status. With the inclusion of indicators of poor relational quality, victimization was not a significant predictor of depression. Arguing and poor communication influenced victimization and depression. Associations between victimization and depression did not differ by gender, nor were the effects of poor quality on depression conditional on gender. Thus, victimization occurs within relationships characterized by a range of negative dynamics. Multifaceted relationship-centered prevention efforts are more useful than focusing only on the use of aggression with a partner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Considering climate in studies of fertility and reproductive health in poor countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Kathryn

    2017-07-01

    Factors related to fertility such as population size, composition and growth rate may influence a community's ability to adapt to climate change, particularly in poor countries. This Perspective describes theories and analytic strategies that can link climate to reproductive health outcomes.

  1. Poor people and poor fields? : integrating legumes for smallholder soil fertility management in Chisepo, central Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamanga, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil infertility undermines the agriculture-based livelihoods in Malawi, where it is blamed for poor crop yields and the creation of cycles of poverty. Although technologies and management strategies have been developed to reverse the decline in soil fertility, they are under-used by smallholder far

  2. Poor people and poor fields? : integrating legumes for smallholder soil fertility management in Chisepo, central Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamanga, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil infertility undermines the agriculture-based livelihoods in Malawi, where it is blamed for poor crop yields and the creation of cycles of poverty. Although technologies and management strategies have been developed to reverse the decline in soil fertility, they are under-used by smallholder far

  3. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  4. Poor, Old “Physical Education”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earle F. Zeigler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of physical activity (and related health education (“poor, old ‘PE’” needs to assert its "will to win" more vigorously then ever before. Scholarly and scientific investigation of the past 60 years since Sputnik was launched in 1957 has identified a wide variety of findings proving that a quality program can provide highly important benefits to the growing child and youth. Societal developments, including other curricular demands, have undoubtedly created uneasiness within the overall field of education. In North America the time and attention devoted to the relatively few involved in external highly competitive sport for the few has been a negative factor. At the same time intramural athletics for the large majority of children and youth has not been available to the extent it should be. There is now doubt as to the field’s ability to achieve high status within education. Therefore, we must pledge ourselves to make still greater efforts to become vibrant and stirring through absolute dedication and commitment in our professional endeavors. Ours is a high calling since we seek to improve the quality of life for all people on earth through the finest type of human motor performance in exercise, sport, and related expressive movement.

  5. Analysis of Social Capital’s Effect on Income of Poor Households:A Case Study in Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu; SUN; Junwen; LIU; Baofeng; CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Looking from the existing research,improving the social capital of the poverty population is an effective way to promote the population quality and the income growth of the poor people. Based on the existing research,with the rural poor households in Sichuan Liangshan as the research object,this article used factor analysis to measure social capital stock,and then analyzed the influence of social capital on the income of the poor peasant households in that region,through the reconstructed production function. The results show that the poor households’ social capital has a significant impact on their income level,and the effect degree varies in different income levels.

  6. [Child development in poor areas of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Adrián Alberto; Gallestey, Jorge Bacallao; Vargas-Machuca, Rocío; Velarde, Roxana Aguilar

    2017-06-08

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate the influence of several socioeconomic factors on the motor and language development of children under 5 from the baseline study conducted within the framework of the Joint Program for Children, Food Security, and Nutrition, implemented by five United Nations agencies across 65 districts in the departments of Loreto, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, and Apurímac, Peru. Dichotomous logistic regression models were used to estimate the likelihood of achievement of motor and language milestones, while polynomial regression models were used to estimate the last milestone achieved and the number of milestones achieved. The study analyzes the influence that maternal education, urban vs. rural housing, and unmet basic needs have on the difference between actual results and expected results for age was analyzed. Children living in rural areas, those whose mothers had low educational attainment, and those from households with unmet basic needs exhibited poorer outcomes in the two areas of development assessed. As the number of risk factors increased, so did the developmental delay. Evaluation of child development and follow-up of families during the child-rearing process should be prioritized by health systems and social programs. The instruments used were sensitive to three criteria for validation.

  7. Making law work for the poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotula, Lorenzo

    2005-11-15

    To many, law – the systems of binding rules governing human relations – seems remote from the reality of daily struggle in poor and marginalised communities around the world. Yet, directly or indirectly, legal rules shape the way we behave in our everyday life, and contribute to organise social and economic relations (from commercial codes to EC 'freedom-of-movement' treaty provisions to welfare state legislation). Since the 1960s, development agencies have supported law reform processes in developing countries. Interest in law reform was recently revived by the recognition of the importance of institutional frameworks for social change ('New Institutional Economics'), and by the attention paid by several development agencies to concepts like good governance and the rule of law. Earlier emphasis on 'legal transplants' and naive assumptions about the way the law operates have given way to a better understanding of the complex nature of processes of legal and socio-economic change. Drawing on three examples, this paper explores the extent to which legal tools can contribute to improve the lives of poorer groups in both developing and developed countries; the conditions under which this is possible; and the constraints that such tools face in the pursuit of this aim. The paper aims to spark reflection and debate on these issues – not to come up with definitive answers. It is likely to be of interest for development lawyers, development practitioners working at a macro-planning level, and researchers. As for development practitioners, the paper sets out the case for taking law seriously as a tool for positive change. As for development lawyers, it argues that designing and implementing legal interventions that deliver that positive change is function not only of sound legal thinking, but also of a solid understanding of power relations and other social, cultural, political and economic factors that affect the way the law operates in

  8. Poor livestock keepers: ecosystem–poverty–health interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Johanna; Wanyoike, Francis; Bett, Bernard; Randolph, Tom; Rich, Karl M.

    2017-01-01

    Humans have never been healthier, wealthier or more numerous. Yet, present success may be at the cost of future prosperity and in some places, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, poverty persists. Livestock keepers, especially pastoralists, are over-represented among the poor. Poverty has been mainly attributed to a lack of access, whether to goods, education or enabling institutions. More recent insights suggest ecosystems may influence poverty and the self-reinforcing mechanisms that constitute poverty traps in more subtle ways. The plausibility of zoonoses as poverty traps is strengthened by landmark studies on disease burden in recent years. While in theory, endemic zoonoses are best controlled in the animal host, in practice, communities are often left to manage disease themselves, with the focus on treatment rather than prevention. We illustrate this with results from a survey on health costs in a pastoral ecosystem. Epidemic zoonoses are more likely to elicit official responses, but these can have unintended consequences that deepen poverty traps. In this context, a systems understanding of disease control can lead to more effective and pro-poor disease management. We illustrate this with an example of how a system dynamics model can help optimize responses to Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Kenya by giving decision makers real-time access to the costs of the delay in vaccinating. In conclusion, a broader, more ecological understanding of poverty and of the appropriate responses to the diseases of poverty can contribute to improved livelihoods for livestock keepers in Africa. This article is part of the themed issue ‘One Health for a changing world: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being’. PMID:28584174

  9. Study on of influencing factors of self-rated health among the elderly from poor rural areas in Guizhou%贵州贫困农村地区老年人健康自评情况及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀红; 黄文湧; 杨敬源; 邓开盛; 任丽; 徐亦然; 蔡毅媛

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解贵州省贫困农村地区老年人健康自评情况及影响因素.方法 采用多阶段分层整群随机抽样方法,在贵州省50个国家级贫困县中抽取6个县3 600户调查对象中农村户籍、年龄大于或等于60岁的常住老年人共1400名作为研究对象.研究内容包括一般人口社会经济学特征,健康自评情况、健康状况、自我保健行为、吸烟、饮酒情况、社会支持等,结果分析采用x2检验及有序变量累积比数模型.结果 在1400名研究对象中,健康自评“好”的老年人565人,占40.4%; “一般”的为635人,占45.4%; “差”的200人,占14.3%;文化程度高、收入高的、有经常性社会交往的老年人健康自评好,年龄越大、患有慢性病、两周患病、ADL、IADL有损害、做过健康体检及生活照料依赖家人/亲友的老年人健康自评差.结论 贵州贫困农村地区老年人文化程度低、经济条件差,健康自评水平低,提高农村老年人的生活水平,加强农村地区医疗卫生保健,缩小城乡差距,应成为改善农村老年人健康状况的关键.%OBJECTIVE To study the status of self-rated health and the affecting factors among the elderly of poor rural areas in Guizhou province.METHODS A multi-stage stratified sampling method was used in 6 poverty counties at national level of Guizhou,3 600 households were selected in the survey of those households,1 400 people aged 60 and over were the research objects.The study contents included general characteristics of the subjects,self-rated health conditions,health status,self-health care and life behavior,social support.x2 test and ordered variable cumulative odds model were used to analyze the data.RESULTS In 1 400 subjects,the old people had good self-rated health were 565,accounting for 40.4%;general self-rated health for 635,accounting for 45.4%; poor health cases were 200,accounting for 14.3%.Moreover,The elderly who with high level

  10. Factors predicting poor prognosis in ischemic colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramón A(n)ón; Marta Maia Boscá; Vicente Sanchiz; Joan Tosca; Pedro Almela; Cirilo Amorós; Adolfo Benages

    2006-01-01

    ). Stenosis was the only endoscopic finding that appeared more frequently in seriously ill patients than in slightly ill patients (66.6% vs 17.3%, P = 0.017).CONCLUSION: The factors that can predict poor prognosis of IC are the absence of hematochezia, tachycardia and peritonism, anemia and hyponatremia and stenosis.

  11. A Problem Solving Framework for Managing Poor Readers in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    Points out that poor readers may exhibit behavioral, cognitive, and emotional problems. Offers a problem-solving framework for intervention in poor readers' nonacademic problems, and describes several possible types of intervention. (ARH)

  12. Standard & Poor's kulupäid ei kummarda / Raivo Raigna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raigna, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    Rahvusvaheline reitinguagentuur Standard & Poor's hoiatas, et ilma rahanduslike reformideta hakkab Eesti rahvastiku vananemine avaldama tugevat survet avaliku sektori rahandusele ja ühtlasi riigi reitingule. Standard & Poor'si nn. mustast stsenaariumist, pakutud lahendusest

  13. Factors associated with high school learners' poor performance: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... learners' poor performance: a spotlight on mathematics and physical science. ... Participants were purposefully selected from seven schools with poor pass rates ... was attributed to the role played by parents in their children's education, and ...

  14. Standard & Poor's kulupäid ei kummarda / Raivo Raigna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raigna, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    Rahvusvaheline reitinguagentuur Standard & Poor's hoiatas, et ilma rahanduslike reformideta hakkab Eesti rahvastiku vananemine avaldama tugevat survet avaliku sektori rahandusele ja ühtlasi riigi reitingule. Standard & Poor'si nn. mustast stsenaariumist, pakutud lahendusest

  15. Truckers' Poor Health: An Accident Waiting to Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163147.html Truckers' Poor Health: An Accident Waiting to Happen? Multiple medical ... pain and diabetes -- that have been linked with poor driving performance. Truck drivers with three or more ...

  16. The Solution to Poor Data Bank Using Rough Sets Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shilin

    2006-01-01

    This article states the poor database which is very common when being used them. So the demanding database must be all-round, effective collection. When the offering database is poor database, it will affect the application of Supporter Deciding. To this question, the author brings out one solution to solve the poor database basing on the Rough Sets Theory. It can scientifically, correctly, effectively supplement the poor database, and can offer greatly help to enforce the application of data and artificial intelligence.

  17. Very Early Language Skills of Fifth-Grade Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura; Mashburn, Andrew; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the theory that future poor comprehenders would show modest but pervasive deficits in both language comprehension and production during early childhood as compared with future poor decoders and typical readers. Using an existing database (NICHD ECCRN), fifth-grade students were identified as having poor comprehension skills…

  18. Very Early Language Skills of Fifth-Grade Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura; Mashburn, Andrew; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the theory that future poor comprehenders would show modest but pervasive deficits in both language comprehension and production during early childhood as compared with future poor decoders and typical readers. Using an existing database (NICHD ECCRN), fifth-grade students were identified as having poor comprehension skills…

  19. Beyond liposomes: Recent advances on lipid based nanostructures for poorly soluble/poorly permeable drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, M C; Carbone, C; Souto, E B

    2017-08-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and hybrid nanoparticles, have gained increasing interest as drug delivery systems because of their potential to load and release drugs from the Biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) of class II (low solubility and high permeability) and of class IV (low solubility and low permeability). Lipid properties (e.g. high solubilizing potential, biocompatibility, biotolerability, biodegradability and distinct route of absorption) contribute for the improvement of the bioavailability of these drugs for a set of administration routes. Their interest continues to grow, as translated by the number of patents being field worldwide. This paper discusses the recent advances on the use of SLN, NLC and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for the loading of lipophilic, poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs, being developed for oral, topical, parenteral and ocular administration, also discussing the industrial applications of these systems. A review of the patents filled between 2014 and 2017, concerning the original inventions of lipid nanocarriers, is also provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Social Assistance As Seen By Buenos Aires Poor And New Poor During Convertibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Aguirre

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available La perception de l’assistance sociale par les pauvres et les nouveaux pauvres de Buenos Aires à l’époque de la « convertibilité ». Cet article traite de l’assistance alimentaire dans la région métropolitaine de Buenos Aires, entre 1991 et 2001, lors de l’application du programme économique « Convertibilité » et de ses effets sur les pauvres et les « nouveaux pauvres ». La Dépense Publique Sociale (en régression et la subvention (négative que reçoivent les familles sous forme d’assistance alimentaire, sont évaluées en comparaison avec, d’une part, leur apport en tant qu’impôt à la consommation et, d’autre part, les concepts recteurs de l’assistance : équité, efficacité, focalisation et participation. L’étude de cas réalisée auprès de 144 familles montre des différences pour chacun des deux groupes quant à leurs perceptions : (i sur l’État (eux-nous ; (ii l’assistance alimentaire (comprise par les pauvres comme un don et par les nouveaux pauvres comme un droit ; (iii les effets de la focalisation (perçue comme exclusion et de la participation (troc de travail contre aliments.This article deals with food assistance provided in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires between 1991 and 2001 during the economic program called “Convertibility” and its effects on the poor and the “new poor”. This study involves the highly regressive social public expenditure and a comparison between the negative subsidy provided as food assistance and contributions made by recipient families in the form of sales taxes, along with a view of the notions that rule assistance: equity, efficiency, focalization, and participation. The results of case studies comprehending 114 families point out varying perceptions of a the State (them/us, b food assistance (which the poor understood as a gift and the new poor as a right, and c the effects of focalization (seen as exclusion and participation (exchange work

  1. Who cares for the poor in Europe? Micro and macro determinants for alleviating poverty in 15 European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Scheepers, Peer; Grotenhuis, Manfred te

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to answer research questions on people’s willingness to donate money to help alleviate poverty. First, what are the individual (or micro) determinants and state-level (macro) determinants of welfare states that influence people’s willingness to donate money to the poor? Second, to what extent do individual determinants for donating money to the poor interact with state-level determinants? To answer these two questions, the 1993 Eurobarometer survey is used, containing r...

  2. Calculation of expected rates of fisheries‐induced evolution in data‐poor situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste

    for modeling the demography of fish based on size-based prescriptions of natural mortality, growth, and fishing is presented. Life history theory is used to reduce the necessary parameter set by utilizing relations between parameters making the framework particularly well suited for data-poor situations where...... analysis of the parameter values is performed, and calculations of how different fishing patterns influences the results are presented....

  3. [Predictors of poor self-rated health in an elderly population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Trinidad; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Sánchez, Alba; Maseda, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Self-Rated Health is part of the comprehensive concept of Quality of Life and is a valid measurement of health status. The main objective of this study was to test the predictive value of some different variables on the poor Self-Rated Health among elders. We performed a cross-sectional study on a sample consisting of 140 participants. age, gender, level of education, environment, cognitive status, physical impairment, diseases, health perception and social support. The influence of the studied variables on the poor Self-Rated Health was performed with a logistic regression analysis and a ROC curve to establish the cut-off values for these variables with the best sensitivity and specificity to predict the poor Self-Rated Health. A poor Self-Rated Health was significantly associated with age, comorbidity, and the perception of poor functional social support, whereas no association was found with gender, environment and educational level. Old age, the number of diagnosed diseases, and functional social support are Self-Rated Health risk factors, while the characteristics and repercussions of the diseases should not be considered. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Intimate Partner Victimization, Poor Relationship Quality, and Depressive Symptoms during Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Copp, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Examining longitudinal data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) (n = 927), we assessed associations between physical victimization by an intimate partner, indicators of poor relationship quality, and depressive symptoms among young adult men and women in casually dating, exclusively dating, cohabiting, and marital relationships. In zero-order models, we found that physical victimization increased depressive symptoms. In multivariate models, victimization was a risk factor for depressive symptoms with the inclusion of prior depressive symptoms, family factors reflecting the intergenerational transmission of violence, sociodemographic background, and relationship characteristics including union status. Yet with the additional inclusion of indicators of poor relational quality, victimization was not a significant predictor of depressive symptoms. Arguing and poor communication influenced victimization and depressive symptoms. The associations between victimization and depressive symptoms did not differ by gender, nor were the effects of poor relationship quality on depressive symptoms conditional on gender. Thus, depressive symptoms are similarly responsive to intimate partner victimization, and for both women and men these associations were not significant with the inclusion of indicators of poor relationship quality. Findings underscored that victimization often occurs within relationship contexts characterized by a range of negative dynamics; thus multifaceted relationship-centered prevention and intervention efforts are likely to be more useful than those focusing only on negative messages about the use of aggression with an intimate partner. PMID:25131276

  5. "Mixed-solvency approach" - Boon for solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a large number of experiments on solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs, the author is of the opinion that hydrotropy is another type of cosolvency and all water-soluble substances whether liquids, solids, or gases may act as solubilizers for poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present investigation, a mixed-solvency approach has been utilized for solubility enhancement of poorly water-soluble drug, salicylic acid (as a model drug. Sixteen blends (having total 40% w/v strength of solubilizers containing various solubilizers among the commonly used hydrotropes (urea and sodium citrate, cosolvents (glycerin, propylene glycol, PEG 300 and PEG 400, and water-soluble solids (PEG 4000 and PEG 6000 were made to study the influence on solubility of salicylic acid. Twelve blends were found to increase the solubility of salicylic acid, synergistically. This approach shall prove a boon in pharmaceutical field to develop various formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs by combining various water-soluble excipients in safe concentrations to give a strong solution (say 25% w/v or so to produce a desirable aqueous solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present investigation, the mixed-solvency approach has been employed to analyze salicylic acid in the bulk drug sample (using six blends precluding the use of organic solvents (a way to green chemistry.

  6. [Poor, propertyless and pregnant: classification of women's status by country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    A new study called "Poor, propertyless, and pregnant" that classified the condition of women in 99 countries found women in Sweden, Finland, and the US to enjoy the best legal and social conditions and the greatest degree of equality with men. The worst discrimination against women occurred in Bangladesh, Mali, Afghanistan, North Yemen, Pakistan, Nigeria, and Saudi Arabia. Women do not have complete equality with men in any country. But over 60% of the world's female population lives in countries where extensive poverty and sexual discrimination have created conditions of deprivation. One of the principal mechanisms that negatively influences the condition of women is early procreation; early and frequent childbirth obliterates women's chances for education and paid employment. Feminization of poverty is becoming universal, largely because a growing proportion of households are headed by women with dependent children. In developed and developing countries alike, working women with families work a double day. Although the struggle for legal and social equality for women takes different forms in different countries, certain basic measures can be applied by all governments. Reforms are needed to give women access to more remunerative jobs, equal property rights, and access to credit. Greater investments are needed in reproductive health and in education and training for women. Governments, employers, and husbands should recognize the social value of childbirth and child rearing. The study is divided into 5 sections, each of which has 4 series of data, so that each country is evaluated on 20 variables. The 5 sections are health, nuptiality and children, education, economic participation, and social equality. In most developed countries women live an average of 7 years longer than men, but in developing countries the difference is only 2 years. Complications of pregnancy and childbirth cause the deaths of over 500,000 women each year and affect another 5 million, mostly

  7. A comparison of the language skills of ELLs and monolinguals who are poor decoders, poor comprehenders, or normal readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Esther; Massey-Garrison, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this article is to examine how oral language abilities relate to reading profiles in English language learners (ELLs) and English as a first language (EL1) learners, and the extent of similarities and differences between ELLs and EL1s in three reading subgroups: normal readers, poor decoders, and poor comprehenders. The study included 100 ELLs and 50 EL1s in Grade 5. The effect of language group (ELL/EL1) and reading group on cognitive and linguistic skills was examined. Except for vocabulary, there was no language group effect on any measure. However, within ELL and EL1 alike, significant differences were found between reading groups: Normal readers outperformed the two other groups on all the oral language measures. Distinct cognitive and linguistic profiles were associated with poor decoders and poor comprehenders, regardless of language group. The ELL and EL1 poor decoders outperformed the poor comprehenders on listening comprehension and inferencing. The poor decoders displayed phonological-based weaknesses, whereas the poor comprehenders displayed a more generalized language processing weakness that is nonphonological in nature. Regardless of language status, students with poor decoding or comprehension problems display difficulties with various aspects of language.

  8. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  9. The War against the Poor. The Underclass and Antipoverty Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Herbert J.

    For much of its history, America has been waging war against many of its poor people. Chapters 1 through 4 of this book discuss the labeling of the poor as morally inferior, which has increased in the last 15 years, blames them falsely for the ills of the American society and economy, reinforces their mistreatment, increases their misery, and…

  10. Is Globalization Good for the Poor? A Reply to Pogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderholm, Jørn; Lydholm, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In an article from 2011, Thomas Pogge asks if globalization is good for the world’s poor. Pogge answers in the negative. As important evidence for the view that the globalization period has not been good for the world’s poor, Pogge cites a dataset provided by Branko Milanović (CUNY). In this arti...

  11. Energy sector reform, energy transitions and the poor in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Gisela [Energy Research Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2008-08-15

    There is little systematic information about the impact of energy sector reform on all sources and methods of energy utilised or potentially utilised by the poor. It is not sufficiently known what fuels the poor use, if a larger range of fuels becomes available and affordable and if barriers to access and consumption are reduced. A detailed assessment is presented for four countries, three in Africa (Botswana, Ghana and Senegal) and for comparison one in Latin America (Honduras), of steps taken to reform the energy sector and their effect on various groups of poor households. The paper analyses the pattern of energy supply to, and use by, poor households and explores the link - or its absence - to energy policy. We investigate what works for the poor and which type of reforms and implementation are effective and lead to a transition to more efficient and clean fuels from which the poor benefit. Energy sector reforms when adjusted to the specific conditions of the poor have a positive impact on access and use of clean, safe and efficient fuels. The poor are using gradually less wood as cooking fuel. Gas and kerosene are made more widely available through market liberalisation and subsidy in the particular case of Senegal. Electricity access and use is generally promoted or subsidised through changes in payment conditions and lifeline tariffs. (author)

  12. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  13. Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child…

  14. A influência da desnutrição na utilização de ventilação mecânica em crianças admitidas em UTI pediátrica The influence of poor nutrition on the necessity of mechanical ventilation among children admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Martins Mota

    2002-04-01

    -nificativamente pela presença de desnutrição.Conclusões: em nosso estudo, tivemos oportunidade de documentar que a presença de desnutrição em crianças menores de 4 anos admitidas em UTI pediátrica representa um fator decisivo na sua evolução, aumentando significativamente a necessidade de ventilação mecânica, o tempo de ventilação e o tempo de permanência em UTI pediátrica.Objective: to determine the relation between children's nutritional status when they are admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, the necessity and length of mechanical ventilation and the mortality rate. Methods: a cohort study was conducted between July 1st, 1995 and June 30th, 1996. This study involved all children (28 days old to 48 months old admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit of Hospital São Lucas, who stayed there longer than 8 hours. Exclusion criteria were complex cardiac disease, admission to the pediatric intensive care unit for elective procedure (regardless of pediatric intensive care unit admission criteria or elective mechanical ventilation (cardiac, thoracic or other postoperative period. The staff responsible for the daily data collection were not involved with patient care or assistance decisions. On the day of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, patients were evaluated regarding their nutritional status through the z score and the severity of the disease using the Pediatric Risk Mortality score. Demographic data, necessity and length of mechanical ventilation as well as main diagnosis and evolution of each patient were evaluated every day.Results: malnourishment increased significantly the need for mechanical ventilation, especially when associated with (a age under one year old (RR= 2.4; 1.4-3.8; (b children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with low Pediatric Risk Mortality score (less than 10 (RR=2.5; 1.3-4.7; (c presence of respiratory disease (RR=2.1; 1.3-4.7. Otherwise, malnourishment did not show any influence on the mortality rate

  15. Early Disparities in Mathematics Gains among Poor and Non-Poor Children: Examining the Role of Behavioral Engagement in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to investigate the relationship between poverty status, mathematics achievement gains, and behavioral engagement in learning over kindergarten. Data included information on 11,680 poor, low-income, and non-poor kindergartners from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). Results…

  16. Is a governmental micro-credit program for the poor really pro-poor? Evidence from Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Viet Cuong, N.

    2008-01-01

    It is argued that without collateral the poor often face binding borrowing constraints in the formal credit market. This justifies a micro-credit program, which is operated by the Vietnam Bank for Social Policies to provide the poor with preferential credit. The present paper examines poverty target

  17. Medicaid expansions and the insurance coverage of poor teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    This article employs a comparison group research design to examine the effects of the Medicaid expansions of the late 1990s on the insurance coverage of poor teenagers. Results suggest that the expansions were associated with a decrease in the likelihood of poor teens experiencing uninsured spells over the course of a calendar year, as measured by spending any part of the prior year uninsured and spending over half of the prior year uninsured. While the expansions were successful in increasing coverage among poor adolescents, they fell far short of facilitating near-universal coverage for this population.

  18. Teenagers Poor Readers: Evaluation of Basic Cognitive Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa del Carmen Flores Macías

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the cognitive processes associated with reading difficulties of teenage poor readers. Several studies suggest that this population presents a poor comprehension, despite reading the words properly and have good phonological skills (which distinguishes them from a population with dyslexia. With a comparative cross-sectional design the Sicole-R multimedia battery, which assesses basic cognitive processes related to reading, was applied to participants. Results indicate that poor reader students exhibit a lower performance than normal readers in phonological awareness, orthographic processing and processing syntax, although only the latter comparison was statistically significant.

  19. Outcome of poor response Paediatric AML using early SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Heilmann, Carsten; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    treated with SCT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Treatment was given according to the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol. All patients received AIET (Cytarabine, Idarubicin, Etoposide, Thioguanine) and AM (Cytarabine, Mitoxantrone) as induction. We included poor response defined as > 15% blasts on day 15 after AIET (n = 17......) or > 5% blasts after AM (n = 14, refractory disease). Poor response patients received intensively timed induction and proceeded to SCT when a donor was available. RESULTS: Thirty-one of 267 evaluable patients (12%) had a poor response. SCT was performed in 25; using matched unrelated donors in 13...

  20. Factors contributing to poor glycaemic control in diabetic patients at Mopani District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Shiluban

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is not only a major burden in the developed world, it is also an increasing health problem in less developed countries. Although health education could be a tool to achieve better glycaemic control, it is important to understand that health education should be adjusted to patients’ literacy, cultural environment and economic status. Among other factors, lack of money has an influence on the outcome of diabetes mellitus. Thus the purpose of the study is to identify factors contributing to poor glycaemia control in diabetic patients. Data was collected using self-report questionnaire on a convenient sample of 32 diabetic patients and unstructured, open-ended interviews on eight patients’ inorder to allow them freedom of expressing themselves with regard to factors that contribute to poor glycaemic control on diabetic patients. Data was then analysed using a computer program called Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The socioeconomic factors appeared to have significant influence on glycaemic control among participants, for instance 75% of the total subjects (32 indicated that they experienced problems of accessing health care services due to lack of money. Ignorance related to where to seek support system such as educational programme, and nutrition counselling were factors that were identified to contribute to diabetic patients’ poor glycaemia control.Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the Provincial Department of Health and the managers of the institutions where the study was conducted. Recommendations for dealing with the identified factors have been formulated.

  1. Factors contributing to poor glycaemic control in diabetic patients at Mopani District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Shilubane,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is not only a major burden in the developed world, it is also an increasing health problem in less developed countries. Although health education could be a tool to achieve better glycaemic control, it is important to understand that health education should be adjusted to patients’ literacy, cultural environment and economic status. Among other factors, lack of money has an influence on the outcome of diabetes mellitus. Thus the purpose of the study is to identify factors contributing to poor glycaemia control in diabetic patients. Data was collected using self-report questionnaire on a convenient sample of 32 diabetic patients and unstructured, open-ended interviews on eight patients’ inorder to allow them freedom of expressing themselves with regard to factors that contribute to poor glycaemic control on diabetic patients. Data was then analysed using a computer program called Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The socioeconomic factors appeared to have significant influence on glycaemic control among participants, for instance 75% of the total subjects (32 indicated that they experienced problems of accessing health care services due to lack of money. Ignorance related to where to seek support system such as educational programme, and nutrition counselling were factors that were identified to contribute to diabetic patients’ poor glycaemia control. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the Provincial Department of Health and the managers of the institutions where the study was conducted. Recommendations for dealing with the identified factors have been formulated.

  2. Circulating carnosine dipeptidase 1 associates with weight loss and poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia (CC is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia.Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32 or without (n = 27 cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer.Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1 was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008. In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results.In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC.

  3. Reconstructive maxillofacial surgery in a resource poor setting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reconstructive maxillofacial surgery in a resource poor setting: Challenges encountered ... Background: Facial reconstruction in a paediatric patient requires peculiar ... age and gender considerations, depth of expertise and extent of surgery ...

  4. PRO-POOR TOURISM POTENTIALS OF GHANA The Contribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apusigah

    hospitality industry has been neglected by development practitioners and the ' .... According to Mitchel and Ashley, tourism can affect poor people in several different ... The earnings of non-management staff in hotels are a major element of the ...

  5. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  6. Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162068.html Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk Testing looks for decreased olfactory sense, combined ... of smell may help predict their risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. The researchers included ...

  7. Cost Analysis of Poor Quality Using a Software Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Fabianová

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The issues of quality, cost of poor quality and factors affecting quality are crucial to maintaining a competitiveness regarding to business activities. Use of software applications and computer simulation enables more effective quality management. Simulation tools offer incorporating the variability of more variables in experiments and evaluating their common impact on the final output. The article presents a case study focused on the possibility of using computer simulation Monte Carlo in the field of quality management. Two approaches for determining the cost of poor quality are introduced here. One from retrospective scope of view, where the cost of poor quality and production process are calculated based on historical data. The second approach uses the probabilistic characteristics of the input variables by means of simulation, and reflects as a perspective view of the costs of poor quality. Simulation output in the form of a tornado and sensitivity charts complement the risk analysis.

  8. Poor weather conditions and flight operations: Implications for air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor weather conditions and flight operations: Implications for air transport hazard ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ... fog, dust haze and line squall that affect flight operation such as flight delays, diversion and ...

  9. Hypertension And Poor Semen Quality: A New Compelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of hypertension is usually individualized for optimal results. ... favourable effects on the side not necessarily related to blood pressure lowering effect. ... as preferred first line drugs in hypertension for men with poor quality semen.

  10. Poor Sleep in Preschool Years Could Mean Behavior Troubles Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164075.html Poor Sleep in Preschool Years Could Mean Behavior Troubles Later ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers who get too little sleep may be more likely to have trouble paying ...

  11. Inference in {open_quotes}poor{close_quotes} languages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules ({open_quote}poor{close_quote} languages) are considered. The problem of existence of a finite, complete, and consistent inference rule system for a {open_quotes}poor{close_quotes} language is stated independently of the language or the rule syntax. Several properties of the problem are proved. An application of the results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  12. Chinese Poor Reduced to 26.1 Million

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The year 2004 saw the greatest reduction in the number of the poor over the past five years and the number of the poor decreased to 26.1 million,according to the latest statistics released by the Office of Poverty Alleviation under the State Council. In 2004, the number of people living in rural areas with an average per capita income of less than RMB668(dire poverty) was reduced by 2.9 million,

  13. US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions=Poor Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY NATIONAL WAR COLLEGE STRATEGIC LOGIC ESSAY US INTERVENTION IN FAILED STATES: BAD ASSUMPTIONS = POOR ...2002 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Intervention in Failed States: Bad Assumptions= Poor ...country remains in the grip of poverty , natural disasters, and stagnation. Rwanda Rwanda, another small African country, is populated principally

  14. Polarization of the Poor: Multivariate Relative Poverty Measurement Sans Frontiers

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon Anderson

    2009-01-01

    A major impediment to poverty evaluation in multivariate environments are the difficulties associated with formulating poverty frontiers. This paper proposes a new multivariate polarization measure which, in appropriate circumstances, works as a multivariate poverty measure which does not require computation of a poverty frontier. As a poverty measure it has the intuitive appeal of reflecting the degree to which societies poor and non-poor are polarized. (The measure would also have considera...

  15. The influence of Enteral Nutrition in postoperative patients with poor liver function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Gang Hu; Qi-Chang Zheng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety, rationality and the practicality of enteral nutritional (EN) support in the postoperative patients with damaged liver function and the protective effect of EN on the gut barrier.METHODS: 135 patients with liver function of Child B or C grade were randomly allocated to enteral nutrition group (EN, 65 cases), total parenteral nutrition group (TPN, 40cases) and control group (CON, 30 cases). Nutritional parameters, hepatic and kidney function indexes were measured at the day before operation, 5th and 10th day after the operation respectively. Comparison was made to evaluate the efficacy of different nutritional support. Urinary concentrations of lactulose(L) and mannitol(M) were measured by pulsed electrochemical detection(HPLC-PED)and the L/M ratio calculated to evaluate their effectiveness on protection of gut barrier.RESULTS: No significant damages in hepatic and kidney function were observed in both EN and TPN groups between pre- and postoperatively. EN group was the earliest one reaching the positive nitrogen balance after operation and with the lowest loss of body weight and there was no change in L/M ratio after the operation (0.026±0.004) at the day 1before operation, 0.030±0.004 at the day 5 postoperative and 0.027±0.005 at the day 10 postoperative), but the change in TPN group was significant at the day 5postoperative (0.027±0.003 vs 0.038±0.009,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: EN is a rational and effective method in patients with hepatic dysfunction after operation and has significant protection effect on the gut barrier.

  16. School and Parental Influences on Sociopolitical Development among Poor Adolescents of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.; Hsieh, Chueh-an; Pan, Tianshu

    2009-01-01

    Sociopolitical development represents a motivation to reduce sociopolitical inequity, a healthy sense of the self, and perceived agency in the context of structural oppression. Sociopolitical development has been associated with progress in career development, school engagement, and healthier sexual behavior among oppressed and marginalized…

  17. Malaria control in Malawi: are the poor being served?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathanga Don P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Africa, national governments and international organizations are focusing on rapidly "scaling up" malaria control interventions to at least 60 percent of vulnerable populations. The potential health and economic benefits of "scaling up" will depend on the equitable access to malaria control measures by the poor. This paper analyses the present inequalities in access to malaria interventions in Malawi. Methods Equity in access to malaria control measures was assessed using the Malawi Demographic Health Survey (DHS 2000 and the 2004 national survey on malaria control. Utilisation of malaria control methods was compared across the wealth quintiles, to determine whether the poor were being reached with malaria control measures. Results Overall ITN coverage increased from 5% in 2000 to 35% in 2004. However, there was a disproportionate concentration of ITNs amongst the least poor compared to the poorest group. Effective treatment of fever remains unacceptably low with only 17% of the under-five children being promptly treated with an effective antimalarial drug. And only 29 percent of pregnant women received the recommended dose of at least two doses during the pregnancy. No income related inequalities were associated with prompt treatment and IPT use. Conclusion The present distribution strategies for ITNs are not addressing the needs of the vulnerable groups, especially the poor. Increasing access to ITNs by the poor will require innovative distribution models which deliberately target the poorest of the poor.

  18. The poor in the Psalms: A variety of views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eben H. Scheffler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the psalms are religious, poetic, existential expressions of life, entailing both extreme joy and intense suffering, it stands to reason that poverty (in its literal sense and otherwise would receive considerable attention. Focussing on material poverty and challenging the idea of a homogeneous view on poverty (e.g. Armenfr�mmigkeit in the psalms, the diversity of views on poverty in the psalms is explored. Attention is paid to YHWH or God caring for the poor, the (Israelite king as champion for the poor, the gods (heavenly assembly (noncaring for the poor, caring for the poor in Zion theology, God as crusher of the poor and mutual human charity. The article concludes with some remarks regarding the possible present-day appropriation of the views in the psalms.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The article challenges the traditional notion on Armenfr�mmigkeit in the psalms. This is important for contexts where identifying with the poor are fed by selfish interest and actually feeds exploitation. It also propounds that various views on poverty exist, demanding creative and contextual applicable measures to combat poverty in the present-day world.

  19. Who cares for the poor in Europe? Micro and macro determinants for alleviating poverty in 15 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.L.H.; Grotenhuis, H.F. te

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to answer research questions on people’s willingness to donate money to help alleviate poverty. First, what are the individual (or micro) determinants and state-level (macro) determinants of welfare states that influence people’s willingness to donate money to the poor?

  20. Who Cares for the Poor in Europe? Micro and Macro Determinants for Alleviating Poverty in 15 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Peer; Grotenhuis, Manfred te

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to answer research questions on people’s willingness to donate money to help alleviate poverty. First, what are the individual (or micro) determinants and state-level (macro) determinants of welfare states that influence people’s willingness to donate money to the poor?

  1. Who Cares for the Poor in Europe? Micro and Macro Determinants for Alleviating Poverty in 15 European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Peer; Grotenhuis, Manfred te

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to answer research questions on people’s willingness to donate money to help alleviate poverty. First, what are the individual (or micro) determinants and state-level (macro) determinants of welfare states that influence people’s willingness to donate money to the poor? Second

  2. Poor Reliability and Poor Adherence to Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Are Common in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and May Be Associated With Poor Pregnancy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Emmanuel; Baz, Baz; Gary, Françoise; Pharisien, Isabelle; Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Sandre-Banon, Dorian; Jaber, Yahya; Cussac-Pillegand, Camille; Banu, Isabela; Carbillon, Lionel; Valensi, Paul

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the compliance with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and the reliability of diabetes logbooks in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), as well as the associated determinants and outcomes. We prospectively selected French-speaking women with newly diagnosed GDM who had been referred to our diabetes management program and understood SMBG principles. At the next follow-up visit, we collected SMBG results from glucose meters and logbooks. We analyzed pregnancy outcomes. Data were analyzed over 13 ± 3 days in 91 women. Only 61.5% had performed ≥80% of the required tests. Poor compliance was associated with a family history of diabetes, social deprivation, and non-European origin. The average time between pre- and postprandial tests was 141 ± 20 min, with 46.5% of women performing ≥80% of postprandial measurements 100-140 min after meals. Inadequate timing was associated with ethnicity and higher HbA1c at baseline. A total of 23.1% of women had <90% matched values in diary and meter memory, and a poor concordance was associated with a family history of diabetes. Poor adherence was associated with more preeclampsia (12.2 vs. 1.9%, P = 0.049), and inadequate postprandial test timing with a higher HbA1c at delivery (5.3 ± 0.4 vs. 5.0 ± 0.3% [34 ± 2 vs. 31 ± 2 mmol/mol], P < 0.01), despite more frequent insulin therapy. Although women with GDM are considered to be highly motivated, SMBG adherence and reliability are of concern and may be associated with poor gestational prognosis, suggesting that caregivers should systematically check the glucose meter memory to improve GDM management. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Choice of valve type and poor ventricular catheter placement: Modifiable factors associated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Kealeboga Josephine; Cherry, Catherine Louise; Wan, Kai Rui; Toy, Jennifer Ah; Wolfe, Rory; Danks, Robert Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion is a common neurosurgical procedure, essentially unchanged in recent years, with high revision rates. We aimed to identify potentially modifiable associations with shunt failure. One hundred and forty patients who underwent insertion of a VP shunt from 2005-2009 were followed for 5-9years. Age at shunt insertion ranged from 0 to 91years (median 44, 26% hydrocephalus were congenital (26%), tumour-related (25%), post-haemorrhagic (24%) or normal pressure hydrocephalus (19%). Fifty-eight (42%) patients required ⩾1 shunt revision. Of these, 50 (88%) were for proximal catheter blockage. The median time to first revision was 108days. Early post-operative CT scans were available in 105 patients. Using a formal grading system, catheter placement was considered excellent in 49 (47%) but poor (extraventricular) in 13 (12%). On univariate analysis, younger age, poor ventricular catheter placement and use of a non-programmable valve were associated with shunt failure. On logistic regression modelling, the independent associations with VP shunt failure were poor catheter placement (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-18.9, p=0.02) and use of a non-programmable valve (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-1.0, p=0.04). In conclusion, poor catheter placement (revision rate 77%) was found to be the strongest predictor of shunt failure, with no difference in revisions between excellent (43%) and moderate (43%) catheter placement. Avoiding poor placement in those with mild or moderate ventriculomegaly may best reduce VP shunt failures. There may also be an influence of valve choice on VP shunt survival.

  4. Mapping onto Eq-5 D for patients in poor health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazier John E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing amount of studies report mapping algorithms which predict EQ-5 D utility values using disease specific non-preference-based measures. Yet many mapping algorithms have been found to systematically overpredict EQ-5 D utility values for patients in poor health. Currently there are no guidelines on how to deal with this problem. This paper is concerned with the question of why overestimation of EQ-5 D utility values occurs for patients in poor health, and explores possible solutions. Method Three existing datasets are used to estimate mapping algorithms and assess existing mapping algorithms from the literature mapping the cancer-specific EORTC-QLQ C-30 and the arthritis-specific Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ onto the EQ-5 D. Separate mapping algorithms are estimated for poor health states. Poor health states are defined using a cut-off point for QLQ-C30 and HAQ, which is determined using association with EQ-5 D values. Results All mapping algorithms suffer from overprediction of utility values for patients in poor health. The large decrement of reporting 'extreme problems' in the EQ-5 D tariff, few observations with the most severe level in any EQ-5 D dimension and many observations at the least severe level in any EQ-5 D dimension led to a bimodal distribution of EQ-5 D index values, which is related to the overprediction of utility values for patients in poor health. Separate algorithms are here proposed to predict utility values for patients in poor health, where these are selected using cut-off points for HAQ-DI (> 2.0 and QLQ C-30 ( Conclusion Mapping algorithms overpredict utility values for patients in poor health but are used in cost-effectiveness analyses nonetheless. Guidelines can be developed on when the use of a mapping algorithms is inappropriate, for instance through the identification of cut-off points. Cut-off points on a disease specific questionnaire can be identified through association

  5. The transition from good to poor health: an econometric study of the older population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Neil J; Denton, Frank T; Robb, A Leslie; Spencer, Byron G

    2004-09-01

    This is a study of the influence of socioeconomic factors on the state of health of older Canadians. Three years of panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics are used to model the transition probabilities between good and poor health. Care is taken to avoid the problem of endogeneity of income in modelling its effects, and to adjust reported income to free it from its strong association with age at the time of the survey. Of particular note are the significant effects found for income, in spite of universal public health care coverage. Significant effects are found also for age, education, and other variables.

  6. Channels for change: private water and the urban poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Matthew; Matthews, Petter; Ryan-Collins, Lily [Engineers Against Poverty (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    For the rapidly urbanising developing world, safe and affordable water is key to health and livelihoods, as well as meeting the Millennium Development Goals. But providing it demands innovative models. Where the context allows and the approach is appropriate, private sector involvement can generate win-win outcomes. Poor people can gain access to high-quality, affordable services, and companies can gain access to new and profitable business opportunities. Two examples of innovative 'private' water suppliers are the Manila Water Company's Water for the Poor Communities (TPSB) programme, and the Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) partnership. Both have a multisector approach to service expansion and provision, including partnerships with local authorities; strong community involvement in selecting, designing and operating options; appropriate service levels to reduce costs; and a flexible range of services. Many elements of these models are also replicable.

  7. Near-Field Cosmology with Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The oldest, most metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo and satellite dwarf galaxies present an opportunity to explore the chemical and physical conditions of the earliest star forming environments in the Universe. We review the fields of stellar archaeology and dwarf galaxy archaeology by examining the chemical abundance measurements of various elements in extremely metal-poor stars. Focus on the carbon-rich and carbon-normal halo star populations illustrates how these provide insight into the Population III star progenitors responsible for the first metal enrichment events. We extend the discussion to near-field cosmology, which is concerned with the formation of the first stars and galaxies and how metal-poor stars can be used to constrain these processes. Complementary abundance measurements in high-redshift gas clouds further help to establish the early chemical evolution of the Universe. The data appear consistent with the existence of two distinct channels of star formation at the earliest times.

  8. Expanding Access to Pro-Poor Energy Services in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleri, Ewah Otu; Ugwu, Okechukwu; Onuvae, Precious

    2012-10-15

    Nigeria experiences a remarkable paradox -- the abundance of energy resources and widespread energy poverty. Only about 40% of the population has access to the country’s grid electricity. About 72% of the population depends on traditional fuelwood for cooking. Despite this, government financing of energy services that benefits majority of Nigeria’s population has been grossly inadequate. Private sector investments and donor support have not fared better. This paper examines the current level of energy poverty in Nigeria. It analyses the level of government, private sector and donor funding for energy services that benefit the poor. It further reviews international best practices in expanding access for pro poor energy services. The paper finds a significant decline in political interest for expanding electricity services to rural areas. Even though ambitious policy reforms have commenced, agreed programmes are not implemented effectively. Not only are investments in rural electrification in decline, there is no history of annual budgeting for cooking energy programmes. The paper recommends a number of action points for expanding access to energy services that benefit the poor. These include the development and launching of a new national rural electrification strategy; establishment of a national cooking energy programme; and the development of clear policy incentives to support private sector investment in energy services for the poor. It calls on the Nigerian Central Bank of Nigeria to set aside 10% of the existing power intervention fund for pro poor energy financing; and the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission to establish a clear framework for the utilization of the Consumer Assistance Fund. Other recommendations include the use of a proportion of the Ecological Fund to finance cooking energy; establishment of a donor’s platform on pro poor energy; and the mobilization of civil society in providing community-level energy services.

  9. Elucidating poor decision-making in a rat gambling task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Rivalan

    Full Text Available Although poor decision-making is a hallmark of psychiatric conditions such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, pathological gambling or substance abuse, a fraction of healthy individuals exhibit similar poor decision-making performances in everyday life and specific laboratory tasks such as the Iowa Gambling Task. These particular individuals may provide information on risk factors or common endophenotypes of these mental disorders. In a rodent version of the Iowa gambling task--the Rat Gambling Task (RGT, we identified a population of poor decision makers, and assessed how these rats scored for several behavioral traits relevant to executive disorders: risk taking, reward seeking, behavioral inflexibility, and several aspects of impulsivity. First, we found that poor decision-making could not be well predicted by single behavioral and cognitive characteristics when considered separately. By contrast, a combination of independent traits in the same individual, namely risk taking, reward seeking, behavioral inflexibility, as well as motor impulsivity, was highly predictive of poor decision-making. Second, using a reinforcement-learning model of the RGT, we confirmed that only the combination of extreme scores on these traits could induce maladaptive decision-making. Third, the model suggested that a combination of these behavioral traits results in an inaccurate representation of rewards and penalties and inefficient learning of the environment. Poor decision-making appears as a consequence of the over-valuation of high-reward-high-risk options in the task. Such a specific psychological profile could greatly impair clinically healthy individuals in decision-making tasks and may predispose to mental disorders with similar symptoms.

  10. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A.; Tobias, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction. PMID:25197099

  11. Predictors of Poor Outcome in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Luis E; Espinoza, Luis R

    2016-12-01

    It is important to recognize factors that might predict poor outcome and prognosis in patients with AAV. The predictors reported in the literature encompass genetic, histopathological, and clinical ones. Genetic studies (genetic predictors) have found genes that are associated with prediction of poor response to treatment, deterioration of renal function, and risk of mortality. Histopathological studies (histopathological predictors) have shown that sclerotic renal lesions are associated with increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and death. Lastly, scores (clinical predictors) obtained with tool as FFS, Maldini risk score, VDI, and emerging new biomarkers could potentially be helpful in assessment of prognosis in the future.

  12. Sociodemographic, health and lifestyle predictors of poor diets

    OpenAIRE

    Harrington, Janas M.; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Layte, Richard; Lutomski, Jennifer E; Molcho, Michal; Perry, Ivan J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Poor-quality diet, regarded as an important contributor to health inequalities, is linked to adverse health outcomes. We investigated sociodemographic and lifestyle predictors of poor-quality diet in a population sample.Design A cross-sectional analysis of the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (SLÁN). Diet was assessed using an FFQ (n 9223, response rate = 89 %), from which a dietary score (the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) score) was constructed.Setting ...

  13. On Poor Separation in Magnetically Driven Shock Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.

    1973-01-01

    Observations made at steady-state running conditions in a magnetically driven shock tube, with parallel-plate electrodes, showed that for a given discharge voltage, sufficient separation between the shock and the current-sheet occurred only at relatively high discharge pressures. As a comparison......, poor separations were also noted in conventional diaphragm-type shock tubes running at low initial pressures. It is demonstrated that the observed poor separation can be explained by a mass leakage, instead of through the wall boundary layer, but through the current-sheet itself....

  14. Turning a Poor Ion Channel into a Good Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astumian, Dean

    2003-05-01

    We consider a membrane protein that can exist in two configurations, either one of which acts as a poor ion channel, allowing ions to slowly leak across the membrane from high to low elctrochemical potential. We show that random external fluctuations can provide the energy to turn this poor channel into a good pump that drives ion transport from low to high electrochemical potential. We discuss this result in terms of a gambling analogy, and point to possible implications for fields as far ranging as population biology, economics, and actuarial science.

  15. Motivação para aprender música em espaços escolares e não-escolares/Motivation to learn music in school and non-school contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cereser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta o resultado da amostra brasileira da pesquisa internacional intitulada “Os significados da música para crianças e adolescentes em atividades musicais escolares e não-escolares”. Essa pesquisa teve o objetivo de investigar a importância e o significado atribuído pelos alunos às atividades musicais desenvolvidas em ambientes escolares e não-escolares. O método consistiu em um survey envolvendo 21.975 alunos de oito países (Brasil, China, Coreia do Sul, Estados Unidos, Finlândia, Hong Kong, Israel e México, cujo questionário foi concebido sob a ótica do modelo de expectativa e valor de Eccles e Wigfield. No Brasil, fizeram parte da amostra 1848 alunos da 6a série do ensino fundamental à 3a série do ensino médio, de 11 cidades do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. O instrumento de coleta de dados foi um questionário sobre o perfil dos alunos e suas opiniões quanto ao interesse, importância, dificuldade, utilidade, senso de competência e senso de confiança em relação às disciplinas Artes, Ciências, Educação Física, Matemática, Português e Música. Os dados foram tratados por análise de variância (ANOVA. Os resultados do Brasil apontam que o grau de interesse, importância e utilidade da Música aumenta à medida que os estudantes brasileiros pertencem a séries mais avançadas, em sentido oposto ao observado na maioria dos outros países. This article presents the results of the Brazilian study within the international research entitled “Meanings of music for students in school-based and non-school musical activities”. This research aimed at investigating the importance and the meaning assigned by students to musical activities developed in school and non-school contexts. The method consisted of a survey involving 21,975 students from eight countries (Brazil, China, Finland, Hong Kong, Israel, Mexico, South Korea and United States of America, which questionnaire was grounded on the Eccles and

  16. Aggregate packing characteristics of good and poor performing asphalt mixes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aggregate structure of the compacted mix is a determining factor for the performance of Hot-Mix Asphalt (HMA). In this paper, the grading characteristics of good and poor performing HMA mixes are explored using the concepts of the Bailey method...

  17. Poor Reading Culture: A Barrier to Students' Patronage of Libraries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    causes of poor reading culture of students in secondary schools. It was also revealed ... education received then. Patronage of school ... poverty as well as providing one with the liberty for all round development. For effective and ... According to Nzeako (1982), the ability to read is a skill that a person can develop or acquire ...

  18. Health, Education and Economic Crisis : Protecting the Poor in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrow, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    When an economic crisis hits, a primary policy concern in developing countries is how social services can be protected and, in particular, how access to health and education for the poor can be maintained. Using the Indonesian Social Safety Net (SSN) as case study, this dissertation investigates

  19. Supernova Nucleosynthesis and Extremely Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Maeda, Keiichi; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-01-01

    We investigate hydrodynamical and nucleosynthetic properties of the jet-induced explosion of a population III $40M_\\odot$ star and compare the abundance patterns of the yields with those of the metal-poor stars. We conclude that (1) the ejection of Fe-peak products and the fallback of unprocessed materials can account for the abundance patterns of the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars and that (2) the jet-induced explosion with different energy deposition rates can explain the diversity of the abundance patterns of the metal-poor stars. Furthermore, the abundance distribution after the explosion and the angular dependence of the yield are shown for the models with high and low energy deposition rates $\\dot{E}_{\\rm dep}=120\\times10^{51} {\\rm ergs s^{-1}}$ and $1.5\\times10^{51} {\\rm ergs s^{-1}}$. We also find that the peculiar abundance pattern of a Si-deficient metal-poor star HE 1424--0241 can be reproduced by the angle-delimited yield for $\\theta=30^\\circ-35^\\circ$ of the model with $\\dot{E}_{\\rm dep}=120\\ti...

  20. Understanding Care for the Poor in Rural Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    The issues surrounding care and care-provision have been key themes in social scientific research, yet the intersections between care and poverty, particularly in rural contexts, have not been sufficiently explored. This paper addresses this gap by studying care for the poor in rural Russia. It argues that isolated, disengaged and decontextualised…

  1. #608902 DRUG METABOLISM, POOR, CYP2D6-RELATED [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available henotype are tests using oral ingestion of debrisoquine (approximately 5 mg) and dextromethorphan (approxima...-hydroxydebrisoquine and dextromethorphan-to-dextrorphan. Poor metabolizers are defined by an MR of greater ...than 12.6 for debrisoquine and an MR of greater than 0.3 for dextromethorphan (Sachse et al., 1997). Ultrara

  2. Stable field emission from W tips in poor vacuum conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tondare, V.N.; van Druten, N.J.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2003-01-01

    We report a stable field emission (FE) current from sharp tungsten (W) tips in relatively poor vacuum (up to 10-2 mbar) conditions. We use small tip-anode spacing to keep the extraction voltage low. A simple current regulator circuit, with a bandwidth of ~1.6 kHz, was designed, which controls the vo

  3. Happiness Rich and Poor: Lessons from Philosophy and Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigman, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Happiness is a large idea. It looms enticingly before us when we are young, delivers verdicts on our lives when we are old, and seems to inform a responsible engagement with children. The question is raised: do we want this idea? I explore a distinction between rich and poor conceptions of happiness, suggesting that many sceptical arguments are…

  4. Keeping Secrets from Parents: Daily Variations among Poor, Urban Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Villalobos, Myriam; Rogge, Ronald D.; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Daily variations in secrecy with mothers and fathers were examined in 108 poor, urban, diverse middle adolescents (M = 15.16 years, SD = 0.89). Adolescents completed online diaries over 14 days assessing secrecy from parents about school, personal, and multifaceted activities (e.g., staying out late), and bad behavior. Three-level hierarchical…

  5. Childhood obesity in relation to poor asthma control and exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Vijverberg, Susanne; Arets, Hubertus; De Boer, Anthonius; Lang, Jason; Kattan, Meyer; Palmer, Colin; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Turner, Steve; Van Der Zee, Anke-Hilse Maitland

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma severity in children is inconsistent across studies. Objectives: To estimate the association between obesity and poor asthma control/ risk of exacerbations in asthmatic children and adolescents, and to assess whether these associations are diff

  6. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  7. Can 'Mixed Living' Narrow The Rich-Poor Gap?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ In order to tackle marginalization of low-income earners and eliminate psychological estrangement between the rich and the poor, the government of Lanzhou in northwest China's Gansu Province recently imple-mented a policy of "mixed living," meaning to build low-income housing in, instead of separately from, commercial residential communities.

  8. Poor Metacomprehension Accuracy as a Result of Inappropriate Cue Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Keith W.; Griffin, Thomas D.; Wiley, Jennifer; Anderson, Mary C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Two studies attempt to determine the causes of poor metacomprehension accuracy and then, in turn, to identify interventions that circumvent these difficulties to support effective comprehension monitoring performance. The first study explored the cues that both at-risk and typical college readers use as a basis for their metacomprehension…

  9. Hardship financing of healthcare among rural poor in Orissa, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Binnendijk (Erica); R. Koren (Ruth); D.M. Dror (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This study examines health-related "hardship financing" in order to get better insights on how poor households finance their out-of-pocket healthcare costs. We define hardship financing as having to borrow money with interest or to sell assets to pay out-of-pocket healthcare

  10. The RAVE Survey: Rich in Very Metal-poor Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Ruchti, Gregory R.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, Eva; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Zwitter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Very metal-poor stars are of obvious importance for many problems in chemical evolution, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Finding complete samples of such stars which are also bright enough to allow high-precision individual analyses is of considerable interest. We demonstrate here that stars w

  11. The RAVE Survey : Rich in Very Metal-poor Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Ruchti, Gregory R.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, Eva; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Zwitter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Very metal-poor stars are of obvious importance for many problems in chemical evolution, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Finding complete samples of such stars which are also bright enough to allow high-precision individual analyses is of considerable interest. We demonstrate here that stars w

  12. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  13. Global results from the HARPS metal-poor sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ségransan D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the global results of a HARPS-GTO program to search for planets orbiting a sample of metal-poor stars. The detection of several giant planets in long period orbits is discussed in the context of the metallicitygiant planet correlation.

  14. Stellar Archaeology -- Exploring the Universe with Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The abundance patterns of the most metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo and small dwarf galaxies provide us with a wealth of information about the early Universe. In particular, these old survivors allow us to study the nature of the first stars and supernovae, the relevant nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the formation and evolution of the elements, early star- and galaxy formation processes, as well as the assembly process of the stellar halo from dwarf galaxies a long time ago. This review presents the current state of the field of "stellar archaeology" -- the diverse use of metal-poor stars to explore the high-redshift Universe and its constituents. In particular, the conditions for early star formation are discussed, how these ultimately led to a chemical evolution, and what the role of the most iron-poor stars is for learning about Population III supernovae yields. Rapid neutron-capture signatures found in metal-poor stars can be used to obtain stellar ages, but also to constrain this complex ...

  15. Abundances in the metal poor dwarf Ross 451

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiesman, William J.

    1990-01-01

    High dispersion echelle spectra of the high velocity subdwarf Ross 451 (= G236-080) were obtained using the 4-m telescope at Kitt Peak. Initial abundance determinations for six elements are presented, using absolute oscillator strengths and metal-poor stellar-atmosphere models.

  16. Telestroke in resource-poor developing country model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Smartphone-based telestroke services may be a much cheaper alternative to video-conferencing-based telestroke services and are more portable with less technical glitches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first telestroke model being reported from India. It seems to be the way forward in providing timely treatment in acute ischemic stroke in underserved and resource poor settings.

  17. Health, Education and Economic Crisis : Protecting the Poor in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrow, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    When an economic crisis hits, a primary policy concern in developing countries is how social services can be protected and, in particular, how access to health and education for the poor can be maintained. Using the Indonesian Social Safety Net (SSN) as case study, this dissertation investigates th

  18. Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krawczyk, Janusz

    2010-09-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.

  19. Keeping Secrets from Parents: Daily Variations among Poor, Urban Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Villalobos, Myriam; Rogge, Ronald D.; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Daily variations in secrecy with mothers and fathers were examined in 108 poor, urban, diverse middle adolescents (M = 15.16 years, SD = 0.89). Adolescents completed online diaries over 14 days assessing secrecy from parents about school, personal, and multifaceted activities (e.g., staying out late), and bad behavior. Three-level hierarchical…

  20. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  1. Solid Phospholipid Dispersions for Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Martins, Susana A. M.; Brandl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Celecoxib (CXB) is a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug in which its oral bioavailability is limited by poor aqueous solubility. Although a range of formulations aiming to increase the solubility of CXB have been developed, it is not completely understood, whether (1) an increase...

  2. Rich man, poor man: developmental differences in attributions and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-11-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N=88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like older children, perceived the rich man as more competent than the poor man. However, they had difficulty in explaining wealth and poverty, especially poverty, and their trait perceptions were associated primarily with their attributions of wealth to job status, education, and luck. Fifth and ninth graders more clearly attributed wealth and poverty to the equity factors of ability and effort and based their trait perceptions on these attributions. Although the use of structured attribution questions revealed more understanding among young children than previous studies have suggested, the findings suggest a shift with age in the underlying bases for differential evaluation of rich and poor people from a focus on good outcomes associated with wealth (a good education and job) to a focus on personal qualities responsible for wealth (ability and effort).

  3. Choices and decisions: Locating the poor in urban land markets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wanjiku Kihato, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Places: Accessing land in African cities Chapter 5 Choices and decisions: Locating the poor in urban land markets Caroline Wanjiku Kihato and Mark Napier MNapier@csir.co.za Abstract World cities face a bleak future. Global capital, state failure...

  4. Prognostic factors for poor recovery in acute whiplash patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, E.J.M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Neeleman-van der Steen, C.W.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Verhagen, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our prospective inception cohort study was to identify prognostic factors for poor recovery in patients with whiplash-associated disorders grade 1 or 2 who still had neck pain and accompanying complaints 2 weeks after the accident. The study was carried out in a primary health care

  5. Prognostic factors for poor recovery in acute whiplash patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, E.J.M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Windt - Mens, van der D.A.W.M.; Steen, de C.W. Neeleman-van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Verhagen, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our prospective inception cohort study was to identify prognostic factors for poor recovery in patients with whiplash-associated disorders grade 1 or 2 who still had neck pain and accompanying complaints 2 weeks after the accident. The study was carried out in a primary health care

  6. Forces of Accountability? The Power of Poor Parents in NCLB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John

    2006-01-01

    Parental involvement is mentioned more than one hundred times in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). In this article, John Rogers argues that President Bush and former U.S. secretary of education Rod Paige have promoted policy narratives of test accountability, choice, and parental involvement that describe how poor parents can spur educators to…

  7. Poor physician performance in the Netherlands: characteristics, causes, and prevalence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, M.M.P.G. van den; Wagner, C.; Lombarts, K.M.J.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Poor physician performance has a profound impact on patient safety and society's trust in the health care system. The attention that this topic has received in the media suggests that it is a large-scale issue. However, research about physician performance is still scant; there is litt

  8. In-Kind Benefits and the Nonmetro Poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Virginia K.

    1986-01-01

    Reports the effect of valuing in-kind benefits as income and contrasts the resulting changes in reported poverty rates in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. Finds consideration of in-kind benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid does reduce the reported number of poor, but incidence of poverty remains higher for nonmetro areas. (LFL)

  9. Is Persistent Visual Neglect Associated with Poor Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jehkonen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The association of visual neglect with survival after right hemisphere (RH stroke has received only limited attention. Objective This study explores the relationship of visual neglect and its spontaneous recovery to survival in a homogenous patient group with first-ever RH stroke. Methods Fifty-one RH stroke patients who suffered an infarct between 1994 and 1997 were retrospectively followed for survival until August 31, 2009. Acute-phase neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological data were studied to identify predictors of survival. Results Twenty-eight patients died during the follow-up. Age, education, and poor recovery of visual neglect emerged as significant single predictors of death. The best set of predictors for poor survival in the multivariate model was poor recovery of visual neglect and low education. Conclusions Poor recovery of visual neglect is associated with long-term mortality in RH infarct patients. The follow-up of RH patients’ neuropsychological performance gives additional information about the prognosis.

  10. Food provisioning experiences of ultra poor female heads of household living in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lynn; Rondeau, Krista; Kirkpatrick, Sharon; Hatfield, Jennifer; Islam, Khaled Shamsul; Huda, Syed Nazmul

    2011-03-01

    Ultra poor women in Bangladesh are especially vulnerable to poverty and food insecurity, and they have generally been excluded from recent improvements in hunger and poverty rates in the country. An examination of the food provisioning narratives of 43 ultra poor female heads of household in Bangladesh was conducted in order to deepen understanding of this obstacle to the country's achievement of the First Millennium Development Goal. All participants were the household's sole income provider, had dependent children, and earned less than $1 USD per day. Women were purposively selected based on occupational group, context, and personal characteristics. Ethnographic interviews were conducted in January and February, 2008. Analysis of women's accounts of their daily food routine revealed chronic and pervasive food insecurity punctuated by acute episodes of absolute food deprivation that resulted from seasonal fluctuations in earnings, rising food prices, illness disrupting work, and healthcare costs. Women's accounts of their daily food provisioning experiences suggested compromises in, and trade-offs between, multiple basic needs as a result of inadequate income. Women were further constrained by social norms and gender roles that influenced their ability to work outside the home. Our method of inquiry led us to construct an organizing framework that extends knowledge of ultra poor women in Bangladesh's complex and multi-sphered experience of poverty and food insecurity. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy called whole person development (WPD), which seeks small adjustments to services, programs, and policies based on leverage points identified through in-depth narratives.

  11. Very metal-poor stars observed by the RAVE survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijevič, G.; Chiappini, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Kunder, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.

    2017-07-01

    Metal-poor stars trace the earliest phases in the chemical enrichment of the Universe. They give clues about the early assembly of the Galaxy as well as on the nature of the first stellar generations. Multi-object spectroscopic surveys play a key role in finding these fossil records in large volumes. Here we present a novel analysis of the metal-poor star sample in the complete Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) Data Release 5 catalog with the goal of identifying and characterizing all very metal-poor stars observed by the survey. Using a three-stage method, we first identified the candidate stars using only their spectra as input information. We employed an algorithm called t-SNE to construct a low-dimensional projection of the spectrum space and isolate the region containing metal-poor stars. Following this step, we measured the equivalent widths of the near-infrared Ca ii triplet lines with a method based on flexible Gaussian processes to model the correlated noise present in the spectra. In the last step, we constructed a calibration relation that converts the measured equivalent widths and the color information coming from the 2MASS and WISE surveys into metallicity and temperature estimates. We identified 877 stars with at least a 50% probability of being very metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2 dex), out of which 43 are likely extremely metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -3 dex). The comparison of the derived values to a small subsample of stars with literature metallicity values shows that our method works reliably and correctly estimates the uncertainties, which typically have valuesσ[Fe/H] ≈ 0.2 dex. In addition, when compared to the metallicity results derived using the RAVE DR5 pipeline, it is evident that we achieve better accuracy than the pipeline and therefore more reliably evaluate the very metal-poor subsample. Based on the repeated observations of the same stars, our method gives very consistent results. We intend to study the identified sample further by acquiring high

  12. Extremely metal-poor star candidates in the SDSS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Yao Xu; Hua-Wei Zhang; Xiao-Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    For a sample of metal-poor stars (-3.3 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤-2.2) that have highresolution spectroscopic abundance determinations,we have measured equivalent widths of the Ca Ⅱ K,Mg Ⅰ b and near-infrared Ca Ⅱ triplet lines using low-resolution spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS),calculated effective temperatures from (g-z)o color,deduced stellar surface gravities by fitting stellar isochrones,and determined metallicities based on the aforementioned quantities.Metallicities thus derived from the Ca Ⅱ K line are in much better agreement with the results determined from high-resolution spectra than the values given in the SDSS Data Release 7.The metallicities derived from the Mg Ⅰ b lines have a large dispersion owing to the large measurement errors,whereas those deduced from the Ca Ⅱ triplet lines are too high due to both non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects and measurement errors.Abundances after correction for the NLTE effect for the Mg Ⅰ b lines and Ca Ⅱ triplet lines are also presented.Following this method,we have identified six candidates of ultra-metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] ~-4.0 from a sample of 166 metal-poor star candidates.One of them,SDSS J102915+172927,was recently confirmed to be an ultra-metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-4.0) star with the lowest metallicity ever measured.Follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy for the other five ultra-metal-poor stars in our sample will therefore be of great interest.

  13. Factors associated with poor sleep quality in women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansano-Schlosser, Thalyta Cristina; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2017-03-02

    to analyze the factors associated with poor sleep quality, its characteristics and components in women with breast cancer prior to surgery for removing the tumor and throughout the follow-up. longitudinal study in a teaching hospital, with a sample of 102 women. The following were used: a questionnaire for sociodemographic and clinical characterization, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the Beck Depression Inventory; and the Herth Hope Scale. Data collection covered from prior to the surgery for removal of the tumor (T0) to T1, on average 3.2 months; T2, on average 6.1 months; and T3, on average 12.4 months. Descriptive statistics and the Generalized Estimating Equations model were used. depression and pain contributed to the increase in the score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and hope, to the reduction of the score - independently - throughout follow-up. Sleep disturbances were the component with the highest score throughout follow-up. the presence of depression and pain, prior to the surgery, contributed to the increase in the global score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, which indicates worse quality of sleep throughout follow-up; greater hope, in its turn, influenced the reduction of the score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. analizar los factores asociados a la mala calidad del sueño, sus características y componentes en mujeres con cáncer de mama, antes de la cirugía de retirada del tumor y a lo largo del seguimiento. estudio longitudinal, en hospital universitario con muestra de 102 mujeres. Fueron utilizados: un cuestionario de caracterización sociodemográfica y clínica; el Índice de Calidad del Sueño de Pittsburgh; el Inventario de Depresión de Beck; y la Escala de Esperanza de Herth. La recolección comprendió los momentos: antes de la cirugía de retirada del tumor (T0), en (T1) en promedio 3,2 meses, en (T2) en promedio 6,1 meses y en (T3) en promedio 12,4 meses. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva y el modelo de

  14. The Local Food Environment and Body Mass Index among the Urban Poor in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, Fidelia A A; Thompson, Amanda L; Ng, Shu Wen; Agyei-Mensah, Samuel; Codjoe, Samuel N A

    2016-06-01

    Obesity in the sub-Saharan Africa region has been portrayed as a problem of affluence, partly because obesity has been found to be more common in urban areas and among the rich. Recent findings, however, reveal rising prevalence among the poor particularly the urban poor. A growing body of literature mostly in Western countries shows that obesity among the poor is partly the result of an obesogenic-built environment. Such studies are lacking in the African context. This study examines the characteristics of the local food environment in an urban poor setting in Accra, Ghana and further investigates the associated risk of obesity for residents. Data on the local food environment was collected using geographic positioning system (GPS) technology. The body mass indices (BMI) of females (15-49 years) and males (15-59 years) were calculated from measured weight and height. Data on the socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle behaviors of respondents was also collected through a household survey. Spatial analysis tools were used to examine the characteristics of the local food environment while the influence of the food environment on BMI was examined using a two-level multilevel model. The measures of the food environment constituted the level 2 factors while individual socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle behaviors constituted the level 1 factors. The local food environment in the study communities is suggestive of an obesogenic food environment characterized by an abundance of out-of-home cooked foods, convenience stores, and limited fruits and vegetables options. The results of the multilevel analysis reveal a 0.2 kg/m(2) increase in BMI for every additional convenience store and a 0.1 kg/m(2) reduction in BMI for every out-of-home cooked food place available in the study area after controlling for individual socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and community characteristics. The findings of this study indicate that the local

  15. Domestic food preparation practices: a review of the reasons for poor home hygiene practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sakkaf, Ali

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand has a much higher rate of reported campylobacteriosis cases than the rest of the developed world. It has been suggested that New Zealanders have worse home hygiene practices during food preparation than the citizens of other developed countries. Thus, it is necessary to recognize and understand the reasons for consumer's poor practices in order to help develop a more effective message to improve New Zealanders' practices in the domestic environment. This could in turn lead to a reduction in the number of campylobacteriosis cases. The objective is to review cited literature on consumer practices which is related to food poisoning and to attempt to list the factors related to poor consumer practice. There are many internationally identifiable reasons for the poor practices of consumers. These reasons include psychological, demographic and socioeconomic variables; personal interest in new information; prior knowledge; cultural influence; educational background; perception of risk, control and liability; and attitude towards the addressed practices or hazards. The results have indicated that 'optimistic bias', the 'illusion of control', habits and lack of knowledge concerning food safety during domestic food preparation are prevalent among consumers. The research indicated the influence of demographic factors (age, gender, level of education, income, work hours, race, location, culture), as they play a potential role in determining domestic food safety behaviour. It appears that all these factors are applicable for New Zealand consumers and should be addressed in any future education strategy aimed at improving New Zealanders' food handling practices. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Community-based health insurance in poor rural China: the distribution of net benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Yip, Winnie; Zhang, Licheng; Wang, Lusheng; Hsiao, William

    2005-11-01

    The collapse of China's Cooperative Medical System (CMS) in 1978 resulted in the lack of an organized financing scheme for health care, adversely affecting rural farmers' access to health care, especially among the poor. The Chinese government recently announced a policy to re-establish some forms of community-based insurance (CBI). Many existing schemes involve low premiums but high co-payments. We hypothesized that such benefit design leads to unequal distribution of the "net benefits" (NB)--benefits net of payment--because even though low premiums are more affordable to poor farmers, high co-payments may have a significant deterrent effect on the poor in the use of services in CBI. To test this hypothesis empirically, we estimated the probability of farmers joining a re-established CBI using logistic regression, and the utilization of health care services for those who joined the scheme using the two-part model. Based on the estimations, we predicted the distribution of NB among those who joined the CBI and for the entire population in the community. Our data came from a household survey of 4160 members of 1173 households conducted in six villages in Fengshan Township, Guizhou Province, China. Three principal findings emerged from this study. First, income is an important factor influencing farmers' decision to join a CBI despite the premium representing a very small fraction of household income. Secondly, both income and health status influence enrollees' utilization of health services: richer/sicker participants obtain greater NB from the CBI than poorer/healthier members, meaning that the poorer/healthier participants subsidize the rich/sick. Thirdly, wealthy farmers benefit the most from the CBI with low premium and high co-payment features at every level of health status. In conclusion, policy recommendations related to the improvement of the benefit distribution of CBI schemes are made based on the results from this study.

  17. Developing Countries Debt Relief Initiative for Poor Countries Faces Challenges Debt Relief Initiative for Poor Countries Faces Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This report responds to your request that we (1) assess whether the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative is likely to free up...resources for poverty reduction and achieve the goal of debt sustainability, (2) describe the strategy to strengthen the link between debt relief and poverty

  18. Low GILT expression is associated with poor patient survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah ePhipps-Yonas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class II-restricted antigen processing pathway presents antigenic peptides acquired in the endocytic route for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Multiple cancers express MHC class II, which may influence the anti-tumor immune response and patient outcome. Low MHC class II expression is associated with poor survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the most common form of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, we investigated whether gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT, an upstream component of the MHC class II-restricted antigen processing pathway that is not regulated by the transcription factor class II transactivator, may be important in DLBCL biology. GILT reduces protein disulfide bonds in the endocytic compartment, exposing additional epitopes for MHC class II binding and facilitating antigen presentation. In each of four independent gene expression profiling cohorts with a total of 585 DLBCL patients, low GILT expression was significantly associated with poor overall survival. In contrast, low expression of a classical MHC class II gene, HLA-DRA, was associated with poor survival in one of four cohorts. The association of low GILT expression with poor survival was independent of established clinical and molecular prognostic factors, the International Prognostic Index and the cell of origin classification, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis of GILT expression in 96 DLBCL cases demonstrated variation in GILT protein expression within tumor cells which correlated strongly with GILT mRNA expression. These studies identify a novel association between GILT expression and clinical outcome in lymphoma. Our findings underscore the role of antigen processing in DLBCL and suggest that molecules targeting this pathway warrant investigation as potential therapeutics.

  19. Poor sleep quality is associated with a negative cognitive bias and decreased sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Christina M; Banks, Jonathan B; Fins, Ana I; Tartar, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Poor sleep quality has been demonstrated to diminish cognitive performance, impair psychosocial functioning and alter the perception of stress. At present, however, there is little understanding of how sleep quality affects emotion processing. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which sleep quality, measured through the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, influences affective symptoms as well as the interaction between stress and performance on an emotional memory test and sustained attention task. To that end, 154 undergraduate students (mean age: 21.27 years, standard deviation = 4.03) completed a series of measures, including the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, the Sustained Attention to Response Task, an emotion picture recognition task and affective symptom questionnaires following either a control or physical stress manipulation, the cold pressor test. As sleep quality and psychosocial functioning differ among chronotypes, we also included chronotype and time of day as variables of interest to ensure that the effects of sleep quality on the emotional and non-emotional tasks were not attributed to these related factors. We found that poor sleep quality is related to greater depressive symptoms, anxiety and mood disturbances. While an overall relationship between global Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index score and emotion and attention measures was not supported, poor sleep quality, as an independent component, was associated with better memory for negative stimuli and a deficit in sustained attention to non-emotional stimuli. Importantly, these effects were not sensitive to stress, chronotype or time of day. Combined, these results suggest that individuals with poor sleep quality show an increase in affective symptomatology as well as a negative cognitive bias with a concomitant decrease in sustained attention to non-emotional stimuli.

  20. Poor farmers - poor yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Baijukya, F.; Kantengwa, S.; Reckling, M.; Vanlauwe, B.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Climbing bean is the key staple legume crop in the highlands of East and Central Africa. We assessed the impact of interactions between soil fertility characteristics, crop management and socio-economic factors, such as household resource endowment and gender of the farmer, on climbing bean

  1. Poor farmers - poor yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Baijukya, F.; Kantengwa, S.; Reckling, M.; Vanlauwe, B.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Climbing bean is the key staple legume crop in the highlands of East and Central Africa. We assessed the impact of interactions between soil fertility characteristics, crop management and socio-economic factors, such as household resource endowment and gender of the farmer, on climbing bean producti

  2. Health indicators associated with poor sleep quality among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Flávio Moura de Araújo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To associate the sleep quality of Brazilian undergraduate students with health indicators. Method A cross-sectional study was developed with a random sample of 662 undergraduate students from Fortaleza, Brazil. The demographic data, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and health data indicators (smoking, alcoholism, sedentary lifestyle, nutritional condition and serum cholesterol were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Blood was collected at a clinical laboratory. In order to estimate the size of the associations, a Poisson Regression was used. Results For students who are daily smokers, the occurrence of poor sleep was higher than in non-smokers (p<0.001. Prevalence rate values were nevertheless close to 1. Conclusion The likelihood of poor sleep is almost the same in smokers and in alcoholics.

  3. Mechanisms for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Marianne Ladegaard

    in the development of lipid-based formulations. However, in order for optimum formulations to be developed, knowledge of the mechanisms of absorption of poorly water-soluble drug substances is desired. Accordingly, the purpose of this PhD study was to study the effects of endogenous surfactants (bile salts...... the intake of a lipid-rich meal can increase the bioavailability due to slower gastric emptying, increased solubilization of the drug substance in the intestinal fluids by endogenous and exogenous components, inhibition of efflux carriers and induction of intestinal lymphatic transport. Some...... of these processes can also be obtained by formulating the poorly water-soluble drug substances in lipid-based formulations. Then the drug substance is in solution when administered. Consequently, an enhanced and less variable bioavailability can be obtained, and this has led to an increasing interest...

  4. Clinical management of poor adherence to CPAP: motivational enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloia, Mark S; Arnedt, J Todd; Riggs, Raine L; Hecht, Jacki; Borrelli, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is poor. Previous studies have attempted to identify specific barriers to treatment, but none has identified the sole cause for the problem. We outline a behavioral approach to the problem of CPAP adherence that is based on the theories of the transtheoretical model and social cognitive theory. We used these theories to guide the development of an intervention based on the methods of motivational interviewing. We present our motivational enhancement therapy for CPAP (ME-CPAP) here, with some brief pilot data to show its efficacy. Finally, we outline some strengths and weaknesses of taking a behavior change approach to the problem of poor CPAP adherence.

  5. Asteroseismic modelling of the metal-poor star Tau Ceti

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yanke; 10.1051/0004-6361/201014886

    2010-01-01

    Context. Asteroseismology is an effcient tool not only for testing stellar structure and evolutionary theory but also constraining the parameters of stars for which solar-like oscillations are detected, presently. As an important southern asteroseismic target, Tau Ceti, is a metal-poor star. The main features of the oscillations and some frequencies of ? Ceti have been identified. Many scientists propose to comprehensively observe this star as part of the Stellar Observations Network Group. Aims. Our goal is to obtain the optimal model and reliable fundamental parameters for the metal-poor star Tau Ceti by combining all non-asteroseismic observations with these seismological data. Methods. Using the Yale stellar evolution code (YREC), a grid of stellar model candidates that fall within all the error boxes in the HR diagram have been constructed, and both the model frequencies and large- and small- frequency separations are calculated using the Guenther's stellar pulsation code. The \\chi2c minimization is perf...

  6. Poor Textural Image Matching Based on Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Xiuxiao; Yuan, Wei; Cai, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Image matching lies at the heart of photogrammetry and computer vision. For poor textural images, the matching result is affected by low contrast, repetitive patterns, discontinuity or occlusion, few or homogeneous textures. Recently, graph matching became popular for its integration of geometric and radiometric information. Focused on poor textural image matching problem, it is proposed an edge-weight strategy to improve graph matching algorithm. A series of experiments have been conducted including 4 typical landscapes: Forest, desert, farmland, and urban areas. And it is experimentally found that our new algorithm achieves better performance. Compared to SIFT, doubled corresponding points were acquired, and the overall recall rate reached up to 68%, which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  7. Drug delivery strategies for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Alfred; Liu, Xiangli

    2007-07-01

    The drug candidates coming from combinatorial chemistry research and/or the drugs selected from biologically based high-throughput screening are quite often very lipophilic, as these drug candidates exert their pharmacological action at or in biological membranes or membrane-associated proteins. This challenges drug delivery institutions in industry or academia to develop carrier systems for the optimal oral and parenteral administration of these drugs. To mention only a few of the challenges for this class of drugs: their oral bioavailability is poor and highly variable, and carrier development for parenteral administration is faced with problems, including the massive use of surface-active excipients for solubilisation. Formulation specialists are confronted with an even higher level of difficulties when these drugs have to be delivered site specifically. This article addresses the emerging formulation designs for delivering of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  8. On social inequality: Analyzing the rich-poor disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-05-01

    From the Old Testament to the Communist Manifesto, and from the French Revolution to the Occupy Wall Street protests, social inequality has always been at the focal point of public debate, as well as a major driver of political change. Although being of prime interest since Biblical times, the scientific investigation of the distributions of wealth and income in human societies began only at the close of the nineteenth century, and was pioneered by Pareto, Lorenz, Gini, and Pietra. The methodologies introduced by these trailblazing scholars form the bedrock of the contemporary science of social inequality. Based on this bedrock we present a new quantitative approach to the analysis of wealth and income distributions, which sets its spotlight on the most heated facet of the current global debate on social inequality-the rich-poor disparity. Our approach offers researchers highly applicable quantitative tools to empirically track and statistically analyze the growing gap between the rich and the poor.

  9. Overcoming poor tabletability of pharmaceutical crystals by surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Limin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2011-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that coating particles with a highly bonding polymer is effective in improving tabletability of poorly compressible drugs. Micronized acetaminophen (d (90) nanoindentation. Spray-drying successfully produced acetaminophen particles enveloped with a layer of HPC but did not cause any detectable phase change of acetaminophen. At 200 MPa, physical mixtures containing up to 40% HPC could not be compressed into intact tablets. In contrast, acetaminophen coated with 1% to 10% HPC could form strong tablets (tensile strength was 1.9-7.0 MPa) at 200 MPa. Under a given compaction pressure, tablet tensile strength increased sharply with the amount of HPC coating. The profoundly improved tabletability of acetaminophen confirmed the effectiveness of the particle coating approach in improving tableting performance of drugs. HPC coating by spray-drying profoundly enhances tabletability of acetaminophen. This strategy is expected to have transformative effects on formulation development of poorly compressible drugs.

  10. Beyond "banking for the poor": credit mechanisms and women's empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, A

    1996-10-01

    This article describes some strengths and limitations of credit programs for women in developing countries. It is urged that development planners recognize the importance of the selection of the type of credit mechanism in the long term. Ethical issues should be decided upon before the credit mechanism is operable. Organizations should make clear what level of commitment there is to empower borrowers. Most organizations give loans to women and assume empowerment will take place without devising strategies to ensure empowerment. Credit mechanisms include credit for the poor and credit by the poor. A sound financial portfolio and 100% repayment are not the appropriate criteria for securing the empowerment of women. Empowerment of women is related to "building the capacity of borrowers to manage and control decision making." UNICEF's framework of gender equality and women's empowerment identifies levels of empowerment as "welfare, access, conscientisation, participation, and control." Development planners should be aware that provision of credit also has the potential to increase a poor family's debt. Delinquency may be hidden by overlapping loans that trap borrowers. Fewer installment payments increase the chances of a debt trap. Reducing the number of installments may reduce administrative costs and conform to production processes, but may also lead to a debt trap. There is now considerable emphasis on investing in low-income women entrepreneurs as a highly efficient means of achieving social and economic objectives. Credit programs aim to support the growth of small, self-sustaining businesses, to improve women's opportunities, and to provide alternatives to exploitation by local money-lenders. This article describes the following credit mechanisms: bank guarantee systems, government credit schemes, intermediary projects, direct lending projects, banks for the poor, credit unions, and village-based banks.

  11. Understanding How Resource-Poor Firms Survive and Thrive

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I first critique the composition-based view of Yadong Luo and John Child for understanding how resource-poor firms survive and thrive. To remedy the deficiencies in their perspective, I then propose a dynamic theory of compositional advantage and strategy. Here, the compositional advantage is redefined as the attractiveness of the composition of the producer’s offering in terms of scope and perceived value/price ratio. I identify five ways or basic compositional strategies to i...

  12. Malaria control in Malawi: are the poor being served?

    OpenAIRE

    Mathanga Don P; Bowie Cameron

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In Africa, national governments and international organizations are focusing on rapidly "scaling up" malaria control interventions to at least 60 percent of vulnerable populations. The potential health and economic benefits of "scaling up" will depend on the equitable access to malaria control measures by the poor. This paper analyses the present inequalities in access to malaria interventions in Malawi. Methods Equity in access to malaria control measures was assessed usi...

  13. Horticulture Revolution for the Poor : Nature, Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Growth in the horticulture sector, after taking off in the mid-1990s, has encouraged growth in horticultural trade, per capita availability and share in farming systems. Developing countries, especially China, have benefited from the horticulture sector expansion. The Horticultural Revolution (HR) benefited the poor by generating employment and income opportunities; improving resource use efficiency; encouraging commercialization in agriculture; and enhancing the availability of health-promot...

  14. Multisystemic Therapy for Adolescents With Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Deborah; Naar-King, Sylvie; Templin, Thomas; Frey, Maureen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Sheidow, Ashli; Cakan, Nedim; Idalski, April

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The study aim was to determine if multisystemic therapy (MST), an intensive home-based psychotherapy, could reduce hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in youth with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes over 24 months. Potential cost savings from reductions in admissions were also evaluated. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 127 youth were randomly assigned to MST or control groups and also received standard medical care. RESULTS—Youth who received MST had significa...

  15. Dimensional correlates of poor insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Pittenger, Christopher; Torres, Albina Rodrigues; Fontenelle, Leonardo Franklin; do Rosario, Maria Conceicao; Ferrão, Ygor Arzeno; de Mathis, Maria Alice; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Bloch, Michael H

    2011-08-15

    Cross-sectional studies have associated poor insight in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with increased OCD symptom severity, earlier age of onset, comorbid depression, and treatment response. The goal of this current study was to examine the relationship between dimensions of OCD symptomatology and insight in a large clinical cohort of Brazilian patients with OCD. We hypothesized that poor insight would be associated with total symptom severity as well as with hoarding symptoms severity, specifically. 824 outpatients underwent a detailed clinical assessment for OCD, including the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS), the Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale (BABS), a socio-demographic questionnaire, and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis I DSM-IV disorders (SCID-P). Tobit regression models were used to examine the association between level of insight and clinical variables of interest. Increased severity of current and worst-ever hoarding symptoms and higher rate of unemployment were associated with poor insight in OCD after controlling for current OCD severity, age and gender. Poor insight was also correlated with increased severity of current OCD symptoms. Hoarding and overall OCD severity were significantly but weakly associated with level of insight in OCD patients. Further studies should examine insight as a moderator and mediator of treatment response in OCD in both behavioral therapy and pharmacological trials. Behavioral techniques aimed at enhancing insight may be potentially beneficial in OCD, especially among patients with hoarding. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in Tattooed Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Deba P. Sarma; Dentlinger, Renee B.; Forystek, Amanda M.; Todd Stevens; Christopher Huerter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Tattoos have increasingly become accepted by mainstream Western society. As a result, the incidence of tattoo-associated dermatoses is on the rise. The presence of a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma in an old tattooed skin is of interest as it has not been previously documented. Case Presentation. A 79-year-old white homeless man of European descent presented to the dermatology clinic with a painless raised nodule on his left forearm arising in a tattooed area. A...

  17. Small-sum Loans - A Solution for the Rural Poor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUOYUANJUN

    2005-01-01

    ONE year ago, Li Yinzhao was a poor farmer in Tuanshuitou Village, Linxian County, Shanxi Province. Early last year he started a small pig farm, and by December, he had sold some 30 pigs.There are still over 50 in his pigsties.""My goal is to raise 100 pigs,"" says Li,confidently. Li owes a great part of his successful venture to the Foundation for Poverty Alleviation.

  18. NAFTA and Farm Subsidies: A Recipe for Poor Regional Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    reengage NAFTA . A renegotiation of NAFTA may cause more problems with our other trade agreement partner, Canada . For instance, renegotiating NAFTA may...FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAFTA & Farm Subsidies: A Recipe for Poor Regional Security...ABSTRACT The North American Free Trade Agreement ( NAFTA ) and U.S. farm subsidies are a recipe for Mexican agribusiness failure. Removing farm subsidies

  19. Understanding Preclerkship Medical Students’ Poor Performance in Prescription Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to explore reasons for poor performance in prescription writing stations of the objective structured practical examination (OSPE and absenteeism in prescription writing sessions among preclerkship medical students at the Arabian Gulf University (AGU in Manama, Bahrain. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out between September 2014 and June 2015 among 157 preclerkship medical students at AGU. Data were collected using focus group discussions and a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended items. Results: All 157 students participated in the study (response rate: 100.0%. The most frequently cited reasons for poor performance in OSPE stations were an inability to select the correct drugs (79.6%, treatment duration (69.4%, drug quantity (69.4% and drug formulation (68.2%. Additionally, students reported inadequate time for completing the stations (68.8%. During focus group discussions, students reported other reasons for poor performance, including examination stress and the difficulty of the stations. Absenteeism was attributed to the length of each session (55.4%, lack of interest (50.3%, reliance on peers for information (48.4% and optional attendance policies (47.1%. Repetitive material, large group sessions, unmet student expectations and the proximity of the sessions to summative examinations were also indicated to contribute to absenteeism according to open-ended responses or focus group discussions. Conclusion: This study suggests that AGU medical students perform poorly in prescription writing OSPE stations because of inadequate clinical pharmacology knowledge. Participation in prescription writing sessions needs to be enhanced by addressing the concerns identified in this study. Strategies to improve attendance and performance should take into account the learner-teacher relationship.

  20. Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in Tattooed Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deba P. Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tattoos have increasingly become accepted by mainstream Western society. As a result, the incidence of tattoo-associated dermatoses is on the rise. The presence of a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma in an old tattooed skin is of interest as it has not been previously documented. Case Presentation. A 79-year-old white homeless man of European descent presented to the dermatology clinic with a painless raised nodule on his left forearm arising in a tattooed area. A biopsy of the lesion revealed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating into a tattoo. The lesion was completely excised and the patient remains disease-free one year later. Conclusion. All previous reports of squamous cell carcinomas arising in tattoos have been well-differentiated low-grade type or keratoacanthoma-type and are considered to be coincidental rather than related to any carcinogenic effect of the tattoo pigments. Tattoo-associated poorly differentiated invasive carcinoma appears to be extremely rare.

  1. A tiered analytical approach for investigating poor quality emergency contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, María Eugenia; Dwivedi, Prabha; Zhou, Manshui; Payne, Michael; Harris, Chris; House, Blaine; Juggins, Yvonne; Cizmarik, Peter; Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Jenkins, David

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive health has been deleteriously affected by poor quality medicines. Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) are an important birth control method that women can use after unprotected coitus for reducing the risk of pregnancy. In response to the detection of poor quality ECPs commercially available in the Peruvian market we developed a tiered multi-platform analytical strategy. In a survey to assess ECP medicine quality in Peru, 7 out of 25 different batches showed inadequate release of levonorgestrel by dissolution testing or improper amounts of active ingredient. One batch was found to contain a wrong active ingredient, with no detectable levonorgestrel. By combining ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IMS-MS) and direct analysis in real time MS (DART-MS) the unknown compound was identified as the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole. Quantitation by UHPLC-triple quadrupole tandem MS (QqQ-MS/MS) indicated that the wrong ingredient was present in the ECP sample at levels which could have significant physiological effects. Further chemical characterization of the poor quality ECP samples included the identification of the excipients by 2D Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (DOSY 1H NMR) indicating the presence of lactose and magnesium stearate.

  2. A tiered analytical approach for investigating poor quality emergency contraceptives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Monge

    Full Text Available Reproductive health has been deleteriously affected by poor quality medicines. Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs are an important birth control method that women can use after unprotected coitus for reducing the risk of pregnancy. In response to the detection of poor quality ECPs commercially available in the Peruvian market we developed a tiered multi-platform analytical strategy. In a survey to assess ECP medicine quality in Peru, 7 out of 25 different batches showed inadequate release of levonorgestrel by dissolution testing or improper amounts of active ingredient. One batch was found to contain a wrong active ingredient, with no detectable levonorgestrel. By combining ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-IMS-MS and direct analysis in real time MS (DART-MS the unknown compound was identified as the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole. Quantitation by UHPLC-triple quadrupole tandem MS (QqQ-MS/MS indicated that the wrong ingredient was present in the ECP sample at levels which could have significant physiological effects. Further chemical characterization of the poor quality ECP samples included the identification of the excipients by 2D Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (DOSY 1H NMR indicating the presence of lactose and magnesium stearate.

  3. A New Look at Poor Groups of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zabludoff, A I

    1999-01-01

    We use a new fiber spectroscopic survey of 12 nearby, poor groups of galaxies to examine the dynamics and evolution of galaxies in these common, but poorly studied, environments. Some of our conclusions are: (1) The nine groups in our sample with diffuse X-ray emission are in fact bound systems with at least 20-50 group members with absolute magnitudes as faint as M_B ~ -14 + 5 log h. (2) Galaxies in each X-ray-detected group have not all merged together because a significant fraction of the group mass lies outside of the galaxies and in a common halo, thereby reducing the rate of galaxy-galaxy interactions. (3) The similarity of the recent star formation histories and the fraction of early type galaxies in some poor groups to those in rich clusters suggests that cluster-specific environmental effects may not play a dominant role in the recent evolution of cluster galaxies. The evolution of group and cluster members may be driven instead by galaxy-galaxy interactions, which are likely to occur with equal freq...

  4. Total and acylated ghrelin levels in children with poor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, Jordan E; Ondrasik, Deborah; Chan, Debora; Fredericks, Gregory J; Tabisola-Nuesca, Eludrizza; Fernandez-Aponte, Minela; Focht, Dean R; Poth, Merrily

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, an enteric hormone with potent appetite stimulating effects, also stimulates growth hormone release. We hypothesized that altered levels of total ghrelin (TG) or acylated ghrelin (AG) could affect growth by altering growth hormone secretion, subsequently affecting insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) generation or by altering appetite and food intake. After institutional review board approval, 52 children presenting for evaluation of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms (group 1), poor weight gain (group 2), or poor linear growth (group 3) were evaluated for fasting TG and AG levels in addition to their regular evaluation. Serum ghrelin, IGF-1, and prealbumin were compared between groups. No difference was observed for mean fasting TG between groups. However, mean fasting AG was highest in patients in group 2 (465 ± 128 pg/mL) versus group 1 (176 ± 37 pg/mL) and group 3 (190 ± 34 pg/mL). IGF-1 was lowest in patients in group 2 despite similar prealbumin levels among the three groups. We conclude that serum AG levels are highest in children with isolated poor weight gain compared with children with short stature or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, suggesting the possibility of resistance to AG in underweight children. Additional studies are needed to further clarify ghrelin's role in growth and appetite.

  5. The Best and Brightest Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schlaufman, Kevin C

    2014-01-01

    The chemical abundances of large samples of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be used to investigate metal-free stellar populations, supernovae, and nucleosynthesis as well as the formation and galactic chemical evolution of the Milky Way and its progenitor halos. However, current progress on the study of EMP stars is being limited by their faint apparent magnitudes. The acquisition of high signal-to-noise spectra for faint EMP stars requires a major telescope time commitment, making the construction of large samples of EMP star abundances prohibitively expensive. We have developed a new, efficient selection that uses only public, all-sky APASS optical, 2MASS near-infrared, and WISE mid-infrared photometry to identify bright metal-poor star candidates through their lack of molecular absorption near 4.6 microns. We have used our selection to identify 11,916 metal-poor star candidates with V < 14, increasing the number of publicly-available candidates by more than a factor of five in this magnitude range....

  6. Causes and problems of nonresponse or poor response to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvà Lacombe, P; García Vicente, J A; Costa Pagès, J; Lucio Morselli, P

    1996-04-01

    The lack of (or poor) response to drugs has very important medical, social and economic consequences today. An unsatisfactory response to treatment implies not only a worsening or prolongation of the pathological state, but also prolonged hospitalisation, longer withdrawal from social and active life, and waste of community resources. Poor response to drugs has many and varied causes, among which 4 major categories can be identified: pharmacokinetic, cellular, genetic and medical. After a brief description of the terminology, the phenomena of tachyphylaxis, tolerance and drug resistance are analysed and critically described on the basis of the available evidence. Whenever possible, alternative or operative behaviours aimed at reducing the incidence of the above phenomena are commented on. On the question of medical causes, irrational prescriptions and poor compliance with the prescribed regimen stand as two major issues whose prevalence is worrying. In order to limit the waste of professional responsibility and economic resources, efforts aimed at reducing the present insufficiencies are needed at organisational and educational levels.

  7. Poorly Differentiated Uterine or Cervical Sarcoma in a Young Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Cora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1.5 year old, female, spayed, Labrador retriever with a history of three abdominal surgeries within the previous two months presented to the North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of a pelvic inlet mass causing fecal tenesmus, obstipation, and dysuria. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a caudal abdominal mass extending into the pelvic cavity. Cytologic evaluation of the mass showed a pleomorphic round to fusiform cell population with histiocytic and suppurative inflammation. The primary differential was neoplasia, but inflammation with cellular pleomorphism could not be excluded. Via histopathology and immunohistochemistry, a diagnosis of poorly differentiated sarcoma originating from the uterus or cervix with widespread intra-abdominal dissemination and metastasis was made. Sarcomas of any type are rare in young dogs with only sporadic cases of poorly or undifferentiated sarcomas reported. This case is a unique presentation of an aggressive, poorly differentiated sarcoma arising from the cervix or uterus in a young dog and illustrates the importance of histologic evaluation of surgically resected tissues that are abnormal in appearance.

  8. Management of Poor Responders in IVF: Is There Anything New?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Ubaldi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that in the last two decades an enormous number of papers on the topic of poor ovarian response have been published in the literature, so far it has been impossible to identify any efficient treatment to improve the ovarian response and the clinical outcome of this group of patients. The incidence of poor ovarian responders among infertile women has been estimated at 9–24% but according to recent reviews, it seems to have slightly increased. The limitation in quantifying the incidence of these patients among the infertile population is due to the difficulty of a clear definition in literature. A recent paper by the Bologna ESHRE working group on poor ovarian response has been the first real attempt to find a common definition. Current literature proposes new risk factors which could be the cause of a reduction in ovarian reserve, which also includes genetic factors. This represents the first necessary step towards finding applicable solutions for these patients. To date, there is a substantial lack of literature that identifies an ideal protocol for these patients. The use of the “Bologna criteria” and the introduction of long acting gonadotropin in clinical practice have given rise to new promising stimulation protocols for this group of patients.

  9. Energy access: illusion or reality for the poor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, L.

    2005-09-01

    Electricity access is vital for alleviating poverty, and reversing the past and current negative economic and social trends in developing countries. However, despite efforts undertaken so far, the technological accomplishments and so-called breakthroughs, as well as global wealth, the population without electricity access in developing countries is still tremendous. In Sub-Saharan Africa, at least three-quarters of the population currently have no access to electricity; and over the past three decades, the number of people without access to electricity in this region has doubled. Moreover, if we applied the electricity connection rates of the past decade, one must wait until at least the end of this century, before achieving the electricity access objective set for this region. Some experts contend that electricity reform options experienced in Africa have not yet reached the expected beneficial effects, in terms of improvement of the electricity access rate for the poor, and that they were not designed to address the energy problems of the poor, but were explicitly aimed at achieving other objectives. It is thus well founded to raise the following questions: Is the WSSD objective of energy access realistic or utopian, particularly for Africa? Is the UN Millenium Development Goal of halving the number of African poor by 2015 a 'white vow'? How can we reverse the past and current negative trends and move towards the achievement of ambitious yet realistic objectives of widespread energy access? (author)

  10. Planetary companions around the metal-poor star HIP 11952

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, J.; Roccatagliata, V.; Fedele, D.; Henning, Th.; Pasquali, A.; Rodríguez-Ledesma, M. V.; Caffau, E.; Seemann, U.; Klement, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: We carried out a radial-velocity survey to search for planets around metal-poor stars. In this paper we report the discovery of two planets around HIP 11952, a metal-poor star with [Fe/H] = -1.9 that belongs to our target sample. Methods: Radial velocity variations of HIP 11952 were monitored systematically with FEROS at the 2.2 m telescope located at the ESO La Silla observatory from August 2009 until January 2011. We used a cross-correlation technique to measure the stellar radial velocities (RV). Results: We detected a long-period RV variation of 290 d and a short-period one of 6.95 d. The spectroscopic analysis of the stellar activity reveals a stellar rotation period of 4.8 d. The Hipparcos photometry data shows intra-day variabilities, which give evidence for stellar pulsations. Based on our analysis, the observed RV variations are most likely caused by the presence of unseen planetary companions. Assuming a primary mass of 0.83 M⊙, we computed minimum planetary masses of 0.78 MJup for the inner and 2.93 MJup for the outer planet. The semi-major axes are a1 = 0.07 AU and a2 = 0.81 AU, respectively. Conclusions: HIP 11952 is one of very few stars with [Fe/H] < -1.0 which have planetary companions. This discovery is important to understand planet formation around metal-poor stars.

  11. 6Li/7Li estimates for metal-poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, A E Garcia; Inoue, S; Ryan, S G; Suzuki, T K; Chiba, M

    2009-01-01

    The presence of the lithium-6 isotope in some metal-poor stars is a matter of surprise because of the high values observed. Non-standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis and pre-Galactic cosmic ray fusion and spallation have been proposed to explain these values. However, the observations of this light isotope are challenging which may make some detections disputable. The goal was to determine 6Li/7Li for a sample of metal-poor stars; three of them have been previously studied and the remaining two are new for this type of study. The purpose was to increase, if possible, the number of lithium-6 detections and to confirm previously published results. Spectra of the resonance doublet line of neutral lithium Li I 670.78nm were taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph at the Subaru 8.2m-telescope for a sample of five metal-poor stars (-3.12 < [Fe/H] < -2.19). The contribution of lithium-6 to the total observed line profile was estimated from the 1D-LTE analysis of the line asymmetry. Observed asymmetri...

  12. Poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma arising in tattooed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Deba P; Dentlinger, Renee B; Forystek, Amanda M; Stevens, Todd; Huerter, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Tattoos have increasingly become accepted by mainstream Western society. As a result, the incidence of tattoo-associated dermatoses is on the rise. The presence of a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma in an old tattooed skin is of interest as it has not been previously documented. Case Presentation. A 79-year-old white homeless man of European descent presented to the dermatology clinic with a painless raised nodule on his left forearm arising in a tattooed area. A biopsy of the lesion revealed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating into a tattoo. The lesion was completely excised and the patient remains disease-free one year later. Conclusion. All previous reports of squamous cell carcinomas arising in tattoos have been well-differentiated low-grade type or keratoacanthoma-type and are considered to be coincidental rather than related to any carcinogenic effect of the tattoo pigments. Tattoo-associated poorly differentiated invasive carcinoma appears to be extremely rare.

  13. Residential Electrostatic Precipitator - Performance at efficient and poor combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baefver, Linda; Yngvesson, Johan; Niklasson, Fredrik

    2012-07-01

    The performance of a pilot residential electrostatic precipitator R{sub E}SP (Applied Plasma Physics AS), was investigated at laboratory. Measurements of TSP (Total Suspended Particles), content of organic and elemental carbon, and mass size distribution of particles upstream and downstream of ESP were performed. Values for PM1 (particles < 1 {mu}m) were calculated from the particle size distributions. Concentrations and size distributions with respect to particle numbers were measured in separate tests. Gas concentrations, temperatures and boiler parameters were also measured. The TSP concentrations upstream of the R{sub E}SP were varied in range of 15-390 mg/m{sub N}{sup 3}. Up to concentrations of about 300 mg/m{sub N}{sup 3}, the TSP-concentrations out from the ESP were less than 20 mg/m{sub N}{sup 3}, which is well below the German emission limit for wood stoves. The removal efficiencies with respect to mass were about 87% at efficient combustion and 93% at poor combustion. Corresponding values with respect to number concentrations were about 97% at efficient combustion and almost 99% at poor combustion. The better performance at poor combustion may be explained by lower flue gas temperature, leading to longer residence time in the ESP. High removal efficiencies were also found with respect to particulate organic and elemental carbon.

  14. Care seeking for maternal health: challenges remain for poor women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    The pregnant woman is influenced by her attendants; families only seek care for complications if local or herbal, remedies .... onset of complications; the lack of accessible roads, harsh terrain ... genitalia and causes prolonged/obstructed labor.

  15. Foraging by elephant, giraffe and impala during wet and dry season in rich and poor savanna, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mlingi, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Plant have evolved traits in response to herbivory and these traits depends on soil nutrient status, plants in nutrient rich soils have evolved tolerance to herbivory by being palatable and those in nutrient poor have evolved to avoid and prevent future herbivory by being unpalatable. This condition influence interactions between elephant a mega-herbivore with browsers (giraffe) and mixed-feeders (impala) as their interaction depends on food availability. Serengeti National Park is nutrient r...

  16. Waste management and recycling practices of the urban poor: a case study in Kuala lumpur city, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Md Wahid; Siwar, Chamhuri

    2007-02-01

    This study assesses waste management and recycling practices of the urban poor households residing as squatters and in low-cost flats of Kuala Lumpur city, Malaysia. To attain the objective, the study employed some statistical techniques such as t-tests of equality of means, one-way analysis of variance, chi-squared 'likelihood ratio' tests, and simple descriptive statistics. The statistical techniques were used to determine and analyse the factors that significantly influence the environmental behaviour of the urban poor concerning solid waste management, particularly their recycling practices. The findings of the study show that the urban poor and low-income communities have been proved to behave in ways that are consistent with and conducive to environmentally friendly solid waste management. This study provides evidence that the urban poor and low-income communities are the main recyclers, re-users, and source-reducers of their household solid waste. The study, however, suggests that policies should be formulated to focus on promoting knowledge, education, and the skills of the urban poor and, in addition, to empower them as a means of improving their quality of life.

  17. Specific food preferences of older adults with a poor appetite. A forced-choice test conducted in various care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; Finlayson, Graham S; Oosten, Babette S H; Visser, Marjolein

    2015-07-01

    A poor appetite in older adults is an important determinant of reduced food intake and undernutrition. Food preferences may influence food intake. The aim of this study was to investigate food preferences of older adults with a poor appetite and compare these with preferences of older adults with a good appetite. Older adults (n = 349, aged 65-101 years) in nursing/residential care homes, hospitals or at home receiving home care participated in a computer-based forced-choice food preference assessment. Self-reported appetite in the past week was classified as 'good' or 'poor' using a validated instrument. Food preferences were determined by counting the relative frequency of choices for food images according to 11 dichotomous categories: high/low 1) protein; 2) fat; 3) carbohydrates; 4) fiber; 5) variation; and 6) animal/vegetarian proteins; 7) sweet/savory taste; 8) solid/liquid texture; 9) dairy/non-dairy; with/without 10) sauce or 11) color variation. Specific food preferences in participants with a poor appetite were identified by one-sample t-tests comparing frequencies to the expected value of 48. Preference differences between those with a good and a poor appetite were analyzed using GLM adjusting for confounders. The results showed that older adults with a poor appetite (n = 113; 32.4%) preferred variation (51.6 vs. 48, P food preferences. Their preference for variation differs from those with a good appetite. These results may be used to develop meals that are preferred by older adults with poor appetite in order to increase food intake and prevent undernutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Poor Ovarian Response to Stimulation for In Vitro Fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremović-Radjenović, Svetlana; Bila, Jovan; Gudović, Aleksandra; Vidaković, Snežana; Dokić, Milan; Radunović, Nebojša

    2015-01-01

    The term "poor respond (POR) patients" is used for the group of women who respond badly to usual doses of gonadotropins in in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments; the consequence is low pregnancy rate. A consensus was reached on the minimal criteria needed to define POR. At least two of the following three features must be present: 1. advanced maternal age (40 years or more) 2. previous POR (3 or less oocytes with a conventional stimulation protocol) 3. abnormal ovarian reserve (AMH 0.5-1.1 ng/ml or AFC 5-7).The aim is to find better therapeutic options for these patients. Increased levels of day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2), as well as decreased levels of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and antral follicle count (AFC), can be used to assess ovarian reserve, as indirect predictive tests. A larger number of well designed, large scale, randomized, controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy of different management strategies for poor responders: flare up gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist protocols, modified long GnRH agonist mini-dose protocols, luteal initiation GnRH agonist stop protocol, pretreatment with estradiol--GnRH antagonist in luteal phase, natural cycle aspiration or natural cycle aspiration GnRH antagonist controlled, adjuvant therapy with growth hormone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The results of up to now used protocols are unsatisfactory and stimulation of the ovulation in poor responders remains a challenge, especially when bearing in mind that in the majority of cases the patients will be menopausal in relatively short period of time.

  19. Poor ovarian response to stimulation for in vitro fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spremović-Rađenović Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “poor respond (POR patients” is used for the group of women who respond badly to usual doses of gonadotropins in in vitro fertilization (IVF treatments; the consequence is low pregnancy rate. A consensus was reached on the minimal criteria needed to define POR. At least two of the following three features must be present: 1. advanced maternal age (40 years or more 2. previous POR (3 or less oocytes with a conventional stimulation protocol 3. abnormal ovarian reserve (AMH 0.5-1.1 ng/ml or AFC 5-7. The aim is to find better therapeutic options for these patients. Increased levels of day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and estradiol (E2, as well as decreased levels of anti-Mьllerian hormone (AMH and antral follicle count (AFC, can be used to assess ovarian reserve, as indirect predictive tests. A larger number of well designed, large scale, randomized, controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy of different management strategies for poor responders: flare up gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH agonist protocols, modified long GnRH agonist mini-dose protocols, luteal initiation GnRH agonist stop protocol, pretreatment with estradiol - GnRH antagonist in luteal phase, natural cycle aspiration or natural cycle aspiration GnRH antagonist controlled, adjuvant therapy with growth hormone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA. The results of up to now used protocols are unsatisfactory and stimulation of the ovulation in poor responders remains a challenge, especially when bearing in mind that in the majority of cases the patients will be menopausal in relatively short period of time.

  20. SOLUBILITY ENHANCEMENT OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS BY SOLID DISPERSIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Verm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid dispersions have been employed to enhance the dissolution rates of poorly water-soluble drugs. Many approaches have been investigated for the preparation of solid dispersions. This paper reports the various solubility enhancement strategies in solid dispersion. The approaches described are fusion (melting, solvent evaporation, lyophilization (freeze drying, melt agglomeration process, extruding method, spray drying technology, use of surfactant, electro static spinning method and super critical fluid technology. This paper also highlights the potential applications and limitations of theseapproaches in solid dispersions.

  1. Impact of savings groups on the lives of the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlan, Dean; Savonitto, Beniamino; Thuysbaert, Bram; Udry, Christopher

    2017-03-21

    Savings-led microfinance programs operate in poor rural communities in developing countries to establish groups that save and then lend out the accumulated savings to each other. Nonprofit organizations train villagers to create and lead these groups. In a clustered randomized evaluation spanning three African countries (Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda), we find that the promotion of these community-based microfinance groups leads to an improvement in household business outcomes and women's empowerment. However, we do not find evidence of impacts on average consumption or other livelihoods.

  2. Pro-poor growth: the evidence beyond income.

    OpenAIRE

    Hague, Sarah; Ricardo GOTTSCHALK; Martins, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    It is widely agreed that economic growth is necessary for reducing poverty. It is also well-established that poverty is multi-dimensional and not fully explained by income levels alone. Therefore, this paper attempts to fill a relative gap in the pro-poor growth literature by examining the impact of income growth on non-income poverty, particularly child mortality. The results confirm that although changes in per capita income matter for non-income poverty outcomes, they may not matter as muc...

  3. When the poor excel: Poverty facilitates procedural learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Bin; Mao, Lihua

    2016-08-01

    Recent research has shown that poverty directly impeded cognitive functions because the poor could be easily distracted by monetary concerns. We argue that this effect may be limited to functions relying on working memory. For functions that rely on proceduralized processes however, monetary concerns elicited by reminding of financial demands would be conducive rather than harmful. Our results supported this hypothesis by showing that participants with lower income reached the learning criterion of the information-integration categorization task faster than their more affluent counterparts after reminding of financial demands.

  4. Ethical review boards are poor advocates for patient perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masterton, Malin; Renberg, Tobias; Hansson, Mats G;

    2014-01-01

    In medical research, patients are increasingly recognized with ‘lay knowledge’ but their views are poorly researched. The study objective was to investigate patients’ attitudes to medical research. This is in comparison to lay and expert members on ethical review boards (ERB), as their task...... ERB board members in Sweden (N = 583). Response rates were 65 percent and the surveys were conducted in Jan−May 2011. Agreement across the groups included priority for medical research on diagnostic and early detection of disease. A key difference was expert and lay ERB members giving higher priority...

  5. [Health consequences of smoking electronic cigarettes are poorly described].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Wibholm, Niels Christoffer; Lange, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Despite increasing popularity, health consequences of vaping (smoking electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes) are poorly described. Few studies suggest that vaping has less deleterious effects on lung function than smoking conventional cigarettes. One large study found that e-cigarettes were as efficient as nicotine patches in smoking cessation. The long-term consequences of vaping are however unknown and while some experts are open towards e-cigarettes as a safer way of satisfying nicotine addiction, others worry that vaping in addition to presenting a health hazard may lead to an increased number of smokers of conventional cigarettes.

  6. Poorly differentiated carcinoma arising from adenolymphoma of the parotid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciulla Michele M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is only one previous case report of a poorly differentiated carcinoma arising from an adenolymphoma of the parotid gland (Warthin's tumour. The absence of clinical symptoms, and the aspecificity of the radiological pattern make the diagnosis very difficult. Case presentation We here report the case of a 73-year-old man with Warthin's tumour who was brought to our attention because of a swelling in the parotid region. Conclusions In this case with an atypical clinical presentation, the intra-operative examination of a frozen section of the parotid mass allowed us to diagnose the malignant tumour correctly and consequently undertake its radical excision.

  7. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal-poor galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Shi, Yong; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal-poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z ≲ Z_⊙/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f_(70μm)/f_(160 μm) ratios at a given f_(160 μm)/f_(2...

  8. Food science and nutrition: the gulf between rich and poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, J H

    1982-06-18

    The people of economically developed countries benefit greatly from modern food science. They are protected from food contamination, have access to a great variety of food, and need spend little time preparing it. The poor in developing countries enjoy few of the benefits of food science. Their diets are often nutritionally deficient and they spend many hours each day processing their food and searching for wood with which to cook it. In most tropical countries food losses between harvest of slaughter and eventual consumption are inestimable. Efforts to improve post-harvest food systems in developing countries require the attention and ingenuity of many scientific disciplines and the support of all development agencies.

  9. Causes and Countermeasures of Helping Poor Students to Learn English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏

    2012-01-01

    In English teaching,there is a common phenomenon:at the beginning of English learning,students are enthusiastic and full of interest; then polarization appears after a period of study.Some of the students become discouraged and lose confidence in learning English,and gradually become the so-called poor learners.Therefore,teachers should make careful analysis,find out the causes and regulate countermeasures to improve teaching methods,so that every student can get a comprehensive and healthy development.

  10. Poor Outcomes in Hepatic Amyloidosis: A Report of 2 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yue; Patel, Pruthvi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic amyloidosis is a rare disease entity that results from insoluble amyloid protein deposition in the liver. The disease often presents with vague, nonspecific clinical features. Currently, there is little literature describing treatment outcomes for biopsy-proven hepatic amyloidosis and current treatment guidelines recommend that patients enroll in a clinical trial due to insufficient evidence to suggest an optimal treatment regimen. Here, we present two cases of hepatic amyloidosis at an academic medical center and describe their presentation, treatment, and outcomes. These cases highlight the poor outcomes and difficult management of hepatic amyloidosis. Further understanding and investigation of this rare disease are warranted.

  11. Overcoming the Obstacle of Poor Knowledge in Proving Geometry Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatan Magajna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Proving in school geometry is not just about validating the truth of a claim. In the school setting, the main function of the proof is to convince someone that a claim is true by providing an explanation. Students consider proving to be difficult; in fact, they find the very concept of proof demanding. Proving a claim in planar geometry involves several processes, the most salient being visual observation and deductive argumentation. These two processes are interwoven, but often poor observation hinders deductive argumentation. In the present article, we consider the possibility of overcoming the obstacle of a student’s poor observation by making use of computer-aided observation with appropriate software. We present the results of two small-scale research projects, both of which indicate that students are able to work out considerably more deductions if computer-aided observation is used. Not all students use computer-aided observation effectively in proving tasks: some find an exhaustive computer-provided list of properties confusing and are not able to choose the properties that are relevant to the task.

  12. Do horses with poor welfare show 'pessimistic' cognitive biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Fureix, C; Rowberry, R; Bateson, M; Hausberger, M

    2017-02-01

    This field study tested the hypothesis that domestic horses living under putatively challenging-to-welfare conditions (for example involving social, spatial, feeding constraints) would present signs of poor welfare and co-occurring pessimistic judgement biases. Our subjects were 34 horses who had been housed for over 3 years in either restricted riding school situations (e.g. kept in single boxes, with limited roughage, ridden by inexperienced riders; N = 25) or under more naturalistic conditions (e.g. access to free-range, kept in stable social groups, leisure riding; N = 9). The horses' welfare was assessed by recording health-related, behavioural and postural indicators. Additionally, after learning a location task to discriminate a bucket containing either edible food ('positive' location) or unpalatable food ('negative' location), the horses were presented with a bucket located near the positive position, near the negative position and halfway between the positive and negative positions to assess their judgement biases. The riding school horses displayed the highest levels of behavioural and health-related problems and a pessimistic judgment bias, whereas the horses living under more naturalistic conditions displayed indications of good welfare and an optimistic bias. Moreover, pessimistic bias data strongly correlated with poor welfare data. This suggests that a lowered mood impacts a non-human species' perception of its environment and highlights cognitive biases as an appropriate tool to assess the impact of chronic living conditions on horse welfare.

  13. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  14. Poor sleep quality affects spatial orientation in virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Valera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is well known to have a significant impact on learning and memory. Specifically, studies adopting an experimentally induced sleep loss protocol in healthy individuals have provided evidence that the consolidation of spatial memories, as acquired through navigating and orienteering in spatial surroundings, is negatively affected by total sleep loss. Here, we used both objective and subjective measures to characterize individuals' quality of sleep, and grouped participants into either a poor (insomnia-like or normal (control sleep quality group. We asked participants to solve a wayfinding task in a virtual environment, and scored their performance by measuring the time spent to reach a target location and the number of wayfinding errors made while navigating. We found that participants with poor sleep quality were slower and more error-prone than controls in solving the task. These findings provide novel evidence that pre-existing sleep deficiencies in otherwise healthy individuals affects negatively the ability to learn novel routes, and suggest that sleep quality should be accounted for among healthy individuals performing experimental spatial orientation tasks in virtual environments.

  15. Poor sleep quality affects spatial orientation in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Silvana; Guadagni, Veronica; Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Ferrara, Michele; Campbell, Tavis; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is well known to have a significant impact on learning and memory. Specifically, studies adopting an experimentally induced sleep loss protocol in healthy individuals have provided evidence that the consolidation of spatial memories, as acquired through navigating and orienteering in spatial surroundings, is negatively affected by total sleep loss. Here, we used both objective and subjective measures to characterize individuals' quality of sleep, and grouped participants into either a poor (insomnia-like) or normal (control) sleep quality group. We asked participants to solve a wayfinding task in a virtual environment, and scored their performance by measuring the time spent to reach a target location and the number of wayfinding errors made while navigating. We found that participants with poor sleep quality were slower and more error-prone than controls in solving the task. These findings provide novel evidence that pre-existing sleep deficiencies in otherwise healthy individuals affects negatively the ability to learn novel routes, and suggest that sleep quality should be accounted for among healthy individuals performing experimental spatial orientation tasks in virtual environments.

  16. Investigation on Strengthening Approaches Adopted for Poorly Detailed RC Corbels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Neupane

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Poor detailing of the position of bearing pad over reinforced concrete (RC corbel may lead to premature failure, which is undesired and structurally vulnerable. An appropriate retrofitting solution is necessary to ensure the functionality of such RC corbels. Considering the growing popularity of external carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP in retrofitting, this research examines the effectiveness of an externally wrapped unidirectional CFRP sheet and compares its performance against traditional retrofitting methods. Moreover, it is intended to fulfill the lack of extensive research on external CFRP application for corbel strengthening. A total of eight medium-scale corbel specimens were tested on vertical load. Observed premature failure due to placing the bearing pad near the edge of corbel was verified and the effectiveness of the proposed structural strengthening solutions was studied. Experimental results show that although the loading capacity of the damaged corbel due to the poor detailing of bearing pad position could not be fully recovered, the external CFRP wrapping method demonstrated superior performance over RC jacketing and was able to prevent localized failure. Further study based on non-linear 3D finite element analysis (FEA was carried out to identify the governing parameters of each retrofitting solution. Numerical studies suggested important parameters of various retrofitting alternatives for higher capacity assurance.

  17. Micro-insurance in Bangladesh: risk protection for the poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Wendy J

    2009-08-01

    Health services and modem medicines are out of reach for over one billion people globally. Micro-insurance for health is one method to address unmet health needs. This case study used a social exclusion perspective to assess the health and poverty impact of micro-insurance for health in Bangladesh and contrasts this with several micro-insurance systems for health offered in India. Micro-insurance for health in Bangladesh targeted towards the poor and the ultra-poor provides basic healthcare at an affordable rate whereas the Indian micro-insurance schemes for health have been implemented across larger populations and include high-cost and low-frequency events. Results of analysis of the existing literature showed that micro-insurance for health as currently offered in Bangladesh increased access to, and use of, basic health services among excluded populations but did not reduce the likelihood that essential health-related costs would be a catastrophic expense for a marginalized household.

  18. Radioactive Ages of Metal-Poor Halo Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Li; Gang Zhao

    2004-01-01

    The abundances of long-lived radioactive elements Th and U observed in metal-poor halo stars can be used as chronometers to determine the age of individual stars, and hence set a lower limit on the age of the Galaxy and hence of the universe.This radioactive dating requires the zero-decay productions of Th and U, which involves complicated r-process nucleosynthesis calculations. Several parametric rprocess models have been used to calculate the initial abundance ratios of Th/Eu and U/Th, but, due to the sharp sensitivity of these models to nuclear physics inputs, the calculations have relatively large uncertainties which lead to large uncertainties in the age determinations. In order to reduce these uncertainties, we present a simple method to estimate the initial productions of Th and U, which only depends on the solar system abundances and the stellar abundances of stable r-process elements.From our calculations of the initial abundance ratios of Th/Eu and U/Th, we reestimate the ages of those very metal-poor halo stars with published abundances of Th and U. Our age estimates are consistent, within the errors, with the other age determinations derived from r-process models, and offer useful constrains for r-process theoretical calculations. The advantages and limitations of our simple method of radioactive dating are discussed.

  19. Alleviating energy poverty for the world's poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Ambuj D. E-mail: ambuj_sagar@harvard.edu

    2005-07-01

    Improving energy services for poor households in developing countries remains one of the most pressing challenges facing the development community. The dependence of these households on traditional forms of energy leads to significant health impacts as well as other major disbenefits, yet there has been little progress in meeting this challenge. This viewpoint argues for an 'energy-poverty alleviation' fund to help provide modern energy services to these households. It also proposes an approach through which to create such a fund, namely by introducing an incremental levy on petroleum. Notably, this scheme does not need a global agreement since a levy could be introduced by major oil-exporting countries. The implementation of this mechanism would result in a climate-friendly outcome (even before taking into account the elimination of products of incomplete combustion resulting from the traditional household use of biomass-based fuels) while providing immense socio-economic benefits to the world's poor. Such an approach would allow significant progress on the sustainable development front while reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, and therefore is very much consistent with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

  20. Planetary companions around the metal-poor star HIP 11952

    CERN Document Server

    Setiawan, J; Fedele, D; Henning, Th; Pasquali, A; Rodríguez-Ledesma, M V; Caffau, E; Seemann, U; Klement, R J; 10.1051/0004-6361/201117826

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We carried out a radial-velocity survey to search for planets around metal-poor stars. In this paper we report the discovery of two planets around HIP 11952, a metal-poor star with [Fe/H]= -1.9 that belongs to our target sample. Methods. Radial velocity variations of HIP 11952 were monitored systematically with FEROS at the 2.2 m telescope located at the ESO La Silla observatory from August 2009 until January 2011. We used a cross-correlation technique to measure the stellar radial velocities (RV). Results. We detected a long-period RV variation of 290 d and a short-period one of 6.95 d. The spectroscopic analysis of the stellar activity reveals a stellar rotation period of 4.8 d. The Hipparcos photometry data shows intra-day variabilities, which give evidence for stellar pulsations. Based on our analysis, the observed RV variations are most likely caused by the presence of unseen planetary companions. Assuming a primary mass of 0.83 M\\odot, we computed minimum planetary masses of 0.78 MJup for the inne...

  1. Binarity in Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Starkenburg, Else; McConnachie, Alan W; Venn, Kim A

    2014-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the lowest metallicity stars show very high enhancements in carbon. It is debated whether these enhancements reflect the stars' birth composition, or if their atmospheres were subsequently polluted, most likely by accretion from an AGB binary companion. Here we investigate and compare the binary properties of three carbon-enhanced sub-classes: The metal-poor CEMP-s stars that are additionally enhanced in barium; the higher metallicity (sg)CH- and Ba II stars also enhanced in barium; and the metal-poor CEMP-no stars, not enhanced in barium. Through comparison with simulations, we demonstrate that all barium-enhanced populations are best represented by a ~100% binary fraction with a shorter period distribution of at maximum ~20,000 days. This result greatly strengthens the hypothesis that a similar binary mass transfer origin is responsible for their chemical patterns. For the CEMP-no group we present new radial velocity data from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope for 15 stars to supplement t...

  2. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: management challenges in poor resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekanye, Abiola Grace; Umana, A N; Offiong, M E; Mgbe, R B; Owughalu, B C; Inyama, M; Omang, H M

    2016-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is a rare and potentially fatal disease. It is a bacterial infection characterized by spreading along fascia planes and subcutaneous tissue resulting in tissue necrosis and likely death. It is commonly of dental or pharyngeal origin. Factors affecting the success of the treatment are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotics and surgical debridement. Our study showed eight patients, five males and three females with mean age of 49.25 years (range 20-71 years). Clinical presentations were a rapidly progressing painful neck swelling, fever, dysphagia and trismus. The aetiology varied from idiopathic, pharyngeal/tonsillar infection, trauma and nasal malignancy. There were associated variable comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, hypertension and congestive cardiac failure). All the patients received early and aggressive medical treatment. The earliest time of surgery was 12 h after admission because of the poor financial status of patients. Three cases came in with complications of the disease and were not fit for extensive debridement under general anaesthesia. For them limited and reasonable bed side debridement was done. Mortality was 50 % from multiple organ failure, HIV encephalopathy, aspiration pneumonitis and septicemia. The duration of hospital stay for the patients that died ranged from 1 to 16 days and 4 to 34 days for the survivor. Our study heightens awareness and outlines the management challenges of necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in a poor resource setting.

  3. A New Type of Extremely Metal Poor Star

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, J G; Christlieb, N; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Melendez, J; Reimers, L W D; Cohen, Judith G.; William, Andrew Mc; Christlieb, Norbert; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian; Melendez, Jorge; Reimers, Lutz Wisotzki & Dieter

    2007-01-01

    We present an abundance analysis for the extremely metal poor star HE1424-0241 based on high dispersion spectra from HIRES at Keck. This star is a giant on the lower red giant branch with [Fe/H] ~ -4.0 dex. Relative to Fe, HE1424-0241 has normal Mg, but it shows a very large deficiency of Si, with epsilon(Si)/epsilon(Fe) ~ 1/10 and epsilon(Si)/epsilon(Mg) ~ 1/25 that of all previously known extremely metal poor giants or dwarfs. It also has a moderately large deficiency of Ca and a smaller deficit of Ti, combined with enhanced Mn and Co and normal or low C. We suggest that in HE1424-0241 we see the effect of a very small number of contributing supernovae, and that the SNII contributing to the chemical inventory of HE1424-0241 were biased in progenitor mass or in explosion characteristics so as to reproduce its abnormal extremely low Si/Mg ratio. HE1424-0241 shows a deficiency of the explosive alpha-burning elements Si, Ca and Ti coupled with a ratio [Mg/Fe] normal for EMP stars; Mg is produced via hydrostatic...

  4. Hepatitis A: epidemiology in resource-poor countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Goel, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is primarily fecal-oral. Symptomatic hepatitis, severe disease, and death are more likely to occur when infection occurs at an older age. Improvements in socioeconomic and hygienic conditions have led to a change in its epidemiology worldwide. In the last two decades, improved hygiene in several resource-poor countries has led to reduced transmission of HAV, an increase in average age at infection, and, consequently, a paradoxical increase in morbidity and mortality because of hepatitis A. In Argentina, introduction of one dose (instead of the conventional two doses, to reduce costs) of inactivated HAV vaccine at 12-month age in a universal childhood immunization program during such 'epidemiologic transition' has markedly reduced the incidence of symptomatic hepatitis A, and of fulminant hepatitis and liver transplantation caused by HAV infection. The monetary value of medical and nonmedical benefits of this strategy outweighed the expenditure on vaccination. These excellent results were possibly contingent upon a high vaccination coverage. Resource-poor countries should closely monitor the epidemiology of HAV infection and periodically undertake cost-effectiveness analyses of HAV immunization strategies. This should allow timely identification of epidemiologic transition and introduction of preventive strategies before HAV infection becomes a public health problem.

  5. Carbon and Strontium Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, David K; Bolte, Michael; Lucatello, Sara

    2007-01-01

    We present carbon and strontium abundances for 100 metal-poor stars measured from R$\\sim $7000 spectra obtained with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager at the Keck Observatory. Using spectral synthesis of the G-band region, we have derived carbon abundances for stars ranging from [Fe/H]$=-1.3$ to [Fe/H]$=-3.8$. The formal errors are $\\sim 0.2$ dex in [C/Fe]. The strontium abundance in these stars was measured using spectral synthesis of the resonance line at 4215 {\\AA}. Using these two abundance measurments along with the barium abundances from our previous study of these stars, we show it is possible to identify neutron-capture-rich stars with our spectra. We find, as in other studies, a large scatter in [C/Fe] below [Fe/H]$ = -2$. Of the stars with [Fe/H]$<-2$, 9$\\pm$4% can be classified as carbon-rich metal-poor stars. The Sr and Ba abundances show that three of the carbon-rich stars are neutron-capture-rich, while two have normal Ba and Sr. This fraction of carbon enhanced stars is consistent with ...

  6. Azacitidine. Poor-prognosis myelodysplasia: promising, but more data needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Some myelodysplastic syndromes carry a poor prognosis. This is also the case for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (related to myelodysplastic syndromes), and acute myeloblastic leukaemia, a frequent complication of myelodysplasia. The only treatment capable of providing long-term remission (in about 1 in 2 patients on average) is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but this burdensome treatment can only be used in a minority of cases. Azacitidine (Vidaza, Celgene), an agent that blocks DNA synthesis, is the first drug to receive EU marketing authorisation in these settings. Its clinical evaluation is based on an unblinded trial that included 358 patients comparable to those discussed in the marketing authorisation. In addition to individually tailored symptomatic care, they were randomised to receive either azacitidine or conventional care regimens chosen by their physician (no treatment, low-dose cytarabine, or an anthracycline plus cytarabine). The median overall survival time was significantly longer with azacitidine (24.5 versus 15 months), and transfusion requirements were also reduced. Another comparative trial versus symptomatic treatment alone in 191 patients with various prognoses also showed an increase in survival time with azacitidine, but this study suffered from methodological flaws. The main adverse effects of azacitidine are potentially severe toxicity for various blood cells, gastrointestinal disorders, and reactions at the injection site. In practice, when haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is not feasible for poor-prognosis patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or related disorders, azacitidine can be used instead of disappointing standard treatments, even though more clinical evaluation is needed.

  7. Energy, equity and the future of the fuel poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Simon [Centre for Sustainable Energy, 3 St.Peter' s Court, Bedminster Parade, Bristol BS3 4AQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    A warm and adequately-lit home is considered a basic need, together with access to energy-consuming appliances ranging from a fridge to a TV. An underlying tenet of sustainable energy is that such basic needs should be affordably met. Yet low incomes, energy-inefficient housing and appliances and high energy costs mean that roughly 10 per cent of UK households, many of them elderly or with young children, fail to attain this basic standard. These households, which would need to spend more than 10 per cent of their income to attain adequate energy services, are officially defined as 'fuel poor'. Their cold, poorly equipped homes lead to chronic cold-related health conditions, exacerbate social isolation, and may undermine educational achievement. In addition, rural areas have a disproportionately high incidence of fuel poverty. This Review examines the current distribution of energy consumption, its social impacts, and the opportunities to address fuel poverty through improvements to the housing stock. It will then consider potential future developments. (author)

  8. [Thrombocytosis Associated with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Gastric Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Katsutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Kazuma; Arita, Tomohiro; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytosis in patients with cancer is reportedly associated with an increased expression of angiogenic factors and a poor prognosis in some cancer types. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of platelet counts in patients with gastric cancer. Preoperative platelet counts were measured in 306 patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery between 2001 and 2010.We used the cut-off level of 250.9×10(3) mL (mean) to define thrombocytosis and then analyzed the correlation between platelet count and clinicopathological factors. The multivariate prognostic value was determined using the Cox proportional hazards model. Platelet counts were significantly elevated in patients with lymph node metastasis (p=0.0349) and pStage Ⅲdisease (p=0.0326). Adjusting for venous invasion and pStage, multivariate analysis indicated that thrombocytosis as defined in this study was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio=1.50, 95%CI: 1.07-2.36, p=0.0402). A high platelet count is associated with tumor progression and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer.

  9. Do horses with poor welfare show `pessimistic' cognitive biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S.; Fureix, C.; Rowberry, R.; Bateson, M.; Hausberger, M.

    2017-02-01

    This field study tested the hypothesis that domestic horses living under putatively challenging-to-welfare conditions (for example involving social, spatial, feeding constraints) would present signs of poor welfare and co-occurring pessimistic judgement biases. Our subjects were 34 horses who had been housed for over 3 years in either restricted riding school situations ( e.g. kept in single boxes, with limited roughage, ridden by inexperienced riders; N = 25) or under more naturalistic conditions ( e.g. access to free-range, kept in stable social groups, leisure riding; N = 9). The horses' welfare was assessed by recording health-related, behavioural and postural indicators. Additionally, after learning a location task to discriminate a bucket containing either edible food (`positive' location) or unpalatable food (`negative' location), the horses were presented with a bucket located near the positive position, near the negative position and halfway between the positive and negative positions to assess their judgement biases. The riding school horses displayed the highest levels of behavioural and health-related problems and a pessimistic judgment bias, whereas the horses living under more naturalistic conditions displayed indications of good welfare and an optimistic bias. Moreover, pessimistic bias data strongly correlated with poor welfare data. This suggests that a lowered mood impacts a non-human species' perception of its environment and highlights cognitive biases as an appropriate tool to assess the impact of chronic living conditions on horse welfare.

  10. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei.

  11. WTO accepts rules limiting medicine exports to poor countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John S

    2003-09-12

    In a controversial decision on August 30, 2003, the World Trade Organization agreed to complex rules limiting the export of medications to developing countries. Reaction to the decision so far has shown a complete disconnect between trade delegates and the WTO, both of which praise the new rules as a humanitarian advance, and those working in treatment access in poor countries, who believe that they will effectively block treatment from reaching many who need it. We have prepared a background paper that analyzes this decision and its implications and offers the opinions of key figures on both sides of the debate. It is clear that the rules were largely written for and probably by the proprietary pharmaceutical industry, and imposed on the countries in the WTO mainly by the United States. The basic conflict is that this industry does not want the development of international trade in low-cost generic copies of its patented medicines--not even for poor countries, where little or no market exists. Yet millions of people die each year without medication for treatable conditions such as AIDS, and drug pricing remains one of several major obstacles to controlling global epidemics.

  12. Burn Wound Mucormycosis: A Case Study on Poor Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, Bryan; Bell, Derek

    Mucormycosis is a rare, rapidly progressive and often fatal fungal infection. The rarity of the condition lends itself to unfamiliarity, delayed treatment, and poor outcomes. Diagnosis of fungal infections early enough to enable appropriate treatment occurs in less than half of affected patients. A 56-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus II, hepatitis C, and intravenous drug abuse was involved in a rollover motor vehicle accident. He sustained circumferential partial and full-thickness burns to his lower extremities with 20% BSA burns. He ultimately required a below-knee amputation of his right lower extremity due to poor wound healing and nonviability of the soft tissue and foot. Debridement found muscle fibers that were necrotic and purulent. Pathology revealed Mucor species with extensive vascular invasion. This case and discussion highlights the importance of maintaining vigilance for mycotic infections and acting appropriately when there are concerning signs and symptoms of serious wound complications. Caretakers of severe trauma patients should have a high level of suspicion for complications and be cognizant of the American Burn Association's guidelines for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Progressive necrosis outside the confines of the original burn wound should raise concern for impaired wound healing, an immunocompromised state or an underlying infection.

  13. Influencing Up

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Allan R

    2012-01-01

    The authors of the classic Influence Without Authority explain the unique challenges of influencing powerful people Learn to overcome your difficulties with a boss who is uninterested in your concerns, or resistant to giving needed support. Or discover how to win the cooperation of senior managers who are hard to reach, and hard to sell on your ideas, products, or services. In their classic book, Influence Without Authority, Allan Cohen and David Bradford provided a universal model of how to influence someone you don't control. Influencing Up applies those ideas to problematic bosses and other

  14. Overweight and obesity as poor prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Salinas, C; Aguilar-Ponce, J L; Villarreal-Garza, C; Lara-Medina, F U; Olvera-Caraza, D; Alvarado Miranda, A; Flores-Díaz, D; Mohar, A

    2014-07-01

    Obesity and overweight are established risk factors for the development of breast cancer. They are also associated with poor prognosis for higher risk of disease recurrence and lower overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of overweight and obesity in OS in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This is a retrospective analysis that included 819 patients diagnosed with LABC between January 2004 and December 2008. The patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAT) based on anthracyclines, taxanes, or both, followed by surgery. For comparison, patients were divided into the normal weight (NW) group or the overweight/obesity (OW/OB) group. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 74 %. General characteristics of the patients, including age, tumor size, clinical stage, nuclear grade, hormone receptors, and HER2 expression, were similar between both groups. At a median follow-up of 28 months, we found a statistically significant difference in OS between the two groups, achieving a 91.5 % in NW patients versus 85.9 % in the OW/OB group (P = 0.050). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that obesity was an independent factor for poor prognosis, with a hazard ratio of 1.79 (95 % CI (Confidence Interval) 1.09-2.96; P = 0.022). This is the first Mexican study that confirms the role of OW/OB as a risk factor for poor outcome among patients with LABC. Obesity in our country is a public health problem and requires strong preventive intervention strategies for its control, especially among patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  15. Integration of immigrants into a new culture is related to poor sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ursula; Tuin, Inka

    2008-08-10

    This article reports on the relationship between cultural influences on life style, coping style, and sleep in a sample of female Portuguese immigrants living in Germany. Sleep quality is known to be poorer in women than in men, yet little is known about mediating psychological and sociological variables such as stress and coping with stressful life circumstances. Migration constitutes a particularly difficult life circumstance for women if it involves differing role conceptions in the country of origin and the emigrant country. The study investigated sleep quality, coping styles and level of integration in a sample of Portuguese (N = 48) and Moroccan (N = 64) immigrant women who took part in a structured personal interview. Sleep quality was poor in 54% of Portuguese and 39% of Moroccan women, which strongly exceeds reports of sleep complaints in epidemiologic studies of sleep quality in German women. Reports of poor sleep were associated with the degree of adoption of a German life style. Women who had integrated more into German society slept worse than less integrated women in both samples, suggesting that non-integration serves a protective function. An unusually large proportion of women preferred an information-seeking (monitoring) coping style and adaptive coping. Poor sleep was related to high monitoring in the Portuguese but not the Moroccan sample. Sleep quality appears to be severely affected in women with a migration background. Our data suggest that non-integration may be less stressful than integration. This result points to possible benefits of non-integration. The high preference for an information-seeking coping style may be related to the process of migration, representing the attempt at regaining control over an uncontrollable and stressful life situation.

  16. Are government veterinary paraprofessionals serving the poor? The perceptions of smallholder livestock farmers in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K'Oloo, Tobias Onyango; Ilukor, John; Mockshell, Jonathan; Ilatsia, Evans Deyie; Birner, Regina

    2015-01-01

    The liberalization of clinical veterinary services in Kenya introduced new service providers into the animal health service sector. This study examines the perceptions of livestock farmers regarding these service providers and analyses the factors that influence their choice of alternative service providers in Kakamega County. The empirical analysis shows that private animal health assistants were perceived to provide better services than alternative providers because they are more accessible and offer services on credit. Results from a multinomial logit model reveal that more educated, wealthier, and older farmers are more likely to use government services. The study concludes that it is imperative to better target the poor and to integrate private service providers into government animal health programs.

  17. Effect of the surfactant on the availability of piroxicam as a poorly hydrosoluble drug from suppositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Zorro, M; Franceschinis, E; Punchina, A; Realdon, N

    2012-01-01

    The use of surfactants in suppository formulations has been suggested to improve availability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present study, different kinds of surfactants have been investigated to clarify the influence on piroxicam release from suppositories formulated with both lipophilic and hydrophilic bases. Two hydrophilic glucose-derivate surfactants, and a polyoxylglyceride amphiphilic surfactant, all with high HLB values, were investigated for their use in improving drug availability. The two glucose derivate surfactants reduced drug availability from both lipophilic suppositories and hydrophilic formulations, according to longer disintegration times and drug micellization. The more complex surfactant, a lauroyl macrogolglyceride, showed an increase in piroxicam availability from lipophilic suppositories at the higher tested concentrations (15% and 20%). Otherwise, when used in hydrophilic formulations, it was less effective in promoting drug release and even reduced drug availability.

  18. Comparative Research of Residents’ Effect Perception and Participation Capacity and Willingness on Pro-poor Tourism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqing; HUANG; Hong; SHU

    2014-01-01

    In this article,comparative research on residents’ effect perception,participation capacity and willingness on Pro-poor Tourism( PPT) is given based on the questionnaire carried out in Wulong County and Fengjie County in Three Gorges Area,Chongqing,China. Some technologies,such as SPSS 13. 0,ANOVA and T-test are applied to analyze the data and results show Wulong residents’ perception behavior is better than that of Fengjie residents. Moreover,the residents with different demographic characteristics have different participation behavior.Finally,multiple regression analysis is applied to identify the key factors influencing residents’ perception behavior,that is participation willingness and positive economic effect perception,positive social and cultural effect perception and participation capacity.

  19. Risk factors for poor immune response to influenza vaccination in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C.J. Bellei

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccination of elderly people is efficacious and cost effective for the prevention of influenza and its complications. Some studies have pointed out low immunogenicity in this group. Health status has been poorly investigated as a risk factor that may influence the immune response to influenza vaccine. We established an immunization response study of a highly-matched elderly population in a nursing home. One-hundred-twenty subjects of Ashkenazian origin had their vaccine-induced antibody response assessed. Good response was obtained in 30.8% (37/120, and 31.7% (38/120 did not react. A lack of good response was found to be associated with dementia (P=0.016 in a multivariate analysis. In addition to dementia, malnutrition was frequently observed among poor responders, suggesting that these factors should be considered in vaccination studies. Chemoprophylaxis in addition to vaccination for elderly presenting dementia should be considered, particularly for those people living nursing homes.

  20. Controlled poorly soluble drug release from solid self-microemulsifying formulations with high viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tao; Wan, Jiangling; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2008-08-07

    The objective of this work was the development of a controlled release system based on self-microemulsifying mixture aimed for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. HPMC-based particle formulations were prepared by spray drying containing a model drug (nimodipine) of low water solubility and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) of high viscosity. One type of formulations contained nimodipine mixed with HPMC and the other type of formulations contained HPMC and nimodipine dissolved in a self-microemulsifying system (SMES) consisting of ethyl oleate, Cremophor RH 40 and Labrasol. Based on investigation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction, differences were found in the particle structure between both types of formulations. In vitro release was performed and characterized by the power law. Nimodipine release from both types of formulations showed a controlled release profile and the two power law parameters, n and K, correlated to the viscosity of HPMC. The parameters were also influenced by the presence of SMES. For the controlled release solid SMES, oil droplets containing dissolved nimodipine diffused out of HPMC matrices following exposure to aqueous media. Thus, it is possible to control the in vitro release of poorly soluble drugs from solid oral dosage forms containing SMES.

  1. Coercion, autonomy, and the preferential option for the poor in the ethics of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaycox, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    The debate concerning whether to legalize and regulate the global market in human organs is hindered by a lack of adequate bioethical language. The author argues that the preferential option for the poor, a theological category, can provide the grounding for an inductive moral epistemology adequate for reforming the use of culturally Western bioethical language. He proposes that the traditional, Western concept of bioethical coercion ought to be modified and expanded because the conditions of the market system, as viewed from the perspective of organ vendors systemically deprived of access to sufficient resources, are sufficiently exploitative as to diminish the possibility of these vendors giving informed consent. Moreover, empirical studies conducted by professionals in medicine, sociology, psychiatry, economics, and medical anthropology continue to contribute support to the growing interdisciplinary consensus that functionally coercive structural factors exert the most significant influence upon a vendor's decision to sell an organ within any market, regardless of legality or degree of regulation. Therefore any proposal to legalize and regulate the organ market remains patently unethical because doing so would likely function to constrain further the agency of poor potential vendors.

  2. Poor health status and distress in cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibović, Mirela; Versteeg, Henneke; Pelle, Aline J M;

    2013-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which includes the risk of shocks, is considered the primary culprit of reductions in patient reported outcomes (PROs; e.g. health status and distress), thereby negating the role of underlying disease severity. We examined the relative influence...

  3. Is workplace culture an excuse for poor care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Steve

    This article looks at the issue of nurses' own responsibility for their actions. Negative behaviour can be explained by external factors, such as culture and the influence of others, or by internal ones, including a person's own moral compass. Within the context of the Francis report, this article raises questions about how we can ensure that nurses adhere to their code of conduct.

  4. Neighborhood Social Capital, Poor Physical Conditions, and School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Michael E.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Gilster, Megan E.; Karb, Rebecca A.; Gant, Larry M.; Reischl, Thomas M.; Alaimo, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Success in school is a vital developmental outcome for children. In recent decades, it has been shown that school outcomes are influenced by a variety of environments and social processes in the lives of children, both within and across the central microsystems of family, school, and neighborhood. The current study used a multilevel analytic…

  5. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua G. Behr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678. Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15 to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69 to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65 and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50, associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma

  6. Dosang Who Assists the Poor to Get Rid of Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAMGYIZHOLGAR; QOINDA

    2005-01-01

    Dosang, living in Qoidain Rango Village in Lungren Town of Damxiong County, is a herder-turned-businessman. When he was a child, his family was very poor.With the help of fellow villagers, he was able to join the Chinese People's Liberation Army in 1970. After retiring from the army in 1975, he stayed in Lhasa to work.Some years later, he resigned from his job and started his own business. Since he had learned to drive as well as other skills in the army, he has been able to run an automobile transportation business for part of the time and an engineering machine business for the rest. After striving for more than ten years, Dosang's enterprise began to show a sizable scale and now possesses a number of vehicles and engineering equipment.

  7. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  8. La and Eu Abundances in Metal-poor Halo Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardillo, Harrison; Burris, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Elements with atomic number greater than Z=26 (the Iron Peak) cannot be formed through fusion in a star's core; the majority of these elements are produced through one of two neutron-capture processes. Early in the history of the Galaxy, the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is believed to be responsible for the production of elements Z=56 and beyond. These elements require at least one generation of stars to have completed their life cycle in order to be synthesized. Therefore, if we observe the heavy metal abundances in what are called Population II stars (metal-poor stars), then we can begin to make inferences about the chemistry of the earliest stars in the Galaxy. To contribute to this picture of the early universe, the Lanthanum and Europium abundances of low-metallicity stars will be measured and trends in these abundances based on comparisons to existing related literature will be sought.

  9. Auditory imagery and the poor-pitch singer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Halpern, Andrea R

    2013-08-01

    The vocal imitation of pitch by singing requires one to plan laryngeal movements on the basis of anticipated target pitch events. This process may rely on auditory imagery, which has been shown to activate motor planning areas. As such, we hypothesized that poor-pitch singing, although not typically associated with deficient pitch perception, may be associated with deficient auditory imagery. Participants vocally imitated simple pitch sequences by singing, discriminated pitch pairs on the basis of pitch height, and completed an auditory imagery self-report questionnaire (the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale). The percentage of trials participants sung in tune correlated significantly with self-reports of vividness for auditory imagery, although not with the ability to control auditory imagery. Pitch discrimination was not predicted by auditory imagery scores. The results thus support a link between auditory imagery and vocal imitation.

  10. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... University, Denmark. In pairs, BLS instructors, certified by the European Resuscitation Council, evaluated each learner in an end-of-course cardiac arrest test. Instructors’ assessments were compared with CPR quality data collected from the resuscitation manikin. Correct chest compressions were defined as ≥2...

  11. Hyperbolic Metamaterial Nano-Resonators Make Poor Single Photon Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Axelrod, Simon; Wong, Herman M K; Helmy, Amr S; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We study the optical properties of quantum dipole emitters coupled to hyperbolic metamaterial nano-resonators using a semi-analytical quasinormal mode approach. We show that coupling to metamaterial nano-resonators can lead to significant Purcell enhancements that are nearly an order of magnitude larger than those of plasmonic resonators with comparable geometry. However, the associated single photon output $\\beta$-factors are extremely low (around 10%), far smaller than those of comparable sized metallic resonators (70%). Using a quasinormal mode expansion of the photon Green function, we describe how the low $\\beta$-factors are due to increased Ohmic quenching arising from redshifted resonances, larger quality factors and stronger confinement of light within the metal. In contrast to current wisdom, these results suggest that hyperbolic metamaterial nano-structures make poor choices for single photon sources.

  12. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  13. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma with poor prognostic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, A; Meerwaldt, J H; van Putten, W L; Treurniet-Donker, A D

    1989-12-01

    Fifty-seven patients with poor prognostic factors following resection with curative intent for gastric adenocarcinoma (T3 or T4, positive lymph nodes, positive resection line) received adjuvant radiotherapy. A dose of 30.0-50.0 Gy was given in 10-25 fractions in one course or with a split of 2 weeks after 15 fractions. This was combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (375 mg/m2) given i.v. as a bolus during the first 4 days of radiation (n = 49). The 5-year survival was 26%; this rate is higher than the figures mentioned in the literature after surgery alone. The only way to prove the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma is a prospective randomized trial.

  14. An equatorial ultra iron-poor star identified in BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, C Allende; Aguado, D S; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Rebolo, R; Lee, Y S; Beers, T C; Rockosi, C M; Ge, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of SDSS J131326.89-001941.4, an ultra iron-poor red giant star ([Fe/H] ~ -4.3) with a very high carbon abundance ([C/Fe]~ +2.5). This object is the fifth star in this rare class, and the combination of a fairly low effective temperature (Teff ~ 5300 K), which enhances line absorption, with its brightness (g=16.9), makes it possible to measure the abundances of calcium, carbon and iron using a low-resolution spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We examine the carbon and iron abundance ratios in this star and other similar objects in the light of predicted yields from metal-free massive stars, and conclude that they are consistent. By way of comparison, stars with similarly low iron abundances but lower carbon-to-iron ratios deviate from the theoretical predictions.

  15. Molecular bands in extremely metal-poor stars. Granulation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Spite, Monique; Plez, Bertrand; Steffen, Matthias; Spite, François

    2013-01-01

    The bands of diatomic molecules are important abundance indicators, especially in metal-poor stars, where they are still measurable in metallicity regimes where the atomic lines of their constituting metallic elements have become vanishingly small. In order to use them for abundance determinations it is imperative to understand the formation of these bands. In this contribution we report on our results obtained using CO5BOLD hydrodynamical simulations. Some effects that are qualitatively different from what found in 1D computations are highlighted. Due to the large number of lines that form the bands, their spectrum synthesis is computationally challenging. We discuss some of the computational strategies we employed to parallelise the computation and possible future developments.

  16. Multi-Epoch Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Robert; De Cia, Annalisa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leloudas, Giorgos; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Perley, Daniel A.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    A growing sample of intrinsically rare supernovae is being uncovered by wide-field synoptic surveys, such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). A fraction of these events have been labeled "superluminous supernovae" due to their peak luminosities, which can exceed normal supernovae by factors of 10 to 100. The power sources for these events and thus their connection to normal luminosity supernovae remains uncertain. Here we present results from 134 spectroscopic observations of 17 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I) discovered by PTF. We select our targets from the full PTF sample using only spectroscopic information; we do not employ the traditional cut in absolute magnitude (e.g. M physical insights into the nature of these explosions offered by this unique dataset.

  17. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma with poor prognostic signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slot, A.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; Treurniet-Donker, A.D. (Dr. Daniel Den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotteram (Netherlands). Department of Radiotherapy); Putten, W.L.J. van (Dr. Daniel Den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Department of Statistics)

    1989-12-01

    Fifty-seven patients with poor prognostic factors following resection with curative intent for gastric adenocarcinoma T{sub 3} or T{sub 4}, positive lymph nodes, positive resection line received adjuvant radiotherapy. A dose of 30.0-50.0 Gy was given in 10-25 fraction in one course or with a split of 2 weeks after 15 fractions. This was combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (375 mg/m{sup 2}) given i.v. as a bolus during the first 4 days of radiation (n = 49). The 5-year survival was 26%; this rate is higher than the figures mentioned in the literature after surgery alone. The only way to prove the role of adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric carcinoma is a prospective randomized trial. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Sustainable development in an N-rich/n-poor world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrings, Charles; Kinzig, Ann; Halkos, George

    2014-11-01

    Sustainable development requires that per capita inclusive wealth-produced, human, and natural capital-does not decline over time. We investigate the impact of changes in nitrogen on inclusive wealth. There are two sides to the nitrogen problem. Excess use of nitrogen in some places gives rise to N-pollution, which can cause environmental damage. Insufficient replacement of nitrogen in other places gives rise to N-depletion, or loss of nutrient stocks. Neither is explicitly accounted for in current wealth measures, but both affect wealth. We calculate an index of net N-replacement, and investigate its relationship to wealth. In countries with low levels of relative N-loss, we find that the uncompensated loss of soil nitrogen in poorer countries is associated with declining rates of growth of inclusive per capita wealth. What is less intuitive is that increasing fertilizer application in both rich and poor countries can increase per capita inclusive wealth.

  19. Discrimination and Depression among Urban Hispanics with Poorly Controlled Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Dana; Williams, Jasmine; Wells, Shayla; Eimicke, Joseph P; Teresi, Jeanne A; Almonte, Casandra; Link, Bruce G; Findley, Sally E; Palmas, Walter; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Luchsinger, José A

    2015-01-01

    We had three objectives for our study: 1) to describe the prevalence and burden of experiences of discrimination among Hispanics with poorly controlled diabetes; 2) to evaluate associations among discrimination experiences and their burden with comorbid depression among Hispanics with poorly controlled diabetes; and 3) to evaluate whether discrimination encountered in the health care context itself was associated with comorbid depression for Hispanic adults with diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We collected data in the context of an RCT in a clinical setting in New York City. Our sample comprised 221 urban-dwelling Hispanics, largely of Caribbean origin. The main outcome measure was major depression, measured by the Euro-D (score > 3). Of 221 participants, 58.8% reported at least one experience of everyday discrimination, and 42.5% reported at least one major experience of discrimination. Depression was associated significantly with counts of experiences of major discrimination (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.09 - 1.94, P = .01), aggregate counts of everyday and major discrimination (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.26, P = .02), and the experience of discrimination in getting care for physical health (OR = 6.30, 95% CI= 1.10-36.03). Discrimination may pose a barrier to getting health care and may be associated with depression among Hispanics with diabetes. Clinicians treating Caribbean-born Hispanics should be aware that disadvantage and discrimination likely complicate a presentation of diabetes.

  20. Streamflow simulation methods for ungauged and poorly gauged watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, A.; Vasiliades, L.

    2014-07-01

    Rainfall-runoff modelling procedures for ungauged and poorly gauged watersheds are developed in this study. A well-established hydrological model, the University of British Columbia (UBC) watershed model, is selected and applied in five different river basins located in Canada, Cyprus, and Pakistan. Catchments from cold, temperate, continental, and semiarid climate zones are included to demonstrate the procedures developed. Two methodologies for streamflow modelling are proposed and analysed. The first method uses the UBC watershed model with a universal set of parameters for water allocation and flow routing, and precipitation gradients estimated from the available annual precipitation data as well as from regional information on the distribution of orographic precipitation. This method is proposed for watersheds without streamflow gauge data and limited meteorological station data. The second hybrid method proposes the coupling of UBC watershed model with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and is intended for use in poorly gauged watersheds which have limited streamflow measurements. The two proposed methods have been applied to five mountainous watersheds with largely varying climatic, physiographic, and hydrological characteristics. The evaluation of the applied methods is based on the combination of graphical results, statistical evaluation metrics, and normalized goodness-of-fit statistics. The results show that the first method satisfactorily simulates the observed hydrograph assuming that the basins are ungauged. When limited streamflow measurements are available, the coupling of ANNs with the regional, non-calibrated UBC flow model components is considered a successful alternative method to the conventional calibration of a hydrological model based on the evaluation criteria employed for streamflow modelling and flood frequency estimation.

  1. Main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Abeni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarise the main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows. Intensive farming systems are considered, both from a structural and a managerial point of view, for their constraints that may limit animal welfare: possible physical activity; acceptable interactions with humans and other animals; feeding and watering, protection from climate, parasites, and diseases. The dairy farms managed according to the organic rules do not always guarantee, per se, better welfare conditions; organic or low input dairy farming needs to consider the right interaction among cattle breed and herd management, focusing on the actual quality of feedstuffs meet face cow requirements. The considered structural aspects evidence how special care must be given to the rest area (straw yard or cubicle; to the floors that should be not too hard or abrasive and not slippery; to the cubicle bedding material to ensure hygiene, softness, and dryness; to the feeding (and watering area to reduce conflicts; to a microclimate control system, to avoid heat stress during summer time. The importance of proper management for animal welfare is evidenced for buildings and equipment, to have clean and comfortable stables and well functioning milking machines; nutritive and storage quality of feeds; diet suitability (energy, protein, physically efficient fibre, buffers etc., in the different phases of a dairy cow’s life (dry period, close-up, transition, and lactation; feed distribution (frequency and time, and 24h availability. Special attention has to be paid to the social aspects, regarding both animal competition (stocking density, group size, and human/animal interactions (methods of management and manipulation. The interaction between welfare and health requires special attention. Poor welfare can cause immune depression, thus increasing the risk of disease. In turn, any disease that causes an inflammatory response may determine depression

  2. Overcoming challenges of catastrophe modelling in data poor regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassby, L.; Millinship, I.; Breinl, K.

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in expanding international insurance markets such as India, China and Thailand. This reflects the combination of an increase in exposures in these territories as industry intensifies and urban development expands, as well as several notable natural catastrophes affecting these areas over the past few years (e.g. extreme floods in Mumbai in 2006 and in Thailand in 2011). Large, global insurers and reinsurers are embracing the opportunity to underwrite these exposures but only where adequate tools are available to provide understanding of the hazards, exposures and potential losses. Unlike more developed countries, data availability in these regions is typically limited and of poor resolution, but model development is still required in order to analyse the risk. Some of the modelling challenges associated with data limitations include: (1) dealing with a lack of hydrological data which results in greater uncertainty of the flow rate and event frequency; (2) lower DTM resolution than that available across much of Europe, which underlies the hazard component of the catastrophe model; (3) limited accessibility to data that characterises the Built Environment including information on different building types and their susceptibility to damage; and (4) a lack of claims data from previous events or engineering research into the vulnerability of different building types. This is used to generate of country and structure specific vulnerability curves that explain the relationship between hazard intensity and damages. By presenting an industry specific flood model for data-poor India in collaboration with Allianz Re, we illustrate how we have overcome many of these challenges to allow loss accumulations to be made. The resulting model was successfully validated against the floods in Mumbai and Surat in 2006 and is being developed further with the availability of new data.

  3. Trigger recognition and management in poorly controlled asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Matthew A; Wollan, Peter; Li, James T; Yawn, Barbara P

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using cross-sectional designs suggest that asthma trigger recognition and management are suboptimal in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess gaps between asthma guideline recommendations and clinical practice regarding asthma trigger recognition and management by tracking poorly controlled asthma patients over a 2-year period. A retrospective cohort study of a representative sample of 102 children and adult residents of Olmsted County, MN, with poor asthma control in 2003-2004 was performed. All medical records from each asthma-related visit were examined for documented asthma trigger inquiries, specific trigger avoidance advice, and for adherence to the trigger avoidance advice. One hundred two subjects made 686 asthma-related visits that were included for analysis. At least 1 trigger inquiry occurred in 83% of visits, with an average of 2.0 triggers queried per visit. The most common trigger inquiries were for infection (47%), environmental tobacco smoke (41%), and allergens (29%). The mean number of triggers queried was higher during exacerbation visits versus nonexacerbation visits (2.1 versus 1.8; p < 0.001) and in the emergency care settings compared with outpatient settings (2.4 versus 1.7; p < 0.001). Advice for managing asthma triggers was given in 30% of visits and adherence to trigger advice was evaluated at 6% of visits. Future interventions for improving asthma trigger management should be targeted to routine asthma outpatient visits, where trigger avoidance advice is infrequent and rarely addressed in follow-up visits.

  4. Obesity in children with poorly controlled asthma: Sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason E; Holbrook, Janet T; Wise, Robert A; Dixon, Anne E; Teague, W Gerald; Wei, Christine Y; Irvin, Charles G; Shade, David; Lima, John J

    2013-09-01

    Obesity increases asthma risk, and may alter asthma severity. In adults, sex appears to modify the effect of obesity on asthma. Among children, the effect of sex on the relationship between obesity and asthma severity remains less clear, particularly when considering race. To determine how obesity affects disease characteristics in a diverse cohort of children with poorly controlled asthma, and if obesity effects are altered by sex. We analyzed 306 children between 6 and 17 years of age with poorly controlled asthma enrolled in a 6-month trial assessing lansoprazole for asthma control. In this secondary analysis, we determined associations between obesity and symptom severity, spirometry, exacerbation risk, airway biomarkers, bronchial reactivity, and airflow perception. We used both a multivariate linear regression and longitudinal mixed-effect model to determine if obesity interacted with sex to affect asthma severity. Regardless of sex, BMI >95th percentile did not affect asthma control, exacerbation risk or airway biomarkers. Sex changed the effect of obesity on lung function (sex × obesity FEV1%, interaction P-value sex × obesity FEV1/FVC, interaction P-value = 0.03). Obese males had significantly worse airflow obstruction compared to non-obese males, while in females there was no obesity effect on airflow obstruction. In females, obesity was associated with significantly greater FEV1 and FVC, and a trend toward reduced airway reactivity. Obesity did not affect asthma control, airway markers or disease stability; however obesity did affect lung function in a sex-dependent manner. In males, obesity associated with reduced FEV1/FVC, and in females, obesity associated with substantially improved lung function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Maternal care practices among the ultra poor households in rural Bangladesh: a qualitative exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury Nuzhat

    2011-03-01

    pregnancy and post-partum period. Women usually failed to go to the healthcare providers for illnesses in the post-partum period. Conclusion This study shows that cultural beliefs and norms have a strong influence on maternal care practices among the ultra poor households, and override the beneficial economic effects from livelihood support intervention. Some of these practices, often compromised by various taboos and beliefs, may become harmful at times. Health behavior education in this livelihood support program can be carefully tailored to local cultural beliefs to achieve better maternal outcomes.

  6. Maternal care practices among the ultra poor households in rural Bangladesh: a qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Nuzhat; Ahmed, Syed M

    2011-03-01

    go to the healthcare providers for illnesses in the post-partum period. This study shows that cultural beliefs and norms have a strong influence on maternal care practices among the ultra poor households, and override the beneficial economic effects from livelihood support intervention. Some of these practices, often compromised by various taboos and beliefs, may become harmful at times. Health behavior education in this livelihood support program can be carefully tailored to local cultural beliefs to achieve better maternal outcomes.

  7. Poor self-control and harsh punishment in childhood prospectively predict borderline personality symptoms in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Michael N; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2015-08-01

    Developmental theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) propose that harsh, invalidating parenting of a child with poor self-control and heightened negative emotionality often leads to a coercive cycle of parent-child transactions that increase risk for BPD symptoms such as emotion dysregulation. Although parenting practices and child temperament have previously been linked with BPD, less is known about the prospective influences of caregiver and child characteristics. Using annual longitudinal data from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (n = 2,450), our study examined how reciprocal influences among harsh parenting, self-control, and negative emotionality between ages 5 and 14 predicted the development of BPD symptoms in adolescent girls ages 14 to 17. Consistent with developmental theories, we found that harsh punishment, poor self-control, and negative emotionality predicted BPD symptom severity at age 14. Only worsening self-control between ages 12 and 14, however, predicted growth in BPD symptoms from 14 to 17. Furthermore, the effects of harsh punishment and poor self-control on age 14 BPD symptoms were partially mediated by their earlier reciprocal effects on each other between ages 5 and 14. Our findings underscore the need to address both child and parental contributions to dysfunctional transactions in order to stem the development of BPD symptoms. Moreover, problems with self-regulation in early adolescence may indicate heightened risk for subsequent BPD. Altogether, these results increase our understanding of developmental trajectories associated with BPD symptoms in adolescent girls. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of poor sleep quality among Inner Mongolia Medical University students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Qin, Peng; Zhao, Yunshan; Duan, Shengyun; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Ying; Hu, Yueling; Sun, Juan

    2016-10-30

    Medical students face new challenges at the beginning of college life, such as being responsible for oneself, an unfamiliar environment, social obligations, and academic stress, all of which influence or even heavily change their sleep quality and life, leading to sleep-related problems to some degree. This study investigated the relationship between sleep quality and behavior among students at the Inner Mongolia Medical University in China. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was also used. A total of 6044 and 6085 students completed the questionnaires in 2011 and 2013. According to the index, 27.8% (1694) of students had poor sleep quality with major risk factors being poor academic performance and interpersonal relationships in 2013. Among others, regular exercise less than three times a week, skipping breakfast, and studying in higher grades were associated with poor sleep quality. These results will help university administrators understand the risk factors of poor sleep quality among students, which can be improved through individual efforts, and provide adequate counseling and systematic education to improve their behavior and lifestyle.

  9. Interaction of some essential amino acids with synthesized poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. El Rhilassi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the release of two essential amino acids, l-lysine and dl-leucine, previously adsorbed onto poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite of Ca/P = 1.59, synthesis by precipitation methods. The composition of the calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA is chemically and structurally similar to the bone mineral. Their surface reactivity is indeed linked to the existence of hydrated surface particles (HPO42- and Ca2+. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is relatively slow. The adsorption rate reached approximately 70%, but the release rate did not exceed 12%. The chemical composition of solution has an influence on the release processes. The presence of phosphate ions favored the release of amino acids, while the calcium ions inhibited it. Also, the release process is slightly influenced by Ra (ml/mg ratio and incubation temperature of the medium. The charged –COO− and NH3+ of amino acids are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of hydroxyapatite, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups –COO− of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the hydroxyapatite. dl-Leucine (non-polar and l-Lysine (polar–basic interact with the hydroxyapatite surface in the zwitterionic and cationic forms, respectively. The study of interactions between amino acids and hydroxyapatite is carried out in vitro by using UV–vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  10. The frequency of giant planets around metal-poor stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, A.; Santos, N. C.; Sozzetti, A.; Mayor, M.; Latham, D.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The discovery of about 700 extrasolar planets, so far, has lead to the first statistics concerning extrasolar planets. The presence of giant planets seems to depend on stellar metallicity and mass. For example, they are more frequent around metal-rich stars, with an exponential increase in planet occurrence rates with metallicity. Aims: We analyzed two samples of metal-poor stars (-2.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0) to see if giant planets are indeed rare around these objects. Radial velocity datasets were obtained with two different spectrographs (HARPS and HIRES). Detection limits for these data, expressed in minimum planetary mass and period, are calculated. These produce trustworthy numbers for the planet frequency. Methods: A general Lomb-Scargle (GLS) periodogram analysis was used together with a bootstrapping method to produce the detection limits. Planet frequencies were calculated based on a binomial distribution function within metallicity bins. Results: Almost all hot Jupiters and most giant planets should have been found in these data. Hot Jupiters around metal-poor stars have a frequency lower than 1.0% at one sigma. Giant planets with periods up to 1800 days, however, have a higher frequency of fp = 2.63-0.8+2.5%. Taking into account the different metallicities of the stars, we show that giant planets appear to be very frequent (fp = 4.48-1.38+4.04%) around stars with [Fe/H] > - 0.7, while they are rare around stars with [Fe/H] ≤ - 0.7 ( ≤ 2.36% at one sigma). Conclusions: Giant planet frequency is indeed a strong function of metallicity, even in the low-metallicity tail. However, the frequencies are most likely higher than previously thought. The data presented herein are based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope (ESO runs ID 72.C-0488, 082.C-0212, and 085.C-0063) and at the W. M. Keck Observatory that is operated as a scientific partnership among the

  11. NLTE Strontium and Barium in metal poor red giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C I

    2006-01-01

    We present atmospheric models of red giant stars of various metallicities, including extremely metal poor (XMP, [Fe/H]<-3.5) models, with many chemical species, including, significantly, the first two ionization stages of Strontium (Sr) and Barium (Ba), treated in Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) with various degrees of realism. We conclude that 1) for all lines that are useful Sr and Ba abundance diagnostics the magnitude and sense of the computed NLTE effect on the predicted line strength is metallicity dependent, 2) the indirect NLTE effect of overlap between Ba and Sr transitions and transitions of other species that are also treated in NLTE non-negligibly enhances NLTE abundance corrections for some lines, 3) the indirect NLTE effect of NLTE opacity of other species on the equilibrium structure of the atmospheric model is not significant, 4) the computed NLTE line strengths differ negligibly if collisional b-b and b-f rates are an order of magnitude smaller or larger than those calculated wi...

  12. Poor agreement between operators on grading of the placenta.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, M

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal placental grading is associated with poor pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study was to measure intra- and interobserver variability in placental grading. Five expert sonographers independently graded 90 images on two occasions, each viewing separated by 1 week. A number of measures were employed to standardise assessment and minimise potential for variation: prior agreement was established between observers on the classifications for placental grading; a controlled viewing laboratory was used for all viewings; ambient lighting was optimal and monitors were calibrated to the GSDF standard. Kappa (κ) analysis was used to measure observer agreement. Substantial variations between individuals\\' scores were observed. A mean κ-value of 0.34 (range from 0.19 to 0.50) indicated fair interobserver agreement over the two occasions and only nine of the 90 images were graded the same by all five observers. Intraobserver agreement had a moderate mean κ-value of 0.52, with individual comparisons ranging from 0.45 to 0.66. This study demonstrates that, despite standardised viewing conditions, Grannum grading of the placenta is not a reliable technique even among expert observers. The need for new methods to assess placental health is required and work is ongoing to develop 2D and 3D software-based methods.

  13. Poor Man's Methadone: A Case Report of Loperamide Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierksen, Jennifer; Gonsoulin, Morna; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Loperamide, a common over-the-counter antidiarrheal drug and opioid derivative, is formulated to act upon intestinal opioid receptors. However, at high doses, loperamide crosses the blood-brain barrier and reaches central opioid receptors in the brain, leading to central opiate effects including euphoria and respiratory depression. We report the case of a young man found dead in his residence with a known history of drug abuse. At autopsy, the only significant findings were a distended bladder and bloody oral purge. Drug screening found nontoxic levels of alprazolam, fluoxetine, and marijuana metabolites. Liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry found an unusual set of split isotope peaks consistent with chlorine. On the basis of autopsy and toxicological findings, loperamide toxicity was suspected because of its opioid properties and molecular formula containing chlorine. A sample of loperamide was analyzed by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry, resulting in a matching mass and retention time to the decedent's sample. Subsequently, quantitative testing detected 63 ng/mL of loperamide or more than 6 times of therapeutic peak concentration. Cause of death was determined as "toxic effects of loperamide with fluoxetine and alprazolam." Because of its opioid effects and easy accessibility, loperamide is known as "poor man's methadone" and may go undetected at medical and forensic drug screening.

  14. Genetic alterations in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC).It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer.

  15. Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Aluminum Phosphide Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhredin Taghaddosi Nejad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aluminum phosphide as a fumigant is extensively used for wheat preservation from rodents and bugs especially in silos worldwide. There is increasing number of acute intoxication with this potentially lethal compound because of its easy availability. We have tried to locate predictors of poor prognosis in patients with aluminum phosphide intoxication in order to find patients who need more strict medical cares. Methods: All cases of aluminum phosphide intoxication that had been referred to our hospital during April 2008 to March 2010 were studied by their medical dossiers. Pertinent data including vital signs, demographic features, clinical and lab findings, and incidence of any complication were collected and analyzed by the relevant statistical methods. Results: Sixty seven cases of aluminum phosphide intoxication were included in the study. 44.8% of them were male. 97% of cases were suicidal. Mean amount of ingestion was 1.23+/- 0.71 tablets. Mortality rate was 41.8%. ECG abnormality and need for mechanical ventilation had negative relation with outcome. Conclusion: Correlation between some findings and complications with outcome in aluminum phosphide intoxication can be used as guidance for risk assessment and treatment planning in the patients.

  16. Depression and Pancreatic Cancer: A Poorly Understood Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektaria Makrilia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pancreatic carcinoma and depression have been linked for many years, the prevalence and relationship of these two entities are still poorly understood. Published studies reviewing this issue have found that many patients with pancreatic cancer are depressed. A clinical gestalt asserts that many patients present with depression before pancreatic carcinoma is diagnosed. If the definition of depression is broadened to include mild depression in addition to major depression, these numbers may increase. Depression in pancreatic cancer is a condition that must be diagnosed and treated, as studies have shown that depression is a detrimental factor in the last stages of life of cancer patients as patients with high score of depression have worse survival rates in breast and hepatobiliary cancers. Treatment for depression has also been shown to impact quality of life and may bring increased comfort during end of life. This article reviews the literature linking pancreatic carcinoma to depression as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach. In addition, for the first time, it fully underlines the key role of a social worker as a key participant throughout the cancer continuum: at time of diagnosis, treatment, relapse, survivorship, end of life and bereavement in the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  17. BIOENHANCED TRANSDERMAL DELIVERY SYSTEM OF A POORLY WATER SOLUBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PRAMOD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The absolute bioavailability of atorvastatin, a selective, competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, is very low. The nanoemulsion gel formulation offers better platform for delivering a drug with poor oral bioavailability. Methods: In this study, we prepared the nanoemulsion gel which contained atorvastatin loaded sunflower oil and using Carbopol 940 polymer as gelling agent. Cumulative percentage of drug release was determined from the in vitro drug release study. Results: Cumulative drug release data showed sustained release of the drug up to 8 hours. The ex-vivo permeation study was performed on rat skin. In vivo study was carried out using animal model for evaluating anti-hypercholesterolemic activity. In the in vivo studies, atorvastatin nanoemulsion gel demonstrated a marked decreasing effect in total cholesterol (TC level, low density lipoprotein (LDL level and (TG triglycerides level. High density lipoprotein (HDL level was significantly increased by atorvastatin nanoemulsion gel. Conclusion: Thus, transdermal nanoemulsion gel of atorvastatin was found to be an effective formulation in treating hypercholesterolemia.

  18. Telemedicine for Epilepsy Support in Resource-poor Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor ePatterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ProblemEpilepsy is a common disease worldwide causing significant physical and social. disability. It is one of the most treatable neurological diseases. Yet in rural, poorer countries like much of India and Nepal most people with epilepsy are not on any treatment often because they cannot access doctors. Conventional ApproachesIt is being appreciated that perhaps doctors are not the solution and that enabling health workers to treat epilepsy may be better. Few details however have been put forward about how that might be achieved.Thinking differentlyUntreated epilepsy should be considered a public health problem like HIV/AIDS, the various steps needed for treatment identified and solutions found. Telemedicine ApproachesTelemedicine might contribute to two steps - diagnosis and review. A tool which enables non-doctors to diagnose episodes as epileptic has been developed as a mobile phone app and has good applicability, sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis. There are a number of ways in which the use of phone review or SMS can improve management.ConclusionsTelemedicine, as part of a public health program, can potentially help the millions of people in the resource-poor world with untreated epilepsy.

  19. Poor body image and alcohol use in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauer, Cathryn Glanton; Zenner, Ashley; Wulfert, Edelgard

    2016-02-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the association between body image and alcohol use. Of interest was the extent to which alcohol outcome expectancies act as a moderator in this relationship, particularly in women. In Study 1, 421 college students (175 men, 246 women) provided self-report data on body image, social expressiveness expectancies, and average weekly alcohol use; the data were examined using a moderation model. Results showed that women with poor body image and high social expressiveness expectancies reported a significantly greater amount of average weekly alcohol consumption, whereas no such interaction was observed for men. Study 2 tested the same moderation model with 67 female participants; however, this second study utilized an in-lab behavioral measure of alcohol consumption as the outcome variable. The second study replicated results from Study 1, showing that women with overweight body image and alcohol-related high social expressiveness expectancies consumed significantly more beer during a taste rating task than women with other combinations of these variables. Taken together, the results of Studies 1 and 2 indicate that, specifically for women, an overweight body image and positive expectancies about the social, confidence-enhancing benefits of alcohol act as risk factors for excessive drinking. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Defining the conformational features of anchorless, poorly neuroinvasive prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus Bett

    Full Text Available Infectious prions cause diverse clinical signs and form an extraordinary range of structures, from amorphous aggregates to fibrils. How the conformation of a prion dictates the disease phenotype remains unclear. Mice expressing GPI-anchorless or GPI-anchored prion protein exposed to the same infectious prion develop fibrillar or nonfibrillar aggregates, respectively, and show a striking divergence in the disease pathogenesis. To better understand how a prion's physical properties govern the pathogenesis, infectious anchorless prions were passaged in mice expressing anchorless prion protein and the resulting prions were biochemically characterized. Serial passage of anchorless prions led to a significant decrease in the incubation period to terminal disease and altered the biochemical properties, consistent with a transmission barrier effect. After an intraperitoneal exposure, anchorless prions were only weakly neuroinvasive, as prion plaques rarely occurred in the brain yet were abundant in extracerebral sites such as heart and adipose tissue. Anchorless prions consistently showed very high stability in chaotropes or when heated in SDS, and were highly resistant to enzyme digestion. Consistent with the results in mice, anchorless prions from a human patient were also highly stable in chaotropes. These findings reveal that anchorless prions consist of fibrillar and highly stable conformers. The additional finding from our group and others that both anchorless and anchored prion fibrils are poorly neuroinvasive strengthens the hypothesis that a fibrillar prion structure impedes efficient CNS invasion.

  1. Defining the conformational features of anchorless, poorly neuroinvasive prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, Cyrus; Kurt, Tim D; Lucero, Melanie; Trejo, Margarita; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Kong, Qingzhong; Nilsson, K Peter R; Masliah, Eliezer; Oldstone, Michael B; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2013-01-01

    Infectious prions cause diverse clinical signs and form an extraordinary range of structures, from amorphous aggregates to fibrils. How the conformation of a prion dictates the disease phenotype remains unclear. Mice expressing GPI-anchorless or GPI-anchored prion protein exposed to the same infectious prion develop fibrillar or nonfibrillar aggregates, respectively, and show a striking divergence in the disease pathogenesis. To better understand how a prion's physical properties govern the pathogenesis, infectious anchorless prions were passaged in mice expressing anchorless prion protein and the resulting prions were biochemically characterized. Serial passage of anchorless prions led to a significant decrease in the incubation period to terminal disease and altered the biochemical properties, consistent with a transmission barrier effect. After an intraperitoneal exposure, anchorless prions were only weakly neuroinvasive, as prion plaques rarely occurred in the brain yet were abundant in extracerebral sites such as heart and adipose tissue. Anchorless prions consistently showed very high stability in chaotropes or when heated in SDS, and were highly resistant to enzyme digestion. Consistent with the results in mice, anchorless prions from a human patient were also highly stable in chaotropes. These findings reveal that anchorless prions consist of fibrillar and highly stable conformers. The additional finding from our group and others that both anchorless and anchored prion fibrils are poorly neuroinvasive strengthens the hypothesis that a fibrillar prion structure impedes efficient CNS invasion.

  2. Searching for Dust around Hyper Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Venn, Kim A; Divell, Mike; Cote, Stephanie; Lambert, David L; Starkenburg, Else

    2014-01-01

    We examine the mid-infrared fluxes and spectral energy distributions for metal-poor stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] $\\lesssim-5$, as well as two CEMP-no stars, to eliminate the possibility that their low metallicities are related to the depletion of elements onto dust grains in the formation of a debris disk. Six out of seven stars examined here show no mid-IR excess. These non-detections rule out many types of circumstellar disks, e.g. a warm debris disk ($T\\!\\le\\!290$ K), or debris disks with inner radii $\\le1$ AU, such as those associated with the chemically peculiar post-AGB spectroscopic binaries and RV Tau variables. However, we cannot rule out cooler debris disks, nor those with lower flux ratios to their host stars due to, e.g. a smaller disk mass, a larger inner disk radius, an absence of small grains, or even a multicomponent structure, as often found with the chemically peculiar Lambda Bootis stars. The only exception is HE0107-5240, for which a small mid-IR excess near 10 microns is detected at ...

  3. Chemical abundances of distant extremely metal-poor unevolved stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G; Spite, M; Hernández, J I González; Behara, N T

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of our study is to determine the chemical composition of a sample of 16 candidate Extremely Metal-Poor (EMP) dwarf stars, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). There are two main purposes: in the first place to verify the reliability of the metallicity estimates derived from the SDSS spectra; in the second place to see if the abundance trends found for the brighter nearer stars studied previously also hold for this sample of fainter, more distant stars. Methods: We used the UVES at the VLT to obtain high-resolution spectra of the programme stars. The abundances were determined by an automatic analysis with the MyGIsFOS code, with the exception of lithium, for which the abundances were determined from the measured equivalent widths of the Li I resonance doublet. Results: All candidates are confirmed to be EMP stars, with [Fe/H]<= -3.0. The chemical composition of the sample of stars is similar to that of brighter and nearer samples. We measured the lithium abundance for 12 st...

  4. Nanosuspension Technologies for Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Yadollahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor aqueous solubility of some drug molecules is a major problem in drug formulation. Drug nanosuspensions emerged as one solution to delivering such hydrophobic drugs. Scaling down to nanoparticles enhances drug aqueous solubility and bioavailability by increasing drug surface area that comes into contact with biological media. Nanosuspensions that have attracted particular attention are those sterically stabilised by steric polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG with a typical size range of 10–100 nm. These nanoparticles are capable of accumulating in targeted areas such as cancer tissues and infarct zones with minimal damage to healthy tissues. Nanosuspensions are often prepared by commercially available methods such as high pressure homogenization, media milling, emulsification, and melt emulsification. Solidification and surface modification methods are post-processing techniques used to add particular properties for advanced therapies. In this review, we firstly describe preparation methods for nanosuspensions. Secondly, we highlight typical characterization techniques. Finally, we describe several practical application of applications for drug delivery design and different administration routes such as parenteral, pulmonary, oral, and ocular.

  5. Melatonin Supplementation in Patients with Complete Tetraplegia and Poor Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Spong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available People with complete tetraplegia have interrupted melatonin production and commonly report poor sleep. Whether the two are related is unclear. This pilot study investigated whether nightly supplementation of 3 mg melatonin would improve objective and subjective sleep in tetraplegia. Five participants with motor and sensory complete tetraplegia ingested 3 mg melatonin (capsule two hours prior to usual sleep time for two weeks. Full portable sleep studies were conducted in participants’ homes on the night before commencing melatonin supplementation (baseline and on the last night of the supplementation period. Endogenous melatonin levels were determined by assaying saliva samples collected the night of (just prior to sleep and morning after (upon awakening each sleep study. Prior to each sleep study measures of state sleepiness and sleep behaviour were collected. The results showed that 3 mg of melatonin increased salivary melatonin from near zero levels at baseline in all but one participant. A delay in time to Rapid Eye Movement sleep, and an increase in stage 2 sleep were observed along with improved subjective sleep experience with a reduction in time to fall asleep, improved quality of sleep and fewer awakenings during the night reported. Daytime sleepiness increased however. A randomised, placebo controlled trial with a larger sample is required to further explore and confirm these findings.

  6. Lithium isotopic abundances in metal-poor halo stars

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, M; Nissen, P E; Primas, F; Smith, V V; Asplund, Martin; Lambert, David L.; Nissen, Poul Erik; Primas, Francesca; Smith, Verne V.

    2005-01-01

    Very high-quality spectra of 24 metal-poor halo dwarfs and subgiants have been acquired with ESO's VLT/UVES for the purpose of determining Li isotopic abundances. The derived 1D, non-LTE 7Li abundances from the LiI 670.8nm line reveal a pronounced dependence on metallicity but with negligible scatter around this trend. Very good agreement is found between the abundances from the LiI 670.8nm line and the LiI 610.4nm line. The estimated primordial 7Li abundance is $7Li/H = 1.1-1.5 x 10^-10, which is a factor of three to four lower than predicted from standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis with the baryon density inferred from the cosmic microwave background. Interestingly, 6Li is detected in nine of our 24 stars at the >2sigma significance level. Our observations suggest the existence of a 6Li plateau at the level of log 6Li = 0.8; however, taking into account predictions for 6Li destruction during the pre-main sequence evolution tilts the plateau such that the 6Li abundances apparently increase with metallicity. Ou...

  7. Trace metal evidence for a poorly ventilated glacial Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meghan; Hendy, Ingrid L.

    2017-08-01

    Glacial benthic δ13C and Δ14C measurements from the Atlantic Ocean have been interpreted to indicate the existence of a poorly ventilated Southern Ocean with greater CO2 and nutrient contents compared to present. Enhanced storage of CO2 in the deep ocean predicts that oxygen concentrations should have declined at the same time-a prediction increasingly supported by evidence for oxygen depletion in the glacial Southern Ocean. Here we take a novel approach by using a suite of redox-sensitive trace metals (Ag, Cd, Re and Mo) to show that Southern Ocean sediments from two cores in the Atlantic sector were suboxic during and prior to deglaciation, implying changes to ocean circulation and/or elevated export production that significantly altered deep water chemistry. In the Cape Basin, enrichments of the authigenically deposited trace metal Re are comparable to those found in oxygen minimum zones, pointing to substantial decreases in oxygenation. Furthermore, trace metal results suggest potential spatial heterogeneity in the glacial Southern Ocean, and a more complicated oceanographic and oxygenation history than has previously been assumed.

  8. Sialolithiasis and Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agoeng Tjahjani Sarwono

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sialolithiasis is a common disease of the submandibular glands or its duct but rare in parotids of patients, especially in male adults. The accessory of salivary glands are small, unsheathed masses with a small canaliculi. The irritant factors might be due to inflammation of the inner layer of the canaliculi, that often concomitant to saliva stasis. This process leads to development of calculus that it is related to secretive specificity of the submandibular gland. The essential factor for its calcification is the stagnation of secretory matieral rich in calcium. The accumulation of this material would cause swelling, further obstruction and atrophy until there is widespread inflammation that has been termed sialadenitis. Diabetes mellitus is one of the medically compromised diseases. Although there are many assocaiations between diabetes mellitus and oral health, lack of investigation in this area has been done to study salivary gland alterations. Many diabetic patient complained xerostomia, a decreasing salivary flow and enlargement of the parotid gland due to a compensatory mechanism to xerostomia that has been termed sialadenosis. This review article summarized that there is no relationship between sialolithiasis and poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Supersaturation of poorly soluble drugs induced by mesoporous magnesium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Welch, Ken; Bergström, Christel; Strømme, Maria

    2016-10-10

    This work investigates whether the solubility of poorly soluble compounds can be improved by using mesoporous magnesium carbonate (MMC) as the drug delivery system. A solvent evaporation method was used to load structurally diverse model drugs (celecoxib, cinnarizine and griseofulvin) into the pores of MMC. The drug-loaded carrier system was then characterized in terms of porosity, crystallinity, and release profiles by a variety of experimental techniques, including X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, UV absorption spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. All three drugs were in a non-crystalline state after loading into the pores of MMC. The concentrations of the drugs in solution over time (a measure of the release rates from loaded MMC) were higher than the corresponding concentrations (dissolution rates) of equal amounts of the crystalline drugs. The release rates were five (celecoxib), three (cinnarizine) and two times (griseofulvin) higher than the dissolution rates of their crystalline counterparts. Supersaturation release profiles were also observed; the areas under the concentration-time curves (0-240min) were 25- (celecoxib), 5- (cinnarizine) and 2-fold (griseofulvin) greater than those of the crystalline drugs. Hence, MMC shows promise as a general drug delivery vehicle for increasing the bioavailability of compounds with dissolution rate- or solubility-limited absorption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Star formation in metal-poor gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O

    2012-01-01

    Observations of molecular clouds in metal-poor environments typically find that they have much higher star formation rates than one would expect based on their observed CO luminosities and the molecular gas masses that are inferred from them. This finding can be understood if one assumes that the conversion factor between CO luminosity and H2 mass is much larger in these low metallicity systems than in nearby molecular clouds. However, it is unclear whether this is the only factor at work, or whether the star formation rate of the clouds is directly sensitive to the metallicity of the gas. To investigate this, we have performed numerical simulations of the coupled dynamical, chemical and thermal evolution of model clouds with metallicities ranging from 0.01 Z_solar to Z_solar. We find that the star formation rate in our model clouds has little sensitivity to the metallicity. Reducing the metallicity of the gas by two orders of magnitude delays the onset of star formation in the clouds by no more than a cloud ...

  11. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal poor galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z around Zsun/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70um/f160um ratios at a given f160um/f250um ratio; single modified black-body (MBB) fittings to the SED at \\lambda >= 100 um still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (beta = 2) show that even at 100 um about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (~20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images further reveal that the far-IR colors including f70um/f160um, f160um/f250um and f250um/f350um are all related to ...

  12. Poor agreement between operators on grading of the placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M; Ryan, J; Higgins, M; Brennan, P C; McAuliffe, F M

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal placental grading is associated with poor pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study was to measure intra- and interobserver variability in placental grading. Five expert sonographers independently graded 90 images on two occasions, each viewing separated by 1 week. A number of measures were employed to standardise assessment and minimise potential for variation: prior agreement was established between observers on the classifications for placental grading; a controlled viewing laboratory was used for all viewings; ambient lighting was optimal and monitors were calibrated to the GSDF standard. Kappa (κ) analysis was used to measure observer agreement. Substantial variations between individuals' scores were observed. A mean κ-value of 0.34 (range from 0.19 to 0.50) indicated fair interobserver agreement over the two occasions and only nine of the 90 images were graded the same by all five observers. Intraobserver agreement had a moderate mean κ-value of 0.52, with individual comparisons ranging from 0.45 to 0.66. This study demonstrates that, despite standardised viewing conditions, Grannum grading of the placenta is not a reliable technique even among expert observers. The need for new methods to assess placental health is required and work is ongoing to develop 2D and 3D software-based methods.

  13. Medi-Cal blamed for poor care in lawsuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Several sources are reporting a lawsuit filed in California alleging poor care in the state’s Medicaid program, Medi-Cal (1. The suit alleges that Medi-Cal failed to pay doctors enough to provide proper care. The suit was filed by five Latino residents on behalf of California’s 13 million lower-income residents, more than half of them Latinos. The suit alleges that "…California has created a separate and unequal system of health care, one for the insurance program with the largest proportion of Latinos (Medi-Cal, and one for the other principal insurance plans, whose recipients are disproportionately white.” The state budget includes $107 billion in state and federal funding for Medi-Cal this year, but the spending is not enough to restore reimbursement cuts made during the Great Recession of 2008. A proposal in the U.S. Senate to repeal the Affordable Health Care law (ACA, Obamacare could drastically reduce funding for Medicare and the …

  14. First stars VII. Lithium in extremely metal poor dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Sivarani, T; Cayrel, R; Spite, M; Spite, F; Plez, B; Andersen, J; Barbuy, B; Beers, T C; Depagne, E; Hill, V; François, P; Nordström, B; Primas, F

    2006-01-01

    Aims. This study aims to determine the level and constancy of the Spite plateau as definitively as possible from homogeneous high-quality VLT-UVES spectra of 19 of the most metal-poor dwarf stars known. Methods. Our high-resolution (R ~ 43000), high S/N spectra are analysed with OSMARCS 1D LTE model atmospheres and turbospectrum synthetic spectra to determine effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities as well as Li abundances for our stars. Results. Eliminating a cool subgiant and a spectroscopic binary, we find 8 stars to have -3.5 < [Fe/H] < -3.0 and 9 stars with -3.0 < [Fe/H] < -2.5. Our best value for the mean level of the plateau is A(Li) =2.10 +- 0.09. The scatter around the mean is entirely explained by our estimate of the observational error and does not allow for any intrinsic scatter in the Li abundances. In addition, we conclude that a systematic error of the order of 200 K in any of the current temperature scales remains possible. The iron excitation equilibria in our...

  15. Poorly Controlled Congenital Hypothyroidism due to an Underlying Allgrove Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tellingen, V.; Finken, M.J.J.; Israëls, J.; Hendriks, Y.M.C.; Kamp, G.A.; van Santen, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital hypothyroidism of thyroidal origin (CHT) is a common disorder in pediatric endocrinology practices, which can be difficult to manage. Elevated thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations are in the great majority of cases explained by poor compliance to levothyroxine therapy. Methods Case description. Results We present a boy with CHT, with 2 heterozygous mutations in the TSH receptor gene, who showed persistently elevated TSH concentrations and psychomotor retardation, initially misinterpreted as malcompliance. At the age of 4 years, he was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency, wherefore a broad diagnostic search was initiated. After the start of glucocorticoid replacement therapy, his TSH normalized and the levothyroxine could be lowered. At the age of 6 years, his TSH increased again, this time caused by malabsorption of levothyroxine due to esophageal achalasia. In retrospect, alacrima was also present and the diagnosis of Allgrove syndrome was genetically confirmed. The CHT was considered a separate disease entity. Conclusions In case of persistently elevated TSH levels in children with CHT, causes other than noncompliance must be considered. Second, in establishing the cause of adrenal insufficiency, specific symptoms, such as alacrima, are easily overlooked. Third, Allgrove syndrome is a rare disorder, in which diagnostic delay can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:27255745

  16. Urban marginality, religious liminality, and the black poor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Drew Smith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While many persons within westernised or westernising nations such as the United States of America and South Africa continue to place importance on matters of faith, a growing number of those persons approach matters of faith informally rather than formally and individually rather than institutionally. The implications of this are that among 21st century populations informal religious formation may be as important as or more important than the formation taking place via formal religious channels. A central emphasis of this article is that this is especially true among more socially marginalised populations, not simply because they may not enjoy the same level of access to formal institutions, but also because they may regard those institutions as spiritually and culturally restrictive and exclusionary. The contributions of the article are, firstly, its use of original and unique survey data generated from neighbourhood studies the author directed in low-income contexts within several U.S. cities and within Pretoria, South Africa, and, secondly, its analysis of informal ways the urban poor engage Christian ideas and practices − an aspect of urban religion that has not received adequate scholarly attention.

  17. Extremely metal-poor stars in SDSS fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, Piercarlo; François, Patrick; Sbordone, Luca; Ludwig, Hans-G; Spite, Monique; Molaro, Paolo; Spite, François; Cayrel, Roger; Hammer, François; Hill, Vanessa; Nonino, Mario; Randich, Sofia; Stelzer, Beate; Zaggia, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Some insight on the first generation of stars can be obtained from the chemical composition of their direct descendants, extremely metal-poor stars (EMP), with metallicity less than or equal to 1/1000 of the solar metalllicity. Such stars are exceedingly rare, the most successful surveys, for this purpose, have so far provided only about 100 stars with 1/1000 the solar metallicity and 4 stars with about 1/10000 of the solar metallicity. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has the potential to provide a large number of candidates of extremely low metallicity. X-Shooter has the unique capability of performing the necessary follow-up spectroscopy providing accurate metallicities and abundance ratios for several elements (Mg, Al, Ca, Ti, Cr, Sr,...) for EMP candidates. We here report on the results for the first two stars observed in the course of our franco-italian X-Shooter GTO. The two stars were targeted to be of metallicity around -3.0, the analysis of the X-Shooter spectra showed them to be of metallicity around -...

  18. Fluorine in a Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Star

    CERN Document Server

    Schuler, S C; Smith, V V; Sivarani, T; Beers, T C; Lee, Y S

    2007-01-01

    The fluorine abundance of the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) star HE 1305+0132 has been derived by analysis of the molecular HF (1-0) R9 line at 2.3357 microns in a high-resolution (R = 50,000) spectrum obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer and Gemini-South telescope. Our abundance analysis makes use of a CNO-enhanced ATLAS12 model atmosphere characterized by a metallicity and CNO enhancements determined utilizing medium-resolution (R = 3,000) optical and near-IR spectra. The effective iron abundance is found to be [Fe/H] = -2.5, making HE 1305+0132 the most Fe-deficient star, by more than an order of magnitude, for which the abundance of fluorine has been measured. Using spectral synthesis, we derive a super-solar fluorine abundance of A(19F) = 4.96 +/- 0.21, corresponding to a relative abundance of [F/Fe] = 2.90. A single line of the Phillips C_2 system is identified in our Phoenix spectrum, and along with multiple lines of the first-overtone vibration-rotation CO (3-1) band head, C and O abundances of ...

  19. Abundance correlations in mildly metal-poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Jehin, E; Neuforge, C; Noels, A; Parmentier, G; Thoul, A A

    1999-01-01

    Accurate relative abundances have been obtained for a sample of 21 mildly metal-poor stars from the analysis of high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra. With these accurate results, correlations between relative abundances have been searched for, with a special emphasis on the neutron capture elements. This analysis shows that the r elements are closely correlated to the alpha elements, which is in agreement with the generally accepted idea that the r-process takes place during the explosion of massive stars. The situation is more complex as far as the s elements are concerned. Their relation with the alpha elements is not linear. In a first group of stars, the relative abundance of the s elements increases only slightly with the alpha elements overabundance until the latter reaches a maximum value. For the second group, the s elements show a rather large range of enhancement and a constant (and maximum) value of the alpha elements overabundance. This peculiar behaviour leads us to distinguish betwee...

  20. Melatonin supplementation in patients with complete tetraplegia and poor sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Jo; Kennedy, Gerard A; Brown, Douglas J; Armstrong, Stuart M; Berlowitz, David J

    2013-01-01

    People with complete tetraplegia have interrupted melatonin production and commonly report poor sleep. Whether the two are related is unclear. This pilot study investigated whether nightly supplementation of 3 mg melatonin would improve objective and subjective sleep in tetraplegia. Five participants with motor and sensory complete tetraplegia ingested 3 mg melatonin (capsule) two hours prior to usual sleep time for two weeks. Full portable sleep studies were conducted in participants' homes on the night before commencing melatonin supplementation (baseline) and on the last night of the supplementation period. Endogenous melatonin levels were determined by assaying saliva samples collected the night of (just prior to sleep) and morning after (upon awakening) each sleep study. Prior to each sleep study measures of state sleepiness and sleep behaviour were collected. The results showed that 3 mg of melatonin increased salivary melatonin from near zero levels at baseline in all but one participant. A delay in time to Rapid Eye Movement sleep, and an increase in stage 2 sleep were observed along with improved subjective sleep experience with a reduction in time to fall asleep, improved quality of sleep and fewer awakenings during the night reported. Daytime sleepiness increased however. A randomised, placebo controlled trial with a larger sample is required to further explore and confirm these findings.

  1. Genetic Alterations in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC). It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer. PMID:22654560

  2. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Ian U

    2012-01-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z=32), arsenic (As, Z=33), and selenium (Se, Z=34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4. We perform a standard abundance analysis of germanium, arsenic, selenium, and several other elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. When combined with previous derivations of germanium abundances in metal-poor stars, our sample reveals an increase in the [Ge/Fe] ratios at higher metallicities. This could mark the onset of the weak s-process contribution to germanium. In contrast, the [As/Fe] and [Se/Fe] ratios rema...

  3. Poor anchoring limits dyslexics' perceptual, memory, and reading skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-07-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin, Putter-Katz, & Banai, 2006), which suggests that dyslexics have a general difficulty in automatic extraction of stimulus regularities from auditory inputs. This hypothesis explained a broad range of dyslexics' verbal and non-verbal difficulties. However, it was not directly tested in the context of reading and verbal memory, which poses the main stumbling blocks to dyslexics. Here we assessed the abilities of adult dyslexics to efficiently benefit from ("anchor to") regularities embedded in repeated tones, orally presented syllables, and written words. We also compared dyslexics' performance to that of individuals with attention disorder (ADHD), but no reading disability. We found an anchoring effect in all groups: all gained from stimulus repetition. However, in line with the anchoring-deficit hypothesis, controls and ADHD participants showed a significantly larger anchoring effect in all tasks. This study is the first that directly shows that the same domain-general deficit, poor anchoring, characterizes dyslexics' performance in perceptual, working memory and reading tasks.

  4. Extremely Metal-Poor Star Candidates in the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao; Liu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    For a sample of metal-poor stars (-3.3< [Fe/H] <-2.2) that have high-resolution spectroscopic abundance determinations, we have measured equivalent widths (EW) of the Ca II K, Mg I b and near-infrared (NIR) Ca II triplet lines using low-resolution spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), calculated effective temperatures from (g-z)0 color, deduced stellar surface gravities by fitting stellar isochrones, and determined metallicities based on the aforementioned quantities. Metallicities thus derived from the Ca II K line are in much better agreement with the results determined from high-resolution spectra than the values given in the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7). The metallicities derived from the Mg I b lines have a large dispersion owing to the large measurement errors, whereas those deduced from the Ca II triplet lines are too high due to both non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects and measurement errors. Abundances after corrected for the NLTE effect for the Mg I b lines and Ca II tr...

  5. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  6. Artificial Neural Network for search for metal poor galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, F; Kong, X; Chen, Y

    2013-01-01

    In order to find a fast and reliable method for selecting metal poor galaxies (MPGs), especially in large surveys and huge database, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method is applied to a sample of star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 9 (DR9) provided by the Max Planck Institute and the Johns Hopkins University (MPA/JHU). A two-step approach is adopted:(i) The ANN network must be trained with a subset of objects that are known to be either MPGs or MRGs(Metal Rich galaxies), treating the strong emission line flux measurements as input feature vectors in an n-dimensional space, where n is the number of strong emission line flux ratios. (ii) After the network is trained on a sample of star-forming galaxies, remaining galaxies are classified in the automatic test analysis as either MPGs or MRGs. We consider several random divisions of the data into training and testing sets: for instance, for our sample, a total of 70 percent of the data are involved in training the algor...

  7. Prediction of oral absorption of cinnarizine--a highly supersaturating poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Mark; Przyklenk, Karl-Heinz; Richtberg, Annette; Baumann, Wolfgang; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-11-01

    Two important driving forces for oral absorption of active pharmaceutical ingredients are drug dissolution and permeability in the gastrointestinal tract. Poorly soluble weak bases typically exhibit high solubility under fasted gastric conditions. However, the solubility of such drugs usually decreases drastically in the fasted small intestine, constraining drug absorption. Since there is a discrepancy in solubility between the fasted state stomach and intestine, it is crucial to examine the influence of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation on the oral absorption of poorly soluble weak bases during and after fasted state gastric emptying. Cinnarizine is a poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability, exhibiting supersaturation and precipitation under simulated fasted state gastric emptying conditions. Interestingly, supersaturation and precipitation of cinnarizine under fed state conditions is not expected to occur, since the drug shows good solubility in fed state biorelevant media and exhibits a positive food effect in pharmacokinetic studies. The present work is aimed at investigating the dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation behavior of marketed cinnarizine tablets under fasted and fed state conditions using biorelevant dissolution and transfer methods. In order to predict the in vivo performance of these cinnarizine formulations, the in vitro results were then coupled with different physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which considered either only dissolution or a combination of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation kinetics. The results of the in silico predictions were then compared with in vivo observations. The study revealed that under fasting conditions, plasma profiles could be accurately predicted only when supersaturation and precipitation as well as dissolution were taken into account. It was concluded that for poorly soluble weak bases with moderate permeability, supersaturation and precipitation

  8. Referral for competency committee review for poor performance on the internal medicine clerkship is associated with poor performance in internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, Brian A; Durning, Steven J; Kelly, William F; Dong, Ting; Pangaro, Louis N; Hemmer, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    remediation garnering low ratings compared to 18% of the reviewed group. Students who are referred to a committee for review following completion of their internal medicine clerkship are more likely to receive poor ratings in internship and fail USMLE Step 3 compared to students whose performance in the medicine clerkship does not trigger a committee review. These findings provide validity evidence for our competency committee review in that the students identified as requiring further clinical work had significantly higher rates of poor ratings in professionalism than students who were reviewed by the competency committee but not required to remediate. Additionally, students reviewed but not required to remediate were nonetheless at risk of low internship ratings, suggesting that these students might need some intervention prior to graduation. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Methylene blue is associated with poor outcomes in vasoplegic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Menachem M; Lin, Hung-Mo; Danforth, Dennis; Rao, Srikar; Hosseinian, Leila; Fischer, Gregory W

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients who received methylene blue as treatment for vasoplegia during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass had decreased morbidity and mortality. Retrospective analysis. Single tertiary care university hospital. Adult patients who suffered from vasoplegia and underwent all types of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at this institution between 2007 and 2008. With IRB approval, the authors reviewed the charts of the identified patients and divided them into 2 groups based on whether they had received methylene blue. Two hundred twenty-six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria for the study. Fifty-seven of these patients had received methylene blue for vasoplegia. The authors collected data on preoperative and intraoperative variables as well as outcomes. The patients who received methylene blue had higher rates of in-hospital mortality, a compilation of morbidities, as well as renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that receiving methylene blue was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (p value: 0.007, OR 4.26, 95% CI: 1.49-12.12), compilation of morbidities (p value: 0.001, OR 4.80, 95% CI: 1.85-12.43), and hyperbilirubinemia (p value:methylene blue as treatment for vasoplegia to be independently associated with poor outcomes. While further studies are required, a thorough risk-benefit analysis should be applied before using methylene blue and, perhaps, it should be relegated to rescue use and not as first-line therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Citrobacter Peritoneal Dialysis Peritonitis: Rare Occurrence with Poor Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lee, Szu-Ying; Yang, Wei-Shun; Chen, Huei-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Non-Pseudomonas gram-negative bacteria are responsible for an increasing proportion of cases of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. The role of Citrobacter species in the etiology of PD-related peritonitis is often underestimated. In the present study, we aimed to describe the clinical features, laboratory findings, and short- and long-term outcomes in PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter. Methods: A retrospective review of all episodes of PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter from a single center between 1990 and 2010 was performed. Clinical features, microbiological data, and outcomes of these episodes were analyzed. Results: Citrobacter species was responsible for 11 PD-related episodes (1.8% of all peritonitis episodes) in 8 patients. Citrobacter freundii was the most common etiologic species (73%), and mixed growth was found in the other 3 episodes (27%). Approximately half (46%) of the episodes were associated with constipation and/or diarrhea. Of the Citrobacter isolates from all episodes, 54% were resistant to cefazolin, and only 18% were susceptible to cefmetazole. All isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenem, and aminoglycosides. More than half of the patients (54%) were hospitalized for index peritonitis, and 27% of the episodes involved a change in antibiotic medication. One patient had relapsing peritonitis caused by C. koseri (9%). The mortality rate of PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter was 18%, and 89% of surviving patients developed technique failure requiring a modality switch after an average of 12 months of follow-up (range 1.2-31.2 months). Conclusion: PD-related peritonitis caused by Citrobacter is associated with poor outcomes, including high rates of antibiotic resistance, a high mortality rate, and a high rate of technique failure among survivors during the follow-up period. PMID:23869184

  11. Planctomycetes in lakes: poor or strong competitors for phosphorus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Thomas; Humbert, Jean-François; Tadonléké, Rémy D

    2014-02-01

    Experiments were conducted with water samples from two perialpine lakes with differing eutrophication status in order to examine the effects of inorganic-nutrient amendments (nitrogen as NO3(-) or NH4(+) and phosphorus as PO4(3-)) on the dynamics, structure, and composition of Planctomycetes and to test the hypothesis that the community structure of Planctomycetes members and that of the other bacteria (without Planctomycetes, here referred to as bacteria-wP, the most represented groups within the community) would be similarly impacted by nutrient additions. Initial samples were characterized by high total nitrogen-to-total phosphorus ratios (range, 39 to 55), suggesting P rather than N was the limiting nutrient for microbial communities. Consistent with this, P additions stimulated phytoplankton growth and affected the community structure of bacteria-wP but, surprisingly, not that of Planctomycetes. N additions did not significantly affect the community structures of bacteria-wP and Planctomycetes or the Planctomycetes phylotype composition. The estimated generation time of Planctomycetes was 123 h. These findings could suggest that the generally well-accepted statement that bacteria (as a whole) are superior to phytoplankton in the ability to obtain phosphorus under P limitation might actually not hold for Planctomycetes. Planctomycetes might be poor competitors for P that do not respond quickly to the nutrient supply, which may help explain why their abundance is low in aquatic systems. The alternative view that Planctomycetes could be strong competitors for P (storing it) is also discussed. Our findings highlight the need for further studies examining Planctomycetes-phosphorus relationships in aquatic ecosystems.

  12. [Congenital anomalies of poor prognosis. Genetics Consensus Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Vargas, Rosa A; Aracena, Mariana; Aravena, Teresa; Cares, Carolina; Cortés, Fanny; Faundes, Víctor; Mellado, Cecilia; Passalacqua, Cristóbal; Sanz, Patricia; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    The Genetic Branch of the Chilean Society of Paediatrics, given the draft Law governing the decriminalisation of abortion on three grounds, focusing on the second ground, which considers the "embryo or foetus suffering from a congenital structural anomaly or a genetic disorder incompatible with life outside the womb", met to discuss the scientific evidence according to which congenital anomalies (CA) may be included in this draft law. Experts in clinical genetics focused on 10 CA, reviewed the literature evidence, and met to discuss it. It was agreed not to use the term "incompatible with life outside the womb", as there are exceptions and longer survivals, and change to "congenital anomaly of poor prognosis (CAPP)". Ten CA were evaluated: serious defects of neural tube closure: anencephaly, iniencephaly and craniorachischisis, pulmonary hypoplasia, acardiac foetus, ectopia cordis, non-mosaic triploidy, "limb body wall" complex, "body stalk" anomaly, trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and bilateral renal agenesis. Findings on the prevalence, natural history, prenatal diagnostic methods, survival, and reported cases of prolonged survival were analysed. Post-natal survival, existence of treatments, and outcomes, as well as natural history without intervention, were taken into account in classifying a CA as a CAPP. A CAPP would be: anencephaly, severe pulmonary hypoplasia, acardiac foetus, cervical ectopia cordis, non-mosaic triploidy, limb body wall complex, body stalk anomaly, non-mosaic trisomy 13, non-mosaic trisomy 18, and bilateral renal agenesis. For their diagnosis, it is required that all pregnant women have access to assessments by foetal anatomy ultrasound and occasionally MRI, and cytogenetic and molecular testing. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal-poor galaxies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Shi, Yong; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-05-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal-poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z ≲ Z⊙/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70μm/f160 μm ratios at a given f160 μm/f250 μm ratio; single modified blackbody (MBB) fittings to the SED at λ ≥ 100 μm still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (β = 2) show that even at 100 μm, about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (˜20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images furthermore reveal that the far-IR colours including f70 μm/f160 μm, f160 μm/f250 μm and f250 μm/f350 μm are all related to the surface densities of young stars as traced by far-UV, 24 μm and star formation rates (SFRs), but not to the stellar mass surface densities. This suggests that the dust emitting at wavelengths from 70 to 350 μm is primarily heated by radiation from young stars.

  14. Poor, powerless and pregnant. Empowering women will benefit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    In South Africa, the better educated women have a responsibility to help out less fortunate women. The possibilities for action could include the following: literacy classes for adult women with the help of teachers, librarians, social workers, development program workers, and among church groups and adult literacy groups; and promotion campaigns to encourage mothers to keep their children in school as long as possible. Women and teenagers could be educated about the complications of teenage births and parental responsibilities. Child spacing should be encouraged as a means of achieving better health and a higher standard of living. Women must be motivated to attend family planning clinics and health education programs. Income generation programs for women could be established. Community improvement projects and new housing projects could be instrumental in improving living conditions. Leadership courses and job creation for women must be provided. These activities would highlight women as assets, such as the UN Population Fund described in its 1992 report of The State of the World. Women's high status has been found to be directly related to economic growth and higher quality of life. 7-9% of a child's mortality risk might be reduced for each year of maternal education. In Africa, the ratio of girls to boys in school attendance averages 80 girls to 100 boys in primary school and 47 girls to 100 boys in secondary school. Almost 66% of adult illiterates were women in 1985: 949 million. Early marriage and childbearing perpetuates the cycle of low status and high fertility. Where human resource development has been high, such as in Asian countries, there have been as many as 78% of women active in the labor force. In South Africa, rural women have had as many as 7 children. The growth rate was 2.3% and population has been doubling every 32 years. At the present rate, greater numbers of women will be poor and illiterate, and their children will continue the cycle.

  15. Poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections: any relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esra, Eryaman; Banu, Oter Ilhan; Erdinc, Aydin

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections. 59 children between 3-12 age intervals were included in this study. The ears were examined by microscope. The findings were marked according to Kempthorne clinical scale and tympanograms were performed. For data analysis of dental caries, dft and DMFT indexes were used in accordance with WHO (World Health Organization) criteria for oral health surveys. The oral hygiene status was determined by using Simplified Oral Hygiene Index of Greene and Vermillion. The scores of 0-1 were classified as low, and of 2-3 as high oral hygiene index (OHI-S). The low OHI-S was taken as the control group (30 patients). The high OHI-S was taken as the study group (29 patients). The effusion scores, the compliance values and the middle ear pressure values in the two groups were compared. The difference between the effusion score values of the control and study groups was found to be statistically meaningful (p = 0.338, and the χ(2) = 2.167). The compliance values of the control and study groups did not differ meaningfully statistically (p = 0.671). However, there was a statistically meaningful low middle ear pressure (p = 0.044, χ(2) = 4.069) in the control group. Since this finding is expected in the study group, instead of the control group, we did not make an issue of this result. We conclude from these clinical results that there is no statistically meaningful relation between the oral hygiene index and the middle ear.

  16. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-09-05

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays . We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus, four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis, and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica. Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/µL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus. Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  17. Trichomoniasis: How do we diagnose in a resource poor setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sivaranjini

    2013-01-01

    (culture, especially in resource poor settings.

  18. Artificial neural network to search for metal-poor galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fei; Liu, Yu-Yan; Kong, Xu; Chen, Yang

    2014-02-01

    Aims: To find a fast and reliable method for selecting metal-poor galaxies (MPGs), especially in large surveys and huge databases, an artificial neural network (ANN) method is applied to a sample of star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 9 (DR9) provided by the Max Planck Institute and the Johns Hopkins University (MPA/JHU). Methods: A two-step approach is adopted: (i) The ANN network must be trained with a subset of objects that are known to be either MPGs or metal rich galaxies (MRGs), treating the strong emission line flux measurements as input feature vectors in n-dimensional space, where n is the number of strong emission line flux ratios. (ii) After the network is trained on a sample of star-forming galaxies, the remaining galaxies are classified in the automatic test analysis as either MPGs or MRGs. We consider several random divisions of the data into training and testing sets; for instance, for our sample, a total of 70 percent of the data are involved in training the algorithm, 15 percent are involved in validating the algorithm, and the remaining 15 percent are used for blind testing the resulting classifier. Results: For target selection, we have achieved an acquisition rate for MPGs of 96 percent and 92 percent for an MPGs threshold of 12 + log (O/H) = 8.00 and 12 + log (O/H) = 8.39, respectively. Running the code takes minutes in most cases under the Matlab 2013a software environment. The ANN method can easily be extended to any MPGs target selection task when the physical property of the target can be expressed as a quantitative variable. The code in the paper is available on the web (http://fshi5388.blog.163.com).

  19. Coping strategies among urban poor: evidence from Nairobi, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djesika D Amendah

    Full Text Available AIMS: In Kenya, it is estimated that 60 to 80% of urban residents live in slum or slum-like conditions. This study investigates expenditures patterns of slum dwellers in Nairobi, their coping strategies and the determinants of those coping strategies. METHOD: We use a dataset from the Indicator Development for Surveillance of Urban Emergencies (IDSUE research study conducted in four Nairobi slums from April 2012 to September 2012. The dataset includes information related to household livelihoods, earned incomes of household members, expenditures, shocks, and coping strategies. RESULTS: Food spending is the single most important component, accounting for 52% of total households' income and 42% of total expenditures. Households report a variety of coping strategies over the last four weeks preceding the interview. The most frequently used strategy is related to reduction in food consumption, followed by the use of credit, with 69% and 52% of households reporting using these strategies respectively. A substantial proportion of households also report removing children from school to manage spending shortfalls. Formal employment, owning a business, rent-free housing, belonging to the two top tiers of income brackets, and being a member of social safety net reduced the likelihood of using any coping strategy. Exposure to shocks and larger number of children under 15 years increased the probability of using a coping strategy. POLICY IMPLICATIONS: Policies that contain food price inflation, improve decent-paying job opportunities for the urban poor are likely to reduce the use of negative coping strategies by providing urban slum dwellers with steady and reliable sources of income. In addition, enhancing access to free primary schooling in the slums would help limit the need to use detrimental strategies like "removing" children from school.

  20. Phonics training for English-speaking poor readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Genevieve; Eve, Philippa M; Jones, Kristy; Banales, Erin; Kohnen, Saskia; Anandakumar, Thushara; Larsen, Linda; Marinus, Eva; Wang, Hua-Chen; Castles, Anne

    2012-12-12

    Around 5% of English speakers have a significant problem with learning to read words. Poor word readers are often trained to use letter-sound rules to improve their reading skills. This training is commonly called phonics. Well over 100 studies have administered some form of phonics training to poor word readers. However, there are surprisingly few systematic reviews or meta-analyses of these studies. The most well-known review was done by the National Reading Panel (Ehri 2001) 12 years ago and needs updating. The most recent review (Suggate 2010) focused solely on children and did not include unpublished studies. The primary aim of this review was to measure the effect that phonics training has on the literacy skills of English-speaking children, adolescents, and adults whose reading was at least one standard deviation (SD), one year, or one grade below the expected level, despite no reported problems that could explain their impaired ability to learn to read. A secondary objective was to explore the impact of various factors, such as length of training or training group size, that might moderate the effect of phonics training on poor word reading skills. We searched the following databases in July 2012: CENTRAL 2012 (Issue 6), MEDLINE 1948 to June week 3 2012, EMBASE 1980 to 2012 week 26, DARE 2013 (Issue 6), ERIC (1966 to current), PsycINFO (1806 to current), CINAHL (1938 to current), Science Citation Index (1970 to 29 June 2012), Social Science Citation Index (1970 to 29 June 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (1990 to 29 June 2012), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Science & Humanities (1990 to 29 June 2012), ZETOC, Index to Theses-UK and Ireland, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, DART Europe E-theses Portal, Australasian Digital Theses Program, Education Research Theses, Electronic Theses Online System, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations

  1. At Work..., and Poor? A Look at the Czech Working Poor Population in the Living Conditions Survey (EU-SILC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarka Sustova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the article is to analyse the working poor employees and their household's social situation in the national income and living conditions survey (EU-SILC. The analysis starts with the definition of the two main groups of employees according to the number of months spent in the full-time employment - those working whole year and those employed for 6 to 11 months. Poverty in earned income concept is used to evaluate poverty at individual level, confronting employee's income with single person household poverty line benchmark. The study then moves to the household level poverty measure based on household's disposable equivalised income. When shifting from the individual income to the household's one the economies of scale represented by an implicit or explicit equivalence scale used in the construction of the household poverty measure play a crucial role. Therefore, attention is paid to the comparison of poverty level based on equivalised disposable income using equivalence scales and per-capita income. At the end, material deprivation of different subgroups of employees according to their poverty status is examined.

  2. Building social networks for maternal and newborn health in poor urban settlements: a cross-sectional study in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alayne M; Nababan, Herfina Y; Hanifi, S M Manzoor Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial influence of social networks on health and wellbeing is well-established. In poor urban settlements in Bangladesh, BRAC's Manoshi programme trains community health workers (CHWs) to support women through pregnancy, delivery and postpartum periods. This paper test the hypothesis that the introduction of CHWs as weak ties into the social networks of Manoshi members mediates improvements in maternal and neonatal health (MNH) best practices by providing support, facilitating ideational change, connecting mother to resources, and strengthening or countering the influence of strong ties. 1000 women who had given birth in the last three months were identified and interviewed as part of ongoing monitoring of 5 poor urban settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh. A social networks questionnaire was administered which elicited women's perceived networks around pregnancy, delivery and post-partum periods. Mediation analysis was performed to test the hypothesis that penetration of Manoshi CHWs into women's perceived networks has a beneficial effect on MNH best practises. The presence and influence of Manoshi CHWs in women's networks significantly mediated the effect of Manoshi membership on MNH best practices. Respondents who were Manoshi members and who listed Manoshi CHWs as part of their support networks were significantly more likely to deliver with a trained birth attendant (OR 3.61; 95%CI 2.36-5.51), to use postnatal care (OR 3.09; 95%CI 1.83-5.22), and to give colostrum to their newborn (OR 7.51; 95%CI 3.51-16.05). Manoshi has succeeded in penetrating the perceived pregnancy, delivery and post-partum networks of poor urban women through the introduction of trained CHWs. Study findings demonstrate the benefits of moving beyond urban health care delivery models that concentrate on the provision of clinical services by medical providers, to an approach that nurtures the power of social networks as a means to support the poorest and most marginalized in changing

  3. Orbitofrontal dysfunction predicts poor prognosis in chronic migraine with medication overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carrasco, María; Bilbao, Amaia; García-Moncó, Juan C

    2011-08-01

    Chronic migraine patients are at risk of developing a medication overuse. Brain functional studies in these patients have demonstrated an orbitofrontal hypometabolism, persistent after overuse cessation. Orbitofrontal dysfunction is also present in addiction and thus could predispose migraineurs to medication overuse. The aim of this study was to investigate if orbitofrontal dysfunction can be demonstrated in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse by performing a systematic neuropsychological evaluation focused on tests that assess frontal lobe function. Second, to establish whether it is related to the outcome of these patients. We prospectively studied 42 chronic migraine patients with medication overuse, 42 episodic migraineurs and 41 controls on a battery of neuropsychological tasks evaluating the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral functioning. Depression, anxiety, and personality traits were also assessed. Chronic migraineurs with medication overuse showed a significant impairment in orbitofrontal task performance and higher depression scores as compared to episodic migraineurs and controls. Dorsolateral dysfunction was present in both groups of migraneurs, who also had higher rates of anxiety as compared to controls. After 1 year of follow-up, migraine patient's outcome was classified according to their medication overuse status. A negative outcome that included persistent or new-onset medication overuse was present in 34% of migraineurs and was associated with baseline poor orbitofrontal task performance, and with mild dorsolateral dysfunction, higher rates of depression, anxiety and neuroticism-anxiety traits. Formal education and years with migraine did not influence outcome. Orbitofrontal dysfunction is present in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse, and associates with a poor outcome at 1 year of follow-up. Neuropsychological evaluation in migraine may help to detect patients prone to overuse so that appropriate therapeutic

  4. Novel electrosprayed nanospherules for enhanced aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Jin, Sung Giu; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present research was to develop a novel electrosprayed nanospherule providing the most optimized aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability for poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. Methods Numerous fenofibrate-loaded electrosprayed nanospherules were prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Labrafil® M 2125 as carriers using the electrospray technique, and the effect of the carriers on drug solubility and solvation was assessed. The solid state characterization of an optimized formulation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Oral bioavailability in rats was also evaluated for the formulation of an optimized nanospherule in comparison with free drug and a conventional fenofibrate-loaded solid dispersion. Results All of the electrosprayed nanospherule formulations had remarkably enhanced aqueous solubility and dissolution compared with free drug. Moreover, Labrafil M 2125, a surfactant, had a positive influence on the solubility and dissolution of the drug in the electrosprayed nanospherule. Increases were observed as the PVP/drug ratio increased to 4:1, but higher ratios gave no significant increases. In particular, an electrosprayed nanospherule composed of fenofibrate, PVP, and Labrafil M 2125 at the weight ratio of 1:4:0.5 resulted in a particle size of amorphous state. It demonstrated the highest solubility (32.51±2.41 μg/mL), an excellent dissolution (~85% in 10 minutes), and an oral bioavailability ~2.5-fold better than that of the free drug. It showed similar oral bioavailability compared to the conventional solid dispersion. Conclusion Electrosprayed nanospherules, which provide improved solubility and bioavailability, are promising drug delivery tools for oral administration of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. PMID:26834471

  5. JAM-A expression positively correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Elaine A; McGee, Sharon F; Jirstrom, Karin; Doyle, Emma M; Brennan, Donal J; Landberg, Goran; Dervan, Peter A; Hopkins, Ann M; Gallagher, William M

    2009-09-15

    The cell-cell adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) influences epithelial cell morphology and migration. As migration is required for tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we sought to elucidate the role of JAM-A in invasive breast cancer. A breast cancer tissue microarray was analyzed for JAM-A protein expression, in parallel with analysis of JAM-A gene expression data from a breast cancer clinical dataset. Our data demonstrate a novel association between JAM-A gene and protein upregulation and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To mechanistically dissect this process, we used lentiviral technology to stably knock down JAM-A gene expression by shRNA in MCF7 breast cancer cells, which express high-endogenous levels of JAM-A. We also antagonized JAM-A function in wild-type MCF7 cells using an inhibitory antibody that blocks JAM-A dimerization. Knockdown or functional antagonism of JAM-A decreased breast cancer cell migration in scratch-wound assays. Reductions in beta1-integrin protein levels were observed after JAM-A-knockdown in MCF7 cells, suggesting a mechanism for reduced motility after loss of JAM-A. Consistent with this hypothesis, tissue microarray analysis of beta1-integrin protein expression in invasive breast cancer tissues revealed a trend toward high beta1-integrin protein levels being indicative of poor prognosis. Twenty-two percent of patients were observed to coexpress high levels of JAM-A and beta1-integrin protein, and MDA-MB-231 breast cells stably overexpressing JAM-A showed an increase in beta1-integrin protein expression. Our results are consistent with a previously unreported role for JAM-A overexpression as a possible mechanism contributing to progression in primary breast cancer; and a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Nutritional quality of two cyanobacteria : How rich is 'poor' food?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, K.; Jonasdottir, Sigrun

    1997-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have often been described to be nutritionally inadequate and to interfere with zooplankton feeding. In laboratory experiments we offered 2 cyanobacteria, a unicellular Microcystis aeruginosa strain and the filamentous Nodularia sprumigena, to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa...... as the sole diet and in food mixtures with the nutritious diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. Egg production was used as criterion of food quality. The use of cyanobacteria alone was an insufficient diet. However, with increasing additions of M. aeruginosa and N. spumigena to the diatom, different effects were...... observed. Large additions of cyanobacteria resulted in lower egg production and often in elevated mortality of the females, but small additions of M. aeruginosa caused an increase of about 25 % in egg production compared to a pure diatom diet. The influence of similar low concentrations of N. spumigena...

  7. Gender differences in exposure to SRH information and risky sexual debut among poor Myanmar youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin Zaw, Phyu Phyu; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; McNeil, Edward; Htay, Thien Thien

    2013-12-05

    Globally, the proportion of youths has been steadily increasing, especially in Asia. This vulnerable population has limited exposure to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information leading to various reproductive health (RH) problems including risky sexual debut, unwanted pregnancy, unsafe abortion as well as STI/HIV infections. Among known social variations which influence youth's RH, gender differences are critical for planning necessary gender appropriate interventions. This study aimed to identify gender differences in exposure to SRH information and risky sexual debut as well as associated factors among Myanmar youths in poor suburban communities of Mandalay City. A total of 444 randomly selected youths (aged 15-24 years) from all poor, suburban communities in Mandalay City took part in our survey. Gender differences in exposure to SRH information and risky sexual debut were assessed by bivariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was used to confirm gender differences and identify independent factors associated with main outcomes separately for males and females as well as for both. Of 444 youths interviewed, 215 were males and 229 were females. Gender differences were seen in both exposures to SRH information (p = 0.013) and risky sexual debut (p = 0.003). These gender differences were confirmed by multivariate analysis even after adjusting for other risk factors. For exposure to SRH information, only age group and schooling status were significant factors for females. As well as those two factors, media exposure and parental guardianship were significant factors among males. Only positive norm of premarital sex increased the likelihood of risky sexual debut among males. In contrast, unwillingness at sexual debut was a risk factor and a higher education level was a protective factor for risky sexual debut among females. Limited exposure to SRH information and high risky sexual debut among poor youths were found. There were different influential

  8. An altered Pseudomonas diversity is recovered from soil by using nutrient-poor Pseudomonas-selective soil extract media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagot, N.; Nybroe, O.; Nielsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    . Several of these analyses showed that the amount of Casamino Acids significantly influenced the diversity of the recovered Pseudomonas isolates. Furthermore, the data suggested that specific Pseudomonas subpopulations were represented on the nutrient-poor media. The NAA 1:100 medium, containing ca. 15 mg......We designed five Pseudomonas-selective soil extract NAA media containing the selective properties of trimethoprim and sodium lauroyl sarcosine and 0 to 100% of the amount of Casamino Acids used in the classical Pseudomonas-selective Gould's S1 medium. All of the isolates were confirmed...

  9. Characteristics of energy access to the poor and to impoverished regions in India[Dissertation 17033

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmler, A.

    2007-07-01

    therein have higher levels of education, better sanitation facilities, and greater access to tap water; their houses are in better condition; and they have a higher daily caloric intake. For this reason, energy measures may form a practical basis for a proxy indicator of poverty, as the use of energy indicators is not restricted to environmental and economical issues but is significant for social issues as well. Although energy development is closely related to measures that focus on basic human needs, a single energy-based indicator cannot grasp the multidimensional quality of poverty. Energy is a factor in fulfilling each of these needs, but the extent of these needs is not completely captured by measuring energy poverty alone. Therefore, while access adjusted useful energy correlates fairly well with most of the analysed poverty dimensions, it is only a rough approximation for poverty. The relationship between energy and poverty, however, is a reciprocal one. Improving the poors' access to modern energy sources can make an important difference to their welfare and can be a catalyst for human development: specifically, electricity may be an important trigger for development. Yet, there are still about 450 million people in India without access to electricity. In this way, one observes remarkable regional differences in the electrification rate. These observed regional disparities in electrification can be explained by a combination of factors that influence both village and household electrification. While the geographic endowment of a region was found to be relevant for village electrification, this was not the case for household electrification. A panel data analysis shows further that having a high proportion of agricultural area has a positive effect on a village's electrification rate, while an unfavourable settlement structure and a large state area constrain its electrification rate. In particular, the existence of small but numerous villages seems to

  10. Poor consistency in evaluating South African adults with neurogenic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mckinley; Pillay, Mershen

    2017-01-23

    Speech-language therapists are specifically trained in clinically evaluating swallowing in adults with acute stroke. Incidence of dysphagia following acute stroke is high in South Africa, and health implications can be fatal, making optimal management of this patient population crucial. However, despite training and guidelines for best practice in clinically evaluating swallowing in adults with acute stroke, there are low levels of consistency in these practice patterns. The aim was to explore the clinical practice activities of speech-language therapists in the clinical evaluation of swallowing in adults with acute stroke. Practice activities reviewed included the use and consistency of clinical components and resources utilised. Clinical components were the individual elements evaluated in the clinical evaluation of swallowing (e.g. lip seal, vocal quality, etc.)Methods: The questionnaire used in the study was replicated and adapted from a study increasing content- and criterion-related validity. A narrative literature review determined what practice patterns existed in the clinical evaluation of swallowing in adults. A pilot study was conducted to increase validity and reliability. Purposive sampling was used by sending a self-administered, electronic questionnaire to members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Thirty-eight participants took part in the study. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and the small qualitative component was subjected to textual analysis. There was high frequency of use of 41% of the clinical components in more than 90% of participants (n = 38). Less than 50% of participants frequently assessed sensory function and gag reflex and used pulse oximetry, cervical auscultation and indirect laryngoscopy. Approximately a third of participants showed high (30.8%), moderate (35.9%) and poor (33.3%) consistency of practice each. Nurses, food and liquids and medical consumables were used usually and

  11. Poor consistency in evaluating South African adults with neurogenic dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mckinley Andrews

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Speech-language therapists are specifically trained in clinically evaluating swallowing in adults with acute stroke. Incidence of dysphagia following acute stroke is high in South Africa, and health implications can be fatal, making optimal management of this patient population crucial. However, despite training and guidelines for best practice in clinically evaluating swallowing in adults with acute stroke, there are low levels of consistency in these practice patterns.Objective: The aim was to explore the clinical practice activities of speech-language therapists in the clinical evaluation of swallowing in adults with acute stroke. Practice activities reviewed included the use and consistency of clinical components and resources utilised. Clinical components were the individual elements evaluated in the clinical evaluation of swallowing (e.g. lip seal, vocal quality, etc.Methods: The questionnaire used in the study was replicated and adapted from a study increasing content- and criterion-related validity. A narrative literature review determined what practice patterns existed in the clinical evaluation of swallowing in adults. A pilot study was conducted to increase validity and reliability. Purposive sampling was used by sending a self-administered, electronic questionnaire to members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Thirty-eight participants took part in the study. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and the small qualitative component was subjected to textual analysis.Results: There was high frequency of use of 41% of the clinical components in more than 90% of participants (n = 38. Less than 50% of participants frequently assessed sensory function and gag reflex and used pulse oximetry, cervical auscultation and indirect laryngoscopy. Approximately a third of participants showed high (30.8%, moderate (35.9% and poor (33.3% consistency of practice each. Nurses, food and liquids and

  12. Early termination of breastfeeding among Philippine urban poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, G M; Guthrie, H A; Fernandez, T L; Estrera, N

    1983-01-01

    The research objective was to identify factors that caused mothers to terminate breastfeeding prematurely, i.e., before the infant reached his or her 1st birthday. Nursing for at least 1 year was a minimum goal of health authorities in the area of this research. The study was conducted in 2 urban poor areas and in 2 fringe squatter settlements of Cebu City, a metropolitan area of 500,000 people in the central Philippines. The data were collected by 2 women field workers. The 130 participants, who were within 3 months of delivery, pre- or postpartum were recruited in 1979. They were visited in their homes once a month by the worker who weighed the mother and the baby, inquired about their diets, and recorded breastfeeding experiences and plans. Special attention was given to any problems the mothers were having that might interfere with continued nursing. Other than encouraging mothers to use the local health center, workers did not intervene to support breastfeeding. The mothers were followed for at least the crucial 1st 6 months. Many were followed for a year or more. Of those who agreed to participate prior to delivery, and who composed 1/3 of the total group, some 95% initiated breastfeeding. Of the 3 who did not, 2 tried to nurse but gave up when the newborn showed persistent diarrhea. Between 10-20% of babies were on a mixed diet of breast and bottle feeding, some beginning as early as the 1st month when mothers returned to part-time work. Other mothers, feeling that the babies were not getting enough to eat, added bottles regularly. This pattern did not necessarily lead to the early termination of breastfeeding. With the exception of 2 instances when mothers decided that their babies were big enough to get along without breast milk, the mothers were forced by circumstances as they perceived them to wean the child. Almost all the terminations were abrupt, with the mother continuing to have an adequate supply of milk. The insufficient milk situation reported by

  13. Infant feeding practices in a poor district of Santo Domingo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclennan, J D; Spady, D W

    1994-01-01

    During August-December 1989, in the Dominican Republic, local health promoters interviewed 103 primary caretakers and took anthropometric measurements from 103 children aged 3 years and under during home visits in three poor neighborhoods of Los Alcarrizos (Alto de Chavon, Barrio Landia, and Pueblo Nuevo) to examine infant feeding practices. 95% of the mothers had started breast feeding. The median duration of breast feeding was 7.5 months. Almost 33% had quit breast feeding by 3 months. Perception of insufficient milk was the leading reason for early discontinuation of exclusive breast feeding. The local pharmacies in all three communities offered powdered milk. About 25% of mothers began using breast milk substitutes within the first week. A non-infant formula milk powder was the most commonly used breast milk substitute. 30% of mothers stored prepared milk for later feeds, as long as half a day. Only 13% of households had a refrigerator. The most frequently used first weaning foods were orange juice, lime juice, and beans. 76% of mothers had used or were currently using baby bottles. 95% of them reported washing the bottle in boiling water. The median age of introducing the baby bottle was 3 days. Only 44% of mother covered prepared food during storage. The most commonly eaten foods among children aged at least 1 year were milk, beans, rice, and citrus fruits. Yet the children did not eat all these foods daily. 18% of 1-2 year olds and 13% of 2-3 year olds did not eat meats and alternatives regularly. 7% of 1-2 year olds and 10% of 2-3 year olds did not eat fruits and vegetables regularly. 4% of 1-2 year olds and 3% of 2-3 year olds did not eat breads and cereals regularly. About 14% of all children were not consuming any milk at the time of the survey. These findings will be used to refine nutrition education programs in the district to make them more effective.

  14. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68 or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40 significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68 (p<0.05. Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1 compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05, and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05 and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1, anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05, and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05 genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3 compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes.

  15. Poor Asthma Sufferers Often Stuck in Homes That Worsen Their Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162878.html Poor Asthma Sufferers Often Stuck in Homes That Worsen Their ... Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Poor Americans with asthma face constant challenges in managing their respiratory disease -- ...

  16. PS1-10bzj: A FAST, HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA IN A METAL-POOR HOST GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M.; Sanders, N. E.; Challis, P. M.; Czekala, I.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Leibler, C.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Roth, K. C. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Scolnic, D., E-mail: rlunnan@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2013-07-10

    We present observations and analysis of PS1-10bzj, a superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey at a redshift z = 0.650. Spectroscopically, PS1-10bzj is similar to the hydrogen-poor SLSNe 2005ap and SCP 06F6, though with a steeper rise and lower peak luminosity (M{sub bol} {approx_equal} -21.4 mag) than previous events. We construct a bolometric light curve, and show that while PS1-10bzj's energetics were less extreme than previous events, its luminosity still cannot be explained by radioactive nickel decay alone. We explore both a magnetar spin-down and circumstellar interaction scenario and find that either can fit the data. PS1-10bzj is located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South and the host galaxy is imaged in a number of surveys, including with the Hubble Space Telescope. The host is a compact dwarf galaxy (M{sub B} Almost-Equal-To -18 mag, diameter {approx}< 800 pc), with a low stellar mass (M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }), young stellar population ({tau}{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr), and a star formation rate of {approx}2-3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The specific star formation rate is the highest seen in an SLSN host so far ({approx}100 Gyr{sup -1}). We detect the [O III] {lambda}4363 line, and find a low metallicity: 12 + (O/H) = 7.8 {+-} 0.2 ({approx_equal} 0.1 Z{sub Sun }). Together, this indicates that at least some of the progenitors of SLSNe come from young, low-metallicity populations.

  17. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve McArthur

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept—particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types of spoken language, and two types of attention. We found that poor readers with poor attention had low academic self-concept, while poor readers with poor spoken language had low general self-concept in addition to low academic self-concept. In contrast, poor readers with typical spoken language and attention did not have low self-concept of any type. We also discovered that academic self-concept was reliably associated with reading and receptive spoken vocabulary, and that general self-concept was reliably associated with spoken vocabulary. These outcomes suggest that poor readers with multiple impairments in reading, language, and attention are at higher risk for low academic and general self-concept, and hence need to be assessed for self-concept in clinical practice. Our results also highlight the need for further investigation into the heterogeneous nature of self-concept in poor readers.

  18. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Genevieve; Castles, Anne; Kohnen, Saskia; Banales, Erin

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept-particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types of spoken language, and two types of attention. We found that poor readers with poor attention had low academic self-concept, while poor readers with poor spoken language had low general self-concept in addition to low academic self-concept. In contrast, poor readers with typical spoken language and attention did not have low self-concept of any type. We also discovered that academic self-concept was reliably associated with reading and receptive spoken vocabulary, and that general self-concept was reliably associated with spoken vocabulary. These outcomes suggest that poor readers with multiple impairments in reading, language, and attention are at higher risk for low academic and general self-concept, and hence need to be assessed for self-concept in clinical practice. Our results also highlight the need for further investigation into the heterogeneous nature of self-concept in poor readers.

  19. Predicting Poor Achievement in Early Grade School Using Kindergarten Scores on Simple Cognitive Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Marcia Strong; Delgado, Christine F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, kindergarten children's scores on nine cognitive tasks were evaluated as potential predictors of poor achievement in first grade. A set of five tasks successfully identified 83% of children who were poor readers in first grade, while just three tasks identified 72% of children who were poor achievers in math in first grade. There…

  20. High prevalence of poor fitness among Danish adults, especially among those with high cardiovascular mortality risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Kirsten; Vinther Skriver, Mette; Terkildsen Maindal, Helle

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Yet, our knowledge about the prevalence of poor CRF is limited. We investigated the prevalence of poor CRF among middle-aged Danish adults from a community-based health promotio...

  1. Prevalence of Obesity: A Public Health Problem Poorly Understood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa A. Nicklas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA in support of a total diet approach to achieving diet and health goals, especially as they relate to the obesity epidemic. However, some scientists and organizations have identified one food, food group, or nutrient as the cause of the obesity epidemic and recommend that simply reducing that food/food group/nutrient will solve the problem. This is simplistic and unlikely to be effective in long term management of the obesity problem. This article also acknowledges discrepancies in the literature and the lack of consensus opinions from systematic reviews. Failure to consider the evidence as a whole can lead to inaccurate reports which may, in turn, adversely influence clinical practice, public policy, and future research. This article also considers where the line should be drawn between individual choice and responsibility and public regulation. Using sugar sweetened beverages as an example, the article considers the lack of a consistent association between added sugars and weight in the literature and calls for policy recommendations that are based on science and emphasizes the need for evidence-based policies rather than policy-based evidence.

  2. Are You Your Friends' Friend? Poor Perception of Friendship Ties Limits the Ability to Promote Behavioral Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaatouq, Abdullah; Radaelli, Laura; Pentland, Alex; Shmueli, Erez

    2016-01-01

    Persuasion is at the core of norm creation, emergence of collective action, and solutions to 'tragedy of the commons' problems. In this paper, we show that the directionality of friendship ties affect the extent to which individuals can influence the behavior of each other. Moreover, we find that people are typically poor at perceiving the directionality of their friendship ties and that this can significantly limit their ability to engage in cooperative arrangements. This could lead to failures in establishing compatible norms, acting together, finding compromise solutions, and persuading others to act. We then suggest strategies to overcome this limitation by using two topological characteristics of the perceived friendship network. The findings of this paper have significant consequences for designing interventions that seek to harness social influence for collective action.

  3. Risk Factors of Poor Prognosis after Whiplash Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Suissa

    2003-01-01

    and symptoms that were found to be independently associated with a slower recovery from whiplash, besides female gender and older age, were neck pain on palpation; muscle pain; pain or numbness radiating from neck to arms, hands or shoulders; and headache. Together, the presence of all these factors in females aged 60 predicted a median recovery time of 262 days, compared with 17 days for younger males aged 20 who do not have any of these factors. In contrast, using the Quebec classification of signs and symptoms, the median recovery time varied from 17 to 123 days. We conclude that several socio-demographic and crash-related factors, as well as several signs and symptoms, including a combination of specific musculoskeletal and neurological ones that whiplash patients present with, are predictive of a longer recovery period. These patients should be targeted for an early intervention programme aimed at managing whiplash patients with a poor prognosis.

  4. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Russell, Sara, E-mail: r.steele@uclmail.net [Meteoritics and Cosmic mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and

  5. Towards improved solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs: cryogenic co-grinding of piroxicam with carrier polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkina, Anna; Semjonov, Kristian; Hakola, Maija; Vuorinen, Sirpa; Repo, Timo; Yliruusi, Jouko; Aruväli, Jaan; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (SDs) open up exciting opportunities in formulating poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). In the present study, novel catalytic pretreated softwood cellulose (CPSC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were investigated as carrier polymers for preparing and stabilizing cryogenic co-ground SDs of poorly water-soluble piroxicam (PRX). CPSC was isolated from pine wood (Pinus sylvestris). Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used for characterizing the solid-state changes and drug-polymer interactions. High-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the particle size and surface morphology of starting materials and final cryogenic co-ground SDs. In addition, the molecular aspects of drug-polymer interactions and stabilization mechanisms are presented. The results showed that the carrier polymer influenced both the degree of amorphization of PRX and stabilization against crystallization. The cryogenic co-ground SDs prepared from PVP showed an enhanced dissolution rate of PRX, while the corresponding SDs prepared from CPSC exhibited a clear sustained release behavior. In conclusion, cryogenic co-grinding provides a versatile method for preparing amorphous SDs of poorly water-soluble APIs. The solid-state stability and dissolution behavior of such co-ground SDs are to a great extent dependent on the carrier polymer used.

  6. Blinded Outcome Assessment Was Infrequently Used and Poorly Reported in Open Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan C Kahan

    Full Text Available Unblinded outcome assessment can lead to biased estimates of treatment effect in randomised trials. We reviewed published trials to assess how often blinded assessment is used, and whether its use varies according to the type of outcome or assessor.A review of parallel group, individually randomised phase III trials published in four general medical journals (BMJ, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine in 2010.Whether assessment of the primary outcome was blinded, and whether this differed according to outcome or assessor type.We identified 258 eligible trials. Of these, 106 (41% were reported as double-blind, and 152 (59% as partially or fully open-label (that is, they included some groups who were unblinded, such as patients, those delivering the intervention, or those in charge of medical care. Of the 152 open trials, 125 required outcome assessment. Of these 125 trials, only 26% stated that outcome assessment was blinded; 51% gave no information on whether assessment was blinded or not. Furthermore, 18% of trials did not state who performed the assessment. The choice of outcome type (e.g. instrument measured, rated, or naturally occurring event did not appear to influence whether blinded assessment was performed (range 24-32% for the most common outcome types. However, the choice of outcome assessor did influence blinding; independent assessors were blinded much more frequently (71% than participant (5% or physician (24% assessors. Despite this, open trials did not use independent assessors any more frequently than double-blind trials (17% vs. 18% respectively.Blinding of outcome assessors is infrequently used and poorly reported. Increased use of independent assessors could increase the frequency of blinded assessment.

  7. Poor Prognosis After Second Locoregional Recurrences in the CALOR Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapnir, Irene L; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Geyer, Charles E; Paterson, Alexander H G; Láng, István; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Regan, Meredith M; Wolmark, Norman; Aebi, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRRs) of breast cancer confer a significant risk for the development of distant metastasis. Management practices and second ILRR events in the Chemotherapy as Adjuvant for LOcally Recurrent breast cancer (CALOR) trial were investigated. In this study, 162 patients with ILRR were randomly assigned to receive postoperative chemotherapy or no chemotherapy. Descriptive statistics characterize outcomes according to local therapy and the influence of hormone receptor status on subsequent recurrences. Competing risk regression models, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate associations between treatment, site of second recurrence, and outcome. The median follow-up period was 4.9 years. Of the 98 patients who received breast-conserving primary surgery 89 had an ipsilateral-breast tumor recurrence. Salvage mastectomy was performed for 73 patients and repeat lumpectomy for 16 patients. Another eight patients had nodal ILRR, and one patient had chest wall ILRR. Among 64 patients whose primary surgery was mastectomy, 52 had chest wall/skin ILRR, and 12 had nodal ILRR. For 15 patients, a second ILRR developed a median of 1.6 years (range 0.08-4.8 years) after ILRR. All second ILRRs occurred for patients with progesterone receptor-negative ILRR. Death occurred for 7 (47 %) of 15 patients with a second ILRR and 19 (51 %) of 37 patients with a distant recurrence. As shown in the multivariable analysis, the significant predictors of survival after either a second ILRR or distant recurrence were chemotherapy for the primary cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.55; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.15-10.9; p = 0.03) and the interval (continuous) from the primary surgery (HR, 0.87; 95 % CI, 0.75-1.00; p = 0.05). Second ILRRs represented about one third of all recurrence events after ILRR, and all were PR-negative. These second ILRRs and distant metastases portend an unfavorable outcome.

  8. Low self-concept in poor readers: prevalence, heterogeneity, and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve McArthur; Anne Castles; Saskia Kohnen; Erin Banales

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that poor readers are at increased risk for various types of low self-concept—particularly academic self-concept. However, this evidence ignores the heterogeneous nature of poor readers, and hence the likelihood that not all poor readers have low self-concept. The aim of this study was to better understand which types of poor readers have low self-concept. We tested 77 children with poor reading for their age for four types of self-concept, four types of reading, three types...

  9. Characteristics of energy access to the poor and to impoverished regions in India[Dissertation 17033

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmler, A.

    2007-07-01

    therein have higher levels of education, better sanitation facilities, and greater access to tap water; their houses are in better condition; and they have a higher daily caloric intake. For this reason, energy measures may form a practical basis for a proxy indicator of poverty, as the use of energy indicators is not restricted to environmental and economical issues but is significant for social issues as well. Although energy development is closely related to measures that focus on basic human needs, a single energy-based indicator cannot grasp the multidimensional quality of poverty. Energy is a factor in fulfilling each of these needs, but the extent of these needs is not completely captured by measuring energy poverty alone. Therefore, while access adjusted useful energy correlates fairly well with most of the analysed poverty dimensions, it is only a rough approximation for poverty. The relationship between energy and poverty, however, is a reciprocal one. Improving the poors' access to modern energy sources can make an important difference to their welfare and can be a catalyst for human development: specifically, electricity may be an important trigger for development. Yet, there are still about 450 million people in India without access to electricity. In this way, one observes remarkable regional differences in the electrification rate. These observed regional disparities in electrification can be explained by a combination of factors that influence both village and household electrification. While the geographic endowment of a region was found to be relevant for village electrification, this was not the case for household electrification. A panel data analysis shows further that having a high proportion of agricultural area has a positive effect on a village's electrification rate, while an unfavourable settlement structure and a large state area constrain its electrification rate. In particular, the existence of small but numerous villages seems to

  10. Application of a revised Water Poverty Index to target the water poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriga, R Giné; Foguet, A Pérez

    2011-01-01

    The Water Poverty Index (WPI) has been recognized as a useful tool in policy analysis. The index integrates various physical, social and environmental aspects to enable more holistic assessment of water resources. However, soundness of this tool relies on two complementary aspects: (i) inadequate techniques employed in index construction would produce unreliable results, and (ii) poor dissemination of final outcome would reduce applicability of the index to influence policy-making. From a methodological point of view, a revised alternative to calculate the index was developed in a previous study. This paper is therefore concerned not with the method employed in index construction, but with how the composite can be applied to support decision-making processes. In particular, the paper examines different approaches to exploit the index as a policy tool. A number of alternatives to disseminate achieved results are presented. The implications of applying the composite at different spatial scales are highlighted. Turkana District, in Kenya has been selected as initial case study to test the applicability and validity of the index. The paper concludes that the WPI approach provides a relevant tool for guiding appropriate action and policy-making towards more equitable allocation of water resources.

  11. Growing up poor: long-term implications for eating patterns and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christine M; Bove, Caron F; Miller, Emily O

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to understand how poverty-associated food deprivation in childhood contributes to the well-known relationship between low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood and obesity in the adult years. Thirty low-income, rural women with at least one child were followed for over three years with annual semi-structured interviews collecting quantitative and qualitative data. For the quantitative portion, the measures of interest were body mass index (BMI), food insecurity, eating patterns, and SES. For the qualitative portion, text from the interviews was analyzed using the constant comparative method. Growing up in a poor household was associated with increased risk of overweight and obesity in adulthood. Experiences of poverty-associated food deprivation in childhood appeared to super-motivate some women to actively avoid food insecurity in adulthood. It also influenced the women's current food preferences. Tremendous excitement accompanied the availability of food after periods of deprivation in both the women and their children. Some women had used food to meet emotional needs in childhood and overeating had become a generalized response to negative emotional states in the adult years. Food deprivation in childhood and associated attitudes and behaviors towards food are one possible mechanism for explaining the association between childhood poverty and adult obesity.

  12. Requesting Help to Understand Medical Information Among People Living with HIV and Poor Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowski, Jennifer; Chen, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Health literacy is known to influence medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. People who experience difficulty reading health information may benefit from asking others to assist them with reading, interpreting, and understanding medical information. We examined medical chart-abstracted HIV viral load, medication adherence assessed by unannounced pill counts, and adherence improvement strategies among 245 individuals with lower-health literacy who do not request assistance, and 229 who do request assistance with reading and understanding health information. Participants were people living with HIV who were taking antiretroviral therapy and scored below 90% correct on a standardized test of functional health literacy. After controlling for health literacy scores, requesting informational assistance was associated with strategies used to improve adherence; individuals who asked for assistance were significantly more likely to use multiple adherence strategies. However, despite requesting informational assistance and using more adherence strategies, participants who requested informational assistance evidenced poorer treatment adherence and poorer suppression of HIV replication. Requesting assistance was more common among those with the poorest health literacy and therefore greatest challenges to adherence. People living with HIV who have poor health literacy skills may benefit from medication adherence programs and requests for assistance afford opportunities for social interventions. PMID:23701199

  13. Interpolation of observed rainfall fields for flood forecasting in data poor areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogelis Prada, M. C.; Werner, M. G. F.

    2010-09-01

    Observed rainfall fields constitute a crucial input for operational flood forecasting, providing boundary conditions to hydrological models for prediction of flows and levels in relevant forecast points. Such observed fields are derived through interpolation from available observed data from rain gauges. The reliability of the derived rainfall field depends on the density of the gauge network within the basin, as well as on the variability of the rainfall itself, and the interpolation method. In this paper interpolation methods to estimate rainfall fields under data- poor environments are researched, with the derived rainfall fields being used in operational flood warnings. Methods are applied in a small catchment in Bogotá, Colombia. This catchment has a complex climatology, which is strongly influenced by the inter-tropical convergence zone and orographic enhancement. As is common in such catchments in developing countries, the rainfall gauging network is sparse, while the need for reliable rainfall in flood forecasting is high. The extensive high flood risk zones in the lower areas of the catchment, where urbanization processes are characterized by unplanned occupation of areas close to rivers, is common in developing countries. Results show the sensitivity of interpolated rainfall fields to the interpolation methods chosen, and the importance of the use of indicator variables for improving the spatial distribution of interpolated rainfall. The value of these methods in establishing optimal new gauging sites for augmenting the sparse gauge network is demonstrated.

  14. Collective attention and stock prices: evidence from Google Trends data on Standard and Poor's 100.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael H Heiberger

    Full Text Available Today´s connected world allows people to gather information in shorter intervals than ever before, widely monitored by massive online data sources. As a dramatic economic event, recent financial crisis increased public interest for large companies considerably. In this paper, we exploit this change in information gathering behavior by utilizing Google query volumes as a "bad news" indicator for each corporation listed in the Standard and Poor´s 100 index. Our results provide not only an investment strategy that gains particularly in times of financial turmoil and extensive losses by other market participants, but reveal new sectoral patterns between mass online behavior and (bearish stock market movements. Based on collective attention shifts in search queries for individual companies, hence, these findings can help to identify early warning signs of financial systemic risk. However, our disaggregated data also illustrate the need for further efforts to understand the influence of collective attention shifts on financial behavior in times of regular market activities with less tremendous changes in search volumes.

  15. Collective attention and stock prices: evidence from Google Trends data on Standard and Poor's 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiberger, Raphael H

    2015-01-01

    Today´s connected world allows people to gather information in shorter intervals than ever before, widely monitored by massive online data sources. As a dramatic economic event, recent financial crisis increased public interest for large companies considerably. In this paper, we exploit this change in information gathering behavior by utilizing Google query volumes as a "bad news" indicator for each corporation listed in the Standard and Poor´s 100 index. Our results provide not only an investment strategy that gains particularly in times of financial turmoil and extensive losses by other market participants, but reveal new sectoral patterns between mass online behavior and (bearish) stock market movements. Based on collective attention shifts in search queries for individual companies, hence, these findings can help to identify early warning signs of financial systemic risk. However, our disaggregated data also illustrate the need for further efforts to understand the influence of collective attention shifts on financial behavior in times of regular market activities with less tremendous changes in search volumes.

  16. Nonword repetition in children with cochlear implants: a potential clinical marker of poor language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Susan; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Sansom, Emily; Twersky, Jill; Lowenstein, Joanna H

    2014-11-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) can facilitate the acquisition of spoken language for deaf children, but challenges remain. Language skills dependent on phonological sensitivity are most at risk for these children, so having an effective way to diagnose problems at this level would be of value for school speech-language pathologists. The goal of this study was to assess whether a nonword repetition (NWR) task could serve that purpose. Participants were 104 second graders: 49 with normal hearing (NH) and 55 with CIs. In addition to NWR, children were tested on 10 measures involving phonological awareness and processing, serial recall of words, vocabulary, reading, and grammar. Children with CIs performed more poorly than children with NH on NWR, and sensitivity to phonological structure alone explained that performance for children in both groups. For children with CIs, 2 audiological factors positively influenced outcomes on NWR: being identified with hearing loss at a younger age and having experience with wearing a hearing aid on the unimplanted ear at the time of receiving a 1st CI. NWR scores were better able to rule out than to rule in such language deficits. Well-designed NWR tasks could have clinical utility in assessments of language acquisition for school-age children with CIs.

  17. [Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage in poor grade neurological status: Study of prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Pérez, Coralia; Morera-Molina, Jesús; Espino-Postigo, Carlos; Jiménez-O'Shanahan, Aruma

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and predict factors influencing prognosis and/or clinical outcome at 6 months in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grades iv and v. This was a retrospective study of a consecutive series of 394 patients admitted to our hospital with clinical and radiological diagnosis of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, from 1 January 1999 to 30 June 2009. We selected 121 patients who met the criteria of being in WFNS grades iv or v before treatment; 3 patients were excluded due to loss of tracking. The outcome variable was assessed 6 months after the event using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. A P valueGlasgow Coma Scale lower than 7 points (P<.0001), those who were grade v (P<.0001) in the pre-treatment WFNS scale and those with pupillary disorder (P=.002) had a worse clinical outcome. Likewise, those with associated intraparenchymal hematoma (P=.020) and those not receiving any treatment (P=.020) were also associated with a poor clinical outcome. These results were statistically significant. Patients admitted with a WFNS grade v and/or presenting pupil disorder and/or intraparenchymal hematoma were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Confabulation in healthy aging is related to poor encoding and retrieval of over-learned information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Eve; Dalla Barba, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging is characterized by deficits that cross multiple cognitive domains including episodic memory and attention. Compared to young adults (YA), older adults (OA) not only show reduction in true memories, but also an increase in false memories. In this study we aim to elucidate how the production of confabulation is influenced by encoding and retrieval processes. We hypothesized that in OA, compared to YA, over-learned information interferes with the recall of specific, unique past episodes and this interference should be more prominent when a concurrent task perturbs the encoding of the episodes to be recalled. We tested this hypothesis using an experimental paradigm in which a group of OA and a group of YA had to recall three different types of story: a previously unknown story, a well-known fairy tale (Snow White), and a modified well-known fairy tale (Little Red Riding Hood is not eaten by the wolf), in three different experimental conditions: (1) free encoding and free retrieval; (2) Divided attention (DA) at encoding and free retrieval; and (3) free encoding and DA at retrieval. Results showed that OA produced significantly more confabulations than YA, particularly, in the recall of the modified fairy tale. Moreover, DA at encoding markedly increased the number of confabulations, whereas DA at retrieval had no effect on confabulation. Our findings reveal the implications of two phenomena in the production of confabulation in normal aging: the effect of poor encoding and the interference of strongly represented, over-learned information in episodic memory recall.

  19. Requesting help to understand medical information among people living with HIV and poor health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth; Pellowski, Jennifer; Chen, Yiyun

    2013-06-01

    Health literacy is known to influence medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. People who experience difficulty reading health information may benefit from asking others to assist them with reading, interpreting, and understanding medical information. We examined medical chart-abstracted HIV viral load, medication adherence assessed by unannounced pill counts, and adherence improvement strategies among 245 individuals with lower-health literacy who do not request assistance, and 229 who do request assistance with reading and understanding health information. Participants were people living with HIV who were taking antiretroviral therapy and scored below 90% correct on a standardized test of functional health literacy. After controlling for health literacy scores, requesting informational assistance was associated with strategies used to improve adherence; individuals who asked for assistance were significantly more likely to use multiple adherence strategies. However, despite requesting informational assistance and using more adherence strategies, participants who requested informational assistance evidenced poorer treatment adherence and poorer suppression of HIV replication. Requesting assistance was more common among those with the poorest health literacy and therefore greatest challenges to adherence. People living with HIV who have poor health literacy skills may benefit from medication adherence programs and requests for assistance afford opportunities for social interventions.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF TERNARY SYSTEM OF POORLY SOLUBLE DRUG IN VARIOUS HYDROPHILIC CARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to experiment the solid dispersion of poorly water soluble drug fenbendazole as model drug. Fenbendazole is an Antihelmintic drug (BCS class 2.The purpose of this study was to enhance the dissolution of Fenbendazole by solid dispersions consisting of the drug, a polymeric carrier, Binary and ternary system were prepared by kneading method using hydrophilic polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone K-25 (PVP K25, beta-cyclodextrin (BCD,mannitol and urea. The prepared formulations were characterized by polymer compatibility by using FT-IR.The drug content uniformity was found to be good in all formulations. The influence of various factors (type of polymer, ratio of the polymer on the solubility and dissolution rate of the drug were also evaluated. The solubility of fenbendazole was greater with fenbendazole-betacyclodextrin-PVP K-25 system. Dissolution rates of fenbendazole were significantly increased by binary and ternary system. Among all the formulations, fenbendazole-betacyclodextrin-polyvinylpyrrolidone K-25 (VK3 Formulation was found to be better amorphous nature in relation with in-vitro release. The result confirmed that ternary system showed better solubility and dissolution characteristics when compared to binary system.

  1. What Sways People's Judgment of Sleep Quality? A Quantitative Choice-Making Study With Good and Poor Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Fatanah; Sanborn, Adam N; Tang, Nicole K Y

    2017-07-01

    We conceptualized sleep quality judgment as a decision-making process and examined the relative importance of 17 parameters of sleep quality using a choice-based conjoint analysis. One hundred participants (50 good sleepers; 50 poor sleepers) were asked to choose between 2 written scenarios to answer 1 of 2 questions: "Which describes a better (or worse) night of sleep?". Each scenario described a self-reported experience of sleep, stringing together 17 possible determinants of sleep quality that occur at different times of the day (day before, pre-sleep, during sleep, upon waking, day after). Each participant answered 48 questions. Logistic regression models were fit to their choice data. Eleven of the 17 sleep quality parameters had a significant impact on the participants' choices. The top 3 determinants of sleep quality were: Total sleep time, feeling refreshed (upon waking), and mood (day after). Sleep quality judgments were most influenced by factors that occur during sleep, followed by feelings and activities upon waking and the day after. There was a significant interaction between wake after sleep onset and feeling refreshed (upon waking) and between feeling refreshed (upon waking) and question type (better or worse night of sleep). Type of sleeper (good vs poor sleepers) did not significantly influence the judgments. Sleep quality judgments appear to be determined by not only what happened during sleep, but also what happened after the sleep period. Interventions that improve mood and functioning during the day may inadvertently also improve people's self-reported evaluation of sleep quality.

  2. Accessing community health services: challenges faced by poor people with disabilities in a rural community in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbet Grut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Poor people with disabilities who live in poor rural societies experience unique problems in accessing health services. Their situation is influenced by multiple factors which unfold and interplay throughout the person’s life course. The difficulties do not only affect the person with a disability and his or her family, but also impact on the relevant care unit. The barriers are rooted in a life in poverty, upheld and maintained by poverty-reinforcing social forces of the past and the present, and reinforced by the lack of the person’s perspective of the health services. This article explores how difficulties may interact and influence access to and utilisation of health services, and how this may render health services out of reach even when they are available. The study reveals that non-compliance is not necessarily about neglect but could as well be a matter of lived poverty. The study was based on in-depth interviews with people with disabilities and family members, and semi-structured interviews with health personnel. The data analysis is contextual and interpretive. When offering health services to people with disabilities living in resource-poor settings, services should take into consideration the person’s history, the needs, and the resources and abilities of the family group. Rethinking access to health services should transcend a narrow medical institutionalization of health professional’s training, and include a patient’s perspective and a social vision in understanding and practice. Such rethinking requires health service models that integrate the skills of health professionals with the skills of disabled people and their family members. Such skills lie dormant at community level, and need to be recognized and utilized.

  3. Accessing community health services: challenges faced by poor people with disabilities in a rural community in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grut, Lisbet; Mji, Gubela; Braathen, Stine Hellum; Ingstad, Benedicte

    2012-01-01

    Poor people with disabilities who live in poor rural societies experience unique problems in accessing health services. Their situation is influenced by multiple factors which unfold and interplay throughout the person's life course. The difficulties do not only affect the person with a disability and his or her family, but also impact on the relevant care unit. The barriers are rooted in a life in poverty, upheld and maintained by poverty-reinforcing social forces of the past and the present, and reinforced by the lack of the person's perspective of the health services. This article explores how difficulties may interact and influence access to and utilisation of health services, and how this may render health services out of reach even when they are available. The study reveals that non-compliance is not necessarily about neglect but could as well be a matter of lived poverty. The study was based on in-depth interviews with people with disabilities and family members, and semi-structured interviews with health personnel. The data analysis is contextual and interpretive. When offering health services to people with disabilities living in resource-poor settings, services should take into consideration the person's history, the needs, and the resources and abilities of the family group. Rethinking access to health services should transcend a narrow medical institutionalisation of health professional's training, and include a patient's perspective and a social vision in understanding and practice. Such rethinking requires health service models that integrate the skills of health professionals with the skills of disabled people and their family members. Such skills lie dormant at community level, and need to be recognised and utilised.

  4. Trending Fibrinolytic Dysregulation: Fibrinolysis Shutdown in the Days After Injury Is Associated With Poor Outcome in Severely Injured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, Christine M; Neal, Matthew D; McKenna, Christine J; Gaines, Barbara A

    2017-09-01

    To trend fibrinolysis after injury and determine the influence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and massive transfusion on fibrinolysis status. Admission fibrinolytic derangement is common in injured children and adults, and is associated with poor outcome. No studies examine fibrinolysis days after injury. Prospective study of severely injured children at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. Rapid thromboelastography was obtained on admission and daily for up to 7 days. Standard definitions of hyperfibrinolysis (HF; LY30 ≥3), fibrinolysis shutdown (SD; LY30 ≤0.8), and normal (LY30 = 0.9-2.9) were applied. Antifibrinolytic use was documented. Outcomes were death, disability, and thromboembolic complications. Wilcoxon rank-sum and Fisher exact tests were performed. Exploratory subgroups included massively transfused and severe TBI patients. In all, 83 patients were analyzed with median (interquartile ranges) age 8 (4-12) and Injury Severity Score 22 (13-34), 73.5% blunt mechanism, 47% severe TBI, 20.5% massively transfused. Outcomes were 14.5% mortality, 43.7% disability, and 9.8% deep vein thrombosis. Remaining in or trending to SD was associated with death (P = 0.007), disability (P = 0.012), and deep vein thrombosis (P = 0.048). Median LY30 was lower on post-trauma day (PTD)1 to PTD4 in patients with poor compared with good outcome; median LY30 was lower on PTD1 to PTD3 in TBI patients compared with non-TBI patients. HF without associated shutdown was not related to poor outcome, but extreme HF (LY30 >30%, n = 3) was lethal. Also, 50% of massively transfused patients in hemorrhagic shock demonstrated SD physiology on admission. All with HF (fc31.2%) corrected after hemostatic resuscitation without tranexamic acid. Fibrinolysis shutdown is common postinjury and predicts poor outcomes. Severe TBI is associated with sustained shutdown. Empiric antifibrinolytics for children should be questioned; thromboelastography-directed selective use should be considered for

  5. Can routine clinical data identify older patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes on admission to hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kinda; Owen, Charlotte; Patel, Harnish P; May, Carl; Baxter, Mark; Sayer, Avan A; Roberts, Helen C

    2017-08-10

    Older patients who are at risk of poor healthcare outcomes should be recognised early during hospital admission to allow appropriate interventions. It is unclear whether routinely collected data can identify high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to define current practice with regard to the identification of older patients at high risk of poor healthcare outcomes on admission to hospital. Interviews/focus groups were conducted to establish the views of 22 healthcare staff across five acute medicine for older people wards in one hospital including seven nurses, four dieticians, seven doctors, and four therapists. In addition, a random sample of 60 patients' clinical records were reviewed to characterise the older patients, identify risk assessments performed routinely on admission, and describe usual care. We found that staff relied on their clinical judgment to identify high risk patients which was influenced by a number of factors such as reasons for admission, staff familiarity with patients, patients' general condition, visible frailty, and patients' ability to manage at home. "Therapy assessment" and patients' engagement with therapy were also reported to be important in recognising high-risk patients. However, staff recognised that making clinical judgments was often difficult and that it might occur several days after admission potentially delaying specific interventions. Routine risk assessments carried out on admission to identify single healthcare needs included risk of malnutrition (completed for 85% patients), falls risk (95%), moving and handling assessments (85%), and pressure ulcer risk assessments (88%). These were not used collectively to highlight patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes. Thus, patients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes were not explicitly identified on admission using routinely collected data. There is a need for an early identification of these patients using a valid measure alongside staff clinical judgment to

  6. Research Review: Maternal Prenatal Distress and Poor Nutrition--Mutually Influencing Risk Factors Affecting Infant Neurocognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Catherine; Georgieff, Michael K.; Osterholm, Erin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accumulating data from animal and human studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays a significant role in shaping children's neurocognitive development. Clinical, epidemiologic, and basic science research suggests that two experiences relatively common in pregnancy--an unhealthy maternal diet and psychosocial…

  7. Influence of dirt, age and poor aim on glare and illumination intensities of car headlamps in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Padmos, P.

    1987-01-01

    Luminous intensities of dipped car headlamps in directions of the eyes of drivers of oncoming cars (glare intensity) and the right roadside (illumination intensity) were measured (404 cars). The often too high glare intensities are mainly due to dirt and lamp age; the often too low illumination inte

  8. LIKE IT ACID AND POOR: A STUDY OF ABIOTIC FACTORS INFLUENCING Streptococcus bovis HC5 GROWTH AND BACTERIOCIN PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Andréa Teixeira Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of pH, temperature, growth atmosphere and nutrient availability on bovicin HC5 production by Streptococcus bovis HC5. S. bovis HC5 grew well in complex and basal media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, but greater bacteriocin yields were recovered from anaerobic cultures. Lactate production and glucose consumption increased if S. bovis HC5 cells were cultivated at pH 7.0 and at 45 ºC, but higher bovicin HC5 activity was recovered from cells grown in acidic conditions and at lower temperatures (39 ºC. Cultures maintained under continuous CO2 flow showed faster growth rates in basal media, but bacteriocin production was always higher if S. bovis was cultivated in anaerobic sealed tubes. These results suggest that acidic pH and anoxic conditions favor bovicin HC5 production by S. bovis HC5. S. bovis HC5 is a unique lactic acid bacterium in its ability to grow and produce high amounts of a potentially useful bacteriocin in simple media. Considering the constrains for bacteriocin production at commercial scale, it appears that bovicin HC5 production could be achieved at lower costs compared to other bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

  9. Research Review: Maternal Prenatal Distress and Poor Nutrition--Mutually Influencing Risk Factors Affecting Infant Neurocognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Catherine; Georgieff, Michael K.; Osterholm, Erin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accumulating data from animal and human studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays a significant role in shaping children's neurocognitive development. Clinical, epidemiologic, and basic science research suggests that two experiences relatively common in pregnancy--an unhealthy maternal diet and psychosocial…

  10. [Influence of serum levels of vitamin D on IgE response in schoolchildren with asthma in poor communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Eduardo; Garavito, Gloria; Fang, Luis; Mendoza, Dary Luz; Escamilla, José Miguel; De Los Ríos, Elsie; Dennis, Rodolfo; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Antecedentes: El asma es una enfermedad frecuente en el mundo y la vitamina D (Vit-D) se ha asociado con la presencia y severidad de esta enfermedad. Objetivo: Establecer la asociación entre los niveles de Vit-D y la respuesta IgE en escolares con asma residentes de cuatro ciudades colombiananas. Métodos: Estudio de casos y controles en 1340 escolares (687 asmáticos y 653 controles) de comunidades en extrema pobreza de Barranquilla, Cartagena, Santa Marta y Montería. Se midieron las concentraciones séricas de Vit-D, IgE total e IgE específica anti Dermatofagoides farinae, Periplaneta americana y Ascaris lumbricoides (AL). Resultados: Los controles reportaron concentraciones mayores de Vit-D [61.9 ± 28.4 ng/mL] que los casos [53 ± 23.3 ng/mL] (p<0.05). La IgE total fue mayor en los casos (p<0.05). Solo IgE anti-AL mostró una diferencia clara: controles, densidad óptica 0.27 ± 0.25; casos 0.22 ± 0.24 (p<0.05). La Vit-D presentó diferencias entre casos y controles en cada población. Conclusiones: No se pudo demostrar la asociación entre deficiencia de Vit-D y asma, dado que la IgE total estuvo elevada en los pacientes y en los controles. Los resultados sugieren que la Vit-D influye en la respuesta IgE específica en niños asmáticos pobres en zonas endémicas para helmintiasis.

  11. Novel electrosprayed nanospherules for enhanced aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousaf AM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abid Mehmood Yousaf,1,2 Omer Mustapha,1 Dong Wuk Kim,1 Dong Shik Kim,1 Kyeong Soo Kim,1 Sung Giu Jin,1 Chul Soon Yong,3 Yu Seok Youn,4 Yu-Kyoung Oh,5 Jong Oh Kim,3 Han-Gon Choi1 1College of Pharmacy and Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Gyeonggi, South Korea; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Central Punjab, Johar, Lahore, Pakistan; 3College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, North Gyeongsang, 4School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 5College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea Purpose: The purpose of the present research was to develop a novel electrosprayed nanospherule providing the most optimized aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability for poorly water-soluble fenofibrate.Methods: Numerous fenofibrate-loaded electrosprayed nanospherules were prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and Labrafil® M 2125 as carriers using the electrospray technique, and the effect of the carriers on drug solubility and solvation was assessed. The solid state characterization of an optimized formulation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Oral bioavailability in rats was also evaluated for the formulation of an optimized nanospherule in comparison with free drug and a conventional fenofibrate-loaded solid dispersion.Results: All of the electrosprayed nanospherule formulations had remarkably enhanced aqueous solubility and dissolution compared with free drug. Moreover, Labrafil M 2125, a surfactant, had a positive influence on the solubility and dissolution of the drug in the electrosprayed nanospherule. Increases were observed as the PVP/drug ratio increased to 4:1, but higher ratios gave no significant increases. In particular, an electrosprayed nanospherule composed of fenofibrate, PVP, and Labrafil M 2125 at the weight ratio of 1

  12. Improving Flood Prediction By the Assimilation of Satellite Soil Moisture in Poorly Monitored Catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Crow, W. T.; Su, C. H.; Robertson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particular, is the assimilation of satellite soil moisture (SM-DA) into rainfall-runoff models. The rationale is that satellite soil moisture (SSM) can be used to correct model soil water states, enabling more accurate prediction of catchment response to precipitation and thus better streamflow. However, there is still no consensus on the most effective SM-DA scheme and how this might depend on catchment scale, climate characteristics, runoff mechanisms, model and SSM products used, etc. In this work, an operational SM-DA scheme was set up in the poorly monitored, large (>40,000 km2), semi-arid Warrego catchment situated in eastern Australia. We assimilated passive and active SSM products into the probability distributed model (PDM) using an ensemble Kalman filter. We explored factors influencing the SM-DA framework, including relatively new techniques to remove model-observation bias, estimate observation errors and represent model errors. Furthermore, we explored the advantages of accounting for the spatial distribution of forcing and channel routing processes within the catchment by implementing and comparing lumped and semi-distributed model setups. Flood prediction is improved by SM-DA (Figure), with a 30% reduction of the average root-mean-squared difference of the ensemble prediction, a 20% reduction of the false alarm ratio and a 40% increase of the ensemble mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. SM-DA skill does not significantly change with different observation error assumptions, but the skill strongly depends on the observational bias correction technique used, and more importantly, on the performance of the open-loop model before assimilation. Our findings imply that proper

  13. Mainstreaming Grameen banking: How rural banks combine sustainability with outreach to the poor in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    In many countries, Grameen replication has not fared well in terms of outreach and sustainability. There is no country where the Grameen Bank, reaching two million poor women in groups of five and centers of 30 in Bangladesh, has been truly replicated. In The Philippines, rural banks and NGOs-turned-rural-bank have made Grameen banking a highly profitable product with rapidly expanding outreach to the enterprising poor and ultra-poor, mostly women. How did they do it?

  14. Who are the Poor in Malaysia? Sensitivity to Measurement of Income,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    confounded changes in the composition of the poor with a reduction in the number of households falling below the poverty threshold. Our purpose here is to...phenomenon. Within each ethnic group, rural residents are more likely to be poor . Rural Malays and rural Indians are the two most poverty -prone subgroups...incidence of poverty , and female-headed households and younger and older households are less likely to be considered to be poor -than they are for

  15. Is violent radicalisation associated with poverty, migration, poor self-reported health and common mental disorders?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhui, Kamaldeep; Warfa, Nasir; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper describes a new method of assessing vulnerability to violent radicalization, and then investigates the role of previously reported causes, including poor self-reported health, anxiety...

  16. Effectiveness of Zakat-based Programs on Poverty Alleviation and Economic Empowerment of Poor Women: A Case Study of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahami Muhammad Anis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the many problems facing Bangladesh, poverty remains a key problem affecting millions of lives. During the past few decades, many initiatives have been implemented such as microcredit and cash transfer programs, yet the results seemed to be ambiguous. New frontiers are now sought to find new sources of finance which could offer a more effective and sustainable solution to the root cause of the poverty problem. Considering the idea of entrepreneurship and group-based development approach of microcredit, a zakat-based development approach was initiated in Bangladesh at a private level by an organization called Center for Zakat Management (CZM for poverty alleviation and sustainable economic empowerment targeting poor women in rural areas. This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of the CZM efforts in utilizing zakat funds for promoting entrepreneurship among poor rural women. Focusing on the case of Bangladesh, this study assesses the effectiveness of zakat on aspects such as income, house hold expense and fixed asset accumulation of the poor client based on the “before and after” approach. Groups comprising of poor individuals and families are given equity capital/seed money and are encouraged to embark on small businesses according to their own liking. The groups are supervised for a period of a minimum of three years to ensure all individuals within the group are able to continue with their activities and ultimately, free themselves from the shackles of poverty and graduate into sustainable livelihood. Results indicate a significant nominal and real increase in average monthly income, increase in fixed assets and an increase in monthly average household expenditure before and after receiving zakat money. Results also demonstrate factors such as age of the entrepreneur, family size, type of business involved and the amount of zakat received to have a strong influence in determining the success of women entrepreneurs. Education level

  17. Expression of RUNX1 correlates with poor patient prognosis in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ferrari

    Full Text Available The RUNX1 transcription factor is widely recognised for its tumour suppressor effects in leukaemia. Recently a putative link to breast cancer has started to emerge, however the function of RUNX1 in breast cancer is still unknown. To investigate if RUNX1 expression was important to clinical outcome in primary breast tumours a tissue microarray (TMA containing biopsies from 483 patients with primary operable invasive ductal breast cancer was stained by immunohistochemistry. RUNX1 was associated with progesterone receptor (PR-positive tumours (P<0.05, more tumour CD4+(P<0.05 and CD8+(P<0.01 T-lymphocytic infiltrate, increased tumour CD138+plasma cell (P<0.01 and more CD68+macrophage infiltrate (P<0.001. RUNX1 expression did not influence outcome of oestrogen receptor (ER-positive or HER2-positive disease, however on univariate analysis a high RUNX1 protein was significantly associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in patients with ER-negative (P<0.05 and with triple negative (TN invasive breast cancer (P<0.05. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis of cancer-specific survival showed a trend towards significance in ER-negative patients (P<0.1 and was significant in triple negative patients (P<0.05. Of relevance, triple negative breast cancer currently lacks good biomarkers and patients with this subtype do not benefit from the option of targeted therapy unlike patients with ER-positive or HER2-positive disease. Using multivariate analysis RUNX1 was identified as an independent prognostic marker in the triple negative subgroup. Overall, our study identifies RUNX1 as a new prognostic indicator correlating with poor prognosis specifically in the triple negative subtype of human breast cancer.

  18. Glasgow coma score and tumor necrosis factor α as predictive criteria for initial poor graft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, G; Morabito, V; Lai, Q; Levi Sandri, G B; Melandro, F; Pugliese, F; Novelli, S; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2012-09-01

    Initial poor graft function (IPGF) is a major factor influencing the clinical outcome after liver transplantation (LT), but there is no reliable method to assess and predict graft dysfunction. To help clinicians determine prognosis in the early postoperative period, individual parameters and complex scoring systems have been suggested, but most of them are inaccurate because of the multifactorial nature of transplantation courses. Therefore, the aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate predictive criteria for retransplantation. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study: 18 who experienced primary non-function (PNF) and 24 with delayed graft function (DGF). All of the patients were treated with the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS). They were into 3 subgroups: patients who survived without LT (n = 20; 47.7%); patients who underwent LT (n = 16; 37%), and patients who died before transplantation (n = 6; 14%). Stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with the intent to find the risk factors for LT or death after MARS treatment (second analysis). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed on significant variables in the logistic regression model with the intent to individually predict variables for LT or death. After a stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis enrolling all of the previously reported features only 2 variables, tumor necrosis factor (TFN)-α and Glasgow coma score (GCS) score, were statistically significant. TNF-α was an unique independent risk factor for retransplantation or death after MARS treatment (odds ratio [OR] 1.235; P = .013). Conversely, GCS score was protective against retransplantation or death (OR 0.150; P = .003). Starting from these assumptions, a predictive model was created using these 2 variables. On ROC analysis, the combined score showed an area under the curve greater than that of the 2 variables considered separately. Validating these results with a

  19. Progression of urinary protein excretion after kidney transplantation: A marker for poor long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego Hinojosa, Josefa; Gentil Govantes, Miguel Angel; Cabello Díaz, Mercedes; Rodriguez Benot, Alberto; Mazuecos Blanca, Auxiliadora; Osuna Ortega, Antonio; Bedoya Pérez, Rafael; Castro De La Nuez, Pablo; Alonso Gil, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplantation proteinuria is a risk factor for graft failure. A progressive decline in renal graft function is a predictor for mortality in kidney transplant patients. To assess the development and the progression of urinary protein excretion (UPE) in the first year post-transplant in recipients of kidney transplants and its effect on patient and graft outcomes. We analysed 1815 patients with 24-h UPE measurements available at 3 and 12 months post-transplant. Patients were divided based on their UPE level: below 300 mg, 300-1000 mg and over 1000 mg (at 3 and 12 months), and changes over time were analysed. At 3 months, 65.7% had UPE below 300 mg/24 h, 29.6% 300-1000 mg/24 h and 4.7% over 1000 mg/24h. At one year, 71.6% had UPE below 300 mg/24 h, 24.1% 300-1000 mg/24 h and 4.4% over 1000 mg/24 h. In 208 patients (12%), the UPE progressed, in 1233 (70.5%) it remained stable and in 306 (17.5%) an improvement was observed. We found that the level of UPE influenced graft survival, particularly if a progression occurred. Recipient's age and renal function at one year were found to be predictive factors for mortality, while proteinuria and renal function were predictive factors for graft survival. Proteinuria after transplantation, essentially when it progresses, is a marker of a poor prognosis and a predictor for graft survival. Progression of proteinuria is associated with poorer renal function and lower graft survival rates. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Mouse early extra-embryonic lineages activate compensatory endocytosis in response to poor maternal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Congshan; Velazquez, Miguel A; Marfy-Smith, Stephanie; Sheth, Bhavwanti; Cox, Andy; Johnston, David A; Smyth, Neil; Fleming, Tom P

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian extra-embryonic lineages perform the crucial role of nutrient provision during gestation to support embryonic and fetal growth. These lineages derive from outer trophectoderm (TE) and internal primitive endoderm (PE) in the blastocyst and subsequently give rise to chorio-allantoic and visceral yolk sac placentae, respectively. We have shown maternal low protein diet exclusively during mouse preimplantation development (Emb-LPD) is sufficient to cause a compensatory increase in fetal and perinatal growth that correlates positively with increased adult-onset cardiovascular, metabolic and behavioural disease. Here, to investigate early mechanisms of compensatory nutrient provision, we assessed the influence of maternal Emb-LPD on endocytosis within extra-embryonic lineages using quantitative imaging and expression of markers and proteins involved. Blastocysts collected from Emb-LPD mothers within standard culture medium displayed enhanced TE endocytosis compared with embryos from control mothers with respect to the number and collective volume per cell of vesicles with endocytosed ligand and fluid and lysosomes, plus protein expression of megalin (Lrp2) LDL-family receptor. Endocytosis was also stimulated using similar criteria in the outer PE-like lineage of embryoid bodies formed from embryonic stem cell lines generated from Emb-LPD blastocysts. Using an in vitro model replicating the depleted amino acid (AA) composition found within the Emb-LPD uterine luminal fluid, we show TE endocytosis response is activated through reduced branched-chain AAs (leucine, isoleucine, valine). Moreover, activation appears mediated through RhoA GTPase signalling. Our data indicate early embryos regulate and stabilise endocytosis as a mechanism to compensate for poor maternal nutrient provision.

  1. Poor People, Black Faces: The Portrayal of Poverty in Economics Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Rosalee A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the portrayal of poverty in economics textbooks, investigating whether poverty would be predicted as a black problem. Results found evidence that black faces were overwhelmingly portrayed among the contemporary poor, yet Blacks were not portrayed among the Great Depression era poor and nor were they used to illustrate the popular Social…

  2. Dorothy Day: A Love of Fiction and Her Love of the Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Judith Ann

    2010-01-01

    Dorothy Day's love of the poor originated from reading novels that portrayed the poor as persons worthy of respect. This article explores how Day's reading novels opened her mind and heart to the realities of poverty. The methodology is literature-based. Dorothy Day's autobiography reveals the novelists who captivated her mind and cultivated a…

  3. Towards Text Simplification for Poor Readers with Intellectual Disability: When Do Connectives Enhance Text Cohesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Inmaculada; Tavares, Gema; Avila, Vicenta; Ferrer, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Cohesive elements of texts such as connectives (e.g., "but," "in contrast") are expected to facilitate inferential comprehension in poor readers. Two experiments tested this prediction in poor readers with intellectual disability (ID) by: (a) comparing literal and inferential text comprehension of texts with and without connectives and/or high…

  4. Relationship between Poor Sleep and Daytime Cognitive Performance in Young Adults with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Elyse; Bolduc, Christianne; Berthiaume, Claude; Mottron, Laurent; Godbout, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Poor sleep is a common feature in autism even though patients themselves do not necessarily complain. The impact of poor sleep on daytime cognitive functioning in autism is not well-known and we therefore investigated whether sleep in autism correlates with daytime cognitive performance. A battery of non-verbal tasks was administered, in the…

  5. Dynamic time warping: A new method in the study of poor handwriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brina, C. di; Niels, R.M.J.; Overvelde, A.J.A.A.M.; Levi, G.; Hulstijn, W.

    2008-01-01

    Poor handwriting is a diagnostic criterion for developmental coordination disorder. Typical of poor handwriting is its low overall quality and the high variability of the spatial characteristics of the letters, usually assessed with a subjective handwriting scale. Recently, Dynamic Time Warping (DTW

  6. Intimate Partner Violence among General and Urban Poor Populations in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Azusa; Poudyal, Amod K.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Jimba, Masamine; Hokama, Tomiko

    2011-01-01

    Comparative studies are lacking on intimate partner violence (IPV) between urban poor and general populations. The objective of this study is to identify the prevalence and risk factors of physical IPV among the general and poor populations in urban Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted by structured questionnaire interview. Participants…

  7. Speech Perception Deficits in Poor Readers: A Reply to Denenberg's Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert-Kennedy, Michael; Mody, Maria; Brady, Susan

    2000-01-01

    This rejoinder to a critique of the authors' research on speech perception deficits in poor readers answers the specific criticisms and reaffirms their conclusion that the difficulty some poor readers have with rapid /ba/-/da/ discrimination does not stem from difficulty in discriminating the rapid spectral transitions at stop-vowel syllable…

  8. Speech Perception Deficits in Poor Readers: Auditory Processing or Phonological Coding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Maria; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Forty second-graders, 20 good and 20 poor readers, completed a /ba/-/da/ temporal order judgment (TOJ) task. The groups did not differ in TOJ when /ba/ and /da/ were paired with more easily discriminated syllables. Poor readers' difficulties with /ba/-/da/ reflected perceptual confusion between phonetically similar syllables rather than difficulty…

  9. The President's Veto of the Minimum Wage Bill: Impact on Poor and Minority Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Isaac

    Restoration of an adequate minimum wage remains a critical ingredient in efforts to provide income security for poor and minority workers. The experience of recent years indicates that work does not provide economic security for many poor, Black, and Hispanic workers. National and minority unemployment rates have dropped during the economic…

  10. Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children. The Social Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Poor children in the United States start school at a disadvantage in terms of their early skills, behaviors, and health. Fewer than half (48 percent) of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75 percent of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. This paper examines the reasons why poor…

  11. Enhancing Decoding Efficiency in Poor Readers via a Word Identification Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorp, Karly; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    The effects of a word identification game aimed at enhancing decoding efficiency in poor readers were tested. Following a pretest-posttest-retention design with a waiting control group, 62 poor-reading Dutch second graders received a five-hour tablet intervention across a period of five weeks. During the intervention, participants practiced…

  12. Does Human Capital Investment Impact the Earning Mobility of the Near Poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    This secondary analysis of the earning mobility of the near poor examined the impact of human capital investment on the earning mobility of the near poor between 2005 and 2009. The theory framing this study is Human Capital Theory (Shultz, 1961). Other demographic and socioeconomic variables were included in this study to further explore factors…

  13. Getting to grips with poor comprehenders: stability of group membership across test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Hanne Trebbien; Oakhill, Jane V.; Elbro, Carsten

    Reliable identification of poor comprehenders is difficult because reading comprehension tests do not measure the same thing (Keenan et al., 2014). In addition to different contents, differences in how the same test is administered may also cause instability of the definition of poor comprehenders....

  14. From Data-Poor to Data-Rich: System Dynamics in the Era of Big Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.

    2014-01-01

    Although SD modeling is sometimes called theory-rich data-poor modeling, it does not mean SD modeling should per definition be data-poor. SD software packages allow one to get data from, and write simulation runs to, databases. Moreover, data is also sometimes used in SD to calibrate parameters or

  15. The Effects of the Informal Sector on Income of the Poor in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy

    2013-01-01

    This paper clarifies the social and economic effects of employment in the informal sector on the poor in Russia in recent years. The article describes the extent to which the figures for informal sector at large and unofficial employment in particular vary in different estimates and the effect they have on the average labor income of the poor. The…

  16. Is the Poor Performance of Self-Worth Protective Students Linked with Social Comparison Goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ted; Perry, Zoe

    2005-01-01

    Students motivated to protect self-worth perform poorly in situations that threaten to reveal low ability while performing well in situations that involve little threat to self-worth. One factor contributing to their poor performance is thought to be their orientation towards social comparison goals (goals that have to do with vindicating their…

  17. Poor Performance in Mathematics: Is There a Basis for a Self-Worth Explanation for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ted; Dinnel, Dale L.

    2007-01-01

    The self-worth theory of achievement motivation holds that in situations in which poor performance is likely to reveal low ability, certain students (known as self-worth protective students) intentionally withdraw effort in order to avoid the negative implications of poor performance in terms of damage to self-worth. In this study, evidence of…

  18. The Role of Training in Reducing Poverty: The Case of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Aktaruzzaman; Ali, Anees Janee

    2014-01-01

    Although microcredit is considered the main vehicle for increasing the income of the poor and alleviating poverty in Bangladesh, it is now well recognised that more than this is needed to reach the ultra poor in rural areas. Consequently, almost half of the Bangladesh population is in some way linked to non-governmental organizations'…

  19. Hyperglycemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : a potentially modifiable risk factor for poor outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nyika D.; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeVries, J. Hans; Luitse, Merel J. A.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Roos, Yvo B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs frequently and is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor clinical outcome. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms that cause hyperglycemia after aSAH, and we discuss how hyperglycemia may contribute to poor c

  20. Getting to grips with poor comprehenders: stability of group membership across test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Hanne Trebbien; Oakhill, Jane V.; Elbro, Carsten

    Reliable identification of poor comprehenders is difficult because reading comprehension tests do not measure the same thing (Keenan et al., 2014). In addition to different contents, differences in how the same test is administered may also cause instability of the definition of poor comprehenders....

  1. [Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, Poor Quality Sleep, and Low Academic Performance in Medical Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Echeverri Chabur, Jorge Enrique; Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affect cognitive ability and performance of medical students. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of EDS, sleep quality, and assess their association with poor academic performance in this population. A descriptive, observational study was conducted on a random sample of 217 medical students from the Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire and the Epworth sleepiness scale. Sociodemographic, clinic and academic variables were also measured. Multivariate analyses for poor academic performance were performed. The included students had a mean age of 21.7±3.3 years, of whom 59.4% were men. Almost half (49.8%) had EDS criteria, and 79.3% were poor sleepers (PSQI ≥ 5), while 43.3% had poor academic performance during the last semester. The bivariate analysis showed that having used tobacco or alcohol until intoxicated, fairly bad subjective sleep quality, sleep efficiency < 65%, and being a poor sleeper were associated with increased risk of low performance. Sleep efficiency < 65% was statistically associated with poor academic performance (P=.024; OR = 4.23; 95% CI, 1.12-15.42) in the multivariate analysis. A poor sleep quality determined by low efficiency was related to poor academic achievement at the end of semester in medical students. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Nutrient imitations in an extant and drained poor fen : implications for restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDuren, IC; Boeye, D; Grootjans, AP

    1997-01-01

    In a species-rich poor fen (Caricetum nigrae) and a species-poor drained fen, the difference in nutrient limitation of the vegetation was assessed in a full-factorial fertilization experiment with N, P and K. The results were compared to the nutrient ratios of plant material and to chemical analysis

  3. Unexpected Poor Comprehenders: An Investigation of Multiple Aspects of Morphological Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Elizabeth Jean; Levesque, Kyle; Deacon, S. Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Poor comprehenders have age-appropriate word reading skills but struggle with understanding what they read. The purpose of this study was to investigate how poor comprehenders perform on multiple aspects of morphological awareness, a skill implicated in reading comprehension. In keeping with current research and theory, we look at three aspects of…

  4. The Role of Training in Reducing Poverty: The Case of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Aktaruzzaman; Ali, Anees Janee

    2014-01-01

    Although microcredit is considered the main vehicle for increasing the income of the poor and alleviating poverty in Bangladesh, it is now well recognised that more than this is needed to reach the ultra poor in rural areas. Consequently, almost half of the Bangladesh population is in some way linked to non-governmental organizations' development…

  5. 5 CFR 9701.408 - Developing performance and addressing poor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Developing performance and addressing poor performance. 9701.408 Section 9701.408 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Developing performance and addressing poor performance. (a) Subject to budgetary and other...

  6. Predictors of poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quach, Phuong Le; Mors, Ole; Christensen, Torben Østergaard;

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.......This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  7. From magma-poor Ocean Continent Transitions to steady state oceanic spreading: the balance between tectonic and magmatic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Morgane; Manatschal, Gianreto; Autin, Julia; Decarlis, Alessandro; Sauter, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    spreading center. The interest of that definition is that it does not restrain the term oceanic crust to a basement composition and consequently does not exclude the creation of magma-poor oceanic crust, as observed at slow spreading ridges for example. Indeed, the initiation of steady state oceanic spreading is not necessarily magmatic (e.g. some segments of the Australian-Antarctic margins). In this case, drifting is accommodated by mantle exhumation. However, in this magma-poor transition, and without clear markers of a gradual increase of magmatism, it thus appears difficult to clearly differentiate an exhumed OCT basement and an exhumed oceanic basement. Some theoretical differences can be nevertheless considered: exhumed OCT basement should display a chemical evolution toward the ocean from a subcontinental to an oceanic signature. Moreover, extensional detachment faults are probably long-lived due to the poor influence of the asthenosphere at this stage. On the contrary, exhumed oceanic basement should only display an oceanic signature. In this case, extensional detachment faults are certainly short-lived, due to the strong influence of the asthenosphere, which tends to quickly re-localize the deformation above the spreading center.

  8. Closing the poor-rich gap in contraceptive use in urban Kenya: are family planning programs increasingly reaching the urban poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso, Jean Christophe; Speizer, Ilene S; Mukiira, Carol; Kizito, Paul; Lumumba, Vane

    2013-08-27

    Kenya is characterized by high unmet need for family planning (FP) and high unplanned pregnancy, in a context of urban population explosion and increased urban poverty. It witnessed an improvement of its FP and reproductive health (RH) indicators in the recent past, after a period of stalled progress. The objectives of the paper are to: a) describe inequities in modern contraceptive use, types of methods used, and the main sources of contraceptives in urban Kenya; b) examine the extent to which differences in contraceptive use between the poor and the rich widened or shrank over time; and c) attempt to relate these findings to the FP programming context, with a focus on whether the services are increasingly reaching the urban poor. We use data from the 1993, 1998, 2003 and 2008/09 Kenya demographic and health survey. Bivariate analyses describe the patterns of modern contraceptive use and the types and sources of methods used, while multivariate logistic regression models assess how the gap between the poor and the rich varied over time. The quantitative analysis is complemented by a review on the major FP/RH programs carried out in Kenya. There was a dramatic change in contraceptive use between 2003 and 2008/09 that resulted in virtually no gap between the poor and the rich in 2008/09, by contrast to the period 1993-1998 during which the improvement in contraceptive use did not significantly benefit the urban poor. Indeed, the late 1990s marked the realization by the Government of Kenya and its development partners, of the need to deliberately target the poor with family planning services. Most urban women use short-term and less effective methods, with the proportion of long-acting method users dropping by half during the review period. The proportion of private sector users also declined between 2003 and 2008/09. The narrowing gap in the recent past between the urban poor and the urban rich in the use of modern contraception is undoubtedly good news, which

  9. Poor Deals?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China's banking sector is being fully opened up this year. But debate continues on whether stakes to foreign investors are going for a song After two years of reform of state-owned commercial banks, China Construction Bank (CCB) was finally listed at the end of 2005, but many issues remain to be resolved. The listing was undoubtedly the most striking development of China's financial sector in

  10. Further evidence of poor comprehenders' difficulty with expressive writing: Exploring the role of inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Anna Maria; Carretti, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that children with poor reading comprehension abilities have weak expressive writing skills too. The aim of the present research was to establish whether poor comprehenders' low performance in expressive writing is mediated by the need to produce relevant inferences to construct the narrative. To do so, we compared two conditions: in one, the children's comprehension of the story relied partly on their ability to draw crucial causal inferences; in the other, all the information needed to follow the sequence of events was provided in pictures. Irrespective of the condition, poor comprehenders (aged 8-10 years) produced less effective written texts. Analyzing the use of connectives shed some light on the characteristics of the poor comprehenders' written narratives, which seemed to be less cohesive. The poor comprehenders tended to use more additive connectives than causal connectives, which is why their texts resembled a list of events with a description of each picture.

  11. Biomedical research and mining of the poor: the need for their exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, R R

    2006-01-01

    Almost all ethical guidelines and legislative policies concerning biomedical research involving human subjects contain provisions about relevance of research for the participating populations, informed consent, adequate care for research induced injuries and several other safeguards but the poor continue to suffer. Globalization has further aggravated poor people's vulnerability by exposing them to international markets. Since the developing countries are abode of higher population of the poor they have become the unholy mines of this human ore for researchers. In this paper I examine various dimensions of poverty and analyze the international ethical responses in the area of biomedical research involving human subjects in order to determine their adequacy to protect the poor against exploitation and misuse and conclude that in view of the poor's inherent and extreme vulnerability and the failure of ethical pronouncements to protect them from misuse and exploitation, they should be excluded from being enrolled as research subjects.

  12. Naturally Occurring Resistance-Associated Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitors in Poor Responders to Pegylated Interferon-Ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrat, Sylvie; Vallet, Sophie; David-Tchouda, Sandra; Caporossi, Alban; Margier, Jennifer; Ramière, Christophe; Scholtes, Caroline; Haïm-Boukobza, Stéphanie; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Besse, Bernard; André-Garnier, Elisabeth; Mohamed, Sofiane; Halfon, Philippe; Pivert, Adeline; LeGuillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Abravanel, Florence; Guivarch, Matthieu; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Lada, Olivier; Mourez, Thomas; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Baazia, Yazid; Alain, Sophie; Hantz, Sebastien; Thibault, Vincent; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Bouvet, Dorine; Mirand, Audrey; Henquell, Cécile; Gozlan, Joel; Lagathu, Gisèle; Pronier, Charlotte; Velay, Aurélie; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Trimoulet, Pascale; Fleury, Hervé; Bouvier-Alias, Magali; Brochot, Etienne; Duverlie, Gilles; Maylin, Sarah; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Morand, Patrice

    2015-07-01

    The pretherapeutic presence of protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated variants (RAVs) has not been shown to be predictive of triple-therapy outcomes in treatment-naive patients. However, they may influence the outcome in patients with less effective pegylated interferon (pegIFN)-ribavirin (RBV) backbones. Using hepatitis C virus (HCV) population sequence analysis, we retrospectively investigated the prevalence of baseline nonstructural 3 (NS3) RAVs in a multicenter cohort of poor IFN-RBV responders (i.e., prior null responders or patients with a viral load decrease of 3-fold shift in 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for telaprevir or boceprevir, T54S was the most frequently detected mutation (3.9%), followed by A156T, R155K (0.7%), V36M, and V55A (0.35%). Mutations were more frequently found in patients infected with genotype 1a (7.5 to 23.6%) than 1b (3.3 to 19.8%) (P = 0.03). No other sociodemographic or viroclinical characteristic was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of RAVs. No obvious effect of baseline RAVs on viral load was observed. In this cohort of poor responders to IFN-RBV, no link was found with a sustained virological response to triple therapy, regardless of the algorithm used for the detection of mutations. Based on a cross-study comparison, baseline RAVs are not more frequent in poor IFN-RBV responders than in treatment-naive patients and, even in these difficult-to-treat patients, this study demonstrates no impact on treatment outcome, arguing against resistance analysis prior to treatment. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Association between poor glycemic control, impaired sleep quality, and increased arterial thickening in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Yoda

    Full Text Available Poor sleep quality is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between glycemic control and objective sleep architecture and its influence on arteriosclerosis in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM. The present study examined the association of objective sleep architecture with both glycemic control and arteriosclerosis in type-2 DM patients.Cross-sectional study in vascular laboratory.The subjects were 63 type-2 DM inpatients (M/F, 32/31; age, 57.5±13.1 without taking any sleeping promoting drug and chronic kidney disease. We examined objective sleep architecture by single-channel electroencephalography and arteriosclerosis by carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT.HbA1c was associated significantly in a negative manner with REM sleep latency (interval between sleep-onset and the first REM period (β=-0.280, p=0.033, but not with other measurements of sleep quality. REM sleep latency associated significantly in a positive manner with log delta power (the marker of deep sleep during that period (β=0.544, p=0.001. In the model including variables univariately correlated with CA-IMT (REM sleep latency, age, DM duration, systolic blood pressure, and HbA1c as independent variables, REM sleep latency (β=-0.232, p=0.038, but not HbA1c were significantly associated with CA-IMT. When log delta power was included in place of REM sleep latency, log delta power (β=-0.257, p=0.023 emerged as a significant factor associated with CA-IMT.In type-2 DM patients, poor glycemic control was independently associated with poor quality of sleep as represented by decrease of REM sleep latency which might be responsible for increased CA-IMT, a relevant marker for arterial wall thickening.

  14. Multilayer encapsulated mesoporous silica nanospheres as an oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Liang [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, Hongrui [English Teaching Department, School of Basic Courses, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Wenhua Road 103, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhao, Qinfu; Han, Ning; Bai, Ling; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We used a combination of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSN) and layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technology to establish a new oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine. Firstly, the model drug was loaded into MSN, and then the loaded MSN were repeatedly encapsulated by chitosan (CHI) and acacia (ACA) via LBL self-assembly method. The structural features of the samples were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption. The encapsulating process was monitored by zeta-potential and surface tension measurements. The physical state of the drug in the samples was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The influence of the multilayer with different number of layers on the drug release rate was studied using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and surface tension measurement. The swelling effect and the structure changes of the multilayer were investigated to explore the relationship between the drug release behavior and the state of the multilayer under different pH conditions. The stability and mucosa adhesive ability of the prepared nanoparticles were also explored. After multilayer coating, the drug release rate was effectively controlled. The differences in drug release behavior under different pH conditions could be attributed to the different states of the multilayer. And the nanoparticles possessed good stability and strong mucosa adhesive ability. We believe that this combination offers a simple strategy for regulating the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs and extends the pharmaceutical applications of inorganic materials and polymers. - Highlights: • A combination of inorganic and organic materials was applied. • Mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSN) were used as drug carriers. • Chitosan and acacia were encapsulated through layer-by-layer self-assembly. • The release rate of the poorly

  15. Impact of polymer conformation on the crystal growth inhibition of a poorly water-soluble drug in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Caitlin J; Beaudoin, Stephen P; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility is a major hindrance to oral delivery of many emerging drugs. Supersaturated drug solutions can improve passive absorption across the gastrointestinal tract membrane as long as crystallization can be inhibited, enhancing the delivery of such poorly soluble therapeutics. Polymers can inhibit crystallization and prolong supersaturation; therefore, it is desirable to understand the attributes which render a polymer effective. In this study, the conformation of a polymer adsorbed to a crystal surface and its impact on crystal growth inhibition were investigated. The crystal growth rate of a poorly soluble pharmaceutical compound, felodipine, was measured in the presence of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) at two different pH conditions: pH 3 and pH 6.8. HPMCAS was found to be a less effective growth rate inhibitor at pH 3, below its pKa. It was expected that the ionization state of HPMCAS would most likely influence its conformation at the solid-liquid interface. Further investigation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed significant differences in the conformation of HPMCAS adsorbed to felodipine at the two pH conditions. At pH 3, HPMCAS formed coiled globules on the surface, whereas at pH 6.8, HPMCAS adsorbed more uniformly. Thus, it appeared that the reduced effectiveness of HPMCAS at pH 3 was directly related to its conformation. The globule formation leaves many felodipine growth sites open and available for growth units to attach, rendering the polymer less effective as a growth rate inhibitor.

  16. Demographic characteristics and clinical profile of poor responders in IVF / ICSI: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabaneeta Padhy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian response varies considerably among individuals and depends on various factors. Poor response in IVF yields lesser oocytes and is associated with poorer pregnancy perspective. Cycle cancellation due to poor response is frustrating for both clinician and the patient. Studies have shown that women conceiving after poor ovarian response have more pregnancy complications like PIH and preeclampsia than women with normal ovarian response. In addition, poor ovarian response could be a predictor of early menopause. This paper studies various demographic and clinical profiles of poor responders and tries to look at the known and unknown factors which could contribute to poor ovarian response in IVF. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from 104 poor responders who had less than four oocytes at retrieval and compared with 324 good responders for factors like age, BMI, type of sub fertility, duration of sub fertility, environmental factors like stress at work, smoking, pelvic surgery, chronic medical disorder, indication of IVF, basal FSH, mean age of menopause in their mothers etc. Results: Among the poor responders, 60.57% were above 35 years of age compared to 36.41% in control group, which is statistically significant. Mean age of menopause in mother was found to be four years earlier in poor responder group. Male factor and unexplained infertility were significantly (P<0.05 higher in good responders (P<0.05. Significant proportion (31.73% of women in study group had undergone some pelvic surgery (P<0.05. Conclusion: Apart from age, prior pelvic surgery also could be used as predictors for poor ovarian response. Heredity also plays a major role in determining ovarian response.

  17. Evidence for deficits in the temporal attention span of poor readers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy A W Visser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While poor reading is often associated with phonological deficits, many studies suggest that visual processing might also be impaired. In particular, recent research has indicated that poor readers show impaired spatial visual attention spans in partial and whole report tasks. Given the similarities between competition-based accounts for reduced visual attention span and similar explanations for impairments in sequential object processing, the present work examined whether poor readers show deficits in their "temporal attention span"--that is, their ability to rapidly and accurately process sequences of consecutive target items. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Poor and normal readers monitored a sequential stream of visual items for two (TT condition or three (TTT condition consecutive target digits. Target identification was examined using both unconditional and conditional measures of accuracy in order to gauge the overall likelihood of identifying a target and the likelihood of identifying a target given successful identification of previous items. Compared to normal readers, poor readers showed small but consistent deficits in identification across targets whether unconditional or conditional accuracy was used. Additionally, in the TTT condition, final-target conditional accuracy was poorer than unconditional accuracy, particularly for poor readers, suggesting a substantial cost arising from processing the previous two targets that was not present in normal readers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mirroring the differences found between poor and normal readers in spatial visual attention span, the present findings suggest two principal differences between the temporal attention spans of poor and normal readers. First, the consistent pattern of reduced performance across targets suggests increased competition amongst items within the same span for poor readers. Second, the steeper decline in final target performance amongst poor readers

  18. Channelling urban modernity to sustainable pro-poor tourism development in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyanti, R.

    2017-06-01

    Sustainable urban planning and development requires not only a fast-growing economic growth and modernity, but also social equity and environmental sustainability. Meanwhile, the global goals of sustainable development have fascinatingly set a promising urban development future by enhancing ecology based pro-poor policy program. Apparently, pro-poor development agenda has led to the notion of pro-poor tourism as part of urban development strategies on poverty alleviation. This research presents Jakarta Hidden Tour and Kampung Warna-warni as certain cases of pro-poor tourism in Indonesia. By the emergence of criticism on “pro-growth” paradigm, the critical analysis of this research focuses on the scenario of sustainable pro-poor tourism through eco-cultural based Kampung-Tour development. In accordance, debates and dilemma have been continuously arising as pros and cons regarding the ethical issues of poverty alleviation based Kampung-Tour development. Nevertheless, this paper tries to redefine Slum Kampung as potential; the writer wildly offers a concept of poverty alleviation by reinventing pro-poor tourism strategy; revitalizing slum site to eco-cultural based pro-poor tourism development as an embodiment of a sustainable urban development. By holding system thinking analysis as research method, sustainable pro-poor tourism highlights the urgency community based tourism and eco-tourism so that poverty alleviation based tourism can be tangibly perceived by the poor. In this sense, good local governance and public private partnership must be enhanced, it is due to, like any other development projects; sustainable pro-poor tourism needs a strong political commitment to alleviate urban poverty, as well as to pursue a better future of sustainable nation.

  19. Poor preoperative nutritional status is an important predictor of the retardation of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery in elderly cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masato; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Kitamura, Aki; Ono, Rei; Sakai, Yoshitada; Okita, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative nutritional status and physical function are important predictors of mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery. However, the influence of nutritional status before cardiac surgery on physical function and the progress of postoperative rehabilitation requires clarification. To determine the effect of preoperative nutritional status on preoperative physical function and progress of rehabilitation after elective cardiac surgery. We enrolled 131 elderly patients with mean age of 73.7 ± 5.8 years undergoing cardiac surgery. We divided them into two groups by nutritional status as measured by the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI): high GNRI group (GNRI ≥ 92, n = 106) and low GNRI group (GNRI nutritional status as assessed by the GNRI could reflect perioperative physical function. Preoperative poor nutritional status may be an independent predictor of the retardation of postoperative rehabilitation in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery.

  20. CCL7 and CCL21 overexpression in gastric cancer is associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsann-Long Hwang; Li-Yu Lee; Chee-Chan Wang; Ying Liang; Shu-Fang Huang; Chi-Ming Wu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate how a complex network of CC chemokine ligands (CCLs) and their receptors influence the progression of tumor and metastasis.METHODS:In the present study,we used immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of CCL7,CCL8 and CCL21 in 194 gastric cancer samples and adjacent normal tissues.We analyzed their correlation with tumor metastasis,clinicopathologic parameters and clinical outcome.RESULTS:We found that the higher expression of CCL7 and CCL21 in cancer tissues than in normal tissues was significantly correlated with advanced depth of wall invasion,lymph node metastasis and higher tumor node metastasis stage.Moreover,Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that CCL7 and CCL21 overexpression in cancer tissues was correlated with poor prognosis.CONCLUSION:These results suggest that overexpression of these two CC chemokine ligands is associated with tumor metastasis and serves as a prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer.