WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-retrievable implant screw

  1. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  2. Virtual estimates of fastening strength for pedicle screw implantation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Camp, Jon J.; Augustine, Kurt E.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional 2D images provide limited use for accurate planning of spine interventions, mainly due to the complex 3D anatomy of the spine and close proximity of nerve bundles and vascular structures that must be avoided during the procedure. Our previously developed clinician-friendly platform for spine surgery planning takes advantage of 3D pre-operative images, to enable oblique reformatting and 3D rendering of individual or multiple vertebrae, interactive templating, and placement of virtual pedicle implants. Here we extend the capabilities of the planning platform and demonstrate how the virtual templating approach not only assists with the selection of the optimal implant size and trajectory, but can also be augmented to provide surrogate estimates of the fastening strength of the implanted pedicle screws based on implant dimension and bone mineral density of the displaced bone substrate. According to the failure theories, each screw withstands a maximum holding power that is directly proportional to the screw diameter (D), the length of the in-bone segm,ent of the screw (L), and the density (i.e., bone mineral density) of the pedicle body. In this application, voxel intensity is used as a surrogate measure of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the pedicle body segment displaced by the screw. We conducted an initial assessment of the developed platform using retrospective pre- and post-operative clinical 3D CT data from four patients who underwent spine surgery, consisting of a total of 26 pedicle screws implanted in the lumbar spine. The Fastening Strength of the planned implants was directly assessed by estimating the intensity - area product across the pedicle volume displaced by the virtually implanted screw. For post-operative assessment, each vertebra was registered to its homologous counterpart in the pre-operative image using an intensity-based rigid registration followed by manual adjustment. Following registration, the Fastening Strength was computed

  3. Influence of bacterial colonization of the healing screws on peri-implant tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta D'Ercole

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: The healing screws left in situ for a period of 90 days caused a peri-implant inflammation and the presence of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in the peri-implant sulcus, due to the plaque accumulation on screw surfaces.

  4. A modified technique for removing a failed abutment screw from an implant with a custom guide tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Fracture of abutment screw is a serious prosthodontic complication. When the abutment screw is fractured at the junction of the screw shank and screw thread, removal of the fractured screw fragment from the screw hole can be difficult. This article describes a modified technique for removing the failed abutment screw with a custom guide tube and tungsten carbide bur. The failed screw can be removed speedily without damaging the screw hole of the implant body or the screw threads.

  5. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  6. Covering the screw-access holes of implant restorations in the esthetic zone: a clinical report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Saboury

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention as well as retrievability, and obviate the risk of excessive sub-gingival cement commonly associated with cement retained implant restorations. Screw-retained restorations generally have screw access holes, which can compromise esthetics and weaken the porcelain around the holes. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of a separate overcasting crown design to cover the screw access hole of implant screw-retained prosthesis for improved esthetics.

  7. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  8. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  9. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Miguel Saliba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm, with p=0.001. CONCLUSION: This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws.

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by titanium screws and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Maki; Nishigawa, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Youji; Ohe, Go; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2016-07-01

    Titanium has been considered to be a non-allergenic material. However, several studies have reported cases of metal allergy caused by titanium-containing materials. We describe a 69-year-old male for whom significant pathologic findings around dental implants had never been observed. He exhibited allergic symptoms (eczema) after orthopedic surgery. The titanium screws used in the orthopedic surgery that he underwent were removed 1 year later, but the eczema remained. After removal of dental implants, the eczema disappeared completely. Titanium is used not only for medical applications such as plastic surgery and/or dental implants, but also for paints, white pigments, photocatalysts, and various types of everyday goods. Most of the usage of titanium is in the form of titanium dioxide. This rapid expansion of titanium-containing products has increased percutaneous and permucosal exposure of titanium to the population. In general, allergic risk of titanium material is smaller than that of other metal materials. However, we suggest that pre-implant patients should be asked about a history of hypersensitivity reactions to metals, and patch testing should be recommended to patients who have experienced such reactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel approach to navigated implantation of S-2 alar iliac screws using inertial measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregory F; Walti, Jonas; Mariani, Luigi; Cattin, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on a novel method of intraoperative navigation with inertial measurement units (IMUs) for implantation of S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screws in sacropelvic fixation of the human spine and its application in cadaveric specimens. Screw trajectories were planned on a multiplanar reconstruction of the preoperative CT scan. The pedicle finder and screwdriver were equipped with IMUs to guide the axial and sagittal tilt angles of the planned trajectory, and navigation software was developed. The entry points were chosen according to anatomical landmarks on the exposed spine. After referencing, the sagittal and axial orientation of the pedicle finder and screwdriver were wirelessly monitored on a computer screen and aligned with the preoperatively planned tilt angles to implant the S2AI screws. The technique was performed without any intraoperative imaging. Screw positions were analyzed on postoperative CT scans. Seventeen of 18 screws showed a good S2AI screw trajectory. Compared with the postoperatively measured tilt angles of the S2AI screws, the IMU readings on the screwdriver were within an axial plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 2 (11%) of the screws and within a sagittal plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 3 (17%) of the screws. IMU-based intraoperative navigation may facilitate accurate placement of S2AI screws.

  12. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  13. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....

  14. Immediate placement and loading of implants in anterior maxilla using an altered screw-retained implant fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Mirza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the immediate placement and loading of implants in the aesthetic zone using an implant-retained, fixed prosthesis with a modified design. One section of the implant prosthesis has cemented crowns and the other section is the conventional screw-retained. This combined approach significantly offsets the unsuitable implant position, alignment or angulation, while ensuring the easy retrievability, repair and maintenance of the prosthesis at the same time.

  15. An accuracy study of computer-planned implant placement in the augmented maxilla using osteosynthesis screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, L M; Meijer, G J; Soehardi, A; Bergé, S J; Xi, T; Maal, T J J

    2017-04-01

    Previous research on the accuracy of flapless implant placement of virtually planned implants in the augmented maxilla revealed unfavourable discrepancies between implant planning and placement. By using the osteosynthesis screws placed during the augmentation procedure, the surgical template could be optimally stabilized. The purpose of this study was to validate this method by evaluating its clinically relevant accuracy. Twelve consecutive fully edentulous patients with extreme resorption of the maxilla were treated with a bone augmentation procedure. Virtual implant planning was performed and a surgical template was manufactured. Subsequently, six implants were installed using the surgical template, which was only supported by the osteosynthesis screws. Implant deviations between planning and placement were calculated. A total of 72 implants were installed. Mean deviations found in the mesiodistal direction were 0.817mm at the implant tip and 0.528mm at the implant shoulder. The angular deviation was 2.924°. In the buccolingual direction, a deviation of 1.038mm was registered at the implant tip and 0.633mm at the implant shoulder. The angular deviation was 3.440°. This study showed that implant placement in the augmented maxilla using a surgical template supported by osteosynthesis screws is accurate.

  16. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....... and 2 molars were removed in such a manner that in approximately half the cases, the root tips were retained. Following healing, the experimental areas were examined on radiographs, and sites were selected for the insertion of the implants, so that every second implant would have a close contact...

  17. Magnesium-Based Compression Screws: A Novelty in the Clinical Use of Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Jan-Marten; Lucas, Arne; Kirschner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys are currently subject to much research for use in biodegradable implant applications. The challenge in this field of material development comprises the design of an alloy that provides adequate mechanical and corrosion properties combined with an excellent biocompatibility. While there are many approaches in current literature only one Mg-based application shows the potential to hit the market. MAGNEZIX® Compression Screws are the world's first approved/CE-certified magnesium-based implants designed for use in biodegradable osteosyntheses applications in humans. Therefore, this paper focusses on challenges and current clinical results achieved by means of degradable compression screws. Insights into the screws' process chain and approval processes are given. As these innovative screws have already been on the market for 2 years long-term results based on their use in surgery are discussed.

  18. Long-term evaluation of hollow screw and hollow cylinder dental implants : Clinical and radiographic results after 10 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background: In 1988, an implant manufacturer offered a new dental implant system, with a wide choice of hollow cylinder (HC) and hollow screw (HS) implants. The purpose of this retrospective study of HS and HC implants was to evaluate clinical and radiographic parameters of peri-implant tissue and

  19. Impact of implant composition of twin-screw extruded lipid implants on the release behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Marie-Paule; Bobbala, Sharan; Kooi, Kok Liang; Hook, Sarah; Winter, Gerhard; Engert, Julia

    2015-09-30

    The development of vaccine delivery systems that will remove or reduce the need for repeated dosing has led to the investigation of sustained release systems. In this context, the duration of antigen release is of great importance as is the requirement for concomitant adjuvant release. In this work, lipid implants consisting of cholesterol (CHOL), soybean lecithin, Dynasan 114 (D114), the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and the adjuvant Quil-A (QA) were produced by twin-screw extrusion. The release of antigen and adjuvant was investigated in vitro and we observed complete OVA release over a period of 7 days while QA was released in a linear fashion over a period of up to 12 days. In order to extend OVA release, lipid implants were subjected to post-extrusion curing at 45-55°C. The OVA release could be extended to up to 14 days. Furthermore the influence of the implant composition on the release of the model antigen was investigated. It was shown that the percentage of cholesterol in particular plays an important role in modulating release.

  20. Immediate loading of titanium hexed screw-type implants in the edentulous patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M P; Muller, E; Garg, A K

    2000-01-01

    Histologic and histomorphometric studies in both animals and humans have shown that more rapid and greater bone-to-implant contact can be achieved with implants that incorporate certain surface characteristics compared with the original machined-surface implants. Such findings are significant because various implant designs may allow the fixtures to sufficiently resist functional loading sooner than originally thought. The case report presented here indicates that immediate loading of hexed titanium screw-type implants in the anterior mandible can lead to successful osseointegration and clinical outcome. The number of implants placed, their distribution, and the type of rigid connection are critical considerations for immediate loading. A bone height that can accommodate dental implants > or = 10 mm long is recommended. Biomechanically, the implants to be immediately loaded must be stable and resistant to macromovement to ensure good osseointegration.

  1. Optimal area of lateral mass mini-screws implanted in plated cervical laminoplasty: a radiography anatomy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Li, Huibo; Deng, Yuxiao; Rong, Xin; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming; Liu, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Lateral mass mini-screws used in plated cervical laminoplasty might penetrate into facet joints. The objective is to observe this complication incidence and to identify the optimal areas for 5- and 7-mm-long mini-screws to implant on lateral mass. 47 patients who underwent plated cervical laminoplasty were included. The optimal area for mini-screws implanting was set according to pre-operative 3D CT reconstruction data. Then, each posterior-lateral mass surface was divided into three regions: 7-mm region, 5-mm region, and dangerous area. The mini-screw implanted region was recorded. Post-operative CT images were used to identify whether the mini-screws penetrated into facet joints. 235 mini-plates and 470 lateral mass mini-screws were used in the study. 117 (24.9%) mini-screws penetrated 88 (37.4%) facet joints. The 5-mm-long mini-screw optimal area occupied the upper 72, 65, 65, 64, and 65 % area of the posterior-lateral mass surface for C3-7, while the 7-mm-long mini-screw optimal area encompassed the upper 54, 39, 40, 33, and 32 %. Only 7-mm-long mini-screws were used to fix the plate to the lateral mass. 4 of 240 mini-screws in 7-mm region, 67 of the 179 mini-screws in 5-mm region, and 46 of the 51 mini-screws in dangerous region penetrated into the facet joint. The differences in the rate of facet joint penetration related to region were statistically significant (P areas we proposed may help guide the mini-screw implantation positions.

  2. Corrosion of magnesium alloy AZ31 screws is dependent on the implantation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willbold, E. [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany); Kaya, A.A. [Mugla University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Mugla (Turkey); Kaya, R.A. [MedicalPark Hospital, Kueltuer Sok No:1, 34160 Bahcelievler, Istanbul (Turkey); Beckmann, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str.1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Witte, F., E-mail: witte.frank@mh-hannover.de [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Strasse 1-7, D - 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The corrosion of biodegradable materials is a crucial issue in implant development. Among other materials, magnesium and magnesium based alloys are one of the most promising candidates. Since the corrosion of biodegradable materials depends on different physiological parameters like pH or ion concentrations, the corrosion might be different in different biological environments. To investigate this issue, we produced screws from magnesium alloy AZ31 and implanted them into the hip bone of 14 sheep. After 3 and 6 months, the screws were explanted and analyzed with synchrotron-radiation based micro-computed tomography and hard tissue histology. We found considerable differences in the corrosion behavior of the magnesium screws with respect to its original tissue location. However, we could detect a normal immunological tissue response.

  3. [Application of endosseous screw implants. Indications and planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajarola, G F; Sailer, H F

    1991-01-01

    To achieve long term positive results for endosseous dental implants, three points have to be considered: the osséointegration, the correct indication and the suprastructural planification designed for the spécific type of implant. If the surgery part is done by a different practitioner as the prosthetic part, tight coworking for planning is necessary and the responsibility in each step has to be cleared in advance. The planification in implant cases is divided into three stages: clearing of contraindications, choice of the suprastructure, and the surgery planning. Aids for exact localisation of the implants are presented.

  4. Effect of Vertical Misfit on Screw Joint Stability of Implant-Supported Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2011-08-01

    The passive fit between prosthesis and implant is a relevant factor for screw joint stability and treatment success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface on preload maintenance of retention screw of implant-supported crowns. The crowns were fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials and divided into 5 groups ( n = 12): Gold UCLA abutments cast in gold alloy veneered with ceramic (Group I) and resin (Group II), UCLA abutments cast in titanium veneered with ceramic (Group III) and resin (Group IV), and zirconia abutments with ceramic veneering (Group V). The crowns were attached to implants by gold retention screws with 35-N cm insertion torque. Specimens were submitted to mechanical cycling up to 106 cycles. Measurements of detorque and vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface were performed before and after mechanical cycling. ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference ( P 0.05) between vertical misfit and detorque value. It was concluded that vertical misfit did not influence torque maintenance and the abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values.

  5. Mechanistic studies on the release of lysozyme from twin-screw extruded lipid implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Gerhard; Winter, Gerhard

    2012-10-28

    The influence of lipid melting on the in-vitro release of lysozyme from twin-screw extruded lipid implants was investigated. Triglyceride based implants were prepared by admixing of glycerol tristearin and various low melting lipids and subsequent twin-screw extrusion (tsc-extrusion) of these mixtures at moderate temperatures. Lysozyme was embedded as model protein and PEG 4000 or PEG 6000 was used as pore-forming excipient. By decreasing the amount of pore-forming agent from 40% to 0% lysozyme release became more sustained and the release kinetics changed from a matrix-type release profile to a linear release profile. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy measurements showed a change in implant structure upon long-term release (240 days) at 37 °C which was explained by partial matrix melting. In addition, partial melting of the implants was found to facilitate complete drug release at 37 °C whereas at 20 °C without partial melting 20% to 90% of the incorporated protein remained trapped in the implant matrix. In conclusion, partial melting of the implants during in-vitro release was found to be a major factor for the control of protein release from extruded implants and can be useful to trigger release, achieve in-vivo biodegradability and complete long-term protein release.

  6. Numerical simulation of in vivo intraosseous torsional failure of a hollow-screw oral implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akca Kivanc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the complexity and magnitude of functional forces transferred to the bone-implant interface, the mechanical strength of the interface is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraosseous torsional shear strength of an osseointegrated oral implant using 3-D finite element (FE stress analysis implemented by in vivo failure torque data of an implant. Methods A Ø 3.5 mm × 12 mm ITI® hollow screw dental implant in a patient was subjected to torque failure test using a custom-made strain-gauged manual torque wrench connected to a data acquisition system. The 3-D FE model of the implant and peri-implant circumstances was constructed. The in vivo strain data was converted to torque units (N.cm to involve in loading definition of FE analysis. Upon processing of the FE analysis, the shear stress of peri-implant bone was evaluated to assume torsional shear stress strength of the bone-implant interface. Results The in vivo torque failure test yielded 5952 μstrains at custom-made manual torque wrench level and conversion of the strain data resulted in 750 N.cm. FE revealed that highest shear stress value in the trabecular bone, 121 MPa, was located at the first intimate contact with implant. Trabecular bone in contact with external surface of hollow implant body participated shear stress distribution, but not the bone resting inside of the hollow. Conclusion The torsional strength of hollow-screw implants is basically provided by the marginal bone and the hollow part has negligible effect on interfacial shear strength.

  7. Biological and biomechanical evaluation of interface reaction at conical screw-type implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seper László

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initial stability of the implant is, in effect, one of the fundamental criteria for obtaining long-term osseointegration. Achieving implant stability depends on the implant-bone relation, the surgical technique and on the microscopic and macroscopic morphology of the implant used. A newly designed parabolic screw-type dental implant system was tested in vivo for early stages of interface reaction at the implant surface. Methods A total of 40 implants were placed into the cranial and caudal part of the tibia in eight male Göttinger minipigs. Resonance frequency measurements (RFM were made on each implant at the time of fixture placement, 7 days and 28 days thereafter in all animals. Block biopsies were harvested 7 and 28 days (four animals each following surgery. Biomechanical testing, removable torque tests (RTV, resonance frequency analysis; histological and histomorphometric analysis as well as ultrastructural investigations (scanning electron microscopy (SEM were performed. Results Implant stability in respect to the measured RTV and RFM-levels were found to be high after 7 days of implants osseointegration and remained at this level during the experimented course. Additionally, RFM level demonstrated no alteration towards baseline levels during the osseointegration. No significant increase or decrease in the mean RFM (6029 Hz; 6256 Hz and 5885 Hz after 0-, 7- and 28 days were observed. The removal torque values show after 7 and 28 days no significant difference. SEM analysis demonstrated a direct bone to implant contact over the whole implant surface. The bone-to-implant contact ratio increased from 35.8 ± 7.2% to 46.3 ± 17.7% over time (p = 0,146. Conclusion The results of this study indicate primary stability of implants which osseointegrated with an intimate bone contact over the whole length of the implant.

  8. An implant-supported, screw-retained, provisional fixed partial denture for pontic site enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, Ricardo; Phillips, Keith; Kois, John C

    2005-01-01

    Due to remodeling of the edentulous ridge following tooth extraction, clinicians and dental technicians face a variety of challenges when attempting to deliver an aesthetic fixed partial denture for the anterior maxilla. An implant-supported, screw-retained fixed partial denture provisional restoration can be utilized in order to manipulate the pontic site with predictable success. This technique can create the illusion of pontics emerging from the soft tissue, creating a natural-looking effect for seating of the definitive restoration.

  9. In vitro effect of chlorhexidine gel on torque and detorque values of implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Neshandar Asli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Use of chlorhexidine (CHX gel to eliminate the malodor of implant cavity may decrease the friction coefficient and effective preload and result in abutment screw loosening. This study aimed to assess the effect of CHX gel on the preload, torque, and detorque values. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on three groups of five implants. Group A (G1 was the control group and no material was applied to the implant cavity. In Group B (G2, implant cavity was filled with saliva before abutment screw tightening. In Group C (G3, implant cavity was first filled with saliva and then with CHX gel. The abutments were torqued to 24 N/cm2 according to the manufacturer's instructions and were then loosened. These processes were repeated five times. The ratio of the mean percentage of detorque to torque values was measured in all groups. The collected data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: No significant difference was noted between G1 and G2. Group G2 had significantly higher detorque value (p < 0.05. ANOVA detected a significant difference in the mean torque (p < 0.05 and detorque (p < 0.001 values among the three groups. G3 showed maximum difference between torque and detorque values; the minimum difference was noted in G2. Conclusion: Application of CHX gel (to decrease the malodor of the implant cavity decreases the detorque and preload values and increases the risk of screw loosening.

  10. Efficacy of Sealing Agents on Preload Maintenance of Screw-Retained Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seloto, Camila Berbel; Strazzi Sahyon, Henrico Badaoui; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sealing agents on preload maintenance of screw joints. A total of four groups (n = 10 in each group) of abutment/implant systems, including external hexagon implants and antirotational UCLA abutments with a metallic collar in cobalt-chromium alloy, were assessed. In the control group (CG), no sealing agent was used at the abutment screw/implant interface. In the other groups, three different sealing agents were used at the abutment screw/implant interface: anaerobic sealing agent for medium torque (ASMT), anaerobic sealing agent for high torque (ASHT), and cyanoacrylate-based bonding agent (CYAB). All abutments were attached to the implants at 32 ± 1 N.cm. After 48 ± 2 hours of initial tightening, loosing torque (detorque) was measured using a digital torque wrench. Data were analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk, Wilcoxon, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, at 5% level of significance. In the CG and ASMT groups, detorque was lower than the insertion torque (24.6 ± 1.5 N.cm and 24.3 ± 1.1 N.cm, respectively). In the ASHT and CYAB groups, mean detorque increased in comparison to the insertion torque (51.0 ± 7.4 N.cm and 47.7 ± 15.1 N.cm, respectively). The ASHT was more efficient than the other sealing agents, increasing the remaining preload (detorque value) 58.88%. Although the cyanoacrylate-based bonding agent also generated high detorque values, the high standard deviation suggested its lower reliability.

  11. Tissue reaction to implants of different metals: A study using guide wires in cannulated screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Devine

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cannulated screws, along with guide wires, are typically used for surgical fracture treatment in cancellous bone. Breakage or bending deformation of the guide wire is a clinical concern. Mechanically superior guide wires made of Co-Cr alloys such as MP35N and L605 may reduce the occurrence of mechanical failures when used in combination with conventional (316L stainless steel cannulated screws. However the possibility of galvanic or crevice corrosion and adverse tissue reaction, exists when using dissimilar materials, particularly in the event that a guide wire breaks, and remains in situ. Therefore, we designed an experiment to determine the tissue reaction to such an in vivo environment. Implant devices were designed to replicate a clinical situation where dissimilar metals can form a galvanic couple. Histological and SEM analyses were used to evaluate tissue response and corrosion of the implants. In this experiment, no adverse in vivo effects were detected from the use of dissimilar materials in a model of a broken guide wire in a cannulated screw.

  12. In vivo investigation of twin-screw extruded lipid implants for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Marie-Paule; Young, Katie; Winter, Gerhard; Hook, Sarah; Engert, Julia

    2014-07-01

    Sustained release systems have become the focus of attention in vaccine delivery as they may reduce or prevent the need for repeated dosing. In this work, lipid implants were prepared by twin-screw extrusion and investigated as vaccine delivery systems in vivo. The lipid implants consisted of cholesterol, soybean lecithin, and Dynasan 114. Ovalbumin (OVA) was employed as a model antigen and Quil-A (QA) as an adjuvant. In addition, OVA and QA loaded liposomes were prepared by the lipid-film hydration method, freeze-dried and then added to the lipid matrix prior to extrusion. Implants were administered subcutaneously and the kinetics of antigen release as well as the overall immune response stimulated were analysed by measuring CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation, OVA-specific IgG production as well as cytokine (IFN-γ and IL4) secretion. Vaccine release from the implants was completed by 14 days. Inclusion of adjuvant into the implants was required for the generation of cellular and humoral immune responses. Inclusion of liposomes into the implant did not enhance the resulting immune responses generated.

  13. CAD/CAM-fabricated template for locating implant abutment screws in cement-retained anatomic zirconia restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2015-09-01

    Currently, appropriate access to the abutment screw within cement-retained implant restorations is determined using labor-intensive techniques. The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture technology has facilitated a digitized fabrication process to yield a template that can enhance the accuracy of drilling a screw channel. This article describes the method used to create these guide templates by using advanced dental design programs and machining.

  14. Evaluation of the Sealing Capability of the Implant Healing Screw by Using Real Time Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis: Internal Hexagon Versus Cone Morse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, A; Lorusso, C; Di Giulio, C; Mazzatenta, A

    2016-12-01

    Implant sealing capability is a crucial issue in assessment of implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss. Clinical studies demonstrated presence of viable bacteria in the internal part of functioning implants during tissue healing. For this study, a volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission test was developed to evaluate the existing "seal" between implant and healing screw. Two kinds of implant-screw connection were compared: 1) internal hexagon; and 2) cone Morse. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study, three males and 12 females, who required fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. A total of 37 implants was placed, 23 with a cone Morse taper internal connection and 14 with a screw-retained internal hexagon abutment. VOCs real-time measures were performed in the implant site immediately after removing the healing screw. Statistical analysis was carried out. Results showed VOCs maximum peak amplitude in cone Morse versus internal hexagon showed significant difference (P <0.001), whereas VOCs time to peak showed no significant difference (P = 0.7). Use of the new methodology for the VOCs emission test may lead to important new data for understanding how the "failed" attachment of implant components, in two-part assemblies, may contribute to implant losses. In particular, study results support the hypothesis that the microgap of the implant-screw healing junction could cause differences in bacterial penetration. VOCs emission test evaluation represents a new diagnostic tool with an effective approach to quickly analyze, in real time, sealing capability of dental implants with healing screw interfaces.

  15. Mechanical resistance of screwless morse taper and screw-retained implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurel, Cihan Sadi; Steiner, Martin; Isik-Ozkol, Gul; Kutay, Omer; Kern, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    The screwless morse taper (SMT) implant-abutment connection is an alternative to conventional external or internal screw-retained (ISR) connections. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate mechanical resistance of the SMT connection and to compare it with three different ISR connections. Four implant systems were tested in this study: SMT system; Tasarimmed Octo (Istanbul, Turkey), ISR systems; Straumann Bone Level (Basel, Switzerland), Biohorizons Internal (Birmingham, AL, USA), and Dentsply Friadent Xive (Mannheim, Germany). Overall, 64 specimens with stylized single crowns were prepared: 32 for dynamic loading (DL) and 32 for static loading (SL). DL was carried out using a chewing simulator with 120 N at 1.75 Hz for 1.2 × 10(6) cycles, and SL was performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min with an angulation of 30°. Cycles until failure from DL and fracture/bending loads at SL were recorded. Statistical analyses were made with Dunn's multiple comparison. Median cycles until failure in DL were as follows: Octo 86,354 (24,810-153,875), Straumann 1,200,000 (1,156,618-1,200,000), Biohorizons 539,719 (437,224-858,732), Xive 139,411 (139,411-139,411). Median fracture/bending loads in Newton at SL were as follows: Octo 429.6 (404.5-482.7), Straumann 574.6 (544.6-629.9), Biohorizons 548.7 (532.9-567.3), Xive 431.5 (412.5-520.5). There were significant differences between the implant systems under both loading conditions (P ≤ 0.05) revealing that the Octo implant system's SMT connection showed significantly lower cycles to failures and lower fracture/bending loads compared with the ISR connections of the Straumann and Biohorizons implant systems. However, there was no significant difference compared with the Xive implant system. The mechanical resistance of the screwless morse taper implant system is lower than that of the ISR implant systems that might result in more frequent clinical complications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A

  16. Evaluation of soft tissues around single tooth implants in the anterior maxilla restored with cemented and screw-retained crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Emerson Souza; Peruzzo, Daiane Cristina; Benatti, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Implant-supported restorations can be attached as screw-retained or cemented prostheses. In both situations, the characteristics of the soft tissues around the implants are crucial for oral rehabilitation and patient satisfaction. Therefore, this study uses the Pink Esthetic Score (PES), which allows evaluation of gingival esthetics around implants, to evaluate the soft tissues around implants in the anterior maxilla rehabilitated with cemented prostheses (CP) and screw-retained prostheses (SP). Forty implants placed in the anterior maxilla were evaluated, and these had been rehabilitated with prosthetic crowns for a minimum of 1 year. Periodontal examination was performed to evaluate probing depth (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) of the implant and the corresponding natural tooth. The total mean (±SD) PES for SP was 10.73 (±1.98) and 10.41 (±2.67) for CP, which was not statistically significant (P ≥ .05). Periodontal examination revealed that CP and SP showed no difference for BOP (P ≥ .05). Differences were only detected in PD when comparing the reference teeth of both groups to CP and SP (P ≤ .05). The present study demonstrates that the PES proved to be an efficient index to assess peri-implant tissues, and that the type of crown retention does not influence the health and quality of the soft tissues around implants.

  17. Screw augmentation reduces motion at the bone-implant interface: a biomechanical study of locking plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Seifert, Robert; Rosslenbroich, Steffen B; Theisen, Christina; Wähnert, Dirk; Raschke, Michael J; Weimann, Andre

    2015-12-01

    Shear forces at the bone-implant interface lead to a loss of reduction after locking plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures. The aim of the study was to analyze the roles of medial support screws and screw augmentation in failure loads and motion at the bone-implant interface after locking plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures. Unstable 3-part fractures were simulated in 6 pairs of cadaveric humeri and were fixed with a DiPhos-H locking plate (Lima Corporate, Udine, Italy). An additional medial support screw was implanted in 1 humerus of every donor. The opposite humerus was stabilized with a medial support screw and additional bone cement augmentation of the 2 anteriorly directed head screws. Specimens were loaded in the varus bending position. Stiffness, failure loads, plate bending, and the motion at the bone-implant interface were evaluated using an optical motion capture system. The mean load to failure was 669 N (standard deviation [SD], 117 N) after fixation with medial support screws alone and 706 N (SD, 153 N) after additional head screw augmentation (P = .646). The initial stiffness was 453 N/mm (SD, 4.16 N/mm) and 461 N/mm (SD, 64.3 N/mm), respectively (P = .594). Plate bending did not differ between the 2 groups. However, motion at the bone-implant interface was significantly reduced after head screw augmentation (P Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of MR issues for the latest standard brands of orthopedic metal implants: Plates and screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yue-fen, E-mail: zou_yf@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Chu, Bin, E-mail: 18262636700@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Wang, Chuan-bing, E-mail: wangchuanb_csr@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Hu, Zhi-yi, E-mail: huzhiyi@medmail.com.cn [Department of Spine Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Although previous studies have indicated that most of the orthopedic implants are compatible in MR imaging system especially for titanium alloy, there are still concerns about the safety of patients with stainless steel implants, who were refused to a MR scan in most cases in our country. •In this study, it was verified that both titanium alloy and stainless steel materials (plates and screws) cause a weak force and low MRI-related heating at a 1.5-T or less, which do not pose an additional hazard or risk to patients. In addition, we also had explored the influence of different sequences and parameters on size of metallic artifacts to obtain optimized pulse sequences with appropriate parameters for reducing artifacts, which would be convenient and useful in clinical work. -- Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) issues for the latest standard brands of plates and screws used in orthopedic surgery at a 1.5-T MR system, including the safety and metallic artifacts. Methods: The plates and screws (made of titanium alloy and stainless steel materials, according to the latest standard brands) were assessed for displacement in degrees, MRI-related heating and artifacts at a 1.5-T MR system. The displacement in degrees of the plates and screws was evaluated on an angel-measurement instrument at the entrance of the MR scanner. The MRI-related heating was assessed on a swine leg fixed with a plate by using a “worst-case” pulse sequence. A rectangular water phantom was designed to evaluate metallic artifacts of a screw on different sequences (T1/T2-weighted FSE, STIR, T2-FSE fat saturation, GRE, DWI) and then artifacts were evaluated on T2-weighted FSE sequence by modifying the scanning parameters including field of view (FOV), echo train length (ETL) and bandwidth to identify the influence of parameters on metallic artifacts. 15 volunteers with internal vertebral fixation (titanium alloy materials) were scanned

  19. A novel approach to implant screw-retained restorations: adhesive combination between zirconia frameworks and monolithic lithium disilicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Giacomo; Sorrentino, Roberto; Brennan, Myra; Cerutti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The use of zirconia is an esthetic alternative to metal for implant-supported frameworks, and it has increased primarily for its high biocompatibility, low bacterial surface adhesion, high flexural strength and high mechanical features. The zirconia frameworks in fixed prosthetic restorations that are supported by implants is commonly covered with hand-layered overlay porcelain. This technical procedure is highly esthetic but it can cause some complications, such as porcelain fractures. The purpose of this article is to introduce an innovative approach to create an esthetic fixed ceramic implant restoration to minimize and facilitate the repair of the mechanical complications, by combining the adhesive-cementation of lithium disilicate full coverage restorations on implant screw-retained zirconia frameworks.

  20. Comparison of magnesium alloys and poly-l-lactide screws as degradable implants in a canine fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marukawa, Eriko; Tamai, Masato; Takahashi, Yukinobu; Hatakeyama, Ichiro; Sato, Masaru; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kakidachi, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takamitsu; Honda, Jun; Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate in vivo the biological responses to implants composed of biodegradable anodized WE43 (containing magnesium yttrium, rare earth elements and zirconium; Elektron SynerMag®) magnesium alloy, monolithic WE43 magnesium alloy and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), which are commonly used materials in clinic settings, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the materials as bone screws. The effectiveness of the magnesium alloy implants in osteosynthesis was evaluated using a bone fracture model involving the tibia of beagle dogs. For the monolithic WE43 implants, radiological, and histological evaluation revealed that bone trabeculae around the implanted monolithic WE43 decreased because of an inflammatory response. However, there was no damage due to hydrogen gas or inflammatory response in the bone tissue around the anodized WE43 implants. After 4 weeks, all the PLLA implants (n = 3) had broken but the WE43 implants had not (n = 6). These results suggest that the WE43 implants had sufficient strength to fix bone fractures at load-bearing sites in orthopedic and oral maxillofacial surgery. Therefore, these biodegradable magnesium alloys are good candidates for replacing biodegradable polymers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1282-1289, 2016.

  1. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load. PMID:27651885

  2. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load.

  3. Replacement of missing anterior tooth using screw retained implant prosthesis in the esthetic zone: a case report with 3 years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2014-09-01

    As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw-retained prosthesis to be the best choice. As both types of prostheses have certain advantages and disadvantages, clinicians should be aware of the limitations of each type. Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained sub-gingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminates unaesthetic screw access holes; have passive fit of castings; reduce stress to splinted implants because of minor misfit of the framework; reduced complexity of lab procedures; enhanced esthetics; reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. This case report presents the replacement of missing left central incisor using screw-retained implant prosthesis due to palatal trajectory of the implant placement and inadequate abutment height for retention of cement retained prosthesis.

  4. Dental materials and their performance for the management of screw access channels in implant-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Philipp; Alamanos, Christos; Hahnel, Sebastian; Papavasileiou, Dimitrios; Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin

    2017-03-31

    Unsuccessfully sealed screw access channels of prosthetic implant abutments may lead to malodor or peri-implant diseases in gingival tissues adjacent to implant-supported restorations. Therefore, 72 sets of screw channel analogs with six different materials incorporated (Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), wax, gutta-percha, cavit, endofrost-pellets and cotton pellets) were exposed (2.5 h, 37°C) to Streptococcus mutans, oralis and Candida albicans suspensions. Bacterial adherence was quantified by using the fluorescence dye, Alamar Blue/resazurin, and an automated multifunctional reader. For quantification of fungal adherence the ATP-based bioluminescence approach was used. High relative fluorescence and luminescence intensities (>10,000), indicating high adhesion of streptococci and fungi were found for cotton and endofrost-pellets and low intensities (wax, gutta-percha, cavit and PTFE. The quantity of bacterial and fungal adhesion differed significantly between the assessed various sealing materials. In conclusion and within the limitations of this study, wax, gutta-percha, cavit and PTFE should be preferred as sealing materials.

  5. Clinical efficacy of poking reduction, bone grafting and pedicle screw implanting through injured vertebra in treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the clinical efficacy of poking reduction, bone grafting and pedicle screw implanting through injured vertebra in treatment of thoracolumbar burst fracture. Methods  Fifty-seven patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures between January 2013 and December 2013 were treated in Chengdu Military General Hospital by poking reduction, bone grafting and pedicle screw implanting through injured vertebra. All the patients were observed and recorded for basic conditions and complications. At pre-operation, 1 week post-operation and last follow-up, pain visual analogue scale (VAS and neurological function score (ASIA were recorded and the compression ratio of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression ratio of spinal canal and Cobb angle were measured and statistically analyzed in all the patients. Results  All the patients acquired surgical success with operation time about 70-120min and blood loss about 120-280ml. There was no spinal cord or nerve injury and no dural tear during the surgery. All the patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months and the neurological function significantly recovered. X-ray and CT examination at last follow-up showed good fracture healing, good position and no loosening of internal fixation device. At 1 week post-operation and last follow-up, VAS, compression ratio of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression ratio of spinal canal and Cobb angle were significantly lower than those at pre-operation (P0.05. Conclusions  Poking reduction, bone grafting and pedicle screw implanting through injured vertebra can effectively restore height of injured vertebra and reduce the compression of spinal canal, which will help correction of spinal kyphosis and recovery of spinal cord function. This method can well maintain height of injured vertebra and significantly reduce risk of long-term vertebral collapse. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.09.06

  6. Tissue reaction to implants of different metals: a study using guide wires in cannulated screws

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Devine, D M; Leitner, M; Perren, S M; Boure, L P; Pearce, S G

    2009-01-01

    ... (316L stainless steel) cannulated screws. However the possibility of galvanic or crevice corrosion and adverse tissue reaction, exists when using dissimilar materials, particularly in the event that a guide wire breaks, and remains in situ...

  7. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area.

  8. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  9. Passive Fit in Screw Retained Multi-unit Implant Prosthesis Understanding and Achieving: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Norsiah Binti

    2014-03-01

    One of the considerable challenges for screw-retained multi-unit implant prosthesis is achieving a passive fit of the prosthesis' superstructure to the implants. This passive fit is supposed to be one of the most vital requirements for the maintenance of the osseointegration. On the other hand, the misfit of the implant supported superstructure may lead to unfavourable complications, which can be mechanical or biological in nature. The manifestations of these complications may range from fracture of various components in the implant system, pain, marginal bone loss, and even loss of osseointegration. Thus, minimizing the misfit and optimizing the passive fit should be a prerequisite for implant survival and success. The purpose of this article is to present and summarize some aspects of the passive fit achieving and improving methods. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Pubmed, and Google database. They were searched in English using the following combinations of keywords: passive fit, implant misfit and framework misfit. Articles were selected on the basis of whether they had sufficient information related to framework misfit's related factors, passive fit and its achievement techniques, marginal bone changes relation with the misfit, implant impression techniques and splinting concept. The related references were selected in order to emphasize the importance of the passive fit achievement and the misfit minimizing. Despite the fact that the literature presents considerable information regarding the framework's misfit, there was not consistency in literature on a specified number or even a range to be the acceptable level of misfit. On the other hand, a review of the literature revealed that the complete passive fit still remains a tricky goal to be achieved by the prosthodontist.

  10. Laser-treated stainless steel mini-screw implants: 3D surface roughness, bone-implant contact, and fracture resistance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, He-Kyong; Chu, Tien-Min; Dechow, Paul; Stewart, Kelton; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the biomechanical properties and bone-implant intersurface response of machined and laser surface-treated stainless steel (SS) mini-screw implants (MSIs). Forty-eight 1.3mm in diameter and 6mm long SS MSIs were divided into two groups. The control (machined surface) group received no surface treatment; the laser-treated group received Nd-YAG laser surface treatment. Half in each group was used for examining surface roughness (Sa and Sq), surface texture, and facture resistance. The remaining MSIs were placed in the maxilla of six skeletally mature male beagle dogs in a randomized split-mouth design. A pair with the same surface treatment was placed on the same side and immediately loaded with 200 g nickel-titanium coil springs for 8 weeks. After killing, the bone-implant contact (BIC) for each MSI was calculated using micro computed tomography. Analysis of variance model and two-sample t test were used for statistical analysis with a significance level of P laser-treated group compared with the machined group (P Laser treatment increased surface roughness without compromising fracture resistance. Despite increasing surface roughness, laser treatment did not improve BIC. Overall, it appears that medical grade SS has the potential to be substituted for titanium alloy MSIs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Twin-screw extruded lipid implants containing TRP2 peptide for tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Marie-Paule; Bobbala, Sharan; Gibson, Blake; Hook, Sarah; Winter, Gerhard; Engert, Julia

    2017-01-16

    Much effort has been put in the development of specific anti-tumour immunotherapies over the last few years, and several studies report on the use of liposomal carriers for tumour-associated antigens. In this work, the use of lipid implants, prepared using two different extruders, was investigated for sustained delivery in tumour therapy. The implants consisted of cholesterol, soybean lecithin, Dynasan 114, trehalose, ovalbumin (OVA) or a TRP2 peptide, and Quil-A. Implants were first produced on a Haake Minilab extruder, and then a scale-down to minimal quantities of material on a small scale ZE mini extruder was performed. All formulations were characterised in terms of extrudability, implant properties and in vitro release behaviour of the model antigen ovalbumin. The type of extruder used to produce the implants had a major influence on implant properties and the release behaviour, demonstrating that extrusion parameters and lipid formulations have to be individually adapted to each extrusion device. Subsequently, lipid implants containing TRP-2 peptide were extruded on the ZE mini extruder and investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo study showed that mice having received TRP2 loaded implants had delayed tumour growth for 3days compared to groups having received no TRP2.

  12. Assessment of the stress transmitted to dental implants connected to screw-retained bars using different casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Klaus; Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Weiss, Claudia; Suleiman, Lubna; Wolfart, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Passive fit of the prosthetic superstructure is important to avoid complications; however, evaluation of passive fit is not possible using conventional procedures. Thus, the aim of this study was to check and locate mechanical stress in bar restorations fabricated using two casting techniques. Fifteen patients received four implants in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and a bar was fabricated using either the cast-on abutment or lost-wax casting technique. The fit accuracy was checked according to the Sheffield's test criteria. Measurements were recorded on the master model with a gap-free, passive fit using foil strain gauges both before and after tightening the prosthetic screws. Data acquisition and processing was analyzed with computer software and submitted to statistical analysis (ANOVA). The greatest axial distortion was at position 42 with the cast-on abutment technique, with a mean distortion of 450 μm/m. The lowest axial distortion occurred at position 44 with the lost-wax casting technique, with a mean distortion of 100 μm/m. The minimal differences between the means of axial distortion do not indicate any significant differences between the techniques (P = 0.2076). Analysis of the sensor axial distortion in relation to the implant position produced a significant difference (P < 0.0001). Significantly higher measurements were recorded in the axial distortion analysis of the distal sensors of implants at the 34 and 44 regions than on the mesial positions at the 32 and 42 regions (P = 0.0481). The measuring technique recorded axial distortion in the implant-supported superstructures. Distortions were present at both casting techniques, with no significant difference between the sides.

  13. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with mandibular implant screw retained Fp-3 prosthesis opposing maxillary acrylic removable over-denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-04-01

    A hybrid denture is one that is fabricated over a metal framework and retained by screws threaded into the implant abutments. The anterior part of a mandibular hybrid denture is fixed on implants while the posterior part of the denture is extended and cantilevered from implants. This article presents the fabrication of a maxillary over-denture opposing mandibular implant retained hybrid prosthesis. A total of four implants were placed in the mandibular arch. Castable abutments were used to produce the optimal angulations. Framework was waxed, cast recovered, and the fit was refined until the framework seated passively on the master cast. The mandibular denture teeth were waxed to the hybrid framework, and a final wax try-in was performed to verify and correct maxillomandibular relations before processing. The prosthesis was inserted after verification of occlusion, retention, and stability. The rehabilitation of edentulous patients with hybrid dentures has been observed to achieve greater masticatory function and psychological satisfaction than with conventional over-dentures. Producing a passive-fitting substructure for a fixed removable screw retained hybrid prosthesis is arguably one of the most technically complex tasks in implant dentistry. The technique presented may not initially produce a perfectly passive framework, but use of disclosing media and adjusting the internal aspect of the casting can result in non-binding, fully seated prostheses.

  14. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with mandibular implant screw retained Fp-3 prosthesis opposing maxillary acrylic removable over-denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid denture is one that is fabricated over a metal framework and retained by screws threaded into the implant abutments. The anterior part of a mandibular hybrid denture is fixed on implants while the posterior part of the denture is extended and cantilevered from implants. This article presents the fabrication of a maxillary over-denture opposing mandibular implant retained hybrid prosthesis. A total of four implants were placed in the mandibular arch. Castable abutments were used to produce the optimal angulations. Framework was waxed, cast recovered, and the fit was refined until the framework seated passively on the master cast. The mandibular denture teeth were waxed to the hybrid framework, and a final wax try-in was performed to verify and correct maxillomandibular relations before processing. The prosthesis was inserted after verification of occlusion, retention, and stability. The rehabilitation of edentulous patients with hybrid dentures has been observed to achieve greater masticatory function and psychological satisfaction than with conventional over-dentures. Producing a passive-fitting substructure for a fixed removable screw retained hybrid prosthesis is arguably one of the most technically complex tasks in implant dentistry. The technique presented may not initially produce a perfectly passive framework, but use of disclosing media and adjusting the internal aspect of the casting can result in non-binding, fully seated prostheses.

  15. A Novel Technique for Immediate Loading Single Root Form Implants With an Interim CAD/CAM Milled Screw-Retained Crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-08-01

    A technique is described where an interim abutment and crown are fabricated in the laboratory by utilizing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology and placed the day of dental implant surgery. The design and contours of the interim crown are designed by the computer software to be identical to the contours of the tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The interim crown satisfies esthetics immediately after dental implant surgery while allowing the tissue to heal and obtain contours similar to the contours of the definitive prosthesis. The interim crown can be either cement retained or screw retained. The presented technique describes fabrication of a screw-retentive interim crown. After osseointegration is confirmed, a definitive impression is made with a CAD/CAM impression coping. The definitive prosthesis is then fabricated.

  16. Impact of various screwed implant prostheses on oral health-related quality of life as measured with the QoLIP-10 and OHIP-14 scales: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Arelis; Del Río, Jaime; Lynch, Christopher D; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to validate the Quality of Life with Implant-Prostheses (QoLIP-10) questionnaire for assessing the impact of screwed implant-supported rehabilitations on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). 131 patients wearing screw-retained implant restorations were assigned to the following groups: Group 1 (HP; n=50): fixed-detachable hybrid prostheses (control), Group 2 (S-PD; n=43): metal-ceramic screwed partial dentures, and Group 3 (S-CD; n=38): metal-ceramic screwed complete dentures. Impacts on OHRQoL were evaluated using the QoLIP-10 and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14sp) scales. Data on global oral satisfaction, socio-demographics, health-behaviours, and prosthetics were gathered. Reliability and validity of the QoLIP-10 were investigated for screwed prosthesis wearers. The Spearman's rank test was applied to determine the correlation between both indices. Descriptive and non-parametric probes were run to evaluate the influence of the study variables on OHRQoL. The QoLIP-10 confirmed its psychometric capacity for screwed prosthesis wearers. Both tests were inversely correlated. HP wearers reported the worst dental-facial aesthetics, performance, and functional limitation outcomes. Gender, education level, complaints about the mouth, perception of treatment needs, and prosthetic status modulated the OHRQoL. Screwed implants restorations provide better OHRQoL than do fixed-detachable hybrid prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A simplified technique for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a screw-plate implanted over the Caspar distractor pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    The author presents a simplified technique for midline screw-plate fixation in fusion procedures after anterior cervical discectomy, in which the plate is introduced over the Caspar distractor pins. The Uniplate system used, with a single screw in each vertebral body, minimizes bone damage to the vertebral body as the screws can be fixed in the holes previously used for the Caspar distractor pins. This simplified version of the classical anterior cervical fusion technique saves surgical time, facilitates screw insertion, and obviates the need for manipulations to stabilize the plate before the screws are inserted. It provides immediate stability comparable to other plate systems. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report on cervical fusion with the Uniplate system with the plate being introduced over the Caspar distractor pins.

  18. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws.

  19. Absorbable screw implantation for humeral supracondylar fracture in children%可吸收螺钉置入治疗小儿肱骨髁上骨折

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 吴顺芬; 唐光耀

    2012-01-01

    背景 研究表明,可吸收螺钉置入内固定治疗儿童肱骨外髁骨折是较为理想的方法.目的 综述可吸收螺钉置入治疗小儿肱骨髁上骨折的研究进展.方法 应用计算机检索2000-01/2011-08 万方数据库、维普数据库及PubMed 数据库有关可吸收螺钉置入内固定治疗小儿肱骨髁上骨折的相关文章,检索词为"可吸收螺钉,内固定,儿童,肱骨髁上骨折,absorbable screw,fracture fixation,supracondylar fracture".共检索到文献79 篇,最终纳入符合标准的文献20 篇.结果与结论 目前临床上多倾向于手术开放复位植入物内固定治疗小儿肱骨髁上骨折,以克氏针交叉置入内固定应用最为广泛.随着置入内固定材料的发展,人们逐渐认识到可吸收螺钉置入内固定的优点.可吸收螺钉具有较好的韧性,固定加压效果确切.可以对断端施加压力,使骨折端端吻合紧密,置入后骨折块血供迅速恢复,能减少临床愈合时间.可吸收螺钉置入治疗儿童肱骨外髁骨折,方法简单,固定可靠.骨折断端紧密结合,临床愈合时间缩短,疗效确切,是一种较好的置入内固定治疗方法%BACKGROUND: Absorbable screw internal fixation is an ideal treatment for humeral lateral condyle fracture in children.OBJECTIVE: To summarize research advances in absorbable screw implantation for humeral supracondylar fracture in children.METHODS: A computer-based online search of Wanfang, VIP and PubMed database was performed for articles related to absorbable screw internal fixation for humeral supracondylar fracture in children, published between January 2000 and August 2011 with key words “absorbable screw, internal fixation, children, humeral supracondylar fracture” in Chinese and English. A total of 79 articles were selected and 20 were included.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Open reduction and internal fixation have been clinically used to treat humeral supracondylar fracture in children. And crossing

  20. An anatomic study on feasibility of pedicle screw or laminar screw implant in the axis of children%儿童枢椎椎弓根及椎板螺钉内固定的解剖学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建华; 夏虹; 尹庆水; 吴优; 朱昌荣; 乔国庆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility for internal fixation of pedicle screw and laminar screw in the axis of children. Methods Thirty-two sets of cervical CT scan images of children (age range from 2 to 10 years old) treated in Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command from 2009 to 2012 were slected, in which there were 16 sets (32 sides) in play age group (age range from 2 to 5 years old ) and other 16 sets (32 sides) in primary school-age group (age range from 5 to 10 years old). The axial pedicle width, length and introvert angle of pedicle screw trajectory, as well as the isthmus width of lamina, length and outward angle of laminar screw trajectory were measured by PACS tools respectively. Results There were 15 sides where pedicle width of pedicle screw trajectory > 3.5 mm in play age group and 26 sides in primary school-age group;while 24 sides where isthmus width of laminar screw trajectory > 3.5 mm in play age group and 31 sides in primary school-age group. Differences of average width, length of pedicle and larmina all showed statistical significance between 2 groups (P 0.05). Conclusions It is mostly feasible for axis pedicle screw and laminar screw implant for primary school-age children. For the play age children, based on preoperative accurate measurement and evaluation of relative screw implant anatomic parameters through thin slice cervical CT scan images, laminar or pedicle screw or mixed internal fixation should be chosen reasonably so as to provide safe and efficient fixation.%目的:探讨儿童枢椎椎弓根及椎板螺钉内固定的可行性。方法收集2009年至2012年广州军区广州总医院儿童颈椎薄层CT影像资料32套,其中年龄2~5岁(幼龄组)及5~10岁(学龄组)各16套32侧。测量枢椎椎弓根虚拟钉道宽度、长度、内倾角,椎板虚拟钉道峡部宽度、长度及外展角数据。结果幼龄组椎弓根虚拟钉道宽度>3.5 mm为15侧、学龄组为26侧;幼龄

  1. Minimally invasive positioning robot system of femoral neck hollow screw implants based on x-ray error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yunpeng; Xu, Ying; Hu, Lei; Guo, Na; Wang, Lifeng

    2017-01-01

    Aiming the high failure rate, the high radiation quantity and the poor positioning accuracy of femoral neck traditional surgery, this article develops a set of new positioning robot system of femoral neck hollow screw implants based on X-rays error correction, which bases on the study of x-rays perspective principle and the Motion Principle of 6 DOF(degree of freedom) series robot UR(Universal Robots). Compared with Computer Assisted Navigation System, this system owns better positioning accuracy and more simple operation. In addition, without extra Equipment of Visual Tracking, this system can reduce a lot of cost. During the surgery, Doctor can plan the operation path and the pose of mark needle according to the positive and lateral X-rays images of patients. Then they can calculate the pixel ratio according to the ratio of the actual length of mark line and the length on image. After that, they can calculate the amount of exercise of UR Robot according to the relative position between operation path and guide pin and the fixed relationship between guide pin and UR robot. Then, they can control UR to drive the positioning guide pin to the operation path. At this point, check the positioning guide pin and the planning path is coincident, if not, repeat the previous steps, until the positioning guide pin and the planning path coincide which will eventually complete the positioning operation. Moreover, to verify the positioning accuracy, this paper make an errors analysis aiming to thirty cases of the experimental model of bone. The result shows that the motion accuracy of the UR Robot is 0.15mm and the Integral error precision is within 0.8mm. To verify the clinical feasibility of this system, this article analysis on three cases of the clinical experiment. In the whole process of positioning, the X-rays irradiation time is 2-3s, the number of perspective is 3-5 and the whole positioning time is 7-10min. The result shows that this system can complete accurately

  2. In vitro evaluation of a modified 4-META/MMA-TBB resin for filling access holes of screw-retained implant prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Remy; Suzuki, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates a modified 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (M4M) as a candidate material for filling screw-retained implant access hole. Its characteristics were compared with a conventional composite resin (CR) with or without a bonding agent (BA) or a ceramic primer (CP). Ceramic blocks were divided into five groups, including (A) CR, (B) CR with BA, (C) CR with CP and BA, (D) M4M, and (E) M4M with CP. Shear bond strengths were measured after 5000 times of thermocycling. Groups A, B, and D were excluded from further tests as they showed no adhesion. A cylindrical cavity (2.5 mm diameter, 3 mm depth) simulating access hole was prepared in a ceramic block and glazed to evaluate micro-leakage and wear test of groups C and E. The results were statistically analyzed with Mann-Whitney test (p  fill the ceramic access holes of the implant upper structure.

  3. The dynamic locking blade plate, a new implant for intracapsular hip fractures: biomechanical comparison with the sliding hip screw and Twin Hook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, W H; Aalsma, A M M; Nijenbanning, G; van Walsum, A D P

    2009-03-01

    Internal fixation of intracapsular hip fractures results in a high failure rate with non-union and avascular necrosis being the two most important complications. In order to prevent these possible complications treatment should consist of an anatomical reduction and stable fixation by insertion of a low volume, dynamic implant, providing angular and rotational stability to the femoral head. According to these principles a new implant, the dynamic locking blade plate (DLBP) was designed for the fixation of intracapsular hip fractures. We performed a biomechanical analysis in synthetic bone to compare the rotational stability and cut out resistance of the DLBP with a conventional sliding hip screw (SHS) and the more recently developed Twin Hook. The rotational stability of the DLBP proved to be three times higher than the rotational stability of a SHS and two times higher than the Twin Hook. There was no major difference in cut out resistance between the different implants. The design of the DLBP and possible advantages with regard to the healing of an intracapsular hip fracture are discussed.

  4. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2 before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philipp Dittmer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation. One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control, whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test. All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05. RESULTS: All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control to 7,592 N±901 N (test. The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060. The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. CONCLUSION: The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional

  5. Biomechanics and stability of the spine after implantation with pedicle screw and cervical vertebral screw fixation%椎弓根螺钉及颈椎体螺钉置入内固定后的生物力学及稳定性比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淼; 尚显文; 宁旭; 庄勇; 许顺恩

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:From the point of view of human anatomy, the load of the spine is more. When the body moves, the range of activities, and activity are relatively large. After screws were implanted in the spine, if biomechanical properties and stability are not up to the standard, it easily leads to lack of grip force of screw and screw loosening so as to increase the incidence of complications after treatment. OBJECTIVE:To compare biomechanical properties and stability of the spine after insertion of pedicle screw and cervical vertebral screw into the spine. METHODS:100 vertebrae under human cervical spine specimens were analyzed and randomly divided into cervical vertebral screw fixation group and pedicle screw fixation group. Cervical vertebral screws and pedicle screws were implanted in lower cervical spine specimens. Electro Force 3510 material testing machine was used to test axial pul-out force, axial pul-out strength after the fatigue loading, and fixed stability. The biomechanical properties and stability were compared after two kinds of screws were implanted in the spine. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1) Instantaneous pul out force and immediate pul out stiffness were significantly higher in the pedicle screw fixation group than in the cervical vertebral screw fixation group (P  目的:对比内固定椎弓根螺钉与颈椎体螺钉置入脊柱后的生物力学性能及其稳定性。  方法:选取100个人体下颈椎椎体标本进行分析,随机分为颈椎体螺钉组与内固定椎弓根螺钉组。分别将内固定椎弓根螺钉与颈椎体螺钉置入人体下颈椎标本中,采用Electro Force 3510材料试验机对标本进行轴向拔出力、疲劳加载后轴向拔出力、固定稳定性等生物力学测试,比较2种螺钉置入脊柱后的生物力学性能及其稳定性。  结果与结论:①内固定椎弓根螺钉组即时拔出力、即时拔出刚度均显著高于颈椎体螺钉组(P<0.05);②2组虽然疲劳

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of macro and micro designed screw-type implants: an insertion torque and removal torque study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Ramesh; Jimbo, Ryo; Thomsen, Christian; Carlsson, Lennart; Wennerberg, Ann

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the combined effect of macro and pitch shortened threads on primary and secondary stability during healing, but before dynamic loading. Two sets of turned implants with different macro geometry were prepared. The test group possessed pitch shortened threads in between the large threads and the control group did not have thread alterations. The two implant groups were placed in both femur and tibiae of 10 lop-eared rabbits, and at the time of implant insertion, insertion torques were recorded. After 4 weeks, all implants were subjected to removal torque tests. The insertion torque values for the control and test groups for the tibia were 15.7 and 20.6 Ncm, respectively, and for the femur, 11.8, and 12.8 Ncm respectively. The removal torque values for the control and test groups in the tibia were 7.9 and 9.1 Ncm, respectively, and for the femur, 7.9 and 7.7 Ncm respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the control and test groups. Under limited dynamic load, the addition of pitch shortened threads did not significantly improve either the primary or the secondary stability of the implants in bone. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Precision Fit of Screw-Retained Implant-Supported Fixed Dental Prostheses Fabricated by CAD/CAM, Copy-Milling, and Conventional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Danilo Gonzaga; Morais, Maria Helena; das Neves, Flávio D; Carreiro, Adriana Fonte; Barbosa, Gustavo As

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fabrication methods (computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture [CAD/CAM], copy-milling, and conventional casting) in the fit accuracy of three-unit, screw-retained fixed dental prostheses. Sixteen three-unit implant-supported screw-retained frameworks were fabricated to fit an in vitro model. Eight frameworks were fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, four in zirconia and four in cobalt-chromium. Four zirconia frameworks were fabricated using the copy-milled system, and four were cast in cobalt-chromium using conventional casting with premachined abutments. The vertical and horizontal misfit at the implant-framework interface was measured using scanning electron microscopy at ×250. The results for vertical misfit were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The horizontal misfits were categorized as underextended, equally extended, or overextended. Statistical analysis established differences between groups according to the chi-square test (α = .05). The mean vertical misfit was 5.9 ± 3.6 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia, 1.2 ± 2.2 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated cobalt-chromium frameworks, 7.6 ± 9.2 μm for copy-milling-fabricated zirconia frameworks, and 11.8 (9.8) μm for conventionally fabricated frameworks. The Mann-Whitney test revealed significant differences between all but the zirconia-fabricated frameworks. A significant association was observed between the horizontal misfits and the fabrication method. The percentage of horizontal misfits that were underextended and overextended was higher in milled zirconia (83.3%), CAD/CAM cobaltchromium (66.7%), cast cobalt-chromium (58.3%), and CAD/CAM zirconia (33.3%) frameworks. CAD/CAM-fabricated frameworks exhibit better vertical misfit and low variability compared with copy-milled and conventionally fabricated frameworks. The percentage of interfaces equally extended was higher when CAD/CAM and zirconia were used.

  8. 颈椎损伤钢钉置入后的生物力学分析%Biomechanics of implanted screws for cervical spine injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶新平

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomechanics showed that cervical spine injury is associated with mechanics.OBJECTIVE: To summarize advances in implanted screw biomechanics in treating cervical spine injury in athletes.METHODS: A computer-based online search of PubMed and CNKI database was performed for related articles with the keywords “cervical spine injury; implanted nail; biomechanics” in Chinese and English. Arti cles that accurately reflected and reportedadvances in cervical biomechanics were selected, and 28 were included and analyzed.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The biomechanics of implanted screws for athletes with cervical spine injury was analyzed fromaspects of cervical endogenous stability, exogenous stability and functional exercise to provide theoretical evidence for functionalexercise of the athletes. To balance cervical endogenous stability and exogenous stability is very important for treating cervicalspine injury and provide new theoretical evidence for understanding occurrence, development, diagnosis and treatment selectionfor spinal cord injury.%背景:生物力学研究表明,颈椎损伤的许多问题都与力学密切相关.目的:总结运动员颈椎损伤置入螺钉后的生物力学研究进展.方法:应用计算机检索PubMed数据库及CNKI数据库.中文检索关键词:颈椎损伤,置入钢钉,生物力学.英文检索关键词:Cervical spine injury; Implanted the nail; Biomechanics.所有选用的文献均为相关性较强,并在此领域具有代表性和权威性,能及时准确地反应和报道颈椎生物力学的研究进展.最终入选28篇文章进入结果分析.结果与结论:文章主要从颈椎内源性稳定、外源性稳定和功能锻炼的角度对运动员颈椎损伤置入螺钉后进行生物力学分析,为运动员颈椎伤病的功能锻炼提供了理论依据.针对其关键发病机制,恢复颈椎内源性、外源性的动力平衡是治疗关键,为认识和掌握脊柱伤患的发生、发展、诊断及治疗方

  9. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  10. Effect of technique and impression material on the vertical misfit of a screw-retained, three-unit implant bridge: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rajati Haghi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: The impression method had no effect on marginal discrepancy of 3-unit screw retained fixed partial dentures. A higher marginal accuracy was obtained using polyether impression material compared to polyvinyl siloxane.

  11. Design and fabrication of a low-frequency (1-3 MHz) ultrasound transducer for accurate placement of screw implants in the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manbachi, Amir; Lee, Mike; Foster, F. Stuart; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 approximately 800,000 spinal fusion surgeries were performed in the United States, requiring the insertion of screws into the pedicles. Their exact placement is critical and made complex due to limited visibility of the spine, continuous bleeding in the exposed regions, and variability in morphologies. The alarmingly high rate of screw misplacements (up to 20%) reported in the literature is of major concern since such misplacements can place the surrounding vital structures at risk. A potential guidance method for determining the best screw trajectory is by the use of real-time ultrasound imaging similar to that used for intravascular imaging. An endovascular transducer could be inserted into the pedicle to image the anatomy from within and identify bone boundaries. A major challenge of imaging within bone is high signal attenuation. The rapid increase of attenuation with frequency requires much lower frequencies (1-3 MHz) than those used in intravascular imaging. This study describes the custom design and fabrication of 2 MHz ultrasound probes (3.5 mm diameter/ 11 Fr) for pedicle screw guidance. Three transducer designs are explored to provide improved sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, compared to the previously tested transducer within the pedicle. Experimental measurements are compared with the results obtained using various simulation tools. The work reported in this paper represents the first stage in our ultimate goal of developing a 32- element phased array that is capable of generating a radial B-mode image.

  12. Biomechanical Comparison of Pedicle Screw Augmented with Different Volumes of Polymethylmethacrylate in Osteoporotic and Severely Osteoporotic Synthetic Bone Blocks in Primary Implantation: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to compare screw stabilities augmented with different volumes of PMMA and analyze relationship between screw stability and volume of PMMA and optimum volume of PMMA in different bone condition. Osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic synthetic bone blocks were divided into groups A0-A5 and B0-B5, respectively. Different volumes of PMMA were injected in groups A0 to A5 and B0 to B5. Axial pullout tests were performed and Fmax was measured. Fmax in groups A1-A5 were all significantly higher than group A0. Except between groups A1 and A2, A3 and A4, and A4 and A5, there were significant differences on Fmax between any other two groups. Fmax in groups B1-B5 were all significantly higher than group B0. Except between groups B1 and B2, B2 and B3, and B4 and B5, there were significant differences on Fmax between any other two groups. There was significantly positive correlation between Fmax and volume of PMMA in osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic blocks. PMMA can significantly enhance pedicle screw stability in osteoporosis and severe osteoporosis. There were positive correlations between screw stability and volume of PMMA. In this study, injection of 3 mL and 4 mL PMMA was preferred in osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic blocks, respectively.

  13. Influência do macheamento na interface do parafuso e do tecido ósseo na fase imediata pós-implante Influencia del taladramiento en la interfase del tornillo y del tejido óseo durante la fase inmediata post implante The influence of tapping techniques on the interface bone screw/bone tissue in immediate postoperative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Pinheiro de Lemos Masson

    2009-06-01

    el orificio proximal derecho fue realizado el taladramiento antes de la inserción del tornillo cortical de 3.5 mm (Grupo A, en el orificio proximal izquierdo el tornillo fue insertado sin taladramiento (Grupo B y los otros dos orificios distales fueron utilizados como controles (Grupo C. Las alteraciones de la interfase entre el hueso y el implante fueron analizadas por medio de un estudio histomorfométrico, teniendo en cuenta el número de trabéculas fracturadas entre los filetes de rosca; la mayor distancia de la fractura trabecular transversal provocada por la inserción del tornillo; la mayor extensión de la fractura trabecular longitudinal provocada por la inserción del tornillo y la línea de contacto en la interfase hueso-tornillo. RESULTADOS: taladrar el orificio piloto ha provocado alteraciones de la microestructura del tejido óseo alrededor del implante cuando comparado con las alteraciones producidas por la inserción del tornillo sin el taladramiento o el orificio piloto. La evaluación del contacto entre el hueso y el implante fue el parámetro que presentó diferencia estadística en la comparación entre la colocación del implante con o sin taladramiento. CONCLUSIÓN: al comparar con el orificio control, todos los parámetros presentaron diferencia estadística.OBJECTIVE: to analyze experimentally the early alterations of the bone-screw interface with tapping techniques in the cancellous bone of the cervical vertebrae. METHODS: five wooless sheep (Santa Inês were analyzed. Pilot holes of 2.5 mm were performed at both sides of the third cervical vertebrae in the proximal and distal portion. The tapping process was done in the right proximal hole before the 3.5 mm screw insertion (Group A, while the left proximal hole was not tapped (Group B and the two distal holes were used as control (Group C. The interface alterations between bone and screw were analyzed through histomorphometric study, considering the number of trabeculae fractures between

  14. Biomechanical analysis of pedicle screw density in spinal instrumentation for scoliosis treatment: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Larson, A Noelle; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies reveal remarkable variation in screw patterns, or screw density in spinal instrumentation. Screw density may have a great impact on blood loss, operative time, radiation, risk of screw malposition, and cost. Thus, there is a need to understanding of the biomechanical effects of screw density so as to minimize the number of pedicle screws while ensuring safe and effective instrumentation. The objective of this study was to compare the deformity correction effects and bone-screw loadings of different pedicle screw densities in spinal instrumentation for scoliosis treatment. Spinal instrumentation simulations were performed on three scoliosis patients using 3 screw density patterns (low, preferred, and high screw density) proposed by two experienced surgeons and basic correction techniques: concave rod attachment, rod derotation, apical vertebral derotation, and convex side rod attachment. Simulation results showed that all tested screw densities generated quite similar correction, with differences between the achieved corrections all below 3°. The average bone-screw forces were 244±67N, 214±66 N, and 210±71 N, respectively for low, preferred, and high densities. It remains a complex challenge balancing the benefit of load sharing between more implants with the overconstraints and limited degrees of freedom introduced by the increased number of implants. Studies on additional screw densities and patterns proposed by more surgeons for a variety of cases, and using more diverse correction techniques are necessary to draw stronger conclusions and to recommend the optimal screw density.

  15. Advantages and Disadvantages of Double Threaded Dental Implant Screws As Opposed to Single-Threaded: A Study from a Biomechanical Perspective by the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Arenal, A.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Lasheras, F. Sánchez; Quevedo, M. Mauvezin

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present article is to study the advantages from a biomechanical point of view of the use of a double-threaded dental implant over the more common single-threaded one. For this purpose a 3D model of a portion of the jaw was generated. In this model four different bone areas were distinguished (transition cortical, transition trabecular, bulk cortical and bulk trabecular). Not only was the portion of the jaw created with CAD software but also two different implants geometries, one with only one thread (single-threaded) and the other with two threads (double-threaded). The loading condition was defined as 150 N intrusive forces and 15 N lingual-labial forces acting on the implant. The results of the present study shown that from a macroscopic point of view, the choice of one or other of the dental implants does not make a significant difference in the general behaviour of the jaw. In spite of this and notwithstanding the effects of the transition bone-implant, the stress distribution achieved by the single-threaded dental implant is more uniform. This effect is better for the biomechanics of the jaw. The advantage presented by the double threaded implant is that due to its larger surface the osseointegration is better than in the single-threaded version.

  16. A four lumen screwing device for multiparametric brain monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, T H; Langemann, H; Gratzl, O; Mendelowitsch, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe multiparametric monitoring in severe head trauma using a new screwing device. Our aim was to create a screw which would make the implantation of the probes and thus multiparametric monitoring easier. The new screw allows us to implant 3 probes (microdialysis, Paratrend and an intracranial pressure device) through one burr hole. The screw has four channels, the fourth being for ventricular drainage. We monitored 13 patients with severe head trauma (GCS = 3-8) for up to 7 days. Brain tissue pO2, pCO2, pH, and temperature were measured on-line with the Paratrend 7 machine. The microdialytic parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate were determined semi on-line with a CMA 600 enzymatic analyser. There were no complications in any of the patients that could be ascribed to the screw.

  17. The influence of screw type, alloy and cylinder position on the marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding Influência do tipo de parafuso, liga e da posição do cilindro na adaptação marginal das infra-estruturas sob implantes antes e após a soldagem a laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Castilio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. METHODS: After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5mm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05. RESULTS: Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13µm than the hexagonal screws (27.93 µm. Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2 The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3 cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values.A desadaptação na interface abutment-cilindro protético pode causar perda da pré-carga, levando ao afrouxamento ou fratura dos parafusos de ouro e tit

  18. Analysis of clinical results of micro - screw implant anchorage in treatment of orthodontics%微螺钉种植体支抗在口腔正畸中的临床效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of micro - screw implant anchorage in treatment of orthodontics. Methods Diagnostic criteria for selecting hospital 50 cases of the wrong jaw deformity patients, randomized into study group and control group, each 25 patients. Study group received treatment micro - screw implant anchorage and the control group with non - implant anchorage is strong anchorage extraoral bow treatment, the whole story are two groups were taken in the treatment of lateral head positioning, analyzed the X - ray cephalometry and compared group methods in orthodontic anchorage in the clinical effect. Results By comparison, the study group total effective rate was 96% , efficacy was significantly better than the control group, 64% , (P < 0. 05) ; Study group the incidence of complications such as root resorption was 30% higher than the 21% (P < 0. 05), study group underwent micro - screw implant anchorage treatment, and convex on the angle from the central incisor as Ul/SN(on the central incisor - SN angle) , L1/MP(lower central incisor - MP plane angle) , U1 - L1 (on - under the central incisor angle) , NLA( nasolabial angle) , UIE - OTV (the upper incisors to the PTV margin vertical distance) , LIA - PTV ( PTV lower incisor tip to the vertical distance) , U6 - PTV ( maxillary first molar buccal tip vertical distance between PTV) and X - ray cephalometry reduction targets significantly more than the control group, the difference was statistically significant ( P < 0. 05). Conclusions Micro - screw implant anchorage in orthodontics in a significant effect, but either have a certain rate of occurrence of root resorption, its effect was significantly better than non - orthodontic implant anchorage, worthy of clinical use.%目的 探讨微螺钉种植体支抗在口腔正畸中的临床效果.方法 按诊断标准选取宿迁市人民医院50例错颌畸形患者,按就诊顺序随机分为研究组和对照组,各25例.其中研究组给予微

  19. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months and the therapeutic effect was evaluated ac-cording to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Soci-ety clinical rating systems. Results: In absorbable screw group, we obtained excel-lent and good results in 62 cases (96.88%; in steel screw group, 61 cases (93.85% achieved excellent and good results. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of malleolus fracture, absorbable screw can achieve the same result compared with metal screw fixation. Absorbable screw is preferred due to its advantages of safety, cleanliness and avoiding the removal procedure associated with metallic implants. Key words: Ankle; Bone screws; Fractures, bone

  20. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  2. Estudo tomográfico do atlas relacionado com a inserção de implantes na massa lateral Tomographic study of the atlas concerning screw fixation on lateral mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Franco de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A técnica de Harms para a realização da artrodese atlantoaxial possibilita o uso de manobras de redução transoperatória da subluxação atlantoaxial e facilita a fixação dessa articulação, principalmente nos pacientes hipercifóticos e nas situações em que há impossibilidade da fixação com o parafuso transarticular C1-C2. OBJETIVOS: descrever os parâmetros morfométricos do atlas relacionados à técnica de Harms para a artrodese C1-C2, o trajeto ideal e o corredor de segurança da inserção do parafuso na massa lateral do atlas mensurados através de imagens de reconstrução multiplanar com tomografia computadorizada helicoidal nos planos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: trinta atlas de origem local foram submetidos a tomografia computadorizada e mensurados com cursor digital. RESULTADOS: o comprimento posteroanterior do implante mediu 16,5 mm à direita e 16,3mm à esquerda. Quando utilizando como ponto de entrada na porção central da massa lateral imediatamente inferior ao arco posterior, o trajeto deve ter uma congruência de 15º no plano coronal e uma angulação superior de 20º no plano sagital. CONCLUSÃO: O corredor de segurança para um parafuso na massa lateral teria uma inclinação inferior de 22º e superior de 33º no plano sagital e no plano axial de 36º medial e 26º lateral.INTRODUCTION: Harms's technique for atlanto-axial arthrodesis fusion makes possible the use of intraoperative reduction maneuvers of the atlanto-axial dislocation and facilitates the fixation of this joint, especially in hiperkyphotic patients and in situations where the fixation with transarticular screw on C1-C2 segment is impossible. OBJECTIVE: to describe the morphometric parameters of atlases related to the Harms's technique for atlanto-axial arthrodesis, the optimal path and the safety aisle for screw insertion into atlas' lateral mass measured with multiplanar reconstruction imaging with helical computed tomography scan at

  3. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jin; HU Jin-feng; GUO Wei-chun; YU Ling; ZHAO Sheng-hao

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics.Methods:A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied.Among them,64 patients were treated with poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screws,while the others were treated with metal screws.All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months) and the therapeutic effect was evaluated according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society clinical rating systems.Results:In absorbable screw group,we obtained excellent and good results in 62 cases (96.88%); in steel screw group,61 cases (93.85%) achieved excellent and good results.There was no significant difference between the two groups.Conclusion:In the treatment of malleolus fracture,absorbable screw can achieve the same result compared with metal screw fixation.Absorbable screw is preferred due to its advantages of safety,cleanliness and avoiding the removal procedure associated with metallic implants.

  4. Double insurance transfacetal screws for lumbar spinal stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The authors report experience with 14 cases where two screws or ′′double insurance′′ screws were used for transfacetal fixation of each joint for stabilization of the lumbar spinal segment. The anatomical subtleties of the technique of insertion of screws are elaborated. Materials and Methods: During the period March 2011 to June 2014, 14 patients having lumbar spinal segmental instability related to lumbar canal stenosis were treated by insertion of two screws into each articular assembly by transfacetal technique. After a wide surgical exposure, the articular cartilage was denuded and bone chips were impacted into the joint cavity. For screw insertion in an appropriate angulation, the spinous process was sectioned at its base. The screws (2.8 mm in diameter and 18 mm in length were inserted into the substance of the medial or inferior articular facet of the rostral vertebra via the lateral limit of the lamina approximately 6-8 mm away from the edge of the articular cavity. The screws were inserted 3 mm below the superior edge and 5 mm above the inferior edge of the medial (inferior facets and directed laterally and traversed through the articular cavity into the lateral (superior articular facet of the caudal vertebra toward and into the region of junction of base of transverse process and of the pedicle. During the period of follow-up all treated spinal levels showed firm bone fusion. There was no complication related to insertion of the screws. There was no incidence of screw misplacement, displacementor implant rejection. Conclusions: Screw insertion into the firm and largely cortical bones of facets of lumbar spine can provide robust fixation and firm stabilization of the spinal segment. The large size of the facets provides an opportunity to insert two screws at each spinal segment. The firm and cortical bone material and absence on any neural or vascular structure in the course of the screw traverse provides strength and

  5. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. METHODS: Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively. Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. RESULTS: No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. CONCLUSIONS: Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws.

  6. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Cai, Hong; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Ke; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively). Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws.

  7. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A [Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  8. The influence of different screw tightening forces on the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks Avaliação do efeito da força de aperto de parafusos de retenção na desadaptação marginal de próteses sobre implantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Klee de Vasconcellos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present in vitro study was designed to compare the differences in the vertical misfit of implant-supported frameworks using three different forces for tightening the bridge locking screws: fastening by hand until first resistance, and using torque drivers with 10 and 20Ncm. METHODS: The investigation was conducted based on the results given by 9 six-unit nickel-chromium (2 abutments/ 4 pontics screw-retained implant-supported frameworks. The structures were exposed to simulated porcelain firings. The marginal misfit measurements were made using a traveling measuring microscope at selected screw tightening forces: fastening by hand until first resistance, and using torque drivers with 10 and 20Ncm. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA with repeated measures on one factor, and post hoc pairwise comparisons using Tukey test (5%. RESULTS: The mean marginal misfit of the frameworks, fastening the screws by hand until first resistance, was 41.56µm (SD±12.45µm. The use of torque driver devices caused a significant reduction in marginal opening (pO presente estudo avaliou o efeito da força de aperto de parafusos de retenção na desadaptação marginal de próteses sobre implantes. A investigação foi conduzida baseada em resultados fornecidos por nove estruturas metálicas implanto-suportadas de seis elementos (02 retentores e 04 pônticos, retidas por parafusos. A mensuração da desadaptação marginal foi realizada com auxílio de microscópio óptico, nos seguintes momentos: M1: aperto com chave manual até a primeira resistência do parafuso; M2: aperto utilizando torquímetro mecânico com 10Ncm e M3: aperto utilizando torquímetro mecânico com 20Ncm. As médias de desadaptação foram submetidas à análise estatística (ANOVA e Tukey. O emprego de torquímetros mecânicos, independente do valor de torque, determinou redução significativa na abertura marginal (p<0,05. A desadaptação média na interface conex

  9. Compressive Force With 2-Screw and 3-Screw Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis With Headless Compression Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Glisson, Richard R; Reidl, Markus; Easley, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Joint compression is an essential element of successful arthrodesis. Although subtalar joint compression generated by conventional screws has been quantified in the laboratory, compression obtainable with headless screws that rely on variable thread pitch to achieve bony contact has not been assessed. This study measured subtalar joint compression achieved by 2 posteriorly placed contemporary headless, variable-pitch screws, and quantified additional compression gained by placing a third screw anteriorly. Ten, unpaired fresh-frozen cadaveric subtalar joints were fixed sequentially using 2 diverging posterior screws (one directed into the talar dome, the other into the talar neck), 2 parallel posterior screws (both ending in the talar dome), and 2 parallel screws with an additional anterior screw inserted from the plantar calcaneus into the talar neck. Joint compression was quantified directly during screw insertion using a novel custom-built measuring device. The mean compression generated by 2 diverging posterior screws was 246 N. Two parallel posterior screws produced 294 N of compression, and augmentation of that construct with a third, anterior screw increased compression to 345 N (P < .05). Compression subsequent to 2-screw fixation was slightly less than that reported previously for subtalar joint fixation with 2 conventional lag screws, but was comparable when a third screw was added. Under controlled testing conditions, 2 tapered, variable-pitch screws generated somewhat less compression than previously reported for 2-screw fixation with conventional headed screws. A third screw placed anteriorly increased compression significantly. Because headless screws are advantageous where prominent screw heads are problematic, such as the load-bearing surface of the foot, their effectiveness compared to other screws should be established to provide an objective basis for screw selection. Augmenting fixation with an anterior screw may be desirable when conditions for

  10. Influência do local de ancoragem dos implantes na vértebra sobre o torque de inserção e resistência ao arrancamento Influencia de la ubicación de los implantes en la vértebra cuanto al torque de inserción y resistencia de arrancamiento Influence of anatomical vertebral site on screw insertion torque and pull-out strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo César Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do sítio anatômico da ancoragem dos implantes na vértebra sobre a resistência ao arrancamento e o torque de inserção dos parafusos pediculares com alma cônica e cilíndrica. MÉTODOS: Parafusos cilíndricos e com alma cônica foram inseridos no pedículo e corpo vertebral de 10 vértebras lombares (L4-L5 de vitelos. Foram avaliados o torque de inserção e a resistência ao arrancamento dos parafusos inseridos no corpo e no pedículo vertebral. RESULTADOS: Os valores do torque de inserção e resistência ao arrancamento foram maiores nos parafusos de alma cilíndrica e alma cônica inseridos no pedículo vertebral. CONCLUSÕES: A ancoragem dos implantes no pedículo vertebral apresentou maiores valores do torque de inserção e da força de arrancamento que os implantes inseridos no corpo vertebral nos dois tipos de parafusos utilizados.OBJETIVO: Evaluar la influencia de la localización anatómica de la fijación de los implantes en la vértebra cuanto al torque de inserción y resistencia de arrancamiento de los tornillos con alma cónica y cilíndrica. MÉTODOS: Los tornillos con alma cilíndrica y cónica se insertan en el cuerpo y el pedículo vertebral de diez vértebras lumbares (L4-L5 de los terneros. Se evaluó el torque de inserción y resistencia al arrancamiento de tornillos insertados en el cuerpo y el pedículo. RESULTADOS: El torque de inserción y resistencia al arrancamiento fue mayor para los tornillos con alma cónica y cilíndrica insertados en el pedículo. CONCLUSIONES: La fijación de los implantes en el pedículo mostró mayor torque de inserción y resistencia al arrancamiento en comparación con los implantes en el cuerpo vertebral, en ambos tipos de tornillos.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of anatomical site of implants on vertebra about insertion torque and pull-out strength of conical and cylindrical core screws. METHODS: Conical and cylindrical core screws were inserted

  11. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Davies Benjamin M; Davidson Jerome A; O'Connor-Read Laurence M; Matthews Michael G; Smirthwaite Paul

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS) and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN) were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded...

  12. Evaluation of pre-tightening in abutments and prosthetic screws on different implant connections = Avaliação do pré-aparafusamento em pilares e parafusos protéticos em diferentes conexões de implante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panza, Leonardo Henrique Vadenal

    2010-01-01

    Conclusão: Os tipos de conexão do implante ou pilar fetaram a manutenção do préaparafusamento. As conexões de hexágono interno e externo foram efetivas para evitar o deslocamento horizontal das coroas

  13. Research on the screws implanting in vertebral pedicle with scoliosis under the intraoperative guide of three-dimensional navigation%术中三维导航引导下脊柱侧凸的椎弓根螺钉置入研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄彦; 吕浩然; 杨进顺; 吴登将

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To discuss the application research of intraoperative three-dimensional navigation in the vertebral pedicle screws implanting of patients with scoliosis. [ Method] Sixteen patients with scoliosis were treated with pedicle screw fixation under the 3D navigation,among which, 18 cases with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis,20 cases with senile degenerated scoliosis. The patients' spines reveived CT 3D scanning during the operation,and then the information and data of scanning were input into the navigation system,and the navigation stick stereoscopically and dynamically implanted pedicle screws into the best location, diameter and length under the guide of navigation system. [ Result] Total 236 pieces of pedicle screws were successfully implanted into 38 patients with scoliosis under the guide of 3D navigation system,the review of X-ray and CT found no loosened screw and cracking screw,according to the classification, these screws included;227 pieces in level A,7 pieces in level B,2 piece in level C,zero in level D. The radiographs taken from standing posteroanterior position and lateral side showed that the mean Cobb angle of scoliosis was corrected from preoperative 67° to post-operative 26°(21° -118°) with a correction rate of 61%. Postoperatively the angle of kyphosis was improved from the preoperative 23° to 14° (5° -29°) with a correction rate of 39%.Thirty-eight cases were received 18 months of follow-up visits on average (12-25 months) ,and there was no tardive spinal cord or nerve root lesion. [ Conclusion] The implanting approach of screws in vertebral pedicle with scoliosis is precise and reliable under the guide of 3D navigation.%[目的]探讨术中实施三维导航在脊柱侧凸病人椎弓根螺钉置入的应用价值.[方法] 38例脊柱侧凸病人行三维导航引导下椎弓根螺钉固定术,其中青少年特发性脊柱侧凸18例,老年退行性脊柱侧凸20例.手术中脊柱CT三维扫描后向导航系统输入患者

  14. Easy retrieval of polyaxial tulip-head pedicle screws by “U” rod technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Cengiz; Altinel, Levent; Ates, Ali; Ozdemir, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The number of fusion surgeries increase each year which also increase the need for implant removal. In some cases, it can be extremely hard to remove a pedicle screw especially when there is a mismatch of the screw and the screwdriver. Also the screwdrivers can be contaminated during the operation, and this will cause a delay till the instruments are re-sterilized. There is a need for the removal of screws without special instruments. We describe a method for removing tulip-head polyaxial pedicle screws without special instruments. The screws are removed using an Allen key, a rod bender and a “U” shaped rod. We successfully removed 76 screws in 11 recent cases without any complications. The “U” rod technique is a simple and useful technique for the removal of tulip-head polyaxial screws. PMID:19618219

  15. Easy retrieval of polyaxial tulip-head pedicle screws by "U" rod technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Kamil Cagri; Isik, Cengiz; Altinel, Levent; Ates, Ali; Ozdemir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The number of fusion surgeries increase each year which also increase the need for implant removal. In some cases, it can be extremely hard to remove a pedicle screw especially when there is a mismatch of the screw and the screwdriver. Also the screwdrivers can be contaminated during the operation, and this will cause a delay till the instruments are re-sterilized. There is a need for the removal of screws without special instruments. We describe a method for removing tulip-head polyaxial pedicle screws without special instruments. The screws are removed using an Allen key, a rod bender and a "U" shaped rod. We successfully removed 76 screws in 11 recent cases without any complications. The "U" rod technique is a simple and useful technique for the removal of tulip-head polyaxial screws.

  16. DLC screw preload. Loosening prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mattias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The screw loosening is a reason to prosthetic rehabilitation failure. However, the DLC (Diamond-like carbon screw treatment lead thefriction decrease and sliding between the components, which increases the screw preload benefit and decreases the chance of looseningoccurrence. This case shows a clinical indication of the association of the correct preload applied and the DLC screw, which can be considered an optimized protocol to solve screw loosening recidivate of unitary prosthesis in anterior maxillary site.

  17. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  18. Biomechanical comparison of cervical transfacet pedicle screws versus pedicle screws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guan-yi; XU Rong-ming; MA Wei-hu; SUN Shao-hua; HUANG Lei; YING Jiang-wei; JIANG Wei-yu

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfacet pedicle screws provide another alternative for standard pedicle screw placement for plate fixation in the Iumbar spine. However, few studies looking at transfacet pedicle screw fixation in the cervical spine are available. Therefore, cervical transfacet pedicle screw fixation and standard pedicle screw fixation techniques were biomechanically compared in this study.Methods Ten fresh human cadaveric cervical spines were harvested. On one side, transfacet pedicle screws were placed at the C3-4, C5-6, and C7-T1 levels. On the other side, pedicle screws were placed at the C3, C5, and C7 levels. The screw insertion technique at each level was randomized for right or left. The starting point for the transfacet pedicle screw insertion was located at the midpoint of the inferolateral quadrant of the lateral mass and the direction of the screw was about 50° caudally in the sagittal plane and about 45° toward the midline in the axial plane. Screws were placed from the inferior articular process, across the facet complex and the pedicle into the body of the caudal vertebra. The entry point for the pedicle screw was located at the midpoint of the superolateral quadrant of the lateral mass, and the direction of the screw was about 45° toward the midline in the axial plane and toward the upper third of the vertebral body in the sagittal plane. After screw placement we performed axial pullout testing.Results All the cervical transfacet pedicle screws and the pedicle screws were inserted successfully. The mean pullout strength for the transfacet pedicle screws was 694 N, while for the pedicle screws 670 N (P=-0.013). In all but six instances (10%), the pedicle screw pullout values exceeded the values for the transfacet pedicle screws; this occurred three times at the C3/C4 level, twice at the C5/C6 level and once at the C7/T1 level. The greatest pullout strength difference at a single level was observed at the C5/C6 level, with a mean difference of 38 N (t

  19. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  20. Collagen type I coating stimulates bone regeneration and osteointegration of titanium implants in the osteopenic rat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartori, Maria; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Ferrari, Andrea; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Fini, Milena

    2015-01-01

    ...) on bone regeneration and osteointegration in a healthy and osteopenic rat animal model.TiColl screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of healthy and osteopenic rats and compared with acid-etched titanium (Ti) screws...

  1. [Clinical stability of immediate load of domestic micro-titanium screws for anchorage in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing-zhong; Xie, Xing-qian; Xie, Xue-mei; Wang, Jian; Yu, Xiao-jia

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the immediate load stability of domestic micro-titanium screws for anchorage in orthodontics. Adult orthodontic patients needing the greatest anchorage were included in the study. Domestic micro-titanium screws were used to be orthodontic anchorage, immediate implantation and loading were conducted. A total of 52 implants of domestic micro-titanium anchorage in 20 patients were used. Forty-seven implants were successful in 20 patients,5 failed. The total loading time was 3-8 months. Domestic micro-titanium implant screws for anchorage can meet the needs of clinical orthodontics. However, immediate loading results in 10.4% failure rate, especially for the implant with a diameter of 1.2mmx7mm. Supported by Science and Technology Development Foundation of Fengxian District, Shanghai Municipality (Grant No. 090602).

  2. Cytotoxicity of a new antimicrobial coating for surgical screws: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel, Yunus; Elmadag, Mehmet; Uzer, Gokcer; Yıldız, Fatih; Bilsel, Kerem; Tuncay, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The risk of surgery-related infection is a persistent problem in orthopaedics and infections involving implants are particularly difficult to treat. This study explored the responses of bone and soft tissue to antimicrobial-coated screws. We investigated whether such screws, which have never been used to fix bony tissues, would result in a cytotoxic effect. We hypothesised that the coated screws would not be toxic to the bone and that the likelihood of infection would be reduced since bacteria are not able to grow on these screws. METHODS Titanium screws were inserted into the left supracondylar femoral regions of 16 rabbits. The screws were either uncoated (control group, n = 8) or coated with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-polyurethane interpolymer with tertiary amine functional groups (experimental group, n = 8). At Week 6, histological samples were obtained and examined. The presence of necrosis, fibrosis and inflammation in the bony tissue and the tissue surrounding the screws was recorded. RESULTS Live, cellular bone marrow was present in all the rabbits from the experimental group, but was replaced with connective tissue in four rabbits from the control group. Eight rabbits from the control group and two rabbits from the experimental group had necrosis in fatty bone marrow. Inflammation was observed in one rabbit from the experimental group and five rabbits from the control group. CONCLUSION Titanium surgical screws coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone-polyurethane interpolymer were associated with less necrosis than standard uncoated screws. The coated screws were also not associated with any cytotoxic side effect. PMID:26805670

  3. Screw bondgraph contact dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Martijn; Stramigioli, Stefano; Heemskerk, Cock

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an elegant contact dynamics model in screw bondgraph form. It can model the contact between any two objects of finite curvature. It does so by defining a Gauss frame on the surfaces of both objects in the points that are closest to each other. Then it describes how the Gauss fram

  4. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  5. Far cortical locking screws in distal femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John D; Tanner, Stephanie L; Jeray, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Distal femur fractures routinely heal by secondary bone healing, which relies on interfragmentary motion. Periarticular locking plates are commonly used for fixation in distal femur fractures but are associated with a high nonunion rate, likely due to the stiffness of the constructs. Far cortical locking (FCL) screws are designed to allow micromotion at the near cortex while maintaining purchase in only the far cortex. Although clinical data are limited, these screws have been shown in biomechanical studies to provide excellent interfragmentary motion, and animal models have shown increased callus formation compared with traditional locking screws. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical effects that FCL screws have on healing in distal femur fractures treated with locked constructs. In this retrospective case series, 15 patients with a distal femur fracture treated with MotionLoc screws (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) were analyzed. Serial radiographs were evaluated for callus presence and time to union. All fractures were either 33-A3 or 33-C2 according to the AO classification system, and 5 (33%) were open. Bone loss was recorded in 2 patients. There were no nonunions, and average time to union was 24 weeks. There were no implant failures, and all 5 open fractures, including the 2 with bone loss, healed without intervention. There was 1 reoperation due to painful hardware. Although this is a small case series, these results are promising. Far cortical locking screws may provide the answer to the high nonunion rate associated with distal femur fractures treated with traditional locked constructs.

  6. Enhanced biocompatibility and osseointegration of calcium titanate coating on titanium screws in rabbit femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Li; He, Rong-Zhen; Tu, Bin; Cao, Xu; He, Jin-Shen; Xia, Han-Song; Liang, Chi; Zou, Min; Wu, Song; Wu, Zhen-Jun; Xiong, Kun

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the biocompatibility of calcium titanate (CaTiO3) coating prepared by a simplified technique in an attempt to assess the potential of CaTiO3 coating as an alternative to current implant coating materials. CaTiO3-coated titanium screws were implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated or uncoated titanium screws into medial and lateral femoral condyles of 48 New Zealand white rabbits. Imaging, histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses were employed to evaluate the osseointegration and biocompatibility 12 weeks after the implantation. Histology and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bone tissues surrounding the screws coated with CaTiO3 were fully regenerated and they were also well integrated with the screws. An interfacial fibrous membrane layer, which was found in the HA coating group, was not noticeable between the bone tissues and CaTiO3-coated screws. X-ray imaging analysis showed in the CaTiO3 coating group, there was a dense and tight binding between implants and the bone tissues; no radiation translucent zone was found surrounding the implants as well as no detachment of the coating and femoral condyle fracture. In contrast, uncoated screws exhibited a fibrous membrane layer, as evidenced by the detection of a radiation translucent zone between the implants and the bone tissues. Additionally, biomechanical testing revealed that the binding strength of CaTiO3 coating with bone tissues was significantly higher than that of uncoated titanium screws, and was comparable to that of HA coating. The study demonstrated that CaTiO3 coating in situ to titanium screws possesses great biocompatibility and osseointegration comparable to HA coating.

  7. Bacterial adherence to titanium, poly-L-lactic acid, and composite hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactic acid interference screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Brendan D; Stinner, Daniel J; Waterman, Scott M; Wenke, Joseph C; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates a potential site of bacterial adherence, the implant surface, comparing titanium, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), and composite hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA-HA) interference screws using a bioluminescent in vitro model. Interference screws of three materials, titanium (Arthrex, Naples, FL), bioabsorbable poly-L-lactic acid (BIORCI, Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA), and bioabsorbable composite hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactic acid (BIORCI-HA, Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) were immersed in a broth of bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus. The screws were irrigated and then imaged with a photon-capturing camera system yielding a total photon count correlating with residual adherent bacteria. The titanium screws had the lowest mean total bacterial counts followed by the PLLA-HA screws and with the PLLA screws having the highest mean total counts. The difference in means between the titanium group and the PLLA group was statistically significant (p bacterial adherence than comparable bioabsorbable PLLA screws.

  8. Evaluation of Design Parameters of Dental Implant Shape, Diameter and Length on Stress Distribution: A Finite Element Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed Ibrahim, M; Thulasingam, C; Nasser, K S. G. A; Balaji, V; Rajakumar, M; Rupkumar, P

    2011-01-01

    ...).The objectives of the study was to compare the influence of stress distribution in the implants of screw-vent tapered and parallel design by varying the implant diameter with a standard implant length...

  9. Error rate of multi-level rapid prototyping trajectories for pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matjaz Merc; Igor Drstvensek; Matjaz Vogrin; Tomaz Brajlih; Tomaz Friedrich; Gregor Recnik

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Free-hand pedicle screw placement has a high incidence of pedicle perforation which can be reduced with fluoroscopy,navigation or an alternative rapid prototyping drill guide template.In our study the error rate of multi-level templates for pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral regions was evaluated.Methods:A case series study was performed on 11 patients.Seventy-two screws were implanted using multilevel drill guide templates manufactured with selective laser sintering.According to the optimal screw direction preoperatively defined,an analysis of screw misplacement was performed.Displacement,deviation and screw length difference were measured.The learning curve was also estimated.Results:Twelve screws (17%) were placed more than 3.125 mm out of its optimal position in the centre of pedicle.The tip of the 16 screws (22%) was misplaced more than 6.25 mm out of the predicted optimal position.According to our predefined goal,19 screws (26%) were implanted inaccurately.In 10 cases the screw length was selected incorrectly:1 (1%) screw was too long and 9 (13%) were too short.No clinical signs of neurovascular lesion were observed.Learning curve was insignificantly noticeable (P=0.129).Conclusion:In our study,the procedure of manufacturing and applying multi-level drill guide templates has a 26% chance of screw misplacement.However,that rate does not coincide with pedicle perforation incidence and neurovascular injury.These facts along with a comparison to compatible studies make it possible to summarize that multi-level templates are satisfactorily accurate and allow precise screw placement with a clinically irrelevant mistake factor.Therefore templates could potentially represent a useful tool for routine pedicle screw placement.

  10. Augmentation of screw fixation with injectable calcium sulfate bone cement in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xie, Xin-Hui; Yu, Zhi-Feng; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of augmenting screw fixation with an injectable calcium sulfate cement (CSC) in the osteoporotic bone of ovariectomized rats. The influence of the calcium sulfate (CS) on bone remodeling and screw anchorage in osteoporotic cancellous bone was systematically investigated using histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses. The femoral condyles of 55 Sprague-Dawley ovariectomized rats were implanted with screw augmented with CS, while the contralateral limb received a nonaugmented screw. At time intervals of 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, 11 rats were euthanized. Six pair-matched samples were used for histological analysis, while five pair-matched samples were preserved for biomechanical testing. Histomorphometric data showed that CS augmented screws activated cancellous bone formation, evidenced by a statistically higher (p < 0.05) percentage of osteoid surface at 2, 4, and 8 weeks and a higher rate of bone mineral apposition at 12 weeks compared with nonaugmented screws. The amount of the bone-screw contact at 2, 8, and 12 weeks and of bone ingrowth on the threads at 4 and 8 weeks was greater in the CS group than in the nonaugmented group (p < 0.05), although these parameters increased concomitantly with time for both groups. The CS was resorbed completely at 8 weeks without stimulating fibrous encapsulation on the screw surface. Also, the cement significantly increased the screw pull-out force and the energy to failure at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implantation, when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). These results imply that augmentation of screw fixation with CS may have the potential to decrease the risk of implant failure in osteoporotic bone.

  11. Study of Bone-screw Surface Fixation in Lumbar Dynamic Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Gang Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to use the animal model of dynamic fixation to examine the interaction of the pedicle screw surface with surrounding bone, and determine whether pedicle screws achieve good mechanical stability in the vertebrae. Methods: Twenty-four goats aged 2-3 years had Cosmic ® pedicle screws implanted into both sides of the L2-L5 pedicles. Twelve goats in the bilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods implanted in L2-L3 and L4-L5. Twelve goats in the unilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods randomly fixed on one side of the lumbar spine. The side that was not implanted with fixation rods was used as a static control group. Results: In the static control group, new bone was formed around the pedicle screw and on the screw surface. In the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation groups, large amounts of connective tissue formed between and around the screw threads, with no new bone formation on the screw surface; the pedicle screws were loose after the fixed rods were removed. The bone mineral density and morphological parameters of the region of interest (ROI in the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation group were not significantly different (P > 0.05, but were lower in the fixed groups than the static control group (P 0.05; however the maximum pull force of the fixation groups was significantly less than the static control group (P < 0.01. Conclusions: Fibrous connective tissue formed at the bone-screw interface under unilateral and bilateral pedicle dynamic fixation, and the pedicle screws lost mechanical stability in the vertebrae.

  12. NUT SCREW MECHANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J.A.F.

    1958-07-01

    A reactor control mechanism is described wherein the control is achieved by the partial or total withdrawal of the fissile material which is in the form of a fuel rod. The fuel rod is designed to be raised and lowered from the reactor core area by means of two concentric ball nut and screw assemblies that may telescope one within the other. These screw mechanisms are connected through a magnetic clutch to a speed reduction gear and an accurately controllable prime motive source. With the clutch energized, the fuel rod may be moved into the reactor core area, and fine adjustments may be made through the reduction gearing. However, in the event of a power failure or an emergency signal, the magnetic clutch will become deenergized, and the fuel rod will drop out of the core area by the force of gravity, thus shutting down the operation of the reactor.

  13. Dental Implants: Dual Stabilization Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    More recent epidemiological data seem to show an increasing trend of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons rather than caries; the presence of initial attachment loss, bone height and the habit of smoking significantly increase the risk of tooth mortality. A dental implant is a titanium screw which is placed into bone to replace missing teeth. The implant mimics the root of a tooth in function. Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry over the last three decades. Success of dental i...

  14. Early tissue responses to zoledronate, locally delivered by bone screw, into a compromised cancellous bone site: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnoldi, Joerg; Alves, Antoine; Procter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    ...) a potent BP was loaded on bone screws and evaluated in a local delivery model. Whilst mid- to long-term effects are already reported, early cellular events occurring at the implant/bone interface are not well described...

  15. The effects of implant surface roughness and surgical technique on implant fixation in an in vitro model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalabi, M.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between implant surface parameters, surgical approach and initial implant fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty tapered, conical, screw-shaped implants with machined or etched surface topography were implanted into the

  16. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  17. Posterior atlantoaxial transpedicle screw fixation for traumatic atlatoaxial instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-lei WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical efficacy of posterior atlantoaxial pedicle screw fixation for traumatic atlantoaxial instability. Methods From September 2009 to March 2013, 17 patients with atlantoaxial instability received posterior atlantoaxial pedicle screw fixation. There were 12 males and 5 females, with a mean age of 42 years old (ranged from 19 to 63 years old. Transpedicle screw fixation was employed in 8 patients with atlantoaxial fracture and dislocation, in 2 with traumatic disruption of transverse atlantal ligament, and in 7 with odontoid fracture. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score before operation was from 5 to 14, with a mean of 11.2. Preoperative CT, MRI and radiographs, as well as intraoperative screw placement and bone graft were administered in all the patients. Results In all the patients, complete reduction was achieved without injury to the vertebral artery, spinal cord or never root, and they started to be ambulatory on the first day after the operation. The patients were followed up for 6-36 months (mean 21 months, and clinical symptoms were seen to be improved significantly. Imaging reexamination 6 months after the surgery showed satisfactory healing of implanted bone and position of all the screws without loosening of the implant. The mean JOA scores was 15.5(11.0-17.0 twelve months after the operation. Conclusion Atlantoaxial pedicle screw fixation for traumatic atlantoaxial instability is safe and reliable with a favorable clinical result. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.14

  18. A screwing device for handling and assembly of micro screws

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegeckaite, Asta; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, the application of specially designed handling devices in micro technology is an important topic and a necessity for the industry. Conventional methods for screwing can not be applied directly to micro screws. This is caused by the 3D micro object geometry and dimensions which inducing ...

  19. Design of three-dimensional visualization based on the posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a three-dimensional visualization model of posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation.Methods A patient with lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and another patient with compression fracture of lumbar vertebra were involved in the present study.Both patients underwent multi-slice spiral CT scan before and after lumbar pedicle screw fixation.The degree of preoperative vertebral compression,vertebral morphology before and after surgery,postoperative pedicle screw position,and decompression effects were observed.The original data of the multi-slice spiral CT were inputted into the computer.The three-dimensional reconstructed images of the lumbar and implanted screws were obtained using the software Amira 4.1 to show the three-dimensional shape of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and the location of the implanted screws.Results The morphology and structure of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and of the implanted screws were reconstructed using the digital navigation platform.The reconstructed 3D images could be displayed in multicolor,transparent,or arbitrary combinations.In the 3D surface reconstruction images,the location and structure of the implanted screws could be clearly observed,and the decompression of the spinal cord or nerve roots and the severity of the fracture and the compression of lumbar vertebrae could be fully evaluated.The reconstructed images before operation revealed the position of the vertebral pedicles and provided reference for intraoperative localization.Conclusions The three-dimensional computerized reconstructions of lumbar pedicle screw fixation may be valuable in basic research,clinical experiment,and surgical planning.The software Amira is one of the bases of three-dimensional reconstruction.

  20. Comparison of low density and high density pedicle screw instrumentation in Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingkui; Jiang, Honghui; Luo, Ming; Wang, Wengang; Li, Ning; Wang, Lulu; Xia, Lei

    2017-08-02

    The correlation between implant density and deformity correction has not yet led to a precise conclusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low density (LD) and high density (HD) pedicle screw instrumentation in terms of the clinical, radiological and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 outcomes in Lenke 1 AIS. We retrospectively reviewed 62 consecutive Lenke 1 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis using all-pedicle screw instrumentation with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The implant density was defined as the number of screws per spinal level fused. Patients were then divided into two groups according to the average implant density for the entire study. The LD group (n = 28) had fewer than 1.61 screws per level, while the HD group (n = 34) had more than 1.61 screws per level. The radiographs were analysed preoperatively, postoperatively and at final follow-up. The perioperative and SRS-22 outcomes were also assessed. Independent sample t tests were used between the two groups. Comparisons between the two groups showed no significant differences in the correction of the main thoracic curve and thoracic kyphosis, blood transfusion, hospital stay, and SRS-22 scores. Compared with the HD group, there was a decreased operating time (278.4 vs. 331.0 min, p = 0.004) and decreased blood loss (823.6 vs. 1010.9 ml, p = 0.048), pedicle screws needed (15.1 vs. 19.6, p density and high density pedicle screw instrumentation achieved satisfactory deformity correction in Lenke 1 AIS patients. However, the operating time and blood loss were reduced, and the implant costs were decreased with the use of low screw density constructs.

  1. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate–screw-systems in an in vitro bone model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, Leonie [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Besdo, Silke [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Angrisani, Nina [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Wriggers, Peter [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hering, Britta [Institute of Production Engineering and Machine Tools, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Seitz, Jan-Marten [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin, E-mail: janin.reifenrath@tiho-hannover.de [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate–screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15 cNm or 7 cNm, NaOH treated plates (15 cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15 cNm) and steel plates as control (15 cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in μ-computed tomography (μCT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. - Highlights: • Mg-based plate screw systems were examined in an in vitro corrosion setup. • Different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour. • Pretreatment with NaOH showed no increase in corrosion resistance. • Fluoride coating slowed down the corrosion rate of plates. • Fluoride coating might be an alternative for decrease of corrosion rate in vivo.

  2. Application of IMF screws to assist internal rigid fixation of jaw fractures: our experiences of 168 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenxi; Gao, Zhibiao; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Wenjuan; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zhaoling

    2015-01-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) screws were first introduced to achieve IMF as a kind of bone borne appliance for jaw fractures in 1989. Because this method can overcome many disadvantages associated with tooth borne appliance, IMF screws have been popularly used for jaw fractures since then. From March 2011 to February 2014, we treated 168 cases with single or multiple jaw fractures by open reduction and a total of 705 IMF screws were intraoperatively applied in all the cases to achieve IMF and maintain dental occlusion as an adjuvant to open reduction. The numbers, implantation sites and complications of IMF screws were retrospectively analyzed. In our experience, we found that IMF screws were important to assist open reduction of jaw fractures but their roles should be objectively assessed and the reliability of open reduction and internal rigid fixation must be emphasized. Much attention should be paid when implanting.

  3. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  4. Accuracy of spinal navigation for Magerl-screws

    CERN Document Server

    Herz, T

    2001-01-01

    Study design: assessment of the accuracy of frameless stereotactic navigation at the second cervical vertebra. Objectives: to assess the influence of the protocol of preoperative CT-scan and the registration technique on the accuracy of navigation for implanting Magerl-screws. Summary of background data: the use of navigation systems for implanting Magerl-screws could help to decrease the risk of complications and to reduce the required skin incision. Two parameters conceivably affecting the accuracy are the protocol of the preoperative CT-scan and the registration technique. Methods: four cervical spine segments of human cadavers were scanned with two different protocols (3 mm slice thickness/2 mm table increment, 1 mm slice thickness/1 mm table increment). Registration was performed either based on anatomical landmarks or using a specially designed percutaneous registration device. For the accuracy-check, the pointer tip was exactly placed on markers. The distance between the pointer and the marker displaye...

  5. Bicortical screw fixation of distal fibula fractures with a lateral plate: an anatomic and biomechanical study of a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Brenton F; Mercer, Deana; Firoozbakhsh, Keikhosrow; Larsen, Kenna; Decoster, Thomas A; Miller, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    One of the potential drawbacks of lateral plating of distal fibula fractures is less than satisfactory fixation of unicortical screws commonly placed in the distal fragment to avoid implant penetration of the ankle joint. This study examines the anatomy of the distal fibula, proposes new techniques for bicortical screw fixation and radiographic evaluation of screw placement, and compares pullout strength of unicortical versus bicortical screws in this area. Sixteen pairs of human cadaver feet were used in this study. It was found that a large percentage of the surface area of the distal fibula is nonarticular and that the distal fibula could be divided into 3 zones with distinct anatomic features. Zone I is defined as the distal most 1.5 cm of the fibula, zone II is the next 1 cm of fibula proximal to zone I, and zone III is defined as the fibula above the ankle joint, starting at just over 2.5 cm proximal to the tip of the fibula. We determined a safe corridor for bicortical screw placement by means of a lateral plate in each zone. An improved radiographic view is described for confirmation of extraarticular screw placement. Screw pullout testing was performed on 8 pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver fibulas. In both zone I and zone II, the bicortical screw fixation was significantly stronger than the unicortical screw fixation. In zone I, the average pullout strength for the bicortical screw fixation was 2.3 times higher than the unicortical screw fixation. In zone II, the average pullout strength for the bicortical screw fixation was 3.3 times higher than the unicortical screw fixation. This study shows that not only is bicortical screw placement in the distal fibula technically feasible, but it is also biomechanically stronger than unicortical placement in this area.

  6. 种植体与横腭杆支抗对减数正畸患者临床疗效影响的比较%An efficacy comparison between mini-screw implant and transpalatal arch on dentofacial morphology in extraction cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘月华; 刘晶; 李强; 丁王辉

    2009-01-01

    lusions As orthodontic anchorage, mini-screw implants were different from TPA. Mini-acrew implant could not only retract the upper incisors but also slightly intrude upper incisors and upper molars.%74±2.66)mm,上唇突点后移(4.61±2.00)mm;矫治后横腭杆支抗组上切牙腭向移动(4.59±1.78)mm,伸长(0.93±1.77)mm,上颌第一磨牙近中移动(1.65±1.87)mm,伸长(0.52±1.59)mm,上唇突点后移(3.07±2.02)mm;两组差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 种植体支抗的作用明显强于横腭杆支抗,种植体不仅能大幅度内收前牙,改善侧貌,有效压低上切牙以利于矫正深覆胎、露龈笑,还可压低上颌磨牙.

  7. Short surface-porous dental implants as an alternative to open sinus lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksyutov А.Е.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the comparative effectiveness of clinical application of short surface-porous of dental implants and sinus lift open with the subsequent installation of screw implants usual length

  8. Mechanical strength, fatigue life, and failure analysis of two prototypes and five conventional tibial locking screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sheng-Mou; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Lin, Jinn

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the design and microstructure on the mechanical strength of tibial locking devices. The mechanical strength of two prototypes of specially developed locking devices (a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt) was tested and compared with that of five types of commercially available tibial locking screws (Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, Osteo AG, and Zimmer) with similar dimensions. The devices were inserted into a polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three-point bending test. Single-loading yielding strength and cyclic-loading fatigue life were then measured. Failure analysis of the fractured screws was performed to investigate the microstructure and potential causes of the fatigue fracture. Test results showed that both yielding strength and fatigue life were closely related to the section modulus of the inner diameter of screws. Among the threaded screws, the both-ends-threaded screws had a higher yielding strength and longer fatigue life than the Osteo AG, Howmedica, Richards, and Zimmer screws. The unthreaded bolts had a lower yielding strength than Synthes screws, but they demonstrated the longest fatigue life among all. In failure analysis of broken screws, no metallurgical or manufacturing defects were found except for surface microimperfections. The implants investigated in this study are manufactured with high-quality materials and manufacturing processes. The main cause of hardware failure was mechanical overloading. The five commercially used tibial locking screws had a relatively short fatigue life under high loading. Removing the screw threads might substantially increase the fatigue life of the locking devices. In unthreaded bolts, this increase might be tenfold to a hundredfold.

  9. Foreign body reaction after PLC reconstruction caused by a broken PLLA screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kwon; Jeong, Tae-Wan; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Foreign body reactions may occur in patients who receive bioabsorbable implants during orthopedic surgery for fractures and ligament repair. The authors describe a 34-year-old man who presented with a palpable tender mass on the lateral aspect of the left knee of 1 month's duration. He underwent posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner reconstruction 3 years earlier. Physical examination showed a 1×1-cm soft, nontender mass without localized warmth on the lateral epicondyle of the distal femur. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a broken screw fragment surrounded by a cyst-like mass. Under general anesthesia, the surgeon excised the screw fragment and the fibrotic mass, enclosing it in the subcutaneous tissue at the lateral epicondyle, the site at which a poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw had been inserted to fix the graft for posterolateral corner reconstruction. Histologic evaluation showed a foreign body reaction to the degraded screw particles. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first description of a patient presenting with a delayed foreign body reaction to a broken poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw at the lateral femoral epicondyle after posterolateral corner reconstruction. Because delayed foreign body reactions can occur at any site of poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw insertion, care should be taken to avoid screw protrusion during ligament reconstruction because it can lead to screw breakage and delayed foreign body reaction.

  10. C2 laminar screw and C1-2 transarticular screw combined with C1 laminar hooks for atlantoaxial instability with unilateral vertebral artery injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Liu, Jun; Ni, Bin; Lu, Xuhua; Zhou, Fengjin

    2011-09-01

    Transarticular screw fixation (TASF) is technically demanding, with high risk of vertebral artery (VA) injury. How to manage intraoperative VA injury and choose optimal alternative fixation becomes a concern of spinal surgeons. In this study, the management strategy for a patient with suspected intraoperative VA injury was analyzed. A 53-year-old woman developed type II odontoid fracture and brain stem injury due to a motor vehicle accident 3 months earlier. After conservative treatments, the brain stem injury improved, but with residual ocular motility defect in the right eye. The odontoid fracture did not achieve fusion with displacement and absorption of fracture fragments. After admission, atlantoaxial fixation using bilateral C1-2 transarticular screws (TASs) combined with C1 laminar hooks was planed. The first TAS was inserted successfully. Unfortunately, suspected VA injury developed during tapping the tract for the second TAS. Considering the previous brain stem injury and that directly inserting the screw to tamponade the hemorrhage might cause VA stenosis or occlusion, we blocked the screw trajectory with bone wax. C2 laminar screw was implanted instead of intended TAS on the injured side. The management strategy for suspected VA injury should depend on intraoperative circumstances and be tailored to patients. Blocking screw trajectory with bone wax is a useful method to stop bleeding. Atlantoaxial fixation using C2 laminar screw and C1-2 TAS combined with C1 laminar hooks is an ideal alternative procedure.

  11. Absorbable screws through the greater trochanter do not disturb physeal growth: rabbit experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Albarova, J; Fini, M; Gil-Albarova, R; Melgosa, M; Aldini-Nicolo, N; Giardino, R; Seral, F

    1998-06-01

    We studied the effect of implantation of self-reinforced polyglycolic acid (SR-PGA) screws through the greater trochanter in rabbits. 15 rabbits aged 10 weeks had an SR-PGA screw inserted through the left trochanter physis. A similar drilling was made through the right greater trochanter without screw implantation. The animals were assigned to 3 groups of 5, and were killed after 1, 2 or 3 months. Radiographs of both femurs were obtained monthly and the articulo-trochanteric distance and the neck-shaft angle were measured. After killing the animals, a histological study was performed. The drilling on the right trochanter generated a bony bridge in all the animals. The SR-PGA screws did not give rise to an epiphysiodesis. The progressive peripheral degradation of the implants gave rise to the formation of only modest bridges, which were smaller in size than those observed in the control trochanter. Our findings suggest that absorbable PGA screws implanted through a growth plate cause only minor bone formation and no epiphyseodesis.

  12. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF MICRO -SCREW IMPLANT ANCHORAGE IN TREATMENT OF ANGLE'S CLASS II DIVISION 1 MALOCCLUSION WITH DEEP OVERBURDEN JAWS%微螺钉种植体支抗在 Angle 氏 II 类1分类深覆颌深覆盖牙颌畸形治疗中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金望

    2015-01-01

    目的:应用微螺钉种植体支抗植入Angle氏II类1分类深覆颌深覆盖牙颌畸形患者上颌牙列,加强支抗,比较其上颌切牙与第一磨牙的位置变化,探讨自攻型微螺钉种植支抗比传统支抗是否具有优越性。方法选择Angle氏II类1分类深覆颌深覆盖患者68例,随机分为研究组和对照组。研究组使用自攻型微型种植钉作为支抗体;对照组使用Nance弓、横腭杆或口外弓联合作为强支抗。比较两组总的治疗时间,及治疗前后X线头影测量的线距和U1/SN的角度差值。结果①微型种植钉保持稳定而无松动,种植体周围软组织健康,无肿胀感染,患者无明显不适。②研究组平均疗程20个月,对照组平均疗程26个月。③研究组患者在软组织侧貌得到显著的改善,上下唇相对于审美平面分别内收4.26 mm和4.54 mm。 U1/SN角减小了10.2°;对照组上下唇相对审美平面分别内收2.88 mm和3.01 mm。两组之间的差异有统计学意义。研究组上颌第一磨牙矫治前后在前后向和垂直向未发生显著性移动( p>0.05),切牙在前后向发生显著性移动,组间的差异有统计学意义( p<0.01)。结论相比传统支抗技术,微螺钉种植支抗能够更好地控制牙齿移动,缩短整个治疗时间。%Objective To assess theapplication values of self -tapping micro-screw implant anchorage in treatment of Angle's class II division 1 malocclusion with deep overburden jaws , compared with the traditional anchor-age.Micro-screw implantswere inserted in maxillary teeth of patients with Angle's class II division 1 malocclusion with deep overburden jaws tostrengthen anchorage .Changesin position of the maxillary incisor and the first molar were compared.Methods 68 cases of Angle's class II division 1 malocclusion with deep overburden jaws were selected and randomly divided into the research group and the control group .The

  13. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  14. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  15. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  16. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  17. How Reliable Are The Threaded Locking Screws?

    OpenAIRE

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Karakaslı, Ahmet; Karcı, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Sesli, Erhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: A frequent problem for interlocking nailing, that affects the treatment of the fracture is locking screw deformation. The research question is whether bending resistance is different between high, low and unthreaded locking screws of interlocking femoral nails. Materials and methods. : We used 90 screws for nine groups, ten screws for each group in this experimental study. We performed three-point bending tests on six group of 5 mm screws (titanium, stainless steel, crossed with u...

  18. 微型种植体支抗辅助牵引成骨重建上颌骨部分缺损的效果评估%Mini-screw implant anchorage-assisted distraction osteogenesis for reconstruction of partial maxillary defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯贻苗; 沈国芳; 房兵; 毛丽霞; 娄新田

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE:To evaluate the usefulness of self-made distraction osteogenesis instrument by orthodontic technique and mini-screw implant anchorage-assisted distraction osteogenesis(DO) to reconstruct partial maxillary defects. METHODS: Eight patients suffering from partial maxillary defects were selected. Their ages ranged from 19 to 43 years and the average age was 33.2 years. There were 5 males. After a special instrument was fabricated, elastic force trifocal distraction was performed by mini-implant borne aneborage. Three months later the implants were implanted in the two distracted region and the prosthetic restorations were finished finally. RESULTS: In the areas of distraction osteogenesis, ossifications were fine and alveolar bones were completed. The partial maxillary defects were repaired with the implant technique and the prosthodontie technique, and favourable occlusion was obtained. CONCLUSION: Combined orthodontic and DO techniques can reconstruct partial maxillary defect successfully and restore the complicated anatomical contour of the maxilla, especially the dental-alveolar bone.%目的:评价正畸技术自制牵引成骨装置及微型种植体支抗辅助弹力牵引重建上颌骨部分缺损的疗效.方法:选择5例上颌骨部分缺损病例,均为男性,年龄19~43岁,平均33.2岁.制作特殊的牵引装置.采用微型种植体支抗辅助支持的弹力牵引方式,进行三焦点式牵引成骨.3个月后,在两侧牵引区植入种植体,进行牙列修复.结果:骨缺损区牵引成骨后成骨良好,形成完整的牙槽嵴,可应用种植和托牙技术进行牙列修复,恢复良好的咬合关系.结论:对上颌骨部分骨缺损病例,可应用正畸技术和牵引成骨技术联合治疗,以恢复颌骨复杂的解剖结构,尤其是牙槽嵴,为牙列修复提供必备的条件.

  19. Gummy smile correction by intruding upper incisors with mini-screw implant: an esthetic evaluation by the golden facial mask%黄金比例面具对种植体支抗压低上切牙改善露龈笑的美学评价初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳大为; 周彦恒; 李韵仪

    2010-01-01

    Objective To use a golden facial mask to classify the gummy smile and then to evaluate the effectiveness of correction gummy smile by intruding upper incisors and canines with mini-screw implants. Methods Sixteen female and 1 male gummy smile patients with an age range of 16-40 years, 26. 2 years on average, were involved in the study. The mini-screw implants were inserted buccally between upper lateral incisors and canines on both sides for intruding upper incisors together with fixed appliance. The golden facial mask was introduced to analyze the frontal view of smile pre- and post-treatment. Results Gummy smile of all patients involved in the study was reduced by intruding upper incisors and canines, and the average period for intruding about 9. 8 months. According to the analysis of the golden facial mask, the reasons of gummy smile in different patients were different before treatment. However, the lips, teeth and gingiva were almost coincident with the golden facial mask after treatment. Conclusions Analyzing the relationship among lip, teeth and gingiva by the golden facial mask, the inprovement of gummy smile by using mini-screw implants to intrude the upper incisors can be evaluated.%目的 利用黄金比例面具对露龈笑进行分类,并评价使用种植体支抗压低上切牙后患者露龈笑的改善程度,探讨种植体支抗压低上切牙治疗露龈笑过程中唇-齿-龈关系的变化趋势.方法 选择17例露龈笑患者,女性16例,男性1例,年龄16~40岁,平均26.2岁.于上颌侧切牙和尖牙间唇侧植入微螺钉种植体支抗压低上切牙,在Photoshop软件中将正面微笑黄金比例面具标准化模板与治疗前后的正面微笑像重叠,比较治疗前后正面微笑像唇、齿、龈在黄金比例面具相应区域内所占比例的变化,定性分析并评价露龈笑的改善程度.结果 17例患者的上切牙均被成功压低,露龈笑明显改善,疗程平均9.8个月.通过黄金比例面具分析发

  20. 金属内植物表面微螺纹联合微弧氧化处理对其在骨质疏松条件下生物稳定性的影响%Effect of surface modification of a metal implant by micro-screw threading plus micro-arc oxidation on its biostability in osteoporotic sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨峥; 石磊; 王陵; 郭征; 雷伟; 张扬; 李小康; 裴国献

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe whether biological performance of a metal implant can be improved after its surface has been modified by micro-screw threading plus micro-arc oxidation in osteoporotic sheep.Methods Osteoporosis was induced in 6 adult female sheep by bilateral ovariectomy and confirmed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and test of bone density of lumbar vertebrae after hormone administration and low calcium diet for 12 months.After 6 implants were put into the right ilium of each sheep,they were divided into 3 equal groups:group A (untreated),group B (treated by micro-screw threading) and group C (treated by micro-screw threading plus micro-arc oxidation).All the animals were sacrificed at 3 months after implantation.Three of them were randomly chosen as zero point controls,in each of which 6 implants were put into the left ilium and divided into similar 3 treatment groups.Mechanical test,Micro-CT analysis and histological observation were conducted for statistical analysis of the data.Results At 3 months after implantation,the maximal pull-out strength and energy absorption in each experimental group were significantly enhanced compared with each control group (P < 0.05).The maximal pull-out strength and energy absorption in group C were significantly better than in groups A and B (P < 0.05).Micro-CT reconstruction showed that the bone volume fraction,trabecular thickness and bone mineral density in group C were significantly improved compared with groups A and B (P < O.05).Histological observation showed significantly improved rates of new bone formation and bone contact in group C compared with groups A and B (P < 0.05).Conclusion Biological performance and stability of a metal implant in osteoporotic sheep can be significantly improved after its surface has been modified by micro-screw threading plus micro-arc oxidation.%目的 观察经过表面微螺纹复合微弧氧化处理的内植物能否提高其在骨质疏松(OP

  1. Torsional stiffness after subtalar arthrodesis using second generation headless compression screws: Biomechanical comparison of 2-screw and 3-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Markus; Glisson, Richard R; Matsumoto, Takumi; Hofstaetter, Stefan G; Easley, Mark E

    2017-06-01

    Subtalar joint arthrodesis is a common operative treatment for symptomatic subtalar arthrosis. Because excessive relative motion between the talus and calcaneus can delay or prohibit fusion, fixation should be optimized, particularly in patients at risk for subtalar arthrodesis nonunion. Tapered, fully-threaded, variable pitch screws are gaining popularity for this application, but the mechanical properties of joints fixed with these screws have not been characterized completely. We quantified the torsion resistance of 2-screw and 3-screw subtalar joint fixation using this type of screw. Ten pairs of cadaveric subtalar joints were prepared for arthrodesis and fixed using Acutrak 2-7.5 screws. One specimen from each pair was fixed with two diverging posterior screws, and the contralateral joint was fixed using two posterior screws and a third screw directed through the anterior calcaneus into the talar neck. Internal and external torsional loads were applied and joint rotation and torsional stiffness were measured at two torque levels. Internal rotation was significantly less in specimens fixed with three screws. No difference was detectable between 2-screw and 3-screw fixation in external rotation or torsional stiffness in either rotation direction. Both 2-screw and 3-screw fixation exhibited torsion resistance surpassing that reported previously for subtalar joints fixed with two diverging conventional lag screws. Performance of the tapered, fully threaded, variable pitch screws exceeded that of conventional lag screws regardless of whether two or three screws were used. Additional resistance to internal rotation afforded by a third screw placed anteriorly may offer some advantage in patients at risk for nonunion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Osteogenesis and Morphology of the Peri-Implant Bone Facing Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of different implant surfaces on peri-implant osteogenesis and implant face morphology of peri-implant tissues during the early (2 weeks and complete healing period (3 months. Thirty endosseous titanium implants (conic screws with differently treated surfaces (smooth titanium = SS, titanium plasma sprayed = TPS, sand-blasted zirconium oxide = Zr-SLA were implanted in femur and tibiae diaphyses of two mongrel sheep. Histological sections of the implants and surrounding tissues obtained by sawing and grinding techniques were observed under light microscopy (LM. The peri-implant tissues of other samples were mechanically detached from the corresponding implants to be processed for SEM observation. Two weeks after implantation, we observed osteogenesis (new bone trabeculae around all implant surfaces only where a gap was present at the host bone-metal interface. No evident bone deposition was detectable where threads of the screws were in direct contact with the compact host bone. Distance osteogenesis predominated in SS implants, while around rough surfaces (TPS and Zr-SLA, both distance and contact osteogenesis were present. At SEM analysis 2 weeks after implantation, the implant face of SS peri-implant tissue showed few, thin, newly formed, bone trabeculae immersed in large, loose, marrow tissue with blood vessels. Around the TPS screws, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue was rather irregular because of the rougher metal surface. Zr-SLA screws showed more numerous, newly formed bone trabeculae crossing marrow spaces and also needle-like crystals in bone nodules indicating an active mineralising process. After 3 months, all the screws appeared osseointegrated, being almost completely covered by a compact, mature, newly formed bone. However, some marrow spaces rich in blood vessels and undifferentiated cells were in contact with the metal surface. By SEM analysis, the implant face of the peri-implant

  3. Self-energized screw coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, A. E.; Totah, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Threaded coupling carries its own store of rotational energy. Originally developed to ease task of astronauts assembling structures in space, coupling offers same advantages in other hazardous operations, such as underwater and in and around nuclear reactors. Coupling consists of two parts: crew portion and receptacle. When screw portion is inserted into receptacle and given slight push by operator, trigger pins release ratchet, allowing energy stored in springs to rotate screw into nut in receptacle.

  4. Do Newer-Generation Bioabsorbable Screws Become Incorporated into Bone at Two Years After ACL Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Graft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Leonard, James P.; Morris, Brent J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    of three years after implantation for ACL reconstruction. Although these newer-generation bioabsorbable screws were designed to promote osseointegration, no tunnel narrowing was noted, and in the majority of cases the remains of the screws were present at approximately three years. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Peer Review: This article was reviewed by the Editor-in-Chief and one Deputy Editor, and it underwent blinded review by two or more outside experts. The Deputy Editor reviewed each revision of the article, and it underwent a final review by the Editor-in-Chief prior to publication. Final corrections and clarifications occurred during one or more exchanges between the author(s) and copyeditors. PMID:24500587

  5. Biodegradable device applied in flatfoot surgery: Comparative studies between clinical and technological aspects of removed screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruozi, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.ruozi@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Belletti, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.belletti@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Manfredini, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe626@virgilio.it [Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, University Hospital of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena Italy, Director Prof. F. Catani, Via del Pozzo 71, Policlinico, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Tonelli, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.tonelli@unimore.it [CIGS, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Sena, Paola, E-mail: paola.sena@unimore.it [Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, Policlinico, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Vandelli, Maria Angela, E-mail: mariaangela.vandelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Forni, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.forni@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy); Tosi, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.tosi@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 183, 41100 Modena, MO (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is one of the most used polymers for biomedical application; its use in sutures and other implants has been widely investigated. Although the knowledge of PLLA biodegradation and biocompatibility features is deep, PLLA screws used to correct the flat foot deformity have deserved attention since they are not degraded in most of cases after a long period of years (3–7) from the implantation. In this article, a clinical and radiological evaluation (NMR, histological and clinical outcomes) on patients was correlated with physico-chemical characterization (by SEM, DSC, GPC and XRD analysis at different temperatures) on both native and patient-recovered screws together with the theoretical degradation processes of PLLA-based implants. The data demonstrated the need for crossing the biodegradation and bioabsorption of the polymer with the characteristics of both the device (geometry, structure and fabrication process) and the implantation site. Highlights: ► Resorbable PLLA screws were proposed for arthroereisis in pediatric flatfoot. ► Satisfactory clinical results were obtained almost in the totality of patients. ► The bioabsorption period is slightly longer than what is expected. ► Patient-recovered screws were analyzed to evaluate the biodegradation stage. ► Degradability/structural integrity during implantation should be ameliorated.

  6. Patient’s perception on mini-screws used for molar distalization = Percepção dos pacientes quanto ao uso de mini-implantes para distalização de molares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaya, Micéli Beck Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Conclusão: Os mini-implantes foram bem aceitos pelos pacientes e foram eficientes para a distalização de molares quando utilizados em associação com o tratamento ortodôntico para correção da maloclusão de Classe II

  7. [Design and experimental study of individual drill templates for atlantoaxial pedicle screw fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Quan, Zhengxue; Liu, Yang; Ou, Yunsheng

    2010-10-01

    To explore and evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of individual rapid prototype (RP) drill templates for atlantoaxial pedicle screw implantation. Volumetric CT scanning was performed in 8 adult cadaveric atlas and axis to collect Dicom format datas. Then three-dimensional (3D) images of atlas and axis were reconstructed and the parameters of pedicles of 3D model were measured by using software Mimics 10.01. The 3D model was saved by STL format in Mimics. The scattered point cloud data of 3D model were processed and the 3D coordinate system was located in software Imageware 12.1. The curves and surfaces of 3D model were processed in software Geomagic Studio 10. The optimal trajectory of pedicle screw was designed and a template was constructed which accorded with the anatomical morphology of posterior arch of atlas and lamina of axis by using software Pro/Engineer 4.0. The optimal trajectory of pedicle screw and the template were integrated into a drill template finally. The drill template and physical models of atlas and axis were manufactured by RP (3D print technology). The accuracy of pilot holes of drill templates was assessed by visually inspecting and CT scanning. The individual drill template was used conveniently and each template could closely fit the anatomical morphology of posterior arch of atlas and lamina of axis. Template loosening and shifting were not found in the process of screw implantation. Thirty-two pedicle screws were inserted. Imaging and visual inspection revealed that the majority of trajectories did not penetrate the pedicle cortex, only 1 cortical penetration was judged as noncritical and did not injury the adjacent spinal cord, nerve roots, and vertebral arteries. The accuracy of atlas pedicle screw was grade 0 in 15 screws and grade I in 1 screw, and the accuracy of axis pedicle screw was grade 0 in 16 screws. The potential of individual drill templates to aid implantation of atlantoaxial pedicle screw is promising because of its

  8. Study of Bone-screw Surface Fixation in Lumbar Dynamic Stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Gang Luo; Tao Yu; Guo-Min Liu; Nan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background:We aimed to use the animal model of dynamic fixation to examine the interaction of the pedicle screw surface with surrounding bone,and determine whether pedicle screws achieve good mechanical stability in the vertebrae.Methods:Twenty-four goats aged 2-3 years had Cosmic(R) pedicle screws implanted into both sides of the L2-L5 pedicles.Twelve goats in the bilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods implanted in L2-L3 and L4-L5.Twelve goats in the unilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods randomly fixed on one side of the lumbar spine.The side that was not implanted with fixation rods was used as a static control group.Results:In the static control group,new bone was formed around the pedicle screw and on the screw surface.In the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation groups,large amounts of connective tissue formed between and around the screw threads,with no new bone formation on the screw surface; the pedicle screws were loose after the fixed rods were removed.The bone mineral density and morphological parameters of the region of interest (ROI) in the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation group were not significantly different (P > 0.05),but were lower in the fixed groups than the static control group (P < 0.05).This showed the description bone of the ROI in the static control group was greater than in the fixation groups.Under loading conditions,the pedicle screw maximum pull force was not significantly different between the bilateral and unilateral dynamic fixation groups (P > 0.05); however the maximum pull force of the fixation groups was significantly less than the static control group (P < 0.01).Conclusions:Fibrous connective tissue formed at the bone-screw interface under unilateral and bilateral pedicle dynamic fixation,and the pedicle screws lost mechanical stability in the vertebrae.

  9. The use of bovine screws to promote bone formation using a tibia model in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Marco Aurélio; Pontual, Marco Antônio B; Bez, Leonardo; Benfatti, César Augusto M; Boabaid, Fernanda; Somerman, Martha J; Magini, Ricardo S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a unique resorbable bovine bone screw, to stimulate bone formation. Bovine bone screws were inserted in the tibia beagle dogs. Each animal received 8 screws, divided into Groups A (screws + no membranes), B (screws + titanium reinforced membranes) and C (bone defects treated with autogenous bone grafts). Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 6 months. New bone was measured with a periodontal probe and reported an average of 7.4 mm in vertical bone gain for Group B, 3.6 mm for Group A and 1.7 mm for Group C. Submission to Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistical differences between groups (p<0,05). Histological examination revealed an intimate contact between the newly formed bone and the resorbing bone screws. Conclusion: Bovine bone screws provide environment for new bone formation and thus may provide an alternative therapy for enhancing bone formation vertically, including for regenerative procedures as well as prior to implant therapy. PMID:23058228

  10. Screw fixation for atlantoaxial dislocation related to Down syndrome in children younger than 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present cases of upper cervical fixation in Down syndrome patients younger than 5 years. In two cases, C1 lateral mass screws were installed. However, owing to the irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation, the screw backed out and fractured. Therefore, O-C2 fusion was performed. Furthermore, C2 bilateral lamina screws were added to the C2 pedicle screw for reinforcement. C1-C2 fusion is an option for Down syndrome patients younger than 5 years with atlantoaxial dislocation, when the dislocation is reducible. If the dislocation is irreducible, or the implant cannot be firmly secured, the fixation range should be expanded to O-C2 or below.

  11. ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS: EVALUATION ON THE EFFECT OF SCREW DENSITY IN THE CORRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enguer Beraldo Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The objective was to investigate implant density or the number of screws correlated with the correction of the main curve in patients undergoing surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Methods: We evaluated 112 medical records: 33 patients with screw density of up to 50%, and 79 patients with a density of 100%; all patients underwent surgical correction by posterior approach with transpedicular fixation. Results: In the group of patients with screw density of up to 50% the residual Cobb median was 10°; in the group with 100% density, the median was 7°. Conclusion: Biostatistical analysis showed that the group with up to 50% of screw density presented correction rate of 82.1% and the group with 100% density had correction of about 86.8%. It is therefore concluded that the difference is statistically significant in favor of the fixation with 100% density (p =0.010.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the bioabsorbable Milagro interference screw for graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, K-H; Sawallich, T; Schütze, G; Losch, A; Walde, T; Balcarek, P; Konietschke, F; Stürmer, K M

    2009-10-01

    Ligament graft fixation with bioabsorbable interference screws is a standard procedure in cruciate ligament replacement. Previous screw designs may resorb incompletely, and can cause osteolysis and sterile cysts despite being implanted for several years. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo degradation and biocompatibility of the new Milagro interference screw (Mitek, Norderstedt, Germany). The Milagro interference screw is made of 30% ss-TCP (TriCalcium phosphate) and 70% PLGA (Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid). In the period between June 2005 and February 2006, 38 patients underwent graft fixation with Milagro screws in our hospital. Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction was performed using hamstring tendon grafts in all the patients. MR imaging was performed on 12 randomly selected patients out of the total of 38 at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. During the examination, the volume loss of the screw, tunnel enlargement, presence of osteolysis, fluid lines, edema and postoperative screw replacement by bone tissue were evaluated. There was no edema or signs of inflammation around the bone tunnels. At 3, 6 and 12 months, the tibial screws showed an average volume loss of 0, 8.1% (+/-7.9%) and 82.6% (+/-17.2%, P Milagro screw is closely linked to the graft healing process. The screws were rapidly resorbed after 6 months and, at 12 months, only the screw remnants were detectable. Moreover, the Milagro screw is biocompatible and osteoconductive, promoting bone ingrowth during resorption. Tunnel enlargement is not prevented in the first months but is reduced by bone ingrowth after 12 months.

  13. Medial Malleoli Fractures: Clinical Comparison Between Newly Designed Sled Device and Conventional Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniar, Hemil; Kempegowda, Harish; Tawari, Akhil A; Rutter, Michael R; Borade, Amrut; Cush, Gerard; Horwitz, Daniel S

    2017-08-01

    The Trimed Medial Malleolar Sled is a newer device designed to treat medial malleolus fracture. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of medial malleolar fractures treated with the sled and conventional malleolar screws. After obtaining an institutional review board approval, we conducted a retrospective study to identify all skeletally mature patients who sustained an ankle fracture with medial malleolar involvement treated with the sled and we identified a matched cohort treated with conventional malleolar screws. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group A included patients treated with malleolar screws and group B included patients treated with the sled device. The outcomes measured included rate of union, implant removal, and pain over the implant site. Eighty-five medial malleolar ankle fractures were divided into 2 groups: group A included patients (n = 64) treated with malleolar screws and group B included patients (n = 21) treated with the sled device. In group A (n = 64), 62 patients (96.8%) achieved radiological union with a mean union rate of 11 weeks and 10 (15%) patients underwent repeat surgery for implant removal of which 3 patients (4.6%) had pain specifically over the medial implant. In group B (n = 21), all of the patients (100%) achieved radiological union with a mean union rate of 10.8 weeks and 3 patients (14.2%) underwent repeat surgery of which 1 (4.7%) was related to the medial pain. There is no significant difference between the groups for the outcomes measured, including rate of union (  P = .93), visual analog scale score for pain (  P = .07), implant removal (  P = .41), and pain over the implant site (  P = .88). Based on the data from our study, we conclude that there are no major differences between the sled devices and conventional screws relating to union rate and complications. Level III: Observational study.

  14. Consensus report - reconstructions on implants. The Third EAO Consensus Conference 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Wiskott, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    This group was assigned the task to review the current knowledge in the areas of implant connections to abutments/reconstructions, fixation methods (cement vs. screw retained) for implant-supported reconstructions, as well as the optimal number of implants for fixed dental prosthesis and implant...

  15. Study of new sheep bone and Zn/Ca ratio around TiAlV screw: PIXE-RBS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, G. [Haute Ecole Arc Ingenierie, IMA-Arc-NEODE, 17 Eplatures-Grise, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)], E-mail: geoffroy.guibert@he-arc.ch; Munnik, F. [Haute Ecole Arc Ingenierie, IMA-Arc-NEODE, 17 Eplatures-Grise, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Langhoff, J.D.; Von Rechenberg, B. [MSRU, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Buffat, Ph.A.; Laub, D. [EPFL-CIME, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Faber, L.; Ducret, F. [DePuy ACE, CH-2400 Le Locle (Switzerland); Gerber, I. [Institute of Cell Biology, ETH Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mikhailov, S. [Haute Ecole Arc Ingenierie, IMA-Arc-NEODE, 17 Eplatures-Grise, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2008-03-15

    This study reports on in vivo particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) measurements combined with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) analyses of new remodeled sheep bone formed around TiAlV screws. The implants (screws) were anodized by a modified TiMax{sup TM} process. The interface between the implant and the bone was carefully investigated. [Zn]/[Ca] in-depth composition profiles as well as Ca, Fe elemental maps were recorded. The thickness of new bone formed around the screw reached 300-400 {mu}m. Osteon and Osteoid phases were identified in the new bone. A higher [Zn]/[Ca] ratio was observed in the new bone as compared to the mature bone. Blood vessels were observed in the bone in close contact with the screw. This study shows the potential of ion beam analysis for biological and biomedical characterization.

  16. A simple procedure for retrieval of a cement-retained implant-supported crown: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed Mahmoud; Mahmood, Wan Adida; Yunus, Norsiah Binti

    2014-02-01

    Retrieval of cement-retained implant prostheses can be more demanding than retrieval of screw-retained prostheses. This case report describes a simple and predictable procedure to locate the abutment screw access openings of cementretained implant-supported crowns in cases of fractured ceramic veneer. A conventional periapical radiography image was captured using a digital camera, transferred to a computer, and manipulated using Microsoft Word document software to estimate the location of the abutment screw access.

  17. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  18. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mirza Rustum Baig; Rajan Gunaseelan

    2012-01-01

    The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported...

  19. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pesenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P=0.0006. No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes.

  1. Cementable implant-supported prosthesis, serial extraction, and serial implant installation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Harry; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2004-12-01

    Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses are particularly indicated where access for screw placement is limited or impossible like in posterior locations or where there is limited jaw opening. The patient in this case report suffered from limited jaw opening as a result of a long history of temporomandibular joint ankylosis related to hemophilia. Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses coupled with serial extraction, serial implant installations, and chairside provisional restorations made uneventful treatment possible.

  2. Pedicle Screw-Based Posterior Dynamic Stabilization: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip K. Sengupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS indicates motion preservation devices that are aimed for surgical treatment of activity related mechanical low back pain. A large number of such devices have been introduced during the last 2 decades, without biomechanical design rationale, or clinical evidence of efficacy to address back pain. Implant failure is the commonest complication, which has resulted in withdrawal of some of the PDS devices from the market. In this paper the authors presented the current understanding of clinical instability of lumbar motions segment, proposed a classification, and described the clinical experience of the pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization devices.

  3. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants.

  4. The Biocompatibility of Degradable Magnesium Interference Screws: An Experimental Study with Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Thormann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Screws for ligament reconstruction are nowadays mostly made of poly-L-lactide (PLLA. However, magnesium-based biomaterials are gathering increased interest in this research field because of their good mechanical property and osteoanabolic influence on bone metabolism. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of an interference screw for ligament reconstruction made of magnesium alloy W4 by diecasting and milling and using different PEO-coatings with calcium phosphates. PLLA and titanium screws were used as control samples. The screws were implanted in the femur condyle of the hind leg of a merino sheep. The observation period was six and twelve weeks and one year. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and molecular biological evaluation were conducted. Further TEM analysis was done. In all magnesium screws a clinically relevant gas formation in the vicinity of the biomaterial was observed. Except for the PLLA and titanium control samples, no screw was fully integrated in the surrounding bone tissue. Regarding the fabrication process, milling seems to produce less gas liberation and has a better influence on bone metabolism than diecasting. Coating by PEO with calcium phosphates could not reduce the initial gas liberation but rather reduced the bone metabolism in the vicinity of the biomaterial.

  5. In vivo study of extracellular matrix coating enhancing fixation of the pedicle screw-bone's interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-min; ZHANG Xing-yi; XU Chuan-jie; ZHU Xiao-min; WANG Jun; LIU Yi

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on in vivo research on the effect of the coating of the extracellular matrix composition of pedicle screws on the conduction and induction of bone formation in young sheep,the aim of this study was to investigate the application of coated pedicle screws in sheep with scoliosis whose spines are under constant development.Methods Four groups of pedicle screws were randomly implanted into bilateral L2-L5 pedicles of 2.5- to 3-month-old sheep.A static experiment was performed on one side and a loading test was performed on the other side by implanting connecting rods at the L2-L3 and L4-L5 segments.The changes in the force on the coated screws and the combination of the surface of the coated screws with the surrounding bone in the growth process of young sheep's spines with aging were observed.After 3 months,the lumbar vertebrae with the screws were removed and examined by micro-CT,histological,and biomechanical analyses.Results Under nonloading conditions,there is bone formation around the surfaces of coated screws.The bone forming on the surface of collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hydroxyapatite coating of pedicle screws is the most,the one of the collagen / chondrcitin sulfate coating and hydroxyapatite coating is followed,and no significant difference between the two groups.In terms of the trabecular bone morphology parameters of the region of interest around the surface of the pedicle screws,such as bone mineral content,bone mineral density,tissue mineral content,tissue bone mineral density,bone volume fraction,and connection density,those associated with collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hydroxyapatite coatings are largest and those unassociated with coatings are smallest.Under nonloading conditions,the pullout strength of the collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hydroxyapatite-coated screws was largest,and that of the uncoated screws was minimal (P <0.01).Under loading conditions,the maximum pullout strength of each group of pedicle screws was less than that

  6. 微种植钉支抗矫正对后牙锁牙合患者髁突形态及对称性的影响%Effects of micro-screw implant anchorage on condylar shape and symmetry in patients with posterior scissors-bite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张同凯; 华先明

    2015-01-01

    objective To explore the effects of micro-screw implant anchorage on condylar shape and symmetry in patients with posterior scissors-bite. Methods A total of 20 Class I unilateral posterior scissors-bite patients visiting our hospital from January 2013 to February 2014 were included in this study.All patients were given micro screw implant anchorage.CT imaging was used to observe the changes in condylar before and after treatment.Their normal right lateral teeth were used as controls. Results The condylar height,condylar surface area and condylar volume of 20 case patients with posterior scissors-bite were higher than that normal controls before treatments[(4.61 ± 1.09 Vs 3.52 ± 0.29)mm,(1201.32 ± 121.37 Vs 1010.23 ± 111.26)mm2,(1409.13 ± 168.24 Vs 1243.35 ± 147.08) mm3].The condylar height(3.60 ± 0.54)mm,condylar surface area(1009.15 ± 112.37)mm2 and condylar volume(1241.03 ± 137.18)mm3 were significantly lower after treatments.There was no statistically significant difference compared with normal group(P>0.05). Conclusion Early correction can effectively change the shape of the condyle and improve the degree of posterior occlusal and symmetry and is worthy of clinical use.%目的:探讨微种植钉支抗矫正对后牙锁牙合患者髁突形态及对称性的影响。方法:收取2014年1月-2015年1月到我院就诊的20例恒牙期安氏I类单侧后牙正锁牙合的患者,20例患者均采用微种植钉支抗矫正。采用颅颌面锥形束CT成像技术观察患者矫治前后髁突的变化,将各自正常对侧后牙作为对照,进行比对研究。结果:20例后牙锁牙合患者矫治前的髁突高度、髁突表面积及髁突体积都高于正常对照后牙[(4.61±1.09 Vs 3.52±0.29)mm、(1201.32±121.37 Vs 1010.23±111.26)mm2、(1409.13±168.24 Vs 1243.35±147.08)mm3];20例后牙锁牙合患者矫治后的髁突高度(3.60±0.54)mm、髁突表面积(1009.15±112.37)mm2、髁突体积(1241.03±137.18

  7. Maintaining space in localized ridge augmentation using guided bone regeneration with tenting screw technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasioti, Evdokia; Chiang, Tat Fai; Drew, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic guided implant surgery requires adequate ridge dimensions for proper implant placement. Various surgical procedures can be used to augment deficient alveolar ridges. Studies have examined new bone formation on deficient ridges, utilizing numerous surgical techniques and biomaterials. The goal is to develop time efficient techniques, which have low morbidity. A crucial factor for successful bone grafting procedures is space maintenance. The article discusses space maintenance tenting screws, used in conjunction with bone allografts and resorbable barrier membranes, to ensure uneventful guided bone regeneration (GBR) enabling optimal implant positioning. The technique utilized has been described in the literature to treat severely resorbed alveolar ridges and additionally can be considered in restoring the vertical and horizontal component of deficient extraction sites. Three cases are presented to illustrate the utilization and effectiveness of tenting screw technology in the treatment of atrophic extraction sockets and for deficient ridges.

  8. Cancellous Screws Are Biomechanically Superior to Cortical Screws in Metaphyseal Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tim; Boone, Christopher; Behn, Anthony W; Ledesma, Justin B; Bishop, Julius A

    2016-09-01

    Cancellous screws are designed to optimize fixation in metaphyseal bone environments; however, certain clinical situations may require the substitution of cortical screws for use in cancellous bone, such as anatomic constraints, fragment size, or available instrumentation. This study compares the biomechanical properties of commercially available cortical and cancellous screw designs in a synthetic model representing various bone densities. Commercially available, fully threaded, 4.0-mm outer-diameter cortical and cancellous screws were tested in terms of pullout strength and maximum insertion torque in standard-density and osteoporotic cancellous bone models. Pullout strength and maximum insertion torque were both found to be greater for cancellous screws than cortical screws in all synthetic densities tested. The magnitude of difference in pullout strength between cortical and cancellous screws increased with decreasing synthetic bone density. Screw displacement prior to failure and total energy absorbed during pullout strength testing were also significantly greater for cancellous screws in osteoporotic models. Stiffness was greater for cancellous screws in standard and osteoporotic models. Cancellous screws have biomechanical advantages over cortical screws when used in metaphyseal bone, implying the ability to both achieve greater compression and resist displacement at the screw-plate interface. Surgeons should preferentially use cancellous over cortical screws in metaphyseal environments where cortical bone is insufficient for fixation. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e828-e832.].

  9. CT-guided screw fixation of vertical sacral fractures in local anaesthesia using a standard CT; CT-kontrollierte Schraubenosteosynthese von vertikalen Frakturen des hinteren Beckenringes in Lokalanaesthesie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuther, G.; Dehne, I. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Roehner, U.; Will, T.; Petereit, U. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate time efficiency, radiation dose, precision and complications of percutaneous iliosacral screw placement under CT-guidance in local anaesthesia. Retrospective analysis of 143 interventions in 135 patients during a period of 42 months. Implant failures could be evaluated in 85/182 screws and bony healing or refracturing in 46/182 screws. A total of 182 iliosacral screw placements in 179 vertical sacral fractures (105 unilateral, 37 bilateral) took place in 135 patients. 166/179 of the sacral fractures were detected in Denis zone 1, 10 in Denis zone 2 and 3 in Denis zone 3. No screw misplacements including the simultaneous bilateral procedures were noted. The average time for a unilateral screw placement was 23 minutes (range: 14-52 minutes) and 35 minutes (range: 21-60 minutes) for simultaneous bilateral screwing. The dose length product was 365 mGy x cm (range: 162-1014 mGy x cm) for the unilateral and 470 mGy x cm (range: 270-1271 mGy x cm) for the bilateral procedure. 1 gluteal bleeding occurred as the only acute minor complication (0.7%). Fracture healing was verified with follow-up CTs in 42/46 sacral fractures after screw placement. Backing out occurred in 12/85 screws between 6 and 69 days after intervention. In 8 patients contralateral stress fractures were detected after unilateral screw placement between day 10 and 127 (average: 48 days). CT-guided iliosacral screw placement in sacral fractures is a safe tool providing a very high precision. The radiation dose is in the order of a diagnostic CT of the pelvis for both unilateral and bilateral screws. Contralateral stress fractures in unilateral screw placements have to be considered during the first weeks after intervention.

  10. Pedicle screw placement accuracy of bone-mounted miniature robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tzou, Rong-Dar; Su, Yu-Feng; Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This article describes factors affecting the accuracy of transpedicle screw placements performed with the Renaissance robot-guided system and reviews the relevant literature. Between January 2013 and January 2015, Renaissance robot-guided spinal surgery was performed in 125 patients at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The surgeries included 662 transpedicle screw implants and 49 Kirschner wire (K-wire) reimplants performed by intraoperative repositioning. The lead author evaluated the accuracy of all K-wire insertions and classified their accuracy into 3 categories relative to the preoperative plan for transpedicle screw placement. For cases in which screws required repositioning after the registration step, factors affecting pedicle screw placement were determined according to the consensus of 3 experienced spinal surgeons. According to the scheme developed by Kuo et al (PLoS One 2016;11:e0153235), the K-wire placement accuracies before and after repositioning were respectively classified as follows: 76.1% and 77.6% in type I; 12.2% and 17.7% in type IIa; 4.3% and 4.5% in type IIb; 6.4% and 0% in type IIIa; and 1% and 1% in type IIIb. The percentage of screws requiring repositioning due to drilling error was 85.7% (42/49). Comparisons of preoperative and postoperative function showed significantly improved accuracy. This study showed that inaccurate pedicle screw placement mainly results from errors in preoperative planning, mounting, registration, drilling, and robot assembly. Pedicle screw placement using a bone-mounted miniature robot system requires meticulous preoperative planning to minimize these errors. PMID:28099339

  11. Pedicle screw placement accuracy of bone-mounted miniature robot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tzou, Rong-Dar; Su, Yu-Feng; Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2017-01-01

    This article describes factors affecting the accuracy of transpedicle screw placements performed with the Renaissance robot-guided system and reviews the relevant literature. Between January 2013 and January 2015, Renaissance robot-guided spinal surgery was performed in 125 patients at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The surgeries included 662 transpedicle screw implants and 49 Kirschner wire (K-wire) reimplants performed by intraoperative repositioning. The lead author evaluated the accuracy of all K-wire insertions and classified their accuracy into 3 categories relative to the preoperative plan for transpedicle screw placement. For cases in which screws required repositioning after the registration step, factors affecting pedicle screw placement were determined according to the consensus of 3 experienced spinal surgeons. According to the scheme developed by Kuo et al (PLoS One 2016;11:e0153235), the K-wire placement accuracies before and after repositioning were respectively classified as follows: 76.1% and 77.6% in type I; 12.2% and 17.7% in type IIa; 4.3% and 4.5% in type IIb; 6.4% and 0% in type IIIa; and 1% and 1% in type IIIb. The percentage of screws requiring repositioning due to drilling error was 85.7% (42/49). Comparisons of preoperative and postoperative function showed significantly improved accuracy. This study showed that inaccurate pedicle screw placement mainly results from errors in preoperative planning, mounting, registration, drilling, and robot assembly. Pedicle screw placement using a bone-mounted miniature robot system requires meticulous preoperative planning to minimize these errors.

  12. Stability of the prosthetic screws of three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanata-Flores, Antonio Gabriel; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Bomfim-Azevedo, Veber Luiz; Olate, Sergio; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prosthetic screws from three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems (bar-clip, ball/O-ring, and magnet) when submitted to mechanical cycling. Twelve models of acrylic resin were used with implants placed 20 mm from each other and separated into three groups: (1) bar-clip (Sistema INP, São Paulo, Brazil), (2) ball/O-ring (Sistema INP), and (3) magnet (Metalmag, São Paulo, Brazil), with four samples in each group. Each sample underwent a mechanical cycling removal and insertion test (f=0.5 Hz) to determine the torque and the detorque values of the retention screws. A servo-hydraulic MTS machine (810-Flextest 40; MTS Systems, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) was used to perform the cycling with 2.5 mm and a displacement of 10 mm/s. The screws of the retention systems received an initial torque of 30 Ncm and the torque values required for loosening the screw values were obtained in three cycles (1,080, 2,160, and 3,240). The screws were retorqued to 30 Ncm before each new cycle. The sample was composed of 24 screws grouped as follows: bar-clip (n=8), ball/O-ring (n=8), and magnet (n=8). There were significant differences between the groups, with greater detorque values observed in the ball/O-ring group when compared to the bar-clip and magnet groups for the first cycle. However, the detorque value was greater in the bar-clip group for the second cycle. The results of this study indicate that all prosthetic screws will loosen slightly after an initial tightening torque, also the bar-clip retention system demonstrated greater loosening of the screws when compared with ball/O-ring and magnet retention systems.

  13. Posterior fixation and fusion with atlas pedicle screw system for upper cervical diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; ZHOU Feng-hua; WANG Huan; CUI Shao-qian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of atlas pedicle screws system fixation and fusion for the treatment of upper cervical diseases. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients with up-per cervical disorders requiring stabilization, including 19 cases of atlantoaxial dislocation (4 congenital odontoid disconnections, 6 old odontoid fractures, 4 fresh odontoid fractures of Aderson Ⅱ C, 3 ruptures of the C1 transverse ligament, and 2 fractures ofC1), 2 cases ofC2 tumor (instability after the resection of the tumors), and 2 giant neurilemomas of C2-C3(instability after resection of the tumors), were treated by posterior fixation and fusion with the atlas pedicle screw system, in which the screws were inserted through the posterior arch of Cr The operative time, bleeding volume and complications were reported. All patients were immobilized without external fixation or with rigid cervical collars for 1-3 months. All patients were followed up and evaluated with radiographs and CT. Results: In the 23 patients, 46 C1 pedicle screws, 42 C2 pedicle screws and 6 lower cervical lateral mass screws and 2 lower cervical pedicle screws were placed. The mean operative time and bleeding volume was 2.7 hours and 490 ml respectively. No intraoperative complications were directly related to surgical technique. No neurological, vascular or infective complications were encountered. All patients were followed up for 3-36 months (average 15 months). Firm bony fusion was documented in all patients after 3-6 months. One patient with atlas fracture showed anterior occipitocervical fusion. There was no implant failure. Conclusions: Posterior fixation and fusion of the atlas pedicle screw system is feasible and safe for the treatment of upper cervical diseases, and may be applicable to a larger number of patients.

  14. Comparison of crossed screw versus plate fixation for radial neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Christina J; Darvish, Kurosh; Ilyas, Asif M; Jones, Christopher M

    2015-11-01

    Fixation of radial neck fractures can be achieved with a plate and screw construct or, in absence of comminution, with two obliquely-oriented screws. This study investigated the mechanical properties, specifically the stiffness and load to failure, of these two fixation strategies in a cadaver model. Ten matched-pair radii were removed from fresh cadaver arms. A transverse osteotomy was created at the neck of each radius. Right-sided radii were fixed with two oblique headless compression screws; left-sided radii were fixed with a radial neck plate. The distal aspect of each radius was potted in urethane casting resin. The radial head was loaded in shear in 4 different planes (medial to lateral, lateral to medial, posterior to anterior, and anterior to posterior) using an Instron machine. Stiffness and load to failure were recorded. The stiffness of both constructs was similar in all planes except for loading from medial to lateral where the screw construct was 1.8 times stiffer. Average ultimate failure occurred at 229N for the screws and 206N for the plate. Failure strength was not statistically different. However, mode of failure differed for both fixation constructs, the plate failed in bending while the screws failed by pullout and fracture. The two strategies provide similar strength and stiffness for the fixation of transverse, non-comminuted radial neck fractures. While plate and screw constructs are more appropriate for axially unstable or comminuted fractures, two oblique screws might be preferred for simple transverse neck fractures since this strategy requires less exposure and the implant is buried. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coating of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone implants with titanium to improve bone apposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Declan M; Hahn, Joachim; Richards, R Geoffery; Gruner, Heiko; Wieling, Ronald; Pearce, Simon G

    2013-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) is a thermoplastic composite biomaterial exhibiting properties suitable for load-bearing orthopedic implants. However, the hydrophobic surface of CF/PEEK implants induces the deposition of a peri-implant fibrous tissue capsule preventing bone apposition. However, if bone apposition was improved, the use of CF/PEEK in orthopedics could be increased as it has many advantages compared with metallic implants. In this study, CF/PEEK screws were coated with titanium (Ti) using two different techniques, namely vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) with uncoated screws as controls. These coatings were characterized and implanted in a loaded sheep tibia model. In the characterization of the screw surfaces using microscopy techniques, the uncoated screws were seen to have an irregular surface. The PVD coating appeared smooth and consistent, whereas the VPS coating appeared to be a rough coating with some inhomogeneities, which did not cover the entire surface area. Nevertheless, in the ex vivo analysis the VPS-coated screws had a screw removal torque which was statistically greater than uncoated and PVD-coated screws (p ≤ 0.002 for both comparisons). Additionally, the VPS-coated screws had a statistically higher bone contact area than the uncoated screws (p = 0.006), whereas no statistical difference was detected between VPS and PVD coating types (p = 0.11). Thereby illustrating that Ti coating of CF/PEEK screws significantly improve bone apposition and removal torque compared with uncoated CF/PEEK screws.

  16. Estudo histomorfométrico da interface óssea do parafuso expansor cervical Histomorphometric analysis of bone-screw interface of expansive cervical screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Sérgio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    experimental study for the Histomorphometric analysis of the bone interface of expansive screws used in the anterior cervical spine fixation system. METHODS: Five sheep cervical vertebrae (C4 were used in the study, in which screws were inserted. The 18.5 mm long and 5.0 mm outer diameter expansive screws (Ulrich were inserted in both sides of the C4 vertebra. On the left side, the screw was inserted without the internal expansive screw, which was used on the right side. A pilot hole was made on the lower portion of the vertebra with a 2.5 mm bore, but no implant was introduced. The vertebral region containing the screws and the pilot hole was prepared for a histological study of the interface between implants and bone screws, and of the pilot hole wall. Histomorphometric analysis evaluated total bone density, external bone density (outside the screw thread, internal density (inside the screw thread and the linear measurement of the contact between bone tissue and the implant. RESULTS: Total bone density was greater in group I (expansive screw as compared to group III (control. External bone density was greater in groups I (expansive screw and II (non-expansive screw when compared to group III. Internal bone density was greater in group I when compared to groups II and III, and greater in group II when compared to group III. Linear contact was greater in group I when compared to groups II and III. CONCLUSION: structural changes around expansive screws detected immediately after their application provide subsidies for a better understanding of the greater tearing resistance of the implant, which could be related to the compacting of cancellous bone around the implant, while providing a larger contact area between the implant and the bone tissue.

  17. Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Breast implants are medical devices that are implanted under the ...

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) as a novel bioactive bone screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bao; Peng, Xiaohua; Jiang, Dianming; Wu, Jun; Qiao, Bo; Li, Weichao; Qi, Xiaotong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepared nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) bioactive bone screws. The microstructure, morphology and coating of the screws were characterised, and the adhesion, proliferation and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells on n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were determined using scanning electron microscope, CCK-8 assays and cellular immunofluorescence analysis. The results confirmed that n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were biocompatible and had no negative effect on MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility, internal fixation properties and osteogenesis of the bioactive screws, both n-HA/PA66/GF screws and metallic screws were used to repair intercondylar femur fractures in dogs. General photography, CT examination, micro-CT examination, histological staining and biomechanical assays were performed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation. The n-HA/PA66/GF screws exhibited good biocompatibility, high mechanical strength and extensive osteogenesis in the host bone. Moreover, 24 weeks after implantation, the maximum push-out load of the bioactive screws was greater than that of the metallic screws. As shown by their good cytocompatibility, excellent biomechanical strength and fast formation and ingrowth of new bone, n-HA/PA66/GF screws are thus suitable for orthopaedic clinical applications.

  19. MODIFIED PERIODONTAL EXPLORER FOR EXPANSION SCREW ACTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Accidents with expansion screw activation keys are r eported in the literature 1,2 . A simple method to prevent such accident is to use a modified periodontal explorer as a key for expansion screw activation. A no.17 per iodontal explorer (fig 1 is cut at its first terminal bend (fig 2. The second section is bent m ore vertically to the long axis of the shaft (fig 3. This part which is tapered and stiff enough to ac tivate the screw is tried extra orally into the screw. It is further trimmed in such a way that onl y a mm of instrument can project through the screw hole (fig 4. Now a safe key for activating t he maxillary expansion screw is ready to use (fig 5. Once the patient’s parent or guardian succes sfully repeat the activation procedure in office, the instrument can be given to them for hom e use

  20. Malposition and revision rates of different imaging modalities for percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation following pelvic fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Hauschild, Oliver; Bode, Gerrit;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Percutaneous iliosacral screw placement following pelvic trauma is associated with high rates of revisions, screw malpositioning, the risk of neurological damage and inefficient stability. The correct entry point and the small target corridor may be difficult to visualize using only...... an image intensifier. Therefore, 2D and 3D image-based navigation and reconstruction techniques could be helpful tools. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the best available evidence regarding the rate of malpositioning and revisions using different techniques for screw...... implantation, i.e., conventional, 2D and 3D image-based navigation and reconstruction techniques, CT navigation. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed using the data available on Ovid Medline. 430 studies published between 1/1948 and 2/2011 were identified by two independent...

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Latarjet Screw Fixation: Comparison of Screw Types and Fixation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jason J; Hamamoto, Jason T; Leroux, Timothy S; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Jain, Akshay; Khair, Mahmoud M; Mellano, Christen R; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Nicholson, Gregory P; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-09-01

    To compare the initial fixation stability, failure strength, and mode of failure of 5 different screw types and fixation methods commonly used for the classic Latarjet procedure. Thirty-five fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens were allocated into 5 groups. A 25% anteroinferior glenoid defect was created, and a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure was performed. All grafts were fixed with 2 screws, differing by screw type and/or fixation method. The groups included partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with unicortical fixation, fully threaded solid 3.5-mm cortical screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, and partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm captured screws with bicortical fixation. All screws were stainless steel. Outcomes included cyclic creep and secant stiffness during cyclic loading, as well as load and work to failure during the failure test. Intergroup comparisons were made by a 1-way analysis of variance. There were no significant differences among different screw types or fixation methods in cyclic creep or secant stiffness after cyclic loading or in load to failure or work to failure during the failure test. Post-failure radiographs showed evidence of screw bending in only 1 specimen that underwent the Latarjet procedure with partially threaded solid cancellous screws with bicortical fixation. The mode of failure for all specimens analyzed was screw cutout. In this biomechanical study, screw type and fixation method did not significantly influence biomechanical performance in a classic Latarjet procedure. When performing this procedure, surgeons may continue to select the screw type and method of fixation (unicortical or bicortical) based on preference; however, further studies are required to determine the optimal method of treatment. Surgeons may choose the screw type and

  2. Improving fixation strength of pedicle screw by microarc oxidation treatment: an experimental study of osteoporotic spine in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Zheng; Wu, Zi-xiang; Liu, Da; Gao, Ming-xuan; Chen, Huan; Fu, Suo-chao; Lei, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Failure of fixation caused by loosening of pedicle screws in osteoporosis is a problem in spinal surgery. We compared the in vivo fixation strength between pedicle screws treated with microarc oxidation (MAO) and untreated screws in an osteoporotic model of ovariectomized sheep. The MAO treated and untreated screws were placed in lumbar vertebral bodies. After 3 months of implantation, biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis, and histological observations were conducted to examine the performance of the two groups. At time 0, no significant difference was found between the two groups in biomechanical tests (p > 0.05); 3 months later, higher pull-out strength and load with less displacement were detected in the MAO-treated group (p sheep.

  3. The Influence of implant geometry and surface composition on bone response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Farraj Aldosari, A.; Anil, S.; Alasqah, M.; Wazzan, K.A. Al; Jetaily, S.A. Al; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The implant design and surface modification are independent conditions that can alter the implant bone response. The objective of this study is to compare the bone response to roughened tapered and cylindrical screw-type implants with and without hydroxyapatite (HA) surface coating in th

  4. Immediate loading of immediate mandibular implants with a full-arch fixed prosthesis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Boronat, Araceli; Garcia, Berta

    2009-06-01

    To determine the survival of immediate dental implants with immediate loading in the partially edentulous mandible, by use of a full-arch screw-retained provisional restoration. Patients who were partially edentulous in the mandible with indications for extraction of the remaining teeth and with a minimum follow-up of 12 months after implant placement were included in the study. They were treated in chronologic order by the insertion of 6 Defcon dental implants (Impladent, Sentmenat, Spain) subjected to immediate loading (4 interforaminal and 2 posterior placements). Implants with a minimum primary stability of 60 implant stability quotient were loaded. All resin screw-retained prostheses were inserted and loaded with fully functional occlusion within 24 hours of implant placement. Eleven patients were treated with immediate implants, although 2 patients were excluded from the study for having an implant stability quotient value below 60 in at least one of the implants after surgery and did not undergo restoration with immediate loading. Fifty-four implants were placed in 9 partially edentulous patients with immediate loading with a full-arch screw-fixed prosthesis. The patients wore this provisional prosthesis during the healing period (2 months) without complication and with a high level of comfort. The survival rate of the implants was 100% at 12 months of follow-up. Immediate mandibular loading with immediate full-arch implant-supported and screw-retained restorations is a viable treatment alternative, yielding a 100% success rate in this small series of patients.

  5. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  6. Influence of Diamondlike Carbon Coating of Screws on Axial Tightening Force and Stress Distribution on Overdenture Bar Frameworks with Different Fit Levels and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Bacchi, Atais; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the axial tightening force applied by conventional and diamondlike carbon (DLC)-coated screws and to verify, through three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA), the stress distribution caused by different framework materials and prosthetic screws in overdenture frameworks with different misfit levels. The axial tightening force applied by the screw was evaluated by means of a titanium matrix connected to a load cell. Conventional titanium or DLC-coated screws were tightened with a digital torque wrench, and the load values were recorded. The values were applied in an FEA to a bar-clip attachment system connected to two 4.0 × 11-mm external-hexagon titanium implants placed in an anterior edentulous arch. DLC-coated and conventional screws were modeled with their respective axial forces obtained on the experimental evaluation for three bar framework materials (titanium, nickel-chromium, and cobalt-chromium) and three levels of misfit (100, 150, and 200 μm). Von Mises stresses for prosthetic components and maximum principal stress and microstrains (maximum principal strains) for bone tissue were measured. The mean force applied by the conventional screw was 25.55 N (± 1.78); the prosthetic screw coated with a DLC layer applied a mean force of 31.44 N (± 2.11), a statistically significant difference. In the FEA, the DLC screw led to higher stresses on the framework; however, the prosthetic screw suffered lower stress. No influence of screw type was seen in the bone tissue. Titanium frameworks reduced the stress transmitted to the bone tissue and the bar framework but had no influence on the screws. Higher misfit values resulted in an increased stress/strain in bone tissue and bar framework, which was not the case for retention screws.

  7. Sol-gel derived titania coating with immobilized bisphosphonate enhances screw fixation in rat tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderbäck, Paula; Areva, Sami; Aspenberg, Per; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-08-01

    A variety of surface modifications have been tested for the enhancement of screw fixation in bone, and locally delivered anti-osteoporosis drugs such as bisphosphonates (BP) are then of interest. In this in vivo study, the impact of surface immobilized BP was compared with systemic BP delivery and screws with no BP. After due in vitro characterization, differently treated stainless steel (SS) screws were divided into four groups with 10 rats each. Three of the groups received screws coated with sol-gel derived TiO(2) and calcium phosphate (SS+TiO(2)+CaP). One of these had no further treatment, one had alendronate (BP) adsorbed to calcium phosphate mineral, and one received systemic BP treatment. The fourth group received uncoated SS screws and no BP (control). The screw pullout force was measured after 4 weeks of implantation in rat tibiae. The immobilized amount and release rate of alendronate could be controlled by different immersion times. The SS+TiO(2)+CaP coating did not increase the pullout force compared to SS alone. Surface delivered alendronate enhanced the pullout force by 93% [p = 0.000; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 67-118%] compared to SS, and by 39% (p = 0.044; 95% CI: 7-71%) compared to systemic alendronate delivery. Both surface immobilized and systemically delivered alendronate improved implant fixation. Also, locally delivered, that is, surface immobilized alendronate showed a better fixation than systemically delivered. Using sol-gel derived TiO(2) as a platform, it is possible to administer controllable amounts of a variety of BPs.

  8. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Rustum Baig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis is described. Cementation of the framework to the abutments intraorally improves the passivity of fit of the prosthesis on the implants. Maintenance of screw-access channels in the final prosthesis ensures retrievability. The metal-resin design allows for easy repair and maintenance. The prosthesis is cost-effective compared to conventional options and can be employed as a viable treatment alternative when considering metal-acrylic resin complete arch fixed prosthesis.

  9. Effect of Recycling Protocol on Mechanical Strength of Used Mini-Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Estelita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the influence of recycling process on the torsional strength of mini-implants. Materials and Methods. Two hundred mini-implants were divided into 4 groups with 50 screws equally distributed in five diameters (1.3 to 1.7 mm: control group (CG: unused mini-implants, G1: mini-implants inserted in pig iliac bone and removed, G2: same protocol of group 1 followed by sonication for cleaning and autoclave sterilization, and G3: same insertion protocol of group 1 followed by sonication for cleaning before and after sandblasting (Al2O3-90 µ and autoclave sterilization. G2 and G3 mini-implants were weighed after recycling process to evaluate weight loss (W. All the screws were broken to determine the fracture torque (FT. The influence of recycling process on FT and W was evaluated by ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and multiple linear regression analysis. Results. FT was not influenced by recycling protocols even when sandblasting was added. Sandblasting caused weight loss due to abrasive mechanical stripping of screw surface. Screw diameter was the only variable that affected FT. Conclusions. Torsional strengths of screws that underwent the recycling protocols were not changed. Thus, screw diameter choice can be a more critical step to avoid screw fracture than recycling decision.

  10. Repair of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone adjacent to bone screw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Up to date, little is known about the repair mode of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone resulting from bone screw implantation. In this study, self-tapping titanium cortical bone screws were inserted into the tibial diaphyses of 24 adult male rabbits. The animals were sacrificed at 1 day, 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months after surgery. Histomorphometric measurement and confocal microscopy were performed on basic fuchsin stained bone sections to examine the morphological characteristics of microdamage, bone resorption activity and spatial relationship between microdamage and bone resorption. Diffuse and linear cracks were coexisted in peri-screw bone. Intracortical bone resorption was significantly increased 2 weeks after screw installation and reach to the maximum at 1 month. There was no significant difference in bone resorption between 1-month and 2-months groups. Microdamage was significantly decreased within 1 month after surgery. Bone resorption was predisposed to occur in the region of <100 µm from the bone-screw interface, where had extensive diffuse damage mixed with linear cracks. Different patterns of resorption cavities appeared in peri-screw bone. These data suggest that 1 the complex microdamage composed of diffuse damage and linear cracks is a strong stimulator for initiating targeted bone remodeling; 2 bone resorption activities taking place on the surfaces of differently oriented Haversian and Volkmann canals work in a team for the repair of extensive microdamage; 3 targeted bone remodeling is a short-term reaction to microdamage and thereby it may not be able to remove all microdamage resulting from bone screw insertion.

  11. Designs and techniques that improve the pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas M; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein.

  12. Lower cervical spine injury treated with lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xue-ling; ZHAO Hong-bin; WANG Bin; ZHU Xiao-song; LI Lin-zhi; ZHANG Chun-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To treat injury of the lower cervical spine C6 to C7 with cervical lateral mass plates and T1 pedicle screws through posterior approach. Methods: The data of 8 patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury (6 patients with fracture and dislocation in C6 and C7 and 2 with fracture in C7) were analyzed retrospectively in this study. For the preoperative American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification, Grade C was found in 3 cases and Grade D in 5 cases. Screws were placed on the lateral masses and the first thoracic pedicle with Margerl technique. Lamina or facet bone allografting was used to achieve a long-term stability. Results: All the 8 patients were followed up for 5-37 months (mean: 15 months). No operative death occurred. There were no examples of aggravation of spinal cord injury or vertebral artery injury, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve roots injury, screw malposition or back-out, loose of alignment or implant failure. Clinical symptoms and ASIA classification were improved in all the patients. Postoperative MRI scanning confirmed the satisfactory screw placement in all the cases. Conclusions: Lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach are safe and beneficial for patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury.

  13. Metalworking defects in surgery screws as a possible cause of post-surgical infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Mario; Peretti, Leandro E.; Romero, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    In the first phase of this work, surface defects (metalworking) in stainless steel implantable prostheses and their possible relation to infections that can be generated after surgery was studied. In a second phase, the results obtained in the aforementioned stage were applied to knee cruciate ligaments surgery screws, considering the fact that a substantial number of Mucormycetes infections have been reported after arthroscopic surgery in Argentina since the year 2005. Two types of screws, transverse and interference screws, were analyzed. The Allen heads presented defects such as burrs and metalworking bending as a result of the machining process. These defects allow the accumulation of machining oil, which could be contaminated with fungal spores. When this is the case, the gaseous sterilization by ethylene oxide may be jeopardized. Cortical screws were also analyzed and were found to present serious metalworking defects inside their heads. To reduce the risk of infection in surgery, the use of screws with metalworking defects on the outer surface, analyzed with stereomicroscope and considering the inside part of the Allen as an outer surface, should be avoided altogether.

  14. Influence of Thickness and Contact Surface Geometry of Condylar Stem of TMJ Implant on Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, Zohreh; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Azari, Abbas

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect thickness and contact surface geometry of condylar stem of TMJ implant on its stability in total reconstruction system and evaluate the micro strain resulted in bone at fixation screw holes in jaw bone embedded with eight different designs of temporomandibular joint implants. A three dimensional model of a lower mandible of an adult were developed from a Computed Tomography scan images. Eight different TMJ implant designs and fixation screws were modeled. Three dimensional finite element models of eight implanted mandibles were analyzed. The forces assigned to the masticatory muscles for incisal clenching were applied consisting of nine important muscular loads. In chosen loading condition, The results indicated that the anatomical curvature contact surface design of TMJ implant can moderately improve the stability and the strain resulted in fixation screw holes in thinner TMJ implant was diminished in comparison with other thicknesses.

  15. Treatment options for unstable trochanteric fractures: Screw or helical proximal femoral nail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeetendra Bajpai; Rajesh Maheshwari; Akansha Bajpai; Sumit Saini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment outcome of screw proximal femoral nail (PFN) system with that of a helical PFN.Methods: The study included 77 patients with closed unstable intertrochanteric fracture classified as AO 31A2 & 31A3, between June 2008 to August 2011.Inclusion criteria were: all mature skeletons above 50 years of age;closed unstable trochanteric fracture classified as AO 31A2 & A3.Exclusion criteria were: immature skeleton, pathological fracture of any cause other than osteoporosis, inability to walk independently prior to injury.Patients were randomized to 2 treatment groups based on admission sequence.Forty patients were treated with screw PFN and thirty seven were treated with helical PFN.Results: Both groups were similar in respect of time of surgery, blood loss and functional assessment and duration of hospitalization.In screw PFN group 2 patients had superficial wound infection, 1 patient had persistent hip pain and 1 patient had shortening >1 cm but <2 cm, while in helical PFN group 1 patient had superficial wound infection.Conclusion: Both screw and helical PFN are very effective implants in osteoporotic and unstable trochanteric fractures even in Indian patients where the bones are narrow and neck diameter is small.It is an implant of choice for osteoporotic and unstable trochanteric fractures.

  16. Anatomic comparison of transarticular screws with lateral mass screws in cervical vertebrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guan-yi; XU Rong-ming; MA Wei-hu; RUAN Yong-ping; SUN Shao-hua; HUANG Lei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the potential incidence of nerve root (ventral and dorsal ramus) injury caused by cervical transarticular screws and Roy-Camille lateral mass screws.Methods: Insertion techniques with Klekamp transarticular screws and Roy-Camille lateral mass screws were respectively performed in this study. Each technique involved four specimens and 40 screws, which were inserted from C3 to C7. And 20-mm-long screws were used to overpenetrate the ventral cortex. The anterolateral aspect of the cervical spine was carefully dissected to allow observation of the screw-ramus relationship.Results: The overall percentage of nerve invasion was significantly lower with Klekamp (45%) technique than with Roy-Camille (85%) technique (P<0.05). The largest percentage of nerve invasion for Klekamp transarticular screws was found at the dorsal ramus (25%), followed by the ventral ramus (15%) and the bifurcation of the ventral dorsal ramus (5%). The largest percentage of nerve invasion for Roy-Camille lateral mass screws was found at the ventral ramus (80%).Conclusion: The potential risk of nerve root invasion is lower with Klekamp transarticular screws than with Roy-Camille lateral mass screws.

  17. Twin-Screw Extruders in Ceramic Extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmann, Werner; Hölzel, Maria

    The machines mainly used for compounding plastics, chemicals and food are co-rotating, closely intermeshing twin-screw extruders. Some 30 000 such extruders are in use worldwide, about 1/3 are ZSKs from Coperion Werner & Pfleiderer, Stuttgart. In the chemical industry more and more batch mixers are being replaced by continuous twin-screw kneaders.

  18. Magnesium-Based Absorbable Metal Screws for Intra-Articular Fracture Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a biodegradable magnesium-based alloy (MgYREZr which is currently used to manufacture bioabsorbable compression screws. To date, there are very few studies reporting on a limited number of elective foot surgeries using this innovative implant. This case report describes the application of this screw for osteochondral fracture fixation at the humeral capitulum next to a loose radial head prosthesis, which was revised at the same time. The clinical course was uneventful. Degradation of the magnesium alloy did not interfere with fracture healing. Showing an excellent clinical result and free range-of-motion, the contour of the implant was still visible in a one-year follow-up.

  19. Twin screw granulation: steps in granule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2012-11-15

    The present work focuses on the study of the progression of granules in different compartments along the length of screws in a twin screw granulator (TSG). The effects of varying powder feed rate; liquid to solid ratio and viscosity of granulation liquid on properties of granules was studied. The bigger granules produced at the start of the process were found to change in terms of size, shape and strength along the screw length at all the conditions investigated. The granules became more spherical and their strength increased along the screw length. Tracer granules were also introduced in order to understand the role of kneading and conveying elements in the TSG. The kneading elements promoted consolidation and breakage while the conveying elements led to coalescence, breakage and some consolidation. The results presented here help to provide a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the twin screw granulation process.

  20. Twin screw subsurface and surface multiphase pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dass, P. [CAN-K GROUP OF COMPANIES, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new subsurface twin screw multiphase pump has been developed to replace ESP and other artificial lift technologies. This technology has been under development for a few years, has been field tested and is now going for commercial applications. The subsurface twin screw technology consists of a pair of screws that do not touch and can be run with a top drive or submersible motor; and it carries a lot of benefits. This technology is easy to install and its low slippage makes it highly efficient with heavy oil. In addition twin screw multiphase pumps are capable of handling high viscosity fluids and thus their utilization can save water when used in thermal applications. It also induces savings of chemicals because asphaltenes do not break down easily as well as a reduction in SOR. The subsurface twin screw multiphase pump presented herein is an advanced technology which could be used in thermal applications.

  1. Acute distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury: A systematic review of suture-button versus syndesmotic screw repair

    OpenAIRE

    Schepers, Tim

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Recently, a new suture-button fixation device has emerged for the treatment of acute distal tibiofibular syndesmotic injuries and its use is rapidly increasing. The current systematic review was undertaken to compare the biomechanical properties, functional outcome, need for implant removal, and the complication rate of syndesmotic disruptions treated with a suture-button device with the current 'gold standard', i.e. the syndesmotic screw. Method: A literature search in t...

  2. Penile Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the discussion with your doctor. Types of penile implants There are two main types of penile implants: ... might help reduce the risk of infection. Comparing implant types When choosing which type of penile implant ...

  3. 双侧钉棒梯次紧凑闭合脊髓短缩联合植入物内固定矫正僵硬性脊柱角状后凸%Bilateral pedicle screw and echelon tight closure spinal cord technique combined with implant fixations for correcting stiff spinal angular kyphosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马华松; 李龙; 伍佳剑; 张敬; 郑蕊; 辛莘; 王晓平; 谭荣; 陈志明; 陆明; 袁伟; 徐启明; 任冬云; 麻巍

    2014-01-01

    是脊柱功能和术后矫形效果的有效保障。%BACKGROUND:The treatment difficulties of thoracolumbar angular kyphosis surgery are:low correction rate, hard to rebuild sagittal plane, easily induce neurological complications, postoperative loss of balance, high incidence of pseudarthrosis and postoperative loss of correction degree. OBJECTIVE:To explore the safety and efficacy of modified posterior vertebral column resection osteotomy and bilateral pedicle screw combined with echelon tight closure spinal cord technique and implant fixation for severe spinal angular kyphosis. METHODS:A total of 87 severe spinal angular kyphosis patients, 36 males and 51 females, who were treated in the Department of Orthopedics, the 306 Hospital of Chinese PLA from January 2006 to December 2013, were enrol ed in this study. They underwent posterior vertebral column resection, bilateral pedicle screw combined with echelon tight closure spinal cord, and implant fixation. Kyphosis, spinal sagittal imbalance, offset rate towards trunk side, operation time and intraoperative blood loss were observed before and after treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The preoperative average kyphosis was 90.1° (31°-138°). The postoperative average kyphosis was 27.9° (15°-57°). The improvement rate was 76%. The improvement rate of trunk sagittal offset was 76%. Intraoperative blood loss was 800-3 000 mL, and average blood loss was 2 300 mL. The operation time was 5-7 hours, averagely 5.9 hours. Before treatment, two patients affected neurologic symptoms in double lower extremity, and their Frankel classification was grade C and became grade E after treatment. Al patients were fol owed up for 9-57 months. Bony fusion was achieved in al patients. No complications of spinal cord injury appeared, and no orthopedic angle missing occurred. These results indicate that during posterior vertebral column resection for treating severe angular stiffness of the thoracic kyphosis, blood vessels could be

  4. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  5. Finite element analyses of two antirotational designs of implant fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akour, Salih N; Fayyad, Mohammed A; Nayfeh, Jamal F

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of cyclic compressive forces on loosening of the abutment retaining screw of dental implant fixtures with two different antirotational designs using the finite element analysis. A three-dimensional model of externally hexed and trichannel dental implant fixtures with their corresponding abutments and retaining screws was developed. Comparison between the two designs was carried out using finite element analysis. The results revealed that the externally hexed design has significantly higher overall stress, contact stress, and deflection compared with the trichannel design. The trichannel antirotational design has the least potential for fracture of the implant/abutment assembly in addition to its capability for preventing rotation of the prosthesis and loosening of the screw.

  6. Treatment of a maxillary dento-alveolar defect using an immediately loaded definitive zygoma implant-retained prosthesis with 11-month follow-up: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Rustum; Rajan, Gunaseelan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the dental implant-based rehabilitation of a partially edentulous patient with a unilateral maxillary dento-alveolar defect. A screw-retained prosthesis with a modified design was fabricated on zygomatic and regular dental implants. One section of the implant prosthesis has cemented crowns and the other section is conventional screw-retained. The design of the prosthesis overcame the hard and soft tissue deficit and provided the desired esthetics.

  7. The effect of hydroxyapatite coated screw in the lateral fragility fractures of the femur. A prospective randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, V; Maccagnano, G; Vicenti, G; Notarnicola, A; Moretti, L; Tafuri, S; Vanni, D; Salini, V; Moretti, B

    2014-01-01

    Due to a growing numbers of lateral fragility fractures of the femur and their high social costs the need to work out an effective strategy in order to find a better solution for these patients is warranted. From January 2010 to July 2011, we carried out a prospective randomized clinical study comparing the results of patients with femoral lateral fractures treated by nail and cephalic hydroxyapatite coated screws (study group including 27 patients) compared to the patients with the same fractures treated with nail and head standard screws (control group including 27 patients). We defined the two parts of the femoral neck as ROI 1 (under the head screw) and ROI 2 (above the femoral screw) on the AP view. The bone density of the two areas was calculated using DEXA at T0 (1st day post-surgery), at T1 (40th day post-surgery), at T2 (3 months later), at T3 (1 year later). The clinical-radiography evaluations were based on the Harris Hip Score (HHS), ADL test and x-ray views of the hip. As far as the bone mineral density average of ROI 1 and ROI 2 is concerned, we found a significant statistical increase at T1 and T3 in the study group, while it was not significant in the control group. We could account for this data through the higher mechanical stability of hydroxyapatite coated screws than standard screws. In fact, this material was responsible for improved implant osteointegration. Thanks to a 1 year follow-up we were able to demonstrate the implant utility associated with augmentation and the importance of densitometry exams such as easily repeatable and low cost diagnostics to prevent the onset of complications linked to screw loosening.

  8. Pedicle screw placement in the lumbar spine: effect of trajectory and screw design on acute biomechanical purchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Steven; Mimran, Ronnie; Vadapalli, Sasidhar; Shetye, Snehal S; McGilvray, Kirk C; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Low bone mineral density in patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery with screws is an especially difficult challenge because poor bone quality can severely compromise the maximum achievable purchase of the screws. A relatively new technique, the cortical bone screw trajectory, utilizes a medialized trajectory in the caudocephalad direction to engage a greater amount of cortical bone within the pars interarticularis and pedicle. The objectives of this cadaveric biomechanical study were to 1) evaluate a cortical screw system and compare its mechanical performance to the traditional pedicle screw system; 2) determine differences in bone quality associated with the cortical screw trajectory versus the normal pedicle screw insertion technique; 3) determine the cortical wall breach rate with both the cortical and traditional screw trajectories; and 4) determine the performance of the traditional screw in the cortical screw trajectory. METHODS Fourteen fresh frozen human lumbar spine sections (L1-5) were used in this study (mean age 57 ± 19 years). The experimental plan involved drilling and tapping screw holes for 2 trajectories under navigation (a traditional pedicle screw and a cortical screw) in both high-and low-quality vertebrae, measuring the bone quality associated with these trajectories, placing screws in the trajectories, and evaluating the competence of the screw purchase via 2 mechanical tests (pullout and toggle). The 3 experimental variants were 1) traditional pedicle screws placed in the traditional pedicle screw trajectory, 2) traditional pedicle screws placed in the cortical screw trajectory, and 3) cortical screws placed in the cortical screw trajectory. RESULTS A statistically significant increase in bone quality was observed for the cortical trajectories with a cortical screw (42%; p parameter comparisons (screw type and trajectory) between high-quality and lowquality samples were significant (p parameters determined from pullout and toggle

  9. A geometrical introduction to screw theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2013-05-01

    This work introduces screw theory, a venerable but little known theory aimed at describing rigid body dynamics. This formulation of mechanics unifies in the concept of screw the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the body. It captures a remarkable mathematical analogy between mechanical momenta and linear velocities, and between forces and angular velocities. For instance, it clarifies that angular velocities should be treated as applied vectors and that, under the composition of motions, they sum with the same rules of applied forces. This work provides a short and rigorous introduction to screw theory intended for an undergraduate and general readership.

  10. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  11. Prosthetic improvement of pronounced buccally positioned zygomatic implants: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes dos; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2014-08-01

    This report presents a prosthetic technique for the improvement of surgically positioned, buccally placed zygomatic implants with the use of custom abutments for improved retention screw position and an esthetic implant reconstruction. The patient presented four zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination. The anterior implants were inclined toward the location where the anterior artificial teeth should be placed during rehabilitation. As the manufacturer does not provide angulated abutments, we attempted the waxing and overcasting of a prosthetic abutment, repositioning the access holes of the prosthetic screws to a more palatal position. This clinical report demonstrates that abutment customization could be an interesting way to relocate the access holes of the prosthetic screws in cases of zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination.

  12. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lung Tai

    Full Text Available Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p 0.05. Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength.

  13. The calcar screw in angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmen Hans-Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With new minimally-invasive approaches for angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures, the need for the placement of oblique inferomedial screws ('calcar screw' has increasingly been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of calcar screws on secondary loss of reduction and on the occurrence of complications. Methods Patients with a proximal humeral fracture who underwent angular stable plate fixation between 01/2007 and 07/2009 were included. On AP views of the shoulder, the difference in height between humeral head and the proximal end of the plate were determined postoperatively and at follow-up. Additionally, the occurrence of complications was documented. Patients with calcar screws were assigned to group C+, patients without to group C-. Results Follow-up was possible in 60 patients (C+ 6.7 ± 5.6 M/C- 5.0 ± 2.8 M. Humeral head necrosis occurred in 6 (C+, 15.4% and 3 (C-, 14.3% cases. Cut-out of the proximal screws was observed in 3 (C+, 7.7% and 1 (C-, 4.8% cases. In each group, 1 patient showed delayed union. Implant failure or lesions of the axillary nerve were not observed. In 44 patients, true AP and Neer views were available to measure the head-plate distance. There was a significant loss of reduction in group C- (2.56 ± 2.65 mm compared to C+ (0.77 ± 1.44 mm; p = 0.01. Conclusions The placement of calcar screws in the angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures is associated with less secondary loss of reduction by providing inferomedial support. An increased risk for complications could not be shown.

  14. An in vivo assessment of the effects of using different implant abutment occluding materials on implant microleakage and the peri-implant microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Caroline

    Microleakage may be a factor in the progression of peri-implant pathology. Microleakage in implant dentistry refers to the passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules or ions between the abutment-implant interface to and from the surrounding periodontal tissues. This creates a zone of inflammation and reservoir of bacteria at the implant-abutment interface. Bone loss typically occurs within the first year of abutment connection and then stabilizes. It has not yet been definitively proven that the occurrence of microleakage cannot contribute to future bone loss or impede the treatment of peri-implant disease. Therefore, strategies to reduce or eliminate microleakage are sought out. Recent evidence demonstrates that the type of implant abutment channel occluding material can affect the amount of microleakage in an in vitro study environment. Thus, we hypothesize that different abutment screw channel occluding materials will affect the amount of observed microleakage, vis-a-vis the correlation between the microflora found on the abutment screw channel occluding material those found in the peri-implant sulcus. Additional objectives include confirming the presence of microleakage in vivo and assessing any impact that different abutment screw channel occluding materials may have on the peri-implant microbiome. Finally, the present study provides an opportunity to further characterize the peri-implant microbiome. Eight fully edentulous patients restored with at dental implants supporting screw-retained fixed hybrid prostheses were included in the study. At the initial appointment (T1), the prostheses were removed and the implants and prostheses were cleaned. The prostheses were then inserted with polytetrafluoroethylene tape (PTFE, TeflonRTM), cotton, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), or synthetic foam as the implant abutment channel occluding material and sealed over with composite resin. About six months later (T2), the prostheses were removed and the materials collected. Paper

  15. Implant Gigi One-Piece vs Two-Pieces dalam Praktek Sehari-Hari

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Lestari Kurnia; Amilia Ramadhani; Rikko Hudyono

    2014-01-01

    Saat ini, implant merupakan pilihan terbaik untuk menggantikan gigi yang tanggal, akan tetapi prosedur pemasangannya terbilang rumit dan memerlukan prosedur bedah kedua untuk pemasangan prostetik. Beberapa komplikasi seperti screw patah atau longgar dan adanya celah mikro pada batas pertemuan implant dan abutment dapat menyebabkan kegagalan implant. Studi kasus ini bertujuan untuk membahas mengenai keuntungan dan kerugian desain implant gigi one-piece dan two-pieces. Kasus pertama, seorang wa...

  16. Twin Screw Mixer/Fine Grind Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 40-mm Twin-Screw Mixer/Extruder (TSE) pilot plant is a continuous, remotely operated, flexible facility that can significantly enhance safety and environmental...

  17. Suture Button Fixation Versus Syndesmotic Screws in Supination-External Rotation Type 4 Injuries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Kaitlin C; Mormino, Matthew A; Wang, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    In stress-positive, unstable supination-external rotation type 4 (SER IV) ankle fractures, implant selection for syndesmotic fixation is a debated topic. Among the available syndesmotic fixation methods, the metallic screw and the suture button have been routinely compared in the literature. In addition to strength of fixation and ability to anatomically restore the syndesmosis, costs associated with implant use have recently been called into question. This study aimed to examine the cost-effectiveness of the suture button and determine whether suture button fixation is more cost-effective than two 3.5-mm syndesmotic screws not removed on a routine postoperative basis. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. Studies with the highest evidence levels in the available literature were used to estimate the hardware removal and failure rates for syndesmotic screws and suture button fixation. Costs were determined by examining the average costs for patients who underwent surgery for unstable SER IV ankle fractures at a single level-1 trauma institution. A decision analysis model that allowed comparison of the 2 fixation methods was developed. Using a 20% screw hardware removal rate and a 4% suture button hardware removal rate, the total cost for 2 syndesmotic screws was US$20,836 and the total effectiveness was 5.846. This yielded a total cost of $3564 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) over an 8-year time period. The total cost for suture button fixation was $19,354 and the total effectiveness was 5.904, resulting in a total cost of $3294 per QALY over the same time period. A sensitivity analysis was then conducted to assess suture button fixation costs as well as screw and suture button hardware removal rates. Other possible treatment scenarios were also examined, including 1 screw and 2 suture buttons for operative fixation of the syndesmosis. To become more cost-effective, the screw hardware removal rate would have to be reduced to less than 10

  18. What do sales data tell us about implant survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Rudolf; Jirku, Alexander; Wagner, Florian; Wutzl, Arno

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of implant diameter, length and shape on a surrogate parameter of implant survival; i.e. the implant return rate in a big data analysis. Materials and methods A retrospective study was conducted and the factors influencing the success rates of 69,377 sold implants over a seven-year period were evaluated. The osseointegration program of a reseller provides reliable data of a single country. Implant loss rates were investigated using logistic regression models and regressed by implant type, diameter, and length. Results The return rate of 69,377 sold implants was 2.78% and comparable to implant loss rates in previous published prospective studies as its surrogate parameter. A total of 80% of implant returns had occurred within 157 days, and an additional 15% within 750.25 days. Diameters of 3.8 to 5.0mm showed the lowest return rates with its bottom in the 4.3mm implant whilst 6.0mm implants had significantly higher return rates. In comparison to the most sold implant length (13mm) shorter implants showed significantly higher early return rates. Conclusions The study provides evidence that in cases of standard indications and sufficient bone, the use of screw typed dental implants with 3.8 or 4.3 diameter and 11 or 13 mm length shows the lowest implant return rates. Other implants may be selected only in specific indications. PMID:28222128

  19. Design and biomechanical study of a modified pedicle screw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; ZHENG Wen-jie; LI Chang-qing; LIU Guo-dong; ZHOU Yue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In pedicle screw fixation,the heads of monoaxial screws need to be directed in the same straight line to accommodate the rod placement by backing out during operation, which decreases the insertional torque and internal fixation strength. While polyaxial screws facilitate the assembly of the connecting rod, but its ball-in-cup locking mechanism reduces the static compressive bending yield strength as compared with monoaxial screws. Our study aimed to assess the mechanical performance of a modified pedicle screw.Methods: In this study, the tail of the screw body of the modified pedicle screw was designed to be a cylindershaped structure that well matched the inner wall of the screw head and the screw head only rotated around the cyclinder. Monoaxial screws, modified screws and polyaxial screws were respectively assembled into 3 groups ofvertebrectomy models simulated by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) blocks. This model was developed according to a standard for destructive mechanical testing published by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM F1717-04). Each screw design had 6 subgroups, including 3 for static tension, load compression and torsion tests, and the rest for dynamic compression tests. In dynamic tests, the cyclic loads were 25%, 50%, and 75% of the compressive bending ultimate loads respectively.Yield load, yield ultimate load, yield stiffness, torsional stiffness, cycles to failure and modes of failure for the 3 types of screws were recorded. The results of modified screws were compared with those ofmonoaxial and polyaxial screws.Results: In static tests, results of bending stiffness,yield load, yield torque and torsional stiffness indicated no significant differences between the modified and monoaxial screws (P>0.05), but both differed significantly from those ofpolyaxial screws (P<0.05). In dynamic compression tests,both modified and monoaxial screws showed failures that occurred at the insertion point of screw

  20. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  1. Bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants subjected to static load. A study in the dog (I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of lateral static load induced by an expansion force on the bone/implant interface and adjacent peri-implant bone. In 3 beagle dogs, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars were extracted bilaterally. Twelve weeks later 8 implants of the ITI Dental...... Implant System were placed in each dog. Crowns connected in pairs were screwed on the implants 12 weeks after implant installation. The connected crowns contained an orthodontic expansion screw yielding 4 loading units in each dog. Clinical registrations, standardized radiographs and fluorochrome labeling...... were carried out during the 24-week loading period. Biopsies were harvested and processed for ground sectioning. The sections were subjected to histological examination. No evident marginal bone loss was observed at either test or control sites. The bone density and the mineralized bone-to-implant...

  2. A systematic review of suture-button versus syndesmotic screw in the treatment of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Liang, Yuan; He, Jinshan; Fang, Yongchao; Chen, Pengtao; Wang, Jingcheng

    2017-07-04

    Now, using a suture-button device to treat distal tibiofibular syndesmotic injuries is overwhelming due to its advantages over screw fixation. Current systematic review was conducted to make a comparison between suture-button fixation and traditionally screw fixation in the treatment of syndesmotic injuries. The outcomes included functional outcomes, implant removal, implant failure, malreduction, post-operative complications (except implant failure and malreduction), and cost-effectiveness aspects. A literature search in the electronic databases of Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science was conducted to identify studies until March 2017. The references of the included articles were also checked for potentially relevant studies. Only English articles were included. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematics reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines in this review. Finally, 10 studies were identified, encompassing a total of 390 patients. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle score (AOFAS) score of 150 patients treated with the suture-button device was 91.06 points, with an average follow-up of 17.58 months, and the mean AOFAS score of 150 patients treated with syndesmotic screws was 87.78 points, with an average follow-up of 17.73 months. Implant removal was reported in 5 of 134 (3.7%) patients treated with the suture-button device, and in 54 of 134 (40.2%) patients treated with the syndesmotic screw. No patient in the suture-button fixation group had implant failure, however the rate of implant failure in the screw fixation group was 30.9%. Malreduction was reported in 1 of 93 (1.0%) patients treated with the suture-button device, and in 12 of 95 (12.6%) patients treated with the syndesmotic screw. The rate of post-operative complications in the suture-button fixation group was 12.0% and 16.4% in the screw fixation group. There was only one publication demonstrated about cost-effectiveness aspects, it showed

  3. Flow characteristics of screws and special mixing enhancers in a co-rotating twin screw extruder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, T.; Todd, D.B.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The flow behavior of a Newtonian fluid through special mixing enhancers in a modular intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruder has been examined. The mixing enhancers are slotted screws and gear mixing elements. Particular attention has been directed to drag and pressure flow characteristics and

  4. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of different tightening forces before laser welding to the implant/framework fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira-Júnior, Clebio Domingues; Neves, Flávio Domingues; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Prado, Célio Jesus; Simamoto-Júnior, Paulo César

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of abutment screw tightening force before laser welding procedures on the vertical fit of metal frameworks over four implants. To construct the frameworks, prefabricated titanium abutments and cylindrical titanium bars were joined by laser welding to compose three groups: group of manual torque (GMT), GT10 and GT20. Before welding, manual torque simulating routine laboratory procedure was applied to GTM. In GT10 and GT20, the abutment screws received 10 and 20 Ncm torque, respectively. After welding, the implant/framework interfaces were assessed by optical comparator microscope using two methods. First, the single screw test (SST) was used, in which the interfaces of the screwed and non-screwed abutments were assessed, considering only the abutments at the framework extremities. Second, the interfaces of all the abutments were evaluated when they were screwed. In the SST, intergroup analysis (Kruskal Wallis) showed no significant difference among the three conditions of tightening force; that is, the different tightening force before welding did not guarantee smaller distortions. Intragroup analysis (Wilcoxon) showed that for all groups, the interfaces of the non-screwed abutments were statistically greater than the interfaces of the screwed abutments, evidencing distortions in all the frameworks. ANOVA was applied for the comparison of interfaces when all the abutments were screwed and showed no significant difference among the groups. Under the conditions of this study, pre-welding tightness on abutment screws did not influence the vertical fit of implant-supported metal frameworks.

  6. Influence of a micro-thread at cervical position and a cylindrical intermediate zone on the mechanical behaviour of dental implants: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garitaonaindia, Ugutz; Alcaraz, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyse the influence on the biomechanical behaviour of dental implants of a micro-thread at their cervical part as well as of a cylindrical geometry at an intermediate zone. Stresses and strains in the elements involved, that is, bone, implant, screw and abutment, have to be considered in detail. Three different three-dimensional finite element models are generated to analyse the behaviour of the various components under the so-called tightening and operating conditions. For the modelling, material specifications for the cancellous bone and cortical bone, on one hand, and titanium properties for the implant, screw and abutment, on the other, are implemented. The tightening condition was fixed according to the stresses in the screw. The operating conditions were simulated by applying a force of 150 N, taking into account ISO 14801:2007 standard. The maximum stress under tightening conditions occurs always in the screw, while under operating conditions it is produced at the screw or the abutment, although considerable stress values are also present in the implant. In all the models, the maximum stress at the junction between the implant and the bone occurs within the cortical bone. Implants provided with micro-thread at the cervical position are advantageous over homogeneously threaded implants since lower stresses in both the implant and the adjacent bone are produced. A cylindrical intermediate portion on the implant surface does not present special advantage over the implants with continuous external thread under tightening and operating conditions.

  7. Pullout strength of pedicle screws with cement augmentation in severe osteoporosis: A comparative study between cannulated screws with cement injection and solid screws with cement pre-filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yen-Chen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pedicle screws with PMMA cement augmentation have been shown to significantly improve the fixation strength in a severely osteoporotic spine. However, the efficacy of screw fixation for different cement augmentation techniques, namely solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling versus cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation, remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the difference in pullout strength between conical and cylindrical screws based on the aforementioned cement augmentation techniques. The potential loss of fixation upon partial screw removal after screw insertion was also examined. Method The Taguchi method with an L8 array was employed to determine the significance of design factors. Conical and cylindrical pedicle screws with solid or cannulated designs were installed using two different screw augmentation techniques: solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling and cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation. Uniform synthetic bones (test block simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a platform for each screw design and cement augmentation technique. Pedicle screws at full insertion and after a 360-degree back-out from full insertion were then tested for axial pullout failure using a mechanical testing machine. Results The results revealed the following 1 Regardless of the screw outer geometry (conical or cylindrical, solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling exhibited significantly higher pullout strength than did cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation (p = 0.0129 for conical screws; p = 0.005 for cylindrical screws. 2 For a given cement augmentation technique (screws without cement augmentation, cannulated screws with cement injection or solid screws with cement pre-filling, no significant difference in pullout strength was found between conical and cylindrical screws (p >0.05. 3 Cement infiltration into the open cell of

  8. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  9. Transpedicular screw fixation in the thoracic and lumbar spine with a novel cannulated polyaxial screw system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Weise

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutz Weise, Olaf Suess, Thomas Picht, Theodoros KombosNeurochirurgische Klinik, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyObjective: Transpedicular screws are commonly and successfully used for posterior fixation in spinal instability, but their insertion remains challenging. Even using navigation techniques, there is a misplacement rate of up to 11%. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a novel pedicle screw system.Methods: Thoracic and lumbar fusions were performed on 67 consecutive patients for tumor, trauma, degenerative disease or infection. A total of 326 pedicular screws were placed using a novel wire-guided, cannulated, polyaxial screw system (XIA Precision®, Stryker. The accuracy of placement was assessed post operatively by CT scan, and the patients were followed-up clinically for a mean of 16 months.Results: The total medio-caudal pedicle wall perforation rate was 9.2% (30/326. In 19 of these 30 cases a cortical breakthrough of less than 2 mm occurred. The misplacement rate (defined as a perforation of 2 mm or more was 3.37% (11/326. Three of these 11 screws needed surgical revision due to neurological symptoms or CSF leakage. There have been no screw breakages or dislocations over the follow up-period.Conclusion: We conclude that the use of this cannulated screw system for the placement of pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar spine is accurate and safe. The advantages of this technique include easy handling without a time-consuming set up. Considering the incidence of long-term screw breakage, further investigation with a longer follow-up period is necessary.Keywords: spinal instrumentation, pedicle screws, misplacement, pedicle wall perforation

  10. Cross-sectional analysis of the implant-abutment interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, A L; Suzuki, M; Dibart, S; DA Silva, N; Coelho, P G

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to evaluate the implant-abutment gap of an external hexagon implant system as a function of radius. Six implants of 3.75 mm in diameter (Conexao Sistema de Protese Ltda, Sao Paulo, Brazil) and their respective abutments were screw connected and torqued to 20 N cm(-1). The implants were mounted in epoxy assuring an implant long-axis position perpendicular to the vertical axis. Each implant was grounded through its thickness parallel to implant long-axis at six different distance interval. Implant-abutment gap distances were recorded along the implant-abutment region for each section. Individual measurements were related to their radial position through trigonometric inferences. A sixth degree polynomial line fit approach determined radial adaptation patterns for each implant. Micrographs along implant sections showed a approximately 300 mum length implant-abutment engagement region. All implants presented communication between external and internal regions through connection gaps and inaccurate implant-abutment alignment. Average gap distances were not significantly different between implants (P > 0.086). Polynomial lines showed implant-abutment gap values below 10 mum from 0 mum to approximately 250 mum of the implant-abutment engagement region. Gap distances significantly increased from approximately 250 mum to the outer radius of the implant-abutment engagement region. The technique described provided a broader scenario of the implant-abutment gap adaptation compared with previous work concerning implant-abutment gap determination, and should be considered for better understanding mechanical aspects or biological effects of implant-abutment adaptation on peri-implant tissues.

  11. Biocompatibility of intraosseously implanted predegraded poly(lactide) : An animal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, RRM; Rozema, FR; DeJong, W; Boering, G

    1996-01-01

    During degradation of high molecular weight as-polymerized poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) late complications such as swelling of the subcutaneously implanted bone plates have been observed in patients. However, in the same patients the intraosseously implanted PLLA screws did not give rise to any complicati

  12. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration.

  13. Graft tendon slippage with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws under cyclic load: a biomechanical study in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Digiácomo Ocampo Moré

    Full Text Available Introduction The rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the most common type of knee injury. Reconstructive surgery is the ‘gold standard’ treatment. During the immediate post-operative period, the fixation of the graft is entirely dependent on the ability of the grafted implant to be secured inside the bone tunnel under the cyclical loads associated with daily tasks. Poor fixation can lead to graft slippage, thus impairing the healing and integration of the graft. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical performance of tendon graft fixation devices with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods Twenty ACL reconstructions were carried out in porcine tibias using deep flexor tendons to fix 9 × 20 mm metallic (n=10 and PLLA 70/30 bioabsorbable screws (n=10. To verify the ability of a construct to resist immediate postoperative (PO rehabilitation protocols for immediate load bearing, a cyclic loading test was applied with 50-250 N of tensile force at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles, and the displacement was measured at 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 load cycles to quantify the slippage of the graft during the test. After the cyclic loading test, a single-cycle load-to-failure test was applied. Results The slippage of the graft using metallic screws did not differ (P = 0.616 from that observed when using bioabsorbable screws. Conclusion The results obtained in this experiment indicate that metallic screws may promote a similar amount of graft slippage during low cyclic loading as bioabsorbable screws. Additionally, there was no difference in the biomechanical performance of these two types of screws during high failure loads.

  14. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-rein...

  15. The accuracy and the safety of individualized 3D printing screws insertion templates for cervical screw insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ting; Jiang, Minghui; Lei, Qing; Cai, Lihong; Chen, Li

    2016-12-01

    Clinical trial for cervical screw insertion by using individualized 3-dimensional (3D) printing screw insertion templates device. The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and accuracy of the individualized 3D printing screw insertion template in the cervical spine. Ten patients who underwent posterior cervical fusion surgery with cervical pedicle screws, laminar screws or lateral mass screws between December 2014 and December 2015 were involved in this study. The patients were examined by CT scan before operation. The individualized 3D printing templates were made with photosensitive resin by a 3D printing system to ensure the screw shafts entered the vertebral body without breaking the pedicle or lamina cortex. The templates were sterilized by a plasma sterilizer and used during the operation. The accuracy and the safety of the templates were evaluated by CT scans at the screw insertion levels after operation. The accuracy of this patient-specific template technique was demonstrated. Only one screw axis greatly deviated from the planned track and breached the cortex of the pedicle because the template was split by rough handling and then we inserted the screws under the fluoroscopy. The remaining screws were inserted in the track as preoperative design and the screw axis deviated by less than 2 mm. Vascular or neurologic complications or injuries did not happen. And no infection, broken nails, fracture of bone structure, or screw pullout occurred. This study verified the safety and the accuracy of the individualized 3D printing screw insertion templates in the cervical spine as a kind of intraoperative screw navigation. This individualized 3D printing screw insertion template was user-friendly, moderate cost, and enabled a radiation-free cervical screw insertion.

  16. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives.

  17. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting.

  18. A processing method for orthodontic mini-screws reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Noorollahian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Cleaning of used mini-screws with phosphoric acid 37% (10 minutes and sodium hypochlorite 5.25% (30 minutes reduces tissue remnants to the level of as-received mini-screws. So it can be suggested as a processing method of used mini-screws. Previous insertion of mini-screws into the bone and above-mentioned processing method and resterilization with autoclave had no adverse effects on insertion, removal, and fracture torque values as mechanical properties indices.

  19. Guided pedicle screw insertion: techniques and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manbachi, Amir; Cobbold, Richard S C; Ginsberg, Howard J

    2014-01-01

    In spinal fusion surgery, the accuracy with which screws are inserted in the pedicle has a direct effect on the surgical outcome. Accurate placement generally involves considerable judgmental skills that have been developed through a lengthy training process. Because the impact of misaligning one or more pedicle screws can directly affect patient safety, a number of navigational and trajectory verification approaches have been described and evaluated in the literature to provide some degree of guidance to the surgeon. To provide a concise review to justify the need and explore the current state of developing navigational or trajectory verification techniques for ensuring proper pedicle screw insertion along with simulation methods for better educating the surgical trainees. Recent literature review. To justify the need to develop new methods for optimizing pedicle screw paths, we first reviewed some of the recent publications relating to the statistical outcomes for different types of navigation along with the conventional freehand (unassisted) screw insertion. Second, because of the importance of providing improved training in the skill of accurate screw insertion, the training aspects of relevant techniques are considered. The third part is devoted to the description of specific navigational assist methods or trajectory verification techniques and these include computer-assisted navigation, three-dimensional simulations, and also electric impedance and optical and ultrasonic image-guided methods. This article presents an overview of the need and the current status of the guidance methods available for improving the surgical outcomes in spinal fusion procedures. It also describes educational aids that have the potential for reducing the training process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of the ultimate torsion on the geometry of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana Beatriz V; Beja, Gabriela B S P; Shimano, Antônio Carlos; Macedo, Ana Paula; Oliscovicz, Nathalia Ferraz; Reis, Andréa C dos

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the profile of implants subjected to torsion test. Four types of implants (Conexão®) were analyzed: Master Porous (MP - external hexagon, cylindrical, double-porous surface implants; 11.5 X 3.75 mm), Master Screw (MS - external hexagon, cylindrical, machined implants; 11.5 X 3.75 mm), Conect Conic (CC - external hexagon, cylindrical, machined implants; 11.5 X 3.5 mm) and Master Conect AR (CA - internal hexagon, cylindrical, double-porous surface implants; 11.5 X 3.75 mm). The Nikon® model C profile projector was used for the analysis before and after torsion test with a Mackena® model MK-20XX digital torque meter. The measures analyzed in the profile of implants were: diameter and height of the platform, diameter of the screw/platform connection, angle of the screw/platform connection, external diameter, internal diameter, thread pitch, height and length of the thread. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey test at 5% significance level. The torsion test caused a visible deformity on the external implant profile. There was a statistical difference among the implants before and after torsion (pstripping of CC. Thus, it was concluded that excessive or some unadvised torque by the manufacturer can lead to changes in different geometric measurements of implants.

  1. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  2. Screw Extruder for Pellet Injection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharadkumar K. Chhantbar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid hydrogenic pellets are used as fuel for fusion energy reactor. A technique for continuous production of solid hydrogen and its isotopes by a screw extruder is suggested for the production of an unlimited number of pellets. The idea was developed and patented by PELIN laboratories, Inc. (Canada. A Gifford McMahon cryocooler is used for the generation of solid hydrogenic fluid pellets. Requirements of the pellets is depends upon the energy to be produced by tokamak. This review paper focuses on the model for the screw extruder for solidification of hydrogen ice having high injection reliability.

  3. A geometrical introduction to screw theory

    CERN Document Server

    Minguzzi, E

    2012-01-01

    Since the addition of applied forces must take into account the line of action, applied forces do not belong to a vector space. Screw theory removes this geometrical limitation and solves other mechanical problems by unifying, in a single concept, the translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Although venerable this theory is little known. By introducing some innovations, I show how screw theory can help us to rapidly develop several standard and less standard results in classical mechanics. The connection with the Lie algebra of the group of rigid maps is clarified.

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of an expansive pedicle screw in calf vertebrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷伟; 吴子祥

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the effect of the improvement of fixation strength of a newly designed expansive pedicle screw through biomechanical analyses.Metheds: 100 (200 pedicles) fresh calf lumber vertebrae were used. A total of four instrumentation systems were tested including CDH (CD Horizon), USS (Universal Spine System pedicle screw), Tenor (Sofamor Denek) and expansive pedicle screw (EPS). Pullout and turning-back tests were performed to compare the holding strength of the expansive pedicle screw with conventional screws, i.e. USS, CDH and Tenor. Revision tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the expansive pedicle screw as a "rescue" revision screw. A fatigue simulation using perpendicular load up to 1 500 000 cycles was carried out.Results: The turning back torque (Tmax) and pull-out force (Fmax) of EPS were significantly greater than those of USS, Tenor and CDH screws (6.5 mm×40 mm). In revision tests, the Fmax of both kinds of EPS (6.5 mm×40 mm; 7.0 mm×40 mm) were greater than that of CDH, USS and Tenor screws significantly (P<0.05). No screws were broken or bent at the end of fatigue tests.Conclusions: EPS can significantly improve the bone purchase and the pull-out strength compared to USS, Tenor and CDH screws with similar dimensions before and after failure simulation. The fatigue characteristic of EPS is similar to that of CDH, USS and Tenor screws.

  5. Dual-worm screw compressors; Compresseurs bi-vis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleydier, J.P. [Bitzer France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    Low power worm-screw moto-compressors are used in any king of refrigerating machineries and more and more in air conditioning systems. This paper presents the principle of dual-screw moto-compressors: worm-screw technology, role of oil (lubrication, tightness, cooling), compression, internal pressure, power reduction, lubrication, economizer, operation, model selection and accessories. (J.S.)

  6. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  7. The additon of screws and the axodes of gear pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-xiang

    2001-01-01

    In the light of screw addition, the distribution of instantaneous axes along the common perpendicular of the two screws is determined and all possible sorts of axodes are derived cinematically with the pitch of the relative-motio n screw in the gear pair as the basis and the transmission ratio i as an inde pendent variable.

  8. The additon of screws and the axodes of gear pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文祥

    2001-01-01

    In the light of screw addition, the distribution of instantaneous axes along the common perpendicular of the two screws is determined and all possible sorts of axodes are derived cinematically with the pitch of the relative-motion screw in the gear pair as the basis and the transmission ratio i as an independent variable.

  9. Design of a magnetic lead screw for wave energy conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Berg, Nick Ilsø; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a magnetic lead screw (MLS) for wave energy conversion. Initially, a brief state-of-the-art regarding linear PM generators and magnetic lead screws is given, leading to an introduction of the magnetic lead screw and a presentation of the results from...

  10. A Novel Pedicle Screw with Mobile Connection: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Tokuhashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent adjacent disc problems after spinal fusion, a pedicle screw with a mobile junction between the head and threaded shaft was newly developed. The threaded shaft of the screw has 10 degrees mobility in all directions, but its structure is to prevent abnormal translation and tilting. This screw was evaluated as follows: (1 endurance test: 106 times rotational stress was applied; (2 biological reactions: novel screws with a mobile head and conventional screws with a fixed head were inserted into the bilateral pedicles of the L3, L4, and L5 in two mini pigs with combination. Eight months after surgery, vertebral units with the screw rod constructs were collected. After CT scan, the soft and bony tissues around the screws were examined grossly and histologically. As a result, none of the screws broke during the endurance test stressing. The mean amount of abrasion wear was 0.0338 g. In the resected mini pig section, though zygapophyseal joints between fixed-head screws showed bony union, the amount of callus in the zygapophyseal joints connected with mobile-head screws was small, and joint space was confirmed by CT. No metalloses were noted around any of the screws. Novel screws were suggested to be highly durable and histologically safe.

  11. Comparison of the clinical accuracy of cervical (C2-C7) pedicle screw insertion assisted by fluoroscopy, computed tomography-based navigation, and intraoperative three-dimensional C-arm navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-jun; TIAN Wei; LIU Bo; LI Qin; HU Lin; LI Zhi-yu; YUAN Qiang; L(U) Yan-wei; SUN Yu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background The complicated anatomy of the cervical spine and the variation among pedicles reduces the accuracy and increases the risk of neurovascular complications associated with screw implantation in this region. In this study, we compared the accuracy of cervical (C2-C7) pedicle screw fixation assisted by X-ray fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, or intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) C-arm navigation.Methods This prospective cohort study was performed in 82 consecutive patients who underwent cervical pedicle screw fixation. The accuracy of screw insertion was assessed by postoperative CT scan with 3D reconstruction. The accuracy of screw insertion was assessed as: excellent (screw completely within pedicle); acceptable (≤ 1 mm screw outside pedicle cortex); poor (>1 mm screw outside pedicle cortex).Results A total of 145 screws were inserted in 24 patients who underwent C-arm fluoroscopy. Of these, 96 screws (66.2%) were excellent, 37 (25.5%) were acceptable, and 12 (8.3%) were poor. One hundred and fifty-nine screws were inserted in 29 patients in the CT-based navigation group. Among these, 141 (88.7%) were excellent, 14 (8.8%) were acceptable, and 4 (2.5%) were poor. A total of 140 screws were inserted in 29 patients in the intraoperative 3D C-arm navigation group, of which 127 (90.7%) were excellent, and 13 (9.3%) were acceptable. No severe or permanent neurovascular complications associated with screw insertion were observed in any patient.Conclusione CT-based and intraoperative 3D C-arm navigation were similarly accurate, and were both significantly more accurate than C-arm fluoroscopy for guiding cervical pedicle screw fixation. They were able to accurately guide the angle and depth of screw placement using visual 3D images. These two techniques are therefore preferable for high-risk cervical pedicle screw fixation. The ease and convenience of intraoperative 3D C-arm navigation suggests that it may replace virtual

  12. The Influence of Partial Knee Replacement Designs on Tensile Strain at Implant-Bone Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial knee replacement (PKR results in fast recovery and good knee mechanics and is ideal to treat medial knee osteoarthritis. Cementless PKR depends on bone growing into the implant surface for long-term fixation. Implant loosening may occur due to high tensile strain resulted from large mechanical loads during rehab exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether external fixations such as superior screw and frontal flange could reduce the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface. Three medial PKRs were designed. The first PKR had no external fixations. A superior screw and a frontal flange were then added to the first PKR to form the second and third PKR designs, respectively. Finite element analysis was performed to examine the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during weight-bearing exercises. The PKR with no external fixations exhibited high tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Both the screwed and flanged PKRs effectively reduced the tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Furthermore, the flanged PKR resulted in a more uniform reduction of the tensile strain than the screwed PKR. In conclusion, external fixations are necessary to alleviate tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during knee rehab exercises.

  13. Clinical pedicle screw accuracy and deviation from planning in robot-guided spine surgery: robot-guided pedicle screw accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Joris D.; Ende, Roy P.J.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Köchling, Matthias; Höss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective chart review was performed for 112 consecutive minimally invasive spinal surgery patients who underwent pedicular screw fixation in a community hospital setting. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical accuracy and deviation in screw positions in robot-assisted pedicle screw

  14. A finite element analysis of the pelvic reconstruction using fibular transplantation fixed with four different rod-screw systems after transplantation fixed with four different rod-screw systems after type Ⅰ resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background The pelvis often needs to be reconstructed after bone tumor resection.A major challenge here for the orthopedic surgeons is to choose a method that gives the best performance which depends upon its biomechanical properties.In this study,a 3-dimensional finite element analysis(FEA)was used to analyze the biomechanical properties of reconstructed pelvis using fibula transplant fixed by four commonly used rod-screw systems.Methods A total pelvic finite-element model including the lumbar-sacral spine and proximal femur was constructed based on the geometry of CT image from a healthy volunteer.Three-dimensional finite element models of different implants including fibula,rod and screw were simulated using ways of solid modeling.Then various reconstructed finite element models were assembled with different finite element implant model and type Ⅰ resected pelvic finite element model.The load of 500 N was imposed vertically onto the superior surface of L3 vertebral body,and the pelvis was fixed in bilateral leg standing positions.FEA was performed to account for the stress distribution on the bones and implants.The pelvis displacement of the different rod-screw fixation methods and the maximum equivalent stress(max EQV)on all nodes and element were figured out to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different reconstructive methods.Results Stress concentration in the fibula transplant was extremely high in the reconstructed pelvis,but could be substantially decreased by internal fixation,which partially transferred the stress from the fibula to the rod-screw systems.High stress concentration was also found in the implants,especially in the connection sites between screw and rod.Among the four methods of fixation,a double rod system with L5-S1 pedicle and ilium screws(L5-S1 HR)produced the best performance:least stress concentrations and least total displacement.Conclusion According to the stability and stress concentration,the method of L5-S1 HR

  15. Clinical success of implant-supported and tooth-implant-supported double crown-retained dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Gunda; Koob, Andreas; Schmitter, Marc; Gabbert, Olaf; Stober, Thomas; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to compare biological and technical complications of implant-supported and tooth-implant-supported double crown-retained dentures (DCRDs) with those of tooth-supported DCRDs. Sixty-three DCRDs were monitored. One study group included 16 prostheses with a combination of implants and natural teeth as double crowns (ti group), whereas in the second study group, 19 dentures were retained exclusively on implants (ii group); a third study group with 28 exclusively tooth-supported dentures served as controls (tt group). Tooth loss, implant failure, and technical complications (loss of retention of primary crown, abutment screw loosening, loss of facing, fracture of resin denture teeth and fracture of saddle resin) were analysed. During the observation period of 24 months, no implants or teeth were lost in the ti group and three technical complications were recorded. In the ii group, two implants were lost, two cases of peri-implantitis occurred and four technical complications were observed. In the tt group, two cases of tooth loss and seven technical complications were observed. At the time of the last examination, all prostheses of the ti group and the ii group were functional. Patients of these two study groups reported high satisfaction with both function and aesthetics with no significant difference between the two groups. Treatment with DCRDs showed comparable results in the three study groups. The 2-year results indicate that double crowns can be recommended for implant and combined tooth-implant-retained dentures.

  16. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  17. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  18. A phenomenological study on twin screw extruders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1976-01-01

    Although more and more twin screw extruders are being used in the polymer industry, the theoretical background is relatively undeveloped. The literature abounds in contradictions and often informs the reader that all extrusion problems can be solved if a certain new design is considered. The develop

  19. Charcot neuroarthropathy: realignment of diabetic foot by means of osteosynthesis using intramedullary screws – case report,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Leme Godoy dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a serious disease that affects a large portion of the population. Charcot neuroarthropathy is one of its major complications and can lead to osteoarticular deformities, functional incapacity, ulcers and ankle and foot infections. Realignment of the foot by means of arthrodesis presents a high rate of implant failure due to weight-bearing on an insensitive foot. The aim of this report was to describe successful use of intramedullary osteosynthesis with compression screws to stabilize the deformed foot, in a diabetic patient with neuroarthropathy.

  20. Charcot neuroarthropathy: realignment of diabetic foot by means of osteosynthesis using intramedullary screws - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Albino, Rômulo Ballarin; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan; Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; de Andrade Corsato, Marcos; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious disease that affects a large portion of the population. Charcot neuroarthropathy is one of its major complications and can lead to osteoarticular deformities, functional incapacity, ulcers and ankle and foot infections. Realignment of the foot by means of arthrodesis presents a high rate of implant failure due to weight-bearing on an insensitive foot. The aim of this report was to describe successful use of intramedullary osteosynthesis with compression screws to stabilize the deformed foot, in a diabetic patient with neuroarthropathy.

  1. A reliable method for intracranial electrode implantation and chronic electrical stimulation in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Melanie; Lang, Min; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Burnham, W McIntyre; Zhang, Liang

    2013-08-06

    Electrical stimulation of brain structures has been widely used in rodent models for kindling or modeling deep brain stimulation used clinically. This requires surgical implantation of intracranial electrodes and subsequent chronic stimulation in individual animals for several weeks. Anchoring screws and dental acrylic have long been used to secure implanted intracranial electrodes in rats. However, such an approach is limited when carried out in mouse models as the thin mouse skull may not be strong enough to accommodate the anchoring screws. We describe here a screw-free, glue-based method for implanting bipolar stimulating electrodes in the mouse brain and validate this method in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling. Male C57 black mice (initial ages of 6-8 months) were used in the present experiments. Bipolar electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the hippocampal CA3 area for electrical stimulation and electroencephalographic recordings. The electrodes were secured onto the skull via glue and dental acrylic but without anchoring screws. A daily stimulation protocol was used to induce electrographic discharges and motor seizures. The locations of implanted electrodes were verified by hippocampal electrographic activities and later histological assessments. Using the glue-based implantation method, we implanted bilateral bipolar electrodes in 25 mice. Electrographic discharges and motor seizures were successfully induced via hippocampal electrical kindling. Importantly, no animal encountered infection in the implanted area or a loss of implanted electrodes after 4-6 months of repetitive stimulation/recording. We suggest that the glue-based, screw-free method is reliable for chronic brain stimulation and high-quality electroencephalographic recordings in mice. The technical aspects described this study may help future studies in mouse models.

  2. Optimal screw orientation for the fixation of cervical degenerative disc disease using nonlinear C3-T2 multi-level spinal models and neuro-genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Kuo; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a common surgical procedure performed to remove a degenerative or herniated disc in cervical spine. Unfortunately, clinical complications of anterior cervical plate (ACP) systems still occur, such as weak fixation stability and implant loosening. Previous researchers have attempted to ameliorate these complications by varying screw orientations, but the screw orientations are mainly determined according to the investigator's experiences. Thus, the aim of this study was to discover the optimal screw orientations of ACP systems to achieve acceptable fixation stability using finite element simulations and engineering algorithms. Three-dimensional finite element models of C3-T2 multi-level segments with an ACP system were first developed to analyze the fixation stability using ANSYS Workbench 14.5. Then, artificial neural networks were applied to create one objective function, and the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system were discovered by genetic algorithms. Finally, the numerical models and the optimization study were validated using biomechanical tests. The results showed that the optimal design of the ACP system had highest fixation stability compared with other ACP designs. The neuro-genetic algorithm has effectively reduced the time and effort required for discovering for the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system. The optimum screw orientation of the ACP system could be successfully discovered, and it revealed excellent fixation stability for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This study could directly provide the biomechanical rationale and surgical suggestion to orthopedic surgeons.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF DISTAL FEMORAL FRACTURES USING DYNAMIC CONDYLAR SCREWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fractures of distal end of femur are complex injuries which are difficult to manage & are unstable and comminuted. Despite advances in implants treatment of distal femoral fractures remains a challenge. AIMS This study was done to analyze the functional outcome & complications associated with surgical management of fractures of distal end of femur in adults using Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS. SETTINGS & DESIGN It was a prospective clinical study done at BMCH, Chitradurga. METHODS The present study included 25 patients with 13 Supracondylar and 12 Intercondylar fractures of femur. They were operated after stabilization using Dynamic Condylar Screw. RESULTS The study showed maximum presentation between 4th and 5th decade with mean age of 39.2 years with sex incidence of 11.5:1 (M:F. Mode of injury was RTA in 17, simple fall in 5, fall from height in 2 and assault in 1 patient. Patients presented to hospital within 0 to 4 days of injury. Left side was involved in 12 and right side in 13 cases. There were 9-A1, 3-A2, 1-A3, 2-C1, 8-C2 and 2-C3 fractures. Six patients had compound fracture. Patients were operated from 3 days to 40 days after admission at an average of 12.36 days. Results were found to be excellent in 8, good in 9, moderate in 3 and poor in 5 patients. Complication in form of valgus angulation, shortening, splintering of proximal femoral fragment, deep infection, Implant failure and lateral angulation at fracture site, Non-union with deep infection were noticed. Average range of knee flexion was 1040 and average time to radiological union was 13.42 weeks. CONCLUSION This study showed that DCS is a good method of treating closed type A1, A2, A3, C1 and C2 fractures. Type C3 and compound fractures treated by this method had more poor results. DCS provides rigid fixation and good purchase in osteoporotic bone. Early mobilization prevents knee stiffness.

  4. Rotational Efficiency of Photo-Driven Archimedes Screws for Micropumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lang Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we characterized the rotational efficiency of the photo-driven Archimedes screw. The micron-sized Archimedes screws were fabricated using the two-photon polymerization technique. Free-floating screws trapped by optical tweezers align in the laser irradiation direction and rotate spontaneously. The influences of the screw pitch and the number of screw blades have been investigated in our previous studies. In this paper, the blade thickness and the central rod of the screw were further investigated. The experimental results indicate that the blade thickness contributes to rotational stability, but not to rotational speed, and that the central rod stabilizes the rotating screw but is not conducive to rotational speed. Finally, the effect of the numerical aperture (NA of the optical tweezers was investigated through a demonstration. The NA is inversely proportional to the rotational speed.

  5. A Review of Screw Conveyors Performance Evaluation During Handling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemad Zareiforoush

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent work on screw conveyors performance evaluation during handling process, especially in the case of agricultural grains and bulk materials. Experimental work has been mainly carried out to determine a range of parameters, such as auger dimension, screw rotational speed, screw clearance, conveyor intake length and conveying angle for horizontal, inclined and vertical screw conveyors. Several measurement techniques including theoretical models and DEM have been utilized to study the screw conveyors performance. However, each of these techniques is limited in its application. Difficulties in representing vortex motion and interactions among conveying grains and between the particles and screw rotating flight have so far limited the success of advanced modeling. Further work is needed to be conducted on screw augers performance to understand and improve the agricultural grains and bulk materials handling process.

  6. Atlantoaxial stabilization using multiaxial C-1 posterior arch screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Michael B; Sergides, Ioannis G; Sears, William R

    2008-12-01

    The authors present a novel technique of atlantoaxial fixation using multiaxial C-1 posterior arch screws. The technique involves the insertion of bilateral multiaxial C-1 posterior arch screws, which are connected by crosslinked rods to bilateral multiaxial C-2 pars screws. The clinical results are presented in 3 patients in whom anomalies of the vertebral arteries, C-1 lateral masses, and/or posterior arch of C-1 presented difficulty using existing fixation techniques with transarticular screws, C-1 lateral mass screws, or posterior wiring. The C-1 posterior arch screws achieved solid fixation and their insertion appeared to be technically less demanding than that of transarticular or C-1 lateral mass screws. This technique may reduce the risk of complications compared with existing techniques, especially in patients with anatomical variants of the vertebral artery, C-1 lateral masses, or C-1 posterior arch. This technique may prove to be an attractive fixation option in patients with normal anatomy.

  7. Application of poly-L-lactide screws in flat foot surgery: histological and radiological aspects of bio-absorption of degradable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, P; Manfredini, G; Barbieri, C; Mariani, F; Tosi, G; Ruozi, B; Ferretti, M; Marzona, L; Palumbo, C

    2012-04-01

    The flat foot in childhood is a condition frequently observed in orthopedic practice but it is still debated when and in which patients surgical corrective treatment is appropriate; recently, the application of poly-L-lactic-acid (PLLA) screws was proposed. The present study investigates a group of 33 patients treated with PLLA expansion endorthesis in order to evaluate the deformity correction. Clinical and radiological outcomes in patients were correlated with: a) morphological characterization of screws both before and after being removed from patients, when necessary; b) histological and bio-molecular evaluation of degradation processes of the implants, focusing attention on the correlation between the cellular cohort involved in inflammatory reaction and the bio-absorption degree of PLLA screws. Deformity correction was mostly achieved, with minimal need of screw removal; the results obtained clearly show the occurrence of chronic rather than acute inflammation in removed screw specimens. At the histological level, after biomaterial implantation, the sequence of events occurring in the surrounding tissues ultimately ends in the formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) at the tissue/material interface; but the mechanisms which influence the fate of screw implants, i.e. the resolution of acute inflammation rather than the progression towards chronic inflammation, are of crucial importance for biodegradable materials like "polylactic acid". In fact, the FBGC response ensures a long-term mechanism which eliminates the foreign material from the body, but at the same time the implications of prolonged FBGC responses, which generate negative side effects, could significantly impede the healing progress.

  8. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  9. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... imaging (MRI) scans, to evaluate your inner ear anatomy. Cochlear implant surgery Cochlear implant surgery is usually performed as an outpatient procedure under general anesthesia. An incision is made behind the ear ...

  10. Biomechanical comparison of cervical fixation via transarticular facet screws without rods versus lateral mass screws with rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seong; Rim, Dae-Cheol; Nam, Ki-Se; Keem, Sang-Hyun; Murovic, Judith A; Lim, Jesse; Park, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Transarticular facet screws restore biomechanical stability to the cervical spine when posterior cervical anatomy has been compromised. This study compares the more recent, less invasive, and briefer transarticular facet screw system without rods with the lateral mass screw system with rods. For this study, 6 human cervical spines were obtained from cadavers. Transarticular facet screws without rods were inserted bilaterally into the inferior articular facets at the C5-C6 and C5-C6-C7 levels. Lateral mass screws with rods were inserted bilaterally at the same levels using Magerl's technique. All specimens underwent range of motion (ROM) testing by a material testing machine for flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Both fixation methods, transarticular facet screws without rods and lateral mass screws with rods, reduced all ROM measurements and increased spinal stiffness. No statistically significant differences between the 2 stabilization methods were found in ROM measurements for 1-level insertions. However, in 2-level insertions, ROM for the nonrod transarticular facet screw group was significantly increased for flexion-extension and lateral bending. Transarticular facet screws without rods and lateral mass screws with rods had similar biomechanical stability in single-level insertions. For 2-level insertions, transarticular facet screws without rods are a valid option in cervical spine repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation for lumbar stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yu

    2011-03-01

    Few reports have described the combined use of unilateral pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion for lumbar stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed 79 patients with lumbar stenosis. The rationale and effectiveness of unilateral pedicle screw fixation were studied from biomechanical and clinical perspectives, aiming to reduce stiffness of the implant. All patients were operated with posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage in combination with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation and had reached the 3-year follow-up interval after operation. The mean operating time was 115 minutes (range=95-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 150 mL (range=100-200 mL). The mean duration of hospital stay was 10 days (range=7-15 days). Clinical outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and reassessed at intervals using Denis' pain and work scales. Fusion status was determined from X-rays and CT scans. At the final follow-up, the clinical results were satisfactory and patients showed significantly improved scores (pdiagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular fixation is an effective treatment for decompressive surgery for lumbar stenosis.

  12. Basic study for ultrasound-based navigation for pedicle screw insertion using transmission and backscattered methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Chen

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver. Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P0.05. At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising.

  13. Lumbar spine superior-level facet joint violations: percutaneous versus open pedicle screw insertion using intraoperative 3-dimensional computer-assisted navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Wei; Xu Yunfeng; Liu Bo; Liu Yajun; He Da; Yuan Qiang; Lang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Background Percutaneous pedicle screw use has a high rate of cranial facet joint violations (FVs) because of the facet joint being indirectly visualized.Computer-assisted navigation shows the anatomic structures clearly,and may help to lower the rate of FVs during pedicle screw insertion.This study used computed tomography (CT) to evaluate and compare the incidence of FVs between percutaneous and open surgeries employing computer-assisted navigation for the implantation of pedicle screw instrumentation during lumbar fusions.Methods A prospective study,including 142 patients having lumbar and lumbosacral fusion,was conducted between January 2013 and April 2014.All patients had bilateral posterior pedicle screw-rod instrumentation (top-loading screws) implanted by the same group of surgeons; intraoperative 3-dimensional computer navigation was used during the procedures.All patients underwent CT examinations within 6 months postoperation.The CT scans were independently reviewed by three reviewers blinded to the technique used.Results The cohort comprised 68 percutaneous and 74 open cases (136 and 148 superior-level pedicle screw placements,respectively).Overall,superior-level FVs occurred in 20 patients (20/142,14.1%),involving 27 top screws (27/284,9.5%).The percutaneous technique (7.4% of patients,3.7% of top screws) had a significantly lower violation rate than the open procedure (20.3% of patients,14.9% of top screws).The open group also had significantly more serious violations than did the percutaneous group.Both groups had a higher violation rate when the cranial fixation involved the L5.A 1-level open procedure had a higher violation rate than did the 2-and 3-level surgeries.Conclusions With computer-assisted navigation,the placement of top-loading percutaneous screws carries a lower risk of adjacent-FVs than does the open technique; when FVs occur,they tend to be less serious.Performing a single-level open lumbar fusion,or the fusion of the L5-S1

  14. Marginal Vertical Fit along the Implant-Abutment Interface: A Microscope Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mobilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the marginal vertical fit along two different implant-abutment interfaces: (1 a standard abutment on an implant and (2 a computer-aided-design/computer-aided-machine (CAD/CAM customized screw-retained crown on an implant. Four groups were compared: three customized screw-retained crowns with three different “tolerance” values (CAD-CAM 0, CAD-CAM +1, CAD-CAM −1 and a standard titanium abutment. Qualitative analysis was carried out using an optical microscope. Results showed a vertical gap significantly different from both CAD-CAM 0 and CAD-CAM −1, while no difference was found between standard abutment and CAD-CAM +1. The set tolerance in producing CAD/CAM screw-retained crowns plays a key role in the final fit.

  15. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte; Huja, Sarandeep; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2015-01-01

    on the control side. The bone volume within the cylinders was quantified. An insertion of a dental implant was simulated bilaterally at the insertion site. The height of the clinical crown and the alveolar crest were determined on both sides. The bone turnover was assessed histomorphometrically on un...... across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant......-decalcified bucco-lingual sections stained with basic fuchsine and toluidine blue. RESULTS: Comparison of the two sides revealed a significant difference both with regard to the bone volume and morphology. The transcortical screw caused an increase in bone density and less ridge atrophy. When simulating a dental...

  16. The efficacy and complications of 2-hole 3.5 mm reconstruction plates and 4 mm noncanulated cancellous screws for temporary hemiepiphysiodesis around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Hossein; Panjavy, Behnam; Bashy, Ramin H Z; Tabrizi, Ali; Nazari, Behrooz

    2014-06-01

    Persistent angular deformities around the knee can lead to growth-plate damage in childhood and osteoarthritis in adulthood. The treatment options include osteotomy and hemiepiphysiodesis. Tension-band plate hemiepiphysiodesis with 8-plate is an effective way to correct these deformities. However, its high cost makes it less available in many countries. In the present series, we have used 3.5 mm reconstruction plates for tension-band temporary hemiepiphysiodesis. Twenty-one patients with bilateral angular deformities of the knee (42 extremities) underwent temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with 3.5 mm reconstruction plates. The diagnosis, BMI, weight, amount of correction of the deformity age, and device failure were analyzed. The mean follow-up period after plate removal was 17 months (ranging from 8 to 24 mo). The mean age of the patients was 10 years and 3 months (± 2 y and 10 mo). Complete correction of the deformities was achieved in 86% of patients. Of the 58 plate and screw constructs, 10% had screw breakage. Patients with genu valgum had 2 screw failures (6.25%), but in the genu varum group there were 4 screw failures (40%). Of the 3 patients who did not have complete correction of the deformities, 2 had mucopolysaccharidosis and 1 was nearing skeletal maturity (16 y old). The age of the patient, body weight, BMI, and degrees of angulation did not have any statistically significant correlation with the screw failure. Screw failures in female patients were more common than in male patients. All implant failures occurred in idiopathic patients. The efficacy of 3.5 mm reconstruction plates for temporary hemiepiphysiodesis around the knee is similar to that of 8-plates. However, the reconstruction plates have a lower cost and are easily available. Noncanulated 3.5 or 4.5 mm cortical screws seem to be superior to 4 mm noncanulated cancellous screws. Level 3.

  17. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore, M.

    2016-01-01

    Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and oral parafunction (OP) rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation. PMID:28050290

  18. Biomechanical performance of subpectoral biceps tenodesis: a comparison of interference screw fixation, cortical button fixation, and interference screw diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Paul M; Rajaram, Arun; Beitzel, Knut; Hackett, Thomas R; Chowaniec, David M; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2013-04-01

    Subpectoral biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation allows reproducible positioning of the tendon to help maintain the length-tension relationship. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of cortical button fixation in isolation or as an augment to interference screw fixation and to determine if the diameter of the interference screw affected fixation strength. Thirty-two cadaveric shoulders were dissected and randomized to 1 of 4 groups: (1) 7-mm interference screw and cortical button, (2) cortical button alone, (3) 7-mm interference screw, or (4) 8-mm interference screw. Testing was performed on a materials testing system with a 100-N load cycled at 1 Hz for 5000 cycles, followed by an axial load to failure test. Cyclic displacement, ultimate load to failure, and site of failure were recorded for each specimen. The mean ultimate failure loads were 7-mm interference screw with cortical button augmentation, 237.8 ± 120.4 N; cortical button alone, 99.4 ± 16.9 N; 7-mm interference screw, 275.5 ± 56 N; 8-mm interference screw, 277.1 ± 42.1 N. All specimens failed through tendon failure at the screw-tendon-bone interface. The biomechanical performance of subpectoral biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation was not improved with cortical button augmentation. In addition, cortical button fixation alone yielded a significantly lower ultimate load to failure compared with interference screws. Finally, the biomechanical performance of smaller-diameter interference screws with matching bone tunnels was not affected by interference screw diameter. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Strategy for salvage pedicle screw placement: A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Neo, Masashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Salvage surgery for failed lumbar spine fusion with a loosened pedicle screw is challenging. In general, the strategy includes replacement with larger and longer pedicle screws, augmentation with polymethylmethacrylate cement or hydroxyapatite granules, and extension of fused segments. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new technique for pedicle screw replacement after failed lumbar spine fusion. Five salvage operations were performed using a different trajectory (DT) pedicle screw replacement technique based on 3-dimensional radiological information. Position of the alternative pedicle screws was planned carefully on the computer screen of a computed tomography-based navigation system before the operation. To obtain sufficient initial stability, 1 of 2 techniques was chosen, depending on the patient. One technique created a completely new route, which did not interfere with the existing screw hole, and the other involved penetration of the existing screw hole. DT pedicle screws were replaced successfully according to the preoperative plan. In all patients, bony union were achieved at the final follow-up period without any instrument failure. Extension of the fused segments could be avoided by using the DT pedicle screw replacement technique combined with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. The DT pedicle screw replacement technique is a treatment option for salvage lumbar spine surgery. The current technique is a treatment option for salvage operations that can both avoid extension of a fused segment and achieve successful bony union.

  20. Metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb arthrodesis using intramedullary interlocking screws XMCP™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa-Parra, C N; Montaner-Alonso, D; Morales-Rodríguez, J

    2017-09-04

    The study objective was to assess the results of a thumb metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) arthrodesis using intramedullary interlocking screws at 25°, XMCP ™ (Extremity Medical, Parsippany, NJ). Radiographs evaluated the angle of arthrodesis, time of fusion and fixation of the implant. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using the DASH questionnaire and the VAS scale. Any complications found during surgery or the follow-up period were noted. We studied 9 patients. The mean follow-up was 27.6 months. Patients showed clinical and radiological evidence of fusion in an average of 8 weeks, the angle of fusion was 25°. There were no complications and no implant had to be removed. The XMCP™ system provides a reliable method for MCPJ arthrodesis for several indications and can be used with other procedures in the complex hand. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  2. "NIMS technique" for minimally invasive spinal fixation using non-fenestrated pedicle screws: A technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alugolu Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Case series. Objective: To reduce the cost of minimally invasive spinal fixation. Background: Minimally invasive spine (MIS surgery is an upcoming modality of managing a multitude of spinal pathologies. However, in a resource-limited situations, using fenestrated screws (FSs may prove very costly for patients with poor affordability. We here in describe the Nizam′s Institute of Medical Sciences (NIMS experience of using routine non-FSs (NFSs for transpedicular fixation by the minimally invasive way to bridge the economic gap. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 patients underwent NFS-minimally invasive spine (MIS surgery. Male to female distribution was 6:1. The average blood loss was 50 ml and the mean operating time was 2 and 1/2 h. All patients were mobilized the very next day after confirming the position of implants on X-ray/computed tomography. Results: All 7 patients are doing well in follow-up with no complaints of a backache or fresh neurological deficits. There was no case with pedicle breach or screw pullout. The average cost of a single level fixation by FS and NFS was `1, 30,000/patient and `32,000/patient respectively ($2166 and $530, respectively. At the end of 1-year follow-up, we had two cases of screw cap loosening and with a displacement of the rod cranio-caudally in one case which was revised through the same incisions. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation by using NFS for thoracolumbar spinal pathologies is a cost-effective extension of MIS surgery. This may extend the benefits to a lower socioeconomic group who cannot afford the cost of fenestrated screw (FS.

  3. Unilateral lag-screw technique for an isolated anterior 1/4 atlas fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Keskil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Fractures of the atlas are classified based on the fracture location and associated ligamentous injury. Among patients with atlas fractures treated using external immobilization, nonunion of the fracture could be seen. Objective: Ideally, treatment strategy for an unstable atlas fracture would involve limited fixation to maintain the fracture fragments in a reduced position without restricting the range of motion (ROM of the atlantoaxial and atlantooccipital joints. Summary of Background Data: Such a result can be established using either transoral limited internal fixation or limited posterior lateral mass fixation. However, due to high infection risk and technical difficulty, posterior approaches are preferred but none of these techniques can fully address anterior 1/4 atlas fractures such as in this case. Materials and Methods: A novel open and direct technique in which a unilateral lag screw was placed to reduce and stabilize a progressively widening isolated right-sided anterior 1/4 single fracture of C 1 that was initially treated with a rigid cervical collar is described. Results: Radiological studies made after the surgery showed no implant failure, good cervical alignment, and good reduction with fusion of C 1 . Conclusions: It is suggested that isolated C 1 fractures can be surgically reduced and immobilized using a lateral compression screw to allow union and maintain both C 1-0 and C 1-2 motions, and in our knowledge this is the first description of the use of a lag screw to achieve reduction of distracted anterior 1/4 fracture fragments of the C1 from a posterior approach. This technique has the potential to become a valuable adjunct to the surgeon′s armamentarium, in our opinion, only for fractures with distracted or comminuted fragments whose alignment would not be expected to significantly change with classical lateral mass screw reduction.

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of a unicortical button versus interference screw for subpectoral biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amarpal S; Singh, Anshu; Koonce, Ryan C

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the biomechanical properties of a unicortical button with an interference screw used for subpectoral biceps tenodesis. We also describe the anatomic dangers of bicortical button use in the subpectoral location. Twenty-eight fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders with a mean age of 52 years were studied. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 experimental biceps tenodesis groups (n = 7): unicortical button, interference screw, bicortical suspensory button, and bicortical suspensory with interference screw (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Each tenodesis specimen was mounted on a mechanical testing machine, preloaded for 2 minutes at 5 N, cycled from 5 to 70 N for 500 cycles (1 Hz), and loaded to failure (1 mm/s). We determined the mode of failure and computed the ultimate load to failure, yield load, pullout stiffness, and displacement at peak load. Calculations of the distance between the axillary and radial nerves with respect to the bicortical buttons were also calculated in 6 specimens. There was no statistically significant difference (P > .05) among groups in terms of age, ultimate load to failure, pullout stiffness, or displacement at peak load. Suture-tendon interface failure was the most commonly observed mode of failure. The axillary nerve was on average 7.8 mm from the bicortical button; however, in 6 specimens the nerve was less than 3 mm away. The use of a unicortical button for subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides biomechanical properties similar to the use of an interference screw. In addition, the use of a bicortical button in this area of the proximal humerus puts the axillary nerve at risk. Using a unicortical button subpectoral biceps method may provide a surgeon with a safe and technically easy and reproducible technique while providing similar biomechanical properties to a known standard implant. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Surgical complications in neuromuscular scoliosis operated with posterior- only approach using pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Surya Udai

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no reports describing complications with posterior spinal fusion (PSF with segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI using pedicle screw fixation in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis. Methods Fifty neuromuscular patients (18 cerebral palsy, 18 Duchenne muscular dystrophy, 8 spinal muscular atrophy and 6 others were divided in two groups according to severity of curves; group I ( 90°. All underwent PSF and SSI with pedicle screw fixation. There were no anterior procedures. Perioperative (within three months of surgery and postoperative (after three months of surgery complications were retrospectively reviewed. Results There were fifty (37 perioperative, 13 postoperative complications. Hemo/pneumothorax, pleural effusion, pulmonary edema requiring ICU care, complete spinal cord injury, deep wound infection and death were major complications; while atelectesis, pneumonia, mild pleural effusion, UTI, ileus, vomiting, gastritis, tingling sensation or radiating pain in lower limb, superficial infection and wound dehiscence were minor complications. Regarding perioperative complications, 34(68% patients had at least one major or one minor complication. There were 16 patients with pulmonary, 14 with abdominal, 3 with wound related, 2 with neurological and 1 cardiovascular complications, respectively. There were two deaths, one due to cardiac arrest and other due to hypovolemic shock. Regarding postoperative complications 7 patients had coccygodynia, 3 had screw head prominence, 2 had bed sore and 1 had implant loosening, respectively. There was a significant relationship between age and increased intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.024. However it did not increased complications or need for ICU care. Similarly intraoperative blood loss > 3500 ml, severity of curve or need of pelvic fixation did not increase the complication rate or need for ICU. DMD patients had higher chances of coccygodynia postoperatively. Conclusion

  6. Biopolymer augmentation of the lag screw in the treatment of femoral neck fractures - a biomechanical in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paech A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cut-out of the sliding screw is one of the most common complications in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. The reasons for the cut-out are: a suboptimal position of the hip-screw in the femoral head, the type of fracture and poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to reproduce the cut-out event biomechanically and to evaluate the possible prevention of this event by the use of a biopolymer augmentation of the hip screw. Concerning the density and compression force of osteoporotic femoral bone polyurethane foam according to the terms of the Association for Standard Testing Material (ASTMF 1839-97 was used as test material. The polyurethane foam Lumoltan 200 with a compression force of 3.3 Mpa and a density of 0.192 g/cm3 was used to reproduce the osteoporotic bone of the femoral fragment (density 12 lbm/ft3. A cylinder of 50 mm of length and 50 mm of width was produced by a rotary splint raising procedure with planar contact. The axial load of the system was performed by a hydraulic force cylinder of a universal test machine type Zwick 1455, Ulm, Germany. The CCD-angle of the used TGN-System was preset at 130 degrees. The migration pattern of the hip screw in the polyurethane foam was measured and expressed as a curve of the distance in millimeter [mm] against the applied load in Newton [N] up to the cut-out point. During the tests the implants reached a critical changing point from stable to unstable with an increased load progression of steps of 50 Newton. This unstable point was characterized by an increased migration speed in millimeters and higher descending gradient in the migration curve. This peak of the migration curve served as an indicator for the change of the hip screw position in the simulated bone material. The applied load in the non-augmented implant showed that in this group for a density degree of 12 (0,192 g/cm3 the mean force at the failure point was 1431 Newton (± 52 Newton. In the augmented

  7. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rausch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Volar locking plate fixation has become the gold standard in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Juxta-articular screws should be placed as close as possible to the subchondral zone, in an optimized length to buttress the articular surface and address the contralateral cortical bone. On the other hand, intra-articular screw misplacements will promote osteoarthritis, while the penetration of the contralateral bone surface may result in tendon irritations and ruptures. The intraoperative control of fracture reduction and implant positioning is limited in the common postero-anterior and true lateral two-dimensional (2D-fluoroscopic views. Therefore, additional 2D-fluoroscopic views in different projections and intraoperative three-dimensional (3D fluoroscopy were recently reported. Nevertheless, their utility has issued controversies. Objectives The following questions should be answered in this study; 1 Are the additional tangential view and the intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy useful in the clinical routine to detect persistent fracture dislocations and screw misplacements, to prevent revision surgery? 2 Which is the most dangerous plate hole for screw misplacement? Patients and Methods A total of 48 patients (36 females and 13 males with 49 unstable distal radius fractures (22 x 23 A; 2 x 23 B, and 25 x 23 C were treated with a 2.4 mm variable angle LCP Two-Column volar distal radius plate (Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland during a 10-month period. After final fixation, according to the manufactures' technique guide and control of implant placement in the two common perpendicular 2D-fluoroscopic images (postero-anterior and true lateral, an additional tangential view and intraoperative 3D fluoroscopic scan were performed to control the anatomic fracture reduction and screw placements. Intraoperative revision rates due to screw misplacements (intra-articular or overlength were evaluated. Additionally, the number of

  8. Impact of screw elements on continuous granulation with a twin-screw extruder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Dejan; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2008-11-01

    The influence of different screw element types on wet granulation process with a twin-screw extruder was investigated. Lactose granules were prepared with different screw configurations such as conveying, combing mixer and kneading elements. The use of kneading blocks led to an almost complete agglomeration of lactose, whereas kneading and combing mixer elements resulted in smaller granules in comparison. Granule porosity varied between 17.4% and 50.6%. Granule friability values ranged from 1.2% to 38.5%. Conveying elements led to the most porous and friable granules, whereas kneading blocks produced the densest and least friable granules. Combing mixer elements produced granules with median properties. A linear correlation between granule porosity and the natural logarithm of granule friability was detected. Flowability of granules was also influenced by the element type. Compressed granules with higher granule porosities resulted in tablets with higher tensile strength values and vice versa. Twin-screw extruders proved to be a versatile tool for wet granulation. By the choice of a suitable screw element granule and tablet characteristics were influenced.

  9. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, Miquela S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brake, Matthew Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vangoethem, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  10. Translaminar facetal screw (magerl′s fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Translaminar facet screw fixation (TLFS achieves stabilization of the vertebral motion segment by screws inserted at the base of the spinous process, through the opposite lamina, traversing the facet joint, and ending in the base of the transverse process. It is simple, does not require any specialized equipment, and has the advantages of being a procedure of lesser magnitude, lesser operative time, less cost and few complication rate. Recently there is growing interest in this technique to augment the anterior lumbar fusions to achieve global fusion less invasively. In this review article, we discuss the clinical and biomechanical considerations, surgical technique, indications, contraindications and recent developments of TLFS fixation in lumbar spine fusion.

  11. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  12. MOVING SCREW DISLOCATION IN CUBIC QUASICRYSTAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wang-min; SONG Yu-hai

    2005-01-01

    The elasticity theory of the dislocation of cubic quasicrystals is developed.The governing equations of anti-plane elasticity dynamics problem of the quasicrystals were reduced to a solution of wave equations by introducing displacement functions,and the analytical expressions of displacements, stresses and energies induced by a moving screw dislocation in the cubic quasicrystalline and the velocity limit of the dislocation were obtained. These provide important information for studying the plastic deformation of the new solid material.

  13. A new concept for implant fixation: bone-to-bone biologic fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D-Y Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made to reduce complications of bone implant, such as pedicle screw loosening. To address this problem, the authors suggest a new concept of bone-to-bone biologic fixation using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2-loaded cannulated pedicle screws. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 is an osteoinductive cytokine. Four types of titanium pedicle screws were tested (uncannulated, cannulated with no loading, beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP-loaded, and TCP/BMP2 loaded using 16 miniature pigs. Radiological evaluation was conducted to assess the fusion and loosening of pedicle screws. Twelve weeks after implantation, peak torsional extraction torque was measured, and the pedicle screw and bone interface was evaluated by micro-computed tomography (µCT and histologic examination. The mean value of the radiological score was significantly greater in the TCP/BMP2 loaded group at 12 weeks post-operation compared to those in the other groups. CT images showed distinct bone formation surrounding TCP/BMP2 loaded cannulated pedicle screws compared to the other groups. Mean extraction torsional peak torque at 12 weeks postoperative was more than 10-fold higher in the TCP/BMP2 loaded pedicle screw group than in the other groups. Bone surface and bone volume, as quantitated through µCT, were higher in the TCP/BMP2 loaded group. Histologic examination revealed bone-to-bone fixation at the interface of pedicle screws and pre-existing bone. Bone-to-bone biologic fixation through the holes of TCP/BMP2 loaded pedicle screws significantly increased fixation strength and represents a novel method that can be applied to osteoporotic or tumour spine surgeries.

  14. Subtrochanteric fracture: a rare but severe complication after screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Hendrik; Frey, Soenke P; Meffert, Rainer H

    2010-12-01

    Cannulated screw fixation is a minimal invasive technique to treat undisplaced femoral neck fractures. It is the preferred method in elderly patients who often suffer co-morbidities. There is scarce literature on subtrochanteric femoral fracture as a complication of cannulated screw fixation of a femoral neck fracture. This complication occurred, without an adequate trauma, in two of 35 patients (5.7%) in this retrospective study of patients older than 65 years (mean age: 77 years) who were treated with cannulated screws for an undisplaced femoral neck fracture between 2004 and 2009. We reviewed the literature for the incidence of this complication and possible predisposing factors. The overall incidence reported in literature is 2.4-4.4% (mean: 2.97%). Despite a broad use of this type of osteosynthesis, the literature does not provide clear biomechanical or clinical indications for optimal screw placement to avoid this complication. Considering the literature and our personal results, surgeons should be aware of this severe complication; they may opt for a different implant in the very old, osteoporotic patient with an undisplaced femoral neck fracture.

  15. Mechanical Elongation of the Small Intestine: Evaluation of Techniques for Optimal Screw Placement in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Hausbrandt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate techniques and establish an optimal method for mechanical elongation of small intestine (MESI using screws in a rodent model in order to develop a potential therapy for short bowel syndrome (SBS. Material and Methods. Adult female Sprague Dawley rats (n=24 with body weight from 250 to 300 g (Σ=283 were evaluated using 5 different groups in which the basic denominator for the technique involved the fixation of a blind loop of the intestine on the abdominal wall with the placement of a screw in the lumen secured to the abdominal wall. Results. In all groups with accessible screws, the rodents removed the implants despite the use of washers or suits to prevent removal. Subcutaneous placement of the screw combined with antibiotic treatment and dietary modifications was finally successful. In two animals autologous transplantation of the lengthened intestinal segment was successful. Discussion. While the rodent model may provide useful basic information on mechanical intestinal lengthening, further investigations should be performed in larger animals to make use of the translational nature of MESI in human SBS treatment.

  16. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshagh Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. Materials and Methods : A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel. In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Results : Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds for every 4 mm of expansion. Conclusion : In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  17. Biomechanical comparison of interference screw and cortical button with screw hybrid technique for distal biceps brachii tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianjam, Afshin; Camisa, William; Leasure, Jeremi M; Montgomery, William H

    2013-11-01

    Various fixation techniques have been described for ruptured distal biceps tendons. The authors hypothesized that no significant differences would be found between the mean failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness of the interference screw and hybrid technique. Fourteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric elbows were prepared. Specimens were randomized to either interference screw or hybrid cortical button with screw fixation. The tendon was pulled at a rate of 4 mm/s until failure. Failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness were measured and compared. Failure strength, maximum strength, and stiffness were 294±81.9 N, 294±82.1 N, and 64.4±40.5 N/mm, respectively, for the interference screw technique and 333±129 N, 383±121 N, and 56.2±40.5 N/mm, respectively, for the hybrid technique. No statistically significant difference existed between the screw and hybrid technique in failure strength, maximum strength, or stiffness (P>.05). The interference screws primarily failed by pullout of the screw and tendon, whereas in the hybrid technique, failure occurred with screw pullout followed by tearing of the biceps tendon. The results suggest that this hybrid technique is nearly as strong and stiff as the interference screw alone. Although the hybrid technique facilitates tensioning of the reconstructed tendon, the addition of the cortical button did not significantly improve the failure strength of the interference screw alone. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient’s discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities.

  19. Internal Fixation of Transverse Patella Fractures Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws with Anterior Tension Band Wiring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anterior tension band wiring technique using two cannulated cancellous screws in patients with transverse (AO34-C1 or transverse with mildly comminuted (AO34-C2 patellar fractures. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of 25 patients with transverse fracture or transverse fracture with mildly comminuted patella fractures. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using two parallel cannulated screws and 18G stainless steel wire as per the tension band principle. Results: There were eighteen males (72% and seven females (28%. The age group ranged from 24 to 58 years, with mean age of 38 years. The most common mode of injury was fall (72% followed by road traffic accident (20% and violent quadriceps contraction (8%. Transverse fracture was present in 60% and transverse fracture with mild comminution in 40% of patients. Mean time to achieve union was 10.7 weeks (range 8-12 weeks. Mean ROM at three months was 113.8 degree (90-130 and at final follow up this improved to 125.4 degrees (range 100-140. There was one case of knee stiffness and no case of implant failure was observed. Patients were evaluated using Bostman scoring, the mean score at three months being 26.04 which improved to 27.36 at the end of final follow up at one year. Conclusion: Cannulated cancellous screws with anterior tension band wiring is a safe, reliable and reproducible method in management of transverse patellar fractures, with less chances of implant failure and soft tissue irritation.

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN QUALITY OF LIFE AND OSTEOLYSIS AROUND LUMBAR PEDICLE SCREWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO ITALO RISSO NETO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether the presence of osteolysis around the pedicle screws affects the quality of life of patients who underwent posterolateral arthrodesis of the lumbosacral spine. Methods: A retrospective study of patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral or lumbosacral arthrodesis due to spinal degenerative disease. CT scans of the operated segments were performed at intervals of 45, 90, 180, and 360 postoperatively. In these tests, the presence of a peri-implant radiolucent halo was investigated, which was considered present when greater than 1mm in the coronal section. Concurrently with the completion of CT scans, the participants completed the questionnaire Oswestry Disability Index (ODI to assess the degree of disability of the patients. Results: A total of 38 patients were evaluated, and 14 (36.84% of them showed some degree of osteolysis around at least one pedicle screw at the end of follow-up. Of the 242 analyzed screws, 27 (11.15% had osteolysis in the CT coronal section, with the majority of these occurrences located at the most distal level segment of the arthrodesis. There was no correlation between the presence of the osteolysis to the quality of life of patients. The quality of life has significantly improved when comparing the preoperative results with the postoperative results at different times of application of ODI. This improvement in ODI maintains linearity over time. Conclusion: There is no correlation between the presence of peri-implant osteolysis to the quality of life of patients undergoing lumbar or posterolateral lumbosacral arthrodesis in the follow-up period up to 360 days. The quality of life in postoperative has significantly improvement when compared to the preoperative period.

  1. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8 and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4, respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  2. 30-Year Outcomes of Dental Implants Supporting Mandibular Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Retrospective Review of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Tözüm, Tolga F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to present the 30-year outcomes of 28 implants supporting mandibular screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Dental charts of the 4 patients were carefully reviewed, and it was noticed that they received 28 implants and 5 screw-retained FDPs in 1983 and 1984. The chief concerns raised by these patients were poor retention of their complete dentures and decreased masticatory function at the time of treatment planning. Each dental care they received was recorded in the last 30 years. Implant survival, radiographic, and prosthodontic examinations were performed. No implants were lost after 30 years, giving the implant a survival rate of 100%. The average marginal bone level was 2.6 ± 0.5 mm at the last recall appointment. Of the 5 FDPs delivered, 1 needed replacement, indicating a prosthesis survival rate of 80%. The patients needed 21 repairs such as replacement of denture teeth/gold screws and hard relining, and 19 adjustments such as occlusal adjustments and acrylic resin contouring, over 30 years. This clinical report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses for over 30 years, making dental implants an important dental treatment alternative compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods.

  3. Discrete element modelling of screw conveyor-mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Aca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Screw conveyors are used extensively in food, plastics, mineral processing, agriculture and processing industries for elevating and/or transporting bulk materials over short to medium distances. Despite their apparent simplicity in design, the transportation action is very complex for design and constructors have tended to rely heavily on empirical performance data. Screw conveyor performance is affected by its operating conditions (such as: the rotational speed of the screw, the inclination of the screw conveyor, and its volumetric fill level. In this paper, horizontal, several single-pitch screw conveyors with some geometry variations in screw blade was investigated for mixing action during transport, using Discrete Element Method (DEM. The influence of geometry modifications on the performance of screw conveyor was examined, different screw designs were compared, and the effects of geometrical variations on mixing performances during transport were explored. During the transport, the particle tumbles down from the top of the helix to the next free surface and that segment of the path was used for auxiliary mixing action. The particle path is dramatically increased with the addition of three complementary helices oriented in the same direction as screw blades (1458.2 mm compared to 397.6 mm in case of single flight screw conveyor Transport route enlarges to 1764.4 mm, when installing helices oriented in the opposite direction from screw blades. By addition of straight line blade to single flight screw conveyor, the longest particle path is being reached: 2061.6 mm [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31055

  4. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav, K. V.; Kovacevic, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an in...

  5. Finite Element Analysis of Reciprocating Screw for Injection Molding Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagsen B. Nagrale

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with, the solution of problem occurred for reciprocating screw of Injection molding machine. It identifies and solves the problem by using the modeling and simulation techniques. The problem occurred in the reciprocating screw of machine which was wearing of threads due to affect of temperature of mold materials(flow materials i.e. Nylon, low density polypropylene, polystyrene, PVC etc., The main work was to model the components of machine with dimensions, assemble those components and then simulate the whole assembly for rotation of the screw. The modeling software used is PRO-E wildfire 4.0 for modeling the machine components like body, movable platen, fixed platen, barrel, screw, nozzle, etc. The analysis software ANSYS is used to analyze the reciprocating screws. The objectives involved are:- • To model all the components using modeling software Pro-E 4.0 • To assemble all the components of the machine in the software. • To make the assembly run in Pro-E software.• Analysis of screw of machine using Ansys 11.0 software. • To identify the wearing of threads and to provide the possible solutions.This problem is major for all industrial injection molding machines which the industries are facing and they need the permanent solution, so if the better solution is achieved then the industries will think for implementing it. The industries are having temporary solution but it will affect the life of the screw, because the stresses will be more in machined screw on lathe machine as compared to normal screw. Also if the screw will fail after some years of operation, the new screw available in the market will have the same problem. Also the cost associated with new screw and its mounting is much more as it is the main component of machine.

  6. Implantable Microimagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ohta

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  7. Peri-Implant Strain in an In Vitro Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaini, Souheil; Vaidyanathan, Tritala K; Wadkar, Abhinav P; Quran, Firas A Al; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2015-10-01

    An in vitro experimental model was designed and tested to determine the influence that peri-implant strain may have on the overall crestal bone. Strain gages were attached to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) models containing a screw-type root form implant at sites 1 mm from the resin-implant interface. Three different types of crown superstructures (cemented, 1-screw [UCLA] and 2-screw abutment types) were tested. Loading (1 Hz, 200 N load) was performed using a MTS Mechanical Test System. The strain gage data were stored and organized in a computer for statistical treatment. Strains for all abutment types did not exceed the physiological range for modeling and remodeling of cancellous bone, 200-2500 με (microstrain). For approximately one-quarter of the trials, the strain values were less than 200 με the zone for bone atrophy. The mean microstrain obtained was 517.7 με. In conclusion, the peri-implant strain in this in vitro model did not exceed the physiologic range of bone remodeling under axial occlusal loading.

  8. Experimental and numerical predictions of Biomet(®) alloplastic implant in a cadaveric mandibular ramus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnard, M; Ramos, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate experimentally the behaviors of an intact and an implanted cadaveric ramus, to compare and analyze load mechanism transfers between two validated finite element models. The intact, clean cadaveric ramus was instrumented with four rosettes and loaded with the temporal reaction load. Next, the Biomet microfixation implant was fixed to the same cadaveric mandibular ramus after resection. The mandibular ramus was reconstructed from computed tomographic images, and two finite element models were developed. The experimental results for the mandibular ramus present a linear behavior of up to 300 N load in the condyle, with the Biomet implant influencing strain distribution; the maximum influence was near the implant (rosette #4) and approximately 59%. The experimental and numerical results present a good correlation, with the best correlation in the intact ramus condition, where R(2) reaches 0.935 and the slope of the regression line is 1.045. The numerical results show that screw #1 is the most critical, with maximum principal strains in the bone around 21,000 με, indicating possible bone fatigue and fracture. The experimental results show that the Biomet temporomandibular joint mandibular ramus implant changes the load transfer in the ramus, compared to the intact ramus, with its strain-shielding effect. The numerical results demonstrate that only three screws are important for the Biomet TMJ fixation. These results indicate that including two proximal screws should reduce stresses in the first screws and strains in the bone.

  9. Fluid Flow Phenomenon in a Three-Bladed Power-Generating Archimedes Screw Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Tineke Saroinsong; Rudy Soenoko; Slamet Wahyudi; Mega N Sasongko

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies of the Archimedes screw turbine are applied as a micro hydro power plant for low head focused on the fluid flow. Fluid flow on a screw turbine is not completely filled water flow there is still a free surface between the water fluid and atmospheric air. Except the screw geometry, the turbine screw free surface allows the flow phenomena that are important in the process of turbine screw power generation. The Archimedes screw turbine main driving force is the fl...

  10. Fluid Flow Phenomenon in a Three-Bladed Power-Generating Archimedes Screw Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies of the Archimedes screw turbine are applied as a micro hydro power plant for low head focused on the fluid flow. Fluid flow on a screw turbine is not completely filled water flow there is still a free surface between the water fluid and atmospheric air. Except the screw geometry, the turbine screw free surface allows the flow phenomena that are important in the process of turbine screw power generation. The Archimedes screw turbine main driving force is the fl...

  11. Utility of a custom screw insertion guide and a full-scale, color-coded 3D plaster model for guiding safe surgical exposure and screw insertion during spine revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Bungo; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Kimura, Hiroaki; Masamoto, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Several articles have described the use of screw insertion guides during primary spine surgery; however, the use of such a guide during revision surgeries has not been described. The purpose of this study is to describe the utility of a custom screw insertion (CSI) guide assembled using a novel method and a full-scale, color-coded 3D plaster (FCTP) model for safe and accurate revision surgery. The authors applied the CSI guide and the FCTP model in 3 cases. In the first case, a patient with multiple failed cervical spine surgeries underwent occipitocervicothoracic fusion. After a successful result for this patient, the authors applied the CSI guide in 2 other patients who underwent revision lumbar fusion surgeries to confirm the accuracy and the efficacy of the CSI guides in such cases. The models and guides were fabricated using rapid prototyping technology. The effectiveness of these methods was examined. The FCTP model was designed using CT data. During model assembly, implants inserted during previous surgery were removed virtually, and for the cervical spine, vertebral arteries were colored red for planning. The CSI guide was designed with 5 or 6 arms to fit the bone surface precisely after removing artifacts. Surgery was performed by referring to the FCTP model. Because the actual structure of the bone surface was almost identical to that of the FCTP model, surgical exposure around the complex bone shape proceeded smoothly. The CSI guides were positioned accurately to aid the successful insertion of a pedicle screw into the C-2 vertebra in the case of cervical revision surgery, and 4 pedicle screws for lumbar vertebrae in the 2 other patients. Postoperative CT scans showed that all screw positions closely matched those predicted during the preoperative planning. In conclusion, the FCTP models and the novel CSI guides were effective for safe and accurate revision surgery of the spine.

  12. Intra- and postoperative complications of navigated and conventional techniques in percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation after pelvic fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Südkamp, Norbert P; König, Benjamin;

    2013-01-01

    and the small target corridor for the iliosacral screw may be difficult to visualise using an image intensifier. 2D and 3D navigation techniques may therefore be helpful tools. The aim of this multicentre study was to evaluate the intra- and postoperative complications after percutaneous screw implantation...... by classifying the fractures using data from a prospective pelvic trauma registry. The a priori hypothesis was that the navigation techniques have lower rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications. METHODS: This study is based on data from the prospective pelvic trauma registry introduced...... were identified. Out of these a further analysis was performed in 597 patients suffering injuries of the SI joint (187×with surgical interventions) and 597 patients with sacral fractures (334×with surgical interventions). The rate of intraoperative complications was not significantly different, with 10...

  13. Wet granulation in a twin-screw extruder: implications of screw design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M R; Sun, J

    2010-04-01

    Wet granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive technology for the continuous processing of pharmaceuticals. The performance of this machinery is integrally tied to its screw design yet little fundamental knowledge exists in this emerging field for granulation to intelligently create, troubleshoot, and scale-up such processes. This study endeavored to systematically examine the influence of different commercially available screw elements on the flow behavior and granulation mechanics of lactose monohydrate saturated at low concentration (5-12%, w/w) with an aqueous polyvinyl-pyrrolidone binder. The results of the work showed that current screw elements could be successfully incorporated into designs for wet granulation, to tailor the particle size as well as particle shape of an agglomerate product. Conveying elements for cohesive granular flows were shown to perform similar to their use in polymer processing, as effective transport units with low specific mechanical energy input. The conveying zones provided little significant change to the particle size or shape, though the degree of channel fill in these sections had a significant influence on the more energy-intensive mixing elements studied. The standard mixing elements for this machine, kneading blocks and comb mixers, were found to be effective for generating coarser particles, though their mechanisms of granulation differed significantly.

  14. Evaluation the treatment outcomes of intracapsular femoral neck fractures with closed or open reduction and internal fixation by screw in 18-50-year-old patients in Isfahan from Nov 2010 to Nov 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javdan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that femoral neck fracture is associated with several complications, especially if open reduction was necessary. So, the surgical method and necessary equipments such as radiolucent bed, C-ARM machine, and implant cannulated screw set should be considered.

  15. Posterior spinal fusion using pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasakopoulos, Michael; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Koufos, Spiros; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2013-07-01

    Few clinical studies have reported polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rod pedicle screw spinal instrumentation systems (CD-Horizon Legacy PEEK rods; Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota). This article describes a clinical series of 52 patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion using the PEEK Rod System between 2007 and 2010. Of the 52 patients, 25 had degenerative disk disease, 10 had lateral recess stenosis, 6 had degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 had lumbar spine vertebral fracture, 4 had combined lateral recess stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 1 had an L5 giant cell tumor. Ten patients had 1-segment fusion, 29 had 2-segment fusion, and 13 had 3-segment fusion. Mean follow-up was 3 years (range, 1.5-4 years); no patient was lost to follow-up. Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index and a low back and leg visual analog pain scale. Imaging evaluation of fusion was performed with standard and dynamic radiographs. Complications were recorded. Mean Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 76% preoperatively (range, 52%-90%) to 48% at 6 weeks postoperatively, and to 34%, 28%, and 30% at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. Mean low back and leg pain improved from 8 and 9 points preoperatively, respectively, to 6 and 5 points immediately postoperatively, respectively, and to 2 points each thereafter. Imaging union of the arthrodesis was observed in 50 (96%) patients by 1-year follow-up. Two patients sustained screw breakage: 1 had painful loss of sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and underwent revision spinal surgery with pedicle screws and titanium rods and the other had superficial wound infection and was treated with wound dressing changes and antibiotics for 6 weeks. No adjacent segment degeneration was observed in any patient until the time of this writing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Comparison between Bilateral C2 Pedicle Screwing and Unilateral C2 Pedicle Screwing, Combined with Contralateral C2 Laminar Screwing, for Atlantoaxial Posterior Fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; HONGO, MICHIO; Kobayashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Abe, Eiji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To compare clinical and radiological outcomes between bilateral C2 pedicle screwing (C2PS) and unilateral C2PS, combined with contralateral C2 laminar screwing (LS), for posterior atlantoaxial fixation. Overview of Literature Posterior fixation with C1 lateral mass screwing (C1LMS) and C2PS (C1LMS-C2PS method) is an accepted procedure for rigid atlantoaxial stabilization. However, conventional bilateral C2PS is not always allowed in this method due ...

  17. [Intraosseous screw splinting of mandibular fragments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erle, A

    1978-12-01

    Fractures in the frontal region of the mandible may be treated by intra-ossal splinting without the risk of injuring nerves or vessels. Function-stable fixation of the reposited fragments was achieved in 15 patients by means of a transfragmental screw with metric thread. The advantages of this procedure consist in the easy removability of the material and the superfluidity of new developments of material or instruments. As the possibility of early functional treatment prevents the late impairment of the articular function, this procedure is particularly indicated in case of concurrent paramedian and articular fractures.

  18. Surface characterization of commercial oral implants on the nanometer level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanborg, Lory Melin; Andersson, Martin; Wennerberg, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Lately, there has been a growing interest in how the presence of nanometer structures on a bone integrated implant surface influences the healing process. Recent in vitro studies have revealed an increased osteoblast response to different nanophase surfaces. Some commercial implant brands claim their implants have nanometer structures. However, at present, there are no studies where the nano topography of today's commercially available oral implants has been investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize commercial oral implants on the nanometer level and to investigate whether or not the nanometer surface roughness was correlated to the more well-known micrometer roughness on the implants. Twelve different commercial screw-shaped oral implants with various surface modifications were examined using scanning electron microscopy and a white light interferometer. The interferometer is suitable for detection of nanoscale roughness in the vertical dimension; however, limitation exists on the horizontal due to the wavelength of the light. A 1 x 1 microm Gaussian filter was found to be useful for identifying nm roughness with respect to height deviation. The results demonstrated that an implant that was smooth on the micrometer level was not necessarily smooth on the nanometer level. Different structures in the nanometer scale was found on some of the implants, indicating that to fully understand the relationship between the properties of an implant surface and its osseointegration behavior, a characterization at the nanometer scale might be relevant.

  19. Determination of the of rate cross slip of screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Rasmussen, Torben; Leffers, Torben;

    2000-01-01

    The rate for cross slip of screw dislocations during annihilation of screw dipoles in copper is determined by molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the rate is seen to obey an Arrhenius behavior in the investigated temperature range: 225-375 K. The activation energy...

  20. Reliability of predictors for screw cutout in intertrochanteric hip fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M.J. de Bruijn (Kirstin); D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); G.R. Roukema (Gert)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Following internal fixation of intertrochanteric hip fractures, tip apex distance, fracture classification, position of the screw in the femoral head, and fracture reduction are known predictors for screw cutout, but the reliability of these measurements is unknown. We invest

  1. KINEMATICS OF 3-DOF PYRAMID MANIPULATOR BY PRINCIPAL SCREWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Kinematics of a 3-RPS parallel pyramid manipulator are investigated by principal screw. Firstly, the principal screws are identified by quadric degeneration. The planar conics representing the relations between the pitches and the three linear inputs are described, and the three-dimensional distribution of the axes of all the twists is illustrated. Finally, a numerical example is given successfully.

  2. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining.

  3. OPTIMAL DISTAL SCREW ALIGNMENT IN THE GAMMA NAIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-KongChao; Chun-ChingHsiao; Po-QuangChen

    2002-01-01

    The effect of stress distribution due to the changes of the distal screw alignment in relation to the Gamma nail and the femoral shaft is thoroughly studied in this paper. Failure of the Gamma nail composite occurs through the cranial aperture of the distal screws and the insertion hole for the lag screw due to nonunion, delayed-union and continued weight-bearing. A three-dimensional finite element model was used to study the fractured femur, the Gamma nail, the lag screw and the distal locking screws. The first and the second distal screws were inserted into the Gamma nail in four different configurations. We found that the stress of the Gamma nail composite was substantially reduced with the two screws configured in the anterior to posterior direction. This alignment can bear greater loading in the more demanding fracture types. In the subtrochanteric fracture or the comminuted fractures at the proximal femur, the optimal alignment of the two distal screws was in the anterior to posterior direction.

  4. The vertical hip fracture – a treatment challenge. A cohort study with an up to 9 year follow-up of 137 consecutive hips treated with sliding hip screw and antirotation screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enocson Anders

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral neck fractures with a vertical orientation have been associated with an increased risk for failure as they are both axial and rotational unstable and experience increased shear forces compared to the conventional and more horizontally oriented femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyse outcome and risk factors for reoperation of these uncommon fractures. Methods A cohort study with a consecutive series of 137 hips suffering from a vertical hip fracture, treated with one method: a sliding hips screw with plate and an antirotation screw. Median follow-up time was 4.8 years. Reoperation data was validated against the National Board of Health and Welfare’s national registry using the unique Swedish personal identification number. Results The total reoperation rate was 18%. After multivariable Logistic regression analysis adjusting for possible confounding factors there was an increased risk for reoperation for displaced fractures (22% compared to undisplaced fractures (3%, and for fractures with poor implant position (38% compared to fractures with adequate implant position (15%. Conclusions The reoperation rate was high, and special attention should be given to achieve an appropriate position of the implant.

  5. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  6. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  7. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasinski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    The application of screw displacement piles (SDP) is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque) during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  8. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  9. A new compression design that increases proximal locking screw bending resistance in femur compression nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Ahmet Adnan; Karakaşli, Ahmet; Karci, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Yildirim, Serhat; Sesli, Erhan

    2015-06-01

    The aim is to present our new method of compression, a compression tube instead of conventional compression screw and to investigate the difference of proximal locking screw bending resistance between compression screw application (6 mm wide contact) and compression tube (two contact points with 13 mm gap) application. We formed six groups each consisting of 10 proximal locking screws. On metal cylinder representing lesser trochanter level, we performed 3-point bending tests with compression screw and with compression tube. We determined the yield points of the screws in 3-point bending tests using an axial compression testing machine. We determined the yield point of 5 mm screws as 1963±53 N (mean±SD) with compression screw, and as 2929±140 N with compression tubes. We found 51% more locking screw bending resistance with compression tube than with compression screw (p=0,000). Therefore compression tubes instead of compression screw must be preferred at femur compression nails.

  10. Immediate CAD/ CAM Custom Fabricated Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There will almost always be gaps between cylin-drical or screw shaped prefabricated implant surface and funnel-shaped tooth socket when an implant is placed immediately after tooth extraction. Hence expensive and difficult bone grafting is re-quired. A custom fabricated implant will be a pragmatic solution for this limitation.The hypothesis: First step following extraction of a tooth is data capture or scanning via a 3D scan method e.g. coordinate measuring machine or non-contact laser scanners such as triangulation range finder. Second step is reconstruction or modeling via editable CAD (computer-aided design model, allowing us to add retentive holes and correction of implant angle. Third step is fabrication via CAM (computer aided manufacturing followed by plasma cleaning process. Fourth step is insertion of the CAD/CAM custom fabricated one-stage implant in the fresh tooth socket. Optimal time for this step is 24-48 hours after extraction. The custom fabricated implant should not load 3-4 months. Usage of chlorhexidine mouth-rinse or chewing gum twice daily for 2 weeks and, in some cases oral antibiotic is recommended. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Contemporary dental implant system faced with several clinical and anatomical limitations such is low sinuses or nerve bundles. Complex and expensive surgical procedures such as nerve repositioning and sinus lift are frequently required. With custom fabricated implant we can overcome several of these limitations because insertion of custom fabricated implant will perform before alveolar bone recession.

  11. Supermassive screwed cosmic string in dilaton gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, V B [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da ParaIba, 58059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Ferreira, Cristine N [Nucleo de Fisica, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Campos, Rua Dr Siqueira, 273-Parque Dom Bosco, 28030-130, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Cuesta, H J Mosquera [Instituto de Cosmologia, Relatividade e AstrofIsica (ICRA-BR), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-06-21

    The early universe might have undergone phase transitions at energy scales much higher than the one corresponding to the grand unified theories (GUT) scales. At these higher energy scales, the transition at which gravity separated from all other interactions, the so-called Planck era, more massive strings called supermassive cosmic strings could have been produced, with energy of about 10{sup 19} GeV. The dynamics of strings formed with this energy scale cannot be described by means of the weak-field approximation, as in the standard procedure for ordinary GUT cosmic strings. As suggested by string theories, at this extreme energy, gravity may be transmitted by some kind of scalar field (usually called the dilaton) in addition to the tensor field of Einstein's theory of gravity. It is then permissible to tackle the issue regarding the dynamics of supermassive cosmic strings within this framework. With this aim, we obtain the gravitational field of a supermassive screwed cosmic string in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity. We show that for the supermassive configuration, exact solutions of scalar-tensor screwed cosmic strings can be found in connection with the Bogomol'nyi limit. We show that the generalization of Bogomol'nyi arguments to the Brans-Dicke theory is possible when torsion is present and we obtain an exact solution in this supermassive regime, with the dilaton solution obtained by consistency with internal constraints.

  12. Lumbar pedicle cortical bone trajectory screw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Tengfei; Wellington K Hsu; Ye Tianwen

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the lumbar pedicle cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw fixation technique,a new fixation technique for lumbar surgery.Data sources The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles reported in PubMed published from 1994 to 2014.Study selection Original articles and critical reviews relevant to CBT technique and lumbar pedicle fixation were selected.Results CBT technique was firstly introduced as a new fixation method for lumbar pedicle surgery in 2009.The concepts,morphometric study,biomechanical characteristics and clinical applications of CBT technique were reviewed.The insertional point of CBT screw is located at the lateral point of the pars interarticularis,and its trajectory follows a caudocephalad path sagittally and a laterally directed path in the transverse plane.CBT technique can be used for posterior fixation during lumbar fusion procedures.This technique is a minimally invasive surgery,which affords better biomechanical stability,fixation strength and surgical safety.Therefore,CBT technique has the greatest benefit in lumbar pedicle surgery for patients with osteoporosis and obesity.Conclusion CBT technique is a better alternative option of lumbar pedicle fixation,especially for patients with osteoporosis and obesity.

  13. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms.

  14. Electropolished Titanium Implants with a Mirror-Like Surface Support Osseointegration and Bone Remodelling

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Larsson Wexell; Shah, Furqan A.; Lars Ericson; Aleksandar Matic; Anders Palmquist; Peter Thomsen

    2016-01-01

    This work characterises the ultrastructural composition of the interfacial tissue adjacent to electropolished, commercially pure titanium implants with and without subsequent anodisation, and it investigates whether a smooth electropolished surface can support bone formation in a manner similar to surfaces with a considerably thicker surface oxide layer. Screw-shaped implants were electropolished to remove all topographical remnants of the machining process, resulting in a thin spontaneously ...

  15. Influence of bruxism on the indication and follow-up of rehabilitations with dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Menine, Cynthia Weiss; Martin, Juliana Maria Habith; Berejuk, Halina Massignan; SARTORI,Ivete Aparecida de Mattias

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to report a clinical case highlighting the main recommendations of the literature to minimize forces applied on implants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A decision was made to increase the number and size of implants installed. Screwed and cemented prostheses were used, combined with an occlusal bruxism night guard. RESULTS: Four months after the prosthesis installation, no biological or biomechanical complications were encountered. CONCLUSION: There are cases of p...

  16. Bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants subjected to static load of different duration. A study in the dog (III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study the effect of a long-standing lateral static load on the peri-implant bone. Three beagle dogs were used. The mandibular premolars were extracted and 12 weeks later 3 titanium implants (ITI(R) Dental Implant System) were installed in each quadrant....... Crowns were fitted to all implants 12 weeks after the installation procedure. The anterior and central crowns were fused and connected to the posterior crown by an expansion screw. In the right side of the mandible, the expansion screws were activated every 2 weeks during a 46-week period. During...... the last 10 weeks of this period, an expansion force similar to that of the right side was applied in the left. The animals were sacrificed and block biopsies of each implant site harvested and prepared for histological analysis. Sites subjected to 10 weeks or 46 weeks of lateral load had a similar (i...

  17. Interference screw versus Endoscrew fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical comparative study in sawbones and porcine knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Chih Hung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference screw fixation is one of the most common methods for ligament reconstruction. Although the advantages and clinical outcomes of this procedure have been widely reported, post-surgical complications often arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new femoral fixation device, the Endoscrew, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. We performed a mechanical test in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards and an in vitro biomechanical study. An axial pullout test was conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new device and the interference screw when implanted in solid rigid polyurethane foam test blocks. The biomechanical test used porcine femora to evaluate the initial fixation strength between these two implants. The maximum pullout force of the interference screw group [722.05 ± 130.49 N (N] was significantly greater (p < 0.01 than the Endoscrew group (440.79 ± 26.54 N when implanted in polyurethane foam 320 kg/m3 density. With polyurethane foam 160 kg/m3 density, the maximum pullout forces were (242.61 ± 37.36 N (p < 0.001 and (99.33 ± 30.01 N for the interference screw group and Endoscrew group, respectively. In the in vitro mechanical study, the Endoscrew (646.39 ± 72.38 N required a significantly greater ultimate load prior to failure (p < 0.05 when compared with the interference screw (489.72 ± 138.64 N. With regard to pullout stiffness, there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.13 between the Endoscrew group (99.15 ± 12.16 N/mm and the interference screw group (87.96 ± 11.12 N/mm. The cyclic stiffness was also not significantly different (p < 0.44 between the Endoscrew group (93.09 ± 16.07 N/mm and the interference screw group (85.78 ± 14.76 N/mm. The axial pullout test showed that the strength of the Endoscrew was close to the fixation strength required for daily activities, but it is

  18. [Distal tibia peri-implant fracture with an intramedullary nail: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cabrera, J M; González-Alconada, R; García-Mota, M D

    2013-01-01

    Peri-implant fractures of the distal tibia after intramedullary nailing are rare. We present a case of a fracture of the distal tibia at the site of the distal interlocking screw. We found two cases reported in the world literature. There are no cases reported in the Spanish literature. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of Twin-Screw Superchargers for Combined Compressor - Expander Performance (SCREW); Optimierung von Schraubenladern fuer den kombinierten Verdichtungs- und Expansionsbetrieb (SCREW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romba, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Fluidenergiemaschinen

    2005-07-01

    During the last years the use of mechanical superchargers has gained increasing interest in a bid to combine attractive emission- and fuel consumption values with dynamic driving performance. Based on an analysis of available supercharging systems the development potential of twin screw superchargers is assessed. A concept using inlet slide valves is developed which allows at the same time to control the mass flow delivered by the supercharger and achieve an expansion of the transported charge under part load conditions when the delivered pressure is lower than ambient pressure, achieving a reduction in necessary shaft power or even the delivery of shaft power. To distinguish it from conventional superchargers the new device is called ''SCREW'' - screw type machine with compressor respectively expander working mode. The effect of several design parameters on the SCREW'S performance is evaluated by extensive simulation calculations, showing that a suitable design varies considerably from conventional supercharger designs and that a significant amount of further research, especially covering the development of rotor profiles suited for the specific task, is still needed to fully utilize the concept's potential. As a proof of concept prototype SCREW'S, based on a conventional twin screw supercharger, have been built and tested. The results obtained made clear the general suitability of the concept but also underlined the shortcomings of the prototype as they had already been predicted by the simulations. (orig.)

  20. Histomorphometric and removal torque analysis for TiO2-blasted titanium implants. An experimental study on dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Nimb, L; Hjörting-Hansen, E

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the anchorage of TiO2-blasted screw and cylindrical implants with conventionally used machine-produced screw and cylindrical implants inserted immediately in extraction sockets on dogs. 6 adult mongrel dogs had 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars extracted....... The medians for the TiO2-blasted screw and cylindrical implants were > 150 Ncm and 105 Ncm, respectively, while the values for the m.p. implants were 60 Ncm and 35 Ncm, respectively. The SEM investigation demonstrated a high irregularity of the TiO2-blasted surface compared to the machined surface. The Ra...... and Rz values for surface roughness were higher for the TiO2-blasted implants than for the normal m.p. implants. Histomorphometrically, the arithmetic mean of the direct bone-implant contact fraction was 69%. There was no significant difference in direct bone-implant contact length fraction between TiO2...

  1. Goserelin Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in men (blockage that causes difficulty urinating), or heart or liver disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Goserelin implant should not be used in pregnant women, except ...

  2. Contraceptive implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Comparison of the safety of three methods of lumbar transpedicular screw fixation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To choose a proper method of lumbar transpedicular screw fixation at different lumbar levels among the three methods ( Roy-Camille's method, Magerl's method and Du's method) in the Chinese population.Methods: Three-dimensional ( 3-D ) images were reconstructed with image data of 42 adult lumbar segments that were scanned by Electron Beam CT. The three methods of lumbar pedicle screw fixation were simulated on the 3-D reconstructed images and the parameters of implanting pedicle screws were measured.Results: There was statistically significant difference at the distance from the entrance point to the pedicle axis between the three methods (P < 0. 001). The distances measured by Du's method were shortest from L1 to L4,and the distances measured by Magerl's method were shortest at L5 (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference from L1 to L2 (P > 0.05) but significant difference from L3 to L5 at inserting safe ranges of TSA (transverse section angle) was found between the three methods (P <0.05). From L3 to L4, the inserting safe ranges of TSA measured by Du's and Magerl's methods were significantly larger than that measured by Roy-Camille's method (P <0.05), but there was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). At L5, the inserting safe ranges of TSA measured by Magerl's method were largest among the three methods (P < 0.05).Conclusions: Among the three methods, Du's method is the best choice from L1 to LA because its distance from the entrance point to the pedicle axis is shortest and the safe range of TSA is largest; Magerl's method can be used from L3 to L5 and is the best choice at L5; Roy-Camille's method is applicable at L1 and L2.

  4. The mechanical benefit of medial support screws in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. METHODS: Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. RESULTS: Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001. When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P ≤ 0.0207. Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure.

  5. Prognosis of single molar implants: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yun, Pil-Young; Hwang, Jung-Won; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short- and mid-term prognosis of maxillary and mandibular single molar implants, prosthetic complications, and factors mediating the effects seen on them. Eighty-seven patients were enrolled consecutively in this study and 96 implants were placed into a single molar defect site by one oral and maxillofacial surgeon from March 2004 to December 2006. Primary osseointegration failure developed in two implants and delayed implant failure occurred at four implants. The fraction surviving interval was 97% to 100%, and at the last follow-up observation, the cumulative survival rate was 91.1%. All failed implants occurred in second molar sites, and the failure rate, according to implant site, showed a significant difference. Prosthetic complications, such as screw loosening, showed a significant correlation to the mesiodistal cantilever. Furthermore, crestal bone loss 3 years after loading was 0.2 mm on average and a very stable result was obtained. Based on the results, the risk of failure for maxillary and mandibular single molar implants is high and the possibility of developing prosthetic complications during loading is also high. Therefore, to minimize the cantilever, implants must be placed precisely and followed carefully and maintained for a long period of time.

  6. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  7. Engineering Aspects of Single- and Twin-screw Extrusion-cooking of Biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilichem, D.J. van; Stolp, W.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the properties of single- and twin-screw extruders. The influence on the design of the different leakage gaps existing in co-rotating, counter-rotating, self-wiping, twin-screw extruders and single-screw equipment is discussed. The mixing effects in single- and twin-screw equipm

  8. Isolated olecranon fractures in children affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I treated with single screw or tension band wiring system: Outcomes and pitfalls in relation to bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiani, Pietro; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Graci, Jole; De Cristo, Claudia; Zambrano, Anna; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Martini, Lorena; Villani, Ciro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the results of 2 techniques, tension band wiring (TBW) and fixation with screws, in olecranon fractures in children affected with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. Between 2010 and 2014, 21 olecranon fractures in 18 children with OI (average age: 12 years old) were treated surgically. Ten patients were treated with the screw fixation and 11 with TBW. A total of 65% of olecranon fractures occurred as a result of a spontaneous avulsion of the olecranon during the contraction of the triceps muscle. The average follow-up was 36 months. Among the children treated with 1 screw, 5 patients needed a surgical revision with TBW due to a mobilization of the screw. In this group, the satisfactory results were 50%. In patients treated with TBW, the satisfactory results were 100% of the cases. The average Z-score, the last one recorded in the patients before the trauma, was -2.53 in patients treated with screw fixation and -2.04 in those treated with TBW. TBW represents the safest surgical treatment for patients suffering from OI type I, as it helps to prevent the rigidity of the elbow through an earlier recovery of the range of motion, and there was no loosening of the implant. In analyzing the average Z-score before any fracture, the fixation with screws has an increased risk of failure in combination with low bone mineral density.

  9. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-02

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  10. Comparison of expansive pedicle screw and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw in osteoporotic sheep lumbar vertebrae: biomechanical and interfacial evaluations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It was reported that expansive pedicle screw (EPS and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw (PMMA-PS could be used to increase screw stability in osteoporosis. However, there are no studies comparing the two kinds of screws in vivo. Thus, we aimed to compare biomechanical and interfacial performances of EPS and PMMA-PS in osteoporotic sheep spine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After successful induction of osteoporotic sheep, lumbar vertebrae in each sheep were randomly divided into three groups. The conventional pedicle screw (CPS was inserted directly into vertebrae in CPS group; PMMA was injected prior to insertion of CPS in PMMA-PS group; and the EPS was inserted in EPS group. Sheep were killed and biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis and histological observation were performed at both 6 and 12 weeks post-operation. At 6-week and 12-week, screw stabilities in EPS and PMMA-PS groups were significantly higher than that in CPS group, but there were no significant differences between EPS and PMMA-PS groups at two study periods. The screw stability in EPS group at 12-week was significantly higher than that at 6-week. The bone trabeculae around the expanding anterior part of EPS were more and denser than that in CPS group at 6-week and 12-week. PMMA was found without any degradation and absorption forming non-biological "screw-PMMA-bone" interface in PMMA-PS group, however, more and more bone trabeculae surrounded anterior part of EPS improving local bone quality and formed biological "screw-bone" interface. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EPS can markedly enhance screw stability with a similar effect to the traditional method of screw augmentation with PMMA in initial surgery in osteoporosis. EPS can form better biological interface between screw and bone than PMMA-PS. In addition, EPS have no risk of thermal injury, leakage and compression caused by PMMA. We propose EPS has a great application potential in augmentation of

  11. Microstructural characterization of titanium dental implants by electron microscopy and mechanical tests; Caracterizacao microestrutural de implantes dentarios de titanio por microscopia eletronica e ensaios mecanicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfenstein, B.; Muniz, N.O.; Dedavid, B.A., E-mail: bruhelfenstein@hotmail.co [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (FE/PUC/RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia; Gehrke, S.A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (FE/UFSM), RS (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia; Vargas, A.L.M. [Parque Tecnologico da PUCRS (TECNOPUC/GEPSI), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos de Propriedades de Superficies e Interfaces

    2010-07-01

    Mini screw types for titanium implants, with differentiated design, were tested for traction and torsion for behavior analysis of the shape relative to the requirements of ASTM F136. All implants showed mechanical tensile strength above by the standard requirement, being that 83.3% of them broke above the doughnut, in support of the prosthesis. Distinct morphologies in ruptured by mechanical tests, were obtained. However, both fracture surfaces showed fragile comportments. Metallographic tests, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness were used for microstructural characterization of material, before and after heat treatment. The presences of {beta} phase in screw surface after quenching treatment proves that the thermal treatment can contribute for mechanical resistance in surface implants. (author)

  12. Implant Gigi One-Piece vs Two-Pieces dalam Praktek Sehari-Hari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Lestari Kurnia

    2014-12-01

    prosedur bedah dan prosedur prostetik lebih sederhana. Desain ini juga meniadakan celah mikro pada perbatasan implant dan abutment. Desain implant gigi one-piece memiliki keterbatasan pada pilihan prosedur prostetik apabila dibandingkan dengan desain implant gigi two-pieces.   One-Piece Versus Two-pieces Tooth Implant In Daily Practice. Implant had been a gold standard to replace missing tooth. However, implant marketed today was considered complex, and needs a second surgery. Complications may occur such as screw loosening or fracture and the presence of micro gap at implant-abutment-junction that is found causing fixture failure. The one-piece-implant design may offer some advantages. Purpose: this paper was aimed to discuss the pros and cons of one-piece-implants and two-piece-implants. Case 1 A 43-year-old woman came to place an implant on #16. The available bone height was 5 mm. A trans alveolar sinus lift procedure was performed with 0,5 cc allograft. A 12 mm one-piece-implant was inserted. Case 2 A 24-year-old woman came to place an implant on #46. The available bone height was 12 mm and a 10 mm two-piece-implant was inserted. Discussion: One-piece-implant offers some advantage. It needs no second surgery, easier placement protocol, and more natural prosthetic procedures. The design is preventing the failure in implant-abutment-junction failure. The absence of micro gap in one-piece-implant seems superior in preventing crestal bone resorption. However, the prosthetic option was limited in one-piece-implant. Two-piece-implant offers more choices in prosthetic abutment. Conclusion: One-piece-implant was easier and provide simple protocol with limited choice on prosthetic.

  13. Analise quimica, microestrutural e da interface implante : pilar intermediario de quatro sistemas de implantes dentarios endo-osseos

    OpenAIRE

    Eider Guimarães Bastos

    2001-01-01

    Resumo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição química, metalográficas, a topografia superficial e a interface de adaptação implante pilar intermediário por meio de microscopia óptica, microscopia eletrônica de varredura e espectroscopia de energia dispersiva de quatro sistemas de implantes dentários endoósseos disponíveis no Brasil: Implamed@, Master Screw@, Titanium Fix@ e INP@, divididos em grupos 1, 2, 3 e 4. Os resultados obtidos com a análise química mostraram que todos os g...

  14. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURES : A STUDY USING DYNAMIC HIP SCREW AND PROXIMAL FEMORAL NAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of intertrochanteric fractures treated with Dynamic Hip Screw and Proximal Femoral nail. METHODS: This study was conducted on 80 cases of Intertrochanteric fractures of femur treated by a dynamic hip screw and proximal femoral nail. Patients were operated on standard fracture table under image intensifier control. RESULTS: The average age of the patient was 63.2 years. Most common mechanism of fracture was domestic fall. The unstable pattern was more common in old aged patients with higher grade of osteoporosis. The average blood loss was 240 and 320ml in PFN and DHS group respectively. In PFN there were more no. of radiation exposure intraoperatively. The average operating time for the patients treated with PFN was 100min as compared to 80 min in patients treated with DHS. No complications of non - union and infection. In the PFN group the amount of sliding on X - rays was less as compared to DHS. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early period (at 1 and 3 month. In the long term both the implant had almost similar functional outcomes. CONCLUSION: From the study, we concluded PFN is better alternative to DHS in management of intertrochanteric fractures but is technically difficult procedure and requires more expertise compared to DHS.

  15. Preliminary Design on Screw Press Model of Palm Oil Extraction Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Muhammad; Salleh, S. M.; Nawi, I.; Ngali, Z.; Siswanto, W. A.; Yusup, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of the screw press is to compress the fruit bunch between the main screw and travelling cones to extract the palm oil. Visual inspection, model development and simulation of screw press by using Solidworks 2016 and calculation of design properties were performed to support the investigation. The project aims to analyse different design of screw press which improves in reducing maintenance cost and increasing lifespan. The currently existing of screw press can endure between 500 to 900 hours and requires frequent maintenance. Different configurations have been tried in determination of best design properties in screw press. The results specify that screw press with tapered inner shaft has more total lifespan (hours) compared existing screw press. The selection of the screw press with tapered inner shaft can reduce maintenance cost and increase lifespan of the screw press.

  16. A power recirculating test rig for ball screw endurance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giberti Hermes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual design of an innovative test rig for endurance tests of ball screws is presented in this paper. The test rig layout is based on the power recirculating principle and it also allows to overtake the main critical issues of the ball screw endurance tests. Among these there are the high power required to make the test, the lengthy duration of the same and the high loads between the screw and the frame that holds it. The article describes the test rig designed scheme, the kinematic expedients to be adopted in order to obtain the required performance and functionality and the sizing procedure to choose the actuation system.

  17. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...... lead screw (MLS) employing permanent magnets only, the new EMLS proposed uses dc current to provide the required helical-shape magnetic field, offering a much simpler, robust structure compared with the MLS. The working principle and the performances of this EMLS are analyzed in this paper. Comparison...

  18. Migration of polyethylene fixation screw after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woo-Shin; Youm, Yoon-Seok

    2009-08-01

    Duracon (Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ) posterior stabilized total knee system has a snap fit locking mechanism of a tibial polyethylene, including an additional locking screw for further fixation of polyethylene. We report 13 cases of locking screw migration from tibial component after Duracon posterior stabilized primary total knee arthroplasty. Among 13 knees, screw migration in 10 asymptomatic cases was incidentally detected during regular follow-up, and they were just observed in the outpatient clinic. Only 3 knees had moderate pain, swelling, and instability, and revision was done on 2 of 3 knees.

  19. Test Research on Special Sucker Rod for Screw Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Mingyi; Chen Mingzhan; Li Zhi

    2006-01-01

    @@ According to the statistics of straight thread sucker rods' application in screw pump in Daqing Oilfield before2000, the proportion of sucker rods' yearly breakaway reached to 41.6%, taking up 70% of the total wells that were checked. Thus it can be seen that the rods breakaway problem was becoming the main barrier restricting screw pump large-scale population and application. Since then,the development work on the special sucker rods for screw pump had been carried on. Through the analysis on the failure position and failure form of the sucker rods',the following conclusions arepresented:

  20. Simulation and analysis of resin flow in injection machine screw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-feng LI; Samir MEKID

    2008-01-01

    A method with simulation and analysis of the resin flow in a screw is presented to ease the control of some problems that may affect the efficiency and the quality of the product among existing screws in an injection machine. The physical model of a screw is established to represent the stress, the strain, the relationship between velocity and stress, and the temperature of the cells. In this paper, a working case is considered where the velocity and the temperature distributions at any section of the flow are obtained. The analysis of the computational results shows an ability to master various parameters depending on the specifications.

  1. 3D CFD analysis of a twin screw expander

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacevic, A.; S Rane

    2013-01-01

    Twin screw machines can be used as expanders for variety of applications. This paper describes how the performance of an oil free twin screw air expander of 3/5 lobe configuration was estimated by use of full 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applying a procedure similar to that used for screw compressors. The grid generator SCORG© was employed for pre-processing of the moving domains between the rotors while the stationary grids for the ports were derived from a commercial grid generator...

  2. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque...

  3. A STUDY OF FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL OUTCOME OF UNDISPLACED SCAPHOID FRACTURES TREATED WITH PERCUTANEOUS HEADLESS SCREW FIXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarigopula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Scaphoid is the most commonly fractured carpal bone, accounting for approximately 60% of all carpal fractures. This injury is commonly seen in active young adults after a fall on an outstretched hand. Management of scaphoid fractures is controversial. Displaced scaphoid fractures are associated with risk of non-union and osteonecrosis. Surgical fixation is recommended for displaced scaphoid fractures of proximal pole, fractures with delayed treatment or diagnosis and non-union. Open reduction and internal fixation of acute scaphoid fractures has been reported to give good results in several nonrandomised, retrospective studies. The incidence of complications after operative treatment of non-displaced fractures has decreased with the advent of safer, more reliable implants and percutaneous techniques. CONCLUSION Percutaneous headless screw fixation is a well-documented surgical procedure. Undisplaced scaphoid fractures fixed by percutaneous headless screw fixation yield better results than patients treated conservatively. Good range of motion is achieved after fixation. It relieves pain and functional disability experienced by patients. Patients achieve good range of motion. Trabecular continuity is achieved in most of the patients before 8 weeks. Most of the patients had resumed normal daily activities before 3 months. This study suggests that percutaneous headless screw fixation for undisplaced scaphoid fractures provides satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes after an intermediate duration follow-up. Even though the procedure is not free of complications, the overall functional and clinical outcome had shown good results.

  4. Orthodontic Implants: Concepts for the Orthodontic Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; de Oliveira Ruellas, Antônio Carlos; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic implants have become a reliable method in orthodontic practice for providing temporary additional anchorage. These devices are useful to control skeletal anchorage in less compliant patients or in cases where absolute anchorage is necessary. There are a great number of advantages in this new approach which include easy insertion, decreased patient discomfort, low price, immediate loading, reduced diameter, versatility in the forces to be used, ease of cleaning, and ease of removal. However, a proper management of the screws by the practitioner is necessary in order to increase the success rate of the technique. The purpose of this paper is to update practitioners on the current concepts of orthodontic implants and orthodontic mechanics. PMID:23209470

  5. Orthodontic Implants: Concepts for the Orthodontic Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Nelson Elias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic implants have become a reliable method in orthodontic practice for providing temporary additional anchorage. These devices are useful to control skeletal anchorage in less compliant patients or in cases where absolute anchorage is necessary. There are a great number of advantages in this new approach which include easy insertion, decreased patient discomfort, low price, immediate loading, reduced diameter, versatility in the forces to be used, ease of cleaning, and ease of removal. However, a proper management of the screws by the practitioner is necessary in order to increase the success rate of the technique. The purpose of this paper is to update practitioners on the current concepts of orthodontic implants and orthodontic mechanics.

  6. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Paul A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: pclark4@gmail.com; Clark, Andrew M. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Rodriguez, Anthony [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Hussain, Mohammad A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Mao, Jeremy J. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: jmao2@uic.edu

    2007-04-15

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-{mu}m intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 {+-} 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 {+-} 0.25 MPa to 2.24 {+-} 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-{mu}m intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants.

  7. Centrifuging Step-Screw Conveyor for Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A variety of ISRU operations will utilize lunar regolith as feedstock. The proposed centrifuging step-screw conveyor concept will provide a well controlled robust,...

  8. Kinematic analysis of parallel manipulators by algebraic screw theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gallardo-Alvarado, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the fundamentals of screw theory concerned with velocity analysis of rigid-bodies, confirmed with detailed and explicit proofs. The author additionally investigates acceleration, jerk, and hyper-jerk analyses of rigid-bodies following the trend of the velocity analysis. With the material provided in this book, readers can extend the theory of screws into the kinematics of optional order of rigid-bodies. Illustrative examples and exercises to reinforce learning are provided. Of particular note, the kinematics of emblematic parallel manipulators, such as the Delta robot as well as the original Gough and Stewart platforms are revisited applying, in addition to the theory of screws, new methods devoted to simplify the corresponding forward-displacement analysis, a challenging task for most parallel manipulators. Stands as the only book devoted to the acceleration, jerk and hyper-jerk (snap) analyses of rigid-body by means of screw theory; Provides new strategies to simplify the forward kinematic...

  9. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Bone plates, bone screws, finite element analysis, jaw fixation techniques, mandible, mandibular .... model is built up, in similar way to building block construction, .... shows advantages, such as granting intraoral route, minimal.

  10. Lumbar pedicle screw placement: Using only AP plane imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Placement of pedicle screws under fluoroscopic guidance using AP plane imaging alone with tactile guidance is safe, fast, and reliable. However, a good understanding of the radiographic landmarks is a prerequisite.

  11. Screw-matrix method in dynamics of multibody systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzhu, Liu

    1988-05-01

    In the present paper the concept of screw in classical mechanics is expressed in matrix form, in order to formulate the dynamical equations of the multibody systems. The mentioned method can retain the advantages of the screw theory and avoid the shortcomings of the dual number notation. Combining the screw-matrix method with the tool of graph theory in Roberson/Wittenberg formalism. We can expand the application of the screw theory to the general case of multibody systems. For a tree system, the dynamical equations for each j-th subsystem, composed of all the outboard bodies connected by j-th joint can be formulated without the constraint reaction forces in the joints. For a nontree system, the dynamical equations of subsystems and the kinematical consistency conditions of the joints can be derived using the loop matrix. The whole process of calculation is unified in matrix form. A three-segment manipulator is discussed as an example.

  12. Intermaxillary Fixation Screw Morbidity in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florescu, Vlad-Andrei; Kofod, Thomas; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark). The fracture type, radiographic findings, treatment modality, screw type and number, and root damage were recorded. For the outcome comparison, a review of the published data regarding iatrogenic dental root damage caused......Purpose The aim of the present retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity of screws used for intermaxillary fixation (IMF) in the treatment of mandibular fractures. A review of the published data was also performed for a comparison of outcomes. Our hypothesis was that the use of screws...... for IMF of mandibular fractures would result in minimal morbidity. Materials and Methods Patients treated for mandibular fractures from 2007 to 2013, using screws for IMF, using the international diagnosis code for mandibular fracture, DS026, were anonymously selected (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial...

  13. A finite element analysis of two different dental implants: stress distribution in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Sergio E T; Cury, Patricia R; Sendyk, Wilson R; Sendyk, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of 2 commercially available dental implant systems on stress distribution in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting alveolar bone under simulated occlusal forces, employing a finite element analysis. The implants and abutments evaluated consisted of a stepped cylinder implant connected to a screw-retained, internal, hexagonal abutment (system 1) and a conical implant connected to a solid, internal, conical abutment (system 2). A porcelain-covered, silver-palladium alloy was used as a crown. In each case, a simulated, 100-N vertical load was applied to the buccal cusp. A finite element model was created based on the physical properties of each component, and the values of the von Mises stresses generated in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting alveolar bone were calculated. In the prostheses, the maximum von Mises stresses were concentrated at the points of load application in both systems, and they were greater in system 1 (148 N/mm2) than in system 2 (55 N/mm2). Stress was greater on the abutment of system 2 than of system 1 on both the buccal (342 N/mm2 x 294 N/mm2) and lingual (294 N/mm2 x 148 N/ mm2) faces. Stress in the cortical, alveolar bone crest was greater in system 1 than in system 2 (buccal: 99.5 N/mm2 x 55 N/mm2, lingual: 55 N/mm2 x 24.5 N/mm2, respectively). Within the limits of this investigation, the stepped cylinder implant connected to a screw-retained, internal hexagonal abutment produces greater stresses on the alveolar bone and prosthesis and lower stresses on the abutment complex. In contrast, the conical implant connected to a solid, internal, conical abutment furnishes lower stresses on the alveolar bone and prosthesis and greater stresses on the abutment.

  14. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  15. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam K Saraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD, diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10-L2 were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation; b screw with medial cortical perforation; and c screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra ( P = 0.105, but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD ( P = 0.901. Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different.

  16. Accuracy of digital impression in dental implants: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudabe Kulivand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of dental implants remains one of the most challenging aspects of implant dentistry. Although it is not clear whether prosthetic misfit could affect osseointegration, mechanical complications of implant-supported prostheses can be avoided by achieving a good passive fit between the framework and the implants. Passive fit is a difficult concept to define. Obtaining absolute passive fit of the prosthetic framework on implants has been reported to be nearly impossible. Because of the multiple steps involved in processing and manufacturing implant-borne prostheses, errors in precision seem to be unavoidable. Misfit of prosthesis may lead to mechanical failures such as screw distortion and loosening, component fractures and even implant failure. Digital impressions offer advantages to both the clinician and the patient. For clinicians, digital impressions may reduce laboratory remakes because the computer screen image of the prepared teeth is magnified, improving the view of the preparation quality. The quality and accuracy of impressions has been demonstrated to be an effective clinical procedure for reducing inaccuracies in prostheses. So, the aim of the current research was to determine accuracy of digital impression in dental implants using the PubMed and Medline database English literature by the terms “Digital impression”, “Implants”, Dentistry”.

  17. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabu, Terufumi; Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49) were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ). Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P Risser sign (P = 0.032), the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031), the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012), and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007). Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003), the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021), and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008). Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively. PMID:27564683

  18. Effects of different abutment connection designs on the stress distribution around five different implants: a 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Ali; Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Keskin, Haluk

    2012-09-01

    The stability of the bone-implant interface is required for the long-term favorable clinical outcome of implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation. The implant failures that occur after the functional loading are mainly related to biomechanical factors. Micro movements and vibrations due to occlusal forces can lead to mechanical complications such as loosening of the screw and fractures of the abutment or implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain distributions in the connection areas of different implant-abutment connection systems under similar loading conditions. Five different implant-abutment connection designs from 5 different manufacturers were evaluated in this study. The investigation was performed with software using the finite element method. The geometrical modeling of the implant systems was done with CATIA virtual design software. The MSC NASTRAN solver and PATRAN postprocessing program were used to perform the linear static solution. According to the analysis, the implant-abutment connection system with external hexagonal connection showed the highest strain values, and the internal hexagonal implant-abutment connection system showed the lowest strain values. Conical + internal hexagonal and screw-in implant abutment connection interface is more successful than other systems in cases with increased vertical dimension, particularly in the posterior region.

  19. Rapid prototyping drill guide template for lumbar pedicle screw placement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sheng; XU Yong-qing; ZHANG Yuan-zhi; LI Yan-bing; SHI Ji-hong; CHEN Guo-ping; CHEN Yu-bing

    2009-01-01

    To develop a novel method of spinal pedical stereotaxy by reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques, and to validate its accuracy by experimental and clinical studies. Methods: A 3D reconstruction model for the desired lumbar vertebra was generated by using the Mimics 10.11 software, and the optimal screw size and orientation were determined using the reverse engineering software. Afterwards, a drill template was created by reverse engi-neering principle, whose surface was the antitemplate of the vertebral surface. The drill template and its correspond-ing vertebra were manufactured using the rapid prototyping technique. Results: The accuracy of the drill template was con-firmed by drilling screw trajectory into the vertebral biomodel preoperatively. This method also showed its ability to cus-tomize the placement and size of each screw based on the unique morphology of the lumbar vertebra.The drill tem-plate fits the postural surface of the vertebra very well in the cadaver experiment. Postoperative CT scans for controlling the pedicle bore showed that the personalized template had a high precision in cadaver experiment and clinical application. No misplacement occurred by using the per-sonalized template. During surgery, no additional computer assistance was needed.Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel drill template for lumbar pedicle screw placement with good applicability and high accuracy. The potential use of drill templates to place lumbar pedicle screws is promising. Our methodology appears to provide an accurate technique and trajectory for pedicle screw placement in the lumbar spine.

  20. Pedicle screw fixation against burst fracture of thoracolumbar vertebrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Fu-xin; HUANG Yong; ZHANG Qiang; SHI Feng-lei; ZHAO Dong-sheng; HU Qiao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the application of vertebral pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of burst fracture of thoracolumbar vertebrae.Methods: A total of 48 cases (31 males and 17 females, aged from 18-72 years, mean: 41.3 years) with thoracolumbar vertebrae burst fracture were treated by pedicle screw system since January 2004. According to the AO classification of thoracolumbar vertebrae fracture,there are 36 cases of Type A, 9 of Type B and 3 of Type C.Results: All patients were followed up for 6-25 months (average 12 months ), no secondary nerve root injury, spinal cord injury, loosening or breakage of pedicle screw were observed. The nerve function of 29 patients with cauda equina nerve injury was restored to different degrees. The vertebral body height returned to normal level and posterior process angle was rectified after operation.Conclusions: The vertebral pedicle screw internal fixation was technologically applicable, which can efficiently reposition and stablize the bursting fractured vertabrae,indirectly decompress canalis spinalis, maintain spine stablity, scatter stress of screw system, reduce the risk of loosening or breakage of screw and loss of vertebral height,and prevent the formation of posterior convex after operation.

  1. Bending strength and holding power of tibial locking screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J; Lin, S J; Chiang, H; Hou, S M

    2001-04-01

    The bending strength and holding power of two types of specially designed tibial locking devices, a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt, were studied and compared with four types of commercially available tibial interlocking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, and Osteo AG. To test bending strength, the devices were inserted into a high molecular weight polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three point bending test. Single loading yielding strength and cyclic loading fatigue life were measured. To test holding power, the devices were inserted into tubes made of polyurethane foam, and their tips were loaded axially to measure pushout strength. The devices were tested with two different densities of foam materials and two different sizes of pilot holes. Insertion torque and stripping torque of the screws were measured first. Pushout tests were performed with each screw inserted with a tightness equal to 60% of its stripping torque. Test results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the screws. The stripping torque predicted the pushout strength more reliably than did the insertion torque. All tested devices showed greater holding power in the foam with the higher density and with the smaller pilot holes. The both-ends-threaded screw had the highest pushout strength and a satisfactory fatigue strength. The unthreaded bolt had the highest fatigue strength but only fair holding power. Clinical studies of the use of these two types of locking devices are worthwhile.

  2. Robot-assisted Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Han; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation has been proved to be effective but technically challenging because the difficult approach is associated with high risks of screw malposition and damage to surrounding vital structures. Navigation techniques are therefore increasingly being used to improve safety and accuracy. However, no robot-assisted odontoid screw fixation has yet been reported. We here report a 61-year-old woman with a type II dens fracture on whom anterior odontoid screw fixation was performed under the guidance of a newly developed robotic system (TiRobot, co-designed by Beijing Jishuitan Hospital and TINAVI Medical Technologies). One odontoid screw was safely and accurately placed, the calculated deviation between the planned and actual positions being 0.9 mm. No intraoperative complications were identified and the patient was discharged on Day 5. Follow-up studies after 2 weeks showed good clinical and radiological results. We believe this is the first reported case of robot-assisted anterior odontoid screw fixation. We consider that complicated procedures can become feasible, safe and accurate using TiRobot systems.

  3. Tibial inlay press-fit fixation versus interference screw in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Ettinger

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL by a tibial press-fit fixation of the patellar tendon with an accessory bone plug is a promising approach because no foreign materials are required. Until today, there is no data about the biomechanical properties of such press-fit fixations. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical qualities of a bone plug tibial inlay technique with the commonly applied interference screw of patellar tendon PCL grafts. Twenty patellar tendons including a bone block were harvested from ten human cadavers. The grafts were implanted into twenty legs of adult German country pigs. In group P, the grafts were attached in a press-fit technique with accessory bone plug. In group S, the grafts were fixed with an interference screw. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. The constructs were biomechanically analyzed in cyclic loading between 60 and 250 N for 500 cycles recording elongation. Finally, ultimate failure load and failure mode were analyzed. Ultimate failure load was 598.6±36.3 N in group P and 653.7±39.8 N in group S (not significant, P>0.05. Elongation during cyclic loading between the 1st and the 20th cycle was 3.4±0.9 mm for group P and 3.1±1 mm for group S. Between the 20th and the 500th cycle, elongation was 4.2±2.3 mm in group P and 2.5±0.9 mm in group S (not significant, P>0.05. This is the first study investigating the biomechanical properties of tibial press-fit fixation of the patellar tendon with accessory bone plug in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The implant-free tibial inlay technique shows equal biomechanical characteristics compared to an interference screw fixation. Further in vivo studies are desirable to compare the biological behavior and clinical relevance of this fixation device.

  4. A new device for impression transfer for non-parallel endosseus implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Guidi, Riccardo; Carinci, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    The three-dimensional orientation of dental implant is transferred to a model by means of transfer device and impression material. If more than one implant is inserted and fixtures are not perfectly parallel, the impression may become distorted when removed from the mouth. In this case, a transfer that can be disengaged from the internal implant-abutment connection and removed together with the tray could be useful. An impression transfer device composed of a proper transfer, an inner hexagon and a central screw is described. When the central screw and the hexagon are removed, the proper transfer is free to move horizontally and the tray can be removed from the mouth without distortion of the impression material.

  5. Migração de parafuso em artroplastia total do joelho: relato clínico Screw migration in total knee arthroplasty: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fonseca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As complicações das artroplastias totais do joelho devidas ao material implantado são raras, exceto o desgaste do polietileno. O relato de migração de parafusos dentro da articulação do joelho é muito raro. Os autores relatam a migração intra-articular de um parafuso de segurança do polietileno numa artroplastia total do joelho com sacrifício do ligamento cruzado posterior (ATJ tipo Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN que obrigou a nova cirurgia para remoção do parafuso, substituição do componente de polietileno e aplicação de novo parafuso de fixação.Complications in total knee arthroplasty directly related to the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the joint cavity are very rare. The authors report an intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (ATJ Performance type; Biomet, Warsaw, IN requiring a new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and insert a new fixation screw.

  6. Mini-implants in the palatal slope – a retrospective analysis of implant survival and tissue reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziebura Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify insertion procedure and force application related complications in Jet Screw (JS type mini-implants when inserted in the palatal slope. Methods Setting and Sample Population: The Department of Orthodontics, the University Hospital Münster. Forty-one consecutively started patients treated using mini-implants in the palatal slope. In this retrospective study, 66 JS were evaluated. Patient records were used to obtain data on the mode of utilization and complications. Standardized photographs overlayed with a virtual grid served to test the hypothesis that deviations from the recommended insertion site or the type of mechanics applied might be related to complications regarding bleeding, gingival overgrowth or implant failure. Results Two implants (3% were lost, and two implants (3%, both loaded with a laterally directed force, exhibited loosening while still serving for anchorage. Complications that required treatment did not occur, the most severe problem observed being gingival proliferation which was attributable neither to patients’ age nor to applied mechanics or deviations from the ideal implant position. Conclusions The JS mini-implant is reliable for sagittal and vertical movements or anchorage purposes. Laterally directed forces might be unfavorable. The selection of implant length as well as the insertion procedure should account for the possibility of gingival overgrowth.

  7. Holographic measurement on deformation of mandible with dental implants due to occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Tamamura, Kentaro; Sugimura, Tadataka; Inada, Joji

    1996-12-01

    To consider the dynamic response of implant bridge caused by occlusion, the deformation of the bridge and the near mandible subjected to occlusional force was measured by holographic interferometry. In the study, the mandibles of Japanese monkeys were used. A screw type ceramic implant was placed in the site of the second molar, when it was about one year since the mandibular first and second molars were extracted. An implant bridge was then fabricated and placed between the implant and the first and second premolars. After the mandibular bone was extracted, double exposure holographic interferograms were recorded under various loads for the mandible. It was found that the stress on the implant bridge concentrated on the mesial of the pontic when the vertical load was applied to the second premolar. This shows that the mandible near the implant receives most of stress and suffers frequent damage such as the bone resorption, when the loads were applied to its mesial side.

  8. Prosthetic Management of an Extensive Maxillary Alveolar Resorption with an Implant-supported Restoration: a Technical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Saadat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recent developments in peri-implant surgical regenerative procedures, re-establishing the hard and soft tissue contour is still a challenge in cases with severe ridge deficiency. It becomes more difficult when incorrectly placed implants cause screw connections to come out onto the labial surfaces of the teeth. A two-part maxillary implant supported fixed restoration was constructed. The first part was consisted of a screw retained sub-structure that replaced gingival portions of the deficient maxilla and the second part was a cement retained super-structure that reconstructed the anatomical crowns of the lost teeth. In this way awkwardly placed implants did not interfere with the desired esthetic result. Another great advantage was that the alterations or repairs on cemented crowns can easily be carried out without compromising the entire construction.

  9. Interference screw for fixation of FDL transfer in the treatment of adult acquired flat foot deformity stage II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charwat-Pessler, Christoph Georg; Hofstaetter, Stefan Gerhard; Jakubek, Doris Elvira; Trieb, Klemens

    2015-10-01

    Flexor digitorum longus transfer and medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy have shown favourable results in the treatment of adult acquired flat foot deformity stage 2. Little is known about the resorbable interference screw for tendon fixation and postoperative patient satisfaction though. Moreover possible changes of radiographic parameters at final follow-up, possible implant-associated complications and differences concerning clinical results at final follow-up to other studies using bone tunnel techniques for fixation of the FDL tendon were investigated. 21 feet in 21 patients with a mean age of 51 years were evaluated pre- and postoperatively after a standardised operative procedure using MDCO and FDL transfer with interference screw fixation. Patients were evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot Score and the Visual Analogue Scale at an average follow-up of 20 months. Hindfoot radiographic parameters were evaluated according to AOFAS guidelines. For statistical analysis SPSS v.15.0.1 was used. The average AOFAS Score (from 42 to 95 points) and VAS (from 0.5 to 8 points) both increased significantly (p < 0.001 each) from preoperative to final follow-up as well as the hindfoot valgus (from 10 to 4 degrees (p = 0.005)) and the lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (from 13.6 preoperative to 5.2° at follow-up). 88 percent of patients evaluated the postoperative result with "very good" or "good". Implant-associated complications could not be detected. We conclude that interference screw fixation for FDL transfer is a safe and promising operative technique, allowing a smaller skin incision without disrupting the normal interconnections at the knot of Henry, while achieving very high patient satisfaction and improving postoperative function as well as relieving pain. This method is technically easy to perform, has a low complication risk and we, therefore, recommend this fixation technique in patients with adult acquired

  10. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  11. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  12. Three-dimensional comparison of alternative screw positions versus actual fixation of scaphoid fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Ido; Gal, Jonathan; Peleg, Eran; Almog, Gil; Luria, Shai

    2017-06-01

    The recommended technique for the fixation of a scaphoid waist fracture involves a headless compression screw placed in the proximal fragment center. This is usually accomplished by placing a longitudinal axis screw as visualized by fluoroscopy. The screw length has been shown to have a biomechanical advantage. An alternative to these options, which has been debated in the literature, is a screw placed perpendicular to the fracture plane and in its center. The perpendicular screw may have a biomechanical advantage despite the fact that it may be shorter. This study examined the differences in location and length in actual patients between a screw in the center of the proximal fragment with a longitudinal axis screw, and the actual fixating screw. These were then compared to a perpendicular axis screw. Pre- and post-operative CT scans of 10 patients with scaphoid waist fractures were evaluated using a 3D computer model. Comparisons were made between the length, location and angle of actual and virtual screw alternatives; namely, a screw along the central third of the proximal fragment (central screw axis) where the scaphoid longitudinal axis was calculated mathematically (longitudinal screw axis) and a screw placed at 90° to the fracture plane and in its center (perpendicular screw axis). The longitudinal axis screw was found to be significantly longer than the other axes (28.3mm). There was a significant difference between the perpendicular axis screw and the location and angle of the other screw axis, but it was only shorter than the longitudinal screw (23.6mm versus 25.5mm for the actual screw; ns.). A computed longitudinal axis screw is longer than a central or actual screw placed longitudinally by visual inspection by the surgeon. Although it needs to be placed using computer assisted (CAS) techniques, it may have the biomechanical advantages of a longer screw in a similar trajectory. The perpendicular screw was found to be significantly different in position

  13. Morse taper implants at different bone levels: a finite element analysis of stress distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Toniollo, Marcelo Bighetti; Macedo, Ana Paula; Palhares, Daniel; Calefi, Paulo Linares; Sorgini, Danilo Balero; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the biomechanical effects of the different implantation bone levels of Morse taper implants, employing a finite element analysis (FEA). METHODS: Dental implants (TitamaxCM) with 4x13 mm and 4x11 mm, and their respective abutments with 3.5 mm height, simulating a screwed premolar metal-ceramic crown, had their design performed using the software AnsysWorkbench 10.0. They were positioned in bone blocks, covered by 2.5 mm thickness of mucosa. The cortical bone was designed with 1...

  14. Computer-guided flapless surgery: immediately loaded implant-prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, M; Quaranta, A; Palazzo, V; Vozza, I

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to show the operative procedure and the advantages coming from computer guided flapless surgery. This case report describes the use of stereolithographic surgiguides in order to insert 6 mandibular and 6 maxillary implants by a computer guided flapless surgery. These implants have been immediately loaded with cross arch screwed temporary prostheses. The definitive rehabilitation was realized with 2 fixed cross arch metal-ceramic prostheses that were cemented by AGC caps. The computer science technology allows to execute complex implant-prosthetic treatments in a shorter time, at low risk, with high esthetical and functional predictability and patient' satisfaction.

  15. Usefulness of absorbable screws in the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Oda, H; Tanaka, S; Kuga, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nishikawa, T; Juji, T; Shimizu, M

    2002-06-01

    Abstract  In the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction, the distal end of the ulna is fixed to the radius with screws. Recently, absorbable screws have increasingly been used instead of metal ones. However, the clinical usefulness of absorbable screws in S-K procedures for rheumatoid patients is still unknown. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of absorbable screws in this procedure by comparing their clinical results with those of metal screws. Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) absorbable screws were used in 23 wrists, and metal screws were used in 20 wrists. We evaluated the presence of general or local reactions to PLLA, the stability of the ulnar head, the time to bone union, changes in the shape of the distal ulna, and the presence of bone resorption around the screws. There were no complications with the use of PLLA screws, and their fixation stability was adequate to form sufficient bone union. In five cases in the metal screw group, bone resorption around the screws occurred between 1 and 2 years after surgery. Bone resorption around the PLLA screws was not observed. We conclude that absorbable screws may be more useful than metal screws in the S-K procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

  16. Ipsilateral pedicle screw placement with contralateral percutaneous facet screws: Early results with an alternative in lumbar arthrodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Rhiew

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Richard B Rhiew, Sunil Manjila, Andrew M Lozen, David Hong, Murali Guthikonda, S S RengacharyDepartment of Neurosurgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF is a widely used method of surgical treatment for a variety of lumbar spinal disorders. Bilateral transpedicular instrumentation is routinely used in conjunction with an interbody graft to provide additional stability. In this technical note, we describe our fusion construct using ipsilateral pedicle screw placement on the side of TLIF and contralateral facet screw placement. We performed this construct at six levels in four patients. Suggested advantages include: low morbidity, small incision and lower cost. Outcomes parameters included radiographic evidence of solid union at four months and improvement in Oswestry Disability Index. A mean improvement from a preoperative score of 73 to 26 after surgery was observed at one-year follow-up. There were no instrument-related complications. In conclusion, this hybrid screw system minimizes contralateral dissection and is an attractive alternative to standard bilateral pedicle screw fixation.Keywords: TLIF, facet screw, pedicle screw, lumbar spine fusion

  17. The influence of screw configuration on the pretreatment performance of a continuous twin screw-driven reactor (CTSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Ho; Um, Byung-Hwan; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2013-03-01

    A combination of a continuous twin screw-driven reactor (CTSR) and a dilute acid pretreatment was used for the pretreatment of biomass with a high cellulose content and high monomeric xylose hydrolyzate. With the newly modified CTSR screw configuration (Config. 3), the influences of the screw rotational speed (30-60 rpm), of the pretreatment conditions such as acid concentration (1-5%) and reaction temperature (160-175 °C) at the operating condition of biomass feeding rate (1.0 g/min) and acid feeding rate (13.4 mL/min) on the pretreatment performance were investigated. The cellulose content in the pretreated rape straw was 67.1% at the following optimal conditions: barrel temperature of 165 °C, acid concentration of 3.0% (w/v), and screw rotational speed of 30 rpm. According to the three screw configurations, the glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70.1%, 72.9%, and 78.7% for screw Configs. 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

  18. Investigation of an 11mm diameter twin screw granulator: Screw element performance and in-line monitoring via image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Ridade; Martinez-Marcos, Laura; Osorio, Juan G; Cruise, Paul; Jones, Ian; Halbert, Gavin W; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Litster, James D

    2015-12-30

    As twin screw granulation (TSG) provides one with many screw element options, characterization of each screw element is crucial in optimizing the screw configuration in order to obtain desired granule attributes. In this study, the performance of two different screw elements - distributive feed screws and kneading elements - was studied in an 11 mm TSG at different liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios. The kneading element configuration was found to break large granules more efficiently, leading to narrower granule size distributions. While pharmaceutical industry shifts toward continuous manufacturing, inline monitoring and process control are gaining importance. Granules from an 11 mm TSG were analysed using the Eyecon™, a real-time high speed direct imaging system, which has been used to capture accurate particle size distribution and particle count. The size parameters and particle count were then assessed in terms of their ability to be a suitable control measure using the Shewhart control charts. d10 and particle count were found to be good indicators of the change in L/S ratio. However, d50 and d90 did not reflect the change, due to their inherent variability even when the process is at steady state.

  19. Non-linear 3D evaluation of different oral implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streckbein, P; Streckbein, R G; Wilbrand, J F; Malik, C Y; Schaaf, H; Howaldt, H P; Flach, M

    2012-12-01

    Micro-gaps and osseous overload in the implant-abutment connection are the most common causes of peri-implant bone resorption and implant failure. These undesirable events can be visualized on standardized three-dimensional finite element models and by radiographic methods. The present study investigated the influence of 7 available implant systems (Ankylos, Astra, Bego, Brånemark, Camlog, Straumann, and Xive) with different implant-abutment connections on bone overload and the appearance of micro-gaps in vitro. The individual geometries of the implants were transferred to three-dimensional finite element models. In a non-linear analysis considering the pre-loading of the occlusion screw, friction between the implant and abutment, the influence of the cone angle on bone strain, and the appearance of micro-gaps were determined. Increased bone strains were correlated with small (< 15°) cone angles. Conical implant-abutment connections efficiently avoided micro-gaps but had a negative effect on peri-implant bone strain. Bone strain was reduced in implants with greater wall thickness (Ankylos) or a smaller cone angle (Bego). The results of our in silico study provide a solid basis for the reduction of peri-implant bone strain and micro-gaps in the implant-abutment connection to improve long-term stability.

  20. Pullout performance comparison of novel expandable pedicle screw with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells and cement-augmented pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycan, Mehmet Fatih; Tolunay, Tolga; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut Emre; Usta, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the pullout performance of various pedicle screws in different test materials. Polyurethane foams (Grade 10 and Grade 40) produced in laboratory and bovine vertebrae were instrumented with normal, cannulated (cemented), novel expandable and normal (cemented) pedicle screws. Test samples were prepared according to the ASTM F543 standard testing protocols and surgical guidelines. To examine the screw placement and cement distribution, anteriosuperior and oblique radiographs were taken from each sample after insertion process was completed. Pullout tests were performed in an Instron 3369 testing device. Load versus displacement graphs were recorded and the ultimate pullout force was defined as the maximum load (pullout strength) sustained before failure of screw. Student's t-test was performed on each group whether the differences between pullout strength of pedicle screws were significant or not. While normal pedicle screws have the lowest pullout strength in all test materials, normal pedicle screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate exhibit significantly higher pullout performance than others. For all test materials, there is a significant improvement in pullout strength of normal screws by augmentation. While novel expandable pedicle screws with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells exhibited lower pullout performance than normal screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate, their pullout performances in all groups were higher than the ones of normal and cannulated pedicle screws. For all test materials, although cannulated pedicle screws exhibit higher pullout strength than normal pedicle screws, there are no significant differences between the two groups. The novel expandable pedicle screws with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells may be used instead of normal and cannulated pedicle screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate due to their good performances.

  1. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup.

  2. Predictors of peri-implant bone loss during long-term maintenance of patients treated with 10-mm implants and single crown restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Rosa, Manuel; Rodríguez, Angel; Sierra, Katia; Mendoza, Gerardo; Chambrone, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the predictors of peri-implant bone loss in a sample of patients treated with 10-mm implants and single crowns who underwent periodontal/peri-implant maintenance (PM) in a Mexican private periodontal practice. Outcomes of a group of systemically healthy, partially edentulous patients attended up to July 2012 were assessed. Patient data were considered for inclusion if they involved treatment of partially edentulous sites with 10-mm-long implants and single crown restorations, as well as at least 3 years of regular PM following implant placement. Peri-implant bone loss was evaluated from data recorded at the most recent examination. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate associations between peri-implant bone loss and sex, duration of PM, location and number of implants placed per patient, region of the mouth, smoking status, type of implant, and retention of restoration. A sample of 104 subjects who had been treated with four different types of dental implants and maintained for at least 3 years was selected. Of the 148 implants placed and followed for an average period of continuing PM of 6 years (range, 3 to 15 years), only one implant (1.8%) was lost. The outcomes of logistic regression analysis showed that the independent variables smoking, retention of restoration (cemented vs screw-retained), and type of implant (internal- or external-hex) were found to be correlated with peri-implant bone loss, with odds ratios of 39.64, 4.85, and 0.04, respectively. Peri-implant bone loss was significantly associated with smoking status, the type of implant (ie, externally hexed), and type of retention (ie, cemented). Overall, all patients maintained low rates of bone loss.

  3. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  4. PEACH POMACE PROCESSING USING TWIN SCREW EXTRUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetam Sarkar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruit by-products have found limited applications in the food industry. They have been primarily used as animal feed, applied to agricultural land for soil amendment or composted and applied to farms for growing crops. Some of these disposal methods are not environment friendly, while others are costly. This study was undertaken to examine the possibility of utilizing peach pomace as a source of soluble dietary fiber in expanded extruded food products. Peach pomace was combined with rice flour at four different levels. The four blends were mixed, dried to a moisture level of 13.5% (w/w and ground to flour. These blends were extruded in a twin-screw extruder (Clextral EV-25 at a feed flow rate of 15 kg/h. The extruded products were analyzed for physical and textural properties. The apparent and true densities for the extrudates decreased from 183.93 to 133.94 kg/m3 and 1275.31 to 1171.2 kg/m3, respectively. A linear increase in extrudate porosity (85.11-88.54% and radial expansion ratio (13.5-19.3 and a steady decrease in breaking strength (104-50.74 kPa were observed with increasing peach pomace level in the blends. This study demonstrates the potential of extrusion processing as a tool for fruit by-product utilization, which will not only enhance consumption of soluble dietary fiber but will also increase the overall fruit utilization.

  5. Sacroiliac secure corridor: analysis for safe insertion of iliosacral screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Alves Cruz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Posterior pelvic lesions, especially of the sacral-iliac joint, have high mortality and morbidity risks. Definitive fixation is necessary for the joint stabilization, and one option is the sacral percutaneous pinning with screws. Proximity to important structures to this region brings risks to the fixation procedure; therefore, it is important to know the tridimensional anatomy of the pelvis posterior region. Deviations of the surgeon's hand of four degrees may target the screws to those structures; dimorphisms of the upper sacrum and a poor lesion reduction may redound in a screw malpositioning. This study is aimed to evaluate the dimensions of a safe surgical corridor for safe sacroiliac screw insertion and relations with age and sex of the patients. METHOD: One hundred randomly selected pelvis CTs of patients with no pelvic diseases, seen at a tertiary care teaching Hospital. Measurements were made by computer and the safest area for screw insertion was calculated by two methods. The results were expressed in mm (not in degrees, in order to be a further surgical reference. RESULTS: There was a significant size difference in the analyzed sacral vertebra, differing on a wider size in men than in women. There was no significant statistical difference between vertebral size and age. By both methods, a safe area for screw insertion could be defined. CONCLUSION: Age does not influence the width of the surgical corridor. The surgeon has a safe corridor considered narrower when inserting screws in a female pelvis than when in a male one. However, as the smallest vertebra found (feminine was considered for statics, it was concluded that this corridor is 20 mm wide in any direction, taking as a reference the centrum of the vertebra.

  6. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments (p = .000). IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  8. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2016-08-25

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  9. A biomechanical study of two different pedicle screw methods for fixation in osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Kosaku; Kim, Jin Hwan; Horton, William C; Hutton, William C

    2012-01-01

    In reconstruction of the osteoporotic spine, patients often show poor outcome because of pedicle screw failure. This study used osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae to determine the difference in fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted straight forward and pedicle screws inserted in an upward trajectory toward the superior end plate (i.e., end-plate screws). There is some evidence to suggest that end-plate screws have a strength advantage. The particular focus was on osteoporotic vertebrae. Thirty-three vertebrae (T10-L2) were harvested. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured: 15 vertebrae were greater than 0.8 g/cm(2) and designated as nonosteoporotic (average BMD 1.146 ± 0.186 g/cm(2)) and 18 vertebrae were designated as osteoporotic (average BMD 0.643 ± 0.088 g/cm(2)). On one pedicle the screw was inserted straight forward and on the other pedicle the screw was inserted as an end-plate screw. The torque of insertion was measured (Proto 6106 torque screwdriver). Using an MTS Mini Bionix, two types of mechanical testing were carried out on each pedicle: (a) cephalocaudad toggling was first carried out to simulate some physiological type loading: 500 cycles at 0.3 Hz, at ±50 N; and (b) then each pedicle screw was pulled out at a displacement rate of 12.5 cm/min.There was no difference in pullout force between the pedicle screws inserted straight forward and the pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws. This result applies whether the vertebrae were osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic. For both the straight-forward screws and the end-plate screws, a statistically significant correlation was observed between torque of insertion and pullout force. The results of this experiment indicate that pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws do not provide a strength advantage over pedicle screws inserted straight forward, whether the vertebrae are osteoporotic or not.

  10. Pediatric lumbar pedicle screw placement using navigation templates: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicle screw technique is commonly used treatment of adult spinal trauma, tumor, degeneration. The application of pedicle screws is very challenging in children because children have a fast growing spine and spinal pedicle morphology of children and adult has large difference. 3 D reconstruction individual navigation templates improve the success rate of pediatric pedicle screw system. This study is aimed to provide a precise method for lumbar spine pedicle screw placement in children using computer-aided design and rapid prototyping technology. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography (CT scans of cadaver specimens of 4 children were obtained, and the raw data were reconstructed using three-dimensional reconstruction software. Pedicle screws were placed using the conventional method or by using individually designed navigation templates based on the principles of reverse engineering and rapid prototyping technology. Results: We evaluated the accuracy of the pedicle screws placed using the two methods by CT scan. Ten navigation templates were designed for placement of 20 lumbar pedicle screws in the navigation group, and CT scan confirmed that all the screws were placed accurately in the corresponding pedicle. Conversely, of the 20 lumbar pedicle screws placed using the conventional method, 3 screws perforated the pedicle. The findings showed that lumbar pedicle screw placement was successful using navigation templates in children. Conclusions: This technique is simple, easy to master, and allows personalized screw placement, thus providing a new and feasible method for lumbar pedicle screw placement in children.

  11. Interfragmentary compression forces of scaphoid screws in a sawbone cylinder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, J T; Mayr, W; Unger, E; Benesch, T; Vécsei, V; Gäbler, C

    2007-07-01

    Various screws have been developed to stabilise fractures of the scaphoid. Commonly used are the Herbert, the HBS, the 3-mm AO and the Acutrak screws. Not long ago a new screw, the Twin Fix, was introduced. This is cannulated and similar in shape and appearance to the classical Herbert screw. In our test series we compared the maximum achievable compression forces of the Twin Fix screw with that of three other screws (AO, HBS and Acutrak screws). To avoid the variations of density, stiffness and rigidity in natural bone, a polyurethane sawbone-based test setup was used. The test series included 10 screws of each type. The compression force was measured using a special strain gauge. The mean compression force was significantly higher for the Twin Fix screw (8+/-1N) and the Acutrak screw (7.6+/-0.4/0.6N) in relation to the AO screw (6.8+/-1.0/1.4N) and HBS screw (2+/-1N). We found the Twin Fix and Acutrak screws to be promising in the treatment of scaphoid fractures.

  12. Anatomic considerations of costotransverse screw placement in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R; Ebraheim, N A; Ou, Y; Skie, M; Yeasting, R A

    2000-04-01

    Numerous techniques have been reported to restore spinal stability and to correct spinal deformities, including rods with wires/hooks, and rods or plates with pedicular screws. It was thought that posterior fixation of the thoracic spine through the costotransverse joint may be another alternative. Nine cadavers were obtained for study of screw fixation of the costotransverse joint for posterior thoracic instrumentation. The entrance point for screw insertion was designed to be at the posterior center of the clubbed extremity of the transverse process. From this point, a 3-mm drill bit was used to create the screw path penetrating the costotransverse joint and the ventral cortex of the rib. Under direct visualization of the costotransverse joint, the drill bit was directed parallel to the sagittal plane and toward the upper portion of the rib. Measurements included the screw path length and sagittal angulation. Also, the distance between the superior borders of the transverse process and the tubercle of the rib and the anatomic relationship of the drill bit exit to the intercostal vessels and nerves were evaluated. The maximum length of the screw path was found at T1 (19.7 mm), whereas the minimum length was noted at T4-T5 (13.9 mm). This value decreased gradually from T1 to T4-T5, and slightly increased to T10. The larger sagittal angles of the screw path were found at the levels of T1-T4 (78-86 degrees ), whereas the smaller were noted at the levels below T5 (53-61 degrees ). The mean distance between the superior borders of the transverse process and the tubercle of the rib was smaller at T1-T5 (0.2-0.4 mm), and significantly increased to T8 (5. 1 mm), and then slightly decreased to T10. The variation of this parameter was remarkable. All of the exit points for the drill bit were located in the upper half of the rib, and away from the intercostal vessels. The ideal screw orientation is parallel to the sagittal plane, and angled 80-90 degrees relative to the

  13. The Study of Vibration Processes in Oil Flooded Screw Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Filippov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration processes that accompany most of machines and mechanisms are of interest to the researcher, as a source of information about the technical condition and the nature of the business processes flow. Vibration-based diagnostics of oil flooded screw compressors allows us to estimate the deviation of their operation from the main mode in accordance with changing the settings of vibration processes.The oil flooded screw compressor transition from the main mode of operation to the abnormal one is accompanied by complex gas-dynamic phenomena i.e. the initial gaps and their decays. This leads to changes in the nature of vibration processes, prompting suggestions that there is a relationship to a change of vibration parameters and mode of compressor operation.Studies were conducted by combined method using an analytical calculation of the decay parameters of the initial discontinuity and an experimental one based on the measurement of acceleration on the body of the real oil flooded screw compressor. A virtually adequate reaction of the decay parameters of the initial gap and the peak values of vibration acceleration to the change of operation mode of oil flooded screw compressor has been received. The peak value of the vibration acceleration was selected by the method of Gating being time-coinciding with the beginning discharge phase of the oil flooded screw compressor, and therefore, with the decay time of the initial discontinuity.This indicates a large degree of hypothesis likelihood on an existing initial break in oil flooded screw compressor when operating in abnormal conditions. This work contains the study results of vibration processes and their relationship to the operating mode of the oil flooded screw compressor, which distinguish it from the other works studied vibration processes in reciprocating compressors. The vibration parameters control of operating oil flooded screw compressor allows us to create an automatic capacity control

  14. Four-Corner Arthrodesis: Description of Surgical Technique Using Headless Retrograde Crossed Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, João; Castro Adeodato, Sandro; Aquino Leal, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    Four-corner fusion has been shown to be a reliable option of treatment of wrist arthritis, but there is no consensus about which implant and surgical procedure should be used in the arthrodesis. The present study aimed to describe a surgical technique using 2 crossed screws as implants, inserted in a retrograde manner, and to demonstrate preliminary results of the use of the technique. A retrospective study was conducted using medical records and imaging tests (radiographs and computed tomography) of all 15 patients who underwent a standardized 4-corner fusion technique, between December 2011 and July 2015, in the Department of Hand Surgery of Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We collected data on the following variables: fusion rate, time to fusion, and percentage of patients who had any complications or needed another surgical procedure on the same wrist. All but one patient achieved fusion of arthrodesis. The average time to union was 5.54 months (SD = 3.84). Only the patient who developed nonunion of the 4-corner fusion required another surgery on the same wrist. The procedure described in this study demonstrated a low complication rate and high fusion rate, and can therefore be considered a reliable surgical technique for 4-corner fusion.

  15. Numerical and experimental study of an Archimedean Screw Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, G.; Garambois, P.-A.; Dufresne, M.; Terfous, A.; Vazquez, J.; Ghenaim, A.

    2016-11-01

    Finding new, safe and renewable energy is becoming more and more of a priority with global warming. One solution that is gaining popularity is the Archimedean Screw Generator (ASG). This kind of hydroelectric plant allows transforming potential energy of a fluid into mechanical energy and is convenient for low-head hydraulic sites. As it is a new and growing technology, there are few references dealing with their design and performance optimization. The present contribution proposes to investigate experimentally and numerically the ASG performances. The experimental study is performed for various flow conditions and a laboratory scale screw device installed at the fluid mechanics laboratory of the INSA of Strasbourg. The first results show that the screw efficiencies are higher than 80% for various hydraulic conditions. In order to study the structure of 3D turbulent flows and energy losses in a screw, the 3D Navier Stokes equations are solved with the k-w SST turbulence model. The exact geometry of the laboratory-scale screw was used in these simulations. Interestingly, the modeled values of efficiency are in fairly good agreement with experimental results while any friction coefficient is involved.

  16. Treatment of scaphoid waist fractures with the HCS screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehrmann, Sebastian V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical results of the Headless Compression Screw (HCS, Synthes when used for treatment of acute scaphoid waist fractures. The new screw design generates interfragmentary compression with use of a compression sleeve. Twenty-one patients were treated for acute scaphoid waist fractures type B2 with HCS screws. The average time to the final follow-up examination was 12.8 months. All 21 fractures united after a mean time of 7.2 weeks. The mean DASH score was 7.1. The average motion of the wrist in extension was 61°, flexion was 46°, radial abduction reached 25° and the ulnar abduction was 31°. The maximally achieved grip strength was 86% compared to the uninjured side. Treatment of type B2 scaphoid fractures with the Headless Compression Screw showed good functional and radiographic results. The results are similar to those identified using other screw fixation systems.

  17. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  18. Theoretical investigation of flash vaporisation in a screw expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasuthevan, Hanushan; Brümmer, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    In the present study flash vaporisation of liquid injection in a twin screw expander for a Trilateral Flash Cycle (TFC) is examined theoretically. The TFC process comprises a pressure increase in the working fluid, followed by heating the liquid close to boiling point. The hot liquid is injected into the working chamber of a screw expander. During this process the pressure of the liquid drops below the saturation pressure, while the temperature of the liquid remains virtually constant. Hence the liquid is superheated and in a metastable state. The liquid jet seeks to achieve a stable state in thermodynamic equilibrium and is therefore partially vaporised. This effect is referred to as flash vaporisation. Accordingly, a two-phase mixture, consisting of vapour and liquid, exists in the working chamber. Thermodynamic simulations were carried out using water as the working fluid for representative screw expander geometry. The simulations presented are performed from two different aspects during the filling process of a screw expander. The first case is the vaporisation of the injected liquid in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, whereby the two-phase mixture is treated entirely as a compressible and homogeneous gas. The second case considers flashing efficiency. It describes the quantity of flashed vapour and consists of a liquid and vapour domain. Both models are compared and analysed with respect to the operational behaviour of a screw expander.

  19. Studies on positive conveying in helically channeled single screw extruders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A solids conveying theory called double-flight driving theory was proposed for helically channeled single screw extruders. In the extruder, screw channel rotates against static barrel channel, which behaves as cooperative embedded twin-screws for the positive conveying. They turn as two parallel arc plates, between which an arc-plate solid-plug was assumed. By analyzing the forces on the solid-plug in the barrel channel and screw channel, the boundary conditions when the solid-plug is waived of being cut off on barrel wall, were found to have the capacity of the positive conveying. Experimental data were obtained using a specially designed extruder with a helically channeled barrel in the feeding zone and a pressure-adjustable die. The effects of the barrel channel geometry and friction coefficients on the conveying mechanism were presented and compared with the experimental results. The simulations showed that the positive conveying could be achieved after optimizing extruder designs. Compared with the traditional design with the friction-drag conveying, the throughput is higher while screw torque and energy consumption are decreased. Besides, the design criteria of the barrel channel were also discussed.

  20. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  1. Screw dislocations in GaN grown by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Zakharov, D.; Jasinski, J.; O' Keefe, M.A.; Morkoc, H.

    2003-05-27

    A study of screw dislocations in Hydride-Vapor-Phase-Epitaxy (HVPE) template and Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy (MBE) over-layers was performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in plan-view and in cross-section. It was observed that screw dislocations in the HVPE layers were decorated by small voids arranged along the screw axis. However, no voids were observed along screw dislocations in MBE overlayers. This was true both for MBE samples grown under Ga-lean and Ga-rich conditions. Dislocation core structures have been studied in these samples in the plan-view configuration. These experiments were supported by image simulation using the most recent models. A direct reconstruction of the phase and amplitude of the scattered electron wave from a focal series of high-resolution images was applied. It was shown that the core structures of screw dislocations in the studied materials were filled. The filed dislocation cores in an MBE samples were stoichiometric. However, in HVPE materials, single atomic columns show substantial differences in intensities and might indicate the possibility of higher Ga concentration in the core than in the matrix. A much lower intensity of the atomic column at the tip of the void was observed. This might suggest presence of lighter elements, such as oxygen, responsible for their formation.

  2. Screw theoretic view on dynamics of spatially compliant beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-lun DING; J.M.SELIG

    2010-01-01

    Beams with spatial compliance can be deformed as bending in a plane,twisting,and extending.In terms of the screw theory on rigid body motions,the concept of"deflection screw"is introduced,a spatial compliant beam theory via the deflection screw is proposed,and the spatial compliance of such a beam system is presented and analysed based on the material theory and fundamental kinematic assumptions.To study the dynamics of the spatially compliant beam,the potential energy and the kinetic energy of the beam are discussed by using the screw theory to obtain the Lagrangian.The Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to compute the vibrational frequencies based on discussions of boundary conditions and shape functions.The eigenfrequencies of the beam with spatial compliance are compared with those of individual deformation cases,pure bending,extension,or torsion.Finally,dynamics of a robot with two spatial compliant links and perpendicular joints is studied using the spatial compliant beam theory.Coupling between the joint rigid body motions and the deformations of spatial compliant links can easily be found in dynamic simulation.The study shows the effectiveness of using the screw theory to deal with the problems of dynamic modeling and analysis of mechanisms with spatially compliant links.

  3. Effects of local administration of growth hormone in peri-implant bone: an experimental study with implants in rabbit tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Isabel F; Blanco, Luis; Clemente, Celia; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative differences that could appear in newly formed peri-implant bone around Screw-Vent implants placed in rabbit tibiae when treated with local administration of growth hormone (GH). Eight New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups: the experimental group, which received 4 IU of GH in the form of lyophilized powder added to the ostectomy site before implant placement, and the control group, which did not receive GH before implant placement. Animals were sacrificed 2 weeks later, and histologic sections were obtained for histomorphometry and observation under light microscopy. The sections in the GH-treated group presented enhanced growth of new trabeculae from the periosteal tissue, and the bone-to-implant contact in the experimental group was significantly greater (P < .05). Local administration of GH stimulated a more dramatic effect than that seen previously with systemic GH administration, prompting growth from both the periosteum and endosteum. Local administration of GH at the time of implant placement could enhance peri-implant bone reaction.

  4. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  5. Versatile retraction mechanics: Implant assisted en-masse retraction with a boot loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Philip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explain the versatility offered by the use of arch wires with boot loops in retraction mechanics while taking direct anchorage from mini-screws. Materials and Methods: The materials include the mini screws placed at the appropriate location and retraction arches made of 0.019 X 0.025 SS with boot loops placed distal to the lateral incisors. Mini screw provides a stable anchorage for enmasse retraction of the anterior teeth with the help of a boot loop using sliding and/or loop mechanics. Results: The arch wires with boot loops have a definite advantage over the soldered/ crimpable hooks because of the versatility it offers during the process of retraction. Conclusion: An innovative approach combining the advantages of absolute anchorage using mini implants and a retraction arch with boot loop is presented here.

  6. Screw Performance Degradation Assessment Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm and Dynamic Fuzzy Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the performance of ball screw, screw performance degradation assessment technology based on quantum genetic algorithm (QGA and dynamic fuzzy neural network (DFNN is studied. The ball screw of the CINCINNATIV5-3000 machining center is treated as the study object. Two Kistler 8704B100M1 accelerometers and a Kistler 8765A250M5 three-way accelerometer are installed to monitor the degradation trend of screw performance. First, screw vibration signal features are extracted both in time domain and frequency domain. Then the feature vectors can be obtained by principal component analysis (PCA. Second, the initialization parameters of the DFNN are optimized by means of QGA. Finally, the feature vectors are inputted to DFNN for training and then get the screw performance degradation model. The experiment results show that the screw performance degradation model could effectively evaluate the performance of NC machine screw.

  7. Evaluation of stability of interface between CCM (Co-Cr-Mo) UCLA abutment and external hex implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Joon; Park, Young-Bum; Choi, Hyunmin; Cho, Youngsung; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate the stability of interface between Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) UCLA abutment and external hex implant. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen external hex implant fixtures were assigned to two groups (CCM and Gold group) and were embedded in molds using clear acrylic resin. Screw-retained prostheses were constructed using CCM UCLA abutment and Gold UCLA abutment. The external implant fixture and screw-retained prostheses were connected using abutment screws. After the abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm torque, 5 kg thermocyclic functional loading was applied by chewing simulator. A target of 1.0 × 106 cycles was applied. After cyclic loading, removal torque values were recorded using a driving torque tester, and the interface between implant fixture and abutment was evaluated by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The means and standard deviations (SD) between the CCM and Gold groups were analyzed with independent t-test at the significance level of 0.05. RESULTS Fractures of crowns, abutments, abutment screws, and fixtures and loosening of abutment screws were not observed after thermocyclic loading. There were no statistically significant differences at the recorded removal torque values between CCM and Gold groups (P>.05). SEM analysis revealed that remarkable wear patterns were observed at the abutment interface only for Gold UCLA abutments. Those patterns were not observed for other specimens. CONCLUSION Within the limit of this study, CCM UCLA abutment has no statistically significant difference in the stability of interface with external hex implant, compared with Gold UCLA abutment. PMID:28018564

  8. Clinical efficacy of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the therapeutic effect of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion for lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis. Methods  The clinical data were analyzed retrospectively of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis who received treatment of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system and intervertebral fusion from Aug. 2013 to Nov. 2015. The 21 patients (9 males and 12 females aged from 60 to 80 years (mean 64 years old; 6 of them presented degenerative spondylolysis, 15 with isthmic spondylolisthesis; 2 cases had I degree slippage, 13 had Ⅱdegree slippage, 6 had Ⅲdegree slippage, and all the cases were unisegmental slippage including 9 cases in L4 and 12 cases in L5. Bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (L2-L5 was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and T values conforming to the diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis were less than or equal to -2.5; All patients were operated with whole lamina resection for decompression, bone cement injectable pedicle screws system implantation, propped open reduction and fixation intervertebral fusion. The clinical outcomes were determined by the radiographic evaluation including intervertebral height, height of intervertebral foramen, slip distance, slip rate and slip angle, and Oswestry disability index (ODI on preoperative, 3 months after operation and the end of the time, and the interbody fusion were followed up. Results  Cerebrospinal fluid leakage of incision was observed in two cases after operation, compression and dressing to incision, Trendelenburg position, dehydration and other treatments were taken, and the stitches of incisions were taken out on schedule. Slips in the 21 patients were reset to different extent, and lumbar physiological curvatures were recovered. The intervertebral height and height of intervertebral foramen were obviously higher 3 months after operation than that before operation (P0

  9. Instantaneous screws of weight-bearing knee: what can the screws tell us about the knee motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alon

    2014-07-01

    There are several ways to represent a given object's motion in a 3D space having 6DOF i.e., three translations and three rotations. Some of the methods that are used are mathematical and do not provide any geometrical insight into the nature of the motion. Screw theory is a mathematical, while at the same time, geometrical method in which the 6DOF motion of an object can be represented. We describe the 6DOF motion of a weight-bearing knee by its screw parameters, that are extracted from 3D Optical Reflective motion capture data. The screw parameters which describe the transformation of the shank with respect to the thigh in each two successive frames, is represented as the instantaneous screw axis of the motion given in its Plücker line coordinate, along with its corresponding pitch and intensity values. Moreover, the Striction curve associated with the motion provides geometrical insight into the nature of the motion and its repeatability. We describe the theoretical background and demonstrate what the screw can tell us about the motion of healthy subjects' knee.

  10. Augmentation of Pedicle Screw Fixation with Calcium Phosphate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shu-hua; FU De-hao; LI Jin; XU Wei-hua; YANG Cao; YE Zhe-wei; ZUO Xiao-yan

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether a biodegradable calcium phosphate cement(CPC) provides significant augmentation of pedicle screw fixation or not,an in vitro biomechanical study was carried out to evaluate the biomechanical effect of CPC in the restoration and augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.Axial pullout test and cyclic bending resistance test were employed in the experiment,and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was chosen as control.The results demonstrate that the pullout strengths following CPC restoration and augmentation are 74% greater on an average than those of the control group,but less than those of PMMA restoration group and augmentation group respectively (increased by 126% versus control).In cyclic bending resistance test,the CPC augmented screws are found to withstand a greater number of cycles or greater loading with less displacement before loosening,but the augmentation effect of PMMA is greater than that of CPC.

  11. [Midcarpal fusion using break-away compression screw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, N; Facca, S; Gouzou, S; Liverneaux, P

    2012-02-01

    Indication of midcarpal fusion is SNAC or SLAC wrist grade 3. The main complication of circular plate (most common technique) is non-union. In this context, the purpose of our work was to propose the use of break-away compression screws to decrease the rate of non-union. Our series included ten patients. The fusion was fixed using two break-away compression screws (2mm diameter). No bone graft was used. As assessment, subjective (pain, Quick-DASH) and objective (strength, mobility) criteria were reviewed at follow-up. All the criteria were significantly improved after operation except mobility. Among the complications, we noticed one delayed bone-healing with a good outcome and a radiological consolidation. Midcarpal fusion by dorsal approach using break-away compression screws appears to us a technique of interest, not requiring a bone graft, with good cost effectiveness.

  12. Error Analysis of Robotic Assembly System Based on Screw Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩卫军; 费燕琼; 赵锡芳

    2003-01-01

    Assembly errors have great influence on assembly quality in robotic assembly systems. Error analysis is directed to the propagations and accumula-tions of various errors and their effect on assembly success.Using the screw coordinates, assembly errors are represented as "error twist", the extremely compact expression. According to the law of screw composition, relative position and orientation errors of mating parts are computed and the necessary condition of assembly success is concluded. A new simple method for measuring assembly errors is also proposed based on the transformation law of a screw.Because of the compact representation of error, the model presented for error analysis can be applied to various part- mating types and especially useful for error analysis of complexity assembly.

  13. New concept single screw compressors and their manufacture technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q.; Liu, F.; Chang, L.; Feng, C.; Peng, C.; Xie, J.; van den Broek, M.

    2017-08-01

    Single screw compressors were generally acknowledged as one of the nearly perfect machines by compressor researchers and manufacturers. However the rapid wear of the star-wheel in a single screw compressor during operation is a key reason why it hasn’t previously joined the main current compressors’ market. After more than ten years of effective work, the authors of this paper have proposed a new concept single screw compressor whose mesh-couple profile is enveloped with multi-column. Also a new design method and manufacture equipment for this kind of compressor have been developed and are described in this paper. A lot of prototype tests and a long period of industrial operations under full loading conditions have shown that the mesh-couple profiles of the new concept single compressors have excellent anti-wearness.

  14. Optically driven Archimedes micro-screws for micropump application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Vitrant, Guy; Bouriau, Michel; Casalegno, Roger; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2011-04-25

    Archimedes micro-screws have been fabricated by three-dimensional two-photon polymerization using a Nd:YAG Q-switched microchip laser at 532nm. Due to their small sizes they can be easily manipulated, and made to rotate using low power optical tweezers. Rotation rates up to 40 Hz are obtained with a laser power of 200 mW, i.e. 0.2 Hz/mW. A photo-driven micropump action in a microfluidic channel is demonstrated with a non-optimized flow rate of 6 pL/min. The optofluidic properties of such type of Archimedes micro-screws are quantitatively described by the conservation of momentum that occurs when the laser photons are reflected on the helical micro-screw surface.

  15. Experimental determination of bone cortex holding power of orthopedic screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolliger Neto Raul

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical specimens of bone measuring 15 mm in diameter were obtained from the lateral cortical layer of 10 pairs of femurs and tibias. A central hole 3.2 mm in diameter was drilled in each specimen. The hole was tapped, and a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw was inserted from the outer surface. The montage was submitted to push-out testing up to a complete strip of the bone threads. The cortical thickness and rupture load were measured, and the shear stress was calculated. The results were grouped according to the bone segment from which the specimen was obtained. The results showed that bone cortex screw holding power is dependent on the bone site. Additionally, the diaphyseal cortical bone tissue is both quantitatively and qualitatively more resistant to screw extraction than the metaphyseal tissue.

  16. Odontoid screw fixation for fresh and remote fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Ganesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the odontoid process are common, accounting for 10% to 20% of all cervical spine fractures. Odontoid process fractures are classified into three types depending on the location of the fracture line. Various treatment options are available for each of these fracture types and include application of a cervical orthosis, direct anterior screw fixation, and posterior cervical fusion. If a patient requires surgical treatment of an odontoid process fracture, the timing of treatment may affect fusion rates, particularly if direct anterior odontoid screw fixation is selected as the treatment method. For example, type II odontoid fractures treated within the first 6 months of injury with direct anterior odontoid screw fixation have an 88% fusion rate, whereas fractures treated after 18 months have only a 25% fusion rate. In this review, we discuss the etiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, and treatment (including factors affecting fusion such as timing and fracture orientation options available for odontoid process fractures.

  17. Bone healing at implants with a fluoride-modified surface: an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, T; Abrahamsson, I; Albouy, J-P; Lindhe, J

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study early stages of osseointegration to implants with a fluoride-modified surface. Six mongrel dogs, about 1-year old, were used. All mandibular premolars and the first mandibular molars were extracted. Three months later, mucoperiosteal flaps were elevated in one side of the mandible and six sites were identified for implant placement. The control implants (MicroThread) had a TiOblast surface, while the test implants (OsseoSpeed) had a fluoride-modified TiOblast surface. Both types of implants had a similar geometry, a diameter of 3.5 mm and were 8 mm long. Following installation, cover screws were placed and the flaps were adjusted and sutured to cover all implants. Four weeks after the first implant surgery, the installation procedure was repeated in the opposite side of the mandible. Two weeks later, biopsies were obtained and prepared for histological analysis. The void that occurred between the cut bone wall of the recipient site and the macro-threads of the implant immediately following implant installation was used to study early bone formation. It was demonstrated that the amount of new bone that formed in the voids within the first 2 weeks of healing was larger at fluoride-modified implants (test) than at TiOblast (control) implants. It was further observed that the amount of bone-to-implant contact that had been established after 2 weeks in the macro-threaded portion of the implant was significantly larger at the test implants than at the controls. It is suggested that the fluoride-modified implant surface promotes osseointegration in the early phase of healing following implant installation.

  18. Osteointegration of PLGA implants with nanostructured or microsized β-TCP particles in a minipig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Suokas, Esa O; Strandberg, Niko; Leino, Kari A; Laitio, Timo T; Aro, Hannu T

    2014-12-01

    Bioresorbable suture anchors and interference screws have certain benefits over equivalent titanium-alloy implants. However, there is a need for compositional improvement of currently used bioresorbable implants. We hypothesized that implants made of poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) compounded with nanostructured particles of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) would induce stronger osteointegration than implants made of PLGA compounded with microsized β-TCP particles. The experimental nanostructured self-reinforced PLGA (85L:15G)/β-TCP composite was made by high-energy ball-milling. Self-reinforced microsized PLGA (95L:5G)/β-TCP composite was prepared by melt-compounding. The composites were characterized by gas chromatography, Ubbelohde viscometry, scanning electron microscopy, laser diffractometry, and standard mechanical tests. Four groups of implants were prepared for the controlled laboratory study employing a minipig animal model. Implants in the first two groups were prepared from nanostructured and microsized PLGA/β-TCP composites respectively. Microroughened titanium-alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants served as positive intra-animal control, and pure PLGA implants as negative control. Cone-shaped implants were inserted in a random order unilaterally in the anterior cortex of the femoral shaft. Eight weeks after surgery, the mechanical strength of osteointegration of the implants was measured by a push-out test. The quality of new bone surrounding the implant was assessed by microcomputed tomography and histology. Implants made of nanostructured PLGA/β-TCP composite did not show improved mechanical osteointegration compared with the implants made of microsized PLGA/β-TCP composite. In the intra-animal comparison, the push-out force of two PLGA/β-TCP composites was 35-60% of that obtained with Ti6Al4V implants. The implant materials did not result in distinct differences in quality of new bone surrounding the implant.

  19. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    months postoperatively by the same assessor and put into four categories: excellent, good, fair, and poor. Operative time, blood loss, hospital expense, and complications were also recorded. All patients achieved successful radiographic fusion at 2 years, and this was achieved at 1 year in 25 out of 27 patients. At 2 years, clinical results were excellent in 15 patients, good in 10, fair in 1, and poor in 1. Regarding complications, one patient had a postoperative motor and sensory deficit of the nerve root. Reoperation was required in one patient due to migration of pedicle screws. No implant fractures or deformities occurred in any of the patients. PLIF using diagonal insertion of a single threaded cage with supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation enables sufficient decompression and solid interbody fusion to be achieved with minimal invasion of the posterior spinal elements. It is a clinically safer, easier, and more economical means of accomplishing PLIF.

  20. Free-hand thoracic pedicle screws placed by neurosurgery residents: a CT analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Vincent Y.; Chin, Cynthia T.; Lu, Daniel C.; Smith, Justin S.; Chou, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Free-hand thoracic pedicle screw placement is becoming more prevalent within neurosurgery residency training programs. This technique implements anatomic landmarks and tactile palpation without fluoroscopy or navigation to place thoracic pedicle screws. Because this technique is performed by surgeons in training, we wished to analyze the rate at which these screws were properly placed by residents by retrospectively reviewing the accuracy of resident-placed free-hand thoracic pedicle screws u...

  1. Blocking screws for the treatment of distal femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Cakmak, Selami; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel

    2013-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is one of the most convenient biological options for treating distal femoral fractures. Because the distal medulla of the femur is wider than the middle diaphysis and intramedullary nails cannot completely fill the intramedullary canal, intramedullary nailing of distal femoral fractures can be difficult when trying to obtain adequate reduction. Some different methods exist for achieving reduction. The purpose of this study was determine whether the use of blocking screws resolves varus or valgus and translation and recurvatum deformities, which can be encountered in antegrade and retrograde intramedullary nailing. Thirty-four patients with distal femoral fractures underwent intramedullary nailing between January 2005 and June 2011. Fifteen patients treated by intramedullary nailing and blocking screws were included in the study. Six patients had distal diaphyseal fractures and 9 had distal diaphyseo-metaphyseal fractures. Antegrade nailing was performed in 7 patients and retrograde nailing was performed in 8. Reduction during surgery and union during follow-up were achieved in all patients with no significant complications. Mean follow-up was 26.6 months. Mean time to union was 12.6 weeks. The main purpose of using blocking screws is to achieve reduction, but they are also useful for maintaining permanent reduction. When inserting blocking screws, the screws must be placed 1 to 3 cm away from the fracture line to avoid from propagation of the fracture. When applied properly and in an adequate way, blocking screws provide an efficient solution for deformities encountered during intramedullary nailing of distal femur fractures. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Screw-in forces during instrumentation by various file systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum screw-in forces generated during the movement of various Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) file systems. Materials and Methods Forty simulated canals in resin blocks were randomly divided into 4 groups for the following instruments: Mtwo size 25/0.07 (MTW, VDW GmbH), Reciproc R25 (RPR, VDW GmbH), ProTaper Universal F2 (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer), and ProTaper Next X2 (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer, n = 10). All the artificial canals were prepared to obtain a standardized lumen by using ProTaper Universal F1. Screw-in forces were measured using a custom-made experimental device (AEndoS-k, DMJ system) during instrumentation with each NiTi file system using the designated movement. The rotation speed was set at 350 rpm with an automatic 4 mm pecking motion at a speed of 1 mm/sec. The pecking depth was increased by 1 mm for each pecking motion until the file reach the working length. Forces were recorded during file movement, and the maximum force was extracted from the data. Maximum screw-in forces were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc comparison at a significance level of 95%. Results Reciproc and ProTaper Universal files generated the highest maximum screw-in forces among all the instruments while M-two and ProTaper Next showed the lowest (p < 0.05). Conclusions Geometrical differences rather than shaping motion and alloys may affect the screw-in force during canal instrumentation. To reduce screw-in forces, the use of NiTi files with smaller cross-sectional area for higher flexibility is recommended. PMID:27847752

  3. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  4. Effect of increased crown height on stress distribution in short dental implant components and their surrounding bone: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaqi, Haddad Arabi; Mousavi Mashhadi, Mahmoud; Safari, Hamed; Samandari, Mohammad Mahdi; Geramipanah, Farideh

    2015-06-01

    Implants in posterior regions of the jaw require short dental implants with long crown heights, leading to increased crown-to-implant ratios and mechanical stress. This can lead to fracture and screw loosening. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dynamic nature and behavior of prosthetic components and preimplant bone and evaluate the effect of increased crown height space (CHS) and crown-to-implant ratio on stress concentrations under external oblique forces. The severely resorbed bone of a posterior mandible site was modeled with Mimics and Catia software. A second mandibular premolar tooth was modeled with CHS values of 8.8, 11.2, 13.6, and 16 mm. A Straumann implant (4.1×8 mm), a directly attached crown, and an abutment screw were modeled with geometric data and designed by using SolidWorks software. Abaqus software was used for the dynamic simulation of screw tightening and the application of an external load to the buccal cusp at a 75.8-degree angle with the occlusal plane. The distribution of screw load and member load at each step was compared, and the stress values were calculated within the dental implant complex and surrounding bone. During tightening, the magnitude and distribution of the preload and clamp load were uniform and equal at the cross section of all CHSs. Under an external load, the screw load decreased and member load increased. An increase in the CHS caused the corresponding distribution to become more nonuniform and increased the maximum compressive and tensile stresses in the preimplant bone. Additionally, the von Mises stress decreased at the abutment screw and increased at the abutment and fixture. Under nonaxial forces, increased CHS does not influence the decrease in screw load or increase in member load. However, it contributes to screw loosening and fatigue fracture by skewing the stress distribution to the transverse section of the implant. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  5. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine) ...

  6. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine). ...

  7. Degradation of implant materials

    CERN Document Server

    Eliaz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This book surveys the degradation of implant materials, reviewing in detail such failure mechanisms as corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with monitoring techniques. Surveys common implant biomaterials, as well as procedures for implant retrieval and analysis.

  8. Three dimensional finite element analysis to detect stress distribution in spiral implants and surrounding bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Matteo; Palmieri, Annalisa; Farinella, Francesca; Brunelli, Giorgio; Carinci, Francesco; Girardi, Ambra; Spinelli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The aim of research was to study spiral family implant by finite element analysis (FEA) inserted in different bone qualities connected with abutments of different angulations. The biomechanical behaviour of 4.2 × 13 mm dental implants, connecting screw, straight and 15° and 25° angulated abutments subjected to static loads, in contact with high and poor bone qualities was evaluated by FEA. The lowest stress value was found in the system composed by implants and straight abut-ments loaded with a vertical force, while the highest stress value was found in implants with 15° angulated abutment loaded with an angulated force. In addition, we found the lower the bone quality, the higher the distribution of the stress within the bone. Spiral family implants can be used successfully in low bone quality but applying a straight force is recommended.

  9. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto,Yoshihisa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS. When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2. Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion.

  10. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  11. The best location for proximal locking screw for femur interlocking nailing: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A Karaarslan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our findings, there is twice as much difference in locking screw bending resistance between these two application levels. To avoid proximal locking screw deformation, locking screws should be placed in the level of the lesser trochanter in nailing of 1/3 middle and distal femur fractures.

  12. Screw angulation affects bone-screw stresses and bone graft load sharing in anterior cervical corpectomy fusion with a rigid screw-plate construct: a finite element model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mozammil; Natarajan, Raghu N; Fayyazi, Amir H; Braaksma, Brian R; Andersson, Gunnar B J; An, Howard S

    2009-12-01

    Anterior corpectomy and reconstruction with bone graft and a rigid screw-plate construct is an established procedure for treatment of cervical neural compression. Despite its reliability in relieving symptoms, there is a high rate of construct failure, especially in multilevel cases. There has been no study evaluating the biomechanical effects of screw angulation on construct stability; this study investigates the C4-C7 construct stability and load-sharing properties among varying screw angulations in a rigid plate-screw construct. A finite element model of a two-level cervical corpectomy with static anterior cervical plate. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of an intact C3-T1 segment was developed and validated. From this intact model, a fusion model (two-level [C5, C6] anterior corpectomy) was developed and validated. After corpectomy, allograft interbody fusion with a rigid anterior screw-plate construct was created from C4 to C7. Five additional FE models were developed from the fusion model corresponding to five different combinations of screw angulations within the vertebral bodies (C4, C7): (0 degrees, 0 degrees), (5 degrees, 5 degrees), (10 degrees, 10 degrees), (15 degrees, 15 degrees), and (15 degrees, 0 degrees). The fifth fusion model was termed as a hybrid fusion model. The stability of a two-level corpectomy reconstruction is not dependent on the position of the screws. Despite the locked screw-plate interface, some degree of load sharing is transmitted to the graft. The load seen by the graft and the shear stress at the bone-screw junction is dependent on the angle of the screws with respect to the end plate. Higher stresses are seen at more divergent angles, particularly at the lower level of the construct. This study suggests that screw divergence from the end plates not only increases load transmission to the graft but also predisposes the screws to higher shear forces after corpectomy reconstruction. In particular, the inferior screw

  13. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  14. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  15. InterTan钉板系统与空心钉固定Pauwels Ⅲ型股骨颈骨折的有限元分析%InterTan compression hip screw versus three parallel cannulated screws for Pauwels Ⅲ femoral neck fractures: a finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晟; 王一民; 王博炜; 佟矿; 余斌

    2013-01-01

    of the 3D model of Pauwels Ⅲ femoral neck fracture together with 3D reconstruction of fixation models of InterTan compression hip screw and of three parallel cannulated screws by means of reverse engineering software.With Ansys software,the 3D finite element models were established of the 2 internal fixations,in which axial stresses of 700 N were loaded.We measured and compared respectively the yon Mises stress and displacement distributions in different fixations and on the femurs fixated by the 2 implants,as well as the stress and displacement peak values.Results The stress on the implant was mainly located on the middle of the screw and near the fracture line.The peak stress was higher in the cannulated screw model (116.4 MPa) than in the InterTan compression hip screw versus model (65.7 MPa).The stress on the femur was mainly located on the inside of the proximal end.The peak stress was also higher in the cannulated screw model (27.6 MPa) than in the InterTan compression hip screw versus model (13.2 MPa).In the lnterTan compression hip screw versus model,the implant displacement was vertically downward,with the peak displacement of 0.84 mm at the fixation and 0.76mm at the bone end.In the cannulated screw model,the implant displacement was along the femoral neck,with the peak displacement of 1.49 mm at the fixation and 1.61 mm at the bone end.Conclusions In the treatment of Pauwels Ⅲ femoral neck fracture,the InterTan compression hip screw versus results in even stress distribution and may be superior to the three parallel cannulated screws in the fixation stability.Since InterTan compression hip screw versus fixation can lead to a vertically downward displacement,coxa vara is a complication that should be prevented.Since the three parallel cannulated screws can lead to a displacement along the lateral femoral neck,shortening of the femoral neck should be taken into consideration as a likely complication.

  16. A comparison of fit of CNC-milled titanium and zirconia frameworks to implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduo, Jaafar; Lyons, Karl; Waddell, Neil; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Computer numeric controlled (CNC) milling was proven to be predictable method to fabricate accurately fitting implant titanium frameworks. However, no data are available regarding the fit of CNC-milled implant zirconia frameworks. To compare the precision of fit of implant frameworks milled from titanium and zirconia and relate it to peri-implant strain development after framework fixation. A partially edentulous epoxy resin models received two Branemark implants in the areas of the lower left second premolar and second molar. From this model, 10 identical frameworks were fabricated by mean of CNC milling. Half of them were made from titanium and the other half from zirconia. Strain gauges were mounted close to the implants to qualitatively and quantitatively assess strain development as a result of framework fitting. In addition, the fit of the framework implant interface was measured using an optical microscope, when only one screw was tightened (passive fit) and when all screws were tightened (vertical fit). The data was statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. All frameworks produced measurable amounts of peri-implant strain. The zirconia frameworks produced significantly less strain than titanium. Combining the qualitative and quantitative information indicates that the implants were under vertical displacement rather than horizontal. The vertical fit was similar for zirconia (3.7 µm) and titanium (3.6 µm) frameworks; however, the zirconia frameworks exhibited a significantly finer passive fit (5.5 µm) than titanium frameworks (13.6 µm). CNC milling produced zirconia and titanium frameworks with high accuracy. The difference between the two materials in terms of fit is expected to be of minimal clinical significance. The strain developed around the implants was more related to the framework fit rather than framework material. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of different types of prosthetic platforms on stress-distribution in dental implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatel, Lurian; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Kudo, Guilherme Abu Halawa; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Santiago, Joel Ferreira

    2017-02-01

    A biomechanical analysis of different types of implant connections is relevant to clinical practice because it may impact the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the Morse taper connections and the stress distribution of structures associated with the platform switching (PSW) concept. It will do this by obtaining data on the biomechanical behavior of the main structure in relation to the dental implant using the 3-dimensional finite element methodology. Four models were simulated (with each containing a single prosthesis over the implant) in the molar region, with the following specifications: M1 and M2 is an external hexagonal implant on a regular platform; M3 is an external hexagonal implant using PSW concept; and M4 is a Morse taper implant. The modeling process involved the use of images from InVesalius CT (computed tomography) processing software, which were refined using Rhinoceros 4.0 and SolidWorks 2011 CAD software. The models were then exported into the finite element program (FEMAP 11.0) to configure the meshes. The models were processed using NeiNastram software. The main results are that M1 (regular diameter 4mm) had the highest stress concentration area and highest microstrain concentration for bone tissue, dental implants, and the retaining screw (P<0.05). Using the PSW concept increases the area of the stress concentrations in the retaining screw (P<0.05) more than in the regular platform implant. It was concluded that the increase in diameter is beneficial for stress distribution and that the PSW concept had higher stress concentrations in the retaining screw and the crown compared to the regular platform implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-tooth implant reconstructions: esthetic factors influencing the decision between titanium and zirconia abutments in anterior regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Zembic, Anja; Jung, Ronald Ernst; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans Franz; Mattiola, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Implant-supported single crowns have become a valid alternative to conventional fixed dental prostheses due to their excellent clinical long-term results. However, along with good survival rates, esthetic factors are important for success in anterior regions. Today, several kinds of implant abutments are offered by implant manufacturers. A choice must be made between standardized and customized abutments; further, different abutment materials such as titanium or various ceramics (alumina, zirconia) are available. Finally, the reconstruction can be cemented on the abutment or screw-retained directly on the implant. When choosing an abutment for an anterior single-unit case, several factors should be considered: visibility of the region (eg, high vs low smile line); biotype of the gingiva; color of the neighboring teeth; and finally, esthetic expectations of the patient. In esthetically demanding situations, customized ceramic abutments are indicated. In patient situations with thin peri-implant soft tissues, zirconia abutments and all-ceramic crowns should be used in combination. In cases with thick mucosa, titanium can be used as the abutment material, combined with metal-ceramic crowns. In order to avoid difficulties removing excess cement, screw-retained reconstructions may be preferred; however, the screw access hole should be positioned palatal to the incisal edge.

  19. Falhas estruturais em prótese total fixasobre implantes: relato de caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elken Gomes Rivaldo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A total conventional prosthesis implant retained called Branemark Protocolo or Torontosprosthesis is one of the alternatives of rehabilitation for edentulous patient with a residual bonethat do not provides neither retention and stability for a conventional prosthesis. An implantretained screw prosthesis recovers and provides an improvement of quality in mastication,swallowing, phonetic and consequently in the quality of life. The traditional treatment of afixed retained denture is carried through in two stages, surgical and a prosthetic one, with aninterval of four and six months respectively for lower and upper jaw. The abutments are screwon the dental implants and over those, as well as the alloy infrastructure with the acrylic teeth are screw above them. This paper describes the longitudinal maintenance of 2 years of onepatient that was rehabilitated with a full fixed acrylic prosthesis with four dental implants.

  20. The implant neck: smooth or provided with retention elements. A biomechanical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, S

    1999-10-01

    A combined three-dimensional and axisymmetric finite element analysis was made of the effect upon the peak interfacial shear stress of providing an axially loaded mandibular dental implant with retention elements all the way up to the crest of the implant as opposed to a smooth neck. The effect of increased wall thickness of the implant and of using bi-cortical fixation as opposed to uni-cortical fixation was also studied. Retention elements at the implant neck were found to bring about a major decrease in the peak interfacial shear stress. Increased wall thickness and bi-cortical fixation also resulted in decreased peak interfacial shear stress but this effect was minor. The interpretation of this was that all these three measures increase the capacity of the implant to carry axial loads. Thus from a biomechanical viewpoint it appears to be advantageous to provide the neck of screw-shaped implants with retention elements, for example a rough surface of suitable micro-architecture and/or a micro-thread. It is furthermore suggested that retention elements at the implant neck will counteract marginal bone resorption in accordance with Wolff's law. This paper is a revision of: Hansson, S. (1997) Some steps to improve the capacity of dental implants to resist axial loads. In: Hansson, S., ed. Towards an optimized dental implant and implant bridge design: A biomechanical approach. Thesis. Göteborg: Chalmers University of Technology.

  1. [Experimental study of osseointegration of zirconium and titanium dental implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakov, O B; Doktorov, A A; D'iakova, S V; Denisov-Nikol'skiĭ, Iu I; Grötz, K A

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment performed on pigs, methods of light and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the interaction of zirconium and titanium dental implants with bone 6 months following their insertion. Distinct features of integration of both implant types with bone structures were detected. Sites of direct contact of bone structures with metal were found to undergo constant remodeling according to biochemical and metabolic conditions in each zone of an implant surface. Statistically the degree of interactive properties of zirconium implants significantly exceeded similar parameter for titanium screws. Along the perimeter of the zones of bone contact with zirconium implants greater numbers of forming and formed bone areas were revealed as compared to the zones of bone contact with titanium implants, where erosion lacunae were more numerous. The complex of research methods used in this study have not revealed distinct changes in the structure of osteocytes, located in immediate proximity to the metal surface in comparison with more distant sites in the bone.

  2. Current status of noncemented hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, W H

    1987-01-01

    Recently the operative techniques, instrumentation, design, and material properties of bony ingrowth total hip replacement have been greatly improved. I prefer a hemispherical acetabular component fixed with screws going through the metal shell. The titanium mesh allows microinterlock with new bone, and macrointerlock is obtained by adding bone graft into the unused screw holes. The femoral component, made of Tivanium with titanium mesh attached to it by a new process called diffusion bonding, retains superalloy fatigue strength characteristics. An intimate press fit is assured by the specific operative technique, and both the fiber mesh and the collar provide proximal stress transfer. The design affords a nondestructive method for removal if necessary. The short-term clinical results are promising; most patients function as well as with cemented total hip replacement. The incidence of thigh pain has been significantly reduced since prior reports of cementless total hip replacement; however, a few patients still have thigh pain. The results in revision surgery are also promising, but as in cemented total hip replacement, the functional capacity of revision cases is usually lower than primary cases. There is an increased capacity to correct complex and difficult acetabular problems with this acetabular component. Obviously, long-term data are needed to establish the behavior of these implants over the immediate and long term.

  3. Guided tissue regeneration ensures osseointegration of dental implants placed into extraction sockets. An experimental study in monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, L; Gotfredsen, K; Hjørting-Hansen, E

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of achieving osseointegration of dental titanium implants, inserted into alveoli immediately after tooth extraction, by covering the recipient site with a teflon membrane. In each of 7 monkeys, mucoperiosteal flaps were raised...... on the buccal and palatal aspects of the maxillary molars in both sides of the jaw. The second molars were then extracted and self tapping titanium implants of the screw type (Astra Dental Implants) were inserted into the sockets of the largest roots. In the coronal portion of the sockets, a void was always...... present between the implant and the socket walls. In one side of the jaw, a membrane (Gore-Tex Augmentation Material) was adjusted to cover the implant. The implant in the other side of the jaw served as control and was only covered by the tissue flaps. Microscopic analysis after 3 months of healing...

  4. Role of rod diameter in comparison between only screws versus hooks and screws in posterior instrumentation of thoracic curve in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamartina, Claudio; Petruzzi, Maria; Macchia, Marcello; Stradiotti, Paola; Zerbi, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    Since the introduction of Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation in 1984, the correction techniques in scoliosis surgery have changed from Harrington principles of concave distraction to segmental realignment to a variety of possibilities including the rod rotation manoeuvres, and to segmental approximation via cantilever methods. Additionally, pedicle screw utilization in lumbar curves enhanced correction and stabilization of various deformities, and various studies have strongly supported the clinical advantages of lumbar pedicle screws versus conventional hook instrumentation. Pedicle screw constructs have become increasingly popular in the treatment of patients with spinal deformity. When applied to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients, pedicle screw fixation has demonstrated increased corrective ability compared with traditional hook/hybrid instrumentation. In our study, we do a retrospective review of idiopathic scoliosis patients (King 2-Lenke 1 B/C) treated with a selective thoracic posterior fusion using an all-screw construct versus a hybrid (pedicle screws and hooks) construct and, compare the percentage of correction of the scoliotic curves obtained with screws alone and screws and hooks. Special attention was given to the rod diameter and correction technique. Our results show that the percentage of correction of idiopathic thoracic scoliosis is similar when treating the scoliosis with rods and screws alone or with rods, screws and hooks; therefore, we and the majority of authors in the literature do not consider the rod section. This can be an important parameter in the evaluation of the superiority of treatment with screws only or screws and hooks. In our study, even if not of statistical significance, the better thoracic curve correction obtained with the hybrid group should be ascribed to the fact that in this group mostly 6 mm rods were used.

  5. Atomistic simulations of jog migration on extended screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Leffers, T.; Pedersen, O.B.;

    2001-01-01

    We have performed large-scale atomistic simulations of the migration of elementary jogs on dissociated screw dislocations in Cu. The local crystalline configurations, transition paths. effective masses. and migration barriers for the jogs are determined using an interatomic potential based on the...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of the following acute and chronic instabilities or deformities of the thoracic, lumbar, and... conditions are significant mechanical instability or deformity of the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine... screw spinal system because this is a technically demanding procedure presenting a risk of...

  7. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique.

  8. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Farid-Escorcia, Hector; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique. PMID:25336831

  9. Ankle fusion using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Hendrickx; G.M.M.J. Kerkhoffs; S.A.S. Stufkens; C.N. van Dijk; R.K. Marti

    2011-01-01

    Reliable fusion and optimal correction of the alignment of the ankle joint using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint after insufficient other treatment, severe deformity of the osteoarthritic ankle joint, or salvation procedure after failed arthroplasty. Ac

  10. Are inclined screw blades for vertical grain augers advantageous?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, F.J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Due to modern technology, screw blades are often manufactured by rolling them out of one single strip of steel. When simultaneously some blade inclination is applied, less residual stresses and/or larger possible ratios between outer and shaft diameter are claimed by some manufacturers, which seems

  11. Coupled Thermodynamic Behavior of New Screw Compressors Rotors Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arístides Rivera Torres

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article displays an evaluation of the thermodynamic behavior of screw compressor rotors with new profiles, obtained with the help of the Scorpath 2000 software. This allows predicting precisely the operation of the compressor, as well as its thermodynamic evaluation, under equal conditions, with the work of other compressors fitted with rotor profiles of other kinds.

  12. Residence time distribution in twin-screw extruders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the twin-screw extruders used in the food industry at short time high temperature processes the knowledge of their reactor properties is incomplete for mass- and heat flow. Therefore each process change such as: scale-up or product development requires a great number of measurements before an ac

  13. Kinematics of a Hybrid Manipulator by Means of Screw Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo-Alvarado, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Tecnologico de Celaya (Mexico)

    2005-11-15

    In this work the kinematics of a hybrid manipulator, namely a fully parallel-serial manipulator, with a particular topology is approached by means of the theory of screws. Given the length of the six independent limbs, the forward position analysis of the mechanism under study, indeed the computation of the resulting pose, position and orientation, of the end-platform with respect to the fixed platform, is carried out in closed-form solution. Therefore conveniently this initial analysis avoids the use of a numerical technique such as the Newton-Raphson method. Writing in screw form the reduced acceleration state of the translational platform, with respect to the fixed platform, a simple expression for the computation of the acceleration of the translational platform is derived by taking advantage of the properties of reciprocal screws, via the Klein form, a bilinear symmetric form of the Lie algebra e(3). Following a similar procedure, a simple expression for the computation of the angular acceleration of the end-platform, with respect to the translational platform, is easily derived. Naturally, as an intermediate step, this contribution also provides the forward and inverse velocity analyses of the chosen parallel-serial manipulator. Finally, in order to prove the versatility of the expressions obtained via screw theory for solving the kinematics, up to the acceleration analysis, of the proposed spatial mechanism, a numerical example is solved with the help of commercial computer codes.

  14. Residence time distribution in twin-screw extruders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.

    1992-01-01

    For the twin-screw extruders used in the food industry at short time high temperature processes the knowledge of their reactor properties is incomplete for mass- and heat flow. Therefore each process change such as: scale-up or product development requires a great number of measurements

  15. Design of new silencers for a screw compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, L.J. van; Korst, H.J.C.; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Two screw compressors used for the recycling of waste gas showed high vibration in the discharge piping. To mitigate the vibration problems new silencers had to be designed. A great challenge was the large variation in operating conditions, especially the variation of the molecular weight of the

  16. Optimisation of acoustic silencer for the screw compressor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swamy, M.; Lier, L.J. van; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    In one of the screw compressor system, designed silencer was not optimal. A great challenge was the large variation in operating conditions, especially the variation of the molecular weight of the gas. There was need to optimize the silencer. This paper describes the acoustic modelling tools to

  17. Local mixing effects of screw elements during extrusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einde, van den R.M.; Kroon, P.J.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    An in-line method was applied to determine local residence time distribution (RTD) at two places in a completely filled corotating twin screw extruder. Axial mixing effects of different types of elements were evaluated. Paddles +90 degrees induced flow patterns that appear to be circular, both

  18. Optimisation of acoustic silencer for the screw compressor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swamy, M.; Lier, L.J. van; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    In one of the screw compressor system, designed silencer was not optimal. A great challenge was the large variation in operating conditions, especially the variation of the molecular weight of the gas. There was need to optimize the silencer. This paper describes the acoustic modelling tools to opti

  19. Kinematics Analysis Based on Screw Theory of a Humanoid Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAN Cui-hua; FAN Xun; LI Cheng-rong; ZHAO Zhong-hui

    2007-01-01

    A humanoid robot is a complex dynamic system for its idiosyncrasy. This paper aims to provide a mathematical and theoretical foundation for the design of the configuration, kinematics analysis of a novel humanoid robot. It has a simplified configuration and design for entertainment purpose. The design methods, principle and mechanism are discussed. According to the design goals of this research, there are ten degrees of freedom in the two bionic arms.Modularization, concurrent design and extension theory methods were adopted in the configuration study and screw theory was introduced into the analysis of humanoid robot kinematics. Comparisons with other methods show that: 1) only two coordinates need to be established in the kinematics analysis of humanoid robot based on screw theory; 2) the spatial manipulator Jacobian obtained by using twist and exponential product formula is succinct and legible; 3) adopting screw theory to resolve the humanoid robot arms kinematics question can avoid singularities; 4) using screw theory can solve the question of specification insufficiency.

  20. [Posterior atlantoaxial fixation using vertex multiaxial screw system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dejun; Song, Yueming

    2007-06-01

    This study aims to assess the effectiveness and advantages of Vertex multiaxial screw system in use for stabilizing the atlanto-axial junction. The entry point of the atlas was located 18-20 mm lateral to the midline and 2.0 mm superior to the inferior border of posterior arch, and the direction of screw was chosen to be about 10 degrees medial to the sagittal plane and about 5 degrees cephalad to the transverse plane. In odontoid vertebra (C2), the directi