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Sample records for non-scaling ffag arcs

  1. The EMMA Non-scaling FFAG

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, Thomas; Clarke, James; Griffiths, Stephen; Hill, Clive; Jamison, Steven; Jones, James; Kalinin, Alexander; Marinov, Kiril; Marks, Neil; McIntosh, Peter; Muratori, Bruno; Orrett, Joseph; Saveliev, Yuri; Shepherd, Ben; Smith, Robert; Smith, Susan; Tzenov, Stephan; Wheelhouse, Alan; Berg, J. Scott; Bliss, Neil; Martlew, Brian; White, Christopher; Craddock, Michael; Crisp, James; Johnstone, Carol; Giboudot, Yoel; Keil, Eberhard; Kelliher, David; Machida, Shinji; Koscielniak, Shane; Meot, Francois; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Sheehy, Suzanne; Yokoi, Takeichiro

    2010-01-01

    The Elec­tron Model for Many Ap­pli­ca­tions (EMMA) will be the World's first non-scal­ing FFAG and is under con­struc­tion at the STFC Dares­bury Lab­o­ra­to­ry in the UK. Con­struc­tion is due for com­ple­tion in March 2010 and will be fol­lowed by com­mis­sion­ing with beam and a de­tailed ex­per­i­men­tal pro­gramme to study the func­tion­ing of this type of ac­cel­er­a­tor. This paper will give an overview of the mo­ti­va­tion for the pro­ject and de­scribe the EMMA de­sign and hard­ware. The first re­sults from com­mis­sion­ing will be pre­sent­ed in a sep­a­rate paper.

  2. ORBIT CORRECTION IN A NON-SCALING FFAG

    CERN Document Server

    Kelliher, D J; Sheehy, S L

    2010-01-01

    EMMA - the Electron Model of Many Applications - is to be built at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory in the UK and will be the first non-scaling FFAG ever constructed. The purpose of EMMA is to study beam dynamics in such an accelerator. The EMMA orbit correction scheme must deal with two characteristics of a non-scaling FFAG: i.e. the lack of a well defined reference orbit and the variation with momentum of the phase advance. In this study we present a novel orbit correction scheme that avoids the former problem by instead aiming to maximise both the symmetry of the orbit and the physical aperture of the beam. The latter problem is dealt with by optimising the corrector strengths over the energy range.

  3. EMMA The World's First Non-scaling FFAG

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, R; Machida, S; Beard, C; Bliss, N; Clarke, J; Hill, C; Jamison, S; Kalinin, A; Marinov, K; Marks, N; Martlew, B; McIntosh, P; Muratori, B; Owen, H; Saveliev, Yu; Shepherd, B; Smith, R; Smith, S; Tzenov, S; White, C; Wooldridge, E; Berg, J S; Trbojevic, D; Craddock, M; Koscielniak, S; Crisp, J; Johnstone, C; Giboudot, Y; Keil, E; Méot, F; Yokoi, T

    2008-01-01

    EMMA – the Electron Model of Many Applications – is to be built at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory in the UK and will be the first non-scaling FFAG ever constructed. EMMA will be used to demonstrate the principle of this type of accelerator and study its features in detail. The design of the machine and its hardware components are now far advanced and construction is due for completion in Autumn 2009.

  4. Design of a non-scaling FFAG accelerator for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Keil, E.; Neskovic, N.; Belgrade, Vinca; Sessler, A.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years there has been a revival of interest in Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerators. In Japan a number have been built, or are under construction. A new non-scaling approach to the FFAG reduces the required orbit offsets during acceleration and the size of the required aperture, while maintaining the advantage of the low cost magnets associated with fixed fields. An advantage of the non-scaling FFAG accelerator, with respect to synchrotrons, is the fixed field and hence the possibility of high current and high repetition rate for spot scanning. There are possible advantages of the nonscaling design with respect to fixed-field cyclotrons. The non-scaling FFAG allows strong focusing and hence smaller aperture requirements compared to scaling designs, thus leading to very low losses and better control over the beam. We present, here, a non-scaling FFAG designed to be used for proton therapy

  5. EMMA-The world's first non-scaling FFAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R [Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Manchester University, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Berg, J.S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Beard, C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bliss, N.; Clarke, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Craddock, M.K. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Crisp, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Edgecock, R., E-mail: rob.edgecock@stfc.ac.u [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Giboudot, Y. [Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Goudket, P.; Griffiths, S.; Hill, C.; Jamison, S. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Johnstone, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Kalinin, A. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Keil, E. [CERN, Geneva, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Kelliher, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Koscielniak, S. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Machida, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marinov, K. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-01

    Due to the combination of fixed magnetic field operation with strong focusing, non-scaling FFAGs have a significant potential for future particle accelerator applications. However, this technology has a number of unique features, which must be fully studied before this potential can be realised. To do this, a proof-of-principle non-scaling FFAG, called EMMA - Electron Model for Many Applications - has been constructed at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory in the UK. It has been designed by an international collaboration of accelerator scientists and engineers. It will demonstrate the principle of non-scaling FFAGs and be used to study the features of this type of accelerator in detail.

  6. SETTING THE BEAM ONTO THE REFERENCE ORBIT IN NON SCALING FFAG ACCELERATORS

    CERN Document Server

    Tzenov, S I; Muratori, B; Giboudot, Y

    2010-01-01

    De­scribed in the paper are sys­tem­at­ic pro­ce­dures to in­ject and keep the beam on the ref­er­ence tra­jec­to­ry for a fixed en­er­gy, as ap­plied to the EMMA non scal­ing FFAG ac­cel­er­a­tor. The no­tion of ac­cel­er­at­ed or­bits in FFAG ac­cel­er­a­tors has been in­tro­duced and some of their prop­er­ties have been stud­ies in de­tail

  7. Advanced Simulation and Optimization Tools for Dynamic Aperture of Non-scaling FFAGs and Accelerators including Modern User Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, F.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Johnstone, C.

    2010-01-01

    With the U.S. experimental effort in HEP largely located at laboratories supporting the operations of large, highly specialized accelerators, colliding beam facilities, and detector facilities, the understanding and prediction of high energy particle accelerators becomes critical to the success, overall, of the DOE HEP program. One area in which small businesses can contribute to the ongoing success of the U.S. program in HEP is through innovations in computer techniques and sophistication in the modeling of high-energy accelerators. Accelerator modeling at these facilities is performed by experts with the product generally highly specific and representative only of in-house accelerators or special-interest accelerator problems. Development of new types of accelerators like FFAGs with their wide choices of parameter modifications, complicated fields, and the simultaneous need to efficiently handle very large emittance beams requires the availability of new simulation environments to assure predictability in operation. In this, ease of use and interfaces are critical to realizing a successful model, or optimization of a new design or working parameters of machines. In Phase I, various core modules for the design and analysis of FFAGs were developed and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) have been investigated instead of the more general yet less easily manageable console-type output COSY provides.

  8. Advanced Simulation and Optimization Tools for Dynamic Aperture of Non-scaling FFAGs and Accelerators including Modern User Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, F.; Makino, Kyoko; Berz, Martin; Johnstone, C.

    2010-09-01

    With the U.S. experimental effort in HEP largely located at laboratories supporting the operations of large, highly specialized accelerators, colliding beam facilities, and detector facilities, the understanding and prediction of high energy particle accelerators becomes critical to the success, overall, of the DOE HEP program. One area in which small businesses can contribute to the ongoing success of the U.S. program in HEP is through innovations in computer techniques and sophistication in the modeling of high-energy accelerators. Accelerator modeling at these facilities is performed by experts with the product generally highly specific and representative only of in-house accelerators or special-interest accelerator problems. Development of new types of accelerators like FFAGs with their wide choices of parameter modifications, complicated fields, and the simultaneous need to efficiently handle very large emittance beams requires the availability of new simulation environments to assure predictability in operation. In this, ease of use and interfaces are critical to realizing a successful model, or optimization of a new design or working parameters of machines. In Phase I, various core modules for the design and analysis of FFAGs were developed and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) have been investigated instead of the more general yet less easily manageable console-type output COSY provides.

  9. MUON ACCELERATION WITH THE RACETRACK FFAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; EBERHARD, K.; SESSLER, A.

    2007-01-01

    Muon acceleration for muon collider or neutrino factory is still in a stage where further improvements are likely as a result of further study. This report presents a design of the racetrack non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) accelerator to allow fast muon acceleration in small number of turns. The racetrack design is made of four arcs: two arcs at opposite sides have a smaller radius and are made of closely packed combined function magnets, while two additional arcs, with a very large radii, are used for muon extraction, injection, and RF accelerating cavities. The ends of the large radii arcs are geometrically matched at the connections to the arcs with smaller radii. The dispersion and both horizontal and vertical amplitude fictions are matched at the central energy

  10. FFAGS for muon acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J. Scott; Kahn, Stephen; Palmer, Robert; Trbojevic, Dejan; Johnstone, Carol; Keil, Eberhard; Aiba, Masamitsu; Machida, Shinji; Mori, Yoshiharu; Ogitsu, Toru; Ohmori, Chihiro; Sessler, Andrew; Koscielniak, Shane

    2003-01-01

    Due to their finite lifetime, muons must be accelerated very rapidly. It is challenging to make the magnets ramp fast enough to accelerate in a synchrotron, and accelerating in a linac is very expensive. One can use a recirculating accelerator (like CEBAF), but one needs a different arc for each turn, and this limits the number of turns one can use to accelerate, and therefore requires significant amounts of RF to achieve the desired energy gain. An alternative method for muon acceleration is using a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator. Such an accelerator has a very large energy acceptance (a factor of two or three), allowing one to use the same arc with a magnetic field that is constant over time. Thus, one can in principle make as many turns as one can tolerate due to muon decay, therefore reducing the RF cost without increasing the arc cost. This paper reviews the current status of research into the design of FFAGs for muon acceleration. Several current designs are described and compared. General design considerations are also discussed

  11. Review of Current FFAG Lattice Studies in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J. Scott; Plamer, Robert; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Trbojevic, Dejan; Keil, Eberhard; Johnstone, Carol; Sessler, Andrew; Koscielniak, Shane Rupert; Craddock, Michael

    2004-01-01

    There has been a revival of interest in the use of fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs) for many applications, including muon accelerators, high-intensity proton sources, and medical applications. The original FFAGs, and those recently built in Japan, have been based on a so-called scaling FFAG design, for which tunes are constant and the behavior in phase space is independent of energy with the exception of a scaling factor. Activity in the US and Canada has instead mostly focused on nonscaling designs, which, while having the large energy acceptance that characterizes an FFAG, do not obey the scaling relations of the scaling FFAG. Most of these designs have been based on magnets with a linear midplane field profile. A great deal of analysis, both theoretically and numerically, has occurred on these designs, and they are very well understood at this point. Some more recent work has occurred on designs with a nonlinear field profile. Since no non-scaling FFAG has ever been built, there is interest in building a small model which would accelerate electrons and demonstrate our understanding of non-scaling FFAG design

  12. An FFAG-ERL at Cornell University for eRHIC prototyping and bright-beam applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffstaetter, Georg [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Cornell University has prototyped technology essential for any high-brightness electron ERL. This includes a DC gun and an SRF injector Linac with world-record current and normalized brightness in a bunch train, a high-current CW cryomodule for 70 MeV energy gain, a high-power beam stop, and several diagnostics tools for high-current and high-brightness beams, e.g. slid measurements for 6-D phase-space densities, a fast wire scanner for beam profiles, and beam loos diagnostics. All these are now available to equip a one-cryomodule ERL, and laboratory space has been cleared out and is radiation shielded to install this ERL at Cornell. BNL has designed a multi-turn ERL for eRHIC, where beam is transported more than 20 times around the RHIC tunnel. The number of transport lines is minimized by using two non-scaling (NS) FFAG arcs. A collaboration between BNL and Cornell has been formed to investigate the new NS-FFAG optics and the multi-turn eRHIC ERL design by building a 4-turn, one-cryomodule ERL at Cornell. It has a NS-FFAG return loop built with permanent magnets and is meant to accelerate 40 mA beam to 250 MeV.

  13. Developments in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi for 6-D multiturn tracking in FFAG rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemuet, F.; Meot, F.

    2005-01-01

    A geometrical method for 3-D modeling of the magnetic field in scaling and non-scaling FFAG magnets has been installed in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. The method in particular allows a good simulation of transverse non-linearities, of field fall-offs and possible merging fields in configurations of neighboring magnets, while using realistic models of magnetic fields. That yields an efficient tool for FFAG lattice design and optimizations, and for 6-D tracking studies. It is applied for illustration to the simulation of an acceleration cycle in a 150 MeV radial sector proton FFAG

  14. Straight scaling FFAG beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, J.-B.; Planche, T.; Yamakawa, E.; Uesugi, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Qin, B.; Okabe, K.; Mori, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators are recently subject to a strong revival. They are usually designed in a circular shape; however, it would be an asset to guide particles with no overall bend in this type of accelerator. An analytical development of a straight FFAG cell which keeps zero-chromaticity is presented here. A magnetic field law is thus obtained, called “straight scaling law”, and an experiment has been conducted to confirm this zero-chromatic law. A straight scaling FFAG prototype has been designed and manufactured, and horizontal phase advances of two different energies are measured. Results are analyzed to clarify the straight scaling law.

  15. Straight scaling FFAG beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, J.-B.; Planche, T.; Yamakawa, E.; Uesugi, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Qin, B.; Okabe, K.; Mori, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators are recently subject to a strong revival. They are usually designed in a circular shape; however, it would be an asset to guide particles with no overall bend in this type of accelerator. An analytical development of a straight FFAG cell which keeps zero-chromaticity is presented here. A magnetic field law is thus obtained, called "straight scaling law", and an experiment has been conducted to confirm this zero-chromatic law. A straight scaling FFAG prototype has been designed and manufactured, and horizontal phase advances of two different energies are measured. Results are analyzed to clarify the straight scaling law.

  16. BRIEF HISTORY OF FFAG ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2006-01-01

    Colleagues of mine have asked me few times why we have today so much interest in Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators when these were invented a long time ago, and have always been ignored since then. I try here to give a reply with a short history of FFAG accelerators, at least as I know it. I take also the opportunity to clarify few definitions

  17. BRIEF HISTORY OF FFAG ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2006-12-04

    Colleagues of mine have asked me few times why we have today so much interest in Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators when these were invented a long time ago, and have always been ignored since then. I try here to give a reply with a short history of FFAG accelerators, at least as I know it. I take also the opportunity to clarify few definitions.

  18. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.

    2012-01-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS)...

  19. ERL with non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient lattice for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hao, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The proposed eRHIC electron-hadron collider uses a "non-scaling FFAG" (NS-FFAG) lattice to recirculate 16 turns of different energy through just two beam lines located in the RHIC tunnel. This paper presents lattices for these two FFAGs that are optimized for low magnet field and to minimize total synchrotron radiation across the energy range. The higher number of recirculations in the FFAG allows a shorter linac (1.322GeV) to be used, drastically reducing cost, while still achieving a 21.2 GeV maximum energy to collide with one of the existing RHIC hadron rings at up to 250GeV. eRHIC uses many cost-saving measures in addition to the FFAG: the linac operates in energy recovery mode, so the beams also decelerate via the same FFAG loops and energy is recovered from the interacted beam. All magnets will be constructed from NdFeB permanent magnet material, meaning chillers and large magnet power supplies are not needed. This paper also describes a small prototype ERL-FFAG accelerator that will test all of these technologies in combination to reduce technical risk for eRHIC.

  20. The FFAG return loop for the CBETA Energy Recovery Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-28

    The CBETA energy recovery linac uses a single xed eld alternating gradient (FFAG) beam line to return the beam for electron beams with four energies, ranging from 42 MeV to 150 MeV. To keep the beam line compact, the ends of the return line have a small radius of curvature, but the central part of the return line is straight. These are connected by transition lines that adiabatically change from one to the other. We rst describe the design or the arc cell. We then describe how a straight cell is created to be a good match to this arc cell. We then describe the design of the transition line between them. The design process makes use of eld maps for the desired magnets. Because we switch magnet types as we move from the arc, through the transition, and into the straight, there are discrete jumps in the elds that degrade the adiabaticity of the transition, and we describe corrections to manage that.

  1. Prototype superconducting magnet for the FFAG accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Fujii, T.; Iwasa, M.; Orikasa, T.

    2006-01-01

    A study of a superconducting magnet for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been performed. The FFAG accelerator requires static magnetic field, and it is suitable for superconducting magnet applications, because problems associated with time varying magnetic field such as eddy current loss can be eliminated. The superconducting magnet, which can generate high magnetic field, is possible to realize a higher beam energy with a given accelerator size or the size to be smaller for a given beam energy. The FFAG accelerator magnet is demanded to have a complicated nonlinear magnetic field with high accuracy. As a first prototype superconducting coil, the coil configuration which consists of left-right asymmetric cross-section and large aperture has been designed. The prototype coil has been successfully developed by using a 6-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC) winding machine. The magnetic field of the prototype coil has been demonstrated in warm measurement. As a consequence, the technical feasibility has been verified with the prototype coil development and the performance test. In addition, the technology components developed in the prototype coil have a possibility to transfer to a fusion magnet

  2. FFAGs: Front-end for neutrino factories and medical accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    The idea of Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator was originated by different people and groups in the early 1950s. It was independently introduced by Ohkawa [Ohkawa (1953)], Symon et al. [Symon et al. (1956)], and Kolomensky [Kolomensky and Lebedev (1966)] when the strong Alternate Gradient (AG) focusing and the phase stability schemes were applied to particle acceleration. The first FFAG electron model was developed in the MURA accelerator project led by Kerst and Cole in the late 1950s. Since then, they have fabricated several electron models in the early 1960s [Symon et al. (1956)]. However, the studies did not lead to a single practical FFAG accelerator for the following 50 years. Because of the difficulties of treating non-linear magnetic field and RF acceleration for non-relativistic particles, the proton FFAG, especially, was not accomplished until recently. In 2000, the FFAG concept was revived with the world's first proton FFAG (POP) which was developed at KEK [Aiba (2000); Mori (1999)]. Since then, in many places [Berg (2004); Johnstone et al. (2004); Mori (2011); Ruggiero (2004); Trbojevic (2004)], FFAGs have been developed and constructed...

  3. Magnetic design of a FFAG superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Nakamoto, T.; Sasaki, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Orikasa, T.

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting magnet for a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been proposed. The required magnetic field is static and proportional to the k-th power of the orbit radius where k is the geometrical field index of the accelerator. In 2D, the required magnetic field can be generated with the optimized cross section of the coil. The cross section of the coils is a left-right asymmetry to simplify the cross section and ellipse to downsize the magnet. Local and integral 3D fields along the beam trajectory are evaluated with using new type of 3D coil configuration

  4. CHARACTERISATION OF THE ALICE ACCELERATOR AS AN INJECTOR FOR THE EMMA NS-FFAG

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, J M; McKenzie, J W; Muratori, B D

    2010-01-01

    EMMA (ElectronModel with Many Applications) is the first proof-of-principle non-scaling FFAG accelerator and is presently under construction at Daresbury Laboratory in the UK. To probe different parts of the bunch phase space during the acceleration from 10 to 20 MeV (which requires rapid resonance crossing), electron bunches are needed with sufficiently small emittance. To understand the phase space painting into the 3000 mm-mrad EMMA acceptance, we have modelled ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers in Combined Experiments) - which acts as an injector for EMMA - using GPT and compared the estimated emittances with measurements made with a variety of screen-based methods. Although the emittances are not yet as small as desired, we obtain reasonable agreement between simulation and measurement.

  5. Electron Model of Linear-Field FFAG

    CERN Document Server

    Koscielniak, Shane R

    2005-01-01

    A fixed-field alternating-gradient accelerator (FFAG) that employs only linear-field elements ushers in a new regime in accelerator design and dynamics. The linear-field machine has the ability to compact an unprecedented range in momenta within a small component aperture. With a tune variation which results from the natural chromaticity, the beam crosses many strong, uncorrec-table, betatron resonances during acceleration. Further, relativistic particles in this machine exhibit a quasi-parabolic time-of-flight that cannot be addressed with a fixed-frequency rf system. This leads to a new concept of bucketless acceleration within a rotation manifold. With a large energy jump per cell, there is possibly strong synchro-betatron coupling. A few-MeV electron model has been proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of these untested acceleration features and to investigate them at length under a wide range of operating conditions. This paper presents a lattice optimized for a 1.3 GHz rf, initial technology choices f...

  6. Analysis of FFAG accelerators and the evolution of circular accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laslett, J.

    1961-01-01

    After rapidly comparing circular machines with the linear accelerator and the reasons for the choice of an annular high energy and very high intensity accelerator, recent problems concerning accelerator theory are discussed, with emphasis on their physical character. The FFAG principle. The limit of the energy of FFAG cyclotron. The setting-up and interpreting of mean energy of focusing terms for a spiral FFAG synchrotron. The limiting amplitude stable near the non-linear resonance 2Q z = Q r , as well as the linear coupling resonance of Walkinshaw 2Q z = Q r . The crossed-beam accelerator. The 40 MeV electron model of MURA. Two other parts deal with linear and non-linear methods of injection and extraction using a variable disturbance applied to the magnetic field, as well as to collective effects. The interaction of the beam with the accelerating cavities and the walls. The modification of the phase oscillation equation. The influence of the beams' high frequency fields on the Nielsen longitudinal instability. (author) [fr

  7. A compact and high current FFAG for the production of radioisotopes for medical application

    CERN Document Server

    Bruton, David; Edgecock, Rob; Seviour, Rebecca; Johnstone, Carol

    2017-01-01

    A low energy Fixed Field Alternating Gradient(FFAG)accelerator has been designed for the production of radioisotopes. Tracking studies have been conducted using the OPAL code, including the effects of space charge. Radioisotopes have a wide range of uses in medicine, and recent disruption to the supply chain has seen a renewed effort to find alternative isotopes and production methods. The design features separate sector magnets with non-scaling, non-linear field gradients but without the counter bends commonly found in FFAG’s. The machine is isochronous at the level of 0.3% up to at least 28MeV and hence able to operate in Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Both protons and helium ions can be used with this design and it has been demonstrated that proton beams with currents of up to 20 mA can be accelerated. An interesting option for the production of radioisotopes is the use of a thin internal target. We have shown that this design has large acceptance, ideal for allowing the beam to be recirculated through t...

  8. FFAG Designs for the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S.; Machida, S.

    2009-05-04

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) aims to produce a design report for a neutrino factory. One component of that design is a linear nonscaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) that will accelerate to the final energy of 25 GeV. An FFAG is used to reduce the machine cost by maximizing the number of passes made through the RF cavities. We present some design options for this FFAG, individually optimized for cost. We study the addition of nonlinear magnets to the lattice to improve the performance of the lattice and consider the negative effects of doing so.

  9. Research project on accelerator-driven subcritical system using FFAG accelerator and Kyoto University critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Unesaki, Hironobu; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanigaki, Minoru; Mori, Yoshiharu; Shiroya, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Ishi, Y.; Fukumoto, Shintaro

    2005-01-01

    The KART (Kumatori Accelerator-driven Reactor Test facility) project started in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University in fiscal year 2002 with the grant by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the basis feasibility of accelerator driven system (ADS), studying the effect of incident neutron energy on the effective multiplication factor in a subcritical nuclear fuel system. For this purpose, a variable-energy FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) accelerator complex is being constructed to be coupled with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The FFAG proton accelerator complex consists of ion-beta, booster and main rings. This system aims to attain 1 μA proton beam with energy range from 20 to 150 MeV with a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The first beam from the FFAG complex is expected to be available by the end of FY 2005, and the experiment on ADS with KUCA and the FFAG complex (FFAG-KUCA experiment) will start in FY 2006. Before the FFAG-KUCA experiment starts, preliminary experiments with 14 MeV neutrons are currently being performed using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator coupled with the KUCA. Experimental data are analyzed using continuous energy Monte-Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and MNCP-X. (author)

  10. Orbit and Optics Distortion in a Nonscaling Muon FFAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Shinji

    2008-01-01

    Finite chromaticity in a nonscaling FFAG makes transverse tunes move during acceleration. Particles have to cross many integer and half-integer resonances although all those tunes are imperfection ones. Plausible argument is that the acceleration is so fast that effects of those resonance crossings are marginal. We did a tracking study in a lattice with alignment and gradient errors to see how the orbit and optics distortion is excited. We found that in a time scale of the muon acceleration, namely total tune changes about one unit per turn, the resonance is not a proper way to describe the beam dynamics. Instead, a random walk model, in which we assume that alignment and gradient errors kick a particle randomly in phase space, well explains the tracking results

  11. Tune-stabilized, non-scaling, fixed-field, alternating gradient accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J [Warrenville, IL

    2011-02-01

    A FFAG is a particle accelerator having turning magnets with a linear field gradient for confinement and a large edge angle to compensate for acceleration. FODO cells contain focus magnets and defocus magnets that are specified by a number of parameters. A set of seven equations, called the FFAG equations relate the parameters to one another. A set of constraints, call the FFAG constraints, constrain the FFAG equations. Selecting a few parameters, such as injection momentum, extraction momentum, and drift distance reduces the number of unknown parameters to seven. Seven equations with seven unknowns can be solved to yield the values for all the parameters and to thereby fully specify a FFAG.

  12. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG)accelerators and their medical application in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrier, J.

    2008-10-01

    Radiotherapy uses particle beams to irradiate and kill cancer tumors while sparing healthy tissues. Bragg peak shape of the proton energy loss in matter allows a ballistic improvement of the dose deposition compared with X rays. Thus, the irradiated volume can be precisely adjusted to the tumour. This thesis, in the frame of the RACCAM project, aims to the study and the design of a proton therapy installation based on a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator in order to build a spiral sector FFAG magnet for validation. First, we present proton therapy to define medical specifications leading to the technical specifications of a proton therapy installation. Secondly, we introduce FFAG accelerators through their past and on-going projects which are on their way around the world before developing the beam dynamic theories in the case of invariant focusing optics (scaling FFAG). We describe modelling and simulation tools developed to study the dynamics in a spiral scaling FFAG accelerator. Then we explain the spiral optic parameter search which has leaded to the construction of a magnet prototype. Finally, we describe the RACCAM project proton therapy installation starting from the injector cyclotron and ending with the extraction system. (author)

  13. Preliminary parameter assessments of a spiral FFAG accelerator for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.L.; Azaryan, N.S.; Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator was invented in the 1950-60s but never progressed beyond the model stage. Starting from 2000, new interest in this type of accelerator arose. Given advantages of the FFAG over the synchrotron, cyclotron and linac, there are many possible applications of the accelerator. Among them, we are mostly interested in acceleration of protons and light ions for hadron therapy. In this connection a preliminary set of parameters of the facility was estimated and, in particular, the magnetic sector shape and corresponding dynamical properties of the magnetic field of the accelerator were calculated. In addition, preliminary considerations about the RF system design are given.

  14. Analysis of FFAG accelerators and the evolution of circular accelerators; L'analyse des accelerateurs FFAG et l'evolution des accelerateurs circulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laslett, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; [Iowa State Univ., U.S. Office of Naval Research, Dept. of Physics and Institute for Atomic Research, Ames (United States)

    1961-07-01

    After rapidly comparing circular machines with the linear accelerator and the reasons for the choice of an annular high energy and very high intensity accelerator, recent problems concerning accelerator theory are discussed, with emphasis on their physical character. The FFAG principle. The limit of the energy of FFAG cyclotron. The setting-up and interpreting of mean energy of focusing terms for a spiral FFAG synchrotron. The limiting amplitude stable near the non-linear resonance 2Q{sub z} = Q{sub r}, as well as the linear coupling resonance of Walkinshaw 2Q{sub z} = Q{sub r}. The crossed-beam accelerator. The 40 MeV electron model of MURA. Two other parts deal with linear and non-linear methods of injection and extraction using a variable disturbance applied to the magnetic field, as well as to collective effects. The interaction of the beam with the accelerating cavities and the walls. The modification of the phase oscillation equation. The influence of the beams' high frequency fields on the Nielsen longitudinal instability. (author) [French] Apres une comparaison rapide des machines circulaires avec l'accelerateur lineaire et une motivation du choix en faveur d'un accelerateur circulaire de haute energie et tres haute intensite, des problemes recents de la theorie des accelerateurs sont discutes, en insistant sur leur contenu physique. Le principe FFAG. La limitation en energie des cyclotrons FFAG. L'etablissement et l'interpretation des termes de la force moyenne de focalisation d'un synchrotron FFAG spirale. L'amplitude de limite stable a proximite de la resonance non-lineaire Q{sub r} = N/3, ainsi que la resonance lineaire de couplage de Walkinshaw 2Q{sub z} = Q{sub r}. L'accelerateur a faisceaux croises. Le modele a electrons de 40 MeV du MURA. Deux autres chapitres sont consacres a des methodes lineaires et non-lineaires d'injection et d'extraction a l'aide d'une perturbation variable appliquee au champ magnetique, ainsi qu'aux effets collectifs. L

  15. Design of a prototype gap shaping spiral dipole for a variable energy protontherapy FFAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planche, T.; Fourrier, J.; Lancelot, J.L.; Meot, F.; Neuveglise, D.; Pasternak, J.

    2009-01-01

    The design, fabrication and measurement of a prototype magnet is part of the RACCAM ANR medical FFAG project. This magnet prototyping work, started in early 2006, is being performed in collaboration between the IN2P3/LPSC laboratory team and the magnet engineering firm SIGMAPHI. Magnetic computations and parameters of the magnet prototype will be presented in this paper.

  16. Sub-Critical Nuclear Reactor Based on FFAG-Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Seok; Kang, Hung Sik; Lee, Tae Yeon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    After the East-Japan earthquake and the subsequent nuclear disaster, the anti-nuclear mood has been wide spread. It is very unfortunate both for nuclear science community and for the future of mankind, which is threatened by two serious challenges, the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect and the shortage of energy cause by the petroleum exhaustion. While the nuclear energy seemed to be the only solution to these problems, it is clear that it has its own problems, one of which broke out so strikingly in Japan. There are also other problems such as the radiotoxic nuclear wastes that survive up to even tens of thousands years and the limited reserves of Uranium. To solve these problems of nuclear fission energy, accelerator-based sub-critical nuclear reactor was once proposed. (Its details will be explained below.) First of all, it is safe in a disaster such as an earthquake, because the deriving accelerator stops immediately by the earthquake. It also minimizes the nuclear waste problem by reducing the amount of the toxic waste and shortening their half lifetime to only a few hundred years. Finally, it solves the Uranium reserve problem because it can use Thorium as its fuel. The Thorium reserve is much larger than that of Uranium. Although the idea of the accelerator-driven nuclear reactor was proposed long time ago, it has not been utilized yet first by technical difficulty and economical reasons. The accelerator-based system needs 1 GeV, 10 MW power proton accelerator. A conventional linear accelerator would need several hundred m length, which is highly costly particularly in Korea because of the high land cost. However, recent technologies make it possible to realize that scale accelerator by a reasonable size. That is the fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator that is described in this article

  17. Sub-Critical Nuclear Reactor Based on FFAG-Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Seok; Kang, Hung Sik; Lee, Tae Yeon

    2011-01-01

    After the East-Japan earthquake and the subsequent nuclear disaster, the anti-nuclear mood has been wide spread. It is very unfortunate both for nuclear science community and for the future of mankind, which is threatened by two serious challenges, the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect and the shortage of energy cause by the petroleum exhaustion. While the nuclear energy seemed to be the only solution to these problems, it is clear that it has its own problems, one of which broke out so strikingly in Japan. There are also other problems such as the radiotoxic nuclear wastes that survive up to even tens of thousands years and the limited reserves of Uranium. To solve these problems of nuclear fission energy, accelerator-based sub-critical nuclear reactor was once proposed. (Its details will be explained below.) First of all, it is safe in a disaster such as an earthquake, because the deriving accelerator stops immediately by the earthquake. It also minimizes the nuclear waste problem by reducing the amount of the toxic waste and shortening their half lifetime to only a few hundred years. Finally, it solves the Uranium reserve problem because it can use Thorium as its fuel. The Thorium reserve is much larger than that of Uranium. Although the idea of the accelerator-driven nuclear reactor was proposed long time ago, it has not been utilized yet first by technical difficulty and economical reasons. The accelerator-based system needs 1 GeV, 10 MW power proton accelerator. A conventional linear accelerator would need several hundred m length, which is highly costly particularly in Korea because of the high land cost. However, recent technologies make it possible to realize that scale accelerator by a reasonable size. That is the fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator that is described in this article

  18. New Concepts in FFAG Design for Secondary Beam Facilities and Other Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craddock, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators offer much higher acceptances and repetition rates - and therefore higher beam intensities - than synchrotrons, at the cost of more complicated magnet and rf cavity designs. Perhaps because of the difficulty and expense anticipated, early studies never progressed beyond the stage of successful electron models, but in recent years, with improvements in magnet and rf design technology, FFAGs have become the focus of renewed attention. Two proton machines have now been built, and three more, plus a muon phase rotator, are under construction. In addition, more than 20 designs are under study for the acceleration of protons, heavy ions, electrons and muons, with applications as diverse as treating cancer, irradiating materials, driving subcritical reactors, boosting high-energy proton intensity, and producing neutrinos. Moreover, it has become apparent that FFAG designs need not be restricted to the traditional 'scaling' approach, in which the orbit shape, optics and t...

  19. Present state of studies on FFAG accelerator for radiotherapy of cancer in National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misu, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    From 2001, developmental contract studies with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for a compact accelerator for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer started in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with use of fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator, which had been developed in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This paper describes the present state of those studies. Described are FFAG accelerator design for repeated acceleration for 200 Hz or more toward the carbon ion at 400 MeV/u with the range of 25 cm in water, FFAG optical systems for these purposes by linear analyses, and the present situation of the design. Technological problems yielded and future study plan are also commented. (N.I.)

  20. Comparison of Zgoubi and S-Code regarding the FFAG muon acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrier, J.; Machida, S.

    2006-06-01

    The high flux accelerator based neutrino source is foreseen as one of the next generation facilities of particle physics. Called Neutrino Factory (NuFact), it will be based on a muon storage ring where muons will decay, creating high flux neutrino beams. Muons are supposed to be accelerated from 5 to 20 GeV before being injected into the storage ring. In that purpose, Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators (FFAG) are one of the possibilities. Cell designs have been done and tracking studies are on their way using codes such as MAD, S-Code or Zgoubi. In order to cross-check results so obtained, we have performed comparisons between S-Code and Zgoubi at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The present report will explain the different simulations done and the results. The paper has the following contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Time of Flight comparisons; 3. Particle acceleration with different emittances; 4. Bunch acceleration. In conclusion it is shown that the difference of time of flight between the particle 1 and the others is comparable from Zgoubi to S- Code. Nevertheless, further investigation is necessary to make sure that the same revolution time will be found with the same initial conditions. Concerning the acceleration it was found that that the larger the emittance the less efficient appears to be the acceleration. Particles on ellipses 10 to 40 π mm rad are accelerated beyond 9 GeV while particles on ellipse 50 π mm rad are only accelerated up to 7.5 GeV and those on 60 π mm rad ellipse just reach 6 GeV. Thus, a beam whom emittance would be larger than 30 π mm rad would not be accelerated enough to reach 10 GeV and to be injected into the second FFAG. In the same way as for the first FFAG the larger the emittance the less efficient the acceleration. Particles on ellipses 10 to 40 π mm rad are accelerated beyond 18 GeV while particles on ellipses 50 and 60 π mm rad are only accelerated up to 12 GeV. Thus, beams whom emittance is lower than 30 π mm

  1. Study on two-dimensional POISSON design of large-scale FFAG magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Huafu

    2006-01-01

    In order to decrease the edge effect of the field, the designed magnetic field distribution in a large-scale FFAG magnet is realized by both the trim coil and the shape of the magnet pole-face. Through two-dimensional POISSON simulations, the distribution about the current and the position of the trim coil and the shape of the magnet pole are determined. In order to facilitate the POISSON design, two codes are writteen to automatically adjust the current and the position of the trim coil and the shape of magnet pole-face appeared in the POISSON input file. With the two codes, the efficiency of POISSON simulations is improved and the mistakes which might occur in writing and adjusting the POISSON input file manually could be avoided. (authors)

  2. FFAG ACCELERATOR AS A NEW INJECTOR FOR THE BNL-AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    It has been proposed recently to upgrade the Alternating-Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to an average proton beam power of one MWatt at the top energy of 28 GeV. This is to be accomplished primarily by raising the AGS repetition rate from the present {approx} 1/3 to 2.5 pulses per second, and by a relatively modest increase of beam intensity from the present 0.7 to about 1.0 x 10{sup 14} protons per cycle. The present injector, the 1.5 GeV Booster, has a circumference a quarter of that of the AGS, and four successive beam pulses are required for a complete fill of the AGS. The filling time at injection is thus at least 0.5 seconds, and it ought to be eliminated if one desires to shorten the AGS cycle period. Moreover, holding the beam for such a long period of time during injection causes its quality to deteriorate and beam losses. This report is the summary of the results of a feasibility study of a 1.5 GeV Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator as a new possible injection to the AGS.

  3. Diagnostic System Commissioning of the EMMA NS-FFAG Facility at Daresbury Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinin, A

    2010-01-01

    We pre­sent pre­lim­i­nary re­sults of beam di­ag­nos­tics for the world's first Non-Scal­ing FFAG Ac­cel­er­a­tor 'EMMA'. Amongst other means, a sin­gle-shot/turn-by-turn BPM sys­tem is used, that was first test­ed on the ALICE in­jec­tor. The BPM sys­tem uti­lizes a front-end con­ver­sion of but­ton pick­up sig­nals into flat-top-en­ve­lope 700 MHz bursts, time-do­main mul­ti­plex­ing (in each plane, sig­nals are made spaced by 13.8 ns), and the man­u­fac­ture of both syn­chronous de­tec­tor and ADC clocks di­rect­ly from the beam sig­nal. The sys­tem per­for­mance is dis­cussed; re­sults of beam-based res­o­lu­tion mea­sure­ment are given. First turn beam tra­jec­to­ries fur­thest from the Sep­tum and Kick­er are pre­sent­ed.

  4. MODELLING OF THE EMMA NS-FFAG INJECTION LINE USING GPT

    CERN Document Server

    D’Arcy, R T P; Muratori, B D; Jones, J

    2010-01-01

    EMMA (Elec­tron Ma­chine with Many Ap­pli­ca­tions) is a pro­to­type non-scal­ing Fixed Field Al­ter­nat­ing Gra­di­ent (NS-FFAG) ac­cel­er­a­tor present­ly under con­struc­tion at Dares­bury Lab­o­ra­to­ry, UK. The en­er­gy re­cov­ery linac ALICE will serve as an in­jec­tor for EMMA with­in the en­er­gy range of 10 to 20 MeV. The in­jec­tion line con­sists of a sym­met­ric 30° dog­leg to ex­tract the beam from ALICE, a match­ing sec­tion and a to­mog­ra­phy sec­tion for trans­verse emit­tance mea­sure­ments. This is fol­lowed by a trans­port sec­tion to the in­jec­tion point of the EMMA ring. Com­mis­sion­ing of the EMMA in­jec­tion line start­ed in early 2010. A num­ber of dif­fer­ent in­jec­tion en­er­gy and bunch charge regimes are planned; for some of the regimes the ef­fects of space charge will be sig­nif­i­cant. It is there­fore nec­es­sary to model the elec­tron beam trans­port in this line using a code ca­pa­ble of both...

  5. ARC Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    coordination on a regular basis. The overall ARC organizational structure is shown below. Organizational Structure Dynamics and Control of Vehicles Human Centered Modeling and Simulation High Performance

  6. Use of the ''MURA'' transformation to generate the fields and calculate the motion of protons in the designed Argonne Mini-ASPUN FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    As a long range goal for the production of high intensity neutrons, Argonne National Laboratory has proposed the construction of a 1.5 GeV FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator called ASPUN. The 500-MeV injector for this proposed accelerator is a smaller FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator named Mini-ASPUN. Until such a time as the larger machine could be built, it was planned that Mini-ASPUN would replace the present RCS now being used for the IPNS program at Argonne. In order to obtain an accurate estimation of the orbits and betatron oscillations in such a machine, it is necessary that realistic field values be used in the equations of motion. Obtaining these fields from 3-dimensional relaxation calculations is both time consuming and costly. However, because of the required scaling of the machine, the field-generating potential of three variables can be separated into a known function of the radius and a function of two variables. The second order differential equation satisfied by this function can be solved by ordinary relaxation methods. The fields generated from a mesh of values for this function will be accurate except for the extreme inside and outside orbits, which will be affected by the necessary termination of the inside and outside ends of the magnet. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  8. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  9. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  10. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  11. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  12. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  13. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  14. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  15. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Webb, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  16. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  17. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderlik, C; Gregersen, A R; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  18. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  19. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  20. Electric contact arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthrell, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Electrical contacts must function properly in many types of components used in nuclear weapon systems. Design, application, and testing of these components require detailed knowledge of chemical and physical phenomena associated with stockpile storage, stockpile testing, and operation. In the past, investigation of these phenomena has led to significant discoveries on the effects of surface contaminants, friction and wear, and the mechanics of closure on contact performance. A recent investigation of contact arcing phenomena which revealed that, preceding contact closure, arcs may occur at voltages lower than had been previously known is described. This discovery is important, since arcing may damage contacts, and repetitive testing of contacts performed as part of a quality assurance program might produce cumulative damage that would yield misleading life-test data and could prevent proper operation of the contacts at some time in the future. This damage can be avoided by determining the conditions under which arcing occurs, and ensuring that these conditions are avoided in contact testing

  1. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  2. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo; Pottmann, Helmut; Kilian, Martin; Wang, Wen Ping; Wallner, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where

  3. ALICE-ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  4. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  5. THE ARC TRAIL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. The project, carried out by the 1985 Conservation. Team at Durban Girls1 High School, consisted of three main aims- Awareness, Recreation and conservation, which were incorporated into the naming of the ARC trail. The trail is situated in suburban Durban where it was felt that it was important to ...

  6. ARC Software and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archives RESEARCH ▼ Research Areas Ongoing Projects Completed Projects SOFTWARE CONTACT ▼ Primary Contacts Researchers External Link MLibrary Deep Blue Software Archive Most research conducted at the ARC produce software code and methodologies that are transferred to TARDEC and industry partners. These

  7. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  8. Underwater plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leautier, R.; Pilot, G.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the work done to develop underwater plasma arc cutting techniques, to characterise aerosols from cutting operations on radioactive and non-radioactive work-pieces, and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out in the framework of a contract between CEA-CEN Cadarache and the Commission of European Communities. Furthermore, this work has been carried out in close cooperation with CEA-CEN Saclay mainly for secondary emissions and radioactive analysis. The contract started in May 1986 and was completed in December 1988 by a supplementary agreement. This report has been compiled from several progress reports submitted during the work period, contains the main findings of the work and encloses the results of comparative tests on plasma arc cutting

  9. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  10. Aperture modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S M; Wu, Xiaodong; Takita, C; Watzich, M; Xing Lei

    2003-01-01

    We show that it is possible to translate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan and deliver it as a single arc. This technique is referred to in this paper as aperture modulation arc therapy (AMAT). During this arc, the MLC leaves do not conform to the projection of the target PTV and the machine output of the accelerator has a constant value. Dose was calculated using the CORVUS 4.0 IMRT system, which uses a pencil beam dose algorithm, and treatments were delivered using a Varian 2100C/D Clinac. Results are presented for a head and neck and a prostate case, showing the equivalence of the IMRT and the translated AMAT delivery. For a prostate AMAT delivery, coronal plane film dose for the IMRT and AMAT deliveries agreed within 7.19 ± 6.62%. For a meningioma the coronal plane dose distributions were similar to a value of 4.6 ± 6.62%. Dose to the isocentre was measured as being within 2% of the planned value in both cases

  11. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  12. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  13. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  14. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H

    2011-01-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  15. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  16. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  17. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  18. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  19. Arc fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  20. The ARCS radial collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.B.; Abernathy, D.L.; Niedziela, J.L.; Overbay, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. The collimator is composed of collimating blades (or septa). The septa are 12 micron thick Kapton foils coated on each side with 39 microns of enriched boron carbide ( 10 B 4 C with 10 B > 96%) in an ultra-high vacuum compatible binder. The collimator blades represent an additional 22 m 2 of surface area. In the article we present collimator's design and performance and methodologies for its effective use

  1. Plasma's sweeping arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, Max

    2010-01-01

    Full text: It is purely elemental, returning materials to their basic atoms through extreme heat and then recondensing them in useful ways. Plasma arc gasification is the latest advanced waste treatment (AWT)concept to hit our shores, courtesy of Zenergy Australia. According to its fans, plasma technology can eliminate all domestic waste to landfill and turn it into beneficial by-products. Japan has toyed with it for a decade, but the idea is now creating a bit of buzz, in the US in particular. Consultancy URS last year undertook a review of 16 advanced technologies for the City of Los Angeles and determined plasma arc gasification was one of the most promising. The Waste Management Association of Australia (VVMAA), however, is cautious - too many AWT projects here have failed to live up to their promises. Plasma arc gasification works on the same principle as a welding machine. An inert gas is passed through an electrical arc between two electrodes and becomes ionised (called plasma), reaching temperatures as high as 13,900°C. It is then injected into the plasma converter holding the waste. Zenergy is working with US technology company Plasma Waste Recycling (PWR), which says it can convert 80 per cent of waste to syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used to generate renewable electricity. The inorganic compounds in the waste come out as a solid, either molten metal to be cast as scrap steel or a slag that can be used as a building material aggregate or spun into mineral wool. “The plasma arc process is the next generation for AWT plants as there is no incineration involved, no fly ash, no bottom ash and nothing left to landfill,” said Zenergy Australia's Paul Prasad. He estimates a plant could convert up to 175,000 tonnes of household waste a year into energy or reusable by-products. Technically, it also gets around Australia's fears over incineration, though whether that is really the case in practice remains to be seen. Prasad says

  2. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  3. On arc efficiency in gas tungsten arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Stenbacka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the literature on published arc efficiency values for GTAW and, if possible, propose a narrower band. Articles between the years 1955 - 2011 have been found. Published arc efficiency values for GTAW DCEN show to lie on a wide range, between 0.36 to 0.90. Only a few studies covered DCEP - direct current electrode positive and AC current. Specific information about the reproducibility in calorimetric studies as well as in modeling and simulation studies (considering that both random and systematic errors are small was scarce. An estimate of the average arc efficiency value for GTAW DCEN indicates that it should be about 0.77. It indicates anyway that the GTAW process with DCEN is an efficient welding method. The arc efficiency is reduced when the arc length is increased. On the other hand, there are conflicting results in the literature as to the influence of arc current and travel speed.

  4. Electric arc radius and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    The heat transfer equation of an arc discharge has been solved. The arc is assumed to be a cylinder with negligible axial variation and the dominant heat transfer process is conduction radially inside the column and radiation/convection at the outside edge. The symmetric consideration allows a simple one-dimensional formulation. By taking into account proper variation of the electrical conductivity as function of temperature, the heat balance equation has been solved analytically. The radius of the arc and its current-field characteristics have also been obtained. The conventional results that E approx. I 0 5385 and R approx. I 0 7693 with E being the applied field, I the current, and R the radius of the cylindrical arc, have been proved to be simply limiting cases of our more general characteristics. The results can be applied quite widely including, among others, the neutral beam injection project in nuclear fusion and MHD energy conversion

  5. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard

  6. Arc modeling for welding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-04-01

    A one-dimensional model of the welding arc that considers heat generation by the Joule effect and heat losses by radiation and conduction has been used to study the effects of various gases and gas mixtures currently employed for welding applications. Minor additions of low ionization potential impurities to these gases are shown to significantly perturb the electrical properties of the parent gas causing gross changes in the radial temperature distribution of the arc discharge. Such changes are reflected in the current density distribution and ultimately in the input energy distribution to the weldment. The result is observed as a variation in weld penetration. Recently published experiments and analyses of welding arcs are also evaluated and shown to contain erroneous data and results. Contrary to previous beliefs, the inclusion of a radiation loss term in the basic energy balance equation is important and cannot be considered as negligible in an argon arc at temperatures as low as 10,000 0 K. The one-dimensional analysis of the welding arc as well as the evaluation of these earlier published reports helps to explain the effects of various gases used for welding, improves our understanding of the physics of the welding arc, and provides a stepping stone for a more elaborate model which can be applied to help optimize welding parameters

  7. Physically based arc-circuit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong-Lie, L.

    1984-01-01

    An integral arc model is extended to study the interaction of the gas blast arc with the test circuit in this paper. The deformation in the waveshapes of arc current and voltage around the current zero has been formulated to first approximation by using a simple model of arc voltage based on the arc core energy conservation. By supplementing with the time scale for the radiation, the time rates of arc processes were amended. Both the contributions of various arc processes and the influence of circuit parameters to the arc-circuit interaction have been estimated by this theory. Analysis generated a new method of calculating test circuit parameters which improves the accurate simulation of arc-circuit interaction. The new method agrees with the published experimental results

  8. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  9. Equilibrium motion of quict auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatskij, V.B.; Leont'ev, S.V.

    1981-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma convection across auroral arc is investigated. It is shown that the existence of plasma area of increased concentration adjoining arc results not only from the arc but also is a factor supporting its existence. Under stable conditions the arc and plasma zone connected to it will move at a velocity different from a velocity of plasma convection. Arc velocity will be higher or lower as compared with convection velocity depending on arc orientation relative to an external electric field. At that the plasma zone is located either in front of or behind aurora polaris [ru

  10. Principles of arc flash protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    Recent developments in NFPA 70E, the electrical safety standards in the United States and Canada, designed to provide for a safe industrial work environment, are discussed. The emphasis in this instance is on arc explosions. Development of an arc flash protective program is discussed under various major components of an electrical safety program. These are: appropriate qualifications and training for workers, safe work practices, appropriate hazard assessment practices for any task exceeding 50V where there is the potential of an arc flash accident, flash protection equipment commensurate with the hazard associated with the task to be performed, layering in protective clothing over all body surfaces, and strict adherence to rules regarding use of safety garments and equipment.

  11. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keidar, Michael; Schein, Jochen; Wilson, Kristi; Gerhan, Andrew; Au, Michael; Tang, Benjamin; Idzkowski, Luke; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Beilis, Isak I

    2005-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally

  12. Magnetically enhanced vacuum arc thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 MI (United States); Schein, Jochen [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Wilson, Kristi [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Gerhan, Andrew [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Au, Michael [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Tang, Benjamin [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Idzkowski, Luke [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Krishnan, Mahadevan [Alameda Applied Science Corporation, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Beilis, Isak I [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the vacuum arc thruster and its plume is described. Primarily an effect of the magnetic field on the plume expansion and plasma generation is considered. Two particular examples are investigated, namely the magnetically enhanced co-axial vacuum arc thruster (MVAT) and the vacuum arc thruster with ring electrodes (RVAT). It is found that the magnetic field significantly decreases the plasma plume radial expansion under typical conditions. Predicted plasma density profiles in the plume of the MVAT are compared with experimental profiles, and generally a good agreement is found. In the case of the RVAT the influence of the magnetic field leads to plasma jet deceleration, which explains the non-monotonic dependence of the ion current density, on an axial magnetic field observed experimentally.

  13. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  14. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-01-01

    the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how

  15. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reusch, M.F.; Jayaram, K.

    1987-02-01

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  16. Study of gliding arc discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chi; Lin Lie; Wu Bin

    2006-01-01

    The electric parameters change during discharge is studied and the relationship between non-equilibrium degree and parameters is discussed for gliding arc discharges. Using two-channel model, the rules of arc moving due to effect of the airflow is simulated. The numerical simulation results can help analyzing the generation mechanism of gliding arc non-equilibrium plasma. (authors)

  17. Rapid arc - clinical rationale and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, Lucca

    2008-01-01

    The presentation will focus on the background of Intensity modulation volumetric arc therapy Rapid Arc from Varian Medical Systems aiming to highlight the technical and clinical rational also from an historical perspective to the founding pillars of fast delivery with a minimum number of arcs and a minimum number of monitor units

  18. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  19. Influence of arc current and pressure on non-chemical equilibrium air arc behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, WU; Yufei, CUI; Jiawei, DUAN; Hao, SUN; Chunlin, WANG; Chunping, NIU

    2018-01-01

    The influence of arc current and pressure on the non-chemical equilibrium (non-CE) air arc behavior of a nozzle structure was investigated based on the self-consistent non-chemical equilibrium model. The arc behavior during both the arc burning and arc decay phases were discussed at different currents and different pressures. We also devised the concept of a non-equilibrium parameter for a better understanding of non-CE effects. During the arc burning phase, the increasing current leads to a decrease of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core, while the increasing pressure leads to an increase of the non-equilibrium parameter of the particles in the arc core. During the arc decay phase, the non-CE effect will decrease by increasing the arc burning current and the nozzle pressure. Three factors together—convection, diffusion and chemical reactions—influence non-CE behavior.

  20. Microstructural Study on Oxygen Permeated Arc Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Heng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated short circuit of loaded copper wire at ambient atmosphere and successfully identified various phases of the arc bead. A cuprous oxide flake was formed on the surface of the arc bead in the rapid solidification process, and there were two microstructural constituents, namely, Cu-κ eutectic structure and solutal dendrites. Due to the arc bead formed at atmosphere during the local equilibrium solidification process, the phase of arc bead has segregated to the cuprous oxide flake, Cu-κ eutectic, and Cu phase solutal dendrites, which are the fingerprints of the arc bead permeated by oxygen.

  1. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...

  2. Erosion properties of unipolar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekalin, Eh.K.

    1982-01-01

    Processes modelling the formation of unipolar arcs on the elements of the first wall in limiters of the vacuum chamber and on active elements of tokamak divertor, are experimentally investigated. Erosion, processes that take place at two types of non-stationary cathode spots are considered. Experimental data prove the possibility of reducing erosion intensity by coating the surface of electrodes by oxide films, reduction of the temperature of electrode and discharge current

  3. Effect of arc behaviour on the temperature fluctuation of carbon electrode in DC arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, F; Tanaka, M; Choi, S; Watanabe, T

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse and multiple arc-anode attachment modes were observed in a DC arc discharge with a carbon electrode. During the arc discharge, the surface temperature of the electrode was successfully measured by two-colour pyrometry combined with a high-speed camera which employs appropriate band-pass filters. The relationship between the arc-anode attachment mode and the temperature fluctuation of electrode surface was investigated. The diffuse arc-anode attachment mode leads to relatively large temperature fluctuation on anode surface due to the rotation of the arc spot. In the case of diffuse mode, the purity of synthesized multi-wall carbon nanotube was deteriorated with temperature fluctuation

  4. Bifurcation theory of ac electric arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, Thomas; Peinke, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    The performance of alternating current (ac) electric arcing devices is related to arc extinction or its re-ignition at zero crossings of the current (so-called ‘current zero’, CZ). Theoretical investigations thus usually focus on the transient behaviour of arcs near CZ, e.g. by solving the modelling differential equations in the vicinity of CZ. This paper proposes as an alternative approach to investigate global mathematical properties of the underlying periodically driven dynamic system describing the electric circuit containing the arcing device. For instance, the uniqueness of the trivial solution associated with the insulating state indicates the extinction of any arc. The existence of non-trivial attractors (typically a time-periodic state) points to a re-ignition of certain arcs. The performance regions of arcing devices, such as circuit breakers and arc torches, can thus be identified with the regions of absence and existence, respectively, of non-trivial attractors. Most important for applications, the boundary of a performance region in the model parameter space is then associated with the bifurcation of the non-trivial attractors. The concept is illustrated for simple black-box arc models, such as the Mayr and the Cassie model, by calculating for various cases the performance boundaries associated with the bifurcation of ac arcs. (paper)

  5. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  6. Arc Shape Characteristics with Ultra-High-Frequency Pulsed Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc plasma possesses a constriction phenomenon with a pulsed current. The constriction is created by the Lorentz force, the radial electromagnetic force during arc welding, which determines the energy distribution of the arc plasma. Welding experiments were carried out with ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc welding (UHFP-AW. Ultra-high-speed camera observations were produced for arc surveillance. Hue-saturation-intensity (HSI image analysis was used to distinguish the regions of the arc plasma that represented the heat energy distribution. The measurement of arc regions indicated that, with an ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc, the constriction was not only within the decreased arc geometry, but also within the constricted arc core region. This can be checked by the ratio of the core region to the total area. The arc core region expanded significantly at 40 kHz at 60 A. A current level of 80 A caused a decrease in the total region of the arc. Meanwhile, the ratio of the core region to the total increased. It can be concluded that arc constriction depends on the increased area of the core region with the pulsed current (>20 kHz.

  7. Auroral arc classification scheme based on the observed arc-associated electric field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.

    1983-06-01

    Radar and rocket electric field observations of auroral arcs have earlier been used to identify essentially four different arc types, namely anticorrelation and correlation arcs (with, respectively, decreased and increased arc-assocaited field) and asymmetric and reversal arcs. In this paper rocket double probe and supplementary observations from the literature, obtained under various geophysical conditions, are used to organize the different arc types on a physical rather than morphological basis. This classification is based on the relative influence on the arc electric field pattern from the two current continuity mechanisms, polarisation electric fields and Birkeland currents. In this context the tangential electric field plays an essential role and it is thus important that it can be obtained with both high accuracy and resolution. In situ observations by sounding rockets are shown to be better suited for this specific task than monostatic radar observations. Depending on the dominating mechanism, estimated quantitatively for a number of arc-crossings, the different arc types have been grouped into the following main categories: Polarisation arcs, Birkeland current arcs and combination arcs. Finally the high altitude potential distributions corresponding to some of the different arc types are presented. (author)

  8. Clustering of arc volcanoes caused by temperature perturbations in the back-arc mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyeol; Wada, Ikuko

    2017-06-29

    Clustering of arc volcanoes in subduction zones indicates along-arc variation in the physical condition of the underlying mantle where majority of arc magmas are generated. The sub-arc mantle is brought in from the back-arc largely by slab-driven mantle wedge flow. Dynamic processes in the back-arc, such as small-scale mantle convection, are likely to cause lateral variations in the back-arc mantle temperature. Here we use a simple three-dimensional numerical model to quantify the effects of back-arc temperature perturbations on the mantle wedge flow pattern and sub-arc mantle temperature. Our model calculations show that relatively small temperature perturbations in the back-arc result in vigorous inflow of hotter mantle and subdued inflow of colder mantle beneath the arc due to the temperature dependence of the mantle viscosity. This causes a three-dimensional mantle flow pattern that amplifies the along-arc variations in the sub-arc mantle temperature, providing a simple mechanism for volcano clustering.

  9. Prototype arc saw design and cutting trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1980-09-01

    A program was initiated to develop the arc saw as a tool capable of removing the end fittings from spent nuclear fuel bundles. A special arc saw for this purpose was designed, installed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and satisfactorily operated to remove end fittings from simulated, nonradioactive fuel bundles. The design of the arc saw included consideration of the cutting environment, power supply size, control equipment, and work piece size. Several simulated fuel bundles were cut to demonstrate that the arc saw met design specifications. Although the arc saw development program was curtailed before significant performance data could be collected, tests indicate that the arc saw is a good means of cropping spent fuel bundles and is well suited to remote operation and maintenance

  10. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiewicz, K.

    1984-04-01

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  11. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  12. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently

  13. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained

  14. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tang; Wang, Cheng; Liao, Meng-Ran; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  15. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  16. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  17. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  18. Teaching with ArcGIS Pro

    OpenAIRE

    Theller, Larry

    2016-01-01

    For Fall semester 2016 the ABE department moved the course ASM 540 Basic GIS from ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 to ArcGIS Pro 1.3. This software from ESRI has a completely new look and feel, (ribbon-based rather than cascading menus) and is a true 64 bit application, capable of multi-threading, and built on Python 3. After ArcGIS Desktop 10.5 is released, desktop ends and the future release will be ArcGIS Pro; so it makes sense to switch sooner rather than later. This talk will discuss some issues and...

  19. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed

  20. The dual-electrode DC arc furnace-modelling brush arc conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Q.G.

    2012-01-01

    The dual-electrode DC arc furnace, an alternative design using an anode and cathode electrode instead of a hearth anode, was studied at small scale using computational modelling methods. Particular attention was paid to the effect of two key design variables, the arc length and the electrode separation, on the furnace behaviour. It was found that reducing the arc length to brush arc conditions was a valid means of overcoming several of the limitations of the dual-electrode design, namely high...

  1. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  2. Analogue modeling of arc and backarc deformation in the New Hebrides arc and North Fiji Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Lister, G. S.; Jessell, M. W.

    In most backarc basins, extension is perpendicular to the arc. Thus individual spreading ridges extend approximately parallel to the arc. In the North Fiji Basin, however, several ancient and active spreading ridges strike 70°-90° to the New Hebrides arc. These high-angle spreading ridges relocated

  3. Evaluating optical hazards from plasma arc cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Eric; Burr, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    The Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health evaluated a steel building materials manufacturer. The employer requested the evaluation because of concerns about optical radiation hazards from a plasma arc cutting system and the need to clarify eye protection requirements for plasma operators, other employees, and visitors. The strength of the ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation (light), and infrared radiation generated by the plasma arc cutter was measured at various distances from the source and at different operating amperages. Investigators also observed employees performing the plasma arc cutting. Optical radiation above safe levels for the unprotected eyes in the ultraviolet-C, ultraviolet-B, and visible light ranges were found during plasma arc cutting. In contrast, infrared and ultraviolet-A radiation levels during plasma arc cutting were similar to background levels. The highest non-ionizing radiation exposures occurred when no welding curtains were used. A plasma arc welding curtain in place did not eliminate optical radiation hazards to the plasma arc operator or to nearby employees. In most instances, the measured intensities for visible light, UV-C, and UV-B resulted in welding shade lens numbers that were lower than those stipulated in the OSHA Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy table in 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(5). [1] Investigators recommended using a welding curtain that enclosed the plasma arc, posting optical radiation warning signs in the plasma arc cutter area, installing audible or visual warning cues when the plasma arc cutter was operating, and using welding shades that covered the plasma arc cutter operator's face to protect skin from ultraviolet radiation hazards.

  4. Volumetric modulated arc therapy: IMRT in a single gantry arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Karl

    2008-01-01

    In this work a novel plan optimization platform is presented where treatment is delivered efficiently and accurately in a single dynamically modulated arc. Improvements in patient care achieved through image-guided positioning and plan adaptation have resulted in an increase in overall treatment times. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has also increased treatment time by requiring a larger number of beam directions, increased monitor units (MU), and, in the case of tomotherapy, a slice-by-slice delivery. In order to maintain a similar level of patient throughput it will be necessary to increase the efficiency of treatment delivery. The solution proposed here is a novel aperture-based algorithm for treatment plan optimization where dose is delivered during a single gantry arc of up to 360 deg. The technique is similar to tomotherapy in that a full 360 deg. of beam directions are available for optimization but is fundamentally different in that the entire dose volume is delivered in a single source rotation. The new technique is referred to as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf motion and number of MU per degree of gantry rotation is restricted during the optimization so that gantry rotation speed, leaf translation speed, and dose rate maxima do not excessively limit the delivery efficiency. During planning, investigators model continuous gantry motion by a coarse sampling of static gantry positions and fluence maps or MLC aperture shapes. The technique presented here is unique in that gantry and MLC position sampling is progressively increased throughout the optimization. Using the full gantry range will theoretically provide increased flexibility in generating highly conformal treatment plans. In practice, the additional flexibility is somewhat negated by the additional constraints placed on the amount of MLC leaf motion between gantry samples. A series of studies are performed that characterize the relationship

  5. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between ... major objectives: to form fusible slags, to stabilize the arc and to produce an inert gas shielding ... Current fusion welding techniques rely.

  6. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  7. Arcing and surface damage in DITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation into the arcing damage on surfaces exposed to plasmas in the DITE tokamak is described. It has been found that arcing occurs on the fixed limiters, on probes inserted into the plasma and on parts of the torus structure. For surfaces parallel to the toroidal field most of the arcs run across the surface orthogonal to the field direction. Observations in the scanning electron microscope show that the arc tracks are formed by a series of melted craters characteristic of cathode arc spots. The amount of metal removed from the surface is consistent with the concentration of metal observed in the plasma. In plasmas with hydrogen gas puffing during the discharge or with injection of low Z impurities, the arc tracks are observed to be much shallower than in normal low density discharges. Several types of surface damage other than arc tracks have also been observed on probes. These phenomena occur less frequently than arcing and appear to be associated with abnormal discharge conditions. (author)

  8. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of use...

  9. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  10. Verification of Timed-Arc Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lasse; Jacobsen, Morten; Møller, Mikael Harkjær

    2011-01-01

    of interesting theoretical properties distinguishing them from other time extensions of Petri nets. We shall give an overview of the recent theory developed in the verification of TAPN extended with features like read/transport arcs, timed inhibitor arcs and age invariants. We will examine in detail...

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical

  12. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  13. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto...

  14. Arc generators of low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, Cz.; Niewiedzial, R.; Siwiec, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is a review of works concerning investigation and use of low-temperature plasma in arc plasma generators made in Electric Power Institute of PP. There are discussed: analytical approach to a problem of volt-current and operational characteristics of DC arc plasma generators, determination of limits of their stable work and possibilities of their use to technological aims. (author)

  15. Electric arc behaviour in dynamic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put'ko, V.F.

    2000-01-01

    The behaviour of an electric arc in different time-dependent (dynamic) magnetic fields was investigated. New possibilities were found for spatial and energy stabilisation of a discharge, for intensifying heat exchange, extending the electric arc and distributed control of electric arc plasma. Rotating, alternating and travelling magnetic fields were studied. It was found that under the effect of a relatively low frequency of variations of dynamic magnetic fields (f 1000 Hz) the arc stabilised at the axis of the discharge chamber, the pulsation level decreased and discharge stability increased. The borders between these two arc existence modes were formed by a certain critical field variation frequency the period of which was determined by the heat relaxation time of the discharge. (author)

  16. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  17. Neogene displacements in the Solomon Islands Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, J.

    1987-02-01

    The geology and present configuration of the Solomon Island arc can be explained in terms of the Neogene displacement of a single linear chain of islands. The central part of an original arc consisting of Bougainville, Choiseul, Santa Ysabel, Guadalcanal and San Cristobal was displaced to the northeast as a consequence of the attempted subduction of the Woodlark spreading system. Malaita arose on the northeastern side of the arc as a result of interaction between the arc and the Pacific Ocean floor and the volcanic islands of the New Georgia group formed to the southwest in response to the subduction of a spreading ridge, thus giving rise to the present double chain structure of the arc.

  18. Metal transfer during vacuum consumable arc remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanner, F.J.

    1977-11-01

    A description of the vacuum consumable arc remelt process as related to solidification and a review of vacuum arc literature is presented. Metal transfer at arc lengths less than or equal to 3 cm was found to occur when liquid metal spikes hanging from the cathode form a low resistance bridge (drop short) by touching the anode and subsequently rupturing. During the bridge lifetime (0.0003 to 0.020 s) the arc is extinguished and all of the electrical power is directed through the molten bridge. The formation and rupture of these molten metal bridges are confirmed with electrical resistance measurements. At long arc lengths (greater than 10 cm) the spikes separate before touching the anode

  19. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank

    2014-01-01

    on Ohm’s law indicates that the critical length of alternating current (AC) gliding arc discharge columns can be larger than that of a corresponding direct current (DC) gliding arc. This finding is supported by previously published images of AC and DC gliding arcs. Furthermore, the analysis shows......A gliding arc is a quenched plasma that can be operated as a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure and that is thus suitable for large-scale plasma surface treatment. For its practical industrial use the discharge should be extended stably in ambient air. A simple analytical calculation based...... that the critical length can be increased by increasing the AC frequency, decreasing the serial resistance and lowering the gas flow rate. The predicted dependence of gas flow rate on the arc length is experimentally demonstrated. The gap width is varied to study an optimal electrode design, since the extended non...

  20. The characteristic of twin-electrode TIG coupling arc pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Xuesong; Zhang Guangjun; Wu Lin

    2006-01-01

    The coupling arc of twin-electrode TIG (T-TIG) is a particular kind of arc, which is achieved through the coupling of two arcs generated from two insulated electrodes in the same welding torch. It is therefore different from the single arc of conventional TIG in its physical characteristics. This paper studies the distribution of T-TIG coupling arc pressure, and analyses the influences of welding current, arc length, the distance between electrode tips and electrode shape upon arc pressure on the basis of experiment. It is expected that the T-TIG welding method can be applied in high efficiency welding according to its low arc pressure

  1. Electric Arc Furnace Modeling with Artificial Neural Networks and Arc Length with Variable Voltage Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Garcia-Segura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc furnaces (EAFs contribute to almost one third of the global steel production. Arc furnaces use a large amount of electrical energy to process scrap or reduced iron and are relevant to study because small improvements in their efficiency account for significant energy savings. Optimal controllers need to be designed and proposed to enhance both process performance and energy consumption. Due to the random and chaotic nature of the electric arcs, neural networks and other soft computing techniques have been used for modeling EAFs. This study proposes a methodology for modeling EAFs that considers the time varying arc length as a relevant input parameter to the arc furnace model. Based on actual voltages and current measurements taken from an arc furnace, it was possible to estimate an arc length suitable for modeling the arc furnace using neural networks. The obtained results show that the model reproduces not only the stable arc conditions but also the unstable arc conditions, which are difficult to identify in a real heat process. The presented model can be applied for the development and testing of control systems to improve furnace energy efficiency and productivity.

  2. Intensity-modulated arc therapy simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eugene; Chen, Jeff Z.; Greenland, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present a treatment planning strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using gantry arcs with dynamic multileaf collimator, previously termed intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: The planning strategy is an extension of the photon bar arc and asymmetric arc techniques and is classified into three levels of complexity, with increasing number of gantry arcs. This principle allows us to generalize the analysis of the number of arcs required for intensity modulation for a given treatment site. Using a phantom, we illustrate how the current technique is more flexible than the photon bar arc technique. We then compare plans from our strategy with conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for three sites: prostate (prostate plus seminal vesicles), posterior pharyngeal wall, and chest wall. Results: Our strategy generates superior IMAT treatment plans compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal plans. The IMAT plans spare critical organs well, and the trade-off for simplicity is that the dose uniformity in the target volume may not rival that of true inverse treatment plans. Conclusions: The analyses presented in this paper give a better understanding of IMAT plans. Our strategy is easier to understand and more efficient in generating plans than inverse planning systems; our plans are also simpler to modify, and quality assurance is more intuitive

  3. METHOD OF CONJUGATED CIRCULAR ARCS TRACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ageyev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric properties of conjugated circular arcs connecting two points on the plane with set directions of tan- gent vectors are studied in the work. It is shown that pairs of conjugated circular arcs with the same conditions in frontier points create one-parameter set of smooth curves tightly filling all the plane. One of the basic properties of this set is the fact that all coupling points of circular arcs are on the circular curve going through the initially given points. The circle radius depends on the direction of tangent vectors. Any point of the circle curve, named auxiliary in this work, determines a pair of conjugated arcs with given boundary conditions. One more condition of the auxiliary circle curve is that it divides the plane into two parts. The arcs going from the initial point are out of the circle limited by this circle curve and the arcs coming to the final point are inside it. These properties are the basis for the method of conjugated circular arcs tracing pro- posed in this article. The algorithm is rather simple and allows to fulfill all the needed plottings using only the divider and ruler. Two concrete examples are considered. The first one is related to the problem of tracing of a pair of conjugated arcs with the minimal curve jump when going through the coupling point. The second one demonstrates the possibility of trac- ing of the smooth curve going through any three points on the plane under condition that in the initial and final points the directions of tangent vectors are given. The proposed methods of conjugated circular arcs tracing can be applied in solving of a wide variety of problems connected with the tracing of cam contours, for example pattern curves in textile industry or in computer-aided-design systems when programming of looms with numeric control.

  4. Plasma instability of a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since conception of the vacuum arc centrifuge in 1980, periodic fluctuations in the ion saturation current and floating potential have been observed in Langmuir probe measurements in the rotation region of a vacuum arc centrifuge. In this work we develop a linearized theoretical model to describe a range of instabilities in the vacuum arc centrifuge plasma column, and then test the validity of the description through comparison with experiment. We conclude that the observed instability is a 'universal' instability, driven by the density gradient, in a plasma with finite conductivity

  5. Arc pressure control in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.E.; Wells, F.M.; Levick, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Relationships are established between the peak current of a pulsed, rectangular current waveform and the pulse current duty cycle under conditions of constant arc power. By appropriate choice of these interrelated parameters, it is shown that the arc pressure may be varied over a wide range even though the arc power is held constant. The methodology is suggested as a means of countering the effect of gravity in 5-G welding, while maintaining constant heat input to the weld. Combined with appropriate penetration sensors, the methodology is additionally suggested as a means of controlling penetration

  6. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently. 10 figures

  7. Implementation av spridningsmodell i ArcGIS

    OpenAIRE

    Jou, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The project involves implementing a finished dispersion model into ArcGIS. The goal of the tool is to show how dangerous and toxic substances will travel in the ground after long periods. The goal of the project is to understand GIS in general, what it is used for and gain an insight into how developing tools for ArcGIS is, what challenges might exists. Understanding the type of data that can be stored and accessed in ArcGIS a long with the tools and functionality offered by the system when u...

  8. Across-arc versus along-arc Sr-Nd-Pb isotope variations in the Ecuadorian volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Samaniego, Pablo; Vlastélic, Ivan; Nauret, François; Gannoun, Adbelmouhcine; Hidalgo, Silvana

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies of the Ecuadorian arc (1°N-2°S) have revealed across-arc geochemical trends that are consistent with a decrease in mantle melting and slab dehydration away from the trench. The aim of this work is to evaluate how these processes vary along the arc in response to small-scale changes in the age of the subducted plate, subduction angle, and continental crustal basement. We use an extensive database of 1437 samples containing 71 new analyses, of major and trace elements as well as Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes from Ecuadorian and South Colombian volcanic centers. Large geochemical variations are found to occur along the Ecuadorian arc, in particular along the front arc, which encompasses 99% and 71% of the total variations in 206Pb/204Pb and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of Quaternary Ecuadorian volcanics, respectively. The front arc volcanoes also show two major latitudinal trends: (1) the southward increase of 207Pb/204Pb and decrease of 143Nd/144Nd reflect more extensive crustal contamination of magma in the southern part (up to 14%); and (2) the increase of 206Pb/204Pb and decrease of Ba/Th away from ˜0.5°S result from the changing nature of metasomatism in the subarc mantle wedge with the aqueous fluid/siliceous slab melt ratio decreasing away from 0.5°S. Subduction of a younger and warmer oceanic crust in the Northern part of the arc might promote slab melting. Conversely, the subduction of a colder oceanic crust south of the Grijalva Fracture Zone and higher crustal assimilation lead to the reduction of slab contribution in southern part of the arc.

  9. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn may...

  10. Sitka, Alaska 9 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 9 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  11. Retinal injury from a welding arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoff, M.A.; Sliney, D.H.

    1974-01-01

    An 18-year-old man stared at a welding arc for approximately ten minutes, sustaining moderate facial erythema, keratoconjunctivitis, marked visual loss, a pupillary abnormality, and a retinal injury accompanied by a dense central scotoma and peripheral field constriction. A residual, partially pigmented foveal lesion remained after 16 months, with normal visual acuity. Since the degree of keratoconjunctivitis and facial erythema was known, we substantiated the duration of exposure to the arc by weighting the known action spectrum of moderate ultraviolet erythema with the ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements of the arc. From the radiometric measurements of the visible brightness and visible and near infrared spectrum of the arc and from knowledge of pupil size, we calculated the retinal exposure dose rate, which was less than normally considered necessary to produce a chorioretinal burn. This case may provide a clinical example of photic maculopathy recently reported in experimental investigations

  12. Sitka, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  13. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinelnikov, D; Bulgadaryan, D; Kolodko, D; Kurnaev, V; Hwangbo, D; Ohno, N; Kajita, S

    2016-01-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope. (paper)

  14. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  15. Seward, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  16. Seldovia, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seldovia, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  17. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  18. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  19. Managing Data and ArcGIS

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Jobson (CRASSH) produced and edited this video in collaboration with the Incremental project. ESRI's ArcGIS data, and other vector data system, are highly vulnerable to partial or complete data loss over time because as the company makes frequent software updates, and the data themselves have so many moving parts. In this presentation, Lucy Farr (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) describes her experiences using ArcGIS, lessons learnt, and recommendations for best practi...

  20. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrmann, G; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Kleist, J; Taga, A

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous resources in several countries and yet must present a single access point for all data stored within the centre. The middleware framework used in NDGF differs significantly from other Grids, specifically in the way that all data movement and registration is performed by services outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF

  1. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, S

    2004-01-01

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc

  2. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J; Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B; Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A; Kocan, M; Marton, I; Nagy, Zs; Moeller, S; Mohn, B

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  3. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J [NDGF, Kastruplundsgade 22, DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B [Lund University, Experimental High Energy Physics, Institute of Physics, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kocan, M [Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Faculty of Science, Jesenna 5, SK-04000 Kosice (Slovakia); Marton, I; Nagy, Zs [NIIF/HUNGARNET, Victor Hugo 18-22, H-1132 Budapest (Hungary); Moeller, S [University of Luebeck, Inst. Of Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany); Mohn, B, E-mail: oxana.smirnova@hep.lu.s [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Box 535, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  4. Crustal growth of the Izu-Ogasawara arc estimated from structural characteristics of Oligocene arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Yamashita, M.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) carried out seismic surveys using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs, and we have clarified crustal structures of whole Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Marina (IBM) arc since 2002. These refection images and velocity structures suggest that the crustal evolution in the intra-oceanic island arc accompanies with much interaction of materials between crust and mantle. Slow mantle velocity identified beneath the thick arc crusts suggests that dense crustal materials transformed into the mantle. On the other hand, high velocity lower crust can be seen around the bottom of the crust beneath the rifted region, and it suggests that underplating of mafic materials occurs there. Average crustal production rate of the entire arc is larger than expected one and approximately 200 km3/km/Ma. The production rate of basaltic magmas corresponds to that of oceanic ridge. Repeated crustal differentiation is indispensable to produce much light materials like continental materials, however, the real process cannot still be resolved yet. We, therefore, submitted drilling proposals to obtain in-situ middle crust with P-wave velocity of 6 km/s. In the growth history of the IBM arc, it is known by many papers that boninitic volcanisms preceded current bimodal volcanisms based on basaltic magmas. The current volcanisms accompanied with basaltic magmas have been occurred since Oligocene age, however, the tectonic differences to develop crustal architecture between Oligocene and present are not understood yet. We obtained new refraction/reflection data along an arc strike of N-S in fore-arc region. Then, we estimate crustal structure with severe change of the crustal thickness from refraction data, which are similar to that along the volcanic front. Interval for location of the thick arc crust along N-S is very similar to that along the volcanic front. The refection image indicates that the basement of the fore-arc

  5. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-01

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z ∼> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z ∼> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  6. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipcic, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  7. Arc dynamics of a pulsed DC nitrogen rotating gliding arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengsen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Angjian; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Tu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a novel pulsed direct current (DC) rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor co-driven by an external magnetic field and a tangential gas flow has been developed. The dynamic characteristics of the rotating gliding arc have been investigated by means of numerical simulation and experiment. The simulation results show that a highly turbulent vortex flow can be generated at the bottom of the RGA reactor to accelerate the arc rotation after arc ignition, whereas the magnitude of gas velocity declined significantly along the axial direction of the RGA reactor. The calculated arc rotation frequency (14.4 Hz) is reasonably close to the experimental result (18.5 Hz) at a gas flow rate of 10 l min-1. In the presence of an external magnet, the arc rotation frequency is around five times higher than that of the RGA reactor without using a magnet, which suggests that the external magnetic field plays a dominant role in the maintenance of the arc rotation in the upper zone of the RGA reactor. In addition, when the magnet is placed outside the reactor reversely to form a reverse external magnetic field, the arc can be stabilized at a fixed position in the inner wall of the outer electrode at a critical gas flow rate of 16 l min-1.

  8. Operator Bias in the Estimation of Arc Efficiency in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Sikström

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operator bias in the measurement process of arc efficiency in stationary direct current electrode negative gas tungsten arc welding is discussed. An experimental study involving 15 operators (enough to reach statistical significance has been carried out with the purpose to estimate the arc efficiency from a specific procedure for calorimetric experiments. The measurement procedure consists of three manual operations which introduces operator bias in the measurement process. An additional relevant experiment highlights the consequences of estimating the arc voltage by measuring the potential between the terminals of the welding power source instead of measuring the potential between the electrode contact tube and the workpiece. The result of the study is a statistical evaluation of the operator bias influence on the estimate, showing that operator bias is negligible in the estimate considered here. On the contrary the consequences of neglecting welding leads voltage drop results in a significant under estimation of the arc efficiency.

  9. Method to reduce arc blow during DC arc welding of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H.; Rueda-Morales, G.L.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perz-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Tabasco, (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Steel pipelines are huge ferromagnetic structures and can be easily subjected to arc blow during the DC arc welding process. The development of methods to avoid arc blow during pipeline DC arc welding is a major objective in the pipeline industry. This study developed a simple procedure to compensate the residual magnetic field in the groove during DC arc welding. A Gaussmeter was used to perform magnetic flux density measurements in pipelines in southern Mexico. These data were used to perform magnetic finite element simulations using FEMM. Different variables were studied such as the residual magnetic field in the groove or the position of the coil with respect to the groove. An empirical predictive equation was developed from these trials to compensate for the residual magnetic field. A new method of compensating for the residual magnetic field in the groove by selecting the number of coil turns and the position of the coil with respect to the groove was established.

  10. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Haoxi; Li Qingmin; Xing Jinyuan; Li Jinsong; Chen Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. (paper)

  11. Magnetic Method to Characterize the Current Densities in Breaker Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machkour, Nadia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to use magnetic induction measurements from a low voltage breaker arc, to reconstruct the arc's current density. The measurements were made using Hall effect sensors, which were placed close to, but outside the breaking device. The arc was modelled as a rectangular current sheet, composed of a mix of threadlike current segments and with a current density varying across the propagation direction. We found the magnetic induction of the arc is a convolution product of the current density, and a function depending on the breaker geometry and arc model. Using deconvolution methods, the current density in the electric arc was determined.The method is used to study the arc behavior into the breaker device. Notably, position, arc size, and electric conductivity could all be determined, and then used to characterize the arc mode, diffuse or concentrated, and study the condition of its mode changing

  12. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  13. 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for arc calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowke, J J; Tanaka, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of the 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for predicting the properties of electric arcs. Under this approximation, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is assumed, with a particular mesh size near the electrodes chosen to be equal to the 'diffusion length', based on D e /W, where D e is the electron diffusion coefficient and W is the electron drift velocity. This approximation overcomes the problem that the equilibrium electrical conductivity in the arc near the electrodes is almost zero, which makes accurate calculations using LTE impossible in the limit of small mesh size, as then voltages would tend towards infinity. Use of the LTE-diffusion approximation for a 200 A arc with a thermionic cathode gives predictions of total arc voltage, electrode temperatures, arc temperatures and radial profiles of heat flux density and current density at the anode that are in approximate agreement with more accurate calculations which include an account of the diffusion of electric charges to the electrodes, and also with experimental results. Calculations, which include diffusion of charges, agree with experimental results of current and heat flux density as a function of radius if the Milne boundary condition is used at the anode surface rather than imposing zero charge density at the anode

  14. Vacuum arc ion charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Godechot, X.

    1990-06-01

    We have measured vacuum arc ion charge state spectra for a wide range of metallic cathode materials. The charge state distributions were measured using a time-of-flight diagnostic to monitor the energetic ion beam produced by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. We have obtained data for 48 metallic cathode elements: Li, C, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, Th and U. The arc was operated in a pulsed mode with pulse length 0.25 msec; arc current was 100 A throughout. This array of elements extends and completes previous work by us. In this paper the measured distributions are cataloged and compared with our earlier results and with those of other workers. We also make some observations about the performance of the various elements as suitable vacuum arc cathode materials

  15. Vacuum arc ion charge-state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Godechot, X.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have measured vacuum arc ion charge-state spectra for a wide range of metallic cathode materials. The charge-state distributions were measured using a time-of-flight diagnostic to monitor the energetic ion beam produced by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. They have obtained data for 48 metallic cathode elements: Li, C, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, Th, and U. The arc was operated in a pulsed mode with pulse length 0.25 ms; arc current was 100 A throughout. This array of elements extends and completes previous work by the authors. In this paper the measured distributions are cataloged and compared with their earlier results and those of other workers. They also make some observations about the performance of the various elements as suitable vacuum arc cathode materials

  16. Sweden: Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, Staffan A.

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear energy systems must be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide a competitively priced supply of energy, keeping in consideration an optimum use of natural resources, while addressing nuclear safety, waste, and proliferation resistance, and the public perception concerns of the countries in which those systems are deployed. These issues are tightly interconnected, and the implementation of passive and inherent safety features is a high priority in all modern reactor designs since it helps to tackle many of the issues at once. To this end, the Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure excellent inherent safety performance of Generation-IV reactors while having a minimal impact on core performance and economic viability. This paper covers the principles for ARC system design and analysis, the problem of ensuring ARC system response stability and gives examples of the impact of installing ARC systems in well-known fast reactor core systems. It is shown that even with a relatively modest ARC installation, having a near-negligible impact on core performance during standard operation, cores such as the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) can be made to survive any postulated unprotected transient without coolant boiling or fuel melting

  17. Earthquake location in island arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  18. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for cranial radiosurgery using multiple noncoplanar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audet, Chantal; Poffenbarger, Brett A.; Chang, Pauling; Jackson, Paul S.; Lundahl, Robert E.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Ray, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), using multiple noncoplanar arcs, for linac-based cranial radiosurgery, as well as evaluate the combined accuracy of the VMAT dose calculations and delivery. Methods: Twelve patients with cranial lesions of variable size (0.1-29 cc) and two multiple metastases patients were planned (Eclipse RapidArc AAA algorithm, v8.6.15) using VMAT (1-6 noncoplanar arcs), dynamic conformal arc (DCA, ∼4 arcs), and IMRT (nine static fields). All plans were evaluated according to a conformity index (CI), healthy brain tissue doses and volumes, and the dose to organs at risk. A 2D dose distribution was measured (Varian Novalis Tx, HD120 MLC, 1000 MU/min, 6 MV beam) for the ∼4 arc VMAT treatment plans using calibrated film dosimetry. Results: The CI (0-1 best) average for all plans was best for ∼4 noncoplanar arc VMAT at 0.86 compared with ∼0.78 for IMRT and a single arc VMAT and 0.68 for DCA. The volumes of healthy brain receiving 50% of the prescribed target coverage dose or more (V 50% ) were lowest for the four arc VMAT [RA(4)] and DCA plans. The average ratio of the V 50% for the other plans to the RA(4) V 50% were 1.9 for a single noncoplanar arc VMAT [RA(1nc)], 1.4 for single full coplanar arc VMAT [RA(1f)] and 1.3 for IMRT. The V 50% improved significantly for single isocenter multiple metastases plan when two noncoplanar VMAT arcs were added to a full single coplanar one. The maximum dose to 5 cc of the outer 1 cm rim of healthy brain which one may want to keep below nonconsequential doses of 300-400 cGy, was 2-3 times greater for IMRT, RA(1nc) and RA(1f) plans compared with the multiple noncoplanar arc DCA and RA(4) techniques. Organs at risk near (0-4 mm) to targets were best spared by (i) single noncoplanar arcs when the targets are lateral to the organ at risk and (ii) by skewed nonvertical planes of IMRT fields when the targets are not lateral to the organ at risk. The highest dose gradient

  19. Electric arc, water jet cutting of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, D.

    1991-01-01

    For thermal dismantling and cutting of metallic components, as electric arc, water jet cutting method was developed that can be used for underwater cutting work up to a depth of 20 m. Short-circuiting of a continuously fed electrode wire in contact with the metal generates an electric arc which induces partial melting of the metal, and the water jet surrounding the wire rinses away the molten material, thus making a continuous kerf in the material. The method was also tested and modified to allow larger area, surface cutting and removal of metallic surface coatings. This is achieved by melting parts of the surface with the electric arc and subsequent rinsing by the water jet. The cutting and melting depth for surface removal can be accurately controlled by the operating parameters chosen. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Theoretical model of polar cap auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.R.; Burke, W.J.; USAF, Bedford, MA)

    1985-01-01

    A theory of the polar cap auroral arcs is proposed under the assumption that the magnetic field reconnection occurs in the cusp region on tail field lines during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Requirements of a convection model during northward IMF are enumerated based on observations and fundamental theoretical considerations. The theta aurora can be expected to occur on the closed field lines convecting sunward in the central polar cap, while the less intense regular polar cap arcs can occur either on closed or open field lines. The dynamo region for the polar cap arcs is required to be on closed field lines convecting tailward in the plasma sheet which is magnetically connected to the sunward convection in the central polar cap. 43 references

  1. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ion source. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials in the Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-like behavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arc triggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsec and 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150microsec, respectively. Both ion charge states and ion velocities decay further towards steady state values, which are not reached within the 300microsec pulses used here. It is argued that the exceptionally high vapor pressure and charge exchange reactions are associated with the establishment of steady state ion values

  2. Circular arc snakes and kinematic surface generation

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the theory, discretization, and numerics of curves which are evolving such that part of their shape, or at least their curvature as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The discretization of a curve as a smooth sequence of circular arcs is well suited for such purposes, and allows us to reduce evolution of curves to the evolution of a control point collection in a certain finite-dimensional shape space. We approach this evolution by a 2-step process: linearized evolution via optimized velocity fields, followed by optimization in order to exactly fulfill all geometric side conditions. We give applications to freeform architecture, including "rationalization" of a surface by congruent arcs, form finding and, most interestingly, non-static architecture. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Z.W.; Zhu, J.J.; Li, Z.S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera...... triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals...... suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity. ©2013 Optical Society of America...

  4. On the Trail of Joan of Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joyce Forristal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marked the 600th anniversary of the birthday of Joan of Arc (Fr., Jeanne d’Arc (1412–1431. Tributes to this national heroine can be found all over France. There are literally countless statues, streets and restaurants named after her and many sites dedicated to her life. However, despite widespread social and mechanical reproduction and cultural naming in relation to the Maid of Orléans, there is no official network or integrated signage in France to promote cultural heritage tourism to the numerous Joan of Arc sites and festivals, even though her life and death, by any measure, were seminal events in the country’s history. Unfortunately, the pilgrim who wants to follow or intersect with Joan of Arc’s trail through France, for cultural, historical or religious reasons, must do so without much help. Using Actor Network Theory and Site Sacralization Theory as framing devices, this paper explores human actors and tangible and intangible non-human factors that may have contributed to the lack of a unified tourism product despite the existence of an adequate Joan of Arc tourismscape. Insights gleaned from this research include Joan’s conflicted status as both/either saint and/or patriot, the existence of no cooperation or linkage between Joan of Arc sites, and cautious French tourism development policies. Several possible scenarios are suggested as suitable means to help implement or foster the creation of an on-the-ground or virtual Joan of Arc trail or tour.

  5. Sheath and arc-column voltages in high-pressure arc discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G; Li Heping; Wu Guiqing

    2012-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a 1 cm-long free-burning atmospheric-pressure argon arc are calculated by means of a model taking into account the existence of a near-cathode space-charge sheath and the discrepancy between the electron and heavy-particle temperatures in the arc column. The computed arc voltage exhibits a variation with the arc current I similar to the one revealed by the experiment and exceeds experimental values by no more than approximately 2 V in the current range 20-175 A. The sheath contributes about two-thirds or more of the arc voltage. The LTE model predicts a different variation of the arc voltage with I and underestimates the experimental values appreciably for low currents but by no more than approximately 2 V for I ≳ 120 A. However, the latter can hardly be considered as a proof of unimportance of the space-charge sheath at high currents: the LTE model overestimates both the resistance of the bulk of the arc column and the resistance of the part of the column that is adjacent to the cathode, and this overestimation to a certain extent compensates for the neglect of the voltage drop in the sheath. Furthermore, if the latter resistance were evaluated in the framework of the LTE model in an accurate way, then the overestimation would be still much stronger and the obtained voltage would significantly exceed those observed in the experiment.

  6. Arc-to-arc mini-sling 1999: a critical analysis of concept and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Palma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to critically review the Arc-to-Arc mini-sling (Palma's technique a less invasive mid-urethral sling using bovine pericardium as the sling material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Arc-to-Arc mini-sling, using bovine pericardium, was the first published report of a mini-sling, in 1999. The technique was identical to the "tension-free tape" operation, midline incision and dissection of the urethra. The ATFP (white line was identified by blunt dissection, and the mini-sling was sutured to the tendinous arc on both sides with 2 polypropylene 00 sutures. RESULTS: The initial results were encouraging, with 9/10 patients cured at the 6 weeks post-operative visit. However, infection and extrusion of the mini-sling resulted in sling extrusion and removal, with 5 patients remaining cured at 12 months. CONCLUSION: The Arc-to-Arc mini-sling was a good concept, but failed because of the poor technology available at that time. Further research using new materials and better technology has led to new and safer alternatives for the management of stress urinary incontinence.

  7. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-01-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field

  8. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  9. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  10. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution

  11. MOOC Badging and the Learning Arc

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Simon; Galley, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The first part of the post expands on some of our thinking behind the digital badging strategy used in the 2012 OLDS MOOC by using a pictorial representation to explain the place of the badges in the course. This is predicated on (a) the idea that a course, just like a novel, a movie or a video game, contains a broad central 'story arc' - a 'learning arc' or journey with a start (beginning of course) and an end, and (b) the idea that there are different types of badge that have different rela...

  12. Using arc voltage to locate the anode attachment in plasma arc cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterhouse, D J; Heberlein, J V R; Lindsay, J W

    2013-01-01

    Plasma arc cutting is a widely used industrial process in which an electric arc in the form of a high velocity plasma jet is used to melt and blow away metal. The arc attaches inside the resulting cut slot, or kerf, where it both provides a large heat flux and determines the flow dynamics of the plasma. Knowledge of the position of the arc attachment is essential for understanding the phenomena present at the work piece. This work presents a new method of measuring the location of the arc attachment in which the arc voltage is measured during the cutting of a range of work piece thicknesses. The attachment location is then interpreted from the voltages. To support the validity of this method, the kerf shape, dross particle size and dross adhesion to the work piece are also observed. While these do not conclusively give an attachment location, they show patterns which are consistent with the attachment location found from the voltage measurements. The method is demonstrated on the cutting of mild steel, where the arc attachment is found to be stationary in the upper portion of the cut slot and in reasonable agreement with existing published findings. For a process optimized for the cutting of 12.7 mm mild steel, the attachment is found at a depth of 1.5–3.4 mm. For a slower process optimized for the cutting of 25.4 mm mild steel, the attachment is found at a depth of 3.4–4.8 mm, which enhances heat transfer further down in the kerf, allowing cutting of the thicker work piece. The use of arc voltage to locate the position of the arc attachment is unique when compared with existing methods because it is entirely independent of the heat distribution and visualization techniques. (paper)

  13. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k Watercourses (arcs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the ARC features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes are also...

  14. Coefficient of electrical transport vacuum arc for metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, G.V.; Ehjzner, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this article the authors propose formulas for estimation coefficient of electrical transport vacuum arc for metals and alloys. They also represent results of analysis principal physical processes which take place in cathode spot vacuum arc

  15. Distribution of auroral arcs during quiet geomagnetic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassen, K.; Danielsen, C.

    1989-01-01

    Auroral arcs observed from the Greenland all-sky camera network during quiet intervals (AE 500 eV) and a poleward, low-energy part. Previous studies have shown that the arc pattern is composed of two subpatterns, too, the polar cap are pattern and the oval arc pattern. It is demonstrated that the polar cap arc pattern is situated in the poleward, low-energy part of the precipitation belt, connected to the low-latitude boundary layer, whereas the oval arc pattern is in the equatorial higher energy belt, connected to the plasma sheet. The dividing line between the two arc patterns is associated with the boundary of trapped ≥ 40-keV electrons. The designation polar cap arc pattern is shown to be ambiguous, wherefore it is proposed to replace it by the term high-latitude arc pattern

  16. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  17. Optical Arc-Length Sensor For TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed subsystem of tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding system measures length of welding arc optically. Viewed by video camera, in one of three alternative optical configurations. Length of arc measured instead of inferred from voltage.

  18. Influence of arc parameters on plasma cutting efficiency of rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautov, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    The work shows the impact analysis of different arc areas upon metal cutting. The influence of over-nozzle and intra-metal areas extension of elastic arc on efficiency of real cutting is determined. (author)

  19. Large optical conductivity of Dirac semimetal Fermi arc surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-kun; Song, Justin C. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fermi arc surface states, a hallmark of topological Dirac semimetals, can host carriers that exhibit unusual dynamics distinct from that of their parent bulk. Here we find that Fermi arc carriers in intrinsic Dirac semimetals possess a strong and anisotropic light-matter interaction. This is characterized by a large Fermi arc optical conductivity when light is polarized transverse to the Fermi arc; when light is polarized along the Fermi arc, Fermi arc optical conductivity is significantly muted. The large surface spectral weight is locked to the wide separation between Dirac nodes and persists as a large Drude weight of Fermi arc carriers when the system is doped. As a result, large and anisotropic Fermi arc conductivity provides a novel means of optically interrogating the topological surfaces states of Dirac semimetals.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on vacuum arc ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.

    1996-08-01

    Topics included in the papers presented at this conference are: vacuum arc ion source development at GSI (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Germany), ITEP (Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russia), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization); triggers for vacuum arc sources; plasma distribution of cathodic arc deposition system; high ion charge states in vacuum arc ion sources; and gas and metal ion sources. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  1. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed...

  2. ARC discharge sliding over a conducting surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, F.A.; Mitko, S.; Ochkin, V.N.; Paramonov, A.P.; Witteman, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the arc discharge which slides over the surface of a conductor are reported. Experiments were performed in air and argon ambients at various pressures. It is found that the velocity of the discharge plasma front depends linearly on the strength of

  3. Roadmap for the ARC Grid Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleist, Josva; Eerola, Paula; Ekelöf, Tord

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) or the NorduGrid middleware is an open source software solution enabling production quality computational and data Grids, with special emphasis on scalability, stability, reliability and performance. Since its first release in May 2002, the middleware is depl...

  4. Thermal Plasma Generators with Water Stabilized Arc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabovský, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2009), s. 99-104 ISSN 1876-5343 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal plasma * plasma torch * Gerdien arc Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.bentham.org/open/toppj/openaccess2.htm

  5. Circular arc snakes and kinematic surface generation

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael; Shi, Ling; Kilian, Martin; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    of circular arcs is well suited for such purposes, and allows us to reduce evolution of curves to the evolution of a control point collection in a certain finite-dimensional shape space. We approach this evolution by a 2-step process: linearized evolution via

  6. Rejuvenating Allen's Arc with the Geometric Mean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, William A.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, despite ongoing criticism, Allen's arc elasticity formula remains entrenched in the microeconomics principles curriculum. Reviews the evolution and continuing scrutiny of the formula. Argues that the use of the geometric mean offers pedagogical advantages over the traditional arithmetic mean approach. (CFR)

  7. Nonlinear Study of Industrial Arc Spring Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar; Hartmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    acting on the SFD are presented. It is worth mentioning, that the maps and diagrams can be used as design guidance. Finally, a comparison between the numerical results and experimental result is facilitated in form of waterfall diagrams. For this, a full scale model of the arc-spring damper was designed...

  8. ArcAid Interactive Archery Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Vervaeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design process of a bow aiming system, called ArcAid, which is an interactive archery assistant. The main goal of ArcAid is to introduce a way for beginner Robin Hoods to learn the art of archery to its fullest. In order to achieve this goal, our smartphone-based design focuses on a fun and interactive learning process that gives constant feedback to the user on how to hit a certain goal. A SPIKE high- end laser sensor is used for the distance measurement and the smartphone’s accelerometer is used to define the angle of inclination. To measure the force on the arrow and the displacement of the string, a flex sensor is attached upon one of the arcs of the bow. All sensor data is processed in an Arduino Nano microprocessor and feedback to the user is given by a dedicated smartphone app. In this paper, we mainly focus on the construction, mechanics and electronics of the ArcAid bow and on the design of the mobile app, which is the game controller. Furthermore, we briefly discuss some future development ideas.

  9. The 'relics of Joan of Arc'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlier, P.; Poupon, J.; Eb, A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeological remains can provide concrete cases, making it possible to develop, refine or validate medico-legal techniques. In the case of the so-called 'Joan of Arc's relics' (a group of bone and archaeological remains known as the 'Bottle of Chinon'), 14 specialists analysed the samples such ...

  10. An approach for optimizing arc welding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapuis, Julien

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic and transport mechanisms involved in the arc plasma and the weld pool of arc welding operations are numerous and strongly coupled. They produce a medium the magnitudes of which exhibit rapid time variations and very marked gradients which make any experimental analysis complex in this disrupted environment. In this work, we study the TIG and MIG processes. An experimental platform was developed to allow synchronized measurement of various physical quantities associated with welding (process parameters, temperatures, clamping forces, metal transfer, etc.). Numerical libraries dedicated to applied studies in arc welding are developed. They enable the treatment of a large flow of data (signals, images) with a systematic and global method. The advantages of this approach for the enrichment of numerical simulation and arc process control are shown in different situations. Finally, this experimental approach is used in the context of the chosen application to obtain rich measurements to describe the dynamic behavior of the weld pool in P-GMAW. Dimensional analysis of these experimental measurements allows to identify the predominant mechanisms involved and to determine experimentally the characteristic times associated. This type of approach includes better description of the behavior of a macro-drop of molten metal or the phenomena occurring in the humping instabilities. (author)

  11. Application of gas shielded arc welding and submerged arc welding for fabrication of nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehani, M.L.; Rodrigues, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    The remarkable progress made in the development of knowhow and expertise in the manufacture of equipment for nuclear power plants in India is outlined. Some of the specific advances made in the application of higher efficiency weld processes for fabrication of nuclear reactor vessels and the higher level of quality attained are discussed in detail. Modifications and developments in submerged arc, gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes for welding of Calandria which have been a highly challenging and rewarding experience are discussed. Future scope for making the gas metal arc process more economical by using various gas-mixes like Agron + Oxygen, Argon + Carbon Dioxide, Argon + Nitrogen (for Copper Alloys) etc., in various proportions are outlined. Quality and dimensional control exercised in these jobs of high precision are highlighted. (K.B.)

  12. Simulation of a DC electric arc furnace for steelmaking: study in the arc and bath regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Argaez, M. A.; Trapaga Martinez, L. G.

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe fluid flow, heat transfer, and electromagnetic phenomena in the arc and bath regions of DC electric Arc Furnaces (DC-EAF). The model is used to examine the effect on flow patterns and temperature distribution in the bath, under the influence of both an arc and bottom argon injection in steel or steel/slag systems. Validation of the model employed experimental measurements from systems physically related to DC-EAF from literature. For the conditions analyzed, electromagnetic forces dominate the fluid motion in the bath. Buoyancy and shear forces from the arc have a negligible effect in driving the flow; however, they partially counteract the electromagnetic forces. Slag decreases fluid motion in the steel and enhances temperature stratification in the system. Stirring of the bath, using a 3-nozzle inert gas injection system, is found to promote temperature uniformity in the regions near the lateral wall of the furnace. (Author) 24 refs

  13. Eastern Arc Mountains and their national and global importance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Eastern Arc Mountains comprise a chain of separate mountain blocks running from southern Kenya through Tanzania in a crescent or arc shape. In Tanzania, the Eastern Arc consists of North and South Pare, East and West Usambaras, Nguru, Ukaguru, Rubeho, Uluguru, Udzungwa and Mahenge Mountains.

  14. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients

  15. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients.

  16. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1910.254 Section 1910.254 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.254 Arc welding and cutting. (a... following limits shall not be exceeded: (i) Alternating-current machines (A) Manual arc welding and cutting...

  17. Power quality analysis of DC arc furnace operation using the Bowman model for electric arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherman, P. L.

    2018-01-01

    This work is about a relatively new domain. The DC electric arc is superior to the AC electric arc and it’s not used in Romania. This is why we analyzed the work functions of these furnaces by simulation and model checking of the simulation results.The conclusions are favorable, to be carried is to develop a real-time control system of steel elaboration process.

  18. Geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notsu, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes advances in three topics of geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes, which I and my colleagues have been investigating. First one is strontium isotope studies of arc volcanic rocks mainly from Japanese island arcs. We have shown that the precise spatial distribution of the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio reflects natures of the subduction structure and slab-mantle interaction. Based on the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of volcanic rocks in the northern Kanto district, where two plates subduct concurrently with different directions, the existence of an aseismic portion of the Philippine Sea plate ahead of the seismic one was suggested. Second one is geochemical monitoring of active arc volcanoes. 3 He/ 4 He ratio of volcanic volatiles was shown to be a good indicator to monitor the behavior of magma: ascent and drain-back of magma result in increase and decrease in the ratio, respectively. In the case of 1986 eruptions of Izu-Oshima volcano, the ratio began to increase two months after big eruptions, reaching the maximum and decreased. Such delayed response is explained in terms of travelling time of magmatic helium from the vent area to the observation site along the underground steam flow. Third one is remote observation of volcanic gas chemistry of arc volcanoes, using an infrared absorption spectroscopy. During Unzen eruptions starting in 1990, absorption features of SO 2 and HCl of volcanic gas were detected from the observation station at 1.3 km distance. This was the first ground-based remote detection of HCl in volcanic gas. In the recent work at Aso volcano, we could identify 5 species (CO, COS, CO 2 , SO 2 and HCl) simultaneously in the volcanic plume spectra. (author)

  19. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancinelli, B. R.; Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H.; Prevosto, L.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 10 4  A/s.

  20. Volcanism in slab tear faults is larger than in island-arcs and back-arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Luca; Passaro, Salvatore; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Ventura, Guido

    2017-11-13

    Subduction-transform edge propagators are lithospheric tears bounding slabs and back-arc basins. The volcanism at these edges is enigmatic because it is lacking comprehensive geological and geophysical data. Here we present bathymetric, potential-field data, and direct observations of the seafloor on the 90 km long Palinuro volcanic chain overlapping the E-W striking tear of the roll-backing Ionian slab in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The volcanic chain includes arc-type central volcanoes and fissural, spreading-type centers emplaced along second-order shears. The volume of the volcanic chain is larger than that of the neighbor island-arc edifices and back-arc spreading center. Such large volume of magma is associated to an upwelling of the isotherms due to mantle melts upraising from the rear of the slab along the tear fault. The subduction-transform edge volcanism focuses localized spreading processes and its magnitude is underestimated. This volcanism characterizes the subduction settings associated to volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers.

  1. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max Karasik

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes

  2. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  3. Arc Motion in an Obliquely Imposed Alternating Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiho, R; Takeda, K; Sugimoto, M

    2012-01-01

    The arc motion is theoretically investigated under an alternating magnetic field imposed obliquely to the arc. The arc is known to oscillate on a 2-D plane when the alternating magnetic field is imposed perpendicularly to the arc. If the alternating magnetic field is imposed obliquely to the arc, then it is expected that the arc oscillates not on the 2-D plane but in a 3-D space. For this study, 3-D simulation was performed on the motion of the plasma gas under an alternating magnetic field crossing obliquely to the arc. It was also assumed that a stream line of the plasma gas represented the arc profile. The momentum equation for the plasma gas was solved together with the continuity equation. Governing parameters for the gas motion are θ (crossing angle), v 0 (initial velocity of the plasma gas), and λ. Parameter λ is defined as λ = (I a B 0 )/Q 0 . Numerical results are reported under different operating conditions such as magnetic flux densities and the angles between the arc and the magnetic flux. If the crossing angle is larger than 4/π, the arc might be extinguished because of the drastic increase of the arc length.

  4. The Temporal Dynamics of Arc Expression Regulate Cognitive Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Mark J; Collins, Dawn R; Chery, Samantha L; Allen, Zachary D; Pastuzyn, Elissa D; George, Arlene J; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Moy, Sheryl S; Philpot, Benjamin D; Shepherd, Jason D; Müller, Jürgen; Ehlers, Michael D; Mabb, Angela M; Corrêa, Sonia A L

    2018-05-24

    Neuronal activity regulates the transcription and translation of the immediate-early gene Arc/Arg3.1, a key mediator of synaptic plasticity. Proteasome-dependent degradation of Arc tightly limits its temporal expression, yet the significance of this regulation remains unknown. We disrupted the temporal control of Arc degradation by creating an Arc knockin mouse (ArcKR) where the predominant Arc ubiquitination sites were mutated. ArcKR mice had intact spatial learning but showed specific deficits in selecting an optimal strategy during reversal learning. This cognitive inflexibility was coupled to changes in Arc mRNA and protein expression resulting in a reduced threshold to induce mGluR-LTD and enhanced mGluR-LTD amplitude. These findings show that the abnormal persistence of Arc protein limits the dynamic range of Arc signaling pathways specifically during reversal learning. Our work illuminates how the precise temporal control of activity-dependent molecules, such as Arc, regulates synaptic plasticity and is crucial for cognition. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies of hydrogen pellet acceleration by electric arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, S.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design for an arc heated gas gun is described. The experimental development of the final design constitutes the final phase in contract work for JET. The gun consist of a cryogenic arc chamber connected to the inlet of a gun barrel. With a dose of H 2 -gas condensed in the arc chamber and a D 2 -pellet punch loaded into the barrel the gun is fired by the ignition of an electrical discharge in the arc chamber. The pellet is accelerated by the exhaust of hot H 2 -gas from the arc chamber and its velocity and acceleration is measured by time-of-flight along and outside the barrel. The pressure development by the arc is monitored by pressure transducers as well in the arc chamber as in the barrel. The performance of the gun is described in terms of arc current and voltage versus time as functions of power supply configuration and H 2 propellant dose. The time behaviour of the propellant pressure in the arc chamber and in the barrel is shown in relation to the arc current. Pellet acceleration and pressure development in the gun barrel for the arc heated gas gun is discussed and compared to results obtained by conventional fast valve acceleration

  6. Electric arc discharge damage to ion thruster grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, D. D.; Nakanishi, S.; Finke, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Arcs representative of those occurring between the grids of a mercury ion thruster were simulated. Parameters affecting an arc and the resulting damage were studied. The parameters investigated were arc energy, arc duration, and grid geometry. Arc attenuation techniques were also investigated. Potentially serious damage occurred at all energy levels representative of actual thruster operating conditions. Of the grids tested, the lowest open-area configuration sustained the least damage for given conditions. At a fixed energy level a long duration discharge caused greater damage than a short discharge. Attenuation of arc current using various impedances proved to be effective in reducing arc damage. Faults were also deliberately caused using chips of sputtered materials formed during the operation of an actual thruster. These faults were cleared with no serious grid damage resulting using the principles and methods developed in this study.

  7. Universal correlators for multi-arc complex matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemann, G.

    1997-01-01

    The correlation functions of the multi-arc complex matrix model are shown to be universal for any finite number of arcs. The universality classes are characterized by the support of the eigenvalue density and are conjectured to fall into the same classes as the ones recently found for the Hermitian model. This is explicitly shown to be true for the case of two arcs, apart from the known result for one arc. The basic tool is the iterative solution of the loop equation for the complex matrix model with multiple arcs, which provides all multi-loop correlators up to an arbitrary genus. Explicit results for genus one are given for any number of arcs. The two-arc solution is investigated in detail, including the double-scaling limit. In addition universal expressions for the string susceptibility are given for both the complex and Hermitian model. (orig.)

  8. Discharge Characteristics of DC Arc Water Plasma for Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianming; Sooseok, Choi; Takayuki, Watanabe

    2012-12-01

    A water plasma was generated by DC arc discharge with a hafnium embedded rod-type cathode and a nozzle-type anode. The discharge characteristics were examined by changing the operation parameter of the arc current. The dynamic behavior of the arc discharge led to significant fluctuations in the arc voltage and its frequency. Analyses of the high speed image and the arc voltage waveform showed that the arc discharge was in the restrike mode and its frequency varied within several tens of kilohertz according to the operating conditions. The larger thermal plasma volume was generated by the higher flow from the forming steam with a higher restrike frequency in the higher arc current conditions. In addition, the characteristics of the water plasma jet were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy to identify the abundant radicals required in an efficient waste treatment process.

  9. Discharge Characteristics of DC Arc Water Plasma for Environmental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sooseok; Watanabe, Takayuki; Li Tianming

    2012-01-01

    A water plasma was generated by DC arc discharge with a hafnium embedded rod-type cathode and a nozzle-type anode. The discharge characteristics were examined by changing the operation parameter of the arc current. The dynamic behavior of the arc discharge led to significant fluctuations in the arc voltage and its frequency. Analyses of the high speed image and the arc voltage waveform showed that the arc discharge was in the restrike mode and its frequency varied within several tens of kilohertz according to the operating conditions. The larger thermal plasma volume was generated by the higher flow from the forming steam with a higher restrike frequency in the higher arc current conditions. In addition, the characteristics of the water plasma jet were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy to identify the abundant radicals required in an efficient waste treatment process. (plasma technology)

  10. Poster - 42: TB - ARC: A Total Body photon ARC technique using a commercially available linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Michael D. C.; Ruo, Russell; Patrocinio, Horacio J.; Poon, Emily; Freeman, Carolyn; Hijal, Tarek; Parker, William [McGill University Health Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a total body photon irradiation technique using multiple overlapping open field arcs (TB-ARC). This simple technique uses predetermined arc-weights, with MUs calculated as a function of prescription depth only. Patients lie on a stretcher, in the prone/supine treatment position with AP/PA arcs. This treatment position has many advantages including ease of delivery (especially for tall, pediatric or compromised patients), dose uniformity, simplicity for organ shielding, and imaging capabilities. Using a Varian TrueBeam linac, 14 arcs using 40×40 cm{sup 2} 6 MV open photon beams, sweeping across 10 degrees each, complete a 140 degree arc. The nominal SSD at zero degrees is 200 cm. Arcs at the sweep limits (+/− 70 degrees) are differentially weighted and deliver a dose within 10% of the prescription on central axis, at a depth of 10 cm over a superior-inferior length of 275 cm. CT planning using Varian Eclipse enables dose evaluation. A custom made beam spoiler, consisting of a 2.5 m sheet of polycarbonate (6 mm thick) increases the surface dose from 45% to 90%. This beam spoiler also serves as a support in the event that differential attenuation is required for organs such as lung, heart, liver, kidneys. The geometry of the sweeping beam technique limits organ dose (using varying thicknesses of melting alloy) to about 20% and 40% of prescription at dmax and midplane respectively. Digital imaging with a portable DR cassette enables proper attenuator location prior to treatment.

  11. Numerical modeling of transferred arc melting bath heating; Modelisation numerique du chauffage de bains par arc transfere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, A. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Trenty, L.; Guillot, J.B. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France); Delalondre, C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the modeling of a transferred electric arc inside a bath of melted metal. After a recall of the context of the study, the problem of the modeling, which involves magnetohydrodynamic coupling inside the arc and the bath, is described. The equations that govern the phenomena inside the arc and the bath are recalled and the approach used for the modeling of the anode region of the arc is explained using a 1-D sub-model. The conditions of connection between arc and bath calculations are explained and calculation results obtained with a 200 kW laboratory furnace geometry are presented. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  12. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  13. Passive Visual Sensing in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao

    For decades much work has been devoted to the research and development of automatic arc welding systems. However, it has remained a challenging problem. Besides the very complex arc welding process itself, the lack of ability to precisely sense the welding process, including the seam geometry...... and the weld pool, has also prevented the realization of a closed-loop control system for many years, even though a variety of sensors have been developed. Among all the sensor systems, visual sensors have the advantage of receiving visual information and have been drawn more and more attentions. Typical...... industrial solutions for seam detection such as using laser scanners suer from several limitations. For instance, it must be positioned some distance ahead to the molten pool and may cause problem when dealing with shiny surfaces. Existing techniques for weld pool sensing mostly rely on auxiliary light...

  14. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  15. ArcForm - A multimodal notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allsopp, Benjamin Brink

    ArcForm (AF) is a visual notation based on a new graph-like network structure. It supports a unique approach to labeling arcs and nodes to allow diverse and grammatically normal English (or other natural language) sentences to be embedded in the network (Allsopp, 2013). In doing this AF combines...... the familiarity and expressiveness of written natural language with the visuospatial intuition of navigating geographical maps. Thus AF simultaneously exploits visual, textual, linguistic and spatial modalities. In static representations AF seems to have various benefits. We believe that AF’s multiple modalities...... support better overview, aid memory and facilitate forming new insights. At the same time, AF’s closeness to natural language allows it to remain cross-domain and multipurpose. However AF is not limited to static representations and is designed to be supported digitally. Here we expect additional benefits...

  16. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  17. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  18. Recent commissioning experience on the SLC arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toge, N.; Bambade, P.; Barklow, T.; Brown, K.L.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.L.; Fieguth, T.; Haiessinski, J.; Hutton, A.; Jung, C.; Kheifets, S.A.; Komamiya, S.; Mattison, T.; Murray, J.J.; Phinney, N.; Placidi, M.; Ritson, D.M.; Sands, M.; Sheppard, J.C.; Weinstein, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Arc transport line, which brings high-energy, high-intensity electron and positron bunches from the SLAC linac to the Stanford Linear Collider final focus section, has been in operation for the past few years. In this paper, the authors will review the techniques developed for the optical tune-up and diagnostics, recent performance, and on-going improvement programs. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, Christopher; Klein, Michael; Barnett, Rob; Yartsev, Slav

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy requires delivery quality assurance (DQA) to ensure that treatment is accurate and closely follows the plan. We report our experience with the ArcCHECK phantom and investigate its potential optimization for the DQA process. One-hundred seventy DQA plans from 84 patients were studied. Plans were classified into 2 groups: those with the target situated on the diodes of the ArcCHECK (D plans) and those with the target situated at the center (C plans). Gamma pass rates for 8 target sites were examined. The parameters used to analyze the data included 3%/3 mm with the Van Dyk percent difference criteria (VD) on, 3%/3 mm with the VD off, 2%/2 mm with the VD on, and x/3 mm with the VD on and the percentage dosimetric agreement “x” for diode plans adjusted. D plans typically displayed maximum planned dose (MPD) on the cylindrical surface containing ArcCHECK diodes than center plans, resulting in inflated gamma pass rates. When this was taken into account by adjusting the percentage dosimetric agreement, C plans outperformed D plans by an average of 3.5%. ArcCHECK can streamline the DQA process, consuming less time and resources than radiographic films. It is unnecessary to generate 2 DQA plans for each patient; a single center plan will suffice. Six of 8 target sites consistently displayed pass rates well within our acceptance criteria; the lesser performance of head and neck and spinal sites can be attributed to marginally lower doses and increased high gradient of plans

  20. Dual-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Wu, Junqing; Wu, Huanmei; Geneser, Sarah; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an emerging radiation therapy modality for treatment of tumors affected by respiratory motion. However, gating significantly prolongs the treatment time, as delivery is only activated during a single respiratory phase. To enhance the efficiency of gated VMAT delivery, a novel dual-gated VMAT (DG-VMAT) technique, in which delivery is executed at both exhale and inhale phases in a given arc rotation, is developed and experimentally evaluated. Arc delivery at two phases is realized by sequentially interleaving control points consisting of MUs, MLC sequences, and angles of VMAT plans generated at the exhale and inhale phases. Dual-gated delivery is initiated when a respiration gating signal enters the exhale window; when the exhale delivery concludes, the beam turns off and the gantry rolls back to the starting position for the inhale window. The process is then repeated until both inhale and exhale arcs are fully delivered. DG-VMAT plan delivery accuracy was assessed using a pinpoint chamber and diode array phantom undergoing programmed motion. DG-VMAT delivery was experimentally implemented through custom XML scripting in Varian’s TrueBeam™ STx Developer Mode. Relative to single gated delivery at exhale, the treatment time was improved by 95.5% for a sinusoidal breathing pattern. The pinpoint chamber dose measurement agreed with the calculated dose within 0.7%. For the DG-VMAT delivery, 97.5% of the diode array measurements passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. The feasibility of DG-VMAT delivery scheme has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. By leveraging the stability and natural pauses that occur at end-inspiration and end-exhalation, DG-VMAT provides a practical method for enhancing gated delivery efficiency by up to a factor of two

  1. Arc structure of the DAM Jupiter Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamic spectra of the Jovian DAM emission (1.3--40 MHz) has been made from Voyager data; it appears that the different Jovian 'sources' can be defined by spectral chaaracteristics, rather than by occurrence probability. The non-Io emission consists of two families: vertex early arcs (VEA) and vertex late arcs (VLA). These two families are superimposed at all longitudes, but one is always more intense than the other. The characterics of the two families are specified; in particular, it is shown that the VEA family is more stable in time than the VLA family. The Io-controlled emission consists of the four sources already known from the ground-based observations in addition to a new source (Io-A')sp, identified by its dynamic spectrum alone. All of the sources are partially superimposed on non-Io emission. The (Io-B)sp and (Io-A')sp sources are made up of low-curvature arcs having low-frequency limits above 5 MHz. The high-frequency limit of the (Io-B)sp source is strongly modulated by Io-phase. The (Io-A)sp source has a specturm similar to the non-Io VLA emission. The other two sources, (Io-C)sp and (Io-D)sp, are not structured into well-defined arcs. A comparsion is made between the occurrence of these sources in the Io-CML plane with the sources defined from ground observations by probability of occurrence. Local time effects are observed only in the non-Io emission when compared before and after encounter. Before encounter, the VEA family is very weak and the VLA family very intense. After encounter, the opposite effect is observed. The Io-controlled sources are not affected by these local time effects

  2. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width ∼35 cm for a nominal beam area of ∼1,000 cm 2 , and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of ∼100 keV. Separately, they've developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they've developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications

  3. View of an intact oceanic arc, from surficial to mesozonal levels: Cretaceous Alisitos arc, Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Cathy; Fackler Adams, Benjamin; Mattinson, James; Deoreo, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The Alisitos arc is an approximately 300 × 30 km oceanic arc terrane that lies in the western wall of the Peninsular Ranges batholith south of the modern Agua Blanca fault zone in Baja California. We have completed detailed mapping and dating of a 50 × 30 km segment of this terrane in the El Rosario to Mission San Fernando areas, as well as reconnaissance mapping and dating in the next 50 × 30 km segment to the north, in the San Quintin area. We recognize two evolutionary phases in this part of the arc terrane: (I) extensional oceanic arc, characterized by intermediate to silicic explosive and effusive volcanism, culminating in caldera-forming silicic ignimbrite eruptions at the onset of arc rifting, and (II) rifted oceanic arc, characterized by mafic effusive and hydroclastic rocks and abundant dike swarms. Two types of units are widespread enough to permit tentative stratigraphic correlation across much of this 100-km-long segment of the arc: a welded dacite ignimbrite (tuff of Aguajito), and a deepwater debris-avalanche deposit. New U-Pb zircon data from the volcanic and plutonic rocks of both phases indicate that the entire 4000-m-thick section accumulated in about 1.5 MY, at 111-110 MY. Southwestern North American sources for two zircon grains with Proterozoic 206Pb / 207Pb ages support the interpretation that the oceanic arc fringed North America rather than representing an exotic terrane. The excellent preservation and exposure of the Alistos arc terrane makes it ideal for three-dimensional study of the structural, stratigraphic and intrusive history of an oceanic arc terrane. The segment mapped and dated in detail has a central major subaerial edifice, flanked by a down-faulted deepwater marine basin to the north, and a volcano-bounded shallow-water marine basin to the south. The rugged down-faulted flank of the edifice produced mass wasting, plumbed large-volume eruptions to the surface, and caused pyroclastic flows to disintegrate into turbulent

  4. Arc jet testing of a Dynasil dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Jack O.; Strobel, Forrest A.

    1999-07-01

    Arc jet testing of the Hera modified ballistic reentry vehicle - 1E (MBRV-1E) nosetip was conducted in June of 1998. The tests were conducted in the Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center HEAT-H1 arc plasma test facility in Tullahoma, Tennessee. The MBRV-1 vehicle is a separating short- to medium-range target. The MBRV-1E nosetip incorporates a custom designed quartz dome that is integrated into the nosetip stagnation region. The dome was bonded to the baseline nosetip material, a well characterized carbon-carbon composite material, using a silica based ceramic bond materials. The objectives of the test were to demonstrate the thermal performance and structural integrity of the nosetip design by exposing tip to arc plasma-heated flow simulating the reentry flight environment. Pre-test analysis of the Dynasil dome performed using finite element analysis predicted the dome would survive the test conditions with no failures. Post-test inspection of the dome revealed a hard, opaque coating on the outer surface of the dome. Once removed, the dome was shown to have numerous surface cracks near the stagnation region. In addition to the surface cracks, significant pitting on the surface was observed through both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. Post-test analyses were performed to determine the cause of these surface cracks. It was concluded that the cracks occurred during cooldown, and were a result of significant strength degradation which was caused by the surface pitting.

  5. Cold cathode arc model in mercury discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; Byszewski, W.W.; Budinger, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage/current characteristics measured during the starting of metal halide lamps indicate a low voltage discharge when condensates (mainly mercury) are localized on the electrodes. In this case, even with a cold cathode which does not emit electrons, the current is very high and voltage across the lamp drops to about 15 to 20 V. This type of discharge is similar to the cold cathode mercury vapor arc found in mercury pool rectifiers. The cathode sheath in the mercury vapor arc is characterized by very small cathode spot size, on the order of 10 -c cm 2 , very high current density of about 10 6 A/cm 2 and very low cathode fall of approximately 10 volts. The discharge is modified and generalized to describe the cathode phenomena in the cold cathode mercury vapor arc. The sensitivity of calculated discharge parameters with respect to such modifications were examined. Results show that the cathode fall voltage remains fairly constant (7-8 volts) with large fractional variations of metastable mercury atoms bombarding the cathode. This result compares very well with experimental waveforms when anode fall and plasma voltage approximations are incorporated

  6. A Computer Simulation of Auroral Arc Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John Scott

    Recent satellite measurements have revealed two intriguing features associated with the formation of auroral arcs. The first is that an auroral arc is produced by a sheet of electrons accelerated along a geomagnetic field -aligned potential drop, and the second is that these electrons carry a field-aligned, upward directed electric current. In order to explain these measurements, a self-consistent, time dependent, computer simulation of auroral arc formation has been developed. The simulation demonstrates for the first time that a stable V-shaped potential structure, called an auroral double layer, develops spontaneously as a result of an ion shielded electron current sheet interacting with a conducting ionosphere. The double layer accelerates current-carrying electrons into the upper atmosphere at auroral energies. The double layer potential depends critically on the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons and on the temperature of the ambient shielding ions. Localized double layers occur near the ionosphere when the geomagnetic field is assumed to be uniform, but when a converging magnetic field is introduced, the double layer becomes extended due to the presence of an additional population of electrons trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer potential. The simulated auroral current sheet is subject to auroral curl and fold type deformations due to unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. The previous incompletely understood auroral fold producing mechanism is described.

  7. Vacuum arc anode plasma. I. Spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, F.M.

    1975-01-01

    A spectroscopic investigation was made of the anode plasma of a pulsed vacuum arc with an aluminum anode and a molybdenum cathode. The arc was triggered by a third trigger electrode and was driven by a 150-A 10-μs current pulse. The average current density at the anode was sufficiently high that anode spots were formed; these spots are believed to be the source of the aluminum in the plasma investigated in this experiment. By simultaneously measuring spectral emission lines of Al I, Al II, and Al III, the plasma electron temperature was shown to decrease sequentially through the norm temperatures of Al III, Al II, and Al I as the arc was extinguished. The Boltzmann distribution temperature T/subD/ of four Al III excited levels was shown to be kT/subD//e=2.0plus-or-minus0.5 V, and the peak Al III 4D excited state density was shown to be about 5times10 17 m -3 . These data suggest a non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) model of the anode plasma when compared with the Al 3+ production in the plasma. The plasma was theoretically shown to be optically thin to the observed Al III spectral lines

  8. Alignment of the stanford linear collider Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.

    1987-01-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components

  9. Arc melter demonstration baseline test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; Oden, L.L.; O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the test results and evaluation for the Phase 1 (baseline) arc melter vitrification test series conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program (BWID). Phase 1 tests were conducted on surrogate mixtures of as-incinerated wastes and soil. Some buried wastes, soils, and stored wastes at the INEL and other DOE sites, are contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and hazardous organics and metals. The high temperature environment in an electric arc furnace may be used to process these wastes to produce materials suitable for final disposal. An electric arc furnace system can treat heterogeneous wastes and contaminated soils by (a) dissolving and retaining TRU elements and selected toxic metals as oxides in the slag phase, (b) destroying organic materials by dissociation, pyrolyzation, and combustion, and (c) capturing separated volatilized metals in the offgas system for further treatment. Structural metals in the waste may be melted and tapped separately for recycle or disposal, or these metals may be oxidized and dissolved into the slag. The molten slag, after cooling, will provide a glass/ceramic final waste form that is homogeneous, highly nonleachable, and extremely durable. These features make this waste form suitable for immobilization of TRU radionuclides and toxic metals for geologic timeframes. Further, the volume of contaminated wastes and soils will be substantially reduced in the process

  10. Stud arc welding in a magnetic field – Investigation of the influences on the arc motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartz-Behrend, K; Forster, G; Schein, J; Marqués, J L; Jenicek, A; Müller, M; Cramer, H; Jilg, A; Soyer, H

    2014-01-01

    Stud arc welding is widely used in the construction industry. For welding of studs with a diameter larger than 14 mm a ceramic ferrule is usually necessary in order to protect the weld pool. Disadvantages of using such a ferrule are that more metal is molten than necessary for a high quality welded joint and that the ferrule is a consumable generally thrown away after the welding operation. Investigations show that the ferrule can be omitted when the welding is carried out in a radially symmetric magnetic field within a shielding gas atmosphere. Due to the Lorentz force the arc is laterally shifted so that a very uniform and controlled melting of the stud contact surface as well as of the work piece can be achieved. In this paper a simplified physical model is presented describing how the parameters welding current, flux density of the magnetic field, radius of the arc and mass density of the shielding gas influence the velocity of the arc motion. The resulting equation is subsequently verified by comparing it to optical measurements of the arc motion. The proposed model can be used to optimize the required field distribution for the magnetic field stud welding process

  11. Plan quality comparison between 4-arc and 6-arc noncoplanar volumetric modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshio, Kotaro; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Wakita, Akihisa; Kitayama, Takahiro; Hisazumi, Kento; Inoue, Daisaku; Shiode, Tsuyoki; Akaki, Shiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2018-01-04

    To compare the plans of 4-arc and 6-arc noncoplanar volumetric modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy (VMA-SRT) for multiple brain metastases and to investigate the cutoff value for the tumor number and volume for 6-arc rather than 4-arc VMA-SRT. We identified 24 consecutive multiple-target cases (3 to 19 targets in each case) with 189 total targets. We constructed plans using both 4- and 6-arc noncoplanar VMA-SRT. The prescribed dose was 36 Gy/6 fr, and it was delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were evaluated for the dose conformity using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Paddick conformity indices (RCI and PCI), fall-off (Paddick gradient index [PGI]), and the normal brain dose. The median (range) RCI, PCI, and PGI was 0.94 (0.92 to 0.99), 0.89 (0.77 to 0.94), and 3.75 (2.24 to 6.54) for the 4-arc plan and 0.94 (0.91 to 0.98), 0.89 (0.76 to 0.94), and 3.65 (2.24 to 6.5) for the 6-arc plan, respectively. The median (range) of the normal brain dose was 910.3 cGy (381.4 to 1268.9) for the 4-arc plan and 898.8 cGy (377 to 1252.9) for the 6-arc plan. The PGI of the 6-arc plan was significantly superior to that of the 4-arc plan (p = 0.0076), and the optimal cutoff values for the tumor number and volume indicative of 6-arc (and not 4-arc) VMA-SRT were cases with ≥ 5 metastases and a PTV of ≥ 12.9 mL, respectively. The PCI values, however, showed no significant difference between the 2 plans. We believe these results will help in considering the use of 6-arc VMA-SRT for multiple brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF WELDING ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. О. Vakulenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of forming arc welding and condition of its burning. Methodology. A wire with diameter 3 mm of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15% was material for electrode. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of arc welding forming the following compounds were used: kaolin; CaCO3 with admixtures of gypsum up to 60%; SiO2 and Fe − Si with the iron concentration up to 50%. Researches were conducted using the direct electric current and arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current a welding transformer of type PSO-500n was used. On the special stand initial gap between the electrode and metal plate was 1-1.5 mm. The inter electrode space was filled with the probed chemical compound and the electric arc was formed. At the moment of arc forming the values of electric current and arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final gap value between electrodes was accepted as a maximal value of arc length. Findings. Experimentally the transfer of metal in interelectrode space corresponded to the tiny drop mechanism. According to external signs the relation between maximal arc length and the power of electric current has the form of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc at the moment of arc forming per unit of its length characterizes the environment in the interelectrode space. Originality. 1 Based on the analysis of influence of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc the inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length until the moment of its natural break is defined. 2 Ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current, with the sufficiently high coefficient of correlation is submitted to the exponential dependence. Influence of the compounds under study on the process of

  13. Modelling of arc behaviour inside a F4 APS torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, K; Marques, J-L; Vassen, R; Stoever, D

    2006-01-01

    The plasma arc inside the F4 torch used for atmospheric plasma spraying is characterized by means of analytical and numerical methods. A simplified analytical model is formulated to understand the physical behaviour of the plasma arc. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the realistic plasma arc flow inside the torch. At a given torch power and gas flow rate, possible combinations of the arc core radius and arc length are predicted. The thermodynamic principle of minimum entropy production is used to determine the combination of arc core radius and arc length, which corresponds to the actual physical situation of the arc inside the torch. The effect of arc current and gas flow rate on the plasma arc characteristics is clarified. The effect of hydrogen content in the plasma gas on its velocity and temperature profiles at the nozzle exit is shown. Predicted torch efficiencies are comparable to measured ones. The results of the numerical model are similar to that an analytical model. Previously published experimental and numerical results support part of the present results

  14. Numerical simulation of global formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, A.; Sato, T.

    1980-01-01

    Global simulation of auroral arcs is performed, based on the feedback theory of auroral arcs (Sato, 1978), for a three-dimensionally coupled ionosphere-magnetosphere system which includes two pairs of large-scale Birkeland currents, large-scale polar cap electric fields, and a day-night asymmetry of the electron density distribution. Simulation results have shown that auroral arcs are formed in the dark sector of the auroral oval, more preferentially in the evening sector. They usually appear in multiples with a shape elongating in the east-west direction, each arc being a couple of thousand kilometers in length and 10 to 40 km in width. A pair of small-scale, upward and downward, Birkeland currents is associated with each arc, the density of which becomes 10 to 200 μA/m 2 at 110-km height, and the intensity of the associated electrojet reaches 5 to 20 kA. Each arc is strongly polarized in the direction of the large-scale northsouth current so that the electric field inside the arc is reduced considerably from its ambient value. What controls the formation of auroral arcs (growing speed, locations, arc width, etc.) is examined in detail. For example, the arc width becomes sharper, as the bounce time of the Alfven wave decreases. The overall structure of auroras is largely dependent upon the large-scale Birkeland current, the electric field, and the electron density distribution in the auroral oval

  15. Letter to the Editor on 'Single-Arc IMRT?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl

    2009-04-21

    In the note 'Single Arc IMRT?' (Bortfeld and Webb 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 N9-20), Bortfeld and Webb present a theoretical investigation of static gantry IMRT (S-IMRT), single-arc IMRT and tomotherapy. Based on their assumptions they conclude that single-arc IMRT is inherently limited in treating complex cases without compromising delivery efficiency. Here we present an expansion of their work based on the capabilities of the Varian RapidArc single-arc IMRT system. Using the same theoretical framework we derive clinically deliverable single-arc IMRT plans based on these specific capabilities. In particular, we consider the range of leaf motion, the ability to rapidly and continuously vary the dose rate and the choice of collimator angle used for delivery. In contrast to the results of Bortfeld and Webb, our results show that single-arc IMRT plans can be generated that closely match the theoretical optimum. The disparity in the results of each investigation emphasizes that the capabilities of the delivery system, along with the ability of the optimization algorithm to exploit those capabilities, are of particular importance in single-arc IMRT. We conclude that, given the capabilities available with the RapidArc system, single-arc IMRT can produce complex treatment plans that are delivered efficiently (in approximately 2 min).

  16. Current transfer in dc non-transferred arc plasma torches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorui, S; Sahasrabudhe, S N; Das, A K

    2010-01-01

    Fundamentals of current transfer to the anodes in dc non-transferred arc plasma torches are investigated. Specially designed anodes made of three mutually isolated sections and external dc axial magnetic fields of various strengths are utilized to explore the conditions for different diffused and constricted attachments of the arc with the anode. A number of new facts are revealed in the exercise. Under constricted attachment, formation of arc root takes place. Spontaneous and magnetically induced movements of the arc root, their dependence on the arc current and the strength of the external magnetic field, most probable arc root velocity, variation of the root velocity with strength of the applied magnetic field, the effect of swirl on the rotational speed of the arc root are some of the important features investigated. Two new techniques are introduced: one for measurement of the arc root diameter and the other for determination of the negative electric field in the boundary layer over the anode. While the first one exploits the rigid column behaviour of the arcs, the second one utilizes the shooting back of the residual electrons over an arc spot. Sample calculations are provided.

  17. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  18. Arc generation from sputtering plasma-dielectric inclusion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickersham, C.E. Jr.; Poole, J.E.; Fan, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Arcing during sputter deposition and etching is a significant cause of particle defect generation during device fabrication. In this article we report on the effect of aluminum oxide inclusion size, shape, and orientation on the propensity for arcing during sputtering of aluminum targets. The size, shape, and orientation of a dielectric inclusion plays a major role in determining the propensity for arcing and macroparticle emission. In previous studies we found that there is a critical inclusion size required for arcing to occur. In this article we used high-speed videos, electric arc detection, and measurements of particle defect density on wafers to study the effect of Al 2 O 3 inclusion size, shape, and orientation on arc rate, intensity, and silicon wafer particle defect density. We found that the cross-sectional area of the inclusion exposed to the sputtering plasma is the critical parameter that determines the arc rate and rate of macroparticle emission. Analysis of the arc rate, particle defect density, and the intensity of the optical emission from the arcing plasma indicates that the critical aluminum oxide inclusion area for arcing is 0.22±0.1 mm2 when the sputtering plasma sheath dark-space λ d , is 0.51 mm. Inclusions with areas greater than this critical value readily induce arcing and macroparticle ejection during sputtering. Inclusions below this critical size do not cause arcing or macroparticle ejection. When the inclusion major axis is longer than 2λ d and lies perpendicular to the sputter erosion track tangent, the arcing activity increases significantly over the case where the inclusion major axis lies parallel to the erosion track tangent

  19. Exotic Members of Southern Alaska's Jurassic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, E.; Jones, J. V., III; Karl, S. M.; Box, S.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Jurassic Talkeetna arc and contemporaneous plutonic rocks of the Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith (ARB) are key components of the Peninsular terrane of southern Alaska. The Talkeetna arc, considered to be a type example of an intra-oceanic arc, was progressively accreted to northwestern North America in the Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, together with associated components of the Wrangellia Composite terrane. Older Paleozoic and Mesozoic rock successions closely associated with the ARB suggest that at least part of the Peninsular terrane might be an overlap succession built on pre-existing crust, possibly correlative with the Wrangellia terrane to the east. However, the relationship between the Talkeetna arc, ARB, and any pre-existing crust remains incompletely understood. Field investigations focused on the petrogenesis of the ARB near Lake Clark National Park show that Jurassic to Late Cretaceous plutonic rocks commonly host a diverse range of mineralogically distinct xenolith inclusions, ranging in size from several cm to hundreds of meters. The modal fraction of these inclusions ranges from 50% in some outcrops. They are generally mafic in composition and, with few exceptions, are more mafic than host plutonic rocks, although they are observed as both igneous (e.g., gabbro cumulate, diorite porphyry) and metamorphic types (e.g., amphibolite, gneiss and quartzite). Inclusion shapes range from angular to rounded with sharp to diffuse boundaries and, in some instances, are found as planar, compositionally distinct bands or screens containing high-temperature ductile shear fabrics. Other planar bands are more segmented, consistent with lower-temperature brittle behavior. Comparison of age, geochemical fractionation trends, and isotope systematics between the inclusions and host plutons provides a critical test of whether they are co-genetic with host plutons. Where they are related, mafic inclusions provide clues about magmatic evolution and fractionation history

  20. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-01-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V 20Gy and V 30Gy dose levels (range, 4.62–17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D 35% of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5–5.8%. Mean V 10Gy and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15–20 Gy) in the range of 14–16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20–25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  1. Feedback Linearization Based Arc Length Control for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2005-01-01

    a linear system to be controlled by linear state feedback control. The advantage of using a nonlinear approach as feedback linearization is the ability of this method to cope with nonlinearities and different operating points. However, the model describing the GMAW process is not exact, and therefore......In this paper a feedback linearization based arc length controller for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is described. A nonlinear model describing the dynamic arc length is transformed into a system where nonlinearities can be cancelled by a nonlinear state feedback control part, and thus, leaving only......, the cancellation of nonlinear terms might give rise to problems with respect to robustness. Robustness of the closed loop system is therefore nvestigated by simulation....

  2. Effect of vacuum arc cathode spot distribution on breaking capacity of the arc-extinguishing chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Can; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2017-10-01

    A DC circuit breaker performs a key function in breaking an intermediate-frequency (IF) current since breaking a pure IF current is equivalent to breaking a very small DC with a reverse IF current. In this study, it is found that cathode spots show a ring-shaped distribution at 2000 Hz. An arc with an uneven distribution of cathode spots has been simulated. The simulation results show that the distribution of cathode spots significantly affect the microparameter distribution of arc plasma. The current distribution on the anode side differs from that on the cathode side under the total radial electric field. Specifically, the anode current distribution is both uneven and concentrated. The applied axial magnetic field, which cannot reduce the concentrated anode current distribution effectively, might increase the concentration of the anode current. Finally, the uneven distribution of cathode spots reduces the breaking capacity of the arc-extinguishing chamber.

  3. Unraveling the diversity in arc volcanic eruption styles: Examples from the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jessica F.

    2016-11-01

    The magmatic systems feeding arc volcanoes are complex, leading to a rich diversity in eruptive products and eruption styles. This review focuses on examples from the Aleutian subduction zone, encompassed within the state of Alaska, USA because it exhibits a rich diversity in arc structure and tectonics, sediment and volatile influx feeding primary magma generation, crustal magma differentiation processes, with the resulting outcome the production of a complete range in eruption styles from its diverse volcanic centers. Recent and ongoing investigations along the arc reveal controls on magma production that result in diversity of eruptive products, from crystal-rich intermediate andesites to phenocryst-poor, melt-rich silicic and mafic magmas and a spectrum in between. Thus, deep to shallow crustal "processing" of arc magmas likely greatly influences the physical and chemical character of the magmas as they accumulate in the shallow crust, the flow physics of the magmas as they rise in the conduit, and eruption style through differences in degassing kinetics of the bubbly magmas. The broad spectrum of resulting eruption styles thus depends on the bulk magma composition, melt phase composition, and the bubble and crystal content (phenocrysts and/or microlites) of the magma. Those fundamental magma characteristics are in turn largely determined by the crustal differentiation pathway traversed by the magma as a function of tectonic location in the arc, and/or the water content and composition of the primary magmas. The physical and chemical character of the magma, set by the arc differentiation pathway, as it ascends towards eruption determines the kinetic efficiency of degassing versus the increasing internal gas bubble overpressure. The balance between degassing rate and the rate at which gas bubble overpressure builds then determines the conditions of fragmentation, and ultimately eruption intensity.

  4. INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ON THE FORMING OF ELECTRIC ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is a comparative analysis of chemical compounds influence on the process of electric arc forming and condition of its burning. Methodology. Material for an electrode was a wire 3 mm in diameter of low carbon steel with contain of carbon 0.15%. As chemical compounds, which determine the terms of forming of arc welding were used kaolin; CaCO3 with the admixtures of gypsum to 60%; SiO2 and Fe – Si with the iron concentration to 50%. Researches were conducted at the use of direct electric current and the arc of reverse polarity. As a source of electric current the welding transformer of type PSO-500 was used. On the special stand an initial gap between the electrode and metal-plate was equal to 1–1.5 mm. The interelectrode interval was filled with the probed chemical compounds and it was formed an electric arc. In the moment of electric arc arise the values of electric current and the arc voltage were determined. After the natural break of electric arc, the final size of the gap between electrodes was accepted as the maximal value of the arc lengths. Findings. In the conditions of experiment the metal transfer in interelectrode interval corresponded to the drop mechanism. According to external characteristics the ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric discharge has the appearance of exponential dependence. Specific power of electric arc characterizes environment of interelectrode interval in the moment of arc forming per unit of its length. Originality. 1. On the basis of influence analysis of the studied chemical compounds on the formation processes of electric arc inversely proportional relationship between the power of the electric current and the maximum arc length to the moment of its natural break is defined. 2. The ratio between the maximal arc length and the power of electric current with sufficiently high correlation coefficient is subjected to the exponential dependence. Influence of

  5. ArcCN-Runoff: An ArcGIS tool for generating curve number and runoff maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X.; Huang, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The development and the application of ArcCN-Runoff tool, an extension of ESRI@ ArcGIS software, are reported. This tool can be applied to determine curve numbers and to calculate runoff or infiltration for a rainfall event in a watershed. Implementation of GIS techniques such as dissolving, intersecting, and a curve-number reference table improve efficiency. Technical processing time may be reduced from days, if not weeks, to hours for producing spatially varied curve number and runoff maps. An application example for a watershed in Lyon County and Osage County, Kansas, USA, is presented. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  7. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  8. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam, E-mail: knchoi@inu.ac.kr; Rho, Hee Hyuk, E-mail: rdoubleh0902@inu.ac.kr [Dept. of Information and Telecommunication Engineering Incheon National University Incheon 22012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  9. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Roger S-Y; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D; Whelan, Russell S; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N

    2007-12-26

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53.

  10. An arc detector for neutron crystal structure investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, N [Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center. AEA, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    An arc detector for neutron structure investigations of powder crystals using time-of-flight technique is described. In order to enable the measurement of integral intensity from about 1/4 of the Debye-Scherrer ring and for simplicity reasons, the scattering angle 20-90 degree was chosen and a special arc collimator was built. The arc collimator-detector had a divergency of about 20 minutes of arc, and the distance between detector-sample was 64 cm. Four {sup 3} He detectors were fixed on the arc of the collimator. Both efficiency and space sensitivity of the detector were determined using a point neutron source. Results of measurements show that parameters of the arc detector are acceptable for high resolution crystal structure investigations. 6 figs.

  11. Computational Modeling of Arc-Slag Interaction in DC Furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Quinn G.

    2017-02-01

    The plasma arc is central to the operation of the direct-current arc furnace, a unit operation commonly used in high-temperature processing of both primary ores and recycled metals. The arc is a high-velocity, high-temperature jet of ionized gas created and sustained by interactions among the thermal, momentum, and electromagnetic fields resulting from the passage of electric current. In addition to being the primary source of thermal energy, the arc jet also couples mechanically with the bath of molten process material within the furnace, causing substantial splashing and stirring in the region in which it impinges. The arc's interaction with the molten bath inside the furnace is studied through use of a multiphase, multiphysics computational magnetohydrodynamic model developed in the OpenFOAM® framework. Results from the computational solver are compared with empirical correlations that account for arc-slag interaction effects.

  12. Dispersive effects of transverse displacements of SLC Arc magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.; Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.

    1986-01-01

    The SLC Arc magnets are subject to random displacements and field errors resulting in unpredictable transverse displacement of the central trajectory from that of the design. The chosen method of correcting this perturbed trajectory in the SLC Arcs utilizes mechanical movement of the combined function magnets which compose the Arc transport lines. Here we present the results of a recent investigation substantiating the earlier results which led to the adoption of this method

  13. Sleep loss disrupts Arc expression in dentate gyrus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, James E; Kodoth, Varna; Aton, Sara J

    2018-04-07

    Sleep loss affects many aspects of cognition, and memory consolidation processes occurring in the hippocampus seem particularly vulnerable to sleep loss. The immediate-early gene Arc plays an essential role in both synaptic plasticity and memory formation, and its expression is altered by sleep. Here, using a variety of techniques, we have characterized the effects of brief (3-h) periods of sleep vs. sleep deprivation (SD) on the expression of Arc mRNA and Arc protein in the mouse hippocampus and cortex. By comparing the relative abundance of mature Arc mRNA with unspliced pre-mRNA, we see evidence that during SD, increases in Arc across the cortex, but not hippocampus, reflect de novo transcription. Arc increases in the hippocampus during SD are not accompanied by changes in pre-mRNA levels, suggesting that increases in mRNA stability, not transcription, drives this change. Using in situ hybridization (together with behavioral observation to quantify sleep amounts), we find that in the dorsal hippocampus, SD minimally affects Arc mRNA expression, and decreases the number of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells expressing Arc. This is in contrast to neighboring cortical areas, which show large increases in neuronal Arc expression after SD. Using immunohistochemistry, we find that Arc protein expression is also differentially affected in the cortex and DG with SD - while larger numbers of cortical neurons are Arc+, fewer DG granule cells are Arc+, relative to the same regions in sleeping mice. These data suggest that with regard to expression of plasticity-regulating genes, sleep (and SD) can have differential effects in hippocampal and cortical areas. This may provide a clue regarding the susceptibility of performance on hippocampus-dependent tasks to deficits following even brief periods of sleep loss. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. THE DETECTION AND STATISTICS OF GIANT ARCS BEHIND CLASH CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Zheng, Wei; Postman, Marc; Bradley, Larry; Meneghetti, Massimo; Koekemoer, Anton; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Umetsu, Keiichi; Vega, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift z s = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having z s  > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c–M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations

  15. THE DETECTION AND STATISTICS OF GIANT ARCS BEHIND CLASH CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Zheng, Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Postman, Marc; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Meneghetti, Massimo; Koekemoer, Anton [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, and INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Seitz, Stella [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Zitrin, Adi [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Merten, Julian [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Maoz, Dani [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Frye, Brenda [Steward Observatory/Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Vega, Jesus, E-mail: bxu6@jhu.edu [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift z{sub s} = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having z{sub s} > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c–M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  16. Configuration of the Beam Loss Monitors for the LHC arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Arauzo-Garcia, A

    2000-01-01

    A revised configuration for a beam loss detection system is given for the arcs of the LHC. The last modifications of the LHC arc layout have been taken into account, LHC optics version 6.2. A set of 6 Loss Detectors will be placed outside the cryostat around each short straight section. Quench alarm thresholds are estimated for each detector in all possible LHC arc layout configurations. Threshold values are proposed for top and injection energy beam loss.

  17. Origin of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Fluctuations in arc plasma devices are extremely important for any technological application in thermal plasma. The origin of such fluctuations remains unexplained. This paper presents a theory for observed fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices. A qualitative explanation for observed behavior on atmospheric pressure arc plasma fluctuations, reported in the literature, can be obtained from the theory. The potential of the theory is demonstrated through comparison of theoretical predictions with reported experimental observations

  18. Treatment of hazardous wastes by DC thermal plasma arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toru, Iwao; Yafang, Liu; Furuta, N.; Tsuginori, Inaba

    2001-01-01

    The temperature of the DC thermal plasma arc discharge is discussed, and examples of the waste treatment for the inorganic compounds such as fly ash, asbestos, and for the organic compounds such as the toxic dioxines and TBT by using the DC plasma arc discharge are shown. In addition, the plasma treatment by using a radiant power emitted from the DC plasma arc discharge is also shown as another new kind of ones. (authors)

  19. Overview of arc design options: Deliverable D2.1

    CERN Document Server

    Chance, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the collider layouts to be taken into account for further detailed studies. The optimization of the arc cell lattice and the choice made on the dispersion suppressor are explained. The arc lattice is detailed with the procedures to tune the collider ring and to correct the chromaticity. The correction schemes of the orbit, of the dynamic aperture and of the spurious dispersion are detailed. Finally, the properties of the arc design at the injection energy are shown.

  20. A note on the arc elacticity of demand

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Vázquez

    1995-01-01

    This note presents a simple alternative measure for the arc elasticity of demand which comes naturally and does retain the salient characteristics of the point demand elasticity. A remarkable feature is that it equals the point demand elasticity at some point inside the interval, thus leading to the exact estimation of the point demand elasticity when this is constant. It also ensures that the relationships between the arc demand elasticity and the arc revenue elasticities keep exact formal a...

  1. Programming ArcGIS 10.1 with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This book is written in a helpful, practical style with numerous hands-on recipes and chapters to help you save time and effort by using Python to power ArcGIS to create shortcuts, scripts, tools, and customizations.""Programming ArcGIS 10.1 with Python Cookbook"" is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Basic Python or programming knowledge is essential(?).

  2. The Detection and Statistics of Giant Arcs behind CLASH Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei; Bradley, Larry; Vega, Jesus; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift zs = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having zs > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c-M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  3. Highly arc-transitive digraphs -- counterexamples and structure

    OpenAIRE

    DeVos, Matt; Mohar, Bojan; Šámal, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We resolve two problems of [Cameron, Praeger, and Wormald -- Infinite highly arc transitive digraphs and universal covering digraphs, Combinatorica 1993]. First, we construct a locally finite highly arc-transitive digraph with universal reachability relation. Second, we provide constructions of 2-ended highly arc transitive digraphs where each `building block' is a finite bipartite graph that is not a disjoint union of complete bipartite graphs. This was conjectured impossible in the above pa...

  4. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  5. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge, with enough good precision. The results obtained can be used in model and engineering calculations to estimate gas and electronic temperatures in the channel of an arc plasma generator.

  6. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [de

  7. Particle injection into the Castor tokamak by electric arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Juettner, B.; Pursch, H.; Jakubka, K.; Stoeckel, J.; Zacek, F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of arcing on the tokamak discharge was investigated in the Castor tokamak. A special calibrated gun which emitted tantalum by artificially ignited electric arcs, was used to study the transport of the injected tantalum ions, neutrals and droplets. The injection of tantalum led to an increase in electron density and to a change of plasma position only if the transported charge was higher than 0.01 C. As the naturally occurring arcs are well below this limit, the arcing in tokamaks is rather the consequence than the reason of instabilities. (J.U.)

  8. Electric fuses operation, a review: 2. Arcing period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussière, W

    2012-01-01

    In the electric fuse operation the arcing period follows immediately the pre-arcing period depicted in Part 1 (Part 1. Pre-arcing period). The transition between these two operation steps is not fully understood at this time. To simplify the beginning of the arcing period can be identified with the electric arc ignition i.e. with the electrodes voltage drop. The consecutive plasma is of metallic type at the beginning of the arcing period and of metallic plus silica type with varying mixture up to the end of the arcing period. The energy brought by the fault current is withdrawn by means of the interaction between the electric arc and the arc quenching material (usually silica sand) whose morphometric properties influence the properties of the plasma column: composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of the plasma column depend on the porosity (and other morphometric properties) of the filler. The fuse element erosion also known as burn-back is responsible for the lengthening of the plasma column and the variations of the electric field. The whole of these processes is depicted by means of experimental results or modellings when possible.

  9. Momentum equation for arc-driven rail guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batteh, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    In several models of arc-driven rail guns, the rails are assumed to be infinitely high to simplify the calculation of the electromagnetic fields which appear in the momentum equation for the arc. This assumption leads to overestimates of the arc pressures and accelerations by approximately a factor of 2 for typical rail-gun geometries. In this paper, we develop a simple method for modifying the momentum equation to account for the effect of finite-height rails on the performance of the rail gun and the properties of the arc. The modification is based on an integration of the Lorentz force across the arc cross section at each axial location in the arc. Application of this technique suggests that, for typical rail-gun geometries and moderately long arcs, the momentum equation appropriate for infinite-height rails can be retained provided that the magnetic pressure term in the equation is scaled by a factor which depends on the effective inductance of the gun. The analysis also indicates that the magnetic pressure gradient actually changes sign near the arc/projectile boundary because of the magnetic fields associated with the arc current

  10. Photographic and photometric observations of mid-latitude red arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, V.N.; Ievenko, I.B.; Oshchepkov, S.M.; Ignat'ev, V.M.; Zhondorov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Stable auroral red arcs (SAR-arcs) were observed in Majmaga (Φ S ∼56.5deg) at the Yakutsk meridian in November-December, 1987 and February, 1988. The SAR-arcs were observed to the equator of diffuse glow, located at lower latitudes with respect to discrete auroral forms, obviously, in the external plasmospheric projection area. It is noted that they appear both in disturbed periods and in those with medium magnetic activity (K p =3). The SAR-arc height is ∼450km

  11. Double Arc Instability in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, N.; Kusano, K., E-mail: n-ishiguro@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 Japan (Japan)

    2017-07-10

    The stability of the magnetic field in the solar corona is important for understanding the causes of solar eruptions. Although various scenarios have been suggested to date, the tether-cutting reconnection scenario proposed by Moore et al. is one of the widely accepted models to explain the onset process of solar eruptions. Although the tether-cutting reconnection scenario proposes that the sigmoidal field formed by internal reconnection is the magnetic field in the pre-eruptive state, the stability of the sigmoidal field has not yet been investigated quantitatively. In this paper, in order to elucidate the stability problem of the pre-eruptive state, we developed a simple numerical analysis in which the sigmoidal field is modeled by a double arc electric current loop and its stability is analyzed. As a result, we found that the double arc loop is more easily destabilized than the axisymmetric torus, and it becomes unstable even if the external field does not decay with altitude, which is in contrast to the axisymmetric torus instability. This suggests that tether-cutting reconnection may well work as the onset mechanism of solar eruptions, and if so, the critical condition for eruption under a certain geometry may be determined by a new type of instability rather than by the torus instability. Based on them, we propose a new type of instability called double arc instability (DAI). We discuss the critical conditions for DAI and derive a new parameter κ , defined as the product of the magnetic twist and the normalized flux of the tether-cutting reconnection.

  12. Multiphysics Simulation of Welding-Arc and Nozzle-Arc System: Mathematical-Model, Solution-Methodology and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sumedh; Sharma, Atul

    2018-01-01

    This work presents mathematical model and solution methodology for a multiphysics engineering problem on arc formation during welding and inside a nozzle. A general-purpose commercial CFD solver ANSYS FLUENT 13.0.0 is used in this work. Arc formation involves strongly coupled gas dynamics and electro-dynamics, simulated by solution of coupled Navier-Stoke equations, Maxwell's equations and radiation heat-transfer equation. Validation of the present numerical methodology is demonstrated with an excellent agreement with the published results. The developed mathematical model and the user defined functions (UDFs) are independent of the geometry and are applicable to any system that involves arc-formation, in 2D axisymmetric coordinates system. The high-pressure flow of SF6 gas in the nozzle-arc system resembles arc chamber of SF6 gas circuit breaker; thus, this methodology can be extended to simulate arcing phenomenon during current interruption.

  13. Current limitation in low pressure mercury arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torven, S.; Babic, M.

    1976-06-01

    When the electric current in a low pressure arc with a long positive column is increased sufficiently, an electrostatic instability develops in the plasma which leads to formation of thin space charge layers across the column. The instability is investigated in a mercury plasma column kept axially homogeneous by a special technique. Values of some plasma parameters are measured at the instability threshold. It is found that the plasma is in a weakly ionized state in contrast to predictions by widely accepted current limitation theories. It is concluded that new types of theories are required to explain the observations. (Auth.)

  14. Arc plasma incineration of surrogate radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girold, C.; Cartier, R.; Taupiac, J.P.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the feasibility to substitute a single plasma reactor, where the arc is transferred on a melt glass bath, for several steps in an existing nuclear technological wastes incinerator. The incineration of wastes, the produced gas treatment and the vitrification of ashes issued from waste incineration are the three simultaneous functions of this new kind of reactor. The three steps of the work are described: first, post-combustion in an oxygen plasma of gases generated from the waste pyrolysis, then, vitrification of ashes from the calcination of wastes in the transferred plasma furnace and finally, incineration/vitrification of wastes in the same furnace

  15. On the problem of turbulent arcs modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yas'ko, O.I.

    1998-01-01

    A new hypothesis is proposed which considers mass as a charge which produces a special field during its movement likewise the electric charge creates magnetic one. This approach throws new light on vortexes formation since interaction of moving mass with the considered field exerts swirling effect. Some aspects of turbulence in flows near walls and in blown electric arc discharge were considered to validate the hypothesis in the cases of cold and high-temperature flows. The theoretical results are found to comply with experiment well. (author)

  16. Auroral kilometric radiation from transpolar arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, B.M.; Pottelette, R.; Eliasson, L.; Murphree, J.S.; Elphinstone, R.D.; Bahnsen, A.; Jespersen, M.

    1992-01-01

    Observations from the Swedish satellite Viking allow the authors to study the relationship between auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and discrete auroral features. Previous work has shown that AKR generation is most often associated with nightside aurora. They present wave data which show that under certain circumstances the source regions may also occur on discrete features, identified as transpolar arcs. The wave spectrograms detected during crossings or closest approaches to such sources exhibit structures similar to those observed during nightside AKR source crossings. Also, the associated ion beams and trapped conical electron populations with enhanced upward directed loss cones peak at comparable energies (∼1 keV)

  17. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  18. Pulmonary siderosis (pneumoconiosis) in an arc welder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triebel, H J; Spielmann, R P; Jessel, A

    1988-02-01

    An arc welder of 32 years of age is presented with a random finding of miliar reticulonodular shadows in the plain film of the thorax. Subjectively and objectively the patient appears healthy. The presence of a pneumoconiosis is confirmed by biopsy. Differential diagnosis had to consider sarcoidosis and pulmonary siderosis in view of the known professional anamnesis. This case report underlines the repeated demand to assess X-ray films of the thoracic organs only if the clinical findings and anamnesis are thoroughly known.

  19. Pulmonary siderosis (pneumoconiosis) in an arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triebel, H.J.; Spielmann, R.P.; Jessel, A.

    1988-01-01

    An arc welder of 32 years of age is presented with a random finding of miliar reticulonodular shadows in the plain film of the thorax. Subjectively and objectively the patient appears healthy. The presence of a pneumoconiosis is confirmed by biopsy. Differential diagnosis had to consider sarcoidosis and pulmonary siderosis in view of the known professional anamnesis. This case report underlines the repeated demand to assess X-ray films of the thoracic organs only if the clinical findings and anamnesis are thoroughly known. (orig.) [de

  20. Luminous arcs in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynds, R.; Petrosian, V.

    1989-01-01

    Observations are reported of what appears to be a new class of spatially coherent extragalactic features having, in the two most compelling known examples, the following joint properties: location in clusters of galaxies, narrow arclike shape, enormous apparent length, and situation of center of curvature toward both a cD galaxy and the apparent center of gravity of the cluster. The principal available facts concerning the arcs are presented and a variety of interpretations are briefly discussed. The weight of evidence seems to favor the interpretation that these features are images of more distant objects produced by the gravitational field of the intervening clusters. 24 references

  1. Community Structure Comparisons of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Mats Along the Mariana Arc and Back-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.; Moyer, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents along the Mariana Arc and back-arc represent a hotspot of microbial diversity that has not yet been fully recognized. The Mariana Arc and back-arc contain hydrothermal vents with varied vent effluent chemistry and temperature, which translates to diverse community composition. We have focused on iron-rich sites where the dominant primary producers are iron oxidizing bacteria. Because microbes from these environments have proven elusive in culturing efforts, we performed culture independent analysis among different microbial communities found at these hydrothermal vents. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina sequencing of small subunit ribosomal gene amplicons were used to characterize community members and identify samples for shotgun metagenomics. Used in combination, these methods will better elucidate the composition and characteristics of the bacterial communities at these hydrothermal vent systems. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and compare taxonomic and metabolic diversity among different communities of microbial mats. We compared communities collected on a fine scale to analyze the bacterial community based on gross mat morphology, geography, and nearby vent effluent chemistry. Taxa richness and evenness are compared with rarefaction curves to visualize diversity. As well as providing a survey of diversity this study also presents a juxtaposition of three methods in which ribosomal small subunit diversity is compared with T-RFLP, next generation amplicon sequencing, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing.

  2. ArcFuels: an ArcMap toolbar for fuel treatment planning and wildfire risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Vaillant; Alan A. Ager

    2014-01-01

    Fire behavior modeling and geospatial analysis can provide tremendous insight to land managers in defining both the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments in the context of land management goals and public expectations. ArcFuels is a streamlined fuel management planning and wildfire risk assessment system that creates a trans-scale (stand to large landscape...

  3. Seismic evidence for arc segmentation, active magmatic intrusions and syn-rift fault system in the northern Ryukyu volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuta; Kodaira, Shuichi; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2018-04-01

    Tectonic and volcanic structures of the northern Ryukyu arc are investigated on the basis of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data. The study area forms an active volcanic front in parallel to the non-volcanic island chain in the eastern margin of the Eurasian plate and has been undergoing regional extension on its back-arc side. We carried out a MCS reflection experiment along two across-arc lines, and one of the profiles was laid out across the Tokara Channel, a linear bathymetric depression which demarcates the northern and central Ryukyu arcs. The reflection image reveals that beneath this topographic valley there exists a 3-km-deep sedimentary basin atop the arc crust, suggesting that the arc segment boundary was formed by rapid and focused subsidence of the arc crust driven by the arc-parallel extension. Around the volcanic front, magmatic conduits represented by tubular transparent bodies in the reflection images are well developed within the shallow sediments and some of them are accompanied by small fragments of dipping seismic reflectors indicating intruded sills at their bottoms. The spatial distribution of the conduits may suggest that the arc volcanism has multiple active outlets on the seafloor which bifurcate at crustal depths and/or that the location of the volcanic front has been migrating trenchward over time. Further distant from the volcanic front toward the back-arc (> 30 km away), these volcanic features vanish, and alternatively wide rift basins become predominant where rapid transitions from normal-fault-dominant regions to strike-slip-fault-dominant regions occur. This spatial variation in faulting patterns indicates complex stress regimes associated with arc/back-arc rifting in the northern Okinawa Trough.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Effects of lorentz force on flow fields of free burning arc and wall stabilized non-transferred arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yi; Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia

    2013-01-01

    The flow fields of two typical DC plasma arcs, namely the transferred free burning arc and the non-transferred arc were simulated by solving hydrodynamic equations and electromagnetic equations. The effects of the Lorentz force on the characteristics of the flow fields of these two typical DC plasma arcs were estimated. Results show that in the case of the free burning arc, the Lorentz force due to the current self-induced magnetic field has significant impact on the flow fields, as the self-induced magnetic compression is the main arc constraint mechanism. However, in the case of the non-transferred arc generated in a torch with long and narrow inter-electrode inserts and an abruptly expanded anode, the Lorentz force has limited impact on the flow fields of the plasma especially at the downstream of the inter-electrode inserts, compared with the strong wall constraints and relatively high aerodynamic force. This is because the ratio of the electromagnetic force to the aerodynamic force is only about 0.01 in this region. When the main consideration is outlet parameters of the wall stabilized non-transferred DC arc plasma generator, in order to improve the efficiency of the numerical simulation program, the Lorentz force could be neglected in the non-transferred arc in some cases. (authors)

  5. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg, Saarland (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [German] Die mARC (modulated arc) Technik wurde vor kurzen fuer Siemens ARTISTE Linearbeschleuniger eingefuehrt. Wir zeigen die ersten Erfahrungen mit der Kommissionierung des Systems sowie die ersten Patientenbestrahlungen. Bestrahlungsplanung und Behandlung werden fuer das Prowess Panther Bestrahlungsplanungssystem oder alternativ in einer in-house-Loesung praesentiert. Die dosimetrische Verifikation wurde sowohl mit Punktmessungen als auch fuer die 3D-Dosisverteilung durchgefuehrt. Je nach Zielvolumen koennen mit einem oder zwei Boegen hochkonformale Plaene erzeugt werden. Die dosimetrische Verifikation konvertierter mARC-Plaene gegen step-and-shoot-Plaene weicht in absoluter Dosis um

  6. Development of circuit model for arcing on solar panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Bhoomi K; Deshpande, S P; Mukherjee, S; Gupta, S B; Ranjan, M; Rane, R; Vaghela, N; Acharya, V; Sudhakar, M; Sankaran, M; Suresh, E P

    2010-01-01

    The increased requirements of payload capacity of the satellites have resulted in much higher power requirements of the satellites. In order to minimize the energy loss during power transmission due to cable loss, use of high voltage solar panels becomes necessary. When a satellite encounters space plasma it floats negatively with respect to the surrounding space plasma environment. At high voltage, charging and discharging on solar panels causes the power system breakdown. Once a solar panel surface is charged and potential difference between surface insulator and conductor exceeds certain value, electrostatic discharge (ESD) may occur. This ESD may trigger a secondary arc that can destroy the solar panel circuit. ESD is also called as primary or minor arc and secondary is called major arc. The energy of minor arc is supplied by the charge stored in the coverglass of solar array and is a pulse of typically several 100 ns to several 100 μs duration. The damage caused by minor arc is less compared to major arcs, but it is observed that the minor arc is cause of major arc. Therefore it is important to develop an understanding of minor arc and mitigation techniques. In this paper we present a linear circuit analysis for minor arcs on solar panels. To study arcing event, a ground experimental facility to simulate space plasma environment has been developed at Facilitation Centre for Industrial Plasma Technologies (Institute for Plasma Research) in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization's ISRO Satellite Technology Centre (ISAC). A linear circuit model has been developed to explain the experimental results by representing the coverglass, solar cell interconnect and wiring by an LCR circuit and the primary arc by an equivalent LR circuit. The aim of the circuit analysis is to predict the arc current which flows through the arc plasma. It is established from the model that the current depends on various parameters like potential difference between insulator

  7. Electrical and optical investigations on the low voltage vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braic, M.; Braic, V.; Pavelescu, G.; Balaceanu, M.; Pavelescu, D.; Dumitrescu, G.; Gherendi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a low voltage circuit breaker, adapted from a real industrial device, were carried out by electrical and optical methods. Electrical, parameters were measured in the high current arc period and in zero current moment (C.Z) and corroborated with the arc plasma spectroscopic investigations. For the first time in vacuum arc diagnostics, the paper presents results based on single shot time resolved emission spectroscopy around C.Z. The short-circuit current was produced in a special high power installation in order to reproduce exactly the short-circuit regimes developing in low voltage distribution networks. A stainless steel vacuum chamber with classical Cu-Cr electrodes was used. Tests were performed for different current values in the range 3 - 20 kA rms , the voltages being varied between 200 and 1000 V ac . Interruption processes in the different arc regimes (from the diffuse arc mode to the constricted column mode) were analyzed. The success of the arc interruption was analyzed in terms of electric arc energy achieved in the first current halfperiod. The results obtained were corroborated with arc plasma spectroscopic investigations. The emission spectroscopy setup, using an Acton spectrograph and an intensified CCD camera, allowed the spatial and time-resolved investigation of spectra emitted by the vacuum arc plasma. The first truly time-resolved spectroscopic measurements on a single half-period was proven to be a good method to investigate the vacuum arc. Using single shot time resolved spectroscopy around zero current on partial unsuccessful interruption we concluded that the Cu ions, more that Cr ions were responsible for the arc reignition. The financial support for this work comes from NATO-STI SfP /974083 and CORINT-Romania projects. (authors)

  8. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces

  9. Study on underwater plasma arc cutting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yada, Toshio; Nakamura, Uhachiro; Tomidokoro, Sakae; Fukuzawa, Mitsuo

    1980-01-01

    The zirconium alloy tube of the impile creep test facility had been subjected to inner pressure in the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) environment. In the near future, it will be necessary to dismantle the facility and to take out the tube for such examinations as irradiation effects on material properties. In order to establish the dismantling technology for the radioactive facility, a study on underwater plasma arc cutting has been carried out since 1977. Primarily, optimum underwater cutting sequence and conditions were studied in details for developing the remote control handling and the cutting system. Further, the amounts of particles suspended in water as well as those contained in bubbled gas were quantitatively analyzed for developing a safe removal system for contaminants which were produced by cutting the radioactive material. As a result of this study, it has been concluded that the underwater plasma arc cutting method is generally suitable and effective for dismantling such radioactive material as the impile creep test facility of the JMTR. (author)

  10. Vacuum arc ion sources - micro to macro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGill, R.A.; Dickinson, M.R.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-08-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources provide a convenient tool for the production of intense beams of metal ions. The sources are relatively easy to construct and they can produce beams from all of the solid metals as well as of compounds, alloys and mixtures. We have made a number of different kinds of such sources over the course of our development work at LBL in the past decade, from very small open-quote thumb-size close-quote versions to a very large one with 50-cm diameter extractor. Beam current ranges from a few milliamperes up to almost 10 amperes and extraction voltage from about 1 kV to 100 kV. Multicathode versions have been made so that one can switch between metal ion species simply and quickly. Most of the sources have been operated in a repetitively pulsed mode, and we've tested a dc version also. Here we outline some construction features of the array of vacuum arc ion sources that we've developed and used, and describe their performance and limitations

  11. PSYCHOSOMATIC "ARC" IN THE PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Boncheva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The psychoneuroimmunology, the new brain science and the endocrinology today show a lot of results, with which symptoms are better to understand. The psychotherapeutic practice shows the ways to influence them by encoding the levels of bounding between the physical symptom and the psychological condition. The aim of the study was to show the encoding of the psychosomatic arc within a real psychotherapeutic contact. 59 psychotherapeutic cases are followed. 33 of them were with somatoform disorders and 26 with chronic psychosomatic diseases. Every patient has minimum 12 psychotherapeutic sessions. The treatment is provided on the base of the 5 levels model of the positive psychotherapy.We ascertain the following:1. The most significant moment in the arise of such symptomatic is the gained past experience - "vital concepts"; "coping strategies";2. Unlocking moment for the arise of the affection is the fixed emotion - fear, aggression or depression, specific for the particular morbid pictures;3. Showing the connection between symptom and fixed emotion by the technique "positive interpretation", which unlocks the process of changingThis shows that the psychotherapeutic help is possible only if the patient rethink the psychosomatic arc. Showing the connections between the content of the unconscious, the fixed emotion in behavioral models and the symptom gives the impetus to change.

  12. Welding robot package; Arc yosetsu robot package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the conventional high-speed welding robot, the welding current was controlled mainly for reducing the spatters during short circuits and for stabilizing the beads by the periodic short circuits. However, an increase of deposition amount in response to the speed is required for the high-speed welding. Large-current low-spatter welding current region control was added. Units were integrated into a package by which the arc length is kept in short without dispersion of arc length for welding without defects such as undercut and unequal beads. In automobile industry, use of aluminum parts is extended for the light weight. The welding is very difficult, and automation is not so progressing in spite of the poor environment. Buckling of welding wire is easy to occur, and supply of wire is obstructed by the deposition of chipped powders on the torch cable, which stay within the contact chip resulting in the deposition. Dislocation of locus is easy to occur at the corner of rectangular pipe during the welding. By improving these troubles, an aluminum MIG welding robot package has been developed. 13 figs.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy, RapidArc, and a novel IMRT and Arc technique for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Spencer; Chen, Jeff Z.; Rashid Dar, A.; Yartsev, Slav

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiotherapy treatment plans for mid- and distal-esophageal cancer with primary involvement of the gastroesophageal (GE) junction using a novel IMRT and Arc technique (IMRT and Arc), helical tomotherapy (HT), and RapidArc (RA1 and RA2). Methods and materials: Eight patients treated on HT for locally advanced esophageal cancer with radical intent were re-planned for RA and IMRT and Arc. RA plans employed single and double arcs (RA1 and RA2, respectively), while IMRT and Arc plans had four fixed-gantry IMRT fields and a conformal arc. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose uniformity, and dose homogeneity were analyzed to compare treatment plans. Results: RA2 plans showed significant improvement over RA1 plans in terms of OAR dose and PTV dose uniformity and homogeneity. HT plan provided best dose uniformity (p = 0.001) and dose homogeneity (p = 0.002) to planning target volume (PTV), while IMRT and Arc and RA2 plans gave lowest dose to lungs among four radiotherapy techniques with acceptable PTV dose coverage. Mean V 10 of the lungs was significantly reduced by the RA2 plans compared to IMRT and Arc (40.3%, p = 0.001) and HT (66.2%, p 15 of the lungs for the RA2 plans also showed significant improvement over the IMRT and Arc (25.2%, p = 0.042) and HT (34.8%, p = 0.027) techniques. These improvements came at the cost of higher doses to the heart volume compared to HT and IMRT and Arc techniques. Mean lung dose (MLD) for the IMRT and Arc technique (21.2 ± 5.0% of prescription dose) was significantly reduced compared to HT (26.3%, p = 0.004), RA1 (23.3%, p = 0.028), and RA2 (23.2%, p = 0.017) techniques. Conclusion: The IMRT and Arc technique is a good option for treating esophageal cancer with thoracic involvement. It achieved optimal low dose to the lungs and heart with acceptable PTV coverage. HT is a good option for treating esophageal cancer with little thoracic involvement as it achieves superior dose conformality and uniformity. The RA2

  14. Low voltage initiation of damaging arcs between electrical contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthrell, R.E.

    1975-07-01

    Metallic arcs were found to precede the firm contacting of electrical contacts which were closed without bounce. When the open-circuit voltages were below the ionization potential, the initiation of these arcs was found to depend on the presence of asperities on the surfaces and on asperity contracting, melting, and pinching off by magnetic forces. The arc is thought to be initiated inductively when the molten metallic asperity contact is pinched off, and the electrode damage is similar to that produced by the arcing of opening contacts. Arcing could not be produced for exceptionally smooth surfaces, or, for rough surfaces when the open-circuit potential was below the melting voltages of the electrode metals. In order to prevent damage to contact surfaces by melting or arcing, it is suggested that test potentials be limited to below the melting voltages, that the current be limited, the test circuits be designed to prevent inductively generated high voltage transients, and the contact surfaces be very smooth. In order to facilitate arc initiation in arc welding applications, it is suggested that the surfaces of electrodes and work pieces be roughened. (U.S.)

  15. Detection of arcing location on photovoltaic systems using filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jay

    2018-02-20

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic systems capable of identifying the location of an arc-fault. In particular, such systems include a unique filter connected to each photovoltaic (PV) string, thereby providing a unique filtered noise profile associated with a particular PV string. Also described herein are methods for identifying and isolating such arc-faults.

  16. Dye laser spectrometer for the analysis of pulsed vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Robertson, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser spectrometer which is used to obtain detailed single shot spectroscopic measurements of the plasma in a pulsed vacuum arc was developed. The capabilities of this spectrometer are indicated by the detection of laser induced fluorescence signals from 10 6 neutral Ti atoms in the plasma of a pulsed vacuum arc with a Ti anode. (U.S.)

  17. A Circumzenithal Arc to Study Optics Concepts with Geometrical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the formation of a circumzenithal arc for the purpose of teaching light and optics. A circumzenithal arc, an optic formation rarely witnessed by people, is formed in this study using a water-filled cylindrical glass illuminated by sunlight. Sunlight refracted at the top and side surfaces of the glass of water is dispersed into…

  18. A phase one AR/C system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachmar, Peter M.; Polutchko, Robert J.; Matusky, Martin; Chu, William; Jackson, William; Montez, Moises

    1991-01-01

    The Phase One AR&C System Design integrates an evolutionary design based on the legacy of previous mission successes, flight tested components from manned Rendezvous and Proximity Operations (RPO) space programs, and additional AR&C components validated using proven methods. The Phase One system has a modular, open architecture with the standardized interfaces proposed for Space Station Freedom system architecture.

  19. Liquid Metal Oscillation and Arc Behaviour during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudodibroto, B.Y.B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain insight into the oscillation behaviour of the liquid metal and the arc behaviour during GMA welding. Observations of the weld pool and the arc were undertaken by visual means using a high-speed video and by analysis of the voltage. To deal with the complex

  20. The complexity of finding arc-disjoint branching flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Jensen, J.; Havet, Frédéric; Yeo, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The concept of arc-disjoint flows in networks was recently introduced in Bang-Jensen and Bessy (2014). This is a very general framework within which many well-known and important problems can be formulated. In particular, the existence of arc-disjoint branching flows, that is, flows which send on...

  1. Arc generation from sputtering plasma-dielectric inclusion interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wickersham, C E J; Fan, J S

    2002-01-01

    Arcing during sputter deposition and etching is a significant cause of particle defect generation during device fabrication. In this article we report on the effect of aluminum oxide inclusion size, shape, and orientation on the propensity for arcing during sputtering of aluminum targets. The size, shape, and orientation of a dielectric inclusion plays a major role in determining the propensity for arcing and macroparticle emission. In previous studies we found that there is a critical inclusion size required for arcing to occur. In this article we used high-speed videos, electric arc detection, and measurements of particle defect density on wafers to study the effect of Al sub 2 O sub 3 inclusion size, shape, and orientation on arc rate, intensity, and silicon wafer particle defect density. We found that the cross-sectional area of the inclusion exposed to the sputtering plasma is the critical parameter that determines the arc rate and rate of macroparticle emission. Analysis of the arc rate, particle defect...

  2. Production of Manual Metal Arc Welding Electrodes with Local Raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between the base metal and a flux covered metal electrode with electric current that depends on the type of electrode, material, welding position and the desired strength. The composition of flux coated electrodes is complex and a ...

  3. Searching for high baryon density at the AGS with ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, S.H.; Schlagel, T.J.; Pang, Y.

    1993-08-01

    A relativistic cascade ARC is used to analyse heavy ion experiments at the AGS. In particular predictions from ARC for Au on Au at 11.6 GeV/c have proved to be remarkably accurate. Going to lower energies and inserting a phenomenological equation of state into the cascade should lead to information about the interesting region of high baryon density

  4. A sustained-arc ignition system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    A sustained-arc ignition system was developed for internal combustion engines. It produces a very-long-duration ignition pulse with an energy in the order of 100 millijoules. The ignition pulse waveform can be controlled to predetermined actual ignition requirements. The design of the sustained-arc ignition system is presented in the report.

  5. Automating the Fireshed Assessment Process with ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Ager; Klaus Barber

    2006-01-01

    A library of macros was developed to automate the Fireshed process within ArcGIS. The macros link a number of vegetation simulation and wildfire behavior models (FVS, SVS, FARSITE, and FlamMap) with ESRI geodatabases, desktop software (Access, Excel), and ArcGIS. The macros provide for (1) an interactive linkage between digital imagery, vegetation data, FVS-FFE, and...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1915.56 Section 1915.56 Labor... (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.56 Arc welding and cutting. The provisions of this section shall apply to ship repairing...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1926.351 Section 1926.351 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Welding and Cutting § 1926.351 Arc welding and cutting. (a) Manual electrode holders. (1) Only manual electrode holders which are specifically designed...

  8. Current and voltage distribution in the diffuse vacuum arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, H.; Schram, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of extensive measurements, a model is developed for the diffuse plasma of the high-current vacuum arc. The model shows that the current constriction and the voltage distribution in the diffuse vacuum arc prior to anode-spot formation are caused by the pressure source to which the

  9. Petrographic and Geochemical Investigation of Andesitic Arc Volcanism: Mount Kerinci, Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, M.; Saunders, K.; Troll, V. R.; Jolis, E.; Muir, D. D.; Deegan, F. M.; Budd, D. A.; Astbury, R.; Bromiley, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Present knowledge of the chain of dominantly andesitic volcanoes, which span the Sumatran portion of the Sunda Arc is extremely limited. Previous studies have focused on Toba and Krakatau, although over 13 further volcanic edifices are known. Several recent explosive eruptions in Sumatra such as that of Mt. Sinabung, 2014, have highlighted the potential hazard that these volcanoes pose to the local and regional communities. Mount Kerinci, is one of the most active of the volcanoes in this region, yet little is known about the petrogenesis of the magma by which it is fed. Kerinci is located approximately mid-way between Toba in the North and Krakatau in the south. Along arc variations are observed in the major, minor and trace elements of whole rock analyses. However, bulk rock approaches produce an average chemical composition for a sample, potentially masking important chemical signatures. In-situ micro-analytical analysis of individual components of samples such as melt inclusions, crystals and groundmass provides chemical signatures of individual components allowing the evolution of volcanic centres to be deciphered in considerably more detail. Examination of whole rock chemistry indicates its location may be key to unravelling the petrogenesis of the arc as significant chemical changes occur between Kerinci and Kaba, 250 km to the south. Kerinci samples are dominantly porphyritic with large crystals of plagioclase, pyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides, rare olivine crystals are observed. Plagioclase and pyroxene crystals are chemically zoned and host melt inclusions. Multiple plagioclase populations are observed. A combination of in-situ micro-analysis techniques will be used to characterise the chemical composition of melt inclusions and crystals. These data can be used along with extant geothermobarometric models to help determine the magma source, storage conditions and composition of the evolving melt. Integration of the findings from this study with existing data for

  10. The ArcD1 and ArcD2 arginine/ornithine exchangers encoded in the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke E E; Kaczmarek, Michał B; Żygo, Monika; Lolkema, Juke S

    2015-01-01

    The arginine deiminase pathway (ADI) gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis contains two copies of a gene encoding an L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger, the arcD1 and arcD2 genes. The physiological function of ArcD1 and ArcD2 was studied by deleting the two genes. Deletion of arcD1 resulted in loss of

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Metal Active Gas (MAG) Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model for MAG (metal active gas) arc welding of thin plate has been developed. In MAG arc welding, the electrode wire is melted and supplied into the molten pool intermittently. Accordingly, it is assumed on the modeling that the thermal energy enters the base-plates through two following mechanisms, i.e., direct heating from arc plasma and “indirect” heating from the deposited metal. In the second part of the paper, MAG arc welding process is numerically analyzed by using the model, and the calculated weld bead dimension and surface profile have been compared with the experimental MAG welds on steel plate. As the result, it is made clear that the model is capable of predicting the bead profile of thin-plate MAG arc welding , including weld bead with undercutting.

  12. Characteristic study of DC electric Arc plasma igniter jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Yudan; He Liming; Du Hongliang; Wang Feng; Chen Xin

    2012-01-01

    The spectrometer was adopted to measure the emission spectrum of Ar plasma jet at the igniter exit. Boltzmann curve slope method was applied to calculate the jet electron temperature. Ionization equilibrium equation was used to calculate jet temperature and measure the laws that jet length, jet velocity, electron temperature and jet temperature of igniter exit change with arc current and inlet Ar flow rate. Whether the electron temperature could be used to replace jet temperature in aircraft plasma arc jet was also discussed. The experiment results show that arc current reduces with the rising of inlet Ar flow rate; exit jet length and velocity increase with the rising of arc current, and increase at first and then reduce with the rising of inlet Ar flow rate; exit electron temperature, electron density and jet temperature increase with the rising of arc current and reduce with the rising of inlet Ar flow rate. (authors)

  13. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  14. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Ben

    2017-08-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  15. U-series isotopes in arc magma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkesworth, C.; Turner, S.; McDermott, F.; Peate, D.; Van Calsteren, P.

    1997-12-31

    Thorium is not readily mobilized in the fluid component along destructive plate margins. Uranium is mobilized, and the resultant fractionation in U/Th can be used to estimate the rates of transfer slab derived components through the mantle wedge. The variations in Th/Yb, and by implication in the fractionation-corrected Th abundances of arc magmas largely depend on the contributions from subducted sediments. It is inferred that the distinctive high Th/Ta ratios of subduction related magmas primarily reflect the Th/Ta ratios of the subducted sediments, and that such high Th/Ta ratios are generated by processes other than those associated with recent subduction-related magmatism. Uranium and thorium isotopes have also been used to evaluate magma residence times within the crust. Thus, separated minerals and groundmass from six rocks erupted in the last 4,000 years from Soufriere on St. Vincent in the Lesser Antilles, scatter about a 50,000 year errorchron on the U-Th equiline diagram (Heath et al., 1977). Models are currently being developed to investigate how such apparent ages may relate to calculated replenishment times in steady state systems. Bulk continental crust has a lower U/Th ratio (0.25) than at least some estimates for the bulk Earth (0.26) and the depleted upper mantle (0.39). However, the island arc rocks with low U/Th ratios appear to have inherited those from subducted sediments, and arc rocks with a low sediment contribution have significantly higher U/Th. Consequently, the U/Th ratios of new crustal material generated along destructive plate margins are significantly higher than those of bulk continental crust. The low average U/Th of bulk crust may be primarily due to different crust generation processes in the Archaean, when U would be less mobile because conditions were less oxidising, and when residual garnet may have had more of a role in crust generation processes. Extended abstract. 4 figs., 23 refs.

  16. Experimental investigation on the initial expansion stage of vacuum arc on cup-shaped TMF contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xiu, Shixin; Liu, Zixi; Zhang, Yanzhe; Feng, Dingyu

    2018-02-01

    Arc behavior and measures to control it directly affect the properties of vacuum circuit breakers. Nowadays, transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts are widely used for medium voltages. A magnetic field perpendicular to the current direction between the TMF contacts makes the arc move, transmitting its energy to the whole contact and avoiding excessive local ablation. Previous research on TMF arc behavior concentrated mainly on the arc movement and less on the initial stage (from arc ignition to an unstable arc column). A significant amount of experiment results suggest that there is a short period of arc stagnation after ignition. The duration of this arc stagnation and the arc characteristics during this stage affect the subsequent arc motion and even the breaking property of interrupters. The present study is of the arc characteristics in the initial stage. Experiments were carried out in a demountable vacuum chamber with cup-shaped TMF contacts. Using a high-speed camera, both single-point arc ignition mode and multiple-point arc ignition (MPAI) mode were observed. The experimental data show that the probability of MPAI mode occurring is related to the arc current. The influences of arc-ignition mode, arc current, and contact diameter on the initial expansion process were investigated. In addition, simulations were performed to analyze the multiple arc expansion process mechanically. Based on the experimental phenomena and simulation results, the mechanism of the arc expansion motion was analyzed.

  17. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen Wei; Craft, David

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 s. Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets. (paper)

  18. [Study on the arc spectral information for welding quality diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun

    2009-03-01

    Through collecting the spectral signals of TIG and MIG welding arc with spectrometer, the arc light radiations were analyzed based on the basic theory of plasma physics. The radiation of welding arc distributes over a broad range of frequency, from infrared to ultraviolet. The arc spectrum is composed of line spectra and continuous spectra. Due to the variation of metal density in the welding arc, there is great difference between the welding arc spectra of TIG and MIG in both their intensity and distribution. The MIG welding arc provides more line spectra of metal and the intensity of radiation is greater than TIG. The arc spectrum of TIG welding is stable during the welding process, disturbance factors that cause the spectral variations can be reflected by the spectral line related to the corresponding element entering the welding arc. The arc spectrum of MIG welding will fluctuate severely due to droplet transfer, which produces "noise" in the line spectrum aggregation zone. So for MIG welding, the spectral zone lacking spectral line is suitable for welding quality diagnosis. According to the characteristic of TIG and MIG, special spectral zones were selected for welding quality diagnosis. For TIG welding, the selected zone is in ultraviolet zone (230-300 nm). For MIG welding, the selected zone is in visible zone (570-590 nm). With the basic theory provided for welding quality diagnosis, the integral intensity of spectral signal in the selected zone of welding process with disturbing factor was studied to prove the theory. The results show that the welding quality and disturbance factors can be diagnosed with good signal to noise ratio in the selected spectral zone compared with signal in other spectral zone. The spectral signal can be used for real-time diagnosis of the welding quality.

  19. Magma genesis and slab-wedge interaction across an island arc-continent collision zone, East Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerff, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a detailed trace element and isotope geochemistry study into the magma-genesis ofvolcanoes in the Adonara-Pantar Section (APS) ofthe East Sunda Arc in Indonesia, a setting where an oceanic island arc is colliding with a passive continental margin. Sr, Nd, Pb, Ra,

  20. Magma genesis and slab-wedge interaction across an island arc-continent collision zone, East Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerff, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a detailed trace element and isotope geochemistry study into the magma-genesis ofvolcanoes in the Adonara-Pantar Section (APS) ofthe East Sunda Arc in Indonesia, a setting where an oceanic island arc is colliding with a passive continental margin. Sr, Nd, Pb,

  1. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW)

  2. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: II. Current zero behaviour of the nozzle arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Liu, J; Yan, J D; Fang, M T C

    2016-01-01

    The present work (part II) forms the second part of an investigation into the behaviour of SF 6 nozzle arc. It is concerned with the aerodynamic and electrical behaviour of a transient nozzle arc under a current ramp specified by a rate of current decay (d i /d t ) before current zero and a voltage ramp (d V /d t ) after current zero. The five flow models used in part I [1] for cold gas flow and DC nozzle arcs have been applied to study the transient arc at three stagnation pressures ( P 0 ) and two values of d i /d t for the current ramp, representing a wide range of arcing conditions. An analysis of the physical mechanisms encompassed in each flow model is given with an emphasis on the adequacy of a particular model in describing the rapidly varying arc around current zero. The critical rate of rise of recovery voltage (RRRV) is found computationally and compared with test results of Benenson et al [2]. For transient nozzle arcs, the RRRV is proportional to the square of P 0 , rather than to the square root of P 0 for DC nozzle arcs. The physical mechanisms responsible for the strong dependence of RRRV on P 0 have been investigated. The relative merits of the flow models employed are discussed. (paper)

  3. Time dependence of vacuum arc parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Brown, I.G.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved investigations of the expanded plasma of vacuum arc cathode spots are described, including the study of the ion charge state distribution, the random cathode spot motion, and the crater formation. It was found that the ion charge state distribution changes over a time scale on the order of hundreds of microseconds. For the random spot motion two time scales were observed: a very short spot residence time of tens of nanoseconds which gives, combined with the step width, the diffusion parameter of the random motion, and a longer time scale on the order of 100 μs during which the diffusion parameter changes. Crater formation studies by scanning electron microscopy indicate the occurrence of larger craters at the end of crater chains. The existence of a time scale, much longer than the elementary times for crater formation and spot residence, can be explained by local heat accumulation

  4. Instability of a Vacuum Arc Centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Bosco, E. del; Simpson, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Ever since conception of the Vacuum Arc Centrifuge (VAC) in 1980, periodic fluctuations in the ion saturation current and floating potential have been observed in Langmuir probe measurements in the rotation region of a VAC. Our theoretical and experimental research suggests that these fluctuations are in fact a pressure-gradient driven drift mode. In this work, we summarise the properties of a theoretical model describing the range of instabilities in the VAC plasma column, present theoretical predictions and compare with detailed experiments conducted on the PCEN centrifuge at the Brazilian National Space Research Institute (INPE). We conclude that the observed instability is a 'universal' instability, driven by the density-gradient, in a plasma with finite conductivity

  5. Arc modelling in SF6 circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verite, J.C.; Boucher, T.; Comte, A.; Delalondre, C.; Robin-Jouan, P.; Serres, E.; Texier, V.; Barrault, M.; Chevrier, P.; Fievet, C.

    1995-06-01

    The paper presents the work done by an operator, EDF and two manufacturers to improve the physical models and numerical methods used to simulate the behavior of the plasma and cold gas around it in a breaking chamber of the HV SF6 circuit breaker, during the high-current phase. This work concerns flow phenomena, in particular incorporating compressibility and the study of turbulence, the coupling between these flow phenomena and electromagnetic phenomena, and finally, radiation - which plays an essential role in energy transfer during the high-current phase. For this latter aspect, emission but also absorption were proven to play a major role, and the two were introduced into the models. The paper presents the models developed and the results obtained with them for simulation of two circuit breaker mock-ups (a double-pressure circuit breaker mock-up and a self-expanding and rotating arc circuit breaker mock-up). (author)

  6. Collimation system for electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, R.J.; Carter, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An electron collimation system for electron arc therapy treatments consists of a slit collimation system which is movable with the electron beam applicator and is designed to allow for dose compensation in the sagittal direction and a hoop-and-clamp assembly for final field shaping. By correctly designing the shape of the slit in the former and properly adjusting the components of the latter, it is possible to accomplish quite uniform shielding without causing any weight of the shielding material to rest on the patient. The slit collimation system has a specially shaped aperture for confining the radiation beam. The hoop-and-clamp assembly has hoops and clamps which locate shielding over the patient's body. The shielding locating clamps are adjustably movable radially with respect to the hoops. (author)

  7. Recycling of electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques Sobrinho, Vicente de Paulo Ferreira; Oliveira, Jose Roberto de; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to study the process of incorporation of the metal iron in electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), from a steel mill producing long steel by liquid iron in addition to the changing temperature of 1400 degrees Celsius of EAFD 'as received', the percentage of EAFD to be added (5, 10 and 20% of initial weight of sample pig iron) and the time of withdrawal of the sample of pig iron and slag (30 minutes after the addition of EAFD). Previously, the EAFD will be characterized using the following techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, specific surface area, Xray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. . After characterization, the EAFD will be added to the bath of liquid pig iron. It is expected that the results obtained at the end of the research allow the evaluation of the iron metal incorporation of EAFD in pig iron bath. (author)

  8. Investigation and control of dc arc jet instabilities to obtain a self-sustained pulsed laminar arc jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krowka, J; Rat, V; Coudert, J F

    2013-01-01

    The uncontrolled arc plasma instabilities in suspension plasma spraying or solution precursor plasma spraying cause non-homogeneous plasma treatments of material during their flight and also on coatings during their formation. This paper shows that the arc motion in dc plasma torches mainly originates in two main modes of oscillation (Helmholtz and restrike modes). The emphasis is put on the restrike mode in which the time component is extracted after building up and applying a numerical filter to raw arc voltage signals. The dependence of re-arcing events on experimental parameters is analysed in the frame of a phenomenological restrike model. It is shown that when the restrike frequency reaches the Helmholtz one, both modes are locked together and a pulsed arc jet is generated. (paper)

  9. Joan of Arc: Sanctity, witchcraft or epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Picard, Fabienne

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this article is to describe whether Joan of Arc had epilepsy and how that may have influenced her sense of mission and ability to encourage thousands of people to help her to chase the English out of France. Documentation of her Trial of Condemnation in 1431 provides a description of her episodes of experienced voices and visions. From the age of thirteen, Joan of Arc experienced frequent episodes of auditory hallucinations associated with elementary or complex visual hallucinations (e.g., a great light or human faces). These had sudden onset, lasting seconds or minutes at most, and occurred when awake or during sleep, arousing her. Some could be triggered by an auditory stimulus. She had no disorganized thought between the episodes. The semiology of the episodes is very suggestive of epileptic seizures, which have been considered as ecstatic by some authors or as partial epilepsy with auditory features by others, which seems more concordant with the ictal symptoms. The auditory and visual hallucinations could have had a religious content because during her childhood and adolescence, she was brought up in a religious environment, insomuch as this content first undefined only appeared after a few seizures. We can suppose that such hallucinations, without the knowledge of their medical origin, gave her a sense of divine mission, hence, a real strength to try to accomplish the orders she heard during the episodes. Her role during the Hundred Years' War and her narration of her strange episodes led her to be burned for heresy at the age of nineteen, yet rehabilitated 25 years later and to be canonized for her achievements in 1920. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The 2013 Crete (Hellenic Arc) Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, V. G.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    The western Hellenic Arc is a well known place of active interplate deformation, where the convergence motion vector is perpendicular to the subduction front. On 12 October 2013 this area was hit by a strong (Mw=6.7) earthquake, occurred on a thrust fault onto the coupled part of the overriding and descending plates, with the compression axis being oriented in the direction of plate convergence. This was the first strong (M>6.0) event to have occurred onto this segment of the descending slab, which has accommodated the largest (M8.3) known earthquake in the Mediterranean area, and to be recorded by the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) that has been considerably improved in the last five years. The first 2-days relocated seismicity shows activation of the upper part of the descending slab, downdip of the plate interface and forming a relatively narrow aftershock area on map view. The less densely visited by aftershocks area, where the main shock is also encompassed, is considered as the high-slip area along the downdip portion of the subducting plane. Dense concentration of the intraslab aftershocks are probably due to the increase of static stress generated by the main shock. A spectacular feature of the aftershock activity concerns the lateral extension of the slipped area, which appears very sharply defined. This provides evidence on localized coupling and aseismically creeping areas, explaining the low coupling ratio in the Hellenic Arc, as it derives from comparison between relative plate motion and seismic energy release. Elucidating the issue of how far the associated large-slip zone might be extended along the plate interface during the main rupture is crucial in assessing future earthquake hazards from subduction events in the study area. This research has been co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project.

  11. Impacts of continental arcs on global carbon cycling and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. T.; Jiang, H.; Carter, L.; Dasgupta, R.; Cao, W.; Lackey, J. S.; Lenardic, A.; Barnes, J.; McKenzie, R.

    2017-12-01

    On myr timescales, climatic variability is tied to variations in atmospheric CO2, which in turn is driven by geologic sources of CO2 and modulated by the efficiency of chemical weathering and carbonate precipitation (sinks). Long-term variability in CO2 has largely been attributed to changes in mid-ocean ridge inputs or the efficiency of global weathering. For example, the Cretaceous greenhouse is thought to be related to enhanced oceanic crust production, while the late Cenozoic icehouse is attributed to enhanced chemical weathering associated with the Himalayan orogeny. Here, we show that continental arcs may play a more important role in controlling climate, both in terms of sources and sinks. Continental arcs differ from island arcs and mid-ocean ridges in that the continental plate through which arc magmas pass may contain large amounts of sedimentary carbonate, accumulated over the history of the continent. Interaction of arc magmas with crustal carbonates via assimilation, reaction or heating can significantly add to the mantle-sourced CO2 flux. Detrital zircons and global mapping of basement rocks shows that the length of continental arcs in the Cretaceous was more than twice that in the mid-Cenozoic; maps also show many of these arcs intersected crustal carbonates. The increased length of continental arc magmatism coincided with increased oceanic spreading rates, placing convergent margins into compression, which favors continental arcs. Around 50 Ma, however, nearly all the continental arcs in Eurasia and North America terminated as India collided with Eurasia and the western Pacific rolled back, initiating the Marianas-Tonga-Kermadec intra-oceanic subduction complex and possibly leading to a decrease in global CO2 production. Meanwhile, extinct continental arcs continued to erode, resulting in regionally enhanced chemical weathering unsupported by magmatic fluxes of CO2. Continental arcs, during their magmatic lifetimes, are thus a source of CO2, driving

  12. Numerical and experimental study of heat transfers in an arc plasma. Application to TIG arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The arc welding is used for many industrial applications, especially GTA welding. Given the excellent quality of the produced welds, GTA welding is used for the majority of the interventions (repairs, joined sealing) on the French nuclear park. This work is part of a project carried out by EDF R and D which aims to simulate the whole process and builds a tool able to predict the welds quality. In this study, we focus on the development of a predictive model of the exchanged heat flux at the arc - work piece interface, responsible of the work piece fusion. The modeling of the arc plasma using the electric module of the hydrodynamics software Code Saturne R developed by EDF R and D is required. Two types of experimental tests are jointly carried out to validate this numerical model: i) on density and temperature measurements of plasma by atomic emission spectroscopy and ii) on the evaluation of the heat transfers on the work piece surface. This work also aims at demonstrate that the usual method of using an equivalent thermal source to model the welding process, can be replaced by our plasma model, without the numerous trials inherent to the usual method. (author)

  13. Carboniferous rifted arcs leading to an archipelago of multiple arcs in the Beishan-Tianshan orogenic collages (NW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Ji'en; Zhang, Zhiyong; Song, Dongfang

    2017-10-01

    The Beishan and East Tianshan Orogenic Collages in the southernmost Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) record the final stages of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. These collages and their constituent arcs have an important significance for resolving current controversies regarding their tectonic setting and age, consequent accretionary history of the southern CAOB, and the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. In this paper, we present our work on the southern Mazongshan arc and the northern Hongyanjing Basin in the Beishan Orogenic Collage (BOC), and our comparison with the Bogda arc and associated basins in the East Tianshan Orogenic Collage. Field relationships indicate that the Pochengshan fault defines the boundary between the arc and basin in the BOC. Volcanic rocks including basalts and rhyolites in the Mazongshan arc have bimodal calc-alkaline characteristics, an enrichment in large ion lithophile elements such as Rb, Ba, and Pb and depletion in high field-strength elements (e.g., Nb and Ta), which were probably developed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. We suggest that these bimodal calc-alkaline volcanic rocks formed in rifted arcs instead of post-orogenic rifts with mantle plume inputs. By making detailed geochemical comparisons between the Mazongshan arc and the Bogda arc to the west, we further propose that they are similar and both formed in arc rifts, and helped generate a Carboniferous archipelago of multiple arcs in the southern Paleo-Asian Ocean. These data and ideas enable us to postulate a new model for the tectonic evolution of the southern CAOB.

  14. The occurrence and damage of unipolar arcing on fuzzy tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aussems, D.U.B., E-mail: d.aussems@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, NL-3430 BE (Netherlands); Nishijima, D.; Brandt, C. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Meiden, H.J. van der [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, NL-3430 BE (Netherlands); Vilémová, M.; Matějíček, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-IPP, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, NL-3430 BE (Netherlands); Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Lopes Cardozo, N.J. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    This research investigated whether unipolar arcing in the divertor of fusion reactors is a potential cause for enhanced wear of the divertor. It was found that 1 μm of nano-fuzz growth is sufficient to initiate arcing, mainly depending on the sheath potential drop and electron density. The average mass loss rate induced by the arc was determined from mass loss measurements and found to be consistent with the value estimated from the arc current. The average arc track erosion depth was estimated by using the measured mass loss and damaged surface area and was found to be one tenth of the fuzzy layer thickness. Due to melting of the fuzzy structures the actual depth is larger and some arc tracks occasionally appeared to even reach the bulk beyond the fuzzy layer. The conclusion of this study is therefore that arcing in the divertor of future tokamaks (e.g. ITER) potentially is an important cause for surface damage and plasma pollution.

  15. Investigation of pellet acceleration by an arc heated gas gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.; Andersen, S.A.; Bundgaard, J.; Baekmark, L.; Hansen, B.H.; Jensen, V.O.; Kossek, H.; Michelsen, P.K.; Nordskov, A.; Sass, B.; Soerensen, H.; Weisberg, K.V.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work on pellet acceleration by means of an arc heated gas gun. The work is a continuation of the work described in RISO-M-2536. The aim of the work is to obtain velocities well above 2 km/s for 3.2 mm diameter deuterium pellets. By means of a cryogenic arc chamber in which the hydrogen propellant is pre-condensed, extruded deutetrium pellets are accelerated up to a maximum velocity of 1.93 km/s. When increasing the energy input to the arc in order to increase the pellet velocity further the heat input to the extrusion/punching pellet loading mechanism was found to be critical: preparation of pellets became difficult and cooling times between shots became inconveniently long. In order to circumvent this problems the concept of a room temperature hydrogen propellant pellet fed arc chamber was proposed. Preliminary results from acceleration of polyurethane pellets with this arc chamber are described as well as the work of developing of feed pellet guns for this chamber. Finally the report describes design consideration for a high pressure propellant pellet fed arc chamber together with preliminary results obtained with a proto-type arc chamber. (author)

  16. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360 o arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  17. Studies of pellet acceleration with arc discharge heated propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuresko, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    An arc discharge has been utilized to heat gaseous propellants in a pneumatic pellet gun. A cylindrical arc chamber is interposed between the propellant inlet valve and the gun breech and fitted with a ceramic insert for generating swirl in the incoming gas stream. The arc is initiated after the propellant valve opens and the breech pressure starts to rise; a typical discharge lasts 300 microseconds with peak currents up to 2 kA at arc voltages ranging from 100-400 V. The system is instrumented with piezoelectric pressure transducers at the propellant valve outlet, gun breech, and gun muzzle. The gun has been operated with 4 mm diameter polyurethane foam pellets (density = 0.14 g/cm 3 ), a 40 cm-long barrel, and various gas propellants at pressures exceeding 70 bar. At I/sub arc/ = 1 kA, V/sub arc/ = 200 V, with helium propellant, the arc produces a 2-3 fold prompt increase in P/sub breech/ and a delayed increase in P/sub muzzle/; the pellets exit the gun from 0.5-1.0 ms earlier than with the gas alone at 40% higher speeds. Comparisons with the so-called ideal gun theory and with full one-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the pellet acceleration will be presented

  18. Replicability and 40-Year Predictive Power of Childhood ARC Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Goldberg, Lewis R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined three questions surrounding the Undercontrolled, Overcontrolled, and Resilient--or Asendorpf-Robins-Caspi (ARC)--personality types originally identified by Block (1971). In analyses of the teacher personality assessments of over 2,000 children in 1st through 6th grade in 1959-1967, and follow-up data on general and cardiovascular health outcomes in over 1,100 adults recontacted 40 years later, we found: (1) Bootstrapped internal replication clustering suggested that Big Five scores were best characterized by a tripartite cluster structure corresponding to the ARC types; (2) this cluster structure was fuzzy, rather than discrete, indicating that ARC constructs are best represented as gradients of similarity to three prototype Big Five profiles; and (3) ARC types and degrees of ARC prototypicality showed associations with multiple health outcomes 40 years later. ARC constructs were more parsimonious, but neither better nor more consistent predictors than the dimensional Big Five traits. Forty-year incident cases of heart disease could be correctly identified with 68% accuracy by personality information alone, a figure approaching the 12-year accuracy of a leading medical cardiovascular risk model. Findings support the theoretical validity of ARC constructs, their treatment as continua of prototypicality rather than discrete categories, and the need for further understanding the robust predictive power of childhood personality traits for mid-life health. PMID:21744975

  19. Studies of pellet acceleration with arc discharge heated propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuresko, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    An arc discharge has been utilized to heat gaseous propellants in a pneumatic pellet gun. A cylindrical arc chamber is interposed between the propellant inlet valve and the gun breech and fitted with a ceramic insert for generating swirl in the incoming gas stream. The arc is initiated after the propellant valve opens and the breech pressure starts to rise; a typical discharge lasts 300 microseconds with peak currents u to 2 kA at arc voltages ranging from 100 to 400 V. The system is instrumented with piezoelectric pressure transducers at the propellant valve outlet, gun breech, and gun muzzle. The gun has been operated with 4 mm diameter polyurethane foam pellets (density = 0.14 g/cm 3 ), a 40 cm-long barrel, and various gas propellants at pressures exceeding 70 bar. At I/sub arc/ = 1 kA, V/sub arc/ = 200 V, with helium propellant, the arc produces a 2 to 3 fold prompt increase in P/sub breech/ and a delayed increase in P/sub muzzle/; the pellets exit the gun from 0.5 to 1.0 ms earlier than with the gas alone at 40% higher speeds. Comparisons with the so-called ideal gun theory and with full one-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the pellet acceleration will be presented

  20. The occurrence and damage of unipolar arcing on fuzzy tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aussems, D.U.B.; Nishijima, D.; Brandt, C.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Vilémová, M.; Matějíček, J.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R.P.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated whether unipolar arcing in the divertor of fusion reactors is a potential cause for enhanced wear of the divertor. It was found that 1 μm of nano-fuzz growth is sufficient to initiate arcing, mainly depending on the sheath potential drop and electron density. The average mass loss rate induced by the arc was determined from mass loss measurements and found to be consistent with the value estimated from the arc current. The average arc track erosion depth was estimated by using the measured mass loss and damaged surface area and was found to be one tenth of the fuzzy layer thickness. Due to melting of the fuzzy structures the actual depth is larger and some arc tracks occasionally appeared to even reach the bulk beyond the fuzzy layer. The conclusion of this study is therefore that arcing in the divertor of future tokamaks (e.g. ITER) potentially is an important cause for surface damage and plasma pollution

  1. Schizophrenia: What's Arc Got to Do with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managò, Francesca; Papaleo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Human studies of schizophrenia are now reporting a previously unidentified genetic convergence on postsynaptic signaling complexes such as the activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated (Arc) gene. However, because this evidence is still very recent, the neurobiological implication of Arc in schizophrenia is still scattered and unrecognized. Here, we first review current and developing findings connecting Arc in schizophrenia. We then highlight recent and previous findings from preclinical mouse models that elucidate how Arc genetic modifications might recapitulate schizophrenia-relevant behavioral phenotypes following the novel Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework. Building on this, we finally compare and evaluate several lines of evidence demonstrating that Arc genetics can alter both glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems in a very selective way, again consistent with molecular alterations characteristic of schizophrenia. Despite being only initial, accumulating and compelling data are showing that Arc might be one of the primary biological players in schizophrenia. Synaptic plasticity alterations in the genetic architecture of psychiatric disorders might be a rule, not an exception. Thus, we anticipate that additional evidence will soon emerge to clarify the Arc-dependent mechanisms involved in the psychiatric-related dysfunctional behavior.

  2. INFLUENCE OF VACUUM ARC PLASMA EVAPORATOR CATHODE GEOMETRY OF ON VALUE OF ADMISSIBLE ARC DISCHARGE CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ivanou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of main design parameters that determine a level of droplet formation intensity at the generating stage of plasma flow has been given in the paper. The paper considers the most widely used designs of water cooled consumable cathodes. Ti or Ti–Si and Fe–Cr alloys have been taken as a material for cathodes. The following calculated data: average ionic charge Zi for titanium plasma +1.6; for «titanium–silicon plasma» +1.2, an electronic discharge 1.6022 ⋅ 10–19 C, an ion velocity vi = 2 ⋅ 104 m/s, an effective volt energy equivalent of heat flow diverted in the cathode Uк = 12 V, temperature of erosion cathode surface Тп = 550 К; temperature of the cooled cathode surface То = 350 К have been accepted in order to determine dependence of a maximum admissible arc discharge current on cathode height. The calculations have been carried out for various values of the cathode heights hк (from 0.02 to 0.05 m. Diameter of a target cathode is equal to 0.08 m for a majority of technological plasma devices, therefore, the area of the erosion surface is S = 0.005 m2.A thickness selection for a consumable target cathode part in the vacuum arc plasma source has been justified in the paper. The thickness ensures formation of minimum drop phase in the plasma flow during arc cathode material evaporation. It has been shown that a maximum admissible current of an arc discharge is practically equal to the minimum current of stable arcing when thickness of the consumable cathode part is equal to 0.05 m. The admissible discharge current can be rather significant and ensure high productivity during coating process with formation of relatively low amount of droplet phase in the coating at small values of hк.

  3. 3D Numerical Analysis of the Arc Plasma Behavior in a Submerged DC Electric Arc Furnace for the Production of Fused MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhen; Wang Ninghui; Li Tie; Cao Yong

    2012-01-01

    A three dimensional steady-state magnetohydrodynamic model is developed for the arc plasma in a DC submerged electric arc furnace for the production of fused MgO. The arc is generated in a small semi-enclosed space formed by the graphite electrode, the molten bath and unmelted raw materials. The model is first used to solve a similar problem in a steel making furnace, and the calculated results are found to be in good agreement with the published measurements. The behavior of arcs with different arc lengths is also studied in the furnace for MgO production. From the distribution of the arc pressure on the bath surface it is shown that the arc plasma impingement is large enough to cause a crater-like depression on the surface of the MgO bath. The circulation of the high temperature air under the electrode may enhance the arc efficiency, especially for a shorter arc.

  4. Variation in forearc basin development along the Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, W.

    The present forearc basin configuration along the Sunda Arc initially appears to have been controlled by extension and differential subsidence of basement blocks in response to the late Eocene collision of India with Asia. The late Oligocene increase in convergence between the South-east Asian and Indian Plates associated with a new pulse of subduction, resulted in basement uplift and the formation of a regional unconformity that can be recognized along the entire Sunda Arc. From the early to late Miocene, the Sumba and Savu forearc sectors along the eastern Sunda Arc may have been characterized by forearc extension. Submarine fan deposition on the arcward side of the evolving accretionary prism represents the first phase in forearc basin deposition. These fans were subsequently covered by basin and slope sediments derived from the evolving magmatic arc. Structural response to increased late Miocene compression varied along strike of the Sunda Arc. North of Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa, the incipient collision between Australia and the western Banda Arc caused back-arc thrusting and basin inversion. Towards the south of Java, an increase in both the size of the accretionary prism and convergence rates resulted in uplift and large scale folding of the outer forearc basin strata. Along the west coast of Sumatra, increased compression resulted in uplift along the inner side of the forearc along older transcurrent faults. Uplift of West Sumatra was followed by the deposition of a westward prograding sequence of terrigenous sediments that resulted in the development of a broad shelf. Initial forearc basin subsidence relates to the age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, on top of which the basin is situated. Along the western Sunda Arc, both fexural loading of the evolving accretionary prism, and across arc strike-slip faulting represent additional factors that result in forearc subsidence.

  5. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic continental arcs in the North American Cordillera were examined here to establish a baseline model for Phanerozoic continent formation. We combine new trace-element data on lower crustal xenoliths from the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith with an extensive grid-based geochemical map of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith, the southern equivalent of the Sierras. Collectively, these observations give a three-dimensional view of the crust, which permits the petrogenesis and tectonics of Phanerozoic crust formation to be linked in space and time. Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America during the Triassic to early Cretaceous was characterized by trench retreat and slab rollback because old and cold oceanic lithosphere was being subducted. This generated an extensional subduction zone, which created fringing island arcs just off the Paleozoic continental margin. However, as the age of the Farallon plate at the time of subduction decreased, the extensional environment waned, allowing the fringing island arc to accrete onto the continental margin. With continued subduction, a continental arc was born and a progressively more compressional environment developed as the age of subducting slab continued to young. Refinement into a felsic crust occurred after accretion, that is, during the continental arc stage, wherein a thickened crustal and lithospheric column permitted a longer differentiation column. New basaltic arc magmas underplate and intrude the accreted terrane, suture, and former continental margin. Interaction of these basaltic magmas with pre-existing crust and lithospheric mantle created garnet pyroxenitic mafic cumulates by fractional crystallization at depth as well as gabbroic and garnet pyroxenitic restites at shallower levels by melting of pre-existing lower crust. The complementary felsic plutons formed by these deep-seated differentiation processes rose into the upper crust, stitching together the accreted terrane, suture and former

  6. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, an external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  7. Arc tracking energy balance for copper and aluminum aeronautic cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, T; Valensi, F; Teulet, P; Cressault, Y; Zink, T; Caussé, R

    2017-01-01

    Arc tracking tests have been carried out between two voluntarily damaged aeronautic cables. Copper or aluminum conductors have been exposed to short circuits under alternating current. Various data have been recorded (arc voltage and current, radiated power and ablated mass), enabling to determine a power balance, in which every contribution is estimated. The total power is mainly transferred to the cables (between 50 and 65%, depending on the current and the cable type), and causes the melting and partial vaporization of the metallic core and insulating material, or is conducted or radiated. The other part is deposited into the arc column, being either radiated, convected or conducted. (paper)

  8. Heat transfers in a low-pressure arc-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudeck, M [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 92 - Meudon-Bellevue (France); Kaminska, A [Politechnika Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    1995-03-01

    In the framework of low-pressure arc-jet applications to thermodynamical condition simulation for reentry vehicles at hypersonic speed, an analytical study has been carried out concerning the thermodynamical conditions of a plasma in an arc-source for plasmatron usual operating conditions. After a review of gas physical properties, the gas flow in the plasmatron with a divergent nozzle is modelled; temperature profiles in the arc and in the divergent and the wall heat flux are then computed. Results are given. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Tuning the arcs of the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.; Bambade, P.; Barklow, T.; Brown, K.L.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.L.; Fischer, G.E.; Hutton, A.; Jung, C.; Kheifets, S.A.; Komamiya, S.; Mattison, T.; Murray, J.J.; Phinney, N.; Ritson, D.M.; Sands, M.; Sheppard, J.C.; Spence, W.; Toge, N.; Weinstein, A.; Haissinski, J.; Placidi, M.

    1988-01-01

    New experience with the operation of the SLC Arcs is described. Each of these Arcs consists of sequential second-order achromats. Initial measurements showed that the betatron phase advances were systematically offset from the design values. This effect, combined with the abrupt rolls of the achromats needed to follow the local terrain, led to strong cross-plane coupling and to growth of the betatron oscillations. The methods and modifications developed to establish proper operation of the Arcs are described in this paper

  10. Electron temperature measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Manabu; Tashiro, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    In order to make clear the physical grounds of deviations from LTE (Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) in the atmospheric helium TIG arcs electron temperature and LTE temperature obtained from electron number density were measured by using of line-profile analysis of the laser scattering method without an assumption of LTE. The experimental results showed that in comparison with the argon TIG arcs, the region where a deviation from LTE occurs tends to expand in higher arc current because the plasma reaches the similar state to LTE within shorter distance from the cathode due to the slower cathode jet velocity

  11. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  12. Etching Effect of an Atmospheric DC Arc Plasmatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Se Min; Kim, Ji Hun; Kang, In Je; Lee, Heon Ju

    2010-01-01

    Thermal plasmas (especially arc plasma) were extensively industrialized, principally by aeronautic sector. Cold plasma technologies have been developed in the microelectronics but their vacuum equipment limits their implantation. Plasmas used in dry etching, thin film deposition and surface treatment for display or semiconductor industries are operating at low pressures in very costly due to the use of vacuum equipment and vacuum components. Use of DC arc plasmatrons in welding, soldering, and cutting of metals is well known. A DC-arc plasmatron with high durability was reported to be a suitable device for etching silicon and photo-resist surfaces

  13. Energy Balance in DC Arc Plasma Melting Furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Peng; Meng Yuedong; Yu Xinyao; Chen Longwei; Jiang Yiman; Nie Guohua; Chen Mingzhou

    2009-01-01

    In order to treat hazardous municipal solid waste incinerator's (MSWI) fly ash, a new DC arc plasma furnace was developed. Taking an arc of 100 V/1000 A DC as an example, the heat transfer characteristics of the DC arc plasma, ablation of electrodes, heat properties of the fly ash during melting, heat transfer characteristics of the flue gas, and heat loss of the furnace were analyzed based on the energy conservation law, so as to achieve the total heat information and energy balance during plasma processing, and to provide a theoretical basis for an optimized design of the structure and to improve energy efficiency. (plasma technology)

  14. Busbar arcs at large fusion magnets: Conductor to feeder tube arcing model experiments with the LONGARC device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry.klimenko@kit.edu; Pasler, Volker

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The LONGARC device was successfully implemented for busbar to feeder tubes arcing model experiments. •Arcing at an ITER busbar inside its feeder tube was simulated in scaled model experiments. •The narrower half tubes imply a slight increase of the arc propagation speed in compare to full tube experiments. •All simulated half tubes experiments show severe damage indicating that the ITER inner feeder tube will not withstand a busbar arc. -- Abstract: Electric arcs moving along the power cables (the so-called busbars) of the toroidal field (TF) coils of ITER may reach and penetrate the cryostat wall. Model experiments with the new LONGARC device continue the VACARC (VACuum ARC) experiments that were initiated to investigate the propagation and destruction mechanisms of busbar arcs in small scale [1]. The experiments are intended to support the development and validation of a numerical model. LONGARC overcomes the space limitations inside VACARC and allows also for advanced 1:3 (vs. ITER full scale) model setups. The LONGARC device and first results are presented below.

  15. Various Characteristics of Electromagnetic Contactor when Arc Discharge are Generated only Make Arc(Researches and Overseas Activities)--(Reports of Overseas Activities)

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyoshi, Yoshida

    2017-01-01

    Experiments are carried out to clarify the influence on the current and voltage for various characteristics.A small electromagnetic contactor that has two contacts is used.The arc discharge with only a make arc is generated and various characteristics are measured.Source voltage is set to 100V DC, closed contacts currents are changed from 10A 20A and 30A.From the waveforms, the arc duration time and the bounce time are read out.Arc energy is calculated from the arc voltage and arc current.The...

  16. Magmatic sulphides in Quaternary Ecuadorian arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgatou, Ariadni; Chiaradia, Massimo; Rezeau, Hervé; Wälle, Markus

    2018-01-01

    New petrographic and geochemical data on magmatic sulphide inclusions (MSIs) are presented and discussed for 15 Quaternary volcanic centers of the Ecuadorian frontal, main and back volcanic arc. MSIs occur mostly in Fe-Ti oxides (magnetite and/or magnetite-ilmenite pair) and to a lesser extent in silicate minerals (amphibole, plagioclase, and pyroxene). MSIs are present in all volcanic centers ranging in composition from basalt to dacite (SiO2 = 50-67 wt.%), indicating that sulphide saturation occurs at various stages of magmatic evolution and independently from the volcano location along the volcanic arc. MSIs also occur in dioritic, gabbroic and hornblenditic magmatic enclaves of the volcanic rocks. MSIs display variable sizes (1-30 μm) and shapes (globular, ellipsoidal, angular, irregular) and occur mostly as polymineralic inclusions composed of Fe-rich and Cu-poor (pyrrhotite) and Cu-rich (mostly chalcopyrite) phases. Aerial sulphide relative abundances range from 0.3 to 7 ppm in volcanic host rocks and from 13 to 24 ppm in magmatic enclaves. Electron microprobe analyses of MSIs indicate maximum metal contents of Cu = 65.7 wt.%, Fe = 65.2 wt.%, Ni = 10.1 wt.% for those hosted in the volcanic rocks and of Cu = 57.7 wt.%, Fe = 60.9 wt.%, Ni = 5.1 wt.%, for those hosted in magmatic enclaves. Relationships of the sulphide chemistry to the host whole rock chemistry show that with magmatic differentiation (e.g., increasing SiO2) the Cu and Ni content of sulphides decrease whereas the Fe and S contents increase. The opposite behavior is observed with the increase of Cu in the whole rock, because the latter is anti-correlated with the SiO2 whole rock content. Laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of MSIs returned maximum values of PGEs and noble metals of Pd = 30 ppm, Rh = 8.1 ppm, Ag = 92.8 ppm and Au = 0.6 ppm and Pd = 43 ppm, Rh = 22.6 ppm, Ag = 89 ppm and Au = 1 ppm for those hosted in volcanic rocks and magmatic enclaves, respectively. These PGE contents display a

  17. Programmable segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy for respiratory coordination in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jian-Kuen; Wu, Chien-Jang; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    We programmably divided long-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) into split short arcs, each taking less than 30 s for respiratory coordination. The VMAT plans of five pancreatic cancer patients were modified; the short-arc plans had negligible dose differences and satisfied the 3%/3-mm gamma index on a MapCHECK-2 device.

  18. Evidence that polar cap arcs occur on open field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.; Mullen, E.G.; Redus, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of polar cap arc occurrence are reviewed to show that the assumption of a closed magnetospheric magnetic field topology at very high latitudes when the IMF B z is strongly northward is difficult to reconcile with a wide variety of observational and theoretical considerations. In particular, we consider the implications of observations of particle entry for high and low energy electrons, magnetic flux conservation between the near and far tail, the time sequencing in polar cap arcs events, and the hemispherical differences in polar cap arc observations. These points can be explained either by excluding the need for a major topological magnetic field change from explanations of polar cap arc dynamics, or by assuming a long-tailed magnetosphere for all IMF orientations in which magnetic field lines eventually merge with solar wind field lines in either a smooth or a patchy fashion. (author)

  19. Micro-cathode Arc Thruster PhoneSat Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Micro-cathode Arc Thruster Phonesat Experiment  was a joint project between George Washington University and NASA Ames Research Center that successfully...

  20. Arc plasma devices: Evolving mechanical design from numerical

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A recipe for obtaining mechanical design of arc plasma devices from numerical ... to the plasma of the mixture of molecular gases like nitrogen and oxygen. ... Temperature field, associated fluid dynamics and electrical characteristics of a ...

  1. 24 arc-second Kenai Peninsula Bororugh Alaska Elevation Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 24 arc-second Kenai Peninsula Bororugh Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 24 second resolution in geographic coordinates....

  2. MAGNETIC ARC WELDING STABILIZATION USING NON-CONSUMABLE ELECTRODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Павло Юрійович Сидоренко

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of development torch to magnetically operated   welding arc are defined. Changing the design of the electrode unit is provided the ability to create within the area of the arc magnetic field and induction given configuration without additional equipment. The features of the arc in an axial magnetic field which make it possible to avoid the welding process of unsteady abnormalities resulted in the inappropriate formation of defects in welds. Significant increase in the depth of  weld penetration is connected with the more concentrated magnetically operated   welding arc transmission energy to the product. It is concluded about the feasibility of using a designed torch for the implementation of modern technological processes non-consumable electrode welding.

  3. Bermuda 3 arc-second Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Bermuda DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM encompasses the islands of Bermuda...

  4. ARC EMCS Experiments (Seedling Growth-2) Experiment Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, David; Steele, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of the status of the ARC ISS (International Space Station) Experiment, Seedling Growth-2 to the Payload Operations Investigator Working Group meeting at MSFC, Huntsville AL. The experiment employs the European Modular Cultivation System (ECMS).

  5. A Note on the Teaching of Arc Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the Aba P. Lerner alternative for calculating arc elasticity is superior to the commonly used mean prices and quantities method typically used in intermediate microeconomics courses. (JDH)

  6. Bermuda 1 arc-second Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Bermuda DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM encompasses the islands of Bermuda...

  7. British Columbia 3 arc-second Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second British Columbia DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM covers the coastal area...

  8. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  9. The interaction of vacuum arcs with magnetic fields and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.G.; Kimblin, C.W.; Slade, P.G.; Voshall, R.E.; Wien, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Vacuum arc/magnetic field interactions are reviewed and extended. An axial magnetic field (parallel to current flow) produces a stable and diffuse vacuum arc. These properties have been used to build a reliable dc switch for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Princeton. The switching duty for this Ohmic Heating Interrupter involves repetitive interruption of 24kA dc against a 27kV recovery voltage. A transverse magnetic field (perpendicular to current flow) produces an unstable arc with an ensuing high arc voltage. This property has been used to complete a metallic return transfer breaker for the Pacific HVDC Intertie, here the switching duty involves interruption of currents up to 2200A dc against an 80kV recovery voltage

  10. Upgraded vacuum arc ion source for metal ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources have been made and used by a large number of research groups around the world over the past twenty years. The first generation of vacuum arc ion sources (dubbed ''Mevva,'' for metal vapor vacuum arc) was developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1980s. This paper considers the design, performance parameters, and some applications of a new modified version of this kind of source which we have called Mevva-V.Ru. The source produces broad beams of metal ions at an extraction voltage of up to 60 kV and a time-averaged ion beam current in the milliampere range. Here, we describe the Mevva-V.Ru vacuum arc ion source that we have developed at Tomsk and summarize its beam characteristics along with some of the applications to which we have put it. We also describe the source performance using compound cathodes.

  11. Investigation of Vacuum Arc Voltage Characteristics Under Different Axial Magnetic Field Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Shenli; Song Xiaochuan; Huo Xintao; Shi Zongqian; Wang Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of the arc voltage under different profiles of axial magnetic field were investigated experimentally in a detachable vacuum chamber with five pairs of specially designed electrodes generating both bell-shaped and saddle-shaped magnetic field profile. The arc column and cathode spot images were photographed by a high speed digital camera. The dependence of the arc voltage on arcing evolution is analyzed. It is indicated that the axial magnetic field profile could affect the arc behaviors significantly, and the arc voltage is closely related to the arc light intensity.

  12. Modelling vacuum arcs : from plasma initiation to surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timko, H.

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of vacuum arcs is desirable in many of today's 'big science' projects including linear colliders, fusion devices, and satellite systems. For the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design, radio-frequency (RF) breakdowns occurring in accelerating cavities influence efficiency optimisation and cost reduction issues. Studying vacuum arcs both theoretically as well as experimentally under well-defined and reproducible direct-current (DC) conditions is the first step towards exploring RF breakdowns. In this thesis, we have studied Cu DC vacuum arcs with a combination of experiments, a particle-in-cell (PIC) model of the arc plasma, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the subsequent surface damaging mechanism. We have also developed the 2D Arc-PIC code and the physics model incorporated in it, especially for the purpose of modelling the plasma initiation in vacuum arcs. Assuming the presence of a field emitter at the cathode initially, we have identified the conditions for plasma formation and have studied the transitions from field emission stage to a fully developed arc. The 'footing' of the plasma is the cathode spot that supplies the arc continuously with particles; the high-density core of the plasma is located above this cathode spot. Our results have shown that once an arc plasma is initiated, and as long as energy is available, the arc is self-maintaining due to the plasma sheath that ensures enhanced field emission and sputtering.The plasma model can already give an estimate on how the time-to-breakdown changes with the neutral evaporation rate, which is yet to be determined by atomistic simulations. Due to the non-linearity of the problem, we have also performed a code-to-code comparison. The reproducibility of plasma behaviour and time-to-breakdown with independent codes increased confidence in the results presented here. Our MD simulations identified high-flux, high-energy ion bombardment as a possible mechanism forming the early

  13. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  14. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  15. An ArcGIS decision support tool for artificial reefs site selection (ArcGIS ARSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Stavros; Zodiatis, George

    2017-04-01

    Although the use and benefits of artificial reefs, both socio-economic and environmental, have been recognized with research and national development programmes worldwide their development is rarely subjected to a rigorous site selection process and the majority of the projects use the traditional (non-GIS) approach, based on trial and error mode. Recent studies have shown that the use of Geographic Information Systems, unlike to traditional methods, for the identification of suitable areas for artificial reefs siting seems to offer a number of distinct advantages minimizing possible errors, time and cost. A decision support tool (DSS) has been developed based on the existing knowledge, the multi-criteria decision analysis techniques and the GIS approach used in previous studies in order to help the stakeholders to identify the optimal locations for artificial reefs deployment on the basis of the physical, biological, oceanographic and socio-economic features of the sites. The tool provides to the users the ability to produce a final report with the results and suitability maps. The ArcGIS ARSS support tool runs within the existing ArcMap 10.2.x environment and for the development the VB .NET high level programming language has been used along with ArcObjects 10.2.x. Two local-scale case studies were conducted in order to test the application of the tool focusing on artificial reef siting. The results obtained from the case studies have shown that the tool can be successfully integrated within the site selection process in order to select objectively the optimal site for artificial reefs deployment.

  16. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler–Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained. -- Highlights: ► Increasing arc current will increase the coupling arc temperature. ► Arc length seldom affects the peak temperature of the coupling arc. ► Increasing arc length will increase the extension of temperature near the anode. ► Increasing distance will decrease temperatures in the central part of the arc.

  17. Evaporative behavior of carbon with MPD Arc Jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukegawa, Toshio; Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Using the Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arc Jet (MPD Arc Jet) device, the plasma-material interaction during simulated plasma disruption was experimentally investigated. To clarify the effects of the evaporation, the isotropic graphite was used as a target. The thermal conductivity of the isotropic graphite was much higher than that of the pyrolytic graphite, resulting in smaller evaporation. The light intensity distribution during the simulated disruption for the isotropic graphite was quite different from that for the pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  18. Preparing for War Moscow Facing an Arc of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    reflect on Russian strategy making and the emer- gency measures being implemented by the Russian leadership. It suggests that the sense of urgency in...The war in Ukraine and Russia’s intervention in Syria, combined with its extensive program of exercising for war, lends policy urgency to this...Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmus- sen called an “arc of crisis” around the alliance,5 an arc that also includes serious challenges such as Islamic

  19. An observation of ionospheric convection and auroral arc motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, J.H.; Mende, S.B.; Robinson, R.M.; Swenson, G.R.; Valladares, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    An all-sky imager operated at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland has been used to make auroral measurements in correlation with data from the incoherent scatter radar. Reviewing the images as movie sequences with an apparent time compression ratio of 60 allows the eye to discern features which are not apparent in the individual frames. The faint 630 nm airglow background lying poleward of the bright auroral oval arcs appears to be structured in the time lapse observations and drifting at a uniform rate. Analysis of the motion of the airglow structures shows excellent agreement with Doppler radar measurement of the ion drift velocities. Electron density profiles derived from the radar data corroborate the existence of high altitude F-region ionization enhancements. The electron temperature in the patches was about 1,000 K and no higher than outside of the patch signifying that the patches were not produced by local soft electron precipitation. According to the radar Doppler data there was a small component of the drift velocity parallel to the arc at either side of the auroral boundary. The sense of those small components was consistent with drifts driven by a convergent electric field which would also produce an up going field aligned current. The larger component of drift velocity perpendicular to the arc appeared to be continuous on either side of the arc. This drift component shows the existence of an electric field parallel to the arc, showing that the arc was not on an equipotential. During the observations the arc moved slowly in the opposite sense to the ion drift, signifying that the auroral arc motion is not driven by the electric field impressed on the atmosphere by the magnetosphere. Calculations of the expected intensity of the 630 nm emissions are in good agreement with the measured intensities of the moving patches

  20. On generalization of electric field strength in longitudinally blown arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Yas'ko, O.I.; Esipchuk, A.M.; Qing, Z.; Schram, D.C.; Fauchais, P.

    1997-01-01

    Generalization of av. elec. field strength for different discharge conditions in longitudinally blown arcs is considered. Exptl. data for distinctive devices and different gases were used for phys. modeling. Anal. showed that heat transfer processes are responsible for I-E characteristic formation. Turbulent heat transfer is the most effective for atm. pressure discharges while convection plays the main role in vacuum arcs. A generalized I-E characteristic was obtained. [on SciFinder (R)

  1. Tomographic imaging of subducted lithosphere below northwest Pacific island arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Hilst, R.; Engdahl, R.; Spakman, W.; Nolet, G.

    1991-01-01

    The seismic tomography problem does not have a unique solution, and published tomographic images have been equivocal with regard to the deep structure of subducting slabs. An improved tomographic method, using a more realistic background Earth model and surf ace-reflected as well as direct seismic phases, shows that slabs beneath the Japan and Izu Bonin island arcs are deflected at the boundary between upper and lower mantle, whereas those beneath the northern Kuril and Mariana arcs sink into the lower mantle.

  2. A Viral (Arc)hive for Metazoan Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Nicholas F; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2018-01-11

    Arc, a master regulator of synaptic plasticity, contains sequence elements that are evolutionarily related to retrotransposon Gag genes. Two related papers in this issue of Cell show that Arc retains retroviral-like capsid-forming ability and can transmit mRNA between cells in the nervous system, a process that may be important for synaptic function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Computer-integrated electric-arc melting process control system

    OpenAIRE

    Дёмин, Дмитрий Александрович

    2014-01-01

    Developing common principles of completing melting process automation systems with hardware and creating on their basis rational choices of computer- integrated electricarc melting control systems is an actual task since it allows a comprehensive approach to the issue of modernizing melting sites of workshops. This approach allows to form the computer-integrated electric-arc furnace control system as part of a queuing system “electric-arc furnace - foundry conveyor” and consider, when taking ...

  4. The use of rotating electric arc for spherical particle production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, I.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents and experimental device designed to obtain spherical particles by mans of a rotating electric arc. A rotation frequency of the electric arc of 750 s''-1, a voltage of 50 V(dc) and a current of 100 A was used. The mass flow rate was 3 g.min''-1. Under these conditions particles of 15 to 20 μm in diameter were obtained. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, Staffan A., E-mail: staffan.qvist@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley (United States); Hellesen, Carl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Thiele, Roman [Division of Reactor Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Dubberley, Allen E. [General Electric Advanced Reactor Systems Department (retired), Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Gradecka, Malwina; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Here we define the principles of the operation and design of ARC systems. • ARC systems can provide inherent safety during and following unprotected transients. • A manufacturing and assembly method was developed and presented. - Abstract: The Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure inherent safety performance of Generation-IV reactors while having a minimal impact on reactor performance and economic viability. Here we present in detail the principles of how the ARC system operates, what materials should be used, what components make up the system and how they are interconnected. The relevant equations regarding how to design the system for a certain response are developed and defined, and the most important aspects determining the speed of actuation of the systems are analyzed. Thus, this study serves as the general reference material for all of the fundamental principles behind the ARC idea. Finally, we present a step-by-step guide to how a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an ARC system installed would be manufactured, using a full 3D-CAD model. For an ARC installation in a 1000 MWth sodium-cooled oxide-fueled fast reactor core, the system constitutes a relatively minor adjustment to a typical fuel assembly, increasing its total axial extent by ∼5–10% and the total primary coolant pressure drop by ∼1%. The main finding of this study is that it is possible to design, manufacture (using existing methods) and implement ARC systems in the fuel assemblies of fast reactor cores to provide inherent safety in all anticipated unprotected transients with only a modest increase in the length of the assembly and the pressure drop across the core.

  6. 1000-kVA arc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.E.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Because of ever-increasing power demands for the development of the Oak Ridge duoPIGatron ion source, a continuous-duty arc power supply was constructed for the Medium Energy Test Facility (METF) to furnish power for the plasma generator of experimental ion sources. The power supply utilizes 12-pulse rectification with half-wave switching in a delta and wye full-wave bridge that may be connected in series or parallel. It will deliver 340 V dc, 2500 A to an ion source when series connected and 170 V dc, 5000 A when paralleled connected. Silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCR) in each rectifier bridge can be switched for pulses as short as 10 ms through continuous duty. The filter section that reduces the ripple in the output consists of an inductor-to-capacitor (L-C) filter to smooth the 720-Hz pulses. The power transformer serves as an isolation transformer allowing the secondary to be elevated to the accelerating potential of the ion source. The dc output level is controlled with a 1000-kVA auto transformer connected to the primary of the power transformer. All elevated voltages and currents are monitored at ground potential with an optical telemetry system. This paper describes the power supply in detail, including block diagrams, component specifications, and waveforms when supplying power to an ion source

  7. Numerical modelling of steel arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamide, M.

    2008-07-01

    Welding is a highly used assembly technique. Welding simulation software would give access to residual stresses and information about the weld's microstructure, in order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of a weld. It would also permit to evaluate the process feasibility when complex geometrical components are to be made, and to optimize the welding sequences in order to minimize defects. This work deals with the numerical modelling of arc welding process of steels. After describing the industrial context and the state of art, the models implemented in TransWeld (software developed at CEMEF) are presented. The set of macroscopic equations is followed by a discussion on their numerical implementation. Then, the theory of re-meshing and our adaptive anisotropic re-meshing strategy are explained. Two welding metal addition techniques are investigated and are compared in terms of the joint size and transient temperature and stresses. The accuracy of the finite element model is evaluated based on experimental results and the results of the analytical solution. Comparative analysis between experimental and numerical results allows the assessment of the ability of the numerical code to predict the thermomechanical and metallurgical response of the welded structure. The models limitations and the phenomena identified during this study are finally discussed and permit to define interesting orientations for future developments. (author)

  8. Metal vapor vacuum arc ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-06-01

    We have developed a family of metal vapor vacuum are (MEVVA) high current metal ion sources. The sources were initially developed for the production of high current beams of metal ions for heavy ion synchrotron injection for basic nuclear physics research; more recently they have also been used for metal ion implantation. A number of different embodiments of the source have been developed for these specific applications. Presently the sources operate in a pulsed mode, with pulse width of order 1 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, and since the ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma are in general multiply ionized the ion energy is up to several hundred keV. Beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Nearly all of the solid metals of the Periodic Table have been use to produce beam. A number of novel features have been incorporated into the sources, including multiple cathodes and the ability to switch between up to 18 separate cathode materials simply and quickly, and a broad beam source version as well as miniature versions. here we review the source designs and their performance. 45 refs., 7 figs

  9. The ARC-EN-CIEL FEL Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Couprie, M E

    2005-01-01

    ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator-Radiation for Enhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light), the French project of a fourth generation light source aims at providing the user community with coherent femtosecond light pulses covering from UV to soft X ray. It is based on a CW 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with a high repetition rate. The FEL is based on in the injection of High Harmonics in Gases in a High Gain Harmonic Generation scheme, leading to a rather compact solution. The produced radiation extending down to 0.8 nm with the Non Linear Harmonic reproduces the good longitudinal and transverse coherence of the harmonics in gas. Optional beam loops are foreseen to increase the beam current or the energy. They will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR, VUV and X ray ranges and a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. An important synergy is expected between accelerator and laser communities. Indeed, electron plasma accelerat...

  10. Plasma arc cutting: speed and cut quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Severance, W S

    2009-01-01

    When cutting metal with plasma arc cutting, the walls of the cut are narrower at the bottom than at the top. This lack of squareness increases as the cutting speed increases. A model of this phenomenon, affecting cut quality, is suggested. A thin liquid layer, which separates the plasma from the solid metal to be melted, plays a key role in the suggested model. This layer decreases heat transfer from the plasma to the solid metal; the decrease is more pronounced the higher the speed and the thicker the liquid metal layer. Since the layer is thicker at the bottom of the cut, the heat transfer effectiveness is lower at the bottom. The decrease in heat transfer effectiveness is compensated by the narrowness of the cut. The suggested model allows one to calculate the profile of the cut. The result of the calculations of the cutting speeds for plates of various thicknesses, at which the squareness of the cut is acceptable, agrees well with the speeds recommended by manufacturers. The second effect considered in the paper is the deflection of the plasma jet from the vertical at a high cutting speed. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is given. We believe the considerations of this paper are pertinent to other types of cutting with moving heat sources.

  11. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  12. DC plasma arc melter technology for waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.A.; Wittle, J.K.; Trescot, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the features and benefits of a breakthrough DC Arc Melter for the permanent treatment of all types of solid wastes including nonhazardous, hazardous and radioactive. This DC Arc Furnace system, now commercially available, is the low cost permanent solution for solid waste pollution prevention and remediation. Concern over the effective disposal of wastes generated by the industrial society, worldwide, has prompted development of technologies to address the problem. For the most part these technologies have resulted in niche solutions with limited application. The only solution that has the ability to process almost all wastes, and to recover/recycle metallic and inorganic matter, is the group of technologies known as melters. Melters have distinct advantages over traditional technologies such as incineration because melters operate at higher temperatures, are relatively unaffected by changes in the waste stream, produce a vitrified stable product, and have the capability to recover/recycle slag, metals and gas. The system, DC Plasma Arc Melter, has the lowest capital, maintenance and operating cost of any melter technology because of its patented DC Plasma Arc with graphite electrode. DC Plasma Arc Melter systems are commercially available in sizes from 50 kg/batch or 250--3,000 kg/hr on a continuous feed basis. This paper examines the design and operating benefits of a DC Plasma Arc Melter System

  13. Energy and flux variations across thin auroral arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dahlgren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Two discrete auroral arc filaments, with widths of less than 1 km, have been analysed using multi-station, multi-monochromatic optical observations from small and medium field-of-view imagers and the EISCAT radar. The energy and flux of the precipitating electrons, volume emission rates and local electric fields in the ionosphere have been determined at high temporal (up to 30 Hz and spatial (down to tens of metres resolution. A new time-dependent inversion model is used to derive energy spectra from EISCAT electron density profiles. The energy and flux are also derived independently from optical emissions combined with ion-chemistry modelling, and a good agreement is found. A robust method to obtain detailed 2-D maps of the average energy and number flux of small scale aurora is presented. The arcs are stretched in the north-south direction, and the lowest energies are found on the western, leading edges of the arcs. The large ionospheric electric fields (250 mV m−1 found from tristatic radar measurements are evidence of strong currents associated with the region close to the optical arcs. The different data sets indicate that the arcs appear on the boundaries between regions with different average energy of diffuse precipitation, caused by pitch-angle scattering. The two thin arcs on these boundaries are found to be related to an increase in number flux (and thus increased energy flux without an increase in energy.

  14. Heat transfer modeling of double-side arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junsheng; Wu Chuansong

    2002-01-01

    If a plasma arc and a TIG arc are connected in serial and with the plasma arc placed on the obverse side and the TIG arc on the opposite side of the workpiece, a special double-side arc welding (DSAW) system will be formed, in which the PAW current is forced to flow through the keyhole along the thickness direction so as to compensate the energy consumed for melting the workpiece and improve the penetration capacity of the PAW arc. By considering the mechanics factors which influence the DSAW pool geometric shape, the control equations of the pool surface deformation are derived, and the mathematics mode for DSAW heat transfer is established by using boundary-fitted non-orthogonal coordinate systems. With this model, the difference between DSAW and PAW heat transfer is analyzed and the reason for the increase of DSAW penetration is explained from the point of heat transfer. The welding process experiments show that calculated results are in good agreement with measured ones

  15. Fermi arc mediated entropy transport in topological semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Timothy M.; Watzman, Sarah J.; Heremans, Joseph P.; Trivedi, Nandini

    2018-05-01

    The low-energy excitations of topological Weyl semimetals are composed of linearly dispersing Weyl fermions that act as monopoles of Berry curvature in the bulk momentum space. Furthermore, on the surface there exist topologically protected Fermi arcs at the projections of these Weyl points. We propose a pathway for entropy transport involving Fermi arcs on one surface connecting to Fermi arcs on the other surface via the bulk Weyl monopoles. We present results for the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the magnetothermal conductance of this conveyor belt channel. The circulating currents result in a net entropy transport without any net charge transport. We provide results for the Fermi arc mediated magnetothermal conductivity in the low-field semiclassical limit as well as in the high-field ultraquantum limit, where only chiral Landau levels are involved. Our work provides a proposed signature of Fermi arc mediated magnetothermal transport and sets the stage for utilizing and manipulating the topological Fermi arcs in thermal applications.

  16. Fast Arc-Annotated Subsequence Matching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2010-01-01

    is deleted any arc with an endpoint in that base is also deleted. Arc-annotated strings where the arcs are "nested" are a natural model of RNA molecules that captures both the primary and secondary structure of these. The arc-preserving subsequence problem for nested arc-annotated strings is basic primitive...... for investigating the function of RNA molecules. Gramm et al. [ACM Trans. Algorithms 2006] gave an algorithm for this problem using O(nm) time and space, where m and n are the lengths of P and Q, respectively. In this paper we present; a new algorithm using O(nm) time and O(n+m,) space, thereby matching...... the previous time bound while significantly reducing the space from a quadratic term to linear. This is essential to process large RNA molecules where the space is a likely to be a bottleneck. To obtain our result we introduce several novel ideas which may be of independent interest for related problems on arc...

  17. Electric fields and energetic particle precipitation in an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.; Bryant, D.A.; Smith, M.J.; Fahleson, U.; Faelthammer, C.G.; Pedersen, A.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a rocket flight across a single discrete auroral arc extending from early evening to magnetic midnight. The rocket was fired at the end of the growth phase of an isolated auroral substorm. It carried a separating payload to make simultaneous measurements of electrons (0.6 - 25 keV, pitch angle 0 - 60 0 ) at two points. From the main vehicle measurements were also made of ions (same energy range) as well as of the electric field vector and plasma parameters. The electron spectra were hardest towards the centre of the arc, where the peak intensity was at 9.5 keV. The precipitation structure observed was similar to that of an 'inverted V' but on a smaller scale. The electric field was northward south of the arc, southward within the arc and somewhat north of it, then again northward. At the northern edge of the precipitation region the field was very irregular. The field strength reached a maximum of about 50 mV/m some distance north of the arc. The line integral of the electric field across the arc was of the order of a kilovolt, too small to be responsible for the changes observed in the electron energy spectrum. An electric potential distribution, consistent with the results obtained, is present. (Auth.)

  18. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd [Centre of Photonics and Advance Material, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  19. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd

    2015-01-01

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices

  20. Magma addition rates in continental arcs: New methods of calculation and global implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschbacher, B. C.; Paterson, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    The transport of mass, heat and geochemical constituents (elements and volatiles) from the mantle to the atmosphere occurs via magma addition to the lithosphere. Calculation of magma addition rates (MARs) in continental arcs based on exposed proportions of igneous arc rocks is complex and rarely consistently determined. Multiple factors influence MAR calculations such as crust versus mantle contributions to magmas, a change in MARs across the arc and with depths throughout the arc crustal column, `arc tempos' with periods of high and low magmatic activity, the loss of previous emplaced arc rocks by subsequent magmatism and return to the mantle, arc migration, variations in the intrusive versus extrusive additions and evolving arc widths and thicknesses during tectonism. All of these factors need to be considered when calculating MARs.This study makes a new attempt to calculate MARs in continental arcs by studying three arc sections: the Famatinian arc, Argentina, the Sierra Nevada batholith, California and the Coast Mountain batholith, Washington and British Columbia. Arcs are divided into fore-arc, main arc and back arc sections and `boxes' with a defined width, length and thickness spanning upper middle and lower crustal levels are assigned to each section. Representative exposed crustal slices for each depth are then used to calculate MARs based on outcrop proportions for each box. Geochemical data is used to infer crustal recycling percentages and total thickness of the arc. Preliminary results show a correlation between MARs, crustal thicknesses and magmatic flare-up durations. For instance, the Famatinian arc shows a strong decrease in MARs between the main arc section (9.4 km3/Ma/arc-km) and the fore-arc (0.61 km3/Ma/arc-km) and back-arc (1.52 km3/Ma/arc-km) regions and an increase in the amount of magmatism with depth.Global MARs over geologic timescales have the potential to investigate mantle melt generation rates and the volatile outgassing contribution

  1. Comparative Observation of Ar, Ar-H2 and Ar-N2 DC Arc Plasma Jets and Their Arc Root Behaviour at Reduced Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wenxia; Meng Xian; Li Teng; Chen Xi; Wu Chengkang

    2007-01-01

    Results observed experimentally are presented, about the DC arc plasma jets and their arc-root behaviour generated at reduced gas pressure without or with an applied magnetic field. Pure argon, argon-hydrogen or argon-nitrogen mixture was used as the plasma-forming gas. A specially designed copper mirror was used for a better observation of the arc-root behaviour on the anode surface of the DC non-transferred arc plasma torch. It was found that in the cases without an applied magnetic field, the laminar plasma jets were stable and approximately axisymmetrical. The arc-root attachment on the anode surface was completely diffusive when argon was used as the plasma-forming gas, while the arc-root attachment often became constrictive when hydrogen or nitrogen was added into the argon. As an external magnetic field was applied, the arc root tended to rotate along the anode surface of the non-transferred arc plasma torch

  2. Arc discharge characteristics of molten salts used in an MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenaga, Sadayoshi; Mohri, Motoichi.

    1981-01-01

    The seed arc discharge phenomena in an MHD generator were studied. The behavior of arc was observed, which was generated by using K 2 CO 3 and K 2 SO 4 heated up to 1150 degree C as cathodes and a water-cooled copper as an anode. The generated arcs were classified into 3 types, such as free spot arc (point arc), line emission arc (line arc) and plane arc. The estimated temperature of arc foot was lower than the boiling point of seed material. The relation between arc voltage and arc length and that between arc voltage and arc current were measured. From these data, the potential gradient of arc was obtained. The gradients were same for almost all materials of cathode. The potential drop at cathodes depended remarkably on the kinds of molten salt, and also depended on the shapes of cathodes. The evaporation rate of cathode materials was larger when the cathode potential drop was larger and the arc current was larger. (Kato, T.)

  3. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV P ), right pelvic (PTV RtLN ) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV LtLN ), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV RtLN , and PTV LtLN received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV B of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D MEAN ) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D MEAN of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D MEAN in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  4. Fundamentals studies of a magnetically steered vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walke, Paul

    In recent years demand from production industry for high performance cutting tools, aero and automobile engine parts has prompted research into both existing and novel methods of laying down hard, low friction coatings . A key process for the production of such coatings has been Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) which has proved to be a consistent and reliable tool for industry. For this technique to continue to be improved and more advanced coatings to be produced, research at the fundamental level is required. This thesis describes research investigating the behaviour of the steered arc cathode spot and methods of improving existing steered arc coating technology.The majority of existing steered arc systems use either permanent magnets or a combination of permanent and electromagnets to steer the arc. Described here is a novel system which employs a pair of electromagnetic coils of cylindrical geometry which enable the arc to be positioned on a circular orbit through a range of continuously variable radii. In addition to this the coils are capable of controlling the transverse and normal magnetic field profiles independently of the steering radius selected. This enables the behaviour of the arc spot to be investigated under a range of magnetic field conditions thus allowing the comparison of measured arc behaviour with a new model of arc motion. Care has described the motion of the arc spot as a biased random walk and has derived an analytical solution to describe the time dependent, probability density function for the arc position in two dimensions. Two distributions are proposed (one in each dimension); the first describes the probability density for the arc position in the direction of driven motion, the second the probability density in the direction of arc confinement. The shape of these distributions is dependent upon the transverse and normal components of the applied magnetic field.A series of experiments are described here that measure the shape of these

  5. Magnetic phenomena in F.F.A.G. cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurtey, R.

    1957-01-01

    This study regroups and develops some experimental and theoretical results obtained with spiral tract cyclotrons. The method used has been studied previously by C. BLOCH, whom we thank for his helpful advice. We have tried to give the main useful results, which are also in accordance with the rather scarce experimental results obtained on spiral pole pieces. (author) [fr

  6. dc Arc Fault Effect on Hybrid ac/dc Microgrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Zahra

    The advent of distributed energy resources (DER) and reliability and stability problems of the conventional grid system has given rise to the wide spread deployment of microgrids. Microgrids provide many advantages by incorporating renewable energy sources and increasing the reliability of the grid by isolating from the main grid in case of an outage. AC microgrids have been installed all over the world, but dc microgrids have been gaining interest due to the advantages they provide over ac microgrids. However the entire power network backbone is still ac and dc microgrids require expensive converters to connect to the ac power network. As a result hybrid ac/dc microgrids are gaining more attention as it combines the advantages of both ac and dc microgrids such as direct integration of ac and dc systems with minimum number of conversions which increases the efficiency by reducing energy losses. Although dc electric systems offer many advantages such as no synchronization and no reactive power, successful implementation of dc systems requires appropriate protection strategies. One unique protection challenge brought by the dc systems is dc arc faults. A dc arc fault is generated when there is a gap in the conductor due to insulation degradation and current is used to bridge the gap, resulting in an arc with very high temperature. Such a fault if it goes undetected and is not extinguished can cause damage to the entire system and cause fires. The purpose of the research is to study the effect of the dc arc fault at different locations in the hybrid ac/dc microgrid and provide insight on the reliability of the grid components when it is impacted by arc faults at various locations in the grid. The impact of dc arc fault at different locations on the performance of the PV array, wind generation, and constant power loads (CPL) interfaced with dc/dc converters is studied. MATLAB/Simulink is used to model the hybrid ac/dc microgrid and arc fault.

  7. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Martins, R; Chemartin, L; Zaepffel, C; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A

    2016-01-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine–Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs. (paper)

  8. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Chemartin, L.; Zaepffel, C.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-05-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs.

  9. Hybrid laser arc welding: State-of-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acherjee, Bappa

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid laser arc welding simultaneously utilizes the arc welding and the laser welding, in a common interaction zone. The synergic effects of laser beam and eclectic arc in the same weld pool results in an increase of welding speed and penetration depth along with the enhancement of gap bridging capability and process stability. This paper presents the current status of this hybrid technique in terms of research, developments and applications. Effort is made to present a comprehensive technical know-how about this process through a systematic review of research articles, industrial catalogues, technical notes, etc. In the introductory part of the review, an overview of the hybrid laser arc welding is presented, including operation principle, process requirements, historical developments, benefits and drawbacks of the process. This is followed by a detailed discussion on control parameters those govern the performance of hybrid laser arc welding process. Thereafter, a report of improvements of performance and weld qualities achieved by using hybrid welding process is presented based on review of several research papers. The succeeding sections furnish the examples of industrial applications and the concluding remarks.

  10. Dynamic Resource Allocation with the arcControlTower

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job management system (PanDA) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experienc...

  11. Monitoring the Sumatra volcanic arc with InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, E.; Hong, S.; Amelung, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra volcanic arc is the result of the subduction of the Indo-Australian plate under the Sunda plate. The arc consists of 35 known volcanic centers, subaerials on the west coast of the Sumatra and Andaman Islands and submarines between these islands. Six active centers are known in the Sumatra volcanic arc. Surface deformation in volcanic areas usually indicates movement of magma or hydrothermal fluids at depth. Here we present a satellite-based Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey of the Sumatra volcanic arc using ALOS data. Spanning the years 2007 to beginning of 2009, our survey reveals the background level of activity of the 35 volcanoes. We processed data from 40 tracks (24 in descending orbit and 16 in ascending orbit) to cover the whole Sumatra arc. In the first results five of these six known active centers show no sign of activity: Dempo, Kaba, Marapi, Talang and Peuet. The remaining active volcano, Mount Kerinci, has an ambiguous signal. We used pair-wise logic and InSAR time series of the available ALOS data to determine if the observed InSAR signal is caused by ground deformation or by atmospheric delays.

  12. Grid Interoperation with ARC middleware for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, Erik; Groenager, Michael; Johansson, Daniel; Kleist, Josva; Field, Laurence; Qing, Di; Frey, Jaime; Happonen, Kalle; Klem, Jukka; Koivumaeki, Jesper; Linden, Tomas; Pirinen, Antti

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general purpose experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS computing relies on different grid infrastructures to provide computational and storage resources. The major grid middleware stacks used for CMS computing are gLite, Open Science Grid (OSG) and ARC (Advanced Resource Connector). Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP) hosts one of the Tier-2 centers for CMS computing. CMS Tier-2 centers operate software systems for data transfers (PhEDEx), Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and data analysis (CRAB). In order to provide the Tier-2 services for CMS, HIP uses tools and components from both ARC and gLite grid middleware stacks. Interoperation between grid systems is a challenging problem and HIP uses two different solutions to provide the needed services. The first solution is based on gLite-ARC grid level interoperability. This allows to use ARC resources in CMS without modifying the CMS application software. The second solution is based on developing specific ARC plugins in CMS software.

  13. Grid Interoperation with ARC middleware for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, Erik; Groenager, Michael; Johansson, Daniel; Kleist, Josva [Nordic DataGrid Facility, Kastruplundgade 22, 1., DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Field, Laurence; Qing, Di [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Frey, Jaime [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1210 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI (United States); Happonen, Kalle; Klem, Jukka; Koivumaeki, Jesper; Linden, Tomas; Pirinen, Antti, E-mail: Jukka.Klem@cern.c [Helsinki Institute of Physics, PO Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-04-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general purpose experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS computing relies on different grid infrastructures to provide computational and storage resources. The major grid middleware stacks used for CMS computing are gLite, Open Science Grid (OSG) and ARC (Advanced Resource Connector). Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP) hosts one of the Tier-2 centers for CMS computing. CMS Tier-2 centers operate software systems for data transfers (PhEDEx), Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and data analysis (CRAB). In order to provide the Tier-2 services for CMS, HIP uses tools and components from both ARC and gLite grid middleware stacks. Interoperation between grid systems is a challenging problem and HIP uses two different solutions to provide the needed services. The first solution is based on gLite-ARC grid level interoperability. This allows to use ARC resources in CMS without modifying the CMS application software. The second solution is based on developing specific ARC plugins in CMS software.

  14. Dust arcs in the region of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The surfaces of the Trojan asteroids are steadily bombarded by interplanetary micrometeoroids, which releases ejecta of small dust particles. These particles form the faint dust arcs that are associated with asteroid clouds. Here we analyze the particle dynamics and structure of the arc in the region of the L4 Trojan asteroids. Methods: We calculate the total cross section of the L4 Trojan asteroids and the production rate of dust particles. The motion of the particles is perturbed by a variety of forces. We simulate the dynamical evolution of the dust particles, and explore the overall features of the Trojan dust arc. Results: The simulations show that the arc is mainly composed of grains in the size range 4-10 microns. Compared to the L4 Trojan asteroids, the dust arc is distributed more widely in the azimuthal direction, extending to a range of [30, 120] degrees relative to Jupiter. The peak number density does not develop at L4. There exist two peaks that are azimuthally displaced from L4.

  15. Linear fixed-field multipass arcs for recirculating linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Morozov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recirculating linear accelerators (RLA’s provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dogbone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of 2. We present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dogbone RLA.

  16. Molecular beam sampling of a hollow cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theuws, P.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with the description of the process of molecular beam sampling of a Hollow Cathode Arc. The aim of the study is twofold, i.e. investigation of the applicability of molecular beam sampling as a plasma diagnostic and the use of a Hollow Cathode Arc as a high intensity beam source for ground state atoms and metastable state atoms in the superthermal energy range. Suitable models are introduced, describing the process of molecular beam sampling of both ground state atoms and metastable state atoms. Fast ground state atoms produced by ion-atom collisions. The experimental facilities, i.e. the Hollow Cathode Arc, the time-of-flight machine and the dye laser system are described. And an alternative detection scheme for ground state atoms is presented and experimental results on the molecular beam sampling of a low density plasma (densities 10 19 -10 20 m -3 ) in the long arc configuration are reported. The results on the short arc configuration (densities 10 21 -10 22 m -3 ) are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. More About Arc-Welding Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Leidecker, Henning

    2005-01-01

    High-quality batches of carbon nanotubes are produced at relatively low cost in a modified atmospheric-pressure electric-arc welding process that does not include the use of metal catalysts. What would normally be a welding rod and a weldment are replaced by an amorphous carbon anode rod and a wider, hollow graphite cathode rod. Both electrodes are water-cooled. The cathode is immersed in ice water to about 0.5 cm from the surface. The system is shielded from air by flowing helium during arcing. As the anode is consumed during arcing at 20 to 25 A, it is lowered to maintain it at an approximately constant distance above the cathode. The process causes carbon nanotubes to form on the lowest 5 cm of the anode. The arcing process is continued until the anode has been lowered to a specified height. The nanotube-containing material is then harvested. The additional information contained in the instant report consists mostly of illustrations of carbon nanotubes and a schematic diagram of the arc-welding setup, as modified for the production of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O'Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau's Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of open-quotes as-receivedclose quotes heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process

  19. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  20. CHEP2015: Dynamic Resource Allocation with arcControlTower

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job mangement system (Panda) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experience...

  1. Deviations from excitation equilibrium in optically thick mercury arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Up to date mercury arcs at pressure greater than 1 atm have been investigated as plasma systems in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state. These studies have been motivated by the applications of mercury arcs, e.g., in the lighting industry. The LTE-assumption simplifies the use of spectroscopic diagnostics and the performance of species-concentration calculations. A high pressure mercury arc of about 1 atm had been considered in two possibilities: excitation and gas temperatures are the same, the electron temperature is higher and excitation and electron temperatures are the same, the gas temperature is lower. Recent measurements in mercury arcs reveal the existence of severe departures from thermal equilibrium and suggest the absence of excitation equilibrium in the axis and in the periphery in such an arc. The deviation from equilibrium leads to complicated distributions, such that the system cannot be described correctly by any single temperature. This becomes quite complicated when plasma inhomogeneity and strong reabsorption of the radiation are present

  2. Characterizing the thermal effects of High Energy Arc Faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putorti, Anthony; Bareham, Scott; Praydis, Joseph Jr. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Melly, Nicholas B. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-15

    International and domestic operating experience involving High Energy Arc Faults (HEAF) in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) electrical power systems have demonstrated the potential to cause extensive damage to electrical components and distribution systems along with damage to adjacent equipment and cables. An international study by the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) gOECD Fire Project. Topical Report No. 1: Analysis of High Energy Arcing Fault (HEAF) Fire Events h published June 25, 2013 [1], illustrates that HEAF events have the potential to be major risk contributors with significant safety consequences and substantial economic loss. In an effort to better understand and characterize the threats posed by HEAF related phenomena, an international project has been chartered; the Joint Analysis of Arc Faults (Joan of ARC) OECD International Testing Program for High Energy Arc Faults. One of the major challenges of this research is how to properly measure and characterize the risk and influence of these events. Methods are being developed to characterize relevant parameters such as; temperature, heat flux, and heat release rate of fires resulting from HEAF events. Full scale experiments are being performed at low (≤ 1000 V) and medium (≤ 35 kV) voltages in electrical components. This paper introduces the methods being developed to measure thermal effects and discusses preliminary results of full scale HEAF experiments.

  3. DC graphite plasma arc melter technology for waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.A.; Wittle, J.K.; Trescot, J.; Wilver, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the features and benefits of a DC Arc Melter for the permanent treatment of all types of solid wastes including nonhazardous, hazardous and radioactive. This DC Arc Melter system is the low cost permanent solution for solid waste pollution prevention and remediation. Concern over the effective disposal of wastes generated by our industrial society, worldwide, has prompted development of technologies to address the problem. The only solution that has the ability to process almost all wastes, and to recover/recycle metallic and inorganic matter, is the group of technologies known as melters. Melters have distinct advantages over traditional technologies such as incineration because melters; operate at higher temperatures, are relatively unaffected by changes in the waste stream, produce a vitrified stable product, reduce gaseous emissions, and have the capability to recover/recycle slag, metals and gas. The system, DC Plasma Arc Melter, has the lowest capital, maintenance and operating cost of any melter technology because of its patented DC Plasma Arc with graphite electrode. DC Plasma Arc Melter systems are available in sizes from 50 kg/batch or 250-3,000 kg/hr on a continuous basis

  4. Magnetic phenomena in F.F.A.G. cyclotrons; Phenomenes magnetiques dans les cyclotrons F.F.A.G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beurtey, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    This study regroups and develops some experimental and theoretical results obtained with spiral tract cyclotrons. The method used has been studied previously by C. BLOCH, whom we thank for his helpful advice. We have tried to give the main useful results, which are also in accordance with the rather scarce experimental results obtained on spiral pole pieces. (author) [French] Cette etude regroupe et developpe des resultats experimentaux et theoriques sur les cyclotrons 'spirales'. La methode employee est celle etudiee par C. BLOCH, que nous remercions vivement pour sa bienveillance et ses conseils. Nous avons essaye de donner les resultats essentiels a la fois utilisables et compatibles avec les resultats experimentaux peu nombreux sur les pieces polaires spiralees. (auteur)

  5. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathopoulos, V.N., E-mail: vasta@teihal.gr [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece); General Department of Applied Sciences, School of Technological Applications, Technological Educational Institute of Sterea Ellada, GR 34400 Psahna (Greece); Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J. [Ceramics and Refractories Technological Development Company, CERECO S.A., 72nd km Athens Lamia National Road, P.O. Box 18646, GR 34100 Chalkida (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in

  6. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  7. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stathopoulos, V.N.; Papandreou, A.; Kanellopoulou, D.; Stournaras, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Zn is stabilized due to formation of ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel and/or willemite type phases. • EAFD/clay fired mixtures exhibit improved mechanical properties. • Hollow bricks were successfully fabricated from the mixtures studied. • Laboratory articles and scaled up bricks found as environmentally inert materials. -- Abstract: In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an

  8. Dynamic voltage-current characteristics for a water jet plasma arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiaxiang; Lan Sheng; Xu Zuoming

    2008-01-01

    A virtual instrument technology is used to measure arc current, arc voltage, dynamic V-I characteristics, and nonlinear conductance for a cone-shaped water jet plasma arc under ac voltage. Experimental results show that ac arc discharge mainly happens in water vapor evaporated from water when heated. However, due to water's cooling effect and its conductance, arc conductance, reignition voltage, extinguish voltage, and current zero time are very different from those for ac arc discharge in gas work fluid. These can be valuable to further studies on mechanism and characteristics of plasma ac discharge in water, and even in gas work fluid

  9. Participation of the arcRACME protein in self-activation of the arc operon located in the arginine catabolism mobile element in pandemic clone USA300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Zayda Lorena Corredor; Márquez-Ortiz, Ricaurte Alejandro; Castro, Betsy Esperanza; Gómez, Natasha Vanegas; Escobar-Pérez, Javier

    2017-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pandemic clone USA300 has, in addition to its constitutive arginine catabolism (arc) gene cluster, an arginine catabolism mobile element (ACME) carrying another such cluster, which gives this clone advantages in colonisation and infection. Gene arcR, which encodes an oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulator, is inside ACME and downstream of the constitutive arc gene cluster, and this situation may have an impact on its activation. Different relative expression behaviours are proven here for arcRACME and the arcACME operon compared to the constitutive ones. We also show that the artificially expressed recombinant ArcRACME protein binds to the promoter region of the arcACME operon; this mechanism can be related to a positive feedback model, which may be responsible for increased anaerobic survival of the USA300 clone during infection-related processes.

  10. The Origin of Silicic Arc Crust - Insights from the Northern Pacific Volcanic Arcs through Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    The remarkable compositional similarities of andesitic crust at modern convergent margins and the continental crust has long evoked the hypothesis of similar origins. Key to understanding either genesis is understanding the mode of silica enrichment. Silicic crust cannot be directly extracted from the upper mantle. Hence, in modern arcs, numerous studies - observant of the pervasive and irrefutable evidence of melt mixing - proposed that arc andesites formed by mixing of mantle-derived basaltic melts and fusible silicic material from the overlying crust. Mass balance requires the amount of silicic crust in such hybrid andesites to be on the order to tens of percent, implying that their composition to be perceptibly influenced by the various crustal basements. In order to test this hypothesis, major and trace element compositions of mafic and silicic arc magmas with arc-typical low Ce/PbMexico) were combined with Pb isotope ratios. Pb isotope ratios are considered highly sensitive to crustal contamination, and hence should reflect the variable composition of the oceanic and continental basement on which these arcs are constructed. In particular, in thick-crust continental arcs where the basement is isotopically different from the mantle and crustal assimilation thought to be most prevalent, silicic magmas must be expected to be distinct from those of the associated mafic melts. However, in a given arc, the Pb isotope ratios are constant with increasing melt silica regardless of the nature of the basement. This observation argues against a melt origin of silicic melts from the crustal basement and suggest them to be controlled by the same slab flux as their co-eval mafic counterparts. This inference is validated by the spatial and temporal pattern of arc Pb isotope ratios along the Northern Pacific margins and throughout the 50 million years of Cenozoic evolution of the Izu Bonin Mariana arc/trench system that are can be related to with systematic, `real

  11. A study of the dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Sandahl, I.; Opgenoorth, H.

    1981-06-01

    High resolution electric field and particle data, obtained by the S23L1 rocket crossing over a discrete prebreakup arc in January 1979, are studied in coordination with ground observations in order to clarify the electrodynamics of the arc and its surroundings. Height-integrated conductivities have been calculated from the particle data, including the ionization effect of precipitating protons, and assuming a steady state balance between ion production and recombination losses. High resolution optical information of arc location relative to the rocket permitted a check of the validity of this assumption for each fluxtube passed by the rocket. Another check was provided by a comparison between calculated and observed electron densities along the rocket trajectory. (author)

  12. Zidovudine treatment of AIDS and ARC in Denmark 1987

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Mathiesen, L R; Søeberg, B

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, a total of 138 Danish patients (94 AIDS and 44 ARC) received treatment with zidovudine, a total observation period of 572 treatment months. 15 AIDS and 1 ARC patient died after a median of 70 days (range 2-295). In the ARC group 4 patients developed AIDS (3 Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia......, 1 Kaposi's sarcoma). Among the AIDS patients 38 new opportunistic infections were reported. 24 of these opportunistic infections occurred within 6 weeks after treatment initiation. 79 patients were observed for more than 3 months, 25 of these had their daily dose zidovudine reduced, usually from 1......,200 mg to 600 mg, 9 others were temporarily off drug. HIV antigen was analyzed in serum samples from 93 patients. Of these, 28 (52%) of 54 initially HIV antigen-positive became antigen-negative, 7 (18%) of 39 initially HIV antigen-negative became antigen-positive within the first 8 weeks of zidovudine...

  13. Modified IRC bench-scale arc melter for waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, T.L.; Sears, J.W.; Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the INEL Research Center (IRC) arc melter facility and its recent modifications. The arc melter can now be used to study volatilization of toxic and high vapor pressure metals and the effects of reducing and oxidizing (redox) states in the melt. The modifications include adding an auger feeder, a gas flow control and monitoring system, an offgas sampling and exhaust system, and a baghouse filter system, as well as improving the electrode drive, slag sampling system, temperature measurement and video monitoring and recording methods, and oxidation lance. In addition to the volatilization and redox studies, the arc melter facility has been used to produce a variety of glass/ceramic waste forms for property evaluation. Waste forms can be produced on a daily basis. Some of the melts performed are described to illustrate the melter's operating characteristics

  14. Enhancing stability of industrial turbines using adjustable partial arc bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasalevris, Athanasios; Dohnal, Fadi

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the principal of operation, the simulation and the characteristics of two partial-arc journal bearings of variable geometry and adjustable/controllable stiffness and damping properties. The proposed journals are supposed to consist of a scheme that enables the periodical variation of bearing properties. Recent achievements of suppressing rotor vibrations using plain circular journal bearings of variable geometry motivate the further extension of the principle to bearings of applicable geometry for industrial turbines. The paper describes the application of a partial-arc journal bearing to enhance stability of high speed industrial turbines. The proposed partial-arc bearings with adjustable/controllable properties enhance stability and they introduce stable margins in speeds much higher than the 1st critical.

  15. Innovation in electric arc furnaces scientific basis for selection

    CERN Document Server

    Toulouevski, Yuri N

    2013-01-01

    This book equips a reader with knowledge necessary for critical analysis of  innovations in electric arc furnaces and helps to select the most effective ones and for their successful implementation. The book also covers general issues related to history of development, current state and prospects of steelmaking in Electric Arc Furnaces. Therefore, it can be useful for everybody who studies metallurgy, including students of colleges and universities. The modern concepts of mechanisms of Arc Furnace processes are are discussed in the book at the level sufficient to solve practical problems: To help readers lacking knowledge required in the field of heat transfer as well as hydro-gas dynamics, it contains several chapters which provide the required minimum of information in these fields of science. In order to better assess different innovations, the book describes experience of the application of similar innovations in open-hearth furnaces and oxygen converters. Some promising ideas on key issues regarding int...

  16. Investigation of pellet acceleration by an arc heated gas gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, S.A.; Baekmark, L.; Jensen, V.O.; Michelsen, P.; Weisberg, K.V.

    1988-10-01

    This report describes work on pellet acceleration by means of an arc heated gas gun. Preliminary results were described in Riso-M-2536 and in Riso-M-2650. This final report describes the work carried out from 1987.03.31 to 1988.09.30. An arc heated hydrogen gas source, for pneumatic acceleration of deuterium pellets to velocities above 2 km/s, was developed. Experiments were performed with an arc chamber to which different methods of hydrogen supply were possible, and to which the input of electrical power could be programmed. Results in terms of pressure transients and acceleration curves are presented. Maximum pellet velocities approaching 2 km/s were obtained. This limit is discussed in relation to the presented data. Finally this report contains a summary and a conclusion for the entire project. (author) 34 ills., 3 refs

  17. High efficient vacuum arc plant for coating deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, I.I.; Belous, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of progressive technical solutions are used in the 'Bulat-9' machine designed for vacuum arc coating deposition. The features of the machine are: a dome shaped working chamber that allows to 'wash' its inner surfaces with hot nitrogen or argon gas; a system of automatic loading/unloading of articles to be treated into the chamber through its bottom; shielding of the inner surfaces of the chamber by heated panels; improved vacuum arc plasma sources including filtered one; four ported power supply for the vacuum arc discharges; LC oscillatory circuits suppressing microarcs on the substrate; the system of automatic control of a working process. The said technical features cause the apparatus originality and novelty preserved up to-day

  18. Ecton mechanism of ion flow generation in vacuum arc

    CERN Document Server

    Mesyats, G A

    2001-01-01

    The basic characteristics of cathode plasma generation in vacuum arc (ion erosion, ion average charge) were studied from the point of an ecton model of a cathode spot in vacuum arc. The estimates of ion parameters obtained for a single cell of a cathode spot show qualitative conformity with the experimental data. One introduces the following mechanism of cathode plasma generation in vacuum arc. In case of explosion-like destruction of a cathode segment under the effect of the Joule heating the cathode matter changes sequentially its state: condensed one, nonideal and ideal plasma ones. During this change one observes formation of plasma charge composition and ion acceleration under the effect of plasma pressure gradient

  19. Timed-Arc Petri Nets vs. Networks of Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    We establish mutual translations between the classes of 1-safe timed-arc Petri nets (and its extension with testing arcs) and networks of timed automata (and its subclass where every clock used in the guard has to be reset). The presented translations are very tight (up to isomorphism of labelled...... transition systems with time). This provides a convenient characterization from the theoretical point of view but is not always satisfactory from the practical point of view because of the possible non-polynomial blow up in the size (in the direction from automata to nets). Hence we relax the isomorphism...... requirement and provide efficient (polynomial time) reductions between networks of timed automata and 1-safe timed-arc Petri nets preserving the answer to the reachability question. This makes our techniques suitable for automatic translation into a format required by tools like UPPAAL and KRONOS. A direct...

  20. Zidovudine treatment of AIDS and ARC in Denmark 1987

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt; Søeberg, B

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, a total of 138 Danish patients (94 AIDS and 44 ARC) received treatment with zidovudine, a total observation period of 572 treatment months. 15 AIDS and 1 ARC patient died after a median of 70 days (range 2-295). In the ARC group 4 patients developed AIDS (3 Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia......, 1 Kaposi's sarcoma). Among the AIDS patients 38 new opportunistic infections were reported. 24 of these opportunistic infections occurred within 6 weeks after treatment initiation. 79 patients were observed for more than 3 months, 25 of these had their daily dose zidovudine reduced, usually from 1...... on 94 occasions and 19 (14%) patients required multiple transfusions. The mortality among the AIDS patients was significantly lower compared to historical controls. In our experience zidovudine treatment is reasonably well tolerated and the side effects are manageable....

  1. Metal arc welding and the risk of skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltoft, K N; Slagor, R M; Agner, T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Arc welding produces the full spectrum of ultraviolet radiation and may be a contributory cause of skin cancer; however, there has been little research into this occupational hazard. The aim of this study is to explore if metal arc welding increases the risk of malignant melanoma and....../or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on skin areas which may possibly be exposed (neck, head, and upper extremities). METHOD: A Danish national company-based historic cohort of 4333 male metal arc welders was followed from 1987 through 2012 to identify the risk of skin cancer....... An external reference group was established including all Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. Occupational histories were gathered by questionnaires in 1986 and information about skin cancer diagnoses [BCC, SCC, cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), and precancerous...

  2. Use of pulsed arc welding for butt joint fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkulov, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    A technology of pulsed-arc butt welding with periodic wire feed to the welding zone has been developed. The pulsed arc is suitable both for submerged and gas-shielded weldings. The technology proposed has some advantages over the stationary-arc welding. Control of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the process enables one to affect melting and crystallization conditions of the welding crater, weld shape, relation between melting and deposited metal section areas, etc., as well as to reduce heat contribution to the base metal. The new process is shown to be applicable in power engineering. Automatic submerged welding conditions are given for low-carbon and pearlitic heat-resistant steels

  3. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. H., E-mail: lanchaohui@163.com; Long, J. D.; Zheng, L.; Dong, P.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, T.; He, J. L. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  4. Decomposition of naphthalene by dc gliding arc gas discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Li, Xiaodong; Tu, Xin; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shengyong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-01-14

    Gliding arc discharge has been proved to be effective in treatment of gas and liquid contaminants. In this study, physical characteristics of dc gliding arc discharge and its application to naphthalene destruction are investigated with different external resistances and carrier gases. The decomposition rate increases with increasing of oxygen concentration and decreases with external resistance. This value can be achieved up to 92.3% at the external resistance of 50 kOmega in the oxygen discharge, while the highest destruction energy efficiency reaches 3.6 g (kW h)(-1) with the external resistance of 93 kOmega. Possible reaction pathways and degradation mechanisms in the plasma with different gases are proposed by qualitative analysis of postdestructed products. In the air and oxygen gliding arc discharges, the naphthalene degradation is mainly governed by reactions with oxygen-derived radicals.

  5. The arc power supply for the TEXTOR neutral injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, U.; Pfister, U.; Goll, O.; Wurslin, R.; Scherer, J.; Haubmann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 24 single arcs in the plasma source of the TEXTOR neutral injector are supplied with an overall current of 1800 A at an arc voltage of 150 V DC. The current is switched on and off in less than 1 msec. The paper presents a new modular solution for such a power supply. Each arc is powered by a separately switched mode supply module. One single module consists of a diode rectifier bridge with a filter, a fast semiconductor switch, an inductance in series for stabilizing the current and a free-wheeling path. The layout of this power supply system is described in detail based on test results. Design features and technical data are given

  6. D11.3.1: Results from the operation of EMMA using the new diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Machida, S

    2012-01-01

    In a Fixed-Field, Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, eliminating pulsed magnet operation permits rapid acceleration to synchrotron energies, but with a much higher beam-pulse repetition rate. Conceived in the 1950s, FFAGs are enjoying renewed interest, fuelled by the need to rapidly accelerate unstable muons for future high energy physics colliders. Until now a ‘scaling’ principle has been applied to avoid beam blow-up and loss. Removing this restriction produces a new breed of FFAG, a non-scaling variant, allowing powerful advances in machine characteristics. We report on the first non-scaling FFAG, in which orbits are compacted to within 10 mm in radius over an electron momentum range of 12 to 18 MeV/c. In this strictly linear-gradient FFAG, unstable beam regions are crossed, but acceleration via a novel serpentine channel is so rapid that no significant beam disruption is observed. This result has significant implications for future particle accelerators, particularly muon and high-intensity prot...

  7. Influences of arc current on composition and properties of MgO thin films prepared by cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Daoyun; Zheng Changxi; Wang Mingdong; Liu Yi; Chen Dihu; He Zhenhui; Wen Lishi; Cheung, W.Y.

    2010-01-01

    MgO thin films with high optical transmittances (more than 90%) were prepared by cathodic vacuum arc deposition technique. With the increase of arc current from 40 to 80 A, the deposition pressure decreases and the film thickness increases; the atomic ratio of Mg/O in MgO thin films (obtained by RBS) increases from 0.97 to 1.17, giving that deposited at 50 A most close to the stoichiometric composition of the bulk MgO; the grains of MgO thin films grow gradually as shown in SEM images. XRD patterns show that MgO (1 1 0) orientation is predominant for films prepared at the arc currents ranged from 50 to 70 A. The MgO (1 0 0) orientation is much enhanced and comparable to that of MgO (1 1 0) for films prepared at the arc current of 80 A. The secondary electron emission coefficient of MgO thin film increases with arc current ranged from 50 to 70 A.

  8. Electromagnetic characteristic of twin-wire indirect arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuanwei; Zou, Yong; Zou, Zengda; Wu, Dongting

    2015-01-01

    Traditional welding methods are limited in low heat input to workpiece and high welding wire melting rate. Twin-wire indirect arc(TWIA) welding is a new welding method characterized by high melting rate and low heat input. This method uses two wires: one connected to the negative electrode and another to the positive electrode of a direct-current(DC) power source. The workpiece is an independent, non-connected unit. A three dimensional finite element model of TWIA is devised. Electric and magnetic fields are calculated and their influence upon TWIA behavior and the welding process is discussed. The results show that with a 100 A welding current, the maximum temperature reached is 17 758 K, arc voltage is 14.646 V while maximum current density was 61 A/mm2 with a maximum Lorene force of 84.5 μN. The above mentioned arc parameters near the cathode and anode regions are far higher than those in the arc column region. The Lorene force is the key reason for plasma velocity direction deviated and charged particles flowed in the channel formed by the cathode, anode and upper part of arc column regions. This led to most of the energy being supplied to the polar and upper part of arc column regions. The interaction between electric and magnetic fields is a major determinant in shaping TWIA as well as heat input on the workpiece. This is a first study of electromagnetic characteristics and their influences in the TWIA welding process, and it is significant in both a theoretical and practical sense.

  9. Experimental study of anode processes in plasma arc cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavka, Tetyana; Chumak, Oleksiy; Šonský, Jiří; Heinrich, M.; Stehrer, T.; Pauser, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2013), 065202-065202 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : Arc cutting * anode attachment * pilot arc * steam plasma cutting * torch * fluctuations * JET Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (UT-L) Impact factor: 2.521, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/46/6/065202/pdf/0022-3727_46_6_065202.pdf

  10. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  11. Spectroscopic observations of an arc-plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clothiaux, E.J. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    Spectra from in-bore and from the muzzle flash of an arc-plasma accelerator have been observed, and a strong absorption in the uv is observed in-bore. High pressure at the wall of the arc-plasma accelerator, >800 Bar, suggests a high on-axis equilibrium temperature and a high opacity. Time-resolved measurements of the in-bore emission, at four spectral points, give a peak temperature at the accelerator wall of {approx equal}200,000{sup o}K. (author).

  12. Spectroscopic observations of an arc-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clothiaux, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Spectra from in-bore and from the muzzle flash of an arc-plasma accelerator have been observed, and a strong absorption in the uv is observed in-bore. High pressure at the wall of the arc-plasma accelerator, >800 Bar, suggests a high on-axis equilibrium temperature and a high opacity. Time-resolved measurements of the in-bore emission, at four spectral points, give a peak temperature at the accelerator wall of ≅200,000 o K. (author)

  13. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  14. Numaerical simulation of a SF6 circuit-breaker arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergne, P.J.; Gonzalez, J.J.; Gleizes, A.

    1995-01-01

    The design and the validation of high-voltage circuit breaker require more and more physical models which take into account complex phenomenae. We present here a numerical simulation of an SF 6 arc established in a simplified geometry of a circuit breaker prototype. Our study deals specially with the turbulent flow, the boundary conditions of the arc roots on the electrodes, the influence of the electromagnetic strengths and the radiative transfer. The results concern a stationary state with fixed geometry and current intensity (I=2000 A)

  15. Engaging ArcForm in Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allsopp, Benjamin Brink

    ArcForm is a non-linear form of general-purpose human language. It is designed as an alternative to paragraphs of text for intellectual collaboration (Allsopp 2013). It combines three areas of notational value. 1) It is similar to natural language (NL): both in its expressiveness and in the way...... not only the relations between the objects of various sciences and technologies, but simultaneously map the interrelations of these relations with social, political, and cultural objects. Furthermore in relation to the second way, the article describes how shared ArcForm maps may support dispersed STS...

  16. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  17. Radiation Dose for Equipment in the LHC Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Wittenburg, K; Spickermann, T

    1998-01-01

    Collisions of protons with residual gas molecules or the beam screen installed in the vacuum chamber are the main sources for the radiation dose in the LHC arcs. The dose due to proton-gas collisions depends on gas pressure, energy and intensity of the circulating beam. The dose is about equally distributed along the arc and has been calculated in previous papers. Collisions of particles with the beam screen will take place where the beam size is largest - close to focusing quadrupole magnets. For this paper the radiation doses due to particles hitting the beam screen in a quadrupole were calculated with the shower codes GEANT3.21 and FLUKA96.

  18. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Stanley W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  19. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in arc jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes were developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes were constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies. The temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its time rate of change gives the steady-state absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. Design, construction, test, and performance data are presented.

  20. Narrow groove gas metal-arc welding of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The Gas Metal-Arc (GMA) welding process is explained and the equipment used described with an analysis of power supply function and the action of the arc, followed by discussion of general applications and problems. GMA braze welding of beryllium is then described, as is the development of a special high purity filler wire and a narrow deep groove joint design for improved weld strength in beryllium. This joint design and the special wire are applied in making high strength welds in high strength aluminum for special applications. High speed motion pictures of the welding operation are shown to illustrate the talk. (auth)

  1. Electrostatic probe and calorimetric measurements in a DC cathodic arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepone, Alejandro; Marquez, Adriana; Kelly, Hector; Grondona, Diana

    2001-01-01

    Several results obtained from measurements with spherical Langmuir probes and a calorimetric technique in a dc cathodic arc are presented. The arc is operated at a current level of 100 A, with a Copper cathode, and with Oxygen gas at a pressure in the range 0.005 divide 0.2 mbar. The measurements were performed at different axial positions in the discharge chamber. It is found that the electron temperature decreases for larger axial positions or higher pressures, but the derivation of reliable values for the ion density and kinetic energy require the consideration of atomic processes between the plasma and gas particles

  2. Efficacy of robust optimization plan with partial-arc VMAT for photon volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated position dependence in planning target volume (PTV)-based and robust optimization plans using full-arc and partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The gantry angles at the periphery, intermediate, and center CTV positions were 181°-180° (full-arc VMAT) and 181°-360° (partial-arc VMAT). A PTV-based optimization plan was defined by 5 mm margin expansion of the CTV to a PTV volume, on which the dose constraints were applied. The robust optimization plan consisted of a directly optimized dose to the CTV under a maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm. The prescription dose was normalized to the CTV D 99% (the minimum relative dose that covers 99% of the volume of the CTV) as an original plan. The isocenter was rigidly shifted at 1 mm intervals in the anterior-posterior (A-P), superior-inferior (S-I), and right-left (R-L) directions from the original position to the maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm in the original plan, yielding recalculated dose distributions. It was found that for the intermediate and center positions, the uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV for all directions did not significantly differ when comparing the PTV-based and robust optimization plans (P > 0.05). For the periphery position, uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV in the R-L direction for the robust optimization plan were found to be lower than those in the PTV-based optimization plan (P plan's efficacy using partial-arc VMAT depends on the periphery CTV position. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  4. Auroral-arc splitting by intrusion of a new convection channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. U. Frey

    Full Text Available During a run of the Common Programme Three of the EISCAT radar the splitting of an auroral arc was observed by high time-resolution, ground-based cameras when the UHF radar beam was close to the arc. The evening eastward electrojet situation with a large-scale northward ionospheric electric field was disturbed by the intrusion of a convection channel with southward electric field from the east. The interaction of the new convection channel with the auroral arc caused changes in arc brightness and arc splitting, i.e. the creation of a new arc parallel to the pre-existing auroral arc. The event is described as one possibility for the creation of parallel arcs during slightly disturbed magnetic conditions far from the Harang discontinuity.

  5. Auroral-arc splitting by intrusion of a new convection channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. U. Frey

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available During a run of the Common Programme Three of the EISCAT radar the splitting of an auroral arc was observed by high time-resolution, ground-based cameras when the UHF radar beam was close to the arc. The evening eastward electrojet situation with a large-scale northward ionospheric electric field was disturbed by the intrusion of a convection channel with southward electric field from the east. The interaction of the new convection channel with the auroral arc caused changes in arc brightness and arc splitting, i.e. the creation of a new arc parallel to the pre-existing auroral arc. The event is described as one possibility for the creation of parallel arcs during slightly disturbed magnetic conditions far from the Harang discontinuity.

  6. Investigation of a subsonic-arc-attachment thruster using segmented anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Darren H.; Sankovic, John M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate high frequency arc instabilities observed in subsonic-arc-attachment thrusters, a 3 kW, segmented-anode arc jet was designed and tested using hydrogen as the propellant. The thruster nozzle geometry was scaled from a 30 kW design previously tested in the 1960's. By observing the current to each segment and the arc voltage, it was determined that the 75-200 kHz instabilities were results of axial movements of the arc anode attachment point. The arc attachment point was fully contained in the subsonic portion of the nozzle for nearly all flow rates. The effects of isolating selected segments were investigated. In some cases, forcing the arc downstream caused the restrike to cease. Finally, decreasing the background pressure from 18 to 0.05 Pa affected the pressure distribution in the nozzle including the pressure in the subsonic arc chamber.

  7. Initiation of arcing on tungsten surface exposed to steady state He plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Shin; Noiri, Yasuyuki; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2015-09-01

    Arcing was initiated in steady state helium plasmas by negatively biasing a tungsten electrode to around -500 V. On the tungsten electrode, nanostructures were grown by the plasma irradiation. In this study, we characterized the property of the initiated arcing by measuring the temporal evolutions of the electrode potential and the arc current. The ignition frequency and duration of arcing were presented from the potential measurements; the arc duration was in the range of changing the biasing voltage. The behavior of arc spots was observed with a fast framing camera. It was shown that the spots split frequently, and sometimes, they run on the surface independently. From the fluctuation of the arc current, the fractal feature of arcing was revealed.

  8. Studies on the Application of Plasma Arc Technology to Destruction of Shipboard Waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    ..., and how plasma arc technology is applied to waste treatment. It provides a description of the development of the plasma arc research facility at NRL and the experimental and theoretical modeling that was conducted at NRL from 1995 to 1998...

  9. A tale of two arcs? Plate tectonics of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc using subducted slab constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Published plate reconstructions typically show the Izu-Bonin Marianas arc (IBM) forming as a result of long-lived ~50 Ma Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea. These reconstructions rely on the critical assumption that the Philippine Sea was continuously coupled to the Pacific during the lifetime of the IBM arc. Because of this assumption, significant (up to 1500 km) Pacific trench retreat is required to accommodate the 2000 km of Philippine Sea/IBM northward motion since the Eocene that is constrained by paleomagnetic data. In this study, we have mapped subducted slabs of mantle lithosphere from MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008) and restored them to a model Earth surface to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions. Here we present two subducted slab constraints that call into question current IBM arc reconstructions: 1) The northern and central Marianas slabs form a sub-vertical 'slab wall' down to maximum 1500 km depths in the lower mantle. This slab geometry is best explained by a near-stationary Marianas trench that has remained +/- 250 km E-W of its present-day position since ~45 Ma, and does not support any significant Pacific slab retreat. 2) A vanished ocean is revealed by an extensive swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 700 to 1000 km depths in the lower mantle below present-day Philippine Sea to Papua New Guinea. We call this vanished ocean the 'East Asian Sea'. When placed in an Eocene plate reconstruction, the East Asian Sea fits west of the reconstructed Marianas Pacific trench position and north of the Philippine Sea plate. This implies that the Philippine Sea and Pacific were not adjacent at IBM initiation, but were in fact separated by a lost ocean. Here we propose a new IBM arc reconstruction constrained by subducted slabs mapped under East Asia. At ~50 Ma, the present-day IBM arc initiated at equatorial latitudes from East Asian Sea subduction below the Philippine Sea. A separate arc was formed from Pacific subduction below

  10. Seismic velocity variation along the Izu-Bonin arc estaimated from traveltime tomography using OBS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, K.; Tamura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc is an intra-oceanic island arc along the convergent plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding Philippine Sea plates. Recent active seismic studies in the Izu-Bonin arc reveal significant along-arc variations in crustal structure [Kodaira et al., 2007]. The thickness of the arc crust shows a remarkable change between thicker Izu (~30 km) and thinner Bonin (~10 km) arcs. In addition to this, several geological and geophysical contrasts, such as seafloor topography and chemical composition of volcanic rocks, between Izu and Bonin arc have been reported [e.g., Yuasa 1992]. We have conducted earthquake observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to reveal seismic velocity structure of the crust and mantle wedge in the Izu-Bonin arc and to investigate origin of the along-arc structure variations. We deployed 40 short-period OBSs in Izu and Bonin area in 2006 and 2009, respectively. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at routine seismic stations on Hachijo-jima, Aoga-shima, and Chichi-jima operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). More than 5000 earthquakes were observed during about three-months observation period in each experiment. We conducted three-dimensional seismic tomography using manually picked P- and S-wave arrival time data. The obtained image shows a different seismic velocity structures in the mantle beneath the volcanic front between Izu and Bonin arcs. Low P-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the volcanic front in the Izu arc are limited at depths deeper than those in the Bonin arc. On the other hand, P-wave velocity in the low velocity anomalies beneath volcanic front in the Bonin arc is slower than that in the Izu arc. These large-scale along-arc structure variations in the mantle could relate to the geological and geophysical contrasts between Izu and Bonin arcs.

  11. Plasma drifts associated with a system of sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, S.B.; Doolittle, J.H.; Robinson, R.M.; Vondrak, R.R.; Rich, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of four sun-aligned arcs passed over Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, on the night of the 17th and 18th of February, 1985. Observations of these arcs were made using the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and an intensified all-sky imaging TV system that was operated at the radar site. The first of the four arcs crossed the Sondre Stromfjord meridian just before local midnight moving westward, and the other three arcs followed at approximately half-hour intervals. When we account for the earth's rotation, the arc drift in an inertial frame was eastward, or dusk to dawn. The half-hour interval between meridian crossings of the arcs implies that the mean spacing between the arcs was 180 km. A Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F6 satellite pass at 0110 UT revealed the presence of highly structured electron and ion precipitation throughout the polar cap. The DMSP visible imager detected a single, sun-aligned arc associated with the largest peak in precipitating electron flux. This arc was also observed at Thule, Greenland, with an intensified film camera. These observations suggest that at least one of the arcs that were observed at Sondre Stromfjord extended across a large part of the polar cap. The radar at Sondre Stromfjord measured electron density and ion drift velocities associated with the four arcs. The radar drift measurements were superimposed on the all-sky video images to determine the location of the measurements relative to the arcs. Plasma drifts outside the arcs were found to be both sunward and antisunward, while within the arcs the drifts were predominantly antisunward. The variability of the drifts in the direction parallel to the arcs indicates that the electric fields were highly structured even though the configuration and motion of the arcs were well behaved

  12. Model experiments to study the first wall erosion by vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, D.A.; Saksagansky, G.L. (Leningradskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. (USSR). Electrophysical Apparatus); Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E.; Manuaba, A. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest. Central Research Inst. for Physics)

    Unipolar arcs acting on the first wall of future thermonuclear reactors were modelled by bipolar arcs burning on the side surface of a cylindrical titanium cathode. Erosion rate and spatial distribution of the material sputtered in arcs were investigated by Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis of collector probes. The obtianed results will be discussed as a function of arc current and the intensity of the applied vault-shaped magnetic field. (orig.).

  13. Model experiments to study the first wall erosion by vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, D.A.; Saksagansky, G.L.; Paszti, F.; Szilagyi, E.; Manuaba, A.

    1989-01-01

    Unipolar arcs acting on the first wall of future thermonuclear reactors were modelled by bipolar arcs burning on the side surface of a cylindrical titanium cathode. Erosion rate and spatial distribution of the material sputtered in arcs were investigated by Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis of collector probes. The obtianed results will be discussed as a function of arc current and the intensity of the applied vault-shaped magnetic field. (orig.)

  14. Three-dimensional modelling of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heping; Chen Xi

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling results are presented concerning a direct current (dc) non-transferred arc plasma torch with axisymmetrical geometrical configuration and axisymmetrical boundary conditions. It is shown that the arc is locally attached at the anode surface of the plasma torch, and the heat transfer and plasma flow within the torch are of 3D features. The predicted arc root location at the anode surface and arc voltage of the torch are very consistent with corresponding experimental results. (author)

  15. D.C.-arc plasma generator for nonequilibrium plasmachemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvaltin, J.

    1990-06-01

    The analysis is made of the conditions for generation of nonequilibrium plasma in a plasmachemical reactor, and the design is described of a d.c. arc plasma generator based on the integral criterion. Results of measuring potentials on the plasma column of this generator are presented. (author)

  16. Plasma flow in a pressure pulsed argon cascade arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, J.C.M.; Bol, L.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Timmermans, C.J.; Timmermans, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Flowing thermal plasmas are frequently used e . g. in welding, cutting, plasma deposition and testing materials at high temperatures . In most of the applications the geometry is complex . In the cascade arc the argon plasma flows through a straight circular channel with a constant area. The study

  17. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  18. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Andre

    2005-01-01

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f 2 , where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion

  19. Automatic Control of Arc Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Pulumbarit, Robert B.; Victor, Joe

    2004-01-01

    An automatic-control system has been devised for a process in which carbon nanotubes are produced in an arc between a catalyst-filled carbon anode and a graphite cathode. The control system includes a motor-driven screw that adjusts the distance between the electrodes. The system also includes a bridge circuit that puts out a voltage proportional to the difference between (1) the actual value of potential drop across the arc and (2) a reference value between 38 and 40 V (corresponding to a current of about 100 A) at which the yield of carbon nanotubes is maximized. Utilizing the fact that the potential drop across the arc increases with the interelectrode gap, the output of the bridge circuit is fed to a motor-control circuit that causes the motor to move the anode toward or away from the cathode if the actual potential drop is more or less, respectively, than the reference potential. Thus, the system regulates the interelectrode gap to maintain the optimum potential drop. The system also includes circuitry that records the potential drop across the arc and the relative position of the anode holder as function of time.

  20. The transport mechanism DC arcs in advanced spectroanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, H.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Nickel, H.

    1977-08-01

    This report presents some basic investigations concerning the emission spectroanalysis of powder specimens with application of a new type of advanced DC arcs which operate in horizontally arranged graphite cylinders. The extremely low detection limits found by experiment for various elements (Be, Cd, In, Pb, Sn) suggest a beneficial and reflector like effect of the graphite cylinder on the transport process in the arc plasma. Experiments in detail and by using radioactive tracers (Ag-110, Cd-115, Co-56, Fe-59, Zn-65) lead to an element specific modified model of the effective mechanism of the new arc arrangement. Elements of favourable thermochemical properties produce about three times as much of the average particle density in the arc plasma with the effect of the graphite cylinder. Besides these effects the element specific properties of the graphite cylinder are remarkably invariable towards magnetic fields (1,24 . 10 -2 T bzw. 2,6 . 10 -4 T) and various additives (Ga 2 O 3 , Li 2 Co 3 , NaCl) to the test specimens. (orig.) [de