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Sample records for non-resurfaced knees revised

  1. Is Electrocautery of Patella Useful in Patella Non-Resurfacing Total Knee Arthroplasty?: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

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    Kwon, Sae Kwang; Nguku, Levis; Han, Chang Dong; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2015-12-01

    There is controversy over the need for electrocauterization of the patella in non-resurfacing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We investigated whether this procedure is beneficial through a prospective randomized controlled trial. Fifty patients who underwent electrocautery were compared with 50 patients who did not undergo this procedure. We determined cartilage status, preoperative and postoperative American Knee Society (AKS) score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities score (WOMAC) and the Patellofemoral (PF) scores for a minimum of 5 years. The two groups did not differ significantly in demographics, intraoperative cartilage status, or preoperative or postoperative outcomes. No complications were detected in either group. We found no benefits of electrocautery of the patella in patellar non-resurfacing TKA up to 5 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-resurfacing techniques in the management of the patella at total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Findlay, I; Wong, F; Smith, C; Back, D; Davies, A; Ajuied, A

    2016-03-01

    Recent meta-analyses support not resurfacing the patella at the time of TKA. Several different modes of intervention are reported for non-resurfacing management of the patella at TKA. We have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of non-resurfacing interventions in TKA. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) study methodology and reporting system was adopted, utilising the PRISMA checklist and statement. Classes of patella interventions were defined as: 0. No intervention. 1. Osteophyte excision only. 2. Osteophyte excision, denervation, with soft tissue debridement. 3. Osteophyte excision, denervation, soft tissue debridement, and drilling or micro-fracture of eburnated bone. 4. Patellar resurfacing. A meta-analysis was conducted upon the pre- and post-operative KSS for each technique. Four hundred and twenty-three studies were identified, 12 studies met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review and eight for the meta-analysis. Two studies compared different non-resurfacing patellar techniques, the other studies used the non-resurfacing cohort as controls for their prospective RCTs comparing patellar resurfacing with non-resurfacing. The meta-analysis revealed no significant difference between the techniques. We conclude that there is no significant difference in KSS for differing non-resurfacing patellar techniques, but further trials using patellofemoral specific scores may better demonstrate superior efficacy of specific classes of patella intervention, by virtue of greater sensitivity for patellofemoral pain and dysfunction. I. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 34%, as compared to 55% in revisions of a revision prosthesis (p = 0.05). The failure rate of the 2-stage revisions was 30%. Median time interval between stages was 84 (9-597) days. 117 (54%) of the 2-stage revisions were revisions of a primary...... prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 21%, as compared to 29% in revisions of a previously revised prosthesis (p = 0.1). Overall postoperative mortality was 0.6% in high-volume centers (> 30 procedures within 2 years) as opposed to 7% in the remaining centers (p = 0.003). Interpretation...

  4. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

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    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  5. New concepts in revision total knee arthroplasty.

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    Vince, Kelly G; Droll, Kurt; Chivas, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Revision knee arthroplasty should be regarded as a discipline separate from primary surgery. A disciplined approach to diagnosis is mandatory in which the following categories for failure are useful: (a) sepsis, (b) extensor mechanism rupture, (c) stiffness, (d) instability, (e) periprosthetic fracture, (f) aseptic loosening and osteolysis, (g) patellar complications and malrotation, (h) component breakage, and (i) no diagnosis. In the event of no coherent explanation for pain and disability, the possibilities of chronic regional pain syndrome, hip or spine pathology, and inability of current technology to meet patient expectations should be considered and revision surgery should be avoided. Revision arthroplasty cannot be performed as if it were a primary procedure and indeed will be eight (or more) different surgeries depending on the cause of failure. Though perhaps counterintuitive, there is a logical rationale and empirical evidence to support complete revision in virtually every case. In general, revision implant systems are required. The early dependence on the "joint line" is inadequate, failing as it does to recognize that the level of the articulation is a three-dimensional concept and not simply a "line." The key to revision surgery technique is that the flexion gap is determined by femoral component size and the extension gap by proximal distal component position. Accordingly, a general technical pathway of three steps can be recommended: 1) tibial platform; 2) stabilization of the knee in flexion with (a) femoral component rotation and (b) size selected with evaluation of (c) patellar height as an indication of "joint line" in flexion only; and 3) stabilization of the knee in extension, an automatic step. Stem extensions improve fixation and, if they engage the diaphysis, may be used as a guide for positioning. Porous metals designed as augments for bone defects may prove more important as "modular fixation interfaces." It is postulated that with the

  6. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery...

  7. Early outcomes of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty

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    Clements, Warren J; Miller, Lisa; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Graves, Stephen E; Ryan, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background Patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty is a contentious issue. The literature suggests that resurfacing of the patella is based on surgeon preference, and little is known about the role and timing of resurfacing and how this affects outcomes. Methods We analyzed 134,799 total knee arthroplasties using data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hazards ratios (HRs) were used to compare rates of early revision between patella resurfacing at the primary procedure (the resurfacing group, R) and primary arthroplasty without resurfacing (no-resurfacing group, NR). We also analyzed the outcomes of NR that were revised for isolated patella addition. Results At 5 years, the R group showed a lower revision rate than the NR group: cumulative per cent revision (CPR) 3.1% and 4.0%, respectively (HR = 0.75, p patella only” revisions were more common in the NR group (29%) than in the R group (6%). Non-resurfaced knees revised for isolated patella addition had a higher revision rate than patella resurfacing at the primary procedure, with a 4-year CPR of 15% and 2.8%, respectively (HR = 4.1, p patella was not resurfaced, and suggest that surgeons may be inclined to resurface later if there is patellofemoral pain. However, 15% of non-resurfaced knees revised for patella addition are re-revised by 4 years. Our results suggest an early beneficial outcome for patella resurfacing at primary arthroplasty based on revision rates up to 5 years. PMID:19968604

  8. Revision total knee arthroplasty using a custom tantalum implant in a patient following multiple failed revisions.

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    McNamara, Colin A; Gösthe, Raúl G; Patel, Preetesh D; Sanders, Kristopher C; Huaman, Gustavo; Suarez, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    The number of revision total knee arthroplasty procedures performed annually is increasing and, subsequently, so is the number of patients presenting following a failed revision. Rerevising a total knee arthroplasty after one or more failed revision procedures presents many challenges, including diminished bone stock for prosthetic fixation. "Off the shelf" implants may not offer the best alternative for reconstruction. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient who required a rerevision total knee arthroplasty following multiple failed revisions with severe femoral and tibia bone loss. We describe a novel technique we employed to improve component fixation within the compromised bone stock.

  9. Functional Outcomes of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Following Failed Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

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    Chris Ironside

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA can be used to treat medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Some of these knees will eventually fail, and need to be revised. There is controversy about using UKA in younger patients as a definitive procedure or as a means to delay total knee arthroplasty (TKA because the outcomes of subsequent revision surgery may be inferior to a primary TKA. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 46 revision TKA patients following failed UKA (UKA revisions using functional outcomes questionnaires and compared the results with a cohort of age and gender matched primary TKA patients. Our hypothesis was that UKA revision surgery would be inferior to primary TKA surgery. Results: Data was collected on 33 knees after a mean follow-up period of five years. There was no significant difference in the Oxford Knee Score (33.7 vs 37.1, p = 0.09 or the Western Ontario and MacMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC (24.8 vs. 19.1, p = 0.22. A subgroup analysis demonstrated that UKAs, which fail early, are more likely to produce an inferior outcome following revision surgery than those that survive more than five years. Discussion: We conclude that UKA can be used effectively in appropriately selected patients, as the functional outcome of their subsequent revision to TKA is not significantly inferior to a primary TKA.

  10. Microbiological diagnosis in revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Pitter, Frederik Taylor; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Revision of infected knee arthroplasties is associated with high failure rates (30-40%). An understanding of the microbiology is important to optimize treatment and outcome. We describe microbiological diagnostic practice and diagnosis in revision of infected knee arthroplasties....... METHODS: One hundred and two partial revisions (open debridement and exchange of tibial insert) and 213 two-stage procedures performed due to infection in 275 patients from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2013 were included and analysed by linkage to data from a nationwide registry on microbiological test results...

  11. Venous Thromboembolic Disease in Revision vs Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

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    Boylan, Matthew R; Perfetti, Dean C; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Delanois, Ronald E; Paulino, Carl B; Mont, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) is a serious complication of primary and revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the incidence and risk of VTED for revision compared with primary TKA cases have not been well-described. We identified 225,584 TKAs (208,954 primaries, 16,630 revisions) in the 2003-2012 Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. Odds ratios (ORs) expressed the risk of VTED for revision vs primary TKA, and models were adjusted for age, gender, race, and Charlson comorbidity scores. Outcome analyses were further stratified into deep venous thromboses (DVTs) and pulmonary emboli (PEs). The incidence of VTED within 30 days was 2.24% for primary and 1.84% for revision. In multivariable-adjusted regression, the OR of VTED within 30 days for revision compared with primary was 0.81 (95% confidence interval = 0.72-0.91; P < .001). The incidence of VTED within 90 days was 2.42% for primary and 2.13% for revision (P = .022), with a multivariable-adjusted OR of 0.87 (95% confidence interval = 0.78-0.97; P = .010) for revision compared with primary. The association was stronger for PE (OR = 0.63; P < .001) than DVT (OR = 0.87; P = .035) at 30 days, and significant for PE (OR = 0.69; P < .001), but not DVT (OR = 0.94; P = .284) at 90 days. In a large statewide database, the risk of VTED was lower for revision TKA compared with primary TKA. The reasons for this observation are not known, but might be related to aggressive prophylactic management of patients undergoing revision procedures. Future studies should attempt to clarify differences in patient selection and management for primary vs revision procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing contemporary revision burden among hip and knee joint replacement registries

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    Brian J. McGrory, MD, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Revision burden has gradually decreased for hip replacements and has remained relatively constant for knee replacements both for the last 4 years and compared to historic controls. Knee revision burden was lower than hip revision burden for each period examined. Revision burden is one measure that may be helpful in following the effect of changes in surgical technique and implant design over time in registry populations and may be a helpful way to compare overall results between registries.

  13. Revision total knee arthroplasty with the use of trabecular metal cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus L; Petersen, Michael Mygind; Schrøder, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    "Trabecular Metal Cone" (TM Cone) (Zimmer, Inc, Warsaw, Ind) for reconstruction of bone loss in the proximal tibia during revision total knee arthroplasty is now optional. Forty patients were randomized to receive revision total knee arthroplasty with or without TM Cone (No TM Cone). The Anderson...

  14. The Use of Epoetin-α in Revision Knee Arthroplasty

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    Lawrence A. Delasotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To evaluate the efficacy of epoetin-α prior to revision total knee arthroplasty, we hypothesized that epoetin-α will reduce blood transfusion. Methods. Eighty-one patients were compared in this retrospective review; twenty-eight patients received our dosing regimen. All patients were mildly anemic. Epoetin-α to control (1 : 2 patient matching occurred so that one of two attending surgeons, gender, BMI, complexity of surgery, ASA score, and age were similar between groups. The clinical triggers for blood transfusion during or after the procedure were determined based on peri- and postoperative hemoglobin levels, ASA score, and/or clinical symptoms consistent with anemia. Blood salvage was not used. Results. Blood transfusion and length of stay were lower in the study group. None of the patients who received epoetin-α underwent transfusion. Hemoglobin increased from 11.97 to 13.8, preoperatively. Hemoglobin at day of surgery and time of discharge were higher. Gender, BMI, ASA score, total and hidden blood losses, calculated blood loss, preop PLT, PT, PTT, and INR were similar between groups. One Epogen patient had an uncomplicated DVT (3.6%. Conclusions. Epoetin-α may have a role in the mildly anemic revision knee patient. It may also decrease patient length of stay allowing for earlier readiness to resume normal activities and/or meet short-term milestones. A randomized study to evaluate the direct and indirect costs of such a treatment methodology in the mildly anemic revision patient may be warranted.

  15. Outcome after isolated polyethylene tibial insert exchange in revision total knee arthroplasty.

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    Baker, Richard P; Masri, Bassam A; Greidanus, Nelson V; Garbuz, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    We identified 45 knees in 42 patients who had an isolated tibial insert exchange for a failed primary knee arthroplasty with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. The mean age at revision was 68 years, and the mean time to revision was 80 months. Thirty patients completed follow-up questionnaires (Oxford Knee Score, University Of California Activity Index score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC], and Short Form 12) with a mean follow-up of 58 months. Patients' current scores were compared with preoperative scores in 14 knees. Four patients (9%) were subsequently revised. Significant improvement was seen in the Oxford Knee Score, Short Form 12 physical component, and all WOMAC domains, but only 58% of patients had a clinically successful result by global WOMAC score. When patients are selected appropriately, an isolated liner exchange can significantly improve the function of the knee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Joint line and patellar height restoration after revision total knee arthroplasty

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    Jong-Keun Seon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: JL position can be sufficiently restored with appropriate distal femoral augment reconstruction after revision TKA, but the patellar height cannot be well improved, especially in the septic revision with obvious PT contracture. No correlation was found between the JL position and patellar height to the knee function post revision TKA.

  17. Short term outcomes of revision total knee arthroplasty.

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    Dieterich, James D; Fields, Adam C; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative complications in revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). The aim of this study was to assess which preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in rTKA. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement (NSQIP) database, we identified patients undergoing rTKA from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and complications within thirty days of surgery were analyzed. A total of 3421 patients underwent rTKA. After adjusted analysis, dialysis (P = 0.016) was associated with minor complications. Male gender (P = 0.03), older age (P = 0.029), ASA class >2 (P = 0.017), wound class >2 (P < 0.0001), emergency operation (P = 0.038), and pulmonary comorbidity (P = 0.047) were associated with major complications.

  18. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

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    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  19. The influence of postoperative coronal alignment on revision surgery in total knee arthroplasty.

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    Morgan, Samer S; Bonshahi, A; Pradhan, N; Gregory, A; Gambhir, A; Porter, M L

    2008-10-01

    This study examines the association between postoperative coronal tibiofemoral alignment and revision surgery in knee arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and post-operative long-leg radiographs of 197 Kinemax knee arthroplasty with mean follow-up of 9 years (SD 2.2). They were divided into three groups: neutral, valgus and varus. Revision or decision to revise was used as a hard endpoint. There was no statistical difference among the three groups (p=0.78). We conclude that aseptic failure of a total knee is multifactorial. Coronal tibio-femoral alignment may not be as important a cause of failure as has been previously thought.

  20. Revision rates after primary hip and knee replacement in England between 2003 and 2006.

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    Nokuthaba Sibanda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hip and knee replacement are some of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. Resurfacing of the hip and unicondylar knee replacement are increasingly being used. There is relatively little evidence on their performance. To study performance of joint replacement in England, we investigated revision rates in the first 3 y after hip or knee replacement according to prosthesis type. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We linked records of the National Joint Registry for England and Wales and the Hospital Episode Statistics for patients with a primary hip or knee replacement in the National Health Service in England between April 2003 and September 2006. Hospital Episode Statistics records of succeeding admissions were used to identify revisions for any reason. 76,576 patients with a primary hip replacement and 80,697 with a primary knee replacement were included (51% of all primary hip and knee replacements done in the English National Health Service. In hip patients, 3-y revision rates were 0.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-1.1% with cemented, 2.0% (1.7%-2.3% with cementless, 1.5% (1.1%-2.0% CI with "hybrid" prostheses, and 2.6% (2.1%-3.1% with hip resurfacing (p < 0.0001. Revision rates after hip resurfacing were increased especially in women. In knee patients, 3-y revision rates were 1.4% (1.2%-1.5% CI with cemented, 1.5% (1.1%-2.1% CI with cementless, and 2.8% (1.8%-4.5% CI with unicondylar prostheses (p < 0.0001. Revision rates after knee replacement strongly decreased with age. INTERPRETATION: Overall, about one in 75 patients needed a revision of their prosthesis within 3 y. On the basis of our data, consideration should be given to using hip resurfacing only in male patients and unicondylar knee replacement only in elderly patients.

  1. Adductor canal block for postoperative pain treatment after revision knee arthroplasty

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    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Schrøder, Henrik M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Revision knee arthroplasty is assumed to be even more painful than primary knee arthroplasty and predominantly performed in chronic pain patients, which challenges postoperative pain treatment. We hypothesized that the adductor canal block, effective for pain relief after primary tota...

  2. Spontaneous patella fracture associated with anterior tibial tubercle pseudarthrosis in a revised knee replacement following knee Arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Conversion of a knee arthrodesis to a Total Knee Arthroplasty is an uncommon procedure. Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty in this setting presents the surgeon with a number of challenges including the management of the extensor mechanism and patella. Case presentation We describe a unique case of a 69 years old Caucasian man who underwent a revision Total Knee Arthroplasty using a tibial tubercle osteotomy after a previous conversion of a knee arthrodesis without patella resurfacing. Unfortunately 9 months following surgery a tibial tubercle pseudarthrosis and spontaneous patella fracture occurred. Both were managed with open reduction and internal fixation. At 30 months follow-up the tibial tubercle osteotomy had completely consolidated while the patella fracture was still evident but with no signs of further displacement. The patient was completely satisfied with the outcome and had a painless range of knee flexion between 0-95°. Conclusions We believe that patients undergoing this type of surgery require careful counseling regarding the risk of complications both during and after surgery despite strong evidence supporting improved functional outcomes. PMID:24195600

  3. Influence of offset stem couplers in femoral revision knee arthroplasty: a radiographic study.

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    Brilhault, Jean M; Ries, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    We questioned whether the use of offset femoral stem would result in modifying the posterior femoral condylar offset (PFCO) in revision knee arthroplasty (RTKA). We measured both PFCO and stem alignment on lateral radiographs of two cohorts: 91 knees with straight stems and 35 knees with offset coupled stems. A higher PCOR was observed in knees with an offset stem compared to knees with straight stem. Knees with an offset stem had a better alignment within the intramedullary canal. Our conclusion is that the use of a modular offset coupler with femoral stem in RTKA compared to a modular straight stem both increases the posterior condylar offset and improves alignment of the stem within the intramedullary canal.

  4. Quality of life outcomes in revision versus primary total knee arthroplasty.

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    Greidanus, Nelson V; Peterson, Richard C; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the quality of life and satisfaction outcomes of patients undergoing primary and revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Sixty revision and 199 primary TKA patients were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Oxford-12 Knee Score, Short Form-12, and patient-reported satisfaction. Baseline preoperative scores demonstrate that revision TKA patients have inferior quality of life across all measures (WOMAC, Oxford-12, and Short Form-12) in comparison with primary TKA patients (P < .05). At follow-up revision, TKA patients continue to have inferior outcomes (P < .05) in comparison with primary TKA patients. When adjusting for confounding factors in regression analyses, revisions are inferior to primary TKA by 8.6 (95% confidence interval, 2.7-14.6) normalized WOMAC units. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Re-admissions, re-operations and length of stay in hospital after aseptic revision knee replacement in Denmark

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    Lindberg-Larsen, M; Jørgensen, C C; Bæk Hansen, T;

    2014-01-01

    We present detailed information about early morbidity after aseptic revision knee replacement from a nationwide study. All aseptic revision knee replacements undertaken between 1st October 2009 and 30th September 2011 were analysed using the Danish National Patient Registry with additional inform...

  6. Mid-term results after implantation of rotating-hinge knee prostheses: primary versus revision

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    Turgay Efe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the mid-term clinical results and survivorship of a rotating-hinge knee prosthesis (LINK® Endo-Model in difficult primary and complex revision situations. Results after primary implantation were compared with those of revision procedures. Forty-nine prostheses in 45 patients were reviewed clinically during follow up. Twenty-one of these were implanted in primary and 28 in revision situations. Outcome was evaluated using commonly used scores (Knee Society, UCLA Activity, Lequesne and a visual analog scale after a mean follow up of 56±37 months for 49 prostheses. Implant survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no significant differences in clinical examination and evaluation scores between the two groups (P>0.05. Survival rates at final follow up were 95% after primary implantation and 76% in revision procedures. The risk of prosthesis loss (odds ratio 5.7 was significantly higher after revision procedures (P=0.004. These data suggest that rotating-hinge knee prostheses provided good clinical and functional results in selected cases of advanced primary gonarthrosis associated with severe bone loss, ligamentous instability or comminuted fractures. They also provide good results in revision situations. However, the failure rate was significantly higher in cases of revision surgery.

  7. Higher cumulative revision rate of knee arthroplasties in younger patients with osteoarthritis.

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    Harrysson, Ola L A; Robertsson, Otto; Nayfeh, Jamal F

    2004-04-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that younger patients treated for osteoarthritis and similar conditions using total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty have a lower implant survival rate when compared with older patients. Previous studies have been done on a small number of patients and only included the younger patients. In many cases patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis have been included in the studies and exceptional survival rates have been reported. The current study compared the cumulative revision rate of the components in 33,251 patients older than 60 years and 2606 patients younger than 60 years treated with total knee arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis or similar conditions. Cox regression was used to compare the risk for revision between the two age groups and between gender and the effect of year of operation. The results showed a higher cumulative revision rate for the group of younger patients in all statistical analyses and the risk ratio for revision was significantly lower for the group of older patients. The risk for revision decreased for both groups when considering the year of surgery. This is probably attributable to better implant components and surgical techniques.

  8. Does malalignment affect revision rate in total knee replacements: a systematic review of the literature.

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    Hadi, Mohammed; Barlow, Tim; Ahmed, Imran; Dunbar, Mark; McCulloch, Peter; Griffin, Damian

    2015-01-01

    To ensure implant durability following Modern total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, one long held principle in condylar total knee arthroplasty is positioning the components in alignment with the mechanical axis and restoring the overall limb alignment to 180° ± 3°. However, this view has been challenged recently. Given the high number of TKR performed, clarity on this integral aspect of the procedure is necessary. To investigate the association between malalignment following primary TKR and revision rates. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using a computerised literature search of Medline, CINHAL, and EMBASE to identify English-language studies published from 2000 through to 2014. Studies with adequate information on the correlation between malalignment and revision rate with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were considered for inclusion. A study protocol, including the detailed search strategy was published on the PROSPERO database for systematic reviews. From an initial 2107 citations, eight studies, with variable methodological qualities, were eligible for inclusion. Collectively, nine parameters of alignment were studied, and 20 assessments were made between an alignment parameter and revision rate. Four out of eight studies demonstrated an association between a malalignment parameter and increased revision rates. In the coronal plane, only three studies assessed the mechanical axis. None of these studies found an association with revision rates, whereas four of the five studies investigating the anatomical axis found an association between malalignment and increased revision rate. This study demonstrates the effect of malalignment on revision rates is likely to be modest. Interestingly, studies that used mechanical alignment in the coronal plane demonstrated no association with revision rates. This questions the premise of patient specific instrumentation devices based on the mechanically aligned knee when considering revision as the

  9. Effect of Gender and Preoperative Diagnosis on Results of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

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    Pun, Stephanie Y.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies question an effect of gender on outcome of primary TKA. We questioned whether the results of revision TKA were affected by gender. We separated 67 revision TKAs by gender and preoperative diagnosis into four groups (arthrofibrosis, infection, instability, and wear and loosening). Each revision TKA was individually matched by age and gender to two primary TKAs. Postoperative Knee Society pain and function scores after revision TKA were lower than for primary TKA for both females and males. However, postoperative Knee Society pain and function scores were similar in males and females. Postoperative pain and function scores were lower for all revision groups compared with primary TKA, except for pain and function scores after revision for instability. Postoperative pain and function scores were higher for instability and wear or loosening than for arthrofibrosis. Our data suggest the results of revision TKA are affected by preoperative diagnosis but not gender. Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective matched cohort study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18726656

  10. The association between metal allergy, total knee arthroplasty, and revision

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    Münch, Henrik J; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Olesen, Jens T;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose - It is unclear whether delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions against implanted metals play a role in the etiopathogenesis of malfunctioning total knee arthroplasties. We therefore evaluated the association between metal allergy, defined as a positive patch test reaction ...

  11. Revision Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: A Single-Center Experience

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    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Background The results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBDs) are poorer when compared with those in the general population, with a notably higher risk of complications and higher revision rates. Thus, revision procedures are becoming a growing concern in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of revision TKA in patients with IBD. Material/Methods A retrospective cohort study with longitudinal assessment of hemophilia patients scheduled for revision TKA between January 2010 and September 2015 was performed. The clinical status of the patients was assessed based on the Knee Society Score, and the Numeric Rating Scale was used to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Radiological examination, post-operative complications, and reinterventions were recorded and analyzed. Results Very good results were obtained in all patients treated for aseptic loosening of the implant. However, inferior results were found in cases with infection. All patients operated on for aseptic loosening required only single-stage TKA, whereas patients with infection underwent multiple interventions. Complications were observed only in cases with infection. Conclusions Our study clearly outlined the differences in results based on failure mode, with far inferior results obtained in cases with infection. Given the lack of data in this area as well as the high specificity of this population, further high-quality studies are needed. PMID:28068306

  12. Revision of partial knee to total knee arthroplasty with use of patient-specific instruments results in acceptable femoral rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotanus, Martijn G M; Thijs, Elke; Boonen, B; Kerens, B; Jong, B; Kort, Nanne P

    2017-08-07

    Patient-specific instruments (PSI) were initially developed for the alignment of both total knee- (TKA) and partial knee arthroplasty (PKA). We hypothesize that CT-based PSI for PKA-to-TKA revision surgery can restore biomechanical limb alignment and prosthetic component positioning in vivo as calculated pre-operatively, resulting in a limited percentages of outliers. An imaging analysis was performed using CT-based 3D measurement methods based on a pre- and post-revision CT scan. Imaging data were gathered on 10 patients who were operated for PKA-to-TKA revision with the use of PSI based on CT imaging. The planned femur and tibia component position in vivo were compared with the pre-revision planned component position. Outliers were defined as deviations >3.0° from pre-revision planned position for the individual implant components. Adjustments (e.g. resection level and implant size) during surgery were recorded. The HKA axis was restored accurately in all patients with a mean post-operative HKA axis of 178.1° (1.4°). Five femoral (2 varus, 2 internal rotation and 1 extension) and 14 tibial guides (2 varus, 6 anterior slope, 3 internal rotation and 3 external rotation) on a total of 60 outcome measures were identified as outliers. During surgery, an intraoperative tibial resection of 2 mm extra was performed in three patients. In 80 and 70% for, respectively, the femur and tibia, the surgeon-planned size was implanted during surgery. All patient-specific guides fitted well in all patients. No intraoperative or post-operative complications related to surgery were registered. This study introduced a unique new concept regarding PSI, PKA-to-TKA revision surgery. Based on the results, we were unable to fully confirm our hypothesis. PSI as a "new" tool for PKA-to-TKA revision surgery appears to be an accurate tool for the alignment of the TKA femur component. The tibial guide seems more susceptible to errors, resulting in a substantial percentage of outliers

  13. Treatment of Severe Bone Defects During Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty with Structural Allografts and Porous Metal Cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A; Mueller, Sebastian; Gondan, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and focal osteolysis are the most common reasons for knee arthroplasty failure. The best treatment remains unclear. We reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision knee arthroplasty using bony structural allografts (476 cases) and porous metal cones (223 cases) to determ...

  14. The Coventry Award. The value of preoperative aspiration before total knee revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrack, R L; Jennings, R W; Wolfe, M W; Bertot, A J

    1997-12-01

    The value of routine aspiration of a symptomatic total knee replacement before reoperation was evaluated. The study group consisted of a consecutive series of 69 knees in 67 patients in which preoperative aspiration was performed. All aspirations were performed on an outpatient basis in a clinic setting. Local anesthetics and saline washings were not used. Twenty knees were determined to be infected and 49 knees were not infected. Preoperative aspiration had an overall sensitivity of 55%, specificity of 96%, accuracy of 84%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 84%. Sixteen patients were taking antibiotics at the time of referral including 12 of 20 (60%) who had infected knees. Seven of these 12 (58%) had no growth on their initial knee aspiration. Four of these had their knees reaspirated at a later date because of a high index of suspicion for infection and the subsequent aspiration revealed the infecting organism in all four cases. Two of the remaining three patients had signs of sepsis develop and reaspiration was not performed because immediate reoperation was indicated clinically. The initial aspiration on the third patient was performed after antibiotic therapy was discontinued for 4 weeks and a repeat aspiration was not deemed necessary. When the results of the reaspirations are included, the overall aspiration results improved to a sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 96%, and accuracy of 90%. The results of the study support the use of routine preoperative aspiration before total knee revision. Previous antibiotic use increases the risk of a false negative result, and reaspiration at a later date can be expected to significantly improve the value of this test in such cases.

  15. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; Borges Gonçalves, Felipe; Osterno Vasconcelos, Jansen; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO) in the period between January 1990 and January 2013. Methods a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting. Results in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK. Conclusion in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability. PMID:26229792

  16. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan de Paula Mozella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO in the period between January 1990 and January 2013.METHODS: a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting.RESULTS: in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK.CONCLUSION: in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability.

  17. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; Borges Gonçalves, Felipe; Osterno Vasconcelos, Jansen; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO) in the period between January 1990 and January 2013. a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting. in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK. in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability.

  18. Coupling failure between stem and femoral component in a constrained revision total knee arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Butt, Ahsan Javed

    2013-02-01

    Knee revision using constrained implants is associated with greater stresses on the implant and interface surfaces. The present report describes a case of failure of the screw coupling between the stem and the femoral component. The cause of the failure is surmised with outline of the treatment in this case with extensive femoral bone loss. Revision implant stability was augmented with the use of a cemented femoral stem, screw fixation and the metaphyseal sleeve of an S-ROM modular hip system (DePuy international Ltd).

  19. Pigmented villonodular synovitis diagnosed during revision total knee arthroplasty for flexion instability and patellar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Yuan, Brandon J; Wood, Adam J; Lewallen, David G

    2016-03-01

    Occurring in either a localized or diffuse form, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a disease of unknown etiology that typically presents with insidious onset of pain, swelling, stiffness, or mechanical symptoms as a result of synovial tissue proliferation. PVNS preferentially affects large joints, most commonly the knee. Currently there is no known association with PVNS and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to date, there are only a few cases reported in the orthopedic literature in which PVNS was diagnosed after primary TKA. To our knowledge, this is the first case of diffuse PVNS that was discovered at the time of revision TKA for flexion instability and patellar fracture. In this patient, with no known history of PVNS, the diagnosis of diffuse PVNS was made at the time of surgery. She underwent revision TKA, partial patellectomy, and extensive synovectomy. Level of evidence: V, Case Report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent hemarthrosis in a hemophilic patient after revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin J; Slover, James D; Stuchin, Steven A

    2010-10-11

    Recurrent hemarthrosis following a revision total knee arthroplasty is a rare complication. The likelihood of encountering bleeding complications in patients with hemophilia C following major surgery is unpredictable. Although the use of postoperative chemotherapeutic agents to prevent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is considered the standard of care for most patients, its use in the hemophiliac population is unknown. This case describes a woman with Hemophilia C who presented with recurrent hemarthrosis 9 days after her revision total knee arthroplasty. Initial treatment efforts were directed towards treating the patient's underlying coagulopathy. Repeated transfusions of fresh frozen plasma and desmopressin were given in an attempt to achieve hemostasis. However the hemarthrosis did not resolve and 36 days postoperatively, a pseudoaneurysm of the left superior geniculate artery was found by angiography and percutaneously embolized. This article presents the first case, to our knowledge, of recurrent hemarthrosis in a hemophiliac patient after revision total knee arthroplasty. It further highlights the importance of considering all possible causes of postoperative bleeding to make a timely diagnosis in the face of a confounding clinical picture.

  1. Increased incidence of patella baja after total knee arthroplasty revision for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Tetreault, Matthew W; Levicoff, Eric A; Fedorka, Catherine J; Rothenberg, Adam C; Klatt, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of patella baja in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revisions for aseptic and septic causes is not well defined. We retrospectively reviewed 101 mobile-bearing TKA revisions performed between 2003 and 2009. Aseptic (n=67) and septic (n=34) revisions were compared for patella baja. A nonarticulating spacer was used as the initial treatment for infected cases. The Insall-Salvati ratio was radiographically measured before surgery (preexplant for septic revisions) and at latest follow-up (postreplant for septic revisions). Mean (SD) Insall-Salvati ratio did not differ between groups before surgery, 1.00 (0.25) for aseptic and 0.96 (0.22) for septic, but differed significantly after surgery, 0.99 (0.23) for aseptic and 0.77 (0.24) for septic. After correcting for preoperative patellar height, there was a statistically significant postoperative difference between aseptic cases, 1.09 (0.19), and septic cases, 0.82 (0.21). There was also a significant difference in mean (SD) postoperative range of motion (ROM) between aseptic cases, 108.0° (20.7°), and septic cases, 92.2° (34.6°), and decreased ROM between cases with patella baja, 95.1° (31.6°) and cases without patella baja, 106.8° (23.6°). TKA revisions done for septic causes using a nonarticulating spacer resulted in a higher incidence of patella baja and decreased ROM.

  2. Effect of retaining a patellar prosthesis on pain, functional, and satisfaction outcomes after revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Bassam A; Meek, R M Dominic; Greidanus, Nelson V; Garbuz, Donald S

    2006-12-01

    It remains controversial whether patients' pain, function, and satisfaction are affected in revision total knee arthroplasty by patellar prosthetic resurfacing. This is a retrospective, comparative cohort study to evaluate this. One hundred twenty-six patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty revision were identified. After revision, the presence or absence of a patellar prosthesis was ascertained. At a minimum of 2 years' follow-up, pain and function were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Oxford-12, Short-Form 12, and patient satisfaction questionnaires in 110 patients (58 with patellar component, 52 bony shell). Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated no significant difference between the 2 cohorts for Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain, function, Oxford-12, and satisfaction outcomes. The absence of a patellar prosthesis does not appear to significantly affect pain, function, or satisfaction outcomes after revision total knee arthroplasty.

  3. The extensile rectus snip exposure in revision of total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, R M D; Greidanus, N V; McGraw, R W; Masri, B A

    2003-11-01

    Revision of a total knee arthroplasty may require an extensile approach to permit a satisfactory exposure without compromising the attachment of the patellar tendon. It has been assumed that a rectus snip is a relatively benign form of release, but the effect of using this approach on function, pain and patient satisfaction is not known. From January 1997 to December 1999, 107 patients who underwent revision of total knee arthroplasty were followed up at a minimum of two years (mean 40.5 months) and assessed by the Oxford Hip Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Short-Form (SF)-12 and patient satisfaction. Co-morbidity, surgical exposure, the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores and the range of movement were also used. A standard medial parapatellar approach was used in 57 patients and the rectus snip in 50. The two groups were equivalent for age, sex and co-morbidity scores. The WOMAC function, pain, stiffness and satisfaction scores demonstrated no statistical difference. The use of a rectus snip as an extensile procedure has no effect on outcome.

  4. The Use of Structural Allograft in Primary and Revision Knee Arthroplasty with Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul A. Kuchinad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss around the knee in the setting of total knee arthroplasty remains a difficult and challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. There are a number of options for dealing with smaller and contained bone loss; however, massive segmental bone loss has fewer options. Small, contained defects can be treated with cement, morselized autograft/allograft or metal augments. Segmental bone loss cannot be dealt with through simple addition of cement, morselized autograft/allograft, or metal augments. For younger or higher demand patients, the use of allograft is a good option as it provides a durable construct with high rates of union while restoring bone stock for future revisions. Older patients, or those who are low demand, may be better candidates for a tumour prosthesis, which provides immediate ability to weight bear and mobilize.

  5. Financial analysis of revision knee surgery based on NHS tariffs and hospital costs: does it pay to provide a revision service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallala, R F; Vanhegan, I S; Ibrahim, M S; Sarmah, S; Haddad, F S

    2015-02-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a complex procedure which carries both a greater risk for patients and greater cost for the treating hospital than does a primary TKA. As well as the increased cost of peri-operative investigations, blood transfusions, surgical instrumentation, implants and operating time, there is a well-documented increased length of stay which accounts for most of the actual costs associated with surgery. We compared revision surgery for infection with revision for other causes (pain, instability, aseptic loosening and fracture). Complete clinical, demographic and economic data were obtained for 168 consecutive revision TKAs performed at a tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2012. Revision surgery for infection was associated with a mean length of stay more than double that of aseptic cases (21.5 vs 9.5 days, p < 0.0001). The mean cost of a revision for infection was more than three times that of an aseptic revision (£30 011 (sd 4514) vs £9655 (sd 599.7), p < 0.0001). Current NHS tariffs do not fully reimburse the increased costs of providing a revision knee surgery service. Moreover, especially as greater costs are incurred for infected cases. These losses may adversely affect the provision of revision surgery in the NHS.

  6. A novel computer-assisted surgical technique for revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacci, Maurilio; Nofrini, Laura; Iacono, Francesco; Di Martino, Alessandro; Bignozzi, Simone; Lo Presti, Mirco

    2007-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) is a skill-demanding intervention presenting several technical challenges to the surgeon due to bone deficiencies and lack of anatomical references. Computer-assisted navigation systems can potentially solve these problems. An innovative computer-assisted surgical technique for RTKA is presented. The system is image free. Based on anatomical landmarks acquired on the patient, the system automatically plans the intervention, and provides the surgeon with tools to analyse and modify the proposed plan and to accurately reproduce it on the patient. Although we performed few cases with this navigated procedure, early results obtained demonstrated to be very promising.

  7. Reverse Anterolateral Thigh Flap to Revise a Below-knee Amputation Stump at the Mid-tibial Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Lionel Sadigh, MB ChB

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The reconstruction of defects around the knee often poses a challenge due to the limited availability of local soft tissues. Indeed, this same problem is encountered when attempting to revise a below-knee amputation stump. Moreover, due to a paucity of recipient vessels in those who have undergone previous amputation secondary to trauma, free-flap reconstruction is often challenging and not always successful. We report a case of a reverse anterolateral thigh (ALT flap used to revise a long below-knee amputation stump. Previous reports in the literature attest to the versatility of the reverse ALT to cover defects around the knee and proximal tibia, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of a reverse ALT reaching to the mid-tibial level.

  8. Patient satisfaction and functional status after aseptic versus septic revision total knee arthroplasty using the PROSTALAC articulating spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, R M Dominic; Dunlop, David; Garbuz, Donald S; McGraw, Robert; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A

    2004-10-01

    This study compared the functional results of an articulating antibiotic spacer for 2-stage revision knee arthroplasty for infection, to the functional results of aseptic revision. One hundred twenty-five patients who underwent revision of total knee arthroplasty for infection and aseptic loosening were identified. All of the patients with infection were treated with the PROSTALAC system (DePuy). At a minimum 2-year follow-up, WOMAC, Oxford-12, SF-12, patient satisfaction data, Harris Hip Score knee scores, and range of motion were assessed. The 2 cohorts (4 deaths in total, leaving 54 septic, 57 aseptic) were equivalent for age, gender, and comorbidity scores. At a mean of 41 months, none of the outcomes were significantly worse for the septic group, which had 2 recurrences of infection (4%). The satisfactory functional results of the PROSTALAC system may be related to the design features.

  9. Low-dose irradiation and constrained revision for severe, idiopathic, arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Yasser R; Thakral, Rishi; Finn, Henry A

    2013-09-01

    Treatment options for arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty include manipulation under anesthesia, open or arthroscopic arthrolysis, and revision surgery to correct identifiable problems. We propose preoperative low-dose irradiation and Constrained Condylar or Rotating-hinge revision for severe, idiopathic arthrofibrosis. Irradiation may decrease fibro-osseous proliferation while constrained implants allow femoral shortening and release of contracted collateral ligaments. Fourteen patients underwent fifteen procedures for a mean overall motion of 46° and flexion contracture of 30°. One patient had worsening range of motion while thirteen patients had 57° mean gain in range of motion (range 5°-90°). Flexion contractures decreased by a mean of 28°. There were no significant complications at a mean follow up of 34 months (range 24 to 74 months). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of Revision Rates of Non-modular Constrained Versus Posterior Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty: a Propensity Score Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mohamed E; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Mehta, Nabil; Lyman, Stephen; Marx, Robert G

    2017-02-01

    Attaining stability during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is essential for a successful outcome. Although traditional constrained total knee prostheses have generally been used in conjunction with intramedullary stems, some devices have been widely used without the use of stems, referred to as non-modular constrained condylar total knee arthroplasty (NMCCK). The aim of this study was to compare revisions rates after total knee replacement with a non-modular constrained condylar total knee (NMCCK) compared to a posterior-stabilized (PS) design. Between 2007 and 2012, primary PS total knees were compared with NMCCK implants from the same manufacturer. Propensity score matching was performed, and implant survivorship was examined using a Cox proportional hazards model. The cohort consisted of 817 PS knees and 817 NMCCKs matched for patient demographics, surgeon volume, and pre-operative diagnosis. All cause revisions occurred in 11 of 817 (1.35%) in the PS group compared to 28 of 817 (3.43%) in the NMCCK group (p = 0.0168). Excluding revisions for infection and fracture, 8 of 817 (0.98%) PS knees required revision for mechanical failure compared to 18 of 817 (2.20%) NMCCK knees (p = 0.0193). While revisions rates in both cohorts were low, there was a significantly higher revision rate with NMCCKs. Given that cases requiring the use of NMCCK implants are likely more complex than those in which PS implants are used, our findings support the judicious use of NMCCK prostheses.

  11. Reconstruction of a deficient patella in revision total knee arthroplasty: results of a new surgical technique using transcortical wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Min

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to report the results of a novel surgical technique for the reconstruction of a deficient patella during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-eight patients (30 knees) with a deficient patella were treated with an onlay-type prosthesis and bone-augmenting procedure, using acrylic bone cement and transcortical wiring. The technique was indicated when the thickness of remnant patella was less than 8mm with variable amounts of the peripheral rim. Mean follow-up period was 36.6months (range, 24 to 55months).The respective mean Knee Society scores for knee and function improved from 34.2 and 23 points, preoperatively to 73.5 and 61 points, at final follow-up. One patient experienced patellar fracture 1week after surgery. There were no complications associated with implanted hardware. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional improvement after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision: New observations on the dimensional nature of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bershadsky Boris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the numerous outcomes measures described it remains unclear what aspects of patient outcome are important in determining actual improvement following total knee arthroplasty revisions (TKAR. We performed a prospective cohort study of TKAR to determine the components of clinical improvement and how they are related and best measured. Methods An improvement scale was devised utilizing data from 186 consecutive TKAR patients on SF-36 physical (PCS and mental (MCS components, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC Index, Knee Society Score (KSS, a novel Activity Scale (AS and a physician derived severity assessment scale performed both preoperatively and at 6 month post-operative follow-up. The change in each of these scores was analyzed using factor analysis, deriving a composite improvement scale. Results All the instruments demonstrated statistically significantly better scores following TKAR (except the SF-36 MCS. Furthermore, all significant correlations between the scores were positive. Statistical factor analysis demonstrated that scores could be arranged into 4 related factor groupings with high internal consistency (Cronbach Alpha = 0.7. Factor 1 reflected patient perceived functional outcomes, Factor 2 activity levels, Factor 3 the MCS and Factor 4 the KSS. Conclusion This study demonstrates that improvement following TKAR has a multidimensional structure. The improvement scales represent a more coordinated method of the previously fragmented analysis of TKAR outcomes. This will improve assessment of the actual effectiveness of TKAR for patients and what aspects of improvement are most critical.

  13. Tibial slope correction combined with second revision ACL produces good knee stability and prevents graft rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejour, David; Saffarini, Mo; Demey, Guillaume; Baverel, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Revision ACL reconstruction requires careful analysis of failure causes particularly in cases of two previous graft ruptures. Intrinsic factors as excessive tibial slope or narrow femoral notch increase failure risks but are rarely addressed in revision surgery. The authors report outcomes, at minimum follow-up of 2 years, for second revision ACL reconstructions combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy for correction of excessive slope (>12°). Nine patients that underwent second revision ACL reconstruction combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy were retrospectively studied. The mean age was 30.3 ± 4.4 years (median 28; range 26-37), and mean follow-up was 4.0 ± 2.0 years (median 3.6; range 2.0-7.6). Autografts were harvested from the quadriceps tendon (n = 8) or hamstrings (n = 1), and tibial osteotomy was done by anterior closing wedge, without detachment of the patellar tendon, to obtain a slope of 3° to 5°. All patients had fused osteotomies, stable knees, and there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The mean posterior tibial slope decreased from 13.2° ± 2.6° (median 13°; range 12°-18°) preoperatively to 4.4° ± 2.3° (median 4°; range 2°-8°) postoperatively. The mean Lysholm score was 73.8 ± 5.8 (median 74; range 65-82), and the IKDC-SKF was 71.6 ± 6.1 (median 72.8; range 62.2-78.5). The satisfactory results of second revision ACL reconstruction combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy at minimum follow-up of 2 years suggest that tibia slope correction protects reconstructed ACL from fatigue failure in this study. The authors stress the importance of careful analysis failure causes prior to revision ACL reconstruction, and recommend correction of tibial slope if it exceeds 12°, to reduce the risks of graft retear. III.

  14. Patella tendon injuries secondary to cement spacers used at first-stage revision of infected total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasim S Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a series of three patients who sustained patella tendon injuries in infected TKAs following the use of a static cement spacer at first-stage knee revision. The patella tendon injuries resulted in significant compromise to wound healing and knee stability requiring multiple surgeries. The mid-term function was poor with an Oxford score at 24 months ranging from 12-20. Based on our experience, we advise caution in the use of static cement spacer blocks. If they are to be used, we recommend that they should be keyed in the bone to prevent patella tendon injuries.

  15. No bias of ignored bilaterality when analysing the revision risk of knee prostheses: Analysis of a population based sample of 44,590 patients with 55,298 knee prostheses from the national Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranstam Jonas

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current practice of the Swedish Knee Register is not to take into consideration if one or both knees in a patient are subject to surgery when evaluating risk of revision after arthroplasty. Risk calculations are typically done by statistical methods, such as Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox's proportional hazards models, that are based on the assumption that observed events are independent, and this is rarely appreciated. The purpose of this study was to investigate if ignoring bilateral operations when using these methods biases the results. Methods The bias of not taking bilateral operations into account was investigated by statistically analysing 55 298 prostheses in 44 590 patients, undergoing knee arthroplasty surgery in Sweden during 1985–1999, using traditional proportional hazards analysis, which assumes that all observations are independent, and a shared gamma frailty model, which allows patients to contribute repeated observations. Results The effect of neglecting bilateral prostheses is minute, possibly because bilateral prosthesis failure is a rare event. Conclusion We conclude that the revision risk of knee prostheses in general can be analysed without consideration for subject dependency, at least in study populations with a relatively low proportion of subjects having experienced bilateral revisions.

  16. Results of a Second-generation Constrained Condylar Prosthesis in Complex Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Mean 5.5-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Ye

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Second-generation modular CCK prostheses are a safe and practical treatment for both primary and revision knees that cannot be balanced. However, further studies focusing on different types of constrained prostheses are required to validate these results.

  17. Have the Causes of Revision for Total and Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasties Changed During the Past Two Decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrhovden, Gro S; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Badawy, Mona; Gøthesen, Øystein; Furnes, Ove

    2017-07-01

    Revisions after knee arthroplasty are expected to increase, and the epidemiology of failure mechanisms is changing as new implants, technology, and surgical techniques evolve. (1) Was there improvement in survival for TKA and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) when comparing two consecutive 11-year periods with similar followups in a national registry? (2) Were there changes in the causes of revision during the two times? (3) Could the changes in revision causes be attributed to patient or implant characteristics? A total of 60,623 TKAs (2426 revisions) and 7648 UKAs (725 revisions) were selected from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register and analyzed based on year of primary surgery: 1994 to 2004 (Period 1) and 2005 to 2015 (Period 2). TKAs had median followup of 3.5 years in Period 1 and 4.2 years in Period 2. Median followup for UKAs was 2.7 years in Period 1 and 4.6 years in Period 2. Of the patients included in the registry, 99.6% were accounted for at the time of analysis, whereas 0.4% had moved abroad. We used Kaplan-Meier analyses and log-rank test to investigate changes in survival. Relative risk of revision in Period 2 relative to Period 1 was calculated for each registered revision cause in a Cox regression model adjusted for age, sex, diagnosis, fixation, and patella resurfacing. For TKAs, the 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival free from revision improved from Period 1 to Period 2 from 91% (95% CI, 90%-92%) to 94% (95% CI, 94%-95%; p advantages of UKA should be balanced against this issue of its decreased durability. Level III, therapeutic study.

  18. Assessment of prosthesis alignment after revision total knee arthroplasty using EOS 2D and 3D imaging: a reliability study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrigje F Meijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A new low-dose X-ray device, called EOS, has been introduced for determining lower-limb alignment in 2D and 3D. Reliability has not yet been assessed when using EOS on lower limbs containing a knee prosthesis. Therefore purpose of this study was to determine intraobserver and interobserver reliability of EOS 2D and 3D knee prosthesis alignment measurements after revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA. METHODS: Forty anteroposterior and lateral images of 37 rTKA patients were included. Two observers independently performed measurements on these images twice. Varus/valgus angles were measured in 2D (VV2D and 3D (VV3D. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Bland and Altman method were used to determine reliability. T-tests were used to test potential differences. RESULTS: Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were excellent for VV2D and VV3D. No significant difference or bias between the first and second measurements or the two observers was found. A significant mean and absolute difference of respectively 1.00° and 1.61° existed between 2D and 3D measurements. CONCLUSIONS: EOS provides reliable varus/valgus measurements in 2D and 3D for the alignment of the knee joint with a knee prosthesis. However, significant differences exist between varus/valgus measurements in 2D and 3D.

  19. Durable infection control and function with the PROSTALAC spacer in two-stage revision for infected knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Christopher R; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive P; Greidanus, Nelson V; Garbuz, Donald S

    2011-04-01

    A two-stage revision total knee arthroplasty is recognized as the gold standard in the treatment of infection. However, traditional spacers limit function in the interval between the two stages and may cause instability, scarring, and bone erosion. The PROSTALAC knee spacer is an antibiotic-loaded cement articulating spacer that allows some movement of the knee between stages. Whether motion enhances long-term function is unknown. We therefore identify the rate of control of infection using the PROSTALAC exchange spacer and to assess the clinical outcome after implantation with a definitive implant. We retrospectively reviewed 115 knees that underwent two-stage exchange with the PROSTALAC spacer. Forty-eight of these had a minimum followup of 5 years (mean, 9 years; range, 5-12 years). At last review, 101 of the 115 knees (88%) had no evidence of infection. Of the 14 knees that became reinfected, four were from the same organism and 10 were with a different organism. After further intervention, using the two-stage approach again, the infection was controlled in 12 of the 14 initially reinfected cases, resulting in a failure to cure in only two cases. We observed improvements in mean WOMAC, Oxford, UCLA, and Patient Satisfaction scores at last review. The PROSTALAC functional spacer was associated with a 98% rate of control of infection and improvements in the quality-of-life outcomes in the treatment of chronically infected total knee arthroplasties. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. Reassessment of the usefulness of frozen section analysis for hip and knee joint revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, William A; Saleh, Khaled J; Frierson, Henry F

    2008-09-01

    Intraoperative frozen section (FS) consultation is used in evaluating possible infection in cases of hip and knee revision arthroplasty, serving as an adjunct to preoperative and intraoperative studies. We examined our experience for more than 11 years to determine if FS examination had value when sections were sent nonselectively. We reviewed 244 cases, 132 with available culture results. The criterion for the presence of acute inflammation was more than 5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field (hpf) in at least 5 separate hpfs, excluding surface inflammatory exudate and fibrin. Only 27 cases (11.1%) demonstrated positive FS or paraffin section results. In comparison with intraoperative culture, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for FS analysis alone (on review) were 29%, 95%, 40%, and 92%. As currently used, FS analysis has excellent specificity and negative predictive value but poor sensitivity and positive predictive value. We suggest that FS examination be used more selectively in conjunction with other studies, namely erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

  1. Posterolateral Corner Reconstruction Alone Using a Fibular-Based Technique in a Patient with Persistent Unstable Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Cline

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterolateral rotatory instability is a relatively uncommon cause of unstable total knee arthroplasty (TKA. In most cases, surgical treatment requires revision TKA into a more constrained design or thicker polyethylene liner. We present a case of a patient with unstable TKA who remained unstable after increasing thickness of the polyethylene liner and undergoing more constrained TKA. After several revision surgeries, the patient was still unstable. Posterolateral corner reconstruction with a fibular-based technique using a tibialis anterior allograft was performed. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was stable and asymptomatic and with excellent function. A soft-tissue procedure only (fibular-based posterolateral corner reconstruction can be effective at restoring posterolateral rotatory stability in a patient with persistent instability after revision TKA.

  2. Results of a Second-generation Constrained Condylar Prosthesis in Complex Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Mean 5.5-Year Follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Yi Ye; De-Ting Xue; Shuai Jiang; Rong-Xin He

    2016-01-01

    Background:The application of second-generation constrained condylar knee (CCK) prostheses has not been widely studied.This retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a second-generation CCK prosthesis for complex primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA).Methods:In total,51 consecutive TKAs (47 patients) were performed between June 2003 and June 2013 using second-generation modular CCK prostheses.The follow-up was conducted at 3rd day,1st,6th,and 12th months postoperatively and later annually.Anteroposterior (AP),lateral,skyline,and long-standing AP radiographs of the affected knees were taken.The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Knee Score,the Knee Society Knee Score (KSKS),the Knee Society Function Score (KSFS),and range of motion (ROM) were also recorded.Heteroscedastic two-tailed Student's t-tests were used to compare the HSS score and the Knee Society score between primary and revision TKAs.A value ofP < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results:Four knees (two patients) were lost to follow-up,and 47 knees (31 primary TKAs and 16 revision TKAs) had a mean follow-up time of 5.5 years.The mean HSS score improved from 51.1 ± 15.0 preoperatively to 85.3 ± 8.4 points at the final follow-up (P < 0.05).Similar results were observed in terms of the KSKS and KSFS,which improved from 26.0 ± 13.0 to 80.0 ± 12.2 and from 40.0 ± 15.0 to 85.0 ± 9.3 points,respectively (P < 0.05).No significant difference in the HSS,KSKS,KSFS,or ROM was found between primary and revision TKAs (P> 0.05).Two complications were observed in the revision TKA group (one intraoperative distal femur fracture and one recurrence of infection) while one complication (infection) was observed in the primary TKA group.No prosthesis loosening,joint dislocation,patella problems,tibial fracture,or nerve injury were observed.Radiolucent lines were observed in 4% of the knees without progressive osteolysis

  3. “Meniscal” scar as a landmark for the joint line in revision total knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wasim Sardar; Bhamra, Jagmeet; Williams, Rhodri; Morgan-Jones, Rhidian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether tissue identified at the joint line was actually remnant “meniscal” scar tissue or not. METHODS Nine patients undergoing revision knee surgery following informed consent had meniscal scar tissue sent to the histology department for analyses. All revisions were performed where joint line had been raised or lowered at earlier surgery. Although preoperative radiographic evaluations suggested that the joint line had been altered, intraoperatively there was scar tissue at the level of the recreated joint line. This scar tissue has traditionally been described as meniscal scar, and to identify the origins of this tissue, samples were sent for histological analyses. The tissue samples were stored in formalin, and embedded and sectioned before undergoing histochemical staining. All samples underwent macroscopic and microscopic examination by a histopathologist who was blind to the study aims. The specific features that were examined included tissue organisation, surface and central composition, cellular distribution including histiocytes, nuclear ratio and vasculature. Atypical and malignant features, inflammation and degeneration were specifically looked for. A statistical review of the study was performed by a biomedical statistician. RESULTS The histological findings for the nine patients showing the macroscopic and microscopic findings, and the conclusion are outlined in a Table. The histological analyses were reviewed to determine whether the tissue samples were likely to be meniscal scar tissue. The response was yes (2, 22%), no (6, 67%) and maybe (1, 11%) based on the conclusions. The results were “yes” when on macroscopy, firm cream tissue was identified. In these two “yes” samples, microscopic analyses showed organised fibrous tissue with focal degenerative areas with laminated pattern associated with histiocytes peripherally but no inflammation. The “no” samples were assessed macroscopically and microscopically and were

  4. Tranexamic Acid in a Multimodal Blood Loss Prevention Protocol to Decrease Blood Loss in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cohort Study#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Andreu, Miguel; Talavera, Gloria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma G.; Perez-Chrzanowska, Hanna; Figueredo-Galve, Reyes; Rodriguez-Merchán, Carlos E.; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if blood loss and transfusion requirements can be decreased in revision knee surgery through a multimodal blood loss approach with tranexamic acid (TXA) Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was designed in 87 knees (79 patients) that received a knee revision between 2007 and 2013. To avoid heterogeneity in the surgical technique, only revisions with one single implant system were included. A treatment series of 44 knees that received TXA and other techniques in a multimodal blood loss protocol was compared to a control series of 43 knees that received neither TXA nor the rest of the multimodal blood loss protocol. No differences in the complexity of surgeries or case severity were detected. Results: A significant decrease was observed from 58% transfusion rate in the control group to 5% in the treated group. The postoperative haemoglobin drop was also significantly different. Although the use of a blood loss prevention approach including TXA was the most relevant factor in the transfusion risk (OR=15), longer surgical time also associated an increased risk of transfusion (OR=1.15). Conclusion: This study supports the use of a two-dose intravenous TXA under a multimodal blood loss prevention approach in revision knee replacement with significant reduction in the transfusion rate, postoperative blood loss and haemoglobin drop. PMID:27708740

  5. Bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome following right total knee revision: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Kristie D; Haque, Shireen H

    2012-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare occurrence traditionally found in settings of extended immobilization. Thrombolytics and medications with myositis as a potential side effect have also been implicated in a few isolated cases of spontaneous compartment syndrome. Early signs are pain on passive stretching and pain out of proportion to physical examination findings. Failure to recognize and definitively treat compartment syndrome within the first 24 to 36 hours can lead to permanent limb loss and morbidity from a host of systemic complications such as hyperkalemia, renal failure, and sepsis. We report a case of bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome in a 52-year-old patient following a right total knee revision. On postoperative day 2, physical examination after the patient became agitated and in severe distress from bilateral buttock pain showed that the right and left gluteal regions were tense, hard, and erythematous. Creatinine phosphokinase and liver function tests were significantly elevated. Following emergency fasciotomy, physicians thoroughly reviewed the operative course, medication history, and imaging studies. We withdrew simvastatin, a medication associated with spontaneous compartment syndrome, from our patient's daily medications. By day of discharge, both creatinine phosphokinase and liver function problems were decreasing, and the gluteal pain had significantly resolved. The etiology of bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome in our patient could have been a combination of intraoperative length and positioning with simvastatin-induced myositis. Obesity presented an additional risk factor. This case highlights the importance of identifying patients at increased risk of compartment syndrome in the preoperative assessment and following them with more intensive intraoperative and postoperative monitoring.

  6. Revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification: implications for use of Unique Device Identification 2012 AAHKS member survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalia A; Jehn, Megan; York, Sally; Davis, Charles M

    2014-02-01

    FDA's Unique Device Identification (UDI) Rule will mandate manufacturers to assign unique identifiers to their marketed devices. UDI use is expected to improve implant documentation and identification. A 2012 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons membership survey explored revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification processes. 87% of surgeons reported regularly using at least 3 methods to identify failed implants pre-operatively. Median surgeon identification time was 20 min; median staff time was 30 min. 10% of implants could not be identified pre-operatively. 2% could not be identified intra-operatively. UDI in TJA registry and UDI in EMR were indicated practices to best support implant identification and save time. FDA's UDI rule sets the foundation for UDI use in patient care settings as standard practice for implant documentation. © 2013.

  7. Development and Validation of a Preoperative Surgical Site Infection Risk Score for Primary or Revision Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Andridge, Rebecca R; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Glassman, Andrew H; Lemeshow, Stanley

    2016-09-21

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major complication following total joint arthroplasty. Host susceptibility to infection has emerged as an important predictor of SSI. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative SSI risk-assessment tool for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. Data for 6,789 patients who underwent total joint arthroplasty (from the years 2000 to 2011) were obtained from a single hospital system. SSI was defined as a superficial infection within 30 days or deep infection within 1 year. Logistic regression modeling was utilized to create a risk scoring system for a derivation sample (n = 5,789; 199 SSIs), with validation performed on a hold-out sample (a subset of observations chosen randomly from the initial sample to form a testing set; n = 1,000; 41 SSIs). On the basis of logistic regression modeling, we created a scoring system to assess SSI risk (range, 0 to 35 points) that is the point sum of the following: primary hip arthroplasty (0 points); primary knee (1); revision hip (3); revision knee (3); non-insulin-dependent diabetes (1); insulin-dependent diabetes (1.5); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (1); inflammatory arthropathy (1.5); tobacco use (1.5); lower-extremity osteomyelitis or pyogenic arthritis (2); pelvis, thigh, or leg traumatic fracture (2); lower-extremity pathologic fracture (2.5); morbid obesity (2.5); primary bone cancer (4); reaction to prosthesis in the last 3 years (4); and history of staphylococcal septicemia (4.5). The risk score had good discriminatory capability (area under the ROC [receiver operating characteristic] curve = 0.77) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test, p = 0.34) and was validated using the independent sample (area under the ROC curve = 0.72). A small subset of patients (5.9%) had a >10% estimated infection risk. The patient comorbidities composing the risk score heavily influenced SSI risk for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. We

  8. Re-admissions, re-operations and length of stay in hospital after aseptic revision knee replacement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, M.; Jørgensen, C. C.; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2014-01-01

    of hospital stay was four days (interquartile range: 3 to 5), with a 90 days re-admission rate of 9.9%, re-operation rate of 3.5% and mortality rate of 0.2%. The age ranges of 51 to 55 years (p = 0.018), 76 to 80 years (p ...-admission. The age ranges of 76 to 80 years (p = 0.018) and the large partial revision subgroup (p = 0.073) were related to an increased risk of re-operation. The ages from 76 to 80 years (p 120 min (p hospital stay...... that a length of hospital stay ≤ four days and discharge home at that time is safe following aseptic knee revision surgery in Denmark....

  9. Type 2 diabetes and in-hospital complications after revision of total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Martínez-Huedo, Maria A; Villanueva-Martinez, Manuel; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) on hospital outcomes such as in hospital postoperative complications (IHPC), length of hospital stay (LOHS) and in-hospital mortality (IHM) after the revision of total hip arthroplasty (RHA) and total knee arthroplasty (RKA) and to identify factors associated with IHPC among T2DM patients undergoing these procedures. We performed a retrospective study using the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database, 2005-2014. We included patients who were ≥40 years old that had undergone RHA and RKA. For each T2DM patient, we selected a year-, gender-, age- and Charlson Comorbidity Index-matched non-diabetic patient. We identified 44,055 and 39,938 patients who underwent RHA (12.72% with T2DM) and RKA (15.01% with T2DM). We matched 4,700 and 5,394 couples with RHA and RKA, respectively. Any IHPC was more frequent among patients with T2DM than among non-T2DM patients (19% vs. 15.64% in the RHA cohort and 12.94% vs. 11.09% in the RKA cohort, respectively). For patients who underwent RHA, postoperative infection (4.51% vs. 2.94%, p<0.001), acute post-hemorrhagic anemia (9.53% vs. 7.70%, p<0.001), mean LOHS and IHM were significantly higher in patients with T2DM. Among RKA patients, the incidence of acute posthemorrhagic anemia (7.21% vs. 5.62%; p = 0.001) and urinary tract infection (1.13% vs. 0.72%; p = 0.029) was significantly higher in patients with diabetes. Older age, obesity, infection due to internal joint prosthesis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, mild liver disease and renal disease and emergency room admission were significantly associated with a higher risk of IHPC in T2DM patients. IHPC decreased over time only in T2DM patients who underwent RHA (OR 0.94, 95%CI 0.89-0.98). Patients with T2DM who underwent RHA and RKA procedures had more IHPC after controlling for the effects of possible confounders. LOHS and IHM were also higher among RHA patients with diabetes. Older age, comorbidity, obesity and

  10. No Effect of a Bipolar Sealer on Total Blood Loss or Blood Transfusion in Nonseptic Revision Knee Arthroplasty-A Prospective Study With Matched Retrospective Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Skovgaard; Gromov, Kirill; Jans, Øivind;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative anemia is frequent after revision of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with reported transfusion rates up to 83%. Despite increased efforts of reducing blood loss and enhancing fast recovery within the fast-track setup, a considerable transfusion rate is still evident. The a...

  11. Use of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level to diagnose infection before revision total knee arthroplasty. A prospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Wilson, S Darrin; McAlinden, M Gavan; Xu, Min; Duncan, Clive P

    2007-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of several diagnostic tests, there is still no perfect test for the diagnosis of infection at the site of a total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic test characteristics of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level for the assessment of infection in patients presenting for revision total knee arthroplasty. One hundred and fifty-one knees in 145 patients presenting for revision total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively for the presence of infection with measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein level. The characteristics of these tests were assessed with use of two different techniques: first, receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal positivity criterion for the diagnostic test, and, second, previously accepted criteria for establishing positivity of the tests were used. A diagnosis of infection was established for forty-five of the 151 knees that underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The receiver-operating-characteristic curves indicated that the optimal positivity criterion was 22.5 mm/hr for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and 13.5 mg/L for the C-reactive protein level. Both the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.83; positive likelihood ratio, 5.81; accuracy, 0.86) and the C-reactive protein level (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.86; positive likelihood ratio, 6.89; accuracy, 0.88) have excellent diagnostic test performance. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein level provide excellent diagnostic test information for establishing the presence or absence of infection prior to surgical intervention in patients with pain at the site of a knee arthroplasty.

  12. Failure of total knee arthroplasty with or without patella resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Patella resurfacing during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is disputed and new prosthesis designs have been introduced without documentation of their survival. We assessed the impact on prosthesis survival of patella resurfacing and of prosthesis brand, based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Patients and methods 5 prosthesis brands in common use with and without patella resurfacing from 1994 through 2009 were included n = 11,887. The median follow-up times were 9 years for patella-resurfaced implants and 7 years for implants without patella resurfacing. For comparison of prosthesis brands, also brands in common use with only one of the two treatment options were included in the study population (n = 25,590). Cox regression analyses were performed with different reasons for revision as endpoints with adjustment for potential confounders. Results We observed a reduced overall risk of revision for patella resurfaced (PR) TKAs, but the statistical significance was borderline (RR = 0.84, p = 0.05). At 15 years, 92% of PR and 91% of patella non resurfaced (NR) prostheses were still unrevised. However, PR implants had a lower risk of revision due to pain alone (RR = 0.1, p < 0.001), but a higher risk of revision due to loosening of the tibial component (RR = 1.4, p = 0.03) and due to a defective polyethylene insert (RR = 3.2, p < 0.001). At 10 years, the survival for the reference NR brand AGC Universal was 93%. The NR brands Genesis I, Duracon, and Tricon (RR = 1.4–1.7) performed statistically significantly worse than NR AGC Universal, while the NR prostheses e.motion, Profix, and AGC Anatomic (RR = 0.1–0.7), and the PR prostheses NexGen and AGC Universal (RR = 0.4–0.5) performed statistically significantly better. LCS, NexGen, LCS Complete (all NR), and Tricon, Genesis I, LCS, and Kinemax (all PR) showed no differences in this respect from the reference brand. A lower risk of revision (crude) was found for TKAs

  13. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben;

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  14. Survival rates and causes of revision in cemented primary total knee replacement: a report from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register 1994-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøthesen, O; Espehaug, B; Havelin, L; Petursson, G; Lygre, S; Ellison, P; Hallan, G; Furnes, O

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated the rates of survival and cause of revision of seven different brands of cemented primary total knee replacement (TKR) in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the years 1994 to 2009. Revision for any cause, including resurfacing of the patella, was the primary endpoint. Specific causes of revision were secondary outcomes. Three posterior cruciate-retaining (PCR) fixed modular-bearing TKRs, two fixed non-modular bearing PCR TKRs and two mobile-bearing posterior cruciate-sacrificing TKRs were investigated in a total of 17 782 primary TKRs. The median follow-up for the implants ranged from 1.8 to 6.9 years. Kaplan-Meier 10-year survival ranged from 89.5% to 95.3%. Cox's relative risk (RR) was calculated relative to the fixed modular-bearing Profix knee (the most frequently used TKR in Norway), and ranged from 1.1 to 2.6. The risk of revision for aseptic tibial loosening was higher in the mobile-bearing LCS Classic (RR 6.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8 to 12.1)), the LCS Complete (RR 7.7 (95% CI 4.1 to 14.4)), the fixed modular-bearing Duracon (RR 4.5 (95% CI 1.8 to 11.1)) and the fixed non-modular bearing AGC Universal TKR (RR 2.5 (95% CI 1.3 to 5.1)), compared with the Profix. These implants (except AGC Universal) also had an increased risk of revision for femoral loosening (RR 2.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.8), RR 3.7 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.9), and RR 3.4 (95% CI 1.1 to 11.0), respectively). These results suggest that aseptic loosening is related to design in TKR.

  15. Proximalisation of the tibial tubercle gives a good outcome in patients undergoing revision total knee arthroplasty who have pseudo patella baja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, F-J; Vandenneucker, H

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with and without proximalisation of the tibial tubercle in patients with a failed primary TKA who have pseudo patella baja. All revision TKAs, performed between January 2008 and November 2013 at a tertiary referral University Orthopaedic Department were retrospectively reviewed. Pseudo patella baja was defined using the modified Insall-Salvati and the Blackburne-Peel ratios. A proximalisation of the tibial tubercle was performed in 13 patients with pseudo patella baja who were matched with a control group of 13 patients for gender, age, height, weight, body mass index, length of surgery and Blackburne-Peel ratio. Outcome was assessed two years post-operatively using the Knee Society Score (KSS). The increase in KSS was significantly higher in the osteotomy group compared with the control group. The outcome was statistically better in patients in whom proximalisation of > 1 cm had been achieved compared with those in whom the proximalisation was patella baja gives good outcomes without major complications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:912-16. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Assessment of Prosthesis Alignment after Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Using EOS 2D and 3D Imaging : A Reliability Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Stevens, Martin; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Reininga, Inge H. F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A new low-dose X-ray device, called EOS, has been introduced for determining lower-limb alignment in 2D and 3D. Reliability has not yet been assessed when using EOS on lower limbs containing a knee prosthesis. Therefore purpose of this study was to determine intraobserver and interobse

  17. The mid-term follow-up of revision total knee athroplasty%人工全膝关节翻修术中期随访结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈曦; 吕厚山; 孙铁铮

    2015-01-01

    revision of total knee arthroplasty and compare the different strategies for infective revisions.Methods All of 45 patients (47 operated knees) lived in Beijing were treated from April 1989 to October 2010 in Arthritis Clinic and Research Center,Peking University People's Hospital.There were 6 male and 39 female patients,who aged from 31 to 77 years (mean (62 ± 11) years).The function of knee,satisfaction and imaging then were compared retrospectively.American Knee Society Scores (KSS),Westem Ontario & McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index(WOMAC),the medical outcomes study item short form health survey (SF-36) scales and satisfaction/pain visual analogue scales(VAS) of patients were evaluated.The patients were divided into infection group (33 patients,34 knees) and non-infection group (12 patients,12 knees) according to the indication of revision of total knee arthroplasty and compared by t-tests.Results The time from operation to follow-up was 1 year and 2 months to 17 years.The mid-term follow-up time was 8 years 3 months.There were significant improvements of KSS clinical and function scores (from 66.9 ± 28.0 and 44.4 ± 37.6 to 25.4 ±24.2 and 10.0 ±24.8,t =7.043 and 3.797,both P =0.001).Patients of infection group had lower KSS clinical and function scores than non-infection group before operation,and lower Society Function (t =2.225,3.520 and 2.885,P =0.035,0.002 and 0.007).About the septic group,the Ⅱ-stage group had significant better post-operation KSS function scores,Society Function,physical component summary,WOMAC functional score and WOMAC score than Ⅰ-stage group(t =2.160-3.268,P =0.004-0.042).The 1-year,2-year,6-year,17-year survival rate were 83.6%,78.7%,62.1%,44.5%.Conclusions Revision total knee arthroplasty is an effective method for solving the failure of primary total knee arthroplasty.It can improve the pain and activity difficulty following the failure of primary total knee arthroplasty,and partially improve function along with

  18. Subperitoneal approach in revision arthroplasty for acetabular component protrusion: Analysis of practices within the French Hip and Knee Society (SFHG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, F; Crenn, V; Tabutin, J

    2017-02-01

    The complications related to revision for acetabular component protrusion with material migrating into the intrapelvic region remain rare but potentially serious. Today, the literature reports no epidemiological data on the subperitoneal approach (SPA) in revision total hip arthroplasty (RTHA) for protrusion. Therefore we conducted a retrospective study on a large revision arthroplasty database to answer the following questions: (1) What is the frequency of this approach in this population? (2) What are the factors related to this procedure? (3) Is morbidity and mortality of the SPA higher than for an isolated conventional approach? Major protrusions with material in the superomedial quadrant (SMQ) have a higher probability of being operated using a SPA. This multicenter retrospective study included 260 cases of THA with endopelvic protrusion of material at least 15mm inside the Kohler line. The degree of protrusion was assessed on the AP pelvic X-ray with the construction of the SMQ. The reason for the subperitoneal approach, the duration of surgery, and the preoperative exams were also collected. Nineteen procedures out of the 260 RTHAs included (7.8%) had a SPA in addition to the approach for the revision THA. The frequency of the SPA varied among centers (range: 1.7-50%). In four cases, the SPA was indicted to care for a vascular complication identified preoperatively. For one patient, the SPA was indicated intraoperatively. The other indications were either to extract the implant (n=7) or prevent a potential intraoperative assault of neurovascular structures (n=9). The cases presenting major protrusion on the AP X-ray with material in the SMQ were more often operated through the SPA (12/19; 63.2%) than cases with no SMQ involvement (4/241; 1.7%) (P0.05). Despite the limitations related to the retrospective and multicenter design of this study, to our knowledge it is the only one that examines SPA procedures within the context of severe material protrusion with

  19. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee bursitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Knee bursitis is inflammation of a small fluid-filled sac (bursa) situated ... in your knee can become inflamed, but knee bursitis most commonly occurs over the kneecap or on ...

  20. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  1. 人工膝关节翻修术后关节线位置的变化及原因分析%Reasons of joint line variance after total knee revision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵宏翊; 杨德金; 周一新; 徐辉

    2014-01-01

    背景:人工膝关节翻修术后的关节线位置是影响术后效果的重要因素之一。  目的:探讨人工膝关节翻修手术技术对关节线位置改变的影响及其原因。  方法:回顾性分析2012年1月至2012年12月行人工膝关节翻修手术的31例患者的X线片资料及临床资料,测量术前、术后关节线的位置,分析关节线位置改变情况与股骨前后径变化和是否使用股骨远端金属加强垫块的关系。  结果:本组患者人工膝关节翻修术后关节线位置较术前平均改变(1.2±3.4)mm(-4.0~8.7 mm);关节线位置改变情况与股骨前后径变化呈线性相关;使用与未使用股骨远端金属加强垫块患者的关节线位置较术前平均改变(-0.54±2.39)mm和(2.59±3.55)mm,均有统计学差异(P<0.01),使用股骨远端金属加强垫块能更精确重建关节线。  结论:目前,人工膝关节翻修手术技术可以重建膝关节关节线,但需要注意股骨大小的重建和骨缺损的处理。%Background:The position of the joint line is one of the important parameters to evaluate the outcome of knee revision. Objective:To analyze the effect of surgical technique of knee revision on the joint line variance. Methods:A retrospective analysis was conducted in 31 patients undergoing total knee revision between January 2012 and December 2012. Preoperative and postoperative joint lines were measured. The correlation between the change of joint line and the distal femur anterior posterior dimension and the use of distal femur metal augment were analyzed. Results: The overall change of the knee joint line was (1.2 ± 3.4)mm (-4.0~8.7 mm) compared to the preoperative ones. There was linear correlation between the position of knee joint and distal femur anterior posterior dimension. The change of the knee joint line was (-0.54±2.39)mm and (2.59±3.55)mm with and without use of distal femur metal augment

  2. Recovery of knee mobility after a static or mobile spacer in total knee infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Hannink, G.; Mde, W. Malefijt

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the recovery of knee mobility after two-stage revision of an infected total knee arthroplasty using a static or mobile spacer. At 12 months follow-up, none of the patients had a recurrent infection of their new prosthesis. Knee flexion was lower in the static

  3. Knee Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BMI Calculator myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Knee ProblemsPain, swelling, stiffness and "water" on the knee are common symptoms. Follow this chart for more ...

  4. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make a diagnosis of knee bursitis during a physical exam. Your doctor will inspect your knee by: Comparing the condition of both knees, particularly if only one is painful Gently pressing on different areas of your knee to detect warmth, swelling and the source of pain Carefully moving ...

  5. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, tenderness, swelling, and pain on the front of ... injury without the aid of a television screen. Physical Therapy Depending on the type of knee injury ...

  6. 初次全膝关节置换术后并发症及翻修手术的原因分析%Postoperative complications and revision surgery following primary total knee arthroplasty after midterm follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宾; 翁习生; 林进; 金今; 钱文伟; 邱贵兴; 王炜

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨初次全膝关节置换术后30 d内相关并发症发生情况及翻修手术的相关因素.方法 收集2001年1月至2012年12月在北京协和医院骨科进行初次全膝关节置换术患者的临床资料,假体均为固定平台假体,采用骨水泥固定,排除翻修病例及血友病关节炎患者.共有1 920例患者(2 779例次全膝关节置换手术)纳入研究,男性323例,女性1 607例;年龄25~86岁,平均(66±9)岁.骨关节炎1 720例(89.58%),类风湿关节炎168例(8.75%),强直性脊柱炎12例(0.63%),继发骨关节炎20例(1.04%).随访患者术后30 d内发生的主要系统并发症、局部并发症及发生的翻修手术及相关因素.结果 随访截至2013年12月,共有1 854例患者(2 693个关节)获得随访,失访率为3.44%.术后平均随访67个月,死亡3例.41例(2.21%)患者出现系统并发症,其中最常见的为呼吸系统并发症(0.49%,9/1 854)及心血管并发症(0.38%,7/1 854).术后经超声证实的症状性深静脉血栓形成发生率为3.02% (56/1 854),其中7例发生肺栓塞.术后发生局部并发症24例(1.29%),包括伤口愈合不良、伤口感染、神经损伤.59个关节接受翻修手术治疗,常见原因包括感染后松动(1.19%,32/2 693)和术后关节僵硬(0.37%,10/2693).结论 初次全膝关节置换术后30 d内最常见系统并发症为呼吸系统及心血管系统并发症.感染后松动是术后翻修最常见的原因.%Objective To determine the postoperative complications of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) within 30 postoperative days,and the different causes for revision surgery during follow-up.Methods Between January 2001 and December 2012,a total of 1 920 patients underwent 2 779 primary TKA with fixed bearing platform in Peking Union Medical College Hospital,with 323 for male and 1 607 for female.The revision surgery at index time and the hemophiliac arthropathy were excluded for this study.The average age was (66 ± 9

  7. The introduction period of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is critical: a clinical, clinical multicentered, and radiostereometric study of 251 Duracon unicompartmental knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrand, A; Stenström, A; Ryd, L; Toksvig-Larsen, S

    2000-08-01

    One hundred twenty-eight consecutive knees were operated on with the Duracon unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Of 111 knees, followed 3 years (range, 1-6 years), 109 knees were satisfactory. Two knees were revised because of progression of osteoarthritis and inexplicable pain. Radiostereometric analysis in 49 knees showed a migration of 0.6 mm after 2 years. The magnitude of migration was lower in comparison with published series. In a multicenter study comprising 4 other hospitals, there were 8 revisions in 123 operated knees. The reasons were loosening, subsidence, or fracture. These revisions were within 1 year and mostly related to operative technique. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is a demanding procedure that needs special experience and includes a risk of early failures during the introduction of a system.

  8. Total knee replacement for posttraumatic degenerative arthritis of the knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Li-dong; XIONG Yan; YAN Shi-gui; YANG Quan-sen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with posttraumatic degenerative arthritis due to a previous fracture around the knee. Methods: We analyzed the results of 15 TKAs, performed from 1997 to 2003, in 15 patients with post-traumatic degenerative arthritis due to a previous fracture around knee. There were 3 women and 12 men with an average age of 58 years (range, 31-76 years). The time from fracture to arthroplasty averaged 8.2 years (range, 2-27 years). Internal fixation had previously been performed in 8 patients resulting in retained hardware. At the time of arthroplasty a femoral fracture malunion was present in two knees. Lateral retinacular release (4 knees), extensor mechanism realignment (1 knee) or medial collateral ligament reconstruction (1 knee) were needed at the time of arthroplasty. Results: Follow-up averaged 35 months (range, 12-73 months). No patient was lost for follow-up. According to the Knee Society Score scale, the mean preoperative knee score was 37 (range, 10-70) and functional score was 41 (range, 0-60). They were improved significantly to a mean of 84 (range, 10-100) and 76 (range, 20-100) points, respectively at the latest follow-up. The mean knee arc of motion were improved from 84° preoperation to 94° at the latest follow-up. Postoperative manipulation under anesthesia for poor motion was carried out in 4 knees. No knee had aseptic loosening that required subsequent revision. Two knees developed superficial infection and were treated with debridement. It subsequently recovered with the retention of components. Conclusions: Significant improvement in function and relief of pain has been achieved in patients with previous fractures undergoing subsequent TKA. However, this procedure is technically demanding and patients are at increased risk for restricted motion and need more care following TKA. This study suggests that the outcome of TKA may be improved further by making special efforts to

  9. Migration of polyethylene fixation screw after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woo-Shin; Youm, Yoon-Seok

    2009-08-01

    Duracon (Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ) posterior stabilized total knee system has a snap fit locking mechanism of a tibial polyethylene, including an additional locking screw for further fixation of polyethylene. We report 13 cases of locking screw migration from tibial component after Duracon posterior stabilized primary total knee arthroplasty. Among 13 knees, screw migration in 10 asymptomatic cases was incidentally detected during regular follow-up, and they were just observed in the outpatient clinic. Only 3 knees had moderate pain, swelling, and instability, and revision was done on 2 of 3 knees.

  10. Periprosthetic Knee Infection: Ten Strategies That Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla Ku; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most serious complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The demand for TKA is rapidly increasing, resulting in a subsequent increase in infections involving knee prosthesis. Despite the existence of common management practices, the best approach for several aspects in the management of periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. This review examines the current understanding in the management of the following aspects of PJI: preoperative risk stratification, preoperative antibiotics, preoperative skin preparation, outpatient diagnosis, assessing for infection in revision cases, improving culture utility, irrigation and debridement, one and two-stage revision, and patient prognostic information. Moreover, ten strategies for the management of periprosthetic knee infection based on available literature, and experience of the authors were reviewed. PMID:24368992

  11. ACL Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Dubois, Julieta Puig; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients one year after an ACL revision with clinical evaluation and MRI, to consider their condition before returning to sports activities. Methods: A descriptive, prospective and longitudinal study was performed. A series of patients who underwent an ACL revision between March 2014 and March 2015 were evaluated after one year post surgery. They were evaluated using the Lysholm score, IKDC, Tegner, artrometry and MRI (3.0 t). A signal pattern and osteointegration was determined in the MRI. Graft signal intensity of the ACL graft using the signal/noise quotient value (SNQ) was also determined to evaluate the ligamentatization process state. Results: A total of 18 male patients were evaluated with a mean age of 31 years old.Average scores were: Lysholm 88 points, IKDC 80 points, Pre-surgical Tegner 9 points and postoperative 4 points. Artrhometry (KT1000) at 20 newtons showed a side to side difference of less than 3 mm in 88%. Only 44% of patients returned to their previous sport activity one year after revision.The MRI showed a heterogeneous signal in neoligaments in 34% of patients. SNQ showed graft integration in only 28%. Synovial fluid was found in bone-graft interphase in 44% of tunnels, inferring partial osteointegration. The heterogeneous signal was present in 50% of patients who did not return to the previous sport level activity. (Fisher statistics: p = 0.043) There were no meaningful differences in patients with auto or allografts. Conclusion: Although the clinical evaluation was satisfactory, only 44% of patients returned to the previous level of sport activity one year after the ACL surgery. The ligamentatization process was found in 28% of knees evaluated with MRI one year later. Partial osteointegration is inferred in 44%. Results showed a meaningful relation between the signal of neoligaments in the MRI and the return to sport activity in said series of patients. MRI is a useful tool

  12. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  13. Knee Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience any of the following: • Fever • Chills • Persistent warmth or redness around the knee • Persistent or increased ... you should be able to return to most physical activities a er 6 to 8 weeks, or ...

  14. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  15. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  16. Relationship between obesity and early failure of total knee prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Bordini, B.; Stea, S.; Cremonini, S.; Viceconti, M.; Palma, R.; Toni, A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Obesity is a risk factor for knee arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is the definitive surgical treatment of this disease. Therefore, a high percentage of subjects treated are overweight. Since 2000 in the Emilia-Romagna Region the Register of Orthopedic Prosthetic Implantology, RIPO, has recorded data of all the primary and revision operations performed on the knee; height and weight of patients at the time of surgery have also been recorded. Methods To understand how ove...

  17. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  18. Total knee arthroplasty for severe valgus knee deformity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xinhua; Wang Min; Liu Chao; Zhang Liang; Zhou Yixin

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in severe valgus knees may prove challenging,and choice of implant depends on the severity of the valgus deformity and the extent of soft-tissue release.The purpose of this study was to review 8 to 11 years (mean,10 years) follow-up results of primary TKA for varient-Ⅲ valgus knee deformity with use of different type implants.Methods Between January 2002 and January 2005,20 women and 12 men,aged 47 to 63 (mean,57.19±6.08) years old,with varient-Ⅲ valgus knees underwent primary TKA.Of the 32 patients,37 knees had varient-Ⅲ deformities.Pie crusting was carefully performed with small,multiple inside-out incisions,bone resection balanced the knee in lieu of soft tissue releases that were not used in the series.Cruciate-retaining knees (Gemini MKⅡ,Link Company,Germany) were used in 13 knees,Genesis Ⅱ (Simth & Nephew Company,USA) in 14 knees,and hinged knee (Endo-Model Company,Germany) in 10 knees.In five patients with bilateral variant-Ⅲll TKAs,three patients underwent 1-stage bilateral procedures,and two underwent 2-stage procedures.All implants were cemented and the patella was not resurfaced.The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score was assessed.Patients were followed up from 8 to 11 years.Results The mean HSS knee score were improved from 50.33±11.60 to 90.06±3.07 (P <0.001).The mean tibiofemoral alignment were improved from valgus 32.72°±9.68° pre-operation to 4.89°±0.90° post-operation (P <0.001).The mean range of motion were improved from 93.72°±23.69° pre-operation to 116.61±16.29° post-operation (P <0.001).No patients underwent revision.One patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation using femoral condylar plates for supracondylar femoral fractures secondary to a fall at three years.Three patients developed transient peroneal nerve palsies,which resolved within nine months.Two patients developed symptomatic deep vein thrombosis that was managed with rivaroxaban

  19. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  20. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  1. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B;

    2011-01-01

    excluding 1 patient, who was transferred to another hospital for logistical reasons (10 days). None of the patients died within 3 months, and 3 patients were re-admitted (2 for suspicion of DVT, which was not found, and 1 for joint mobilization). Patient satisfaction was high. Interpretation Patients...

  2. Water on the Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your knee joint. Some people call this condition "water on the knee." A swollen knee may be ... Choose low-impact exercise. Certain activities, such as water aerobics and swimming, don't place continuous weight- ...

  3. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  4. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  5. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  6. Fibrosis is a common outcome following total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Nicole; Dixon, David; Walker, Andrew; Horabin, Joanna; Smith, Nick; Weir, David J.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures that alleviates pain and restores function in patients with degenerative knee joint diseases. Arthrofibrosis, abnormal scarring in which dense fibrous tissue prevents normal range of motion, develops in ~3–10% of TKA patients. No prophylactic intervention is available and treatment is restricted to aggressive physiotherapy or revision surgery. Tissue was collected from patients undergoing primary (n = 30) or revision (n = 27) TKA. Revision patients were stratified as non-arthrofibrotic and arthrofibrotic. Tissue was macroscopically and histologically compared to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of arthrofibrosis. Macroscopically, tissue from primary TKA presents as homogenous, fatty tissue whereas tissue from revision TKA presents as dense, pigmented tissue. Histologically, there was dramatic tissue remodelling, increased collagen deposition and increased (myo)fibroblast staining in tissue from revision TKA. Significantly, tissue architecture was similar between revision patients regardless of clinically diagnosis. There are significant differences in architecture and composition of tissue from revision TKA over primary TKA. Surprisingly, whether revision TKA were clinically diagnosed as arthrofibrotic or non-arthrofibrotic there were still significant differences in fibrotic markers compared to primary TKA suggesting an ongoing fibrotic process in all revision knees. PMID:26553967

  7. Valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória dos defeitos ósseos no joelho nas revisões de artroplastia Value of preoperative radiographic evaluations on knee bone defects for revision arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Masasi Iamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória nas revisões de artroplastias totais do joelho. MÉTODOS: Trinta e um joelhos operados no período de 2006 a 2008 em uma série consecutiva de casos de cirurgia de revisão de artroplastia total de joelho foram analisados retrospectivamente. CRITÉRIOS ANALISADOS: número de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos estruturados utilizados para preenchimento dos defeitos ósseos; localização das cunhas e enxertos ósseos utilizados e espessura média do polietileno utilizada. A classificação AORI era estabelecida previamente através de radiografias pré-operatórias segundo critérios preestabelecidos. Após a análise, os joelhos foram divididos em quatro grupos (I, IIA, IIB e III. RESULTADOS: O número médio de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos utilizados em cada joelho variou de maneira crescente entre os grupos (grupo I: 1,33; grupo IIA: 2; grupo IIB: 4,33; grupo III: 4,83 (P = 0,0012. As localizações mais comuns foram: medial na tíbia e posteromedial no fêmur. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante na espessura do polietileno utilizado. CONCLUSÃO: A classificação AORI para defeitos ósseos no joelho baseada em radiografias pré-operatórias mostrou correlação crescente com a necessidade de utilização de cunhas e/ou enxertos estruturados na revisão de artroplastia total do joelho. Porém, até 46% dos joelhos dos grupos I e IIA apresentaram falhas ósseas de até 5mm não diagnosticadas através das radiografias pré-operatórias.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of preoperative radiographic evaluations for total knee arthroplasty (TKA revision. METHODS: Thirty-one knees that were operated between 2006 and 2008, in a consecutive series of cases of TKA revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA WERE EVALUATED: number of wedges or structured bone grafts used for filling the bone defects; locations of the wedges and bone grafts used; and

  8. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable...

  9. MR Imaging of Knee Arthroplasty Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jan; Lurie, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty is a highly effective treatment that relieves pain and improves joint function in a large percentage of patients. Despite an initially satisfactory surgical outcome, pain, dysfunction, and implant failure can occur over time. Identifying the etiology of complications is vital for appropriate management and proper timing of revision. Due to the increasing number of knee arthroplasties performed and decreasing patient age at implantation, there is a demand for accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment of symptomatic joints following knee arthroplasty, and for monitoring of patients at risk. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows for comprehensive imaging evaluation of the tissues surrounding knee arthroplasty implants with metallic components, including the polyethylene components. Optimized conventional and advanced pulse sequences can result in substantial metallic artifact reduction and afford improved visualization of bone, implant-tissue interfaces, and periprosthetic soft tissue for the diagnosis of arthroplasty-related complications. In this review article, we discuss strategies for MR imaging around knee arthroplasty implants and illustrate the imaging appearances of common modes of failure, including aseptic loosening, polyethylene wear–induced synovitis and osteolysis, periprosthetic joint infections, fracture, patellar clunk syndrome, recurrent hemarthrosis, arthrofibrosis, component malalignment, extensor mechanism injury, and instability. A systematic approach is provided for evaluation of MR imaging of knee implants. MR imaging with optimized conventional pulse sequences and advanced metal artifact reduction techniques can contribute important information for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification, and surgical planning. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26295591

  10. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  11. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Prosthetic Knee Systems Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of ... Consulting Original article by Bill Dupes Prosthetic knee systems are among the most complex of all components. ...

  12. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  13. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  14. Knee arthroscopy - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100117.htm Knee arthroscopy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The knee is a complex joint made up of the ...

  15. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  16. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  17. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise. Trea...

  18. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Blount Disease or Blount-Like Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Roman M; Nypaver, Chrissy M; Schiff, Adam P; Hopkinson, William J; Rees, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Blount disease is associated with complex deformity of the proximal tibia, and some patients will develop knee osteoarthritis. Five patients (eight knees) with Blount disease or Blount-like deformity underwent total knee arthroplasty. Mean proximal tibial metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was 20.75°. Each patient had substantial posteromedial tibial bony defects and six knees required extensive medial releases. Two knees required increased constraint at index procedure. One patient has undergone bilateral revision surgery with rotating hinge prostheses. Mean WOMAC scores were 13.5 and Knee Society scores were 212.5 at average 75.2 month follow-up. Despite technical challenges, patients with these deformities can have successful outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons should be prepared to address posteromedial tibial bony defects and consider constrained arthroplasty at the index procedure.

  19. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in knees with acute, traumatic extension deficit (the "locked knee"), and evaluated whether arthroscopy of knees with no mechanical pathology could be avoided by MRI evaluation. The study consisted...... of 50 patients who had an acute, traumatic extension deficit of the knee. All patients were submitted to MRI prior to arthroscopy. Following MRI and surgery, standardized forms were filled out, attempting to objectify the findings. The orthopaedic surgeon was not aware of the MRI result prior to surgery......, the following results were calculated for the overall appearance of a lesion able to cause locking: Positive predictive value = 0.85, negative predictive value = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.53. Two knees were erroneously evaluated with no mechanical locking at MRI (one bucket-handle lesion and one...

  20. Knee Arthrodesis after failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. A total of 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed in Denmark from 1997 to 2013 were identified by linking the data using....... Differences in cumulative incidence were compared with the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 164 of the 165 arthrodeses were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of arthrodesis was 0.26% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 0.31%). The 5-year cumulative...

  1. Functional outcomes of uni-knee arthroplasty for medial compartment knee arthropathy in asian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To Wong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uni-knee arthroplasty (UKA has shown better knee kinematics and motion that may better suit the activities of daily living in Eastern countries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of UKA for medial compartment knee arthropathy in Asian patients. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 48 patients with 51 UK A knees. Only one type of prosthesis was used and all components were cemented. Postoperative management included ambulation with weight bearing, range of motion, and muscle strengthening exercises as tolerated until full recovery. The average follow-up was 52.0 ± 24.0 (range 12-92 months. The evaluation included functional assessment, the Knee Society knee and functional scores, the International Knee Document Committee (IKDC subjective and objective scores, and radiographs of the knee. Results: The overall clinical outcomes of the knee showed the functional outcome of the knee to be normal in 51%, nearly normal in 37%, abnormal in 8%, and severely abnormal in 4%. The functional activities included stair climbing in 96%, squatting in 76%, jogging in 71% and kneeling in 47%. Three-quarters of the patients were able to kneel for daily activities. Approximately 98% of the patients were satisfied with the operation. The survivorship of the prosthesis was 98% with one revision pending. Radiographic evaluations revealed the components were centered in 82% and off-centered in 18%. Osteoarthritis was 22% preoperative and 27% postoperative for the patellofemoral compartment, and 0% before and 4% after surgery for the lateral compartment. The functional outcomes showed no difference between patients with and without patellofemoral arthritis. The complications included one component malposition and one knee pain of undetermined origin. Conclusions: UKA provides excellent pain relief and restoration of knee function including kneeling, squatting, and sit-to-stand activities that perfectly fit the oriental

  2. Knee arthrodesis as limb salvage for complex failures of total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinad, Raul; Fourman, Mitchell S; Fragomen, Austin T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2014-11-01

    Patients with multiple failures of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are challenging limb salvage cases. Twenty one patients over the last 10 years were referred to our service for knee fusion by arthroplasty surgeons who felt they were not candidates for revision TKA. Active infection was present in 76.2% and total bone loss averaged 6.6 cm. Lengthening was performed in 7/22 patients. Total time in Ilizarov frames was 9 months, with 93.3% union. Patients treated with IM fusion nails had 100% union. Average LLD increased from 3.6 to 4.5 cm following intervention, while those with concurrent lengthening improved to 1.6 cm. Findings suggest that bone loss and the soft-tissue envelope dictate knee fusion method, and multiple techniques may be needed. A treatment algorithm is presented.

  3. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable......) way. Most respondents and interviewees are worried about increasing pressures on the translation market, which, combined with customers’ general lack of understanding of the translation process, mean that systematic, all-encompassing quality assurance is rarely financially viable....

  4. Revision Notes

    CERN Document Server

    Matthewson, Siobhan; Debbadi, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Revision Notes: CCEA ICT for GCSE has been written by experienced teachers and examiners so that you can be confident that it covers only the facts and ideas you will be expected to recall and use in the exam. - Essential facts are carefully organised to make revising easier. - Exams tips show you how to avoid losing marks and get the best grade. - Check your understanding questions support you in the run-up to the exams, with answers provided free online at www.hodderplus.co.uk. This book will help you plan and pace your revision to suit your learning needs and can be integrated with other re

  5. Ethical Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Mary Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the dilemma of how to respond to student papers advancing morally repugnant positions. Advocates conceptualizing writing as an ethical act and connecting ethics and revision. Describes briefly how three such student papers were handled. (SR)

  6. Scar revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 21. Lorenz P, Bari AS. Scar prevention, treatment, and revision. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 16. Read More Contracture deformity Keloids Review Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  7. Apparent Skin Discoloration about the Knee Joint: A Rare Sequela of Metallosis after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narlaka Jayasekera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Metallosis is a phenomenon most commonly associated with hip replacement. However it can occur in any metallic implant subject to wear. Wear creates metal debris, which is deposited in the surrounding soft tissue. This leads to many local adverse reactions including, but not limited to, implant loosening/osteolysis, pain, and effusion. In the deeper joints, for example, the hip, metal deposits are mostly only seen intraoperatively. Case Study. A 74-year-old lady represented to orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Her principle complaint was skin discolouration, associated with pain and swelling over the left knee, on the background of a previous total knee replacement with a metal backed patella resurfacing six years. A plain radiograph revealed loosening of the patellar prosthesis. A diagnosis of metallosis was made; the patient underwent debridement of the stained soft tissue and primary revision of the prosthesis. She remained symptom-free five years after revision. Discussion. Metallosis results in metallic debris which causes tissue staining, often hidden within the soft tissue envelope of the hip, but more apparent in the knee. Metallosis may cause pain, effusion, and systemic symptoms because of raised levels of serum-metal ions. Surgical intervention with revision and debridement can have good functional results.

  8. USE OF TECHNOLOGIES OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH PATHOLOGY OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rodomanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the results of surgical treatment of 63 patients with knee-joint pathology who were treated in Vreden’s Scientific-research Institute of traumatology and orthopaedics (Saint-Petersburg, Russia within the period from 2000 to 2011. All the patients had pedicled flap transfer or free tissue transfer. 53 patients (84,1% had additionally various orthopedic operations on the knee joint: 42 patients had primary or revision total knee arthroplasty, 6 patients had resections of bony tumors and total knee arthroplasty, 4 - knee arthrodesis, 1 - open reduction and internal fixation of patella. The results of treatment were estimated according to WOMAC knee score. 4 patients had total necrosis of flap what demanded repeated reconstructive microsurgical operation. 6 patients had knee arthroplasty surgical site infection, 1 patient had recidive of osteoblastic sarcoma and he was made leg amputation. 65,7% of patients had good results according to WOMAC knee score, 28,6% patients had satisfactory results. Microsurgical operations in patients with pathology of knee-joint mainly aim to correct various pathological changes of tissues located in this particular area. In cases of scarry deformations and defects of tissues located in the area of knee-joint microsurgical technologies increase the opportunities for fulfilling total knee arthroplasty and improve its results as well as results of other orthopedical operations. At the same time microsurgical technologies may be used as preparative operations, single-step maneuvers and operations fulfilled in case of development of local infectious complications.

  9. Avaliação comparativa da perda de extensão entre acessos cirúrgicos para revisão de artroplastia total do joelho Comparative assessment of extension loss among different surgical approaches to the revision of total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Marques Villardi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a possibilidade de perda de extensão do joelho, após artroplastias de revisão, realizadas com acessos do tipo quadriceps snip e osteotomia do tubérculo anterior da tíbia (TAT, comparativamente, entre ambos e com um grupo controle, em que foi utilizado o acesso parapatelar medial convencional. MÉTODO: Este estudo foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa do INTO. A perda de extensão do joelho foi avaliada em pacientes submetidos a artroplastias de revisão, unilaterais, realizadas pelo Grupo de Joelho do Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia - INTO, em que foram utilizados um dos seguintes acessos: convencional - parapatelar medial, snip do quadríceps ou osteotomia do tubérculo anterior da tíbia. A amostra foi composta por 26 indivíduos, cuja idade variou entre 52 e 80 anos, distribuídos em três grupos: grupo I: acesso parapatelar medial convencional (n = 10; grupo II: quadriceps snip (n = 8; e grupo III: osteotomia do TAT (n = 8. O tempo de seguimento médio foi de 18,57 meses. A perda da extensão do joelho foi determinada pela diferença entre o grau de extensão ativa pré e pós-operatória. Na avaliação estatística, foi utilizado o teste de análise de variância ANOVA, de fator único, com o nível de significância a = 0,05 (5%. RESULTADOS: A perda média de extensão da série foi igual a 8,57º, variando entre 2º e 30º. O p-valor obtido foi igual a 0,112, o que permite assumir a hipótese de igualdade entre os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: No presente estudo, não foi observada diferença significativa entre os grupos compostos pelos três tipos de acesso utilizados para as revisões de artroplastias, no que tange ao parâmetro perda de extensão.OBJECTIVE: To assess the possibility of extension loss of the knee after revision arthroplasties performed with approaches like quadriceps snip and TAT osteotomy, comparing the two methods and using a control group in who the conventional medial

  10. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  11. [Therapy of arthrofibrosis after total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollwitzer, H; Burgkart, R; Diehl, P; Gradinger, R; Bühren, V

    2006-02-01

    Arthrofibrosis is one of the most common complications after total knee arthroplasty with an overall incidence of approximately 10%. Nevertheless, published data are rare and clinical trials mostly include small and heterogeneous patient series resulting in controversial conclusions. Clinically, arthrofibrosis after knee arthroplasty is defined as (painful) stiffness with scarring and soft tissue proliferation. Differentiation between local (peripatellar) and generalized fibrosis is therapeutically relevant. Histopathology typically shows subsynovial fibrosis with synovial hyperplasia, chronic inflammatory infiltration, and excessive and unregulated proliferation of collagen and fibroblasts. Diagnostic strategies are based on the exclusion of differential causes for painful knee stiffness, and especially the exclusion of low-grade infections represents a diagnostic challenge. Early and intensive physiotherapy combined with sufficient analgesia should be initiated as a basic therapy. The next therapeutic steps for persisting arthrofibrosis include closed manipulation and open arthrolysis. Arthroscopic interventions should be limited to local fibrosis. Revision arthroplasty represents a rescue surgery, often associated with recurrence of fibrosis. Prevention of arthrofibrosis by sufficient analgesia and early physiotherapy remains the best treatment option for painful stiffness after knee arthroplasty.

  12. Clinical outcome after treatment of infected primary total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive cases of infected primary total knee arthroplasties were treated at our institution from 1989 through 2000. Eleven patients had debridement and irrigation performed within 2 months of index arthroplasty or hematogenous spread; only one infection was eradicated. Twenty......-five patients had their prostheses removed; 17 had two-stage revision arthroplasty, following which infection was eradicated in 15; one had a permanent spacer, 7 had arthrodesis (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) and 2 had a femur amputation (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) at follow......-up of mean 24 months. Infections were cured equally well with revision arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Among the 15 patients who ended up with revision arthroplasty, 11 had a better range of motion compared to the index arthroplasty, but 8 had daily pain. We present our treatment protocol, which eradicated 15...

  13. Results of porous-coated anatomic and duracon total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Jonathon; Quinlan, John; Doyle, Terry; Bayan, Ali; Theis, Jean-Claude

    2010-12-01

    The Duracon total knee replacement and its forerunner the Porous-Coated Anatomic (PCA) knee system have been associated with good results. This study reviews a series of 181 knee replacements performed with these systems by seven general orthopedic surgeons with follow-up to a mean of 6.7 years. The mean Knee Society knee and function scores were 72 and 68. The mean Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score was 76, and the mean 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey result was 55. A mean flexion of 104 degrees was recorded, and 93.8% of patients rated their satisfaction as good to excellent. Fifty-five percent of patients had minor radiographic lucencies-these were of questionable clinical significance. Seven patients required revision. These knee systems used in a relatively low-volume general unit provide consistent results comparable with those from larger arthroplasty units.

  14. Pneumatic osteoarthritis knee brace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Kojić, Milos; Stojanović, Boban; Hunter, David

    2009-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease that necessitates long term therapeutic intervention. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated an improvement in the external adduction moment with application of a valgus knee brace. Despite being both efficacious and safe, due to their rigid frame and bulkiness, current designs of knee braces create discomfort and difficulties to patients during prolonged periods of application. Here we propose a novel design of a light osteoarthritis knee brace, which is made of soft conforming materials. Our design relies on a pneumatic leverage system, which, when pressurized, reduces the excessive loads predominantly affecting the medial compartment of the knee and eventually reverses the malalignment. Using a finite-element analysis, we show that with a moderate level of applied pressure, this pneumatic brace can, in theory, counterbalance a greater fraction of external adduction moment than the currently existing braces.

  15. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilian Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  16. Early outcomes of twin-peg mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with primary total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Z. C.; Lombardi, A. V.; Hurst, J. M.; Morris, M. J.; Adams, J. B.; Berend, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since redesign of the Oxford phase III mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) femoral component to a twin-peg design, there has not been a direct comparison to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thus, we explored differences between the two cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 168 patients (201 knees) underwent medial UKA with the Oxford Partial Knee Twin-Peg. These patients were compared with a randomly selected group of 177 patients (189 knees) with primary Vanguard TKA. Patient demographics, Knee Society (KS) scores and range of movement (ROM) were compared between the two cohorts. Additionally, revision, re-operation and manipulation under anaesthesia rates were analysed. Results The mean follow-up for UKA and TKA groups was 5.4 and 5.5 years, respectively. Six TKA (3.2%) versus three UKAs (1.5%) were revised which was not significant (p = 0.269). Manipulation was more frequent after TKA (16; 8.5%) versus none in the UKA group (p < 0.001). UKA patients had higher post-operative KS function scores versus TKA patients (78 versus 66, p < 0.001) with a trend toward greater improvement, but there was no difference in ROM and KS clinical improvement (p = 0.382 and 0.420, respectively). Conclusion We found fewer manipulations, and higher functional outcomes for patients treated with medial mobile-bearing UKA compared with TKA. TKA had twice the revision rate as UKA although this did not reach statistical significance with the numbers available. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):28–33. PMID:27694513

  17. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Della Vale

    2008-12-01

    chapter there are revision questions including painful total knee arthroplasty, periprosthetic infection, exposure in revision knee arthroplasty, surgical technique, using stem, offset stems, massive bone loss, retaining patellar component, severe patellar bone loss, assessing joint line position, inserts, chronic extensor mechanism deficiency, spacers, knee fusion, positive culture. AUDIENCE Mainly orthopedic surgeons and residents who are interested in knee arthroplasty have been targeted but the current information related to total knee replacement surgery will also be welcomed by experienced clinicians practicing in knee arthroplasty. Also non-physician personnel may benefit the brief knowledge. ASSESSMENT The brief answers including current concepts and opinions of expert arthroplasty surgeons to carefully chosen questions related to the problems faced in the daily practice of knee artroplasty forming the sections are making almost comprehensive source knowledge for total knee replacement surgery. This reference of complicated cases and controversies in knee arthroplasty by Craig J. Della Vale, MD.and his collaborators will be one of the most practical source of current solutions in the management of knee arthroplasty . Providing straightforward, brief and useful advices, in the form of pearls and pitfalls for frequently encountered problems in total knee replacement surgery makes the text a user friendly, essential reference. The casual style of articles resembling the advices in a dialog of colleagues on a curbside consult makes the text easier to read and understand. Various image and diagrams enhances the knowledge in the text

  18. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Lissa Fahlman; Emmeline Sangeorzan; Nimisha Chheda; Daphne Lambright

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL 0.001) than women with varus or...

  19. Densitometric evaluation might prevent failure of knee artroplasty for aseptic loosening

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the correlation between quantitative ultrasound (QUS) expressed as stiffness index (SI) and the risk of aseptic loosening of knee arthroplasty. Methods: An observational retrospective controlled study was performed on 85 female patients (mean age: 73.3 years) divided into 2 groups from January 2007 to March 2015 and carried out at the Orthopedic Rehabilitation Unit, Casa di Cura Eremo, Arco, Trento, Italy. Group A included 42 patients who had undergone a revision of knee ...

  20. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  1. Runners knee (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forces on the knee, such as a misaligned patella. Chondromalacia is treated with rest or immobilization and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain. Physical therapy, especially ... alignment of the patella that cannot be corrected with therapy.

  2. Osteotomy of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proximal tibial osteotomy; Lateral closing wedge osteotomy; High tibial osteotomy; Distal femoral osteotomy ... There are two types of surgery: Tibial osteotomy is surgery done on ... osteotomy is surgery done on the thigh bone above the knee ...

  3. Dashboard (in the) knee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms...

  4. Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... walking, swimming, golf, driving, light hiking, biking, ballroom dancing, and other low-impact sports. With appropriate activity ... help prevent leg swelling and blood clots. Physical Therapy Most patients begin exercising their knee the day ...

  5. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (nonarthroplasty). J Am Acad ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  6. Prevalent knee pain and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of knee pain in active athletes and to investigate potential associations to type, amount and duration of sports participation. MEASUREMENTS: 339 athletes gave information about occupation, sports activity and different features of knee pain, based...... on a self-filled questionnaire. MAIN RESULTS: The prevalence of knee pain within the preceding 12 months, constant or recurrent knee pain, absence from sport and absence from work due to knee pain, was 54%, 34%, 19% and 4%, respectively. Knee pain was positively associated with years of jogging...... and with weekly hours of participation in competitive gymnastics but negatively with weekly hours of tennis. Constant or recurrent knee pain was positively associated with years of swimming. Absence from sport due to knee pain was positively associated with weekly hours of soccer participation. CONCLUSIONS: Knee...

  7. Taking care of your new knee joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  8. Admissible and Restrained Revision

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, R; 10.1613/jair.1874

    2011-01-01

    As partial justification of their framework for iterated belief revision Darwiche and Pearl convincingly argued against Boutiliers natural revision and provided a prototypical revision operator that fits into their scheme. We show that the Darwiche-Pearl arguments lead naturally to the acceptance of a smaller class of operators which we refer to as admissible. Admissible revision ensures that the penultimate input is not ignored completely, thereby eliminating natural revision, but includes the Darwiche-Pearl operator, Nayaks lexicographic revision operator, and a newly introduced operator called restrained revision. We demonstrate that restrained revision is the most conservative of admissible revision operators, effecting as few changes as possible, while lexicographic revision is the least conservative, and point out that restrained revision can also be viewed as a composite operator, consisting of natural revision preceded by an application of a "backwards revision" operator previously studied by Papini. ...

  9. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  10. 非感染性UKA翻修成TKA的临床结果挪威关节成形登记中心的768例TKA和578例UKA翻修为TKA的病例对照研究(1994年至2011年)%Outcomes of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty After Aseptic Revision to Total Knee Arthroplasty A Comparative Study of 768 TKAs and 578 UKAs Revised to TKAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (1994 to 2011)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tesfaye H.Leta; Stein H(a)kon L.Lygre; Arne Skredderstuen; Geir Hallan; Jan-Erik Gjertsen; Befit Rokne; Ove Furnes; 俞银贤; 易诚青

    2016-01-01

    背景:UKA失败后通常建议翻修为TKA.本文目的是对照研究初次UKA失败后翻修为TKA及初次TKA失败翻修为TKA两种情况下的术后效果、术中数据以及失败原因.方法:1994年到2011年间挪威关节成形登记中心记录的768例TKA失败后翻修为TKA (TKA-→TKA)的病例和578例UKA失败后翻修为TKA (UKA→TKA)的病例.研究中使用了患者自述术后效果的方法(以下简称“PROM”),包括:EuroQolEQ-5D、膝关节损伤和骨关节炎评分Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score(KOOS)、视觉模拟评分法(用来评估满意和疼痛程度).我们进行了改良的Kaplan-Meier和Cox回归分析,获取倾向评分,以评估假体生存率、二次翻修风险以及多次线性回归分析,以便用平均PROM值来评估两组的差异.结果:总体上,1994年到2011年之间,UKA→TKA组有12%的患者进行了二次翻修,TKA→TKA组有13%.UKA→TKA组和TKA→TKA组的10年假体生存比例分别为82%和81%(P=0.63).UKA→TKA组和TKA→TKA组的总体二次翻修风险或平均PROM分值无差异[相关风险(RR)=1.2;P=0.19].但对翻修时年龄≥70岁的情况,TKA→TKA患者的二次翻修风险高出2倍(RR=2.1;P=0.05).UKA→TKA组和TKA→TKA组患者二次翻修的主要原因是:胫骨假体松动(28%比17%)、单纯疼痛(22%比12%)、稳定性差(19%比19%)和深部感染(16%比31%),除深部感染以外,观察到的其他因素在两组间的差异并不大.TKA→TKA组深部感染比例更大(RR=2.2;P=0.03).TKA→TKA组手术操作用时更长(平均150分钟,UKA→TKA为114分钟),手术步骤更复杂且需要用到延长柄(58%,UKA→TKA为19%)和稳定性假体(27%,UKA→TKA为9%).结论:尽管初次TKA翻修成TKA手术过程中可能技术难度更高,但初次UKA翻修成TKA时由于深部感染发生而导致再次翻修的比例更高,不过初次UKA→TKA和初次TKA→TKA总体临床疗效相似.

  11. Traumatic bilateral knee dislocations, unilateral hip dislocation, and contralateral humeral amputation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, James E; Heyworth, Benton E; Piasecki, Dana P; Henn, R Frank; MacGillivray, John D

    2009-02-01

    Bilateral traumatic knee dislocations are a rarity. We report a case of bilateral traumatic knee dislocations with concomitant right hip dislocation and complete traumatic amputation of the left, nondominant upper extremity at the level of the proximal one-third of the humerus. Angiograms revealed no evidence of popliteal artery injury. Orthopedic treatment consisted of immediate reduction of the dislocations and urgent revision amputation of the upper extremity. Staged, bilateral knee ligamentous reconstructions were performed on hospital days 24 and 29, respectively. Despite this constellation of devastating injuries, the patient had a satisfactory outcome. In patients with high-energy hip or knee dislocations, the bilateral hips and knees should be carefully examined to check for associated fractures and/or dislocations.

  12. Atraumatic patellar prosthesis dislocation with patellar tendon injury following a total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Alka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Total knee arthroplasty is a well-established procedure with gratifying results. There is no consensus in the literature whether to routinely resurface the patella while performing total knee arthroplasty or not. Although an extremely rare occurrence in clinical practice, patellar prosthesis dislocation is a possible complication resulting from total knee arthroplasty. Case presentation We report a rare case of atraumatic spontaneous dislocation of patellar prosthesis in a 63-year-old Caucasian man of British origin with patellar tendon injury. The patient was treated successfully through a revision of the patellar component and tendon repair. In two years follow-up the patient is asymptomatic with no sign of loosening of his patellar prosthesis. Conclusions A thorough understanding of knee biomechanics is imperative in performing total knee arthroplasty in order to achieve a better functional outcome and to prevent early prosthetic failure.

  13. Radiotherapy inducing total knee prosthetic component loosening for recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis following joint replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Ta Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a rare condition. We reported a case of PVNS following TKA; initially, arthroscopic synovectomy was performed; however, recurrence of PVNS happened. We performed second arthroscopic synovectomy and moderate dose radiotherapy (total dose 44 cGy/22 fractions to posterior fossa, 36 cGy/18 fractions to knee for the patient. Unfortunately, distal femur osteonecrosis with femoral and tibial component loosening happened 2 months after completing the radiotherapy procedure. Revision TKA with Legacy Constrained Condylar Knee was done. Radiotherapy is not recommended for recurrent PVNS after TKA.

  14. Does post-operative knee awareness differ between knees in bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine Abildgaard; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Latifi Yaghin, Roshan;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the difference in post-operative knee awareness between knees in patients undergoing bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to assess factors predicting high or low knee awareness. METHODS: This study was conducted on 99 bilateral simultaneous TKAs performed...... at our institution from 2008 to 2012. All patients received one set of questionnaires [Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS)] for each knee. Based on the FJS, the patients' knees were divided into two groups: "best" and "worst" knees. The median of the absolute difference in FJS and OKS...... within each patient was calculated. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify factors affecting FJS. RESULTS: The difference between knees was 1 point (CI 0-5) for the FJS and 1 point (CI 0-2) for the OKS. The FJS for females increased (decreasing awareness) with increasing age. Males had...

  15. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Numerous papers on reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (ACL contribute to the significance of this method. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of the use of this surgical treatment method regardless the type of surgical intervention, graft, and the choice of the material for fixing. Methods. The study included 324 patients treated within the period from April 1997 to April 2004. Arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction was typically performed using the central one-third of the patellar ligament, as a graft, with bone blocks. Fixing was performed using screws (spongy or interferential, Mitek type. In the cases who required revision of the surgery, we used a graft m. semitendinosus and m. gracilise (STG or a graft of the patellar ligament (B-Pt-B. Fixation in these cases was performed using absorptive wedges according to the Rigidfix technique or metallic implants. Results. The analysis included the results of the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (B-Pt-B or STG graft in 139 of the knees. Chronic injuries were revealed in 132 (94.9% of the knees. According to the anamnesis and clinical findings, the feeling of instability prevailed in 132 (94.9% of the knees, pain in 72 (51.7%, effluents in 24 (17.2%, and blockages in 13 (9.3%. Early and late postoperative complications were noticeable in 3.5% each. Hypotrophy of the upper knee musculature up to 2 cm was present in 53.9% of the operated knees, while minor contractions in 13.6% of them. The final result of the reconstruction graded begusing the Lysholm Scale was 85.2, simultaneous reconstructions of other ligaments 75.3, and revision surgery 68.0. First-grade degenerative postoperative changes according to the K/L Scale were found in 55.0% of the surgically treated knees, while the worst, four-grade one in 2.5%. Conclusion. On the basis of these findings, we can conclude that this method is the method of choice in

  16. How to quantify knee function after total knee arthroplasty?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.C.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is being undertaken in a younger population than before and as a result the functional demands on the knee are likely to be increasing. As a consequence, it is important to define quantitative functional knee tests that can monitor any increase. A valuable functional

  17. Knee Injuries in Downhill Skiers

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, Kevin G.; Archibald-Seiffer, Noah; Murdock, Elizabeth; Grimm, Nathan L.; Jacobs, John C.; Willick, Stuart; Van Houten, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knee injuries account for approximately one third of injuries in skiers. Researchers have proposed several mechanisms of knee injury in skiers. However, the frequencies of these mechanisms have varied in different studies. Purpose: To identify the most common knee injury mechanisms in recreational downhill skiers and to assess injury frequencies across several demographics. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Over 6 ski seasons, 541 patients with acute knee inju...

  18. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty of the patellofemoral and medial compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Price, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Studies have shown that after total knee arthroplasty neither normal biomechanics nor function is obtained. Selective resurfacing of diseased compartments could be a solution. A narrative review of the available literature on bicompartmental arthroplasty is presented. A literature review of all peer reviewed published articles on bicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee was performed. Bicompartmental arthroplasty is by definition the replacement of the tibiofemoral and the patellofemoral joint. It can be performed with a modular unlinked or a monolithic femoral component. Bicompartmental arthroplasty performed with modular components obtains good to excellent results at ± 10 years follow-up. Function and biomechanics are superior to total knee arthroplasty. Modern monolithic femoral components are reported to give early failure and high revision rates and should be avoided. Modular bicompartmental arthroplasty is an excellent alternative to treat bicompartmental arthritis of the knee leading to good functional results and superior biomechanics in well-selected patients. Caution is needed since only a few peer reviewed articles with small series and old implant designs are available on this type of arthritis treatment. Survivorship in these studies is inferior to total knee arthroplasty.

  19. Knee-extension-assist for knee-ankle-foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Alexander; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with quadriceps muscle weakness often have difficulty generating the knee-extension moments required for common mobility tasks. A new device that provides a knee-extension moment was designed to help individuals perform sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. The knee-extension-assist (KEA) was designed as a modular component to be incorporated into existing knee-ankle-foot-orthoses (KAFO). The KEA loads a set of springs as the knee flexes under bodyweight and returns the stored energy as an extension moment during knee extension. The springs can be locked in place at the end of flexion to prevent unwanted knee extension while seated. When the affected leg is unloaded, the device disengages, allowing free joint motion. A prototype KEA underwent mechanical testing and biomechanical evaluation on an able-bodied individual during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit.

  20. Knee arthroplasty in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Lidgren, Lars; Mehnert, Frank; Odgaard, Anders; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The number of national arthroplasty registries is increasing. However, the methods of registration, classification, and analysis often differ. Methods We combined data from 3 Nordic knee arthroplasty registers, comparing demographics, methods, and overall results. Primary arthroplasties during the period 1997–2007 were included. Each register produced a dataset of predefined variables, after which the data were combined and descriptive and survival statistics produced. Results The incidence of knee arthroplasty increased in all 3 countries, but most in Denmark. Norway had the lowest number of procedures per hospital—less than half that of Sweden and Denmark. The preference for implant brands varied and only 3 total brands and 1 unicompartmental brand were common in all 3 countries. Use of patellar button for total knee arthroplasty was popular in Denmark (76%) but not in Norway (11%) or Sweden (14%). Uncemented or hybrid fixation of components was also more frequent in Denmark (22%) than in Norway (14%) and Sweden (2%). After total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the cumulative revision rate (CRR) was lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having a relative risk (RR) of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6) and 1.6 (CI: 1.4–1.7) times higher. The result was similar when only including brands used in more than 200 cases in all 3 countries (AGC, Duracon, and NexGen). After unicompartmental arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the CRR for all models was also lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having RRs of 1.7 (CI: 1.4–2.0) and 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8), respectively. When only the Oxford implant was analyzed, however, the CRRs were similar and the RRs were 1.2 (CI: 0.9–1.7) and 1.3 (CI: 1.0–1.7). Interpretation We found considerable differences between the 3 countries, with Sweden having a lower revision rate than Denmark and Norway. Further classification and standardization work is needed to permit more elaborate studies. PMID:20180723

  1. Biological Knee Reconstruction With Concomitant Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Minas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treating articular cartilage defects and meniscal deficiency is challenging. Although some short- to mid-term follow-up studies report good clinical outcomes after concurrent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), longer follow-up is needed. Purpose: To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes after combined ACI with MAT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively gathered data from patients who had undergone ACI with MAT between 1999 and 2013. A single surgeon treated 18 patients for symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects with meniscal deficiency. One patient was lost to follow-up. Thus, 17 patients (18 knees; mean age, 31.7 years) were evaluated over a mean 7.9-year follow-up (range, 2-16 years). A mean 1.8 lesions per knee were treated over a total surface area of 7.6 cm2 (range, 2.3-21 cm2) per knee. Seventeen lateral and 1 medial MATs were performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog scale, and Short Form–36 were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Patients also self-reported knee function and satisfaction. Standard radiographs were scored for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade. Results: Both 5- and 10-year survival rates were 75%. Outcomes for 6 knees were considered failures. Of the 6 failures, 4 knees were converted to arthroplasty and the other 2 knees underwent biological revision surgery. Of the 12 successfully operated knees, all clinical measures significantly improved postoperatively. Ten patients representing 11 of the 12 knees rated outcomes for their knees as good or excellent, and 1 rated their outcome as fair. Eight patients representing 9 of the 12 knees were satisfied with the procedure. There was no significant osteoarthritis progression based on K-L grading from preoperatively to a

  2. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and physical function....... RESULTS: The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  3. Bilateral knee replacements for treatment of acute septic arthritis in both knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Omer; Asumu, Theophilus

    2013-11-01

    A case report of bilateral acute septic arthritis of knees is presented, which was managed with staged total knee replacements for both knees. A literature review on septic arthritis treated with knee arthroplasty is also presented.

  4. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Armstrong B. Rehabilitation of the knee following sports injury. Clin Sports Med. 2010;29:81-106. PMID: 19945588 www. ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic ... and Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  5. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns technical aspects of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in unicompartmental arthroplasty, particularly with the introduction of the minimally invasive technique. In the light of the excellent long-term results of the total kn

  6. Knee injuries in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    estimated 240 million (in 2000)1 to 265 million (in 2006)2 players ... injuries during a season, but due to variations in the definition of ... a risk for a major knee injury, with 20% of illegal activity-related ... Rob Collins is a lecturer in the Section Sports Medicine at the University of .... full return to football is between 6 and 9.

  7. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. PMID:26481256

  8. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  9. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  10. Hybrid total knee arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis of clinical and radiographic outcomes at average 10 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illgen, Richard; Tueting, Jonathan; Enright, Timothy; Schreibman, Ken; McBeath, Andrew; Heiner, John

    2004-10-01

    Cemented total knee arthroplasty has demonstrated high success rates at 10-12 years. Although many cementless designs have demonstrated inferior outcomes, hybrid fixation has not been studied in detail. We retrospectively reviewed 112 hybrid total knee arthroplasties (PCA-67 and Duracon-45) after clinical and radiographic review using the SF-12 and Knee Society Scores at an average 10-year follow-up. The revision rate was 4.5%: 4 occurred in patients with metal-backed patellae and 1 in a patient with infection. No revisions were performed for aseptic loosening of the femoral component. Hybrid total knee arthroplasty with these designs provided excellent clinical and radiographic performance at 10 years comparable to cemented series. Aseptic loosening and radiographic failure rates were 0% if patients with metal-backed patellae were excluded. The durability of hybrid fixation beyond 10 years deserves further study.

  11. Component rotation and anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrack, R L; Schrader, T; Bertot, A J; Wolfe, M W; Myers, L

    2001-11-01

    All patients undergoing cruciate-retaining primary total knee arthroplasty for degenerative osteoarthritis at one center were studied prospectively. Clinical and radiographic followup was obtained at a minimum 5 years in 102 knees in 73 patients. Patients were asked specifically about the presence of the pain in the anterior aspect of the knee in the vicinity of the patella and rated the severity of the pain on a visual analog scale. Significant anterior knee pain rating at least 3 of 10 on the visual analog scale was present in 16 knees (13 patients). Eleven patients with 14 symptomatic knees agreed to undergo computed tomography scanning to accurately determine the rotation of the tibial and femoral components. The epicondylar axis and tibial tubercle were used as references using a previously validated technique. A control group of 11 asymptomatic patients (14 knees), matched for age, gender, and length of followup also underwent computed tomography scanning. All patients in both groups had normal axial alignment. There was a highly significant difference in tibial component rotation between the two groups with the patients with anterior knee pain averaging 6.2 degrees internal rotation compared with 0.4 degrees external rotation in the control group. There also was a significant difference in combined component rotation with the patients with anterior knee pain averaging 4.7 degrees internal rotation compared with 2.6 degrees external rotation in the control group. There was no significant difference in the degree of radiographic patellar tilt or patellar subluxation between the two groups. Patients with combined component internal rotation were more than five times as likely to experience anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty compared with those with combined component external rotation. Component malrotation is a significant factor in the development of anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Loosening of Total Knee Arthroplasty after Brucellosis Infection: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Bahramian, Fateme; Mirzaee, Fateme; Zafarani, Zohreh; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this report we describe a 78-year-old man whose total knee arthroplasty showed the symptoms of infection with brucella with radiographic signs of loosening 5 years after the index surgery. The patient was treated successfully after a 2-stage revision arthroplasty surgery along with using rifampicin and doxycycline for 8 weeks. PMID:28271092

  13. A survival analysis of 1084 knees of the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, N.; Jones, L. D.; Rout, R.; Alvand, A.; Rombach, I.; Evans, T.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Beard, D. J.; Price, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this to study was to compare the previously unreported long-term survival outcome of the Oxford medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) performed by trainee surgeons and consultants. Patients and Methods We therefore identified a previously unreported cohort of 1084 knees in 947 patients who had a UKA inserted for anteromedial knee arthritis by consultants and surgeons in training, at a tertiary arthroplasty centre and performed survival analysis on the group with revision as the endpoint. Results The ten-year cumulative survival rate for revision or exchange of any part of the prosthetic components was 93.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 86.1 to 100, number at risk 45). Consultant surgeons had a nine-year cumulative survival rate of 93.9% (95% CI 90.2 to 97.6, number at risk 16). Trainee surgeons had a cumulative nine-year survival rate of 93.0% (95% CI 90.3 to 95.7, number at risk 35). Although there was no differences in implant survival between consultants and trainees (p = 0.30), there was a difference in failure pattern whereby all re-operations performed for bearing dislocation (n = 7), occurred in the trainee group. This accounted for 0.6% of the entire cohort and 15% of the re-operations. Conclusion This is the largest single series of the Oxford UKA ever reported and demonstrates that good results can be achieved by a heterogeneous group of surgeons, including trainees, if performed within a high-volume centre with considerable experience with the procedure. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;(10 Suppl B):22–7. PMID:27694512

  14. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowski, L. A.; Meijer, L. I.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Pilot, P.; Lisowski, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Patients and Methods Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. Results The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. Conclusion This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41–7. PMID:27694515

  15. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  17. Does knee awareness differ between different knee arthroplasty prostheses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more...... natural feeling knee during activities. The purpose af this study was to compare the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) of patients treated with a previous generation standard Cruciate Retaining (CR) TKA to the scores obtained by patients treated with a newer generation CR TKA...... and pre- and postoperative knee alignment. Patients were asked to complete the FJS and OKS questionnaires. Of the 316 patients completing the survey 64 standard CR TKAs to 35 new generation CR TKAs and 121 standard CR TKAs to 68 mobile bearing TKAs were matched. The FJS and OKS scores of the three TKA...

  18. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengtheni...

  19. Posterior Dislocation of the Hinge-Post Extension in a Rotating Hinge Total Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givenchy Manzano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rotating hinge knee prosthesis is a popular intervention in patients lacking stability with highly constrained total knee arthroplasty. Despite improvements in design, nonmechanical and mechanical complications continue to be a problem. Dislocation of the hinge has been widely described, mainly due to the component fracture. Few reports describe isolated dislocation of the rotating stem. We report a case of isolated disengagement of the rotating hinge mechanism, due to severe flexion gap imbalance, leading to subsequent posterior dislocation of the hinge and anterior knee dislocation, in a patient with a history of multiple total knee arthroplasty revisions. This case suggests the importance of the soft tissue balancing, the adequate patellar tracking, and use of a long cylindrical, minimally tapered rotating stem in hinge arthroplasty to minimize hinge dislocation.

  20. Systematic Analysis of Painful Total Knee Prosthesis, a Diagnostic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Djahani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Remaining pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common observation in about 20% of postoperative patients; where in about 60% of these knees require early revision surgery within five years. Obvious causes of this pain could be identified simply with clinical examinations and standard radiographs. However, unexplained painful TKA still remains a challenge for the surgeon. The management should include a multidisciplinary approach to the patient`s pain as well as addressing the underlying etiology. There are a number of extrinsic (tendinopathy, hip, ankle, spine, CRPS and so on and intrinsic (infection, instability, malalignment, wear and so on causes of painful knee replacement. On average, diagnosis takes more than 12 months and patients become very dissatisfied and some of them even acquire psychological problems. Hence, a systematic diagnostic algorithm might be helpful. This review article aims to act as a guide to the evaluation of patients with painful TKA described in 10 different steps. Furthermore, the preliminary results of a series of 100 consecutive cases will be discussed. Revision surgery was performed only in those cases with clear failure mechanism.

  1. Clinical results of Hi-tech Knee II total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid athritis: 5- to 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Hajime

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common form of treatment to relieve pain and improve function in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Good clinical outcomes have been reported with a variety of TKA prostheses. The cementless Hi-Tech Knee II cruciate-retaining (CR-type prosthesis, which has 6 fins at the anterior of the femoral component, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL retention, flat-on-flat surface component geometry, all-polyethylene patella, strong initial fixation by the center screw of the tibial base plate, 10 layers of titanium alloy fiber mesh, and direct compression molded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, is appropriate for TKA in the Japanese knee. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical results of primary TKA in RA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis. Materials and methods We performed 32 consecutive primary TKAs using cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis in 31 RA patients. The average follow-up period was 8 years 3 months. Clinical evaluations were performed according to the American Knee Society (KS system, knee score, function score, radiographic evaluation, and complications. Results The mean postoperative maximum flexion angle was 115.6°, and the KS knee score and function score improved to 88 and 70 after surgery, respectively. Complications, such as infection, occurred in 1 patient and revision surgery was performed. There were no cases of loosening in this cohort, and prosthesis survival rate was 96.9% at 12 years postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that TKA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis is a very effective form of treatment in RA patients at 5 to 12 years postoperatively. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the ultimate utility of this type of prosthesis.

  2. Knee Replacement: What you can Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves function lessen with each additional surgery. Artificial knees can wear out Another risk of knee replacement ... replacement surgery to last about two hours. After knee replacement surgery After surgery, you're wheeled to ...

  3. Limb salvage after infected knee arthroplasty with bone loss and extensor mechanism deficiency using a modular segmental replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Milby, Andrew H; Garino, Jonathan P

    2011-09-01

    Multiple total knee arthroplasty revisions pose significant surgical challenges, such as bone loss and soft tissue compromise. For patients with bone loss and extensor mechanism insufficiency after total knee arthroplasty, arthrodesis is a treatment option for the avoidance of amputation. However, arthrodesis is both difficult to achieve in situations with massive bone loss and potentially undesirable due to the dramatic shortening that follows. Although intramedullary nailing for knee arthrodesis has been widely reported, this technique has traditionally relied on the achievement of bony union. We report a case of a patient with massive segmental bone loss in which a modular intercalary prosthesis was used for arthrodesis to preserve limb length without bony union.

  4. Arthrography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyl, W.; Jaeger, M.

    1981-10-01

    The standardized examination technique and the clinical problems of the arthrographic mehtod applied on the knee joint is explained by the results obtained in 3000 examinations. Whereas the accuracy of the knee-joint arthrography provides a high degree in cases of meniscus lesions, computer tomography presents in chondral and capsular ligament lesions, and sonography in popliteal cysts better diagnostic information; but in any case arthroscopy gains more and more importance in knee-joint diagnostics.

  5. Treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringdahl, Erika; Pandit, Sandesh

    2011-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common disabling condition that affects more than one-third of persons older than 65 years. Exercise, weight loss, physical therapy, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and braces or heel wedges decrease pain and improve function. Acetaminophen, glucosamine, ginger, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM-e), capsaicin cream, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acupuncture, and tai chi may offer some benefit. Tramadol has a poor trade-off between risks and benefits and is not routinely recommended. Opioids are being used more often in patients with moderate to severe pain or diminished quality of life, but patients receiving these drugs must be carefully selected and monitored because of the inherent adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injections are effective, but evidence for injection of hyaluronic acid is mixed. Arthroscopic surgery has been shown to have no benefit in knee osteoarthritis. Total joint arthroplasty of the knee should be considered when conservative symptomatic management is ineffective.

  6. Five- to 8-year results of the uncemented Duracon total knee arthroplasty system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana, Rishi; Shenava, Yatish; Nicholl, Alison P; Lusted, Felicity J; Skinner, Paul W; Gibb, Paul A

    2008-08-01

    We report prospective clinical and radiographic outcomes of a series of 219 hydroxyapatite-coated Duracon (Stryker Howmedica Osteonics Corporation, Kalamazoo, Mich) total knee arthroplasties with a follow-up of 5 to 8 years. Knee Society Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), and SF-12 Health Status Questionnaire were used. Analysis of fluoroscopic radiographs was performed with the American Knee Society Score. All living patients (186 knees) were followed up. Twenty-eight patients (30 knees) had died. The preoperative Knee Society Score of 43.8 increased to 77.1 and the preoperative Function score of 20.3 increased to 63.4. WOMAC scores showed marked improvement (pain, 250 preoperatively to 157; stiffness, 115 preoperatively to 56; and function, 910 preoperatively to 588). There was no radiographic evidence of loosening or migration. Gaps visible at the bone-implant interface healed over the first year. Three prostheses were revised, 2 for deep infection and 1 for tibial tray subsidence. A survivorship of 98.6% has been achieved at 8 years. This intermediate-term study with 100% follow-up at 8 years demonstrates excellent clinical and radiographic outcomes. It is our opinion that these are comparable to the gold standard cemented total knee arthroplasties and may have advantages over other uncoated cementless designs.

  7. Asian-Specific total knee system: 5-14 year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosaka Kunihiro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee size and body size differ in Asians compared with Caucasians. Nevertheless, many total knee arthroplasty (TKA prostheses used worldwide are made for Western Caucasian subjects. As a result, an Asian's knee might not fit these prostheses. We studied the Flexible Nichidai Knee (FNK system, a new model of TKA for Asian patients. The purpose of this report is to investigate the outcomes of this prosthesis retrospectively. Methods We investigated 1055 primary TKAs in 595 patients who underwent FNK for osteoarthritis (OA in Japan and were followed for > 5 years. The knee score and function score were used for clinical evaluation. We examined the range of motion (ROM preoperatively and at final follow-up and radiographic assessments. In addition, postoperative complications were investigated. A survivorship analysis was also conducted using two endpoints: revision for any reason and aseptic failure. Results 890 knees in 502 patients were available for study (follow-up rate of 96.0%. The mean follow-up term was 8.3 years (range, 5.0-14.1 years. The knee and function score significantly improved from 41.3 to 90.3 and from 39.1 to 76.2 points, respectively (p Conclusion The FNK prosthesis for Asians achieved excellent mid- to long-term survivorship and clinical results.

  8. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  9. Eliminating patellofemoral complications in total knee arthroplasty: clinical and radiographic results of 121 consecutive cases using the Duracon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mont, M A; Yoon, T R; Krackow, K A; Hungerford, D S

    1999-06-01

    This study reports the minimum 5-year follow-up of our experience with the Duracon Total Knee Arthroplasty System. A total of 121 consecutive total knee replacements using the Duracon system (Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ) were performed in 104 patients. Three patients died before the 5-year follow-up and were excluded from the final evaluation. The remaining 118 knees (101 patients) were assessed at a mean follow-up of 65 months (range, 60-80 months). The knee diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 97 patients, rheumatoid arthritis in 2 patients, osteonecrosis in 1 patient, and pigmented villonodular synovitis in 1 patient. The mean age was 70 years (range, 28-85 years). There were no reoperations for aseptic loosening, and there have been no reoperations for patellofemoral problems. At final follow-up evaluation, 112 knees (96%) had good or excellent results, and 6 knees (4%) had poor clinical results or went on to revision. For the surviving knees, the preoperative Knee Society objective score improved from a mean of 52 points (range, 20-72 points) to a final follow-up mean of 94 points (range, 66-100 points). Five knees needed reoperations: 2 knees in 1 patient because of acute hematogenous infection at 12 months, 1 knee because of a supracondylar femur fracture, 1 because of a patellar tendon rupture, and 1 to increase polyethylene thickness because of instability. The lack of aseptic loosening at the minimum 5-year follow-up compares favorably with any cemented or cementless series of knee replacement. The almost complete absence of patellofemoral complications in this series also indicates that the design changes, with particular attention to the trochlea design and patellofemoral contact throughout full flexion, have achieved their intended purpose. The results are encouraging at midterm, awaiting true long-term (15-20 years) follow-up.

  10. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de laat, Fred A.; van der Pluijm, Mark J.; van Kuijk, Annette A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The obj

  11. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.;

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years)...

  12. Does knee awareness differ between different knee arthroplasty prostheses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more...... natural feeling knee during activities. The purpose af this study was to compare the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) of patients treated with a previous generation standard Cruciate Retaining (CR) TKA to the scores obtained by patients treated with a newer generation CR TKA...... or a mobile bearing CR TKA. METHODS: We identified all patients receiving a new generation CR TKA or mobile bearing TKA at our institution between 2010 and 2012. These were matched to a population of patients receiving a standard CR TKA regarding age, gender, year of surgery, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade...

  13. Magnification bone scan of knees for knee pain evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Park, Chan H.; Yoon, Seok Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Knee pain is one of the common complaints of patients seen in our orthopedic clinic. Routine anterior and posterior views of whole body bone scan (WBBS) is often not sufficient in the evaluation of these patients. An ideal bone scan using pinhole collimator or single photon emission tomography (SPECT), however, is impractical and time consuming in busy nuclear medicine department with limited resources. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess limited bone scan of knees with magnification (LNSKM) for knee pain evaluation. Technical aspect of LBSKM and diagnostic efficacy are discussed on this poster. Adult patients with knee pain were reffered for LBSKM from an orthopedic surgen specializing knees. Four hundred fifteen LBSKMs were performed since 1999. patients were given 740 MBq (20mCi) Tc-99m MDP intravenously and 3 hours later LBSKM was performed using a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator and Siemens Orbitor camera. (Simens medical systems. Inc., Hoffman Estates, III., USA). Anterior view of the knees was taken for 5 min, without magnification and both lateral views of symptomatic knees were obtained with electronic magnification (1.25, upto 2.0) for 8 min each. Disease processes such as DJD, traumatic arthritis, P-F tendonitis, SONK, meniscus tear are detected and illustrated along with normal knee scan finding. We believe LBSKM may not be as good as SPECT or pinhole imaging of the knees in the evaluation of knee pain but superior to routine WBBS in the nuclear medicine department with limited resources of instrumentation and manpower.

  14. Early failures among 7,174 primary total knee replacements: a follow-up study from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register 1994-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Ove; Espehaug, Birgitte; Lie, Stein Atle; Vollset, Stein Emil; Engesaeter, Lars Birger; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2002-04-01

    We studied primary total knee replacements (TKRs), reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, operated on between 1994 and 2000. A Cox multiple regression model was used to evaluate differences in survival among the prosthesis brands, their types of fixation, and whether or not the patella was resurfaced. In Norway in 1999, the incidence of knee prosthesis operations was 35 per 100,000 inhabitants. Cement was used as fixation in 87% of the knees, 10% were hybrid and 2% uncemented implants. Bicompartmental (not resurfaced patella) prostheses were used in 65% of the knees. With all revisions as endpoint, no statistically significant differences in the 5-year survival were found among the cemented tricompartmental prostheses brands: AGC 97% (n 279), Duracon 99% (n 101), Genesis I 95% (n 654), Kinemax 98% (n 213) and Tricon 96% (n 454). The bicompartmental LCS prostheses had a 5-year survival of 97% (n 476). The type of meniscal bearing in LCS knees had no effect on survival. Survival with revision for all causes as endpoint showed no differences among types of fixation, or bi- or tricompartmental prostheses. Pain alone was the commonest reason for revision of cemented bicompartmental prostheses. The risk of revision because of pain was 5.7 times higher (p < 0.001) in cemented bicompartmental prostheses than cemented tricompartmental ones, but the revisions mainly involved insertion of a patellar component. In tricompartmental prostheses the risk of revision because of infection was 2.5 times higher than in bicompartmental ones (p = 0.03). Young age (< 60) and the sequelae after a fracture increased the risk of revision. The 5-year survival of the 6 most used cemented tricompartmental knee prostheses brands varied between 95% and 99%, but the differences were not statistically significant. There were more revisions because of pain in bicompartmental than in tricompartmental knees. In tricompartmental knees, however, there were more revisions because of an

  15. Metal hypersensitivity after knee arthroplasty: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Massimo; Vieri, Berti; Melani, Tommaso; Paoli, Tommaso; Carulli, Christian

    2017-06-07

    Hypersensitivity to metals in the general population has an incidence of about 15%, and in rising also for the higher number of joint replacements in the last decades. Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) represents the most performed orthopaedic procedure during last years, and it seems to be particularly associated with sensitization after surgery. On the other hand, there is a rising amount of patients with painful but well implanted and functioning TKAs: in certain cases, after the exclusion of the most frequent causes of failure, a condition of hypersensitivity may be found, and a revision with anallergic implants is mandatory. The present study is a review of the potential problems related to hypersensitivity in TKA, its possible diagnostic procedures, and the surgical options to date available. Medical history, patch testing, and other specific laboratory assays are useful to assess a status of metals hypersensitivity before surgery in subjects undergoing a knee replacement, or even after TKA in patients complaining pain in otherwise well implanted and aligned prostheses. However, few groups worlwide deal with such condition, and all proposed diagnostic protocols may be considered still today conjectural. On the other hand, these represent the most updated knowledge of this condition, and may be useful for both the patient and the orthopaedic surgeon. Once assessed a possible or ascertained allergy to metals, several options are available for primary andr revision knee surgery, in order to avoid the risk of hypersensitivity. A review of the recent publications on this topic and an overview of the related aspects has been made to understand a condition to date considered negligible. Hypersensitivity to metals has not to be nowadays considered a "fiction", but rather a possible preoperative risk or a postoperative cause of failure of TKA. Crucial is the information of patients and the medical history, associated in suspect cases to laboratory testings. Today in the

  16. Prevalent knee pain and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of knee pain in active athletes and to investigate potential associations to type, amount and duration of sports participation. MEASUREMENTS: 339 athletes gave information about occupation, sports activity and different features of knee pain, based...... pain is a common symptom in athletes. The prevalence is associated with the type, amount and duration of sports participation....

  17. The Genesis II in primary total knee replacement: a systematic literature review of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Pascale, Walter; Sprague, Sheila; Pascale, Valerio

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1996, the Genesis II Total Knee System has produced good clinical results in patients undergoing primary total knee replacement. A systematic review of the literature-the first of its kind for this device-was undertaken to collect data on the Genesis II in order to provide a better understanding of its medium- to long-term performance. Of 124 Genesis II-related studies published in the literature, 11 met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final analysis. The included studies had a mean follow-up length of 38.1 months. Data from 1201 knees were available for review. Patients were an average of 70.5 years of age and predominantly female (63%). Findings indicated that the revision rate with this implant is low with up to 11.9 years of follow-up, with 14 revisions in total. The survival rate ranged from 100% at 1 and 2 years to 96.0% at 11.9 years. The mean Knee Society knee score improved 51.0 points from preoperative to postoperative evaluation. In conclusion, the Genesis II exhibited good clinical performance with up to 11 years follow-up, with an encouraging rate of survival and improvement in function. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to better understand the long-term performance of this implant.

  18. ARTHROFIBROSIS FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi B. Solanki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty is an uncommon complication defined as less than 80 degrees of knee flexion 6-8 weeks post operatively. It is characterized by abnormal scarring of the joint in which the formation of dense fibrous tissue and tissue metaplasia prevent normal range of motion. Clinical features include limited knee Range of motion with extension deficit, pain with activities of daily living and unusual amount of pain and swelling post operatively in the absence of infection, bleeding or mechanical complications. We present case of 55 years old female who undergone for total knee replacement before 3 months and presented to our department with complain of knee pain and swelling with activities of daily living. She was diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination. Her detailed evaluation was carried out and Physiotherapy treatment was started.

  19. Overuse Knee Injuries in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kezunović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to many statistics over 55% of all sports-related injuries are incurred in the knee joint (active sportsmen and recreationists. The statistics definitely differ, depending on type of sport and specific movements habitually performed in a particular sport. Therefore, in addition to acute knee injuries overuse syndromes are common in the knee area also due to specificities of patellofemoral joint just because specific diseases like „jumper's knee“ and „runner's knee“ are related to certain sport activities. Generally speaking, these syndromes occur due to poor orientation of the knee extensor mechanism, i.e. friction of iliotibial band and patellofemoral chondromalacia. It is believed that about 45% of all overuse syndromes in the knee area occur as a result of running.

  20. Anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  1. Knees Lifted High

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Knees Lifted High gives children fun ideas for active outdoor play.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  2. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  3. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  4. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K;

    2015-01-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study...... was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15–18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS...... questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (

  5. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty.Design: A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study.Setting: A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital...

  6. The cementless AGC 2000 knee prosthesis: 20-year results in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jamila; Christensen, Jan; Solgaard, Søren

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and fourteen AGC 2000 porous-coated cementless total knee arthroplasties were performed in 102 patients between 1984 and 1986. We report their 20-year results with patient assessment, Hospital for Special Surgery knee score, weight-bearing radiographs done under fluoroscopic control...... and survivorship analyses. All patients could be accounted for. With prosthesis revision as a failure criterion, the cumulative survival rate of all prosthetic components at 20 years was 84.4%. The fall in success rate was primarily due to early tibial and late patellar component failure. The cumulative survival...

  7. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  8. Meaningful Thresholds for the Volume-Outcome Relationship in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sean; Marx, Robert G; Pan, Ting-Jung; Lyman, Stephen

    2016-10-19

    Increasing evidence supports the finding that patients undergoing a total knee arthroplasty with high-volume physicians and hospitals achieve better outcomes. Unfortunately, the existing definitions for high-volume surgeons and hospitals are highly variable and entirely arbitrary. The aim of this study was to identify a set of meaningful hospital and surgeon total knee arthroplasty volume thresholds. Using 289,976 patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty from an administrative database, we applied stratum-specific likelihood ratio (SSLR) analysis of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to generate sets of volume thresholds most predictive of adverse outcomes. The outcomes considered for surgeon volume included 90-day complication and 2-year revision. For hospital volume, we considered 90-day complications and 90-day mortality. SSLR analysis of the ROC curves for 90-day complication and 2-year revision rates by surgeon volume identified four volume categories: 0 to 12, 13 to 59, 60 to 145, and ≥146 total knee arthroplasties per year. Complication rates decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in progressively higher-volume categories. Revision rates followed a similar pattern, but did not decrease between surgeons performing 60 to 145 arthroplasties per year and those performing ≥146 arthroplasties per year. SSLR analysis of 90-day complication and 90-day mortality rates by hospital volume also identified four volume categories: 0 to 89, 90 to 235, 236 to 644, and ≥645 total knee arthroplasties per year. Complication rates decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in progressively higher-volume categories, but the rates did not decrease between hospitals performing 236 to 644 arthroplasties per year and those performing ≥645 arthroplasties per year. Mortality rates for hospitals with ≥645 total knee arthroplasties per year were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those below the threshold. Our study supports the use of SSLR analysis of ROC curves

  9. Hydraulic distension of the knee: a novel treatment for arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement (case series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Peter M; Donohue, Michael A; Cannova, Christopher J; Caulfield, J Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common problem, which can be frustrating to both the patient and treating physician and can dramatically compromise post-operative function. Current treatment options for TKA arthrofibrosis include watchful waiting, injections, physical therapy, manipulation under anaesthesia, arthroscopic/open lysis of adhesions and revision surgery. We present a novel technique to treat acute and chronic stiffness following TKA, which we call hydraulic distension. A retrospective pre- and post-operative inpatient and outpatient record review of three patients treated with hydraulic distension for arthrofibrosis following TKA at a single institution. Three patients with a mean age of 74 years (68-78) underwent hydraulic distension of the knee at a mean of 23.4 ± 18.4 months (9 weeks to 36 months) following primary TKA. The mean pre-distension maximum flexion was 86.7 ± 10.4°, and the mean post-distension flexion was 110 ± 13.2° (23.3° increase). The patients maintained a mean 110 ± 20° flexion (23.3° increase) at a mean follow-up of 11.7 months (1 week to 29 months). There were no complications. We present a novel technique for managing arthrofibrosis following TKA that has not been previously reported. This is an effective, safe procedure, with our patients experiencing a mean 23° increased knee flexion at the most recent follow-up. Published 2016. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  11. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levinger, Pazit; Menz, Hylton B; Morrow, Adam D; Bartlett, John R; Feller, Julian A; Bergman, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA...

  12. Predictors of clinical outcome in total hip and knee replacement : a methodological appraisal of implants and patient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, Johan Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied both implants and patient and surgeon factors as predictors of clinical outcome after total hip and knee replacement. Additionally, we studied a number of methodological aspects of orthopaedic research, such as competing risks in estimating the probability of revision

  13. Anterior knee pain: uncommon aetiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Louw

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to inform clinicians of less common causes of anterior knee pain. Relatively less common conditions leading to anterior knee pain include infra-patellar contracture syndrome, conditions affecting the fat pad, saphenous nerve entrapment, prepatellar neuromas, increased intraosseous pressure of the patella, ganglions of the anterior cruciate ligament and cysts. The aetiology, clinical presentation, risk factors and management  of each condition are outlined. Due to the common occurrence of anterior knee pain clinicians must remain vigilant in assessing the cause of this clinical presentation.

  14. Ten Year Follow-Up of Gap Balanced, Rotating Platform Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients Under 60 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason H; Barnett, Steven L; Patel, Jay J; Nassif, Nader A; Cummings, Dennis J; Gorab, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    68 patients (91 primary total knee arthroplasties) were evaluated at a mean 10-year, minimum 5 year follow up in patients younger than sixty years of age utilizing the gap balanced, rotating platform design. Follow up assessment included implant survivorship, adverse events, x-rays, Knee Society rating system and clinical evaluation. Three revisions were performed with only one for aseptic loosening at 45 months. Two manipulations were performed in the early postoperative period. Survivorship of the rotating platform, gap balanced knee was 96.7% using surgical revision for any reason and 98.9% using aseptic loosening as endpoints. The rotating platform design using the gap balancing technique in young patients had excellent survivorship at 10-year mean follow up.

  15. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  16. Relationship between obesity and early failure of total knee prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Palma Rossana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a risk factor for knee arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is the definitive surgical treatment of this disease. Therefore, a high percentage of subjects treated are overweight. Since 2000 in the Emilia-Romagna Region the Register of Orthopedic Prosthetic Implantology, RIPO, has recorded data of all the primary and revision operations performed on the knee; height and weight of patients at the time of surgery have also been recorded. Methods To understand how overweight and obesity affect the outcome of knee arthroplasty, a population of subjects treated with cemented total knee arthroplasty between 2000 and 2005 was studied. 9735 knee prostheses were implanted in 8892 patients; 18.9% of the patients were normal weight, 48.2% were overweight (25 40. Mean and range of follow-up were respectively 3.1 and 1.5–6 yrs. Implant failure was defined as the exchange of at least one component for whatever reason. Results In normal weight patients there were 36 failures out of 1840 implants (1.96%, in overweight patients there were 87 out of 4692 (1.85%, in obese 59 out of 3031 (1.94%, and in morbidly obese there were 4 out of 172 (2.3%. The mean time to failure for each class was 1.57, 1.48, 1.60, 1.77 yrs. Cox regression analyses showed that the risk of implant failure was not influenced by BMI, absolute body weight, or sex. Conversely, an increased failure risk was observed in mobile meniscus prostheses in comparison with those with a fixed meniscus (Rate Ratio 1.88; an increased failure risk was also related to age (Rate Ratio 1.05 per year. These results were also confirmed when considering septic loosening as the end-point. There were no differences in the rate of perioperative complications and death in the 4 classes of BMI. Conclusion In conclusion, cemented knee prostheses, implanted in patients with arthritis do not have significantly different rates of survival or perioperative complications in obese subjects

  17. Value of knee skin temperature measured by infrared thermography and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the diagnosis of peri-prosthetic knee infection in Chinese individuals following total knee arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mumingjiang Yishake; Zhou Xindie; He Rongxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful and frequently performed procedure in orthopedic surgery.The diagnosis of peri-prosthetic joint infection following TKA remains challenging.The present study estimated the usefulness of knee skin temperature (measured by infrared thermography) and serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (slCAM-1) in the diagnosis of post-operative knee peri-prosthetic infection.Methods Patients were divided into three groups:21 patients undergoing uncomplicated TKAs,seven with prosthesis infection,and three undergoing TKA revisions.The serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6),C-reactive protein (CRP),erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR),and slCAM-1 as well as the local knee skin temperature were measured preoperatively and on Days 1 and 7 and at 1,3,and 6 months post-operatively in Groups 1 and 3.The same parameters were measured in Group 2 at the time of prosthesis infection diagnosis.Results In Group 1,the levels of IL-6,CRP,ESR,and knee skin temperature were significantly elevated post-operatively,but returned to baseline levels within 6 months.The slCAM-1 levels were not significantly different.The mean differential temperature (MDT) and levels of siCAM-1,IL-6,CRP,and ESR differed significantly between Groups 1 and 2.The MDT had returned to normal in Group 3 by 6 months post-operatively.Conclusions Elevations in IL-6,CRP,ESR,and MDT in patients undergoing TKA could be a normal response to surgical trauma,but sustained elevations may be indicative of complications.The knee skin temperature and slCAM-1 may be used as indicators in the diagnosis of knee prosthesis infection following TKA.

  18. TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY WITH POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RETENTION IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE VARUS DEFORMITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with posteri- or cruciate ligament (PCL) retention in patients with severe varus deformity. Methods We reviewed the clinical treatment results of primary TKA in patients with severe varus deformity ( ≥ 20°) between January 1990 and July 1995. All patients, suffered from osteoarthritis, were performed on a single surgeon using a minimal- ly constrained “Hybrid” Miller-Galante knees ( MG-I ). Cliniccal evaluation were assessed by using the Knee So- ciety clinical rating system. The Student's t test was used to analyse the data. Results At a mean follow-up of 6 years (4 ~ 9years), 56 knees in 38 patients were available for review. 5 patients ( 7 knees) lost follow-up and 3 patients ( 4 knees) died. The average knee score improved from 33 points before operation to 91 points in the latest follow-up with excellent results in 84% of all patients. The Knee Society functional score improved from 39 to 76 points. The improvements were statistically significant ( P < 0. 01 ). A functionally acceptable range of motion (ROM) of more than 90° were achieved in 86% of all patients. Most of cases (50/56) had postoperative alignment inside the normal range of 5° to 7° valgus. The other 6 cases had postoperative residual deformity of 5° ~ 10° varus. Total revision rate was 21% ( 12/56 ), the average revision time was 5.5 years af- ter surgery. Other complications included patellar subluxation in 1 case, anterior pain of knee in 4 cases, and superficial cellulitis in 1 case. No early or late infection, aseptic loosening or anterioposterior instability oc- curred in this series. Conclusion Severe varus deformity can be successfully corrected at the time of primary TKA by using PCL-retention prosthesis. There were more problems from postoperative medial-lateral instability of knee which contributed significantly to early failure after an average of 6.0 years.

  19. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred A. de Laat, MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank.

  20. Primary versus secondary distal femoral arthroplasty for treatment of total knee arthroplasty periprosthetic femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Choi, Lisa E; Colman, Matthew W; Goodman, Mark A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Tarkin, Ivan S; McGough, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current methods of fixing periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are variable, and include open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) via plating, retrograde nailing, or revision using standard revision TKA components or a distal femoral arthroplasty (DFA). The purpose of this study is to compare patients who failed plating techniques requiring subsequent revision to DFA to patients who underwent primary DFA. Of the 13 patients (9.2%) who failed primary ORIF, causes included nonunion (53.8%), infection (30.8%), loosening (7.7%), and refracture (7.7%). There were significantly more surgical procedures for ORIF revision to DFA compared to primary DFA. Complications for patients who underwent primary reconstruction with DFAs included extensor mechanism disruption (8.3%), infection (5.6%), and dislocation (2.8%). Primary reconstruction via ORIF is beneficial for preserving bone stock, but primary DFA may be preferred in osteopenic patients, or those at high risk for nonunion.

  1. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Huri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30∘–90∘ ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  2. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  3. The INDUS knee prosthesis - Prospective multicentric trial of a posteriorly stabilized high-flex design: 2 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancheti Kantilal

    2009-01-01

    varus pre-operatively and 5.4°± 2.2º of valgus (3-7° of valgus at the final follow-up, with no loss of alignment noted in any case. One knee underwent revision for late infection while another knee had periprosthetic supracondylar fracture treated with plate fixation. Conclusions: Use of the INDUS knee prosthesis has a favorable short-term outcome, with a mean range of 135° flexion and excellent knee scores.

  4. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  5. Rotationplasty with Vascular Reconstruction for Prosthetic Knee Joint Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Fujiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotationplasty is used most often as a function-preserving salvage procedure after resection of sarcomas of the lower extremity; however, it is also used after infection of prosthetic knee joints. Conventional vascular management during rotationplasty is to preserve and coil major vessels, but recently, transection and reanastomosis of the major vessels has been widely performed. However, there has been little discussion regarding the optimal vascular management of rotationplasty after infection of prosthetic knee joints because rotationplasty is rarely performed for this indication. We reviewed four patients who had undergone resection of osteosarcomas of the femur, placement of a prosthetic knee joint, and rotationplasty with vascular reconstruction from 2010 to 2013. The mean interval between prosthetic joint replacement and rotationplasty was 10.4 years and the mean interval between the diagnosis of prosthesis infection and rotationplasty was 7.9 years. Rotationplasty was successful in all patients; however, in one patient, arterial thrombosis developed and necessitated urgent surgical removal and arterial reconstruction. All patients were able to walk independently with a prosthetic limb after rehabilitation. Although there is no consensus regarding the most appropriate method of vascular management during rotationplasty for revision of infected prosthetic joints, vascular transection and reanastomosis is a useful option.

  6. High rate of failure of allograft reconstruction of the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, S S; Greidanus, N; Paprosky, W G; Berger, R A; Rosenberg, A G

    1999-11-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism is an uncommon but devastating complication of total knee arthroplasty. Several techniques for reconstruction of the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty have been reported, but we do not know of any study in which the results of one group's method were corroborated by a second group using the same technique. In the present series, we evaluated the results of reconstruction of the extensor mechanism with use of allograft according to the method described by Emerson et al. Seven reconstructions of the extensor mechanism with use of a bone-tendon-bone allograft were performed with the technique of Emerson et al. in six patients. The patients were evaluated before and after the operation. The knee score according to the system of The Hospital for Special Surgery, evidence of an extensor lag, use of walking aids, and the ambulatory status of each patient were recorded. The patients were also asked about, and the medical records were reviewed for, episodes of falling related to weakness of the quadriceps after the reconstruction. The mean duration of follow-up was thirty-nine months (range, six to 115 months). As these reconstructions often fail early, the minimum duration of follow-up was six months. All seven reconstructions were rated as clinical failures on the basis of a persistent or recurrent extensor lag of more than 30 degrees. All but one patient needed an assistive device full time for walking, and four patients (five knees) had at least one documented episode of falling that was due to giving-way of the affected knee. Four of the reconstructions were revised; one revision was performed with use of another extensor mechanism allograft and three were performed with use of a medial gastrocnemius rotation flap. The other three clinical failures had not been revised at the time of writing. At the time of the most recent follow-up (or at the time of revision of the extensor reconstruction), the mean extensor lag was

  7. Tibia valga morphology in osteoarthritic knees: importance of preoperative full limb radiographs in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ahmed; Rahmé, Michel; Lavigne, Martin; Massé, Vincent; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb. Tibia valga is a contributing factor to lower limb alignment in valgus knees. We evaluated 97 valgus knees and 100 varus knees. Long-leg films were taken in weight bearing with both knees in full extension. For valgus knees, 52 knees (53%) had a tibia valga deformity. Average tibia valgus deformation was 5.0°. For varus knees, there was only 1 case of tibia valga (1%), with a deformation of 2.5°. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of primary tibia valga in valgus and varus knees and understand how it affects our approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We recommend having full-leg length films when planning for TKA in valgus knees.

  8. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients’ Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella. PMID:23002412

  9. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella.

  10. Stripping for Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Describes a three-step process by which students are taught to revise their writing by listing each sentence on another paper, combining sentences by eliminating redundancy, reducing information to appositives, and reducing information to participles, as well as revising the reduced number of sentences by including verbals, action verbs,…

  11. Writing as Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Piana, Gabriel M.; Endo, George T.

    This proposal for a longitudinal experimental study with a treatment intervention focuses on the process of writing as revision. Revision refers to the process which occurs prior to and throughout the writing of a work, rather than the final editing. According to this process, the writer goes through five stages: preconceptions concerning style…

  12. Total knee replacement in the fixed valgus deformity using a lateral approach: role of the automatic iliotibial band release for a successful balancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, P; Boublil, D; Magrino, B; Massin, P; Huten, D

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to document eleven years of experience in knee replacement for fixed knee valgus through a lateral approach with special emphasis on the balancing procedures. At a mean follow-up of seven years, only one revision for sepsis was required in this series of 63 knee replacements. The mean knee score improved from 37 (range 20-45) to 91 (range 65-100) at the last review (p iliotibial band was automatically released in the approach, only four of 63 knees required additional release for tightness in extension. These results underline the appeal of the lateral approach with the automatic release of the iliotibial band. If required, additional ligament release is recommended step-by-step after bone section to avoid postoperative instability.

  13. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4, an inadequate selection of implants (n=1, malrotation of components (n=1 leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC. The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory.

  14. Multiple-ligament injured knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lei; NING Zhi-jie; ZHANG Hui; TIAN Min; NING Tin-min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristic of the multiple-ligament injured knee and evaluate the protocol,technique and outcome of treatment for the multipleligament injured knee.Methods: From October 2001 to March 2005, 9 knees with combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears in 9 patients were identified with clinical and arthroscopic examinations. Of them, 5 knees were combined with ruptures of posteromedial corner (PMC) and medial collateral ligament (MCL), 4 with disruptions of posterolateral corner ( PLC), 2 with popliteal vascular injuries and 1 with peroneal nerve injuries. Six patients were hospitalized in acute phase of trauma, 2 received repairs of popliteal artery and 4 had repairs of PMC and MCL. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL with autografts under arthroscope were performed in all patients at 4 to 10 weeks after trauma,including reconstruction of PLC with the posterior half of biceps femoris tendon tenodesis in 4 patients and reconstructions of PMC and MCL with femoral fascia in 1 patient.Results: No severe complications occurred at early stage after operation in the 9 patients. All of them were followed up for 10-39 months with an average of 23. 00 months ± 9.46 months. Lysholm score was 70-95 with an average of 85.00 ± 8.29. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was from severely abnormal (Grade D) in 9 knees at initial examination to normal (Grade A) in 2 knees, nearly normal (Grade B ) in 6 knees and abnormal in 1 knee at the last follow-up. Of the 9 patients, 7 returned to the same activity level before injury and 2 were under the level.Conclusions: The multiple-ligament injured knee with severe instability is usually combined with other important structure damages. Therefore, careful assessment and treatment of the combined injuries are essential. Reconstructions of ACL and PCL under arthroscope, combined with repairs or reconstructions of the extraarticular ligaments

  15. Bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in two morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Zachary H; Yi, Paul H; Haughom, Bryan D; Hellman, Michael D; Levine, Brett R

    2015-05-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism as a result of patellar tendon or quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon but devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. Treating a disrupted extensor mechanism can be challenging, particularly in patients who are morbidly obese, due to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Therefore, despite the debilitating nature of extensor mechanism disruption, many community surgeons do not feel comfortable pursuing more complex cases like revision total knee arthroplasty with extensor mechanism allograft on morbidly obese patients, and consequently many of these patients are referred to tertiary-care centers for reconstruction secondary to the complexity of this patient cohort. The authors report 2 cases of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in patients who are morbidly obese. One patient experienced trauma leading to her initial rupture; however, her contralateral atraumatic disruption was subsequently diagnosed at a later date. The second patient did not experience trauma leading to either of her extensor mechanism disruptions. Despite substantial medical comorbidities and morbid obesity, revision total knee arthroplasties with extensor mechanism allografts were recommended in both cases in a staged bilateral fashion. The surgical technique is described and the unique challenges afforded by the marked obesity are detailed. The current literature on this subject is reviewed. Despite early complications related to recumbency, this report serves as an example of successful repairs of extensor mechanism disruptions in patients who are morbidly obese, suggesting that extensor mechanism allograft is viable even in patients with high risk of complications.

  16. Ten-year survival of cemented total knee replacement in patients aged less than 55 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, A C M; Wood, A M; Arthur, C A; Jenkins, P J; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2012-07-01

    We report the ten-year survival of a cemented total knee replacement (TKR) in patients aged 55 years at the time of surgery, and compare the functional outcome with that of patients aged > 55 years. The data were collected prospectively and analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival statistics, with revision for any reason, or death, as the endpoint. A total of 203 patients aged 55 years were identified. Four had moved out of the area and were excluded, leaving a total of 221 TKRs in 199 patients for analysis (101 men and 98 women, mean age 50.6 years (28 to 55)); 171 patients had osteoarthritis and 28 had inflammatory arthritis. Four patients required revision and four died. The ten-year survival using revision as the endpoint was 98.2% (95% confidence interval 94.6 to 99.4). Based on the Oxford knee scores at five and ten years, the rate of dissatisfaction was 18% and 21%, respectively. This was no worse in the patients aged 55 years than in patients aged > 55 years. These results demonstrate that the cemented PFC Sigma knee has an excellent survival rate in patients aged 55 ten years post-operatively, with clinical outcomes similar to those of an older group. We conclude that TKR should not be withheld from patients on the basis of age.

  17. [Multicentre study of infection incidence in knee prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén, F; Sanz-Gallardo, M I; Arrazola, M P; García de Codes, A; de Juanes, A; Resines, C

    2012-01-01

    To determine the incidence of surgical site infection in knee prosthesis surgical procedure for a follow-up period of one year in twelve hospitals in Madrid region. A prospective study was carried out from January to December 2009 using a national surveillance system called Indicadores Clínicos de Mejora Continua de Calidad. Primary and revision knee joint replacements in patients operated on in the previous year were included. Criteria used to define surgical site infection and patient risk index categories were those established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. The incidence rates were worked out crude and adjusted by hazard ratio. 2,088 knee prosthesis procedures were analyzed. The overall incidence of surgical site infection was 2.1%. Sixty-five percent of the infections were organ/space. Sixty percent of the infections were identified in the early postoperative period. Of all surgical site infections, 41.9% were microbiologically confirmed. Antibiotic prophylaxis was implemented correctly in 63.3% of the cases. The most important cause of inappropriate prophylaxis was an unsuitable duration in 85.7% of the cases. The presurgical preparation was carried out correctly in 50.3% of surgical operations. The incidence of knee arthroplasty infection was twice as high as in the National Healthcare Safety Network and similar to national rates. In this study, the incidence of infection was within the range of infection rates in other published European studies. Surveillance and control strategies of health care for associated infections allow us to assess trends and the impact of preventive measures. Copyright © 2011 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. RECENT VIEW AT UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY AMONG OTHER SURGICAL APPROACHES TO PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Kornilov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article recent publications dedicated to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty are analyzed. Evolution of indications and contraindications, mid- and late term results, difference in functional outcomes in comparison with total knee arthroplasty are discussed. Taking into consideration all relevant information unicompartmental knee arthroplasty may be considered as effective and reliable method of treatment of patients with knee osteoarthrosis and osteonecrosis.

  19. Does increasing step width alter knee biomechanics in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Zhang, Songning; Milner, Clare E; Klipple, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Research shows that one of the first complaints from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients is difficulty in stair ambulation due to knee pain. Increased step width (SW) has been shown to reduce first and second peak internal knee abduction moments, a surrogate variable for medial compartment knee joint loading, during stair descent in healthy older adults. This study investigates the effects of increased step width (SW) on knee biomechanics and knee pain in medial compartment knee OA patients during stair descent. Thirteen medial compartment knee OA patients were recruited for the study. A motion analysis system was used to obtain three-dimensional joint kinematics. An instrumented staircase was used to collect ground reaction forces (GRF). Participants performed stair descent trials at their self-selected speed using preferred, wide, and wider SW. Participants rated their knee pain levels after each SW condition. Increased SW had no effect on peak knee abduction moments and knee pain. Patients reported low levels of knee pain during all stair descent trials. The 2nd peak knee adduction angle and frontal plane GRF at time of 2nd peak abduction moment were reduced with increasing SW. The findings suggest that increases in SW may not influence knee loads in medial compartment knee OA patients afflicted with low levels of knee pain during stair descent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  1. Ambulatory measurement of the knee adduction moment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Noort, J.C.; van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    High knee joint-loading increases the risk and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading on the knee is reflected in the external knee adduction moment (KAdM) that can be measured during gait with laboratory-based measurement systems. However, clinical application of these systems

  2. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee... procedure in section 572.127(c), the peak resistance force as measured with the test probe mounted... exterior surface. (3) Align the test probe so that throughout its stroke and at contact with the knee it...

  3. Ambulatory measurement of the knee adduction moment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den J.C.; Esch, van der M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Schepers, H.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    High knee joint-loading increases the risk and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading on the knee is reflected in the external knee adduction moment (KAdM) that can be measured during gait with laboratory-based measurement systems. However, clinical application of these systems

  4. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  5. Arthrofibrosis Associated With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuy, Victor A; Foran, Jared R H; Paxton, Roger J; Bade, Michael J; Zeni, Joseph A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2017-08-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a debilitating postoperative complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is one of the leading causes of hospital readmission and a predominant reason for TKA failure. The prevalence of arthrofibrosis will increase as the annual incidence of TKA in the United States rises into the millions. In a narrative review of the literature, the etiology, economic burden, treatment strategies, and future research directions of arthrofibrosis after TKA are examined. Characterized by excessive proliferation of scar tissue during an impaired wound healing response, arthrofibrotic stiffness causes functional deficits in activities of daily living. Postoperative, supervised physiotherapy remains the first line of defense against the development of arthrofibrosis. Also, adjuncts to traditional physiotherapy such as splinting and augmented soft tissue mobilization can be beneficial. The effectiveness of rehabilitation on functional outcomes depends on the appropriate timing, intensity, and progression of the program, accounting for the patient's ability and level of pain. Invasive treatments such as manipulation under anesthesia, debridement, and revision arthroplasty improve range of motion, but can be traumatic and costly. Future studies investigating novel treatments, early diagnosis, and potential preoperative screening for risk of arthrofibrosis will help target those patients who will need additional attention and tailored rehabilitation to improve TKA outcomes. Arthrofibrosis is a multi-faceted complication of TKA, and is difficult to treat without an early, tailored, comprehensive rehabilitation program. Understanding the risk factors for its development and the benefits and shortcomings of various interventions are essential to best restore mobility and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing Jumper's Knee en español Rodilla de saltador (tendinitis rotuliana) Jumper's knee — also known as patellar tendonitis or patellar tendinopathy — is an inflammation or injury of the patellar ...

  7. Knee Confidence as it Relates to Self-Reported and Objective Correlates of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Rasmussen, Sten; Simonsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    osteoarthritis (OA). Background Lack of knee confidence is a frequent symptom in patients with knee OA, but little is known of associations between knee confidence and other common correlates of knee OA. Methods Baseline data from 220 patients with knee OA were applied in ordinal regression analyses, with knee...... confidence, assessed using item Q3 of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, as the dependent variable and self-reported (pain on walking, general health, fear of movement, self-efficacy, function, and previous serious injury) and objective measures (muscle strength, 20-m walk time...

  8. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81 completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S, Knee Society Score (KSS, and HRQL (SF-36. At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (P<0.05. SF-36 scores at the sixth month after surgery were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.001. Preoperative Physical Component Summary Scale (PCS and Mental Component Summary Scale (MCS scores were negatively associated with extraversion (E score (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative PCS and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI scores were negatively associated with neuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI, and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05. The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05, but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05. The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05. In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions.

  9. Novel computational approaches characterizing knee physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wangdo Kim; Veloso, Antonio P; Duarte Araujo; Kohles, Sean S.

    2014-01-01

    A knee joint’s longevity depends on the proper integration of structural components in an axial alignment. If just one of the components is abnormally off-axis, the biomechanical system fails, resulting in arthritis. The complexity of various failures in the knee joint has led orthopedic surgeons to select total knee replacement as a primary treatment. In many cases, this means sacrificing much of an otherwise normal joint. Here, we review novel computational approaches to describe knee physi...

  10. Postinfectious ankylosis of the knee after bacterial arthritis following routine anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Bastian; Schoepp, Christian; Glombitza, Martin; Rixen, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Knee arthroscopy is a very common surgical procedure. It belongs to the most frequently performed procedures in orthopedics and traumatology and is considered to have a low complication rate. The risk of postoperative knee infection following ACL reconstrucion is estimated 1-2 %. Thereby the ACL reconstruction cannot always be preserved. Persistent defects after healing and postinfectios osteoarthritis are observed. We present the case of an adolescent patient suffering from postoperative knee infection following routine ACL reconstruction, who is developing - while infection is decreasing - a complete bony ankylosis of the knee, clinically meaning a severe constraint to joint function with complete stiffness of the knee. Materials and Methods: The 13-year-old male patient sustained a distorsion of the right knee during sports at school, after clinical examination magnetic resonance tomography showed a complete tear of the ACL. Single bundle ACL reconstruction was done using autologous hamstrings in Transfix technique. After 5 days at hospital the patient was discharged without any complications. Shortly afterwards the patient was admitted to hospital again presenting a postoperative knee infection. After primary operative revision the patient was shifted to our intensive care unit in a septic condition for stabilization. During 4 month of stay at our hospital multiple operative revisions were performed as arthrotomy, debridement, insertion of antibiotic carriers, complete removal of the autograft and total synovectomy. We found a severe bacterial infection (staphylococcus aureus) of the knee joint, classified Gaechter IV, histopathologically mostly avital cartilage tissue and chronic synovialitis. After decrease of the infection we could discharge the patient from hospital. Results: During the following 8 month under ongoing physiotherapy the patient was developing an increasing stiffness of the knee, finally fixed at 30 degrees of flexion and

  11. Association between knee alignment and knee pain in patients surgically treated for medial knee osteoarthritis by high tibial osteotomy. A one year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W-Dahl, Annette; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Roos, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between knee alignment and knee pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) is unclear. High tibial osteotomy, a treatment option in knee OA, alters load from the affected to the unaffected compartment of the knee by correcting malalignment. This surgical procedure thus offers...... the possibility to study the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of alignment to pain. The aims were to study 1) the preoperative association of knee alignment to preoperative knee pain and 2) the association of change in knee alignment with surgery to change in knee pain over time in patients operated...... on for knee OA by high tibial osteotomy. METHODS: 182 patients (68% men) mean age 53 years (34 - 69) with varus alignment having tibial osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique for medial knee OA were consecutively included. Knee alignment was assessed by the Hip-Knee-Ankle (HKA) angle from radiographs...

  12. 影响高屈曲度人工全膝关节假体术后活动度的相关变量分析%Analysis of variables affecting range of motion of highflexion prosthesis in patients after total knee arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴定宇; 安晓; 董纪元

    2015-01-01

    ) and patella non-resurfacing group. Secondly, in comparison with patients whose postoperative ROM was less than 125°, lower BMI, greater ROM before surgery, less tourniquet time, less level of deformity and better HSS score were found in patients whose postoperative ROM was greater than 125° (P<0.05). Finally, multivariate analysis showed that RA, non-resurfacing and preoperative ROM<100° were risk factors for postoperative ROM less than 120° (P<0.05).Conclusion The factors related to thefinal ROM for patients who accepted highflexion prosthesis include BMI, preoperative HSS scores, patella resurfacing, preoperative ROM and deformity.

  13. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R.; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KO...

  14. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Leeden, M. van der; Lems, W.F.; Esch, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature: prote

  15. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Alexander; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Schneider, Philipp; Kuster, Markus S

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed using three platinum coils with good clinical result and good knee joint function. Hemarthrosis has not recurred since embolization.

  16. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Rukavina, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Schneider, P.; Kuster, M S

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed using three platinum coils with good clinical result and good knee joint function. Hemarthrosis has not recurred since embolization.

  17. Preserving knee function following osteoarthritis diagnosis: a sustainability theory and social ecology clinical commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, J; Wera, J; Henzman, C; Miller, T; Jakob, R; Caborn, D N M

    2015-02-01

    To sustain natural systems, there must be an ongoing balance between environmental, social, and economic considerations. A key element of sustainability theory is to identify the most vulnerable surroundings. The most vulnerable knee tissue is the articular cartilage as it is the last line of osteoarthritis (OA) defense. This tissue has a poor capacity for healing. Based on sustainability theory and social ecology concepts we propose that several key factors contribute to knee function preservation. Factors include health history, genetic predisposition, personal behaviors, and socio-environmental factors in addition to local-regional-global physiological system function. Addressing only some of these factors or any one factor in isolation may lead to less than optimal treatment effectiveness. The purpose of this commentary is to introduce a medical, surgical and rehabilitation management approach for patients with knee OA that considers more than physical function improvement. This approach also considers social, emotional, and environmental factors to better ensure patient satisfaction, fulfilled expectations and successful outcomes. A clinical care pathway is presented for a 57-year-old patient with medial compartment knee OA who is contemplating early arthroplasty versus a knee function preservation treatment approach. Early arthroplasty refers to high revision likelihood based on a minimum 15 year prosthesis life-expectancy.

  18. MRI of the posterolateral corner of the knee, please have a look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The knee PLC injuries are frequently seen, with other major knee injuries, such as ACL and PCL. Objective: This article aimed to clarify PLC injuries that could be diagnosed by MRI, and may have an impact on the management of the associated major knee injuries. Patient and methods: It was conducted through retrospective MRI revision of 1000 patients who were presented with post-traumatic knee complaints, from January 2011 to March 2016. Results: ITB band injuries were seen in 113 patients (11.3%, biceps tendon injury in 59 patients (5.9%, FCL injuries in 223 patients (22.3%, popliteus muscle injury in 53 patients (5.3%, PFL in 17 (1.7%, arcuate ligament injury in 38 patients (3.8% and arcuate bone fracture (fibular styloid fracture in 22 patients (2.2%. Overall PLC injuries recorded 283 patients, either as separate or combined PLC items. Of these 283 patients, 96 patients had associated ACL tear (33.9%, 19 had PCL tear (6.7%, 73 had medial corner injury (25.7%, 55 combined injuries (19.4% and 40 isolated PLC injuries (14.1%. Conclusion: Different types of PLC injuries may occur in association with other major knee sectorial injuries that may require repair before the associated injured major sector correction, in an attempt to avoid early ACL or PCL graft failure.

  19. Patellofemoral Joint Arthroplasty: Our Experience in Isolated Patellofemoral and Bicompartmental Arthritic Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, L.; Schirò, M.; Atzori, F.; Ferrero, G.; Massè, A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated patellofemoral (PF) arthritis is rare, and there is no complete agreement about the best surgical treatment. The operative treatments are total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral replacement (PFR). The incidence of many early complications of PF arthroplasty has decreased with the introduction of newer designs. Nowadays, the main cause of revision surgery is the progression of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In the past, PF arthroplasty was contraindicated in patients with evidence of osteoarthritis or pain in medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartments. The improvement in implant designs and surgical techniques has allowed the addition of a monocompartmental arthroplasty for the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. In this work, we evaluate our first experience with PF arthroplasty and its combination with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS From May 2014 to March 2016, we treated 14 patients. An isolated PF arthroplasty was performed in six knees (five patients), and a combined PF and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed in nine cases. We observed a significant improvement in the clinical and functional Knee Society Scores (KSSs) after surgery in our patients. RESULTS We obtained good results in our cases both for clinical and functional KSSs. Patellar clunk was recorded in one case. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION We are going toward a new attitude in which partial osteoarthritic changes could be treated with partial resurfacing prosthetic solutions such as unicompartmental, bi–unicompartmental or PFR alone, or unicompartmental combined, which respects the cruciates and achieves maximal bone preservation, which is vital, particularly, for young patients. PMID:27891054

  20. [Relationship between angular deformity and primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-López, C A; García-Lorenzo, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common disease and angular deformities are usually associated to this degenerative affection. Secondary causes of angular deformities are well known in the scientific literature, but there are not many articles about the relationship between angular deformities and primary osteoarthritis. To deepen in the relationship between angular deformities and primary osteoarthritis of the knee. We conducted a literature review of a total of 300 articles in PubMed, Medline and Hinari locator information by EndNote, 52 of them were used and selected quotes to do the review, 47 of them in the last five years, including five books. A revision of important biochemical and biomechanics aspects were made in regards to the relationship between angular deformities and primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Causes of deformities according to the sagittal, coronal and rotational axis were taken into account. Factors related to deformities could be osseous or soft tissues of the knee joint. Deformities of the knee in patients suffering from primary osteoarthritis are common and there are osseous and soft tissues causes to justified the presence of these deformities.

  1. The pediculated gastrocnemius muscle flap as a treatment for soft tissue problems of the knee – indication, placement and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moebius, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increase of endoprosthetic knee replacements, there is also an increase of critical wounds to the knee due to a high incidence of soft tissue problems (ranging from wound healing defects to severe wound infections. The literature describes a general rate of soft tissue complications of up to 20% [1], [2], with 5% [3] involving exposed bone. These complications are an increasingly important problem for surgeons. Since sufficient coverage of bones, tendons and prosthetic material with soft tissue is a necessity, the use of a pediculated muscle flap is the only solution in some cases. The gastrocnemius muscle is very useful for this purpose. It is an elaborate procedure which is associated with a high rate of complications. However, this procedure can establish a secure coverage with soft tissue, and the function of the prosthesis and the patient’s extremity can be saved. We have treated 23 patients with a gastrocnemius rotation flap after knee prosthesis or knee arthrodesis infection with consecutive soft tissue damage at our hospital from 8/2004 through 3/2011. The overall rate of healing of the knee infections with stable soft tissue status is almost 87%. The revision rate with lifting of the flap and revision of the sutures at the point of insertion as well as the point of extraction was about 35% with long-term conservative or additional surgical treatments.

  2. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. Katz's revisability paradox dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard; Verhaegh, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Quine's holistic empiricist account of scientific inquiry can be characterized by three constitutive principles: noncontradiction, universal revisability and pragmatic ordering. We show that these constitutive principles cannot be regarded as statements within a holistic empiricist's scientific theo

  4. Katz's revisability paradox dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard; Verhaegh, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Quine's holistic empiricist account of scientific inquiry can be characterized by three constitutive principles: noncontradiction, universal revisability and pragmatic ordering. We show that these constitutive principles cannot be regarded as statements within a holistic empiricist's scientific

  5. Revised Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  6. The effect of an augmentation patella prosthesis versus patelloplasty on revision patellar kinematics and quadriceps tendon force: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountney, John; Wilson, David R; Paice, Michael; Masri, Bassam A; Greidanus, Nelson V

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of 2 revision reconstructive interventions on patellofemoral joint mechanics in comparison to control. We flexed 8 cadaver knee specimens from 0 degrees to 60 degrees of flexion in a test rig designed to simulate weight-bearing flexion and extension (Oxford rig). Quadriceps tendon extensor force and patellar kinematics were recorded for control total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (normal primary TKA with patella resurfaced) and then for each of the 2 revision patellar interventions (after patelloplasty of typical revision knee patellar bone defect to leave a simple bony shell, and after TKA with augmentation patella resurfacing). Our results demonstrate that patellar kinematics and quadriceps extensor force are optimized when the patella is reconstructed to normal anteroposterior thickness.

  7. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  8. Factors associated with the loss of thickness of polyethylene tibial bearings after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Matthew B; Engh, C Anderson; McAuley, James P; Engh, Gerard A

    2007-06-01

    Wear of the polyethylene tibial bearing is a leading cause of failure of knee replacements done prior to the current decade. The objective of this study was to determine how patient-related factors, implant-related factors, and limb or tibial component alignment influenced the amount of thickness loss in polyethylene tibial bearings that were retrieved at the time of revision surgery or after the death of the patient. We retrieved polyethylene tibial bearings from eighty-one unicondylar and eighty-nine total knee replacements that had been performed because of osteoarthritis with varus deformity from 1984 to 1998. All of the polyethylene bearings had been sterilized with gamma radiation in air. Polyethylene loss was quantified as the change in the minimum bearing thickness per years in vivo (the mean time in vivo [and standard deviation] was 8 +/- 4 years). Multiple linear regression was used to assess whether polyethylene loss was associated with age, weight, gender, varus angle of the tibial component, postoperative hip-knee-ankle angle, initial thickness of the polyethylene, shelf age of the polyethylene, and either the type of polyethylene (for total knee replacements, which were of one posterior cruciate ligament-retaining design) or the manufacturer (for unicondylar knee replacements), and to determine the magnitude by which polyethylene loss would change if any of the significant risk factors were changed. The mean loss (and standard deviation) of polyethylene thickness in the medial compartment of total knee replacements (0.33 +/- 0.28 mm/yr) and that in medial unicompartmental knee replacements (0.49 +/- 0.40 mm/yr) were significantly (p return for follow-up care. Whether the study findings have relevance to bearings sterilized with other methods is unclear and will remain so for many years. Prognostic Level II.

  9. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattapuram, Taj M. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Kattapuram, Susan V. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)], E-mail: skattapuram@partners.org

    2008-07-15

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee presents with acute onset of severe, pain in elderly patients, usually female and usually without a history of trauma. Originally described as idiopathic osteonecrosis, the exact etiology is still debated. Evidence suggests that an acute fracture occurs as a result of chronic stress or minor trauma to a weakened subchondral bone plate. The imaging characteristics on MR reflect the age of the lesion and the symptoms. More appropriate terminology may be ' subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee' or 'focal subchondral osteonecrosis'.

  10. RELIABILITY AND RESPONSIVENESS OF THE DANISH MODIFIED INTERNATIONAL KNEE DOCUMENTATION COMMITTEE SUBJECTIVE KNEE FORM FOR CHILDREN WITH KNEE DISORDERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Knudsen, Pernille; Fynbo, Charlotte;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The modified international Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (Pedi-IKDC) is a widely used patient-reported tool applicable for children with knee disorders ranging on a scale from 0-100. We aimed to translate the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form into Danish......, and furthermore to assess its reliability and responsiveness. Material and Methods The Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form was translated to Danish according to international guidelines. Reliability was assessed with Bland Altman plots, standard error of measurement (SEM), Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) and the Intra....... Reliability and responsiveness were assessed in 50 children (median 15 years) referred to hospital due to different knee disorders. Results The SEM was 4.2 points and the MDC was 11.5 points. The ICC was 0.91 (0.9-1.0). The change score of the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee form was correlated to the external...

  11. Knee Muscles Power Evolution in Patients with Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Monica BORDA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure changes in muscle power from before to 6 months after total knee arthroplasty and to compare outcomes with those from a control group of healthy adults. Material and Methods: 26 patients who underwent a total knee replacement were compared with 12 healthy age-matched adults in a prospective cohort study. Patients’ assessment was performed preoperatively, as well as at 1, 2 and 6 months postoperatively, by the isokinetic method. Healthy adults were assessed once by the same method. Isokinetic evaluation of knee extensor and flexor muscles was performed using a Gimnex Iso 2 dynamometer. After a warm-up protocol, measurements were done at angular velocities of 90 and 180°/sec. Results: Compared to healthy adults, patients performed significantly worse at all evaluation times, for both extensors and flexors of the knee, except for the 6-month evaluation at 180°/sec. One month postoperatively losses from preoperative levels were registered in patients, but without statistically significance, except for extension at 180°/sec. At 6 months postoperatively patients surpassed the preoperative levels, with statistical significance at 180°/sec. Conclusions: Power is an important parameter to follow after TKA, in parallel with peak torque. Increasing muscle power should be one of the central issues to address during postoperative rehabilitation.

  12. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  13. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling and Simulation in Knee Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical functions of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor-intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. Interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes the detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures and their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next-generation knee models is noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  14. Cemented rotating-platform total knee replacement: a concise follow-up, at a minimum of twenty years, of a previous report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, John J; Wells, Christopher W; Liu, Steve S; Goetz, Devon D; Johnston, Richard C

    2010-07-07

    We previously evaluated 119 consecutive total knee arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon in eighty-six patients with use of the cemented LCS (low contact stress) mobile-bearing, rotating-platform system and an all-polyethylene patellar component. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was seventy years. The patients were contacted as part of their routine follow-up and were asked to participate in this study. The purpose of the present study was to report the updated results at a minimum follow-up of twenty years. Twenty patients (twenty-six knees) were living, and one was lost to follow-up. Three knees required a reoperation (two for periprosthetic fractures and one for infection). No component was revised as a part of the reoperations. No knee required revision since the fifteen-year follow-up evaluation. Osteolysis was present in six knees compared with only three knees at the time of the fifteen-year follow-up. One knee had radiographic signs of femoral component loosening, which was associated with osteolysis. It occurred after the fifteen-year follow-up study. The average range of motion was from 1 degrees of extension to 105 degrees of flexion. The average clinical and functional Knee Society scores were 43 and 49 points, respectively, at the preoperative evaluation and 89 and 67 points at the time of the final follow-up. We concluded that the cemented LCS rotating-platform knee performed well, with durable clinical and radiographic results at a minimum follow-up of twenty years. However, the prevalence of osteolysis continues to increase with a longer duration of follow-up in these patients.

  15. Evaluation and management of knee pain in young athletes: overuse injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Villalobos, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent or chronic activity related knee pain is common in young athletes. Numerous intrinsic conditions affecting the knee can cause such pain. In addition, knee pain can be referred pain from low back, hip or pelvic pathology. The most common cause of knee pain in young athletes is patellofemoral pain syndrome, or more appropriately termed idiopathic anterior knee pain. Although, numerous anatomical and biomechanical factors have been postulated to contribute the knee pain in young athletes, the most common underlying reason is overuse injury. In this paper, we have reviewed selected conditions that case knee pain in athletes, including anterior knee pain syndrome, Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johanssen syndrome, juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD), bipartite patella, plica syndrome, and tendonitis around the knee.

  16. Can generic knee joint models improve the measurement of osteoarthritic knee kinematics during squatting activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint kinematics derived from multi-body optimisation (MBO) still requires evaluation. The objective of this study was to corroborate model-derived kinematics of osteoarthritic knees obtained using four generic knee joint models used in musculoskeletal modelling - spherical, hinge, degree-of-freedom coupling curves and parallel mechanism - against reference knee kinematics measured by stereo-radiography. Root mean square errors ranged from 0.7° to 23.4° for knee rotations and from 0.6 to 9.0 mm for knee displacements. Model-derived knee kinematics computed from generic knee joint models was inaccurate. Future developments and experiments should improve the reliability of osteoarthritic knee models in MBO and musculoskeletal modelling.

  17. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  18. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, PBarefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (pknee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  20. Knee bursitis: a sonographic evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Corti, Riccardo; Urciuoli, Luigi; Alessandrino, Francesco; Rotondo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ... of experience.Of these patients, 15 (7 men, 8 women) had bursitis, while 143 (76 men, 67 women) had no bursitis. In evaluating knee bursitis, US, when compared to MRI, correctly identified 13 out of 15 cases of bursitis, showing a sensitivity...

  1. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sadigursky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  2. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  3. Oxford Partial Knee Replacement as a Gateway to Outpatient Arthroplasty “Lessons Learned along the Journey”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Berend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Partial Knee Replacement was approved for implantation in the US in 2004 after the surgeon completed an educational training requirement.  Since then my knee practiced has expanded to over 50% partial knee.  This experience coupled with refinement of surgical techniques, anesthesia protocols, and patient selection has facilitated the transformation to same day discharge for partial knee cases and has quickly transitioned to total hip, total knee, and selected revision surgeries.  Patient selection has also expanded for outpatient joints and is now based on medical screening criteria and insurance access.  Over a two-year period we have performed over 1,000 outpatient arthroplasty procedures with no readmissions for pain control.   Overall readmission rate for all reasons was 2%.  Patient satisfaction scores were 98% Great-Good for 2014-15.  The combination of a partial knee replacement practice and an outpatient joint program brings the best VALUE to the patients, surgeons, and the arthroplasty system and represents the future of arthroplasty care.

  4. Knee injury and obesity in patients undergoing total knee replacement: a retrospective study in 115 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Rofail, S

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and previous knee injury was assessed in a retrospective study of 115 patients under-going total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis. Obesity was considered a contributing factor in the development of osteoarthritis in 37% of the patients, and 33% of the patients had...... had an injury to the knee in question. Unilateral osteoarthritis was significantly more frequent than bilateral osteoarthritis among patients with a history of previous knee injury. The association of previous injury to the knee and unilateral osteoarthritis was stronger in men than women. Aggressive...... treatment of patients with knee injuries seems warranted....

  5. [Importance of revision- and tumor-endoprosthetics in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures of the lower extremity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, P M; Harrasser, N; Suren, C; Pohlig, F; Mühlhofer, H; Schauwecker, J; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of hip and knee prostheses are gaining clinical significance due to the increasing numbers of of primary arthroplasties. Additionally, these fractures are often associated with poor bone quality or present in patients after multiple revision procedures and concomitant excessive bone defects precluding those patients to be adequately treated by conventional osteosynthesis. Revision implants provide a wide range of options for the treatment of these fractures in order to achieve good clinical results. In the acetabular region cavitary defects associated with periprosthetic fractures can be treated by the use of megacups. Extensive segmental defects and pelvic discontinuity necessitate the use of cups with additional iliac support or even customized implants. Proximal femoral fractures can usually be fixed with modular stems and diaphyseal anchorage. Periprosthetic knee joint fractures can be treated with revision implants with modular sleeves or augment-combinations allowing sufficient bridging of bony defects. Functional reconstruction or refixation of the extensor mechanism is of crucial importance.

  6. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  7. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  8. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  9. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  10. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (Pknee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Della Torre, MD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medial collateral ligament injury during primary total knee arthroplasty is a recognised complication potentially resulting in valgus instability, suboptimal patient outcomes and a higher rate of revision or reoperation. Options for management include primary repair with or without augmentation, reconstruction or immediate conversion to prosthesis with greater constraint, in conjunction with various postoperative rehabilitation protocols. Inconsistent recommendations throughout the orthopaedic literature have made the approach to managing this complication problematic. The objective of this study was to review the available literature to date comparing intraoperative and postoperative management options for primary total knee arthroplasty complicated by recognised injury to the medial collateral ligament. This systematic literature review was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (#CRD42014008866 and performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines including a PRISMA flow diagram. Five articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. Each was a retrospective, observational cohort or case series with small numbers reported, inconsistent methodology and incompletely reported outcomes. Four of the five studies managing medial collateral ligament injury during total knee arthroplasty (47/84 patients with direct repair with or without autograft augmentation reported good outcomes with no revision or reoperation required for symptomatic instability over a follow-up period of 16 months to almost 8 years. The fifth study with a follow-up to 10 years and a high rate of conversion to unlinked semi constrained total knee arthroplasty implant (30/37 patients reported a greater incidence of revision due to instability, in patients in whom the medial collateral ligament injury was directly repaired without added constraint. Overall balance of evidence is in favour of satisfactory outcomes without symptomatic instability following direct repair with or without

  12. Clinical Application of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-sen; ZHENG Chen-xiao; QI Liang; CHANG Shang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical value of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. Methods:The clinical data and efficacy of 26 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (26 knees) who were given TKA in our department from June 2012 to May 2013 were retrospectively observed and analyzed. The knee function scores before operation and after follow up were evaluated according to American HSS scoring standard. Results:At the end of follow up, of the 26 patients, 18 were excellent, 6 were good and 2 were not bad in knee function and mobility without sense of pain, which was regarded to be associated with the poor enthusiasm in knee function training, and the total rate of excellent and good was 92.3%. Conclusion:TKA has signiifcant clinical value and favorable efifcacy on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

  13. The effect of total knee arthroplasty on knee joint kinematics and kinetics during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    This study determined how total knee arthroplasty (TKA) altered knee motion and loading during gait. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 42 patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were collected 1 week prior and 1-year post-TKA. Principal component analysis extracted major patterns of variability in the gait waveforms. Overall and midstance knee adduction moment magnitude decreased. Overall knee flexion angle magnitude increased due to an increase during swing. Increases in the early stance knee flexion moment and late stance knee extension moment were found, indicating improved impact attenuation and function. A decrease in the early stance knee external rotation moment indicated alteration in the typical rotation mechanism. Most changes moved toward an asymptomatic pattern and would be considered improvements in motion, function, and loading.

  14. Clinical Application of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Zhi-sen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical value of total knee arthroplasty (TKA on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. Methods: The clinical data and efficacy of 26 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (26 knees who were given TKA in our department from June 2012 to May 2013 were retrospectively observed and analyzed. The knee function scores before operation and after follow up were evaluated according to American HSS scoring standard. Results: At the end of follow up, of the 26 patients, 18 were excellent, 6 were good and 2 were not bad in knee function and mobility without sense of pain, which was regarded to be associated with the poor enthusiasm in knee function training, and the total rate of excellent and good was 92.3%. Conclusion: TKA has significant clinical value and favorable efficacy on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Effect of compression therapy on knee swelling and pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Jensen, Niels J. F.; Andersen, Ida Bøgh;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty may impair postoperative mobilisation and training, and as medical elastic compression stockings are well tolerated and effective to prevent oedema, haematoma and postoperative pain after venous surgery, we wanted to study whether this effect...... could be transferred to total knee arthroplasty surgery reducing postoperative swelling and pain and thereby facilitating mobilisation and improving patient-reported knee function. METHODS: In a randomised controlled study, 88 patients were randomised to use either a medical elastic compression stocking...... or no stocking from the first postoperative day and the following 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Outcome measures were knee, calf and ankle swelling, knee flexion, pain and patient-reported knee function. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of the swelling had occurred before application of the stocking the day...

  16. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  17. Diagnostic of patellar instability after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Zhizhenkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives - to identify main reasons of patella instability after primary total knee arthroplasty, and to determine further treatment strategy of this complication. Material and methods. Since 2011 till 2014 1098 total knee arthroplasties have been performed in Yaroslavl Regional Hospital for Veterans of Wars. We observed 14 (1.3% patients with postoperative patella instability The evaluation included clinical and radiographic methods. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was studied by computed tomography (CT scanner. Conclusion. Position of the femoral components ranged from 2° excessive external to 8° excessive internal rotation. Position of the tibial components ranged from 0° to 6° excessive internal rotation. The summary endoprosthetic position ranged from 1 ° to 10° excessive internal rotation. We found direct correlation between summary implant internal rotation and the severity of postoperative complications in patellafemoral joint. Results. The main reason of the patella instability is implant summary internal malrotation. Extensive lateral release with patella resurfacing was sufficient for pain relief and tracking correction if the combined internal rotation did not exceed 6°. Large value of internal malrotation was the indication for revision surgery with selective approach.

  18. [Effect of rotation of the femoral and tibial components on patellofemoral malalignment in knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienapfel, H; Springorum, H-P; Ziegler, A; Klose, K-J; Georg, C; Griss, P

    2003-04-01

    Patellofemoral complications are among the most common causes for revision surgery in total knee arthroplasty. So far no quantitative assessment has been made of the femoral and tibial malalignment or the positioning of the patellar component and the type of patellofemoral complication or failure. In particular, no comparative studies are available that include patients with and without patellofemoral failure in respect to the above-mentioned parameters when implant material, implant design, and fixation technique were identical. Between 1985 and 1992, 171 MG I total knee arthroplasties were performed. Since 1999, 20% of all the implanted MG I knee arthroplasties (all with metal-backed patellar component) had to be revised. Of those 34 patients, 18 were pair matched with 18 control patients based on the criteria of sex, body mass index, and age. The only difference in the control group was that they did not suffer any malfunction of the patellofemoral mechanism. To assess the patella component localization, conventional AP radiographs, patellar merchant view radiographs in 30 degrees, and CT scans were performed. This study has demonstrated a significant difference for the thickness of the patellar component and a trend regarding the rotational malalignment of the tibial component. Potential causes for the malrotation and guidelines to prevent rotational malalignment are discussed.

  19. Arthroscopic synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis defined by the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, Pierfranco; Rossi, Roberto; Rosso, Federica; Blonna, Davide; Castoldi, Filippo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the mid-term results and survivorship of arthroscopic synovectomy (AS) of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) defined with the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria; and (2) to identify prognostic factors. Patients matching the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria, with symptomatic knee synovitis for at least six months, treated with arthroscopic synovectomy of the knee at a minimum of three year followup were included. Pre-operative evaluation included Larsen, HAQ, DAS28, and Laurin scores. Post-operatively, Laurin, WOMAC, and patient satisfaction scores were evaluated. Different variables were investigated to find associations with the outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. Sixty-four patients met the inclusion criteria. Seven patients (9.6%) were lost to followup, leaving 57 patients (66 knees) for the present study. The average followup was 96.3months (SD 41). The pre-operative Laurin score was 3.91 points (SD 1.3) and significantly (P10%) were identified as negative prognostic factors. Kaplan-Meier survivorship with total knee replacement as endpoint was: 78% at one year, 28% at four years, and six percent at 10 years. Although AS of the knee has still a role as a salvage procedure in the treatment of RA synovitis with initial joint degeneration (less than Larsen grade III) and good ROM, high revision rates and limited survivorship are reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The results of Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, R. H.; Alnachoukati, O.; Barrington, J.; Ennin, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004, the Phase III Oxford Medial Partial Knee is used to treat anteromedial osteoarthritis (AMOA) in patients with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. This unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is relatively new in the United States, and therefore long-term American results are lacking. Patients and Methods This is a single surgeon, retrospective study based on prospectively collected data, analysing a consecutive series of primary UKAs using the Phase III mobile-bearing Oxford Knee and Phase III instrumentation. Between July 2004 and December 2006, the senior author (RHE) carried out a medial UKA in 173 patients (213 knees) for anteromedial osteoarthritis or avascular necrosis (AVN). A total of 95 patients were men and 78 were women. Their mean age at surgery was 67 years (38 to 89) and mean body mass index 29.87 kg/m2 (17 to 62). The mean follow-up was ten years (4 to 11). Results Survivorship of the Oxford UKA at ten years was 88%, using life table analysis. Implant survivorship at ten years was 95%. The most common cause for revision was the progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral compartment. The mean knee score element of the American Knee Society Score (AKSS) was 50 pre-operatively and increased to 93 post-operatively. The mean AKSS function score was 56 pre-operatively rising to 78 post-operatively Conclusion This ten-year follow-up study of the Oxford UKA undertaken in the United States shows good survivorship and excellent function in a wide selection of patients with AMOA and AVN. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):34–40. PMID:27694514

  1. Novel computational approaches characterizing knee physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangdo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A knee joint’s longevity depends on the proper integration of structural components in an axial alignment. If just one of the components is abnormally off-axis, the biomechanical system fails, resulting in arthritis. The complexity of various failures in the knee joint has led orthopedic surgeons to select total knee replacement as a primary treatment. In many cases, this means sacrificing much of an otherwise normal joint. Here, we review novel computational approaches to describe knee physiotherapy by introducing a new dimension of foot loading to the knee axis alignment producing an improved functional status of the patient. New physiotherapeutic applications are then possible by aligning foot loading with the functional axis of the knee joint during the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis.

  2. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  3. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  4. Arthroscopic observation was useful to detect loosening of the femoral component of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in a recurrent hemoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakado Kotaro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee after a mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA; Oxford UKA is described. A 58-year-old man met with a road traffic accident 10 months after UKA. He developed anteromedial pain and hemarthrosis of the knee joint 1 month after the accident, which required multiple aspirations. Physical examination showed no instability. Plain radiograph revealed no signs of loosening. All laboratory data, including bleeding and coagulation times, were within normal limits. Diagnostic arthroscopy demonstrated loosening of the femoral component. Any intraarticular pathology other than nonspecific synovitis was ruled out. The loose femoral component and polyethylene meniscal bearing were revised. Since then, hemarthrosis has not recurred.

  5. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide ran

  6. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  7. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  8. Revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Varossieau, W.W.

    1938-01-01

    The genus Sarcosperma was excluded from the Sapotaceae by the first-named writer in 1925, the group being considered as of family rank. In 1926 the same author published a concise and fragmentary revision of the monotypic order, in which two new Malaysian species were described. The continental spec

  9. Adjustable hinge permits movement of knee in plaster cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, W. E.

    1967-01-01

    Metal knee hinge with an adjustable sleeve worn on the outside of a leg cast facilitates movement of the knee joint. This helps eliminate stiffness of the knee and eliminates bulkiness and adjustment difficulty.

  10. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of the Knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Il; Cho, Kil Ho [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Knee ultrasonography is a feasible and useful diagnostic method not only for the evaluation of periarticular soft tissues but also for intra-articular lesions and for the diagnosis of tumorous disease. Joint effusion, synovial thickening, intra-articular loose bodies, bursal and/or other fluid collection, ganglionic cysts, ligament and tendon injuries, tendinosis, osteomyelitis, and symptoms related to metallic hardware can be diagnosed using ultrasonography.

  11. Pathogenetic treatment for knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Stanislavovna Svetlova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studying the impact of long-term treatment with theraflex (a 3-year follow-up or alflutop (a 5-year follow-up in patients with knee osteoarthosis. Both drugs have been shown to exert a positive effect on the symptoms of the disease. It has been concluded that theraflex affects more actively the pathogenic mechanisms in the progression of gonarthrosis.

  12. Pathogenetic treatment for knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Stanislavovna Svetlova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studying the impact of long-term treatment with theraflex (a 3-year follow-up or alflutop (a 5-year follow-up in patients with knee osteoarthosis. Both drugs have been shown to exert a positive effect on the symptoms of the disease. It has been concluded that theraflex affects more actively the pathogenic mechanisms in the progression of gonarthrosis.

  13. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentink, E.C.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Stramigioli, S.; Rietman, J.S.; Veltink, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic

  14. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  15. Surgery For The Arthritic Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Allan E.

    1985-01-01

    The optimal surgical procedure for the arthritic knee depends upon the type of arthritis and the patient. If the patient is ‘high demand’ (i.e., relatively active and young), and has incongruous arthritis (in either the medial or lateral compartments but not both), then realignment by osteotomy transfers the weight to the healthy compartment. If the osteotomy is successful, the patient may continue a physically demanding lifestyle. Knee replacement is indicated if the patient is ‘low demand’ (i.e., elderly or suffering from multiple joint disease) and has congruous arthritis, with destruction of both weight-bearing compartments. Knee replacement does not allow the same activity level as realignment but, fortunately, the low demand patient tends to have congruous disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis) and the high demand patient incongruous disease (e.g., osteoarthritis). ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Figs. 6A-BFigs. 6C-DFig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:21274227

  16. Posteromedial corner injuries of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, C.V. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom) and Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Stanmore (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: charles.house@uclh.nhs.uk; Connell, D.A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depicts in exquisite detail the supporting structures of the posteromedial corner of the knee. This musculoligamentous unit plays a central role as a dynamic stabilizer of the knee joint and the recognition of injury to the posteromedial corner carries important implications in terms of management and prognosis, most particularly in the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. This article provides a resume of the functional anatomy of the posteromedial corner of the knee as seen with MRI and follows with a review of the MRI appearances of injury to the posteromedial corner.

  17. Prevalence of knee pain and knee OA in southern Sweden and the proportion that seeks medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Engström, Gunnar;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of frequent knee pain in radiographic, symptomatic and clinically defined knee OA in middle-aged and elderly patients and the proportion that seeks medical care. METHODS: In 2007 a random sample of 10 000 56- to 84-year-old residents...... of Malmö, Sweden, were questioned about knee pain. We classified subjects reporting knee pain with a duration of at least 4 weeks as having frequent knee pain. A random sample of 1300 individuals with frequent knee pain and 650 without were invited for assessment by the ACR clinical knee OA criteria...... and for bilateral weight-bearing knee radiography. We considered a Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2 as radiographic knee OA and that in combination with frequent knee pain as symptomatic knee OA. By linkage with the Skåne Healthcare Register, we determined the proportion of subjects that had consulted for knee OA or pain...

  18. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  19. associated injuries and complications in floating knee management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatology Surgery, Cotonou Teaching Hospital, Republic of Bénin. Correspondence to: Dr. ... Keywords: Associated injuries, complications, Floating knee, Management .... floating knee: epidemiology, prognostic indicators. & outcome ...

  20. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  1. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  2. Immediate effects of an elastic knee sleeve on frontal plane gait biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Schween

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics.18 subjects (8 women, 10 men with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests.With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9 ± 2.1° (P = 0.006. Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5 ± 1.6° (P = 0.004. The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74 ± 0.9 Nm • kg-1; P = 0.002 and 12.9% (0.28 ± 0.3 Nm • s • kg-1; P < 0.004, respectively.Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup.

  3. Varus thrust and knee frontal plane dynamic motion in persons with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A H; Chmiel, J S; Moisio, K C; Almagor, O; Zhang, Y; Cahue, S; Sharma, L

    2013-11-01

    Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee load and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about how varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic data. We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation was captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, we used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), gait speed, and knee static alignment. 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m(2) (standard deviation (SD) 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/s, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radoicic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs.

  5. 旋转铰链膝假体在全膝关节置换翻修术后的临床效果%Clinical results of rotating hinged knee prosthesis in total knee arthroplasty revison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄菲; 郑秋坚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical results of rotating hinged knee prosthesis in total knee arthroplasty ( TKA) revision. Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on the clinical data of 10 patients ( 10 knees ) with severe knee deformity from department of orthopedics , Guangdong General Hospital .These patients received rotating hinged knee prosthesis for total knee arthroplasty revison because of aseptic loosening or infection and were followed up between October 2008 and May 2013.All the cases adopted first-stage revision or debridement and the home-made antibiotic polymethyl methacrylate ( PMMA) were used in the first stage treatment; the rotating hinged knee prosthesis was used in the second-stage revision.The patients were followed up after the revision , and evaluated by hospital for special surgery ( HSS) knee score and range of motion . Results The patients were followed up from 2 to 57 months with an average time of 29 months.All the ten cases healed well without lower limb phlebothrombosis or pulmonary infection . Clinical evaluation showed that the mean HSS knee score improved from 37 points preoperatively to 85 points postoperatively , and the mean range of motion increased from 65°to 93°. Conclusion In this study the knee function could be improved by the rotating hinged knee prosthesis than other prostheses .%目的:探讨使用旋转铰链膝假体进行全膝关节置换( TKA)术后翻修的临床效果。方法回顾性分析2008年10月至2013年5月,广东省人民医院骨科行人工TKA术后翻修且进行随访的重度膝关节畸形患者,其中采用旋转铰链型膝关节假体为10例(10膝)。收治的10例(10膝) TKA术后因假体松动或膝关节感染而需行全膝关节翻修的患者,采用一期翻修或一期清创加自制含抗生素骨水泥植入,可旋转绞链膝假体二期翻修方法治疗。术后进行随访并采用膝关节协会评分(HSS)及膝关节活动度评估膝关节

  6. Extensor Mechanism Disruption after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Series and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Extensor mechanism disruption following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare but devastating complication. These patients may require revision of the implants, but even then, it may not be possible to restore the normal function of the knee after the disruption. The patterns of extensor mechanism disruption can broadly be classified into three types: suprapatellar (quadriceps tendon rupture), transpatellar (patellar fracture), or infrapatellar (patellar tendon rupture). Infrapatellar tendon ruptures are the worst injuries, as they carry maximum morbidity and are challenging to manage. The disruption of the extensor mechanism may occur either intra-operatively or in the immediate postoperative period due to an injury. The treatment of extensor mechanism complications after TKA may include either nonsurgical management or surgical intervention in the form of primary repair or reconstruction with autogenous, allogeneic, or synthetic substitutes. We have provided an algorithm for the management of extensor mechanism disruption after TKA. PMID:27004156

  7. Patella Fractures Prior to Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worse Outcomes but Equivalent Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Matthew T; Shannon, Steven F; Watts, Chad D; Wagner, Eric R; Sems, Stephen A; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-12-01

    Distal femur and/or tibial plateau fractures adversely affect outcomes of TKA; however it is unknown if a previous patella fracture affects outcome. We reviewed 113 patients undergoing TKA with a previous patella fracture from 1990 to 2012. Component survival was compared to 19,641 patients undergoing TKA for osteoarthritis during the same period. The 15-year implant survivals following a previous patella fracture was 86%. There was no difference in implant survival compared to patients undergoing TKA for OA (P=0.31). Knee society scores significantly improved following TKA; however patients with a fracture had complications related to knee flexion. Patients undergoing primary TKA following a patella fracture have similar overall revision free survival compared to those undergoing TKA for OA at 15-years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Treatment of fractures of the distal femur on total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, P; Poignard, A; Manicom, O; Chabane-Sari, M A

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the distal femur near a total knee arthroplasty are usually observed in patients aged over 70 years victims of low-energy trauma. The rate of complications is high: in the literature 25-75 %, even when treated by experienced surgeons. The purpose of this study was to detail therapeutic modalities used for the treatment of these fractures with their advantages and disadvantages and to determine the morbidity of complications which do occur. Twenty distal fracture of the femur were treated between 1990 and 2000 in twenty patients who had a total knee arthroplasty. Mean patient age at surgery was 72 years (range 69-77). The fracture was a short oblique fracture in four, transversal in five, long and spiral in four and comminuted in the others. In four fractures, the preoperative radiographic analysis suggested concomitant loosening. Therapeutic modalities included suspension traction for two, femorotibial external fixation for two. Retrograde nailing was possible in two patients. Fixation with a screw plate or a blade plate was used for nine fractures. The prosthesis was revised systematically if loosening was observed. This was done in three cases with preservation of the tibial piece and in two cases, changing the complete prosthesis, using a long femoral stem in all. Mean follow-up was two to ten years. Immediate weight bearing was possible for four of the five patients for whom only the femoral piece was changed with a long stem. For the others, weight bearing was deferred until fracture healing was obtained after a mean five months (range 4-42). Bone healing required one, or two, revisions in three patients. Three patients died within one year of their fracture of the distal femur. There were no cases of infection or late healing. At last follow-up, the knee and function score regressed after treatment of the fracture. The two scores dropped 20 points compared with the pre-operative score (78 +/- 15 to 56 +/- 19 for the knee score and 72 +/- 16 to 54

  9. Astym® Therapy for the Management of Recalcitrant Knee Joint Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Anil; Corcoran, James; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Knee stiffness is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Despite studies published on the surgical management of reduced range of motion (ROM) after TKA, there is limited evidence on the nonoperative management of joint and soft tissue imbalances possibly contributing to reduced knee ROM. This report assesses changes in ROM, pain, function, and patellar tendon length after Astym® joint mobilization use. A 38-year-old male professional skier had a right TKA 3 months before presentation with 2 subsequent manipulations under anesthesia secondary to persistent knee stiffness. He had patellar baja on radiograph, a reduced arc of ROM, reduced patellar mobility and muscular extensibility, and pain to palpation along the patellar tendon. He had 12 visits of physical therapy with the use of Astym®, patellar mobilization, and tibio-femoral mobilizations with movement. The patient also used a customized knee device at home for prolonged knee extension stretching. The patient was treated for 12 visits, along with home use of customized bracing for knee extension. Significant improvements were seen in pain, function, and ROM. He returned to work full-time, ambulated prolonged distances, and negotiated stairs pain-free. He also demonstrated resolution of patellar baja radiographically. Conservative management of recalcitrant knee joint stiffness after primary TKA can be effective in restoring knee mobility and reducing pain and activity limitation. A multimodal approach using Astym® treatment, customized knee bracing, and targeted joint mobilization can be effective in resolving knee joint stiffness.

  10. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Unstable Knee: Case-Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Amjad, Gholamreza Ghorbani; Kaseb, Mohammad Hassan; Bashti, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    Multiplanar or global laxity in arthritic knee is rare, most of this patients have neuromuscular disorder (post poliomyelitis, spinal dystrophy) or history of knee trauma. Ligament insufficiency and severe bone loss is significant in this patient. The estimated prevalence for the concurrence of charcot marie-tooth (CMT) with myasthenia gravis (MG) suggests an extremely rare event. We have presented a 54-year-old female patient with CMT and MG complaining of progressive pain, swelling, and crepitation of the knee joints who had been undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating hinge prosthesis. She had an acute myasthenia crisis soon after operation with prolonged intubation and intensive care unit admission. Radiographies and physical examination revealed bilateral severe unstable arthritic knee joints and left knee posterior dislocation. Short-term postoperative follow-up revealed improved knee function and resolution of all symptoms in the operated side. PMID:28271089

  11. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  12. Rapid knee-extensions to increase quadriceps muscle activity in patients with total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase...... agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which...... rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...

  13. Long-term outcome of knee arthroplasty in the setting of pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Matthew T; Scorianz, Maurizio; Wyles, Cody C; Trousdale, Robert T; Sim, Franklin H; Taunton, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, benign proliferation of the synovium, commonly affecting the knee. Arthroplasty can successfully manage arthrosis in this population; however, outcome data is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the oncologic and functional outcome of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the setting of PVNS. 48 patients were identified at our institution with histologically confirmed PVNS that subsequently received TKA. The cohort consisted of 28 females and 20 males with a mean age and body mass index of 61years and 29.2kg/m(2). 37patients had "active" disease, defined as diffuse in 40 patients and focal in eight. Mean follow-up was 14years. The 10-year disease free-survival was 88%. Recurrence occurred in 6 patients and was treated with synovectomy and revision arthroplasty (n=4), local excision (n=1) and transfemoral amputation (n=1). 25 patients sustained at least 1 complication, most commonly decreased knee range of motion. Complications resulted in revision TKA in 10 patients (21%). There was no difference (P=0.74) between mean pre- and postoperative ROM; however, there was a significant reduction in the number of patients with a flexion contracture >15° (P=0.03). The mean Knee Society score and functional score significantly improved following surgery (PPVNS improves patient function and reduces the presence of flexion contractures. Patients with a history of PVNS should be cautioned when undergoing arthroplasty on the elevated risk of subsequent procedures. Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR.

  15. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  16. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...

  17. [Ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, M

    2009-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour at the site of the left knee joint praepatellar. The diagnostic imaging, operative findings and histology showed a chronic ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint. Aetiology and pathogenesis of the ossifying bursitis are discussed.

  18. Current surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative-and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  19. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Rönn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoathritis (OA of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  20. Total Knee Arthroplasty in the Combined Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.J. Voskresensky

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We have offered modified access to a knee to work out a method for restoration of extensive apparatus of the knee. 91 patients with degenerative damages of the knee were under out su-pervision. All patients were differentiated in groups according to the form of access and pa-thology of the knee. At all stages of studying the following method of investigation were made: goniometry — for estimation of the knee functional condition; electroneiromyography — for reveling deficiency of muscular activity and determination of its kind. Patient's satisfac-tion by operation was defined by means of WOMAC scale subjective indexes. The received digital material was subjected to statistical processing. Thus, it has been proved that applica-tion of the modified access to a knee offered by us in total knee arthroplasty in patients with combined contracture in comparison with traditionally applied technologies of extensive ap-paratus releasing allows in short terms to restore the volume and force of movements in a knee that reduces time of rehabilitation and improves quality of patient's life

  1. Knee Braces to Prevent Injuries in Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Five physicians discuss the use of knee braces to prevent injuries in football players. Questions are raised regarding the strength and design of the braces, whether they prestress the knee in some cases, and whether they actually reduce injuries. More clinical and biomechanical research is called for. (MT)

  2. Recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rukavina, A.; Kerkhoffs, G.M.M.J.; Schneider, P.; Kuster, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a case of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee that presented 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Femoral arteriography showed a false aneurysm of a branch of the inferior lateral geniculate artery. Therapeutic embolization of the arterial branch was performed usin

  3. THE METHOD OF KNEE JOINT ARTHRODESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Fedorov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of bone plastics by cylindrical autotransplant in cases of posttraumatic changes of knee joint is described. Knee joint arthrodesis is supposed to be used as alternate in term of replacement impossibility (for example, high-grade deformity, the age (osteoporosis, concomitant diseases that can lead to complicate operation.

  4. Hyperextended Knee: Cause of Serious Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tear one of the knee ligaments, particularly the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). If the knee injury is severe enough to cause swelling, pain or instability, see a doctor immediately. Even if the injury doesn't need surgical repair, physical therapy may be needed to help restore leg strength ...

  5. Is Selectively Not Resurfacing the Patella an Acceptable Practice in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradit-Kremers, Hilal; Haque, Omar J; Kremers, Walter K; Berry, Daniel J; Lewallen, David G; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2017-04-01

    To resurface or not to resurface the patella remains a controversy in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term outcomes associated with selectively not resurfacing the patella. This was a historical cohort study of 15,497 patients with 21,371 primary TKA procedures performed at a single institution between 1985 and 2010. The cohort included 402 (2%) knees with unresurfaced patellae and 20,969 knees with all-polyethylene patellae designs. Reasons for not resurfacing the patella were documented. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the risk of complications and revisions among procedures with unresurfaced patellae. According to the surgeon, reasons for not resurfacing were normal cartilage (226, 56%), young patient (30, 8%), thin patella (53, 13%), and surgeons' choice (93, 23%). In age, sex, and calendar year-adjusted analyses, the risk of complications (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.46) and all-cause revisions (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.89) were significantly higher after TKA with unresurfaced patellae. However, after adjusting for femoral component types and operative diagnoses, these associations were no longer significant. The only group with significantly worse outcomes were those with a thin patellae with increased risk of complications (HR: 2.66, 95% CI: 1.70, 4.17) and revisions (HR: 5.94, 95% CI: 2.35, 15.02). Yet, the excess risk in the thin patellae group was mainly due to infections, and not related to unresurfaced patellae. Selectively not resurfacing the patella seemed to provide similar results compared with routine resurfacing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty in severe genu valgus. Five to 14 years followup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Angel Pesciallo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: valgus malalignment is a complex, multiplanar deformity characterized by bone alterations and soft-tissue abnormalities. Several surgical techniques have been described for valgus knee, and the sequence of tight lateral structures release and necessity of constrained prosthesis were addressed. Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA in valgus deformity remains a surgical challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. The objectives of the study were to evaluate our mid and long-term results in the surgical treatment of severe valgus disease, and describe the applied surgical technique.  Materials and Methods: a clinic-radiographic classification was developed, and patients treated for severe genu valgus were discriminated. We retrospectively evaluated 42 TKA in 39 patients, with an average follow-up of 9,2 years. Knee Society Score (KSS was used for clinical evolution, and the last control best quality radiography was considered for radiographic evaluation. Survivorship analysis contemplated need for revision for any reason and for mechanical failure. Results: postoperative average KSS was 83,3, with marked improvement in parameters pain and range of movement. Constrained implants were utilized in 16,7% of cases. Postoperative alignment was on average 5,9°. Two patients underwent revision surgery, having achieved a prosthetic survivorship for mechanical failure of 97,6%. We did not have any revision because of infection. Conclusion: a meticulous physical examination and proper preoperative radiographs are mandatory. The decision of using a constrained device is done intraoperative. Appropriate soft-tissue release is extremely significant. Despite the surgical technique, a constrained prosthesis utilization is limited. We recommend our technique as a low-demanding procedure, with encouraging mid and long-term results. Key words: valgus, deformity, severe, TKA, release, surgical technique.

  7. Use of radiographic projections of knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockshott, W.P.; Burrows, D.A.; Ferrier, M.; Racoveanu, N.T.

    1985-02-01

    A study to determine the routine radiography practice for the investigation of acute trauma cases and those with suspected arthritis of the knee was carried out by questionnaires sent to radiologists in 41 countries. The role of radiology in the investigation of chondromalacia patellae was also ascertained. Some of the reasons for the diversities of practice are discussed. The necessity for further views of the knee to supplement the two standard projections was assessed for various diagnostic entities. It became clear that if occult fractures were not to be missed, patients with knee effusions following acute trauma required additional views if a lesion was not shown by the anteroposterior (AP) and lateral views. In contrast, two views of the knee sufficed for examination of most entities affecting the knee.

  8. Transfemoral amputation after failed knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. With use of individual data linkage, 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Of these, 258...... for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed...

  9. [Jumper's knee--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Pässler, H H

    2005-06-01

    Jumper's knee has been defined as painful chronic overuse injury of the extensor mechanism of the knee joint. The disease has a high incidence in jumping sports and depends on training frequency and level of performance. Its natural course is protracted, repetitive, and often bilaterally occurring. Its etiology is a chronic overload of the knee extensor mechanism which is triggered by jumping sports (volleyball, basketball etc.) as well as different intrinsic (ligamentous laxity, Q-angle, patella height, tenderness, pattern of force development) and extrinsic dispositions (frequency of training, level of performance, hardness of underground). The place of pathology most often is the osteo-tendinous transition zone of the proximal patellar tendon. Histologic evaluation of the tendon showed that the disease is rather degenerative than inflammatory. The diagnosis is primarily based on the typical sports history, physical examination, and ultrasound. MRI is helpful in operation planning. Plain radiography, CT, and bone scans are used to rule out differential diagnoses. Therapy should be chosen according to the stage of the disease and usually starts with a non-surgical approach. This includes rest from sports activities, immobilisation, non-steroid antiphlogistics, para-tendinous cortisone injections, massage, electric therapy, ultrasound and extracorporal shock waves. Afterwards an increase of activities is begun (moderate training, adequate warm-up, ice cooling after activity, muscle stretching, eccentric strengthening of the quadriceps). Patella straps and soft insoles are used as prevention. Up to 42 % of patients need surgical therapy after failure of long-lasting non-surgical measures, carried out either open or arthroscopically. Surgical principles include excision of the para-tendon, excision of the degenerative tissue, resection of the lower patella pole, and longitudinal incisions into the tendon. Most patients are pain-free after surgery but return to sports

  10. Improved knee flexion following high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new techniques and materials in total knee arthroplasty (TKA continue to be a primary focus in orthopedic surgery. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate post TKA total range of motion (ROM among a group of patients who received a gender specific high-flexion design modification implant compared to a control group of patients who received non-gender specific implants. Methods and results The control group was comprised of 39 TKAs that were recruited pre-operatively and received the non-gender specific implant while the study group consisted of 39 TKAs who received gender specific implants. The study group yielded an improvement in mean post-operative ROM of 21° at 12 months, whereas the mean improvement in ROM among the control group was 11°. Thus, the study group had a 10° increased ROM improvement (91% over the control group (p = 0.00060. In addition, 100% of the subjects with gender specific high-flexion implants achieved greater or equal ROM post-operatively compared to 82% for the control cohort. Lastly, women who exhibited greater pre-operative ROM and lower body mass index (BMI were found to benefit the most with the gender specific prosthesis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that among subjects with a normal BMI, the gender specific high-flexion knee implant is associated with increased ROM as compared to the non-gender specific non-high-flexion implant designs.

  11. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  12. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    . DATA SOURCES: Systematic searches for benefits and harms were carried out in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2014. Only studies published in 2000 or later were included for harms. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  13. MINIMALLY INVASIVE TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pencho Kosev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with the MIS TKA through a mid-vastus approach. The indications and contraindications of the technique are discussed. Our series include 104 patients. The Knee Society Score is used to rate the results. The average KSS score on 6-th month is 89 points. Eleven patients had skin necrosis. Eight had transient stiffness. One developed late infection. The MIS-TKA is recommended for selected patients and must be performed by an experienced surgeon and prepared team.

  14. Pediatric Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aristides I; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can cause knee pain and dysfunction in children. The etiology of OCD remains unclear; theories on causes include inflammation, ischemia, ossification abnormalities, genetic factors, and repetitive microtrauma. Most OCD lesions in skeletally immature patients will heal with nonoperative treatment. The success of nonoperative treatment decreases once patients reach skeletal maturity. The goals of surgical treatment include maintenance of articular cartilage congruity, rigid fixation of unstable fragments, and repair of osteochondral defects with cells or tissues that can adequately replace lost or deficient cartilage. Unsalvageable OCD lesions can be treated with various surgical techniques.

  15. Leishmaniasis in the knee area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bava Amadeo Javier; Rossi Maria Laura; Seley Celeste; Troncoso Alcides

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection caused by species leishmaniae, which can produce two types of manifestations: visceral and cutaneous. In south America cutaneous leishmaniasis is more common than visceral leishmaniasis. A case of primary cutaneous leishmaniasis from Bolivia is presented for its rarity. The patient of our case showed an ulcerated lesion of the knee. Montenegro's intradermal test was positive. Giemsa-stained touch preparation of the skin biopsy revealed amastigotes inside macrophages, consistent with leishmaniasis. The patient was treated with meglumine antimoniate intramuscular (20 mg of Sb+/kg/day) three weeks, with complete cicatrization of the lesion.

  16. Long-term survival and radiological results of the Duracon™ total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, Matthias; Bolliger, Lilianna; Ilchmann, Thomas; Clauss, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyse the long-term (>ten years) survival rate and radiological results of the Duracon TKA. Methods Between 1992 and 1999 159 Duracon TKA were implanted at our institution. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the endpoints exchange, addition or removal of any component for any reason, revision due to aseptic loosening and mechanical failure was performed. Radiological long-term (>ten years) follow-up (FU) analysis was performed according to the Knee Soc...

  17. The Dutch version of the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaar Jan AN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS was constructed in Sweden. This questionnaire has proved to be valid for several orthopedic interventions of the knee. It has been formally translated and validated in several languages, but not yet in Dutch. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinimetric properties of the Dutch version of the KOOS questionnaire in knee patients with various stages of osteoarthritis (OA. Methods The Swedish version of the KOOS questionnaire was first translated into Dutch according to a standardized procedure and second tested for clinimetric quality. The study population consisted of patients with different stages of OA (mild, moderate and severe and of patients after primary TKA, and after a revision of the TKA. All patients filled in the Dutch KOOS questionnaire, as well as the SF-36 and a Visual Analogue Scale for pain. The following analyses were performed to evaluate the clinimetric quality of the KOOS: Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency, principal component analyses (factor analysis, intraclass correlation coefficients (reliability, spearman's correlation coefficient (construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects. Results For all patients groups Cronbach's alpha was for all subscales above 0.70. The ICCs, assessed for the patient groups with mild and moderate OA and after revision of the TKA patients, were above 0.70 for all subscales. Of the predefined hypotheses 60% or more could be confirmed for the patients with mild and moderate OA and for the TKA patients. For the other patient groups less than 45% could be confirmed. Ceiling effects were present in the mild OA group for the subscales Pain, Symptoms and ADL and for the subscale Sport/Recreation in the severe OA group. Floor effects were found for the subscales Sport/Recreation and Qol in the severe OA and revision TKA groups. Conclusion Based on these different clinimetric properties within the

  18. Congenital bony fusion (absence) of the knee: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadi, F; Kahlaee, A H; Sarmadi, A; Madadi, Fi; Sadeghian, R; Emami, T M M; Abbasian, M R

    2010-12-01

    Congenital knee ankylosis is a rare condition which might be accompanied with other abnormalities or not. To our knowledge, there is no report on true bony ankylosis of the knee. The only ones in the literature include fibrous knee ankylosis. Thus this seems to be the first presentation of true congenital bony fusion of the knee joint.

  19. Thigh-calf contact force measurements in deep knee flexion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, J.G.; Barink, M.; Loeffen, R.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee models often do not contain thigh-calf contact which occurs in deep knee flexion. Thigh-calf contact is expected to reduce muscle forces and thereby affects internal stresses in the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to measure thigh-calf contact forces. Two deep knee flexion

  20. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  1. Use of closed suction drain after primary total knee arthroplasty – an overrated practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gaurav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The age-old practice of closed suction drain following orthopedic procedures has been challenged since past few decades. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of closed suction drain after total knee arthroplasty. Materials and methods: One hundred twenty patients (135 knees with primary Total Knee Arthroplasty were divided into a study group (no drain and a control group (drain used. Inclusion criteria were grade 3 and grade 4 osteoarthritis of the knee. Revision cases and rheumatoid arthritis were excluded. Parameters assessed were pain, pre and post-op Hb, dressing change, early infection, ecchymosis and duration of stay. Results were calculated using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Oxford Knee scoring systems at two weeks, six months and one year. Results: Mean age was 72.03 ± 6.68 in study group and 71.38 ± 7.02 in control group. Pre and post op Hb was 12.1678 ± 1.3220 (study group, 12.1803 ± 1.2717 (control group and 9.8373 ± 1.5703 (study group, 9.7918 ± 1.4163 (control group. There was one case of early infection in both groups which was controlled by oral antibiotics. Change of dressing and ecchymosis were more in the study group. Duration of hospital stay was more in the control group p < 0.0006 (statistically significant. Conclusion: There is no added advantage of closed suction drain over no drain usage and this practice can safely be brought to a halt.

  2. Clinically assessed mediolateral knee motion: impact on gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena;

    2011-01-01

    Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate...... if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position....

  3. Revision Total Elbow Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Miguel A; Cheung, Emilie V; Murthi, Anand M

    2017-08-01

    Despite recent technologic advances, total elbow arthroplasty has complication rates higher than that of total joint arthroplasty in other joints. With new antirheumatic treatments, the population receiving total elbow arthroplasty has shifted from patients with rheumatoid arthritis to those with posttraumatic arthritis, further compounding the high complication rate. The most common reasons for revision include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, and component failure. Common mechanisms of total elbow arthroplasty failure include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, component failure, and instability. Tension band fixation, allograft struts with cerclage wire, and/or plate and screw constructs can be used for fracture stabilization.

  4. MARKOWITZ STRATEGIES REVISED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia-an; Zhou Xunyu

    2009-01-01

    Continuous-time Markowitz's mean-variance efficient strategies are modified by parameterizing a critical quantity. It is shown that these parameterized Markowitz strategies could reach the original mean target with arbitrarily high probabilities. This, in turn, motivates the introduction of certain stopped strategies where stock holdings are liquidated whenever the parameterized Markowitz strategies reach the present value of the mean target. The risk aspect of the revised Markowitz strategies are examined via expected discounted loss from the initial budget. A new portfolio selection model is suggested based on the results of the paper.

  5. The associations between quadriceps muscle strength, power, and knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Armstrong, Charles W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Tevald, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal knee joint mechanics have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Deficits in muscle function (i.e., strength and power) may contribute to abnormal knee joint loading. The associations between quadriceps strength, power and knee joint mechanics remain unclear in knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to collect peak knee joint angles and moments during the first 50% of stance phase of gait in 33 participants with knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps strength and power were assessed using a knee extension machine. Strength was quantified as the one repetition maximum. Power was quantified as the peak power produced at 40-90% of the one repetition maximum. Quadriceps strength accounted for 15% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P=0.016). Quadriceps power accounted for 20-29% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (Pknee adduction moment (P=0.05). These data suggest that quadriceps power explains more variance in knee flexion angle and knee adduction moment during gait in knee osteoarthritis than quadriceps strength. Additionally, quadriceps power at multiple loads is associated with knee joint mechanics and therefore should be assessed at a variety of loads. Taken together, these results indicate that quadriceps power may be a potential target for interventions aimed at changing knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loading in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, J

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  7. Analysis of the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Firsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012-2014 total 67 unicompartmental arthroplasty surgeries with use of Oxford knee meniscal bearing were performed. The surgeries were performed by a single surgeon. Minimally invasive approach was used. All patients were evaluated clinically, radiographically and with Oxford Knee score scale, Knee Society score scale and functional scale. Obtained data was processed with nonparametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results were processed using the statistical analysis application package SPSS, version 10.07. Analysis of of mid-term results showed that the average for Oxford Knee score increased from 16.4 (95% CI 9-23 to 41.3 (95% CI 29-47. Average for Knee Society score scale increased from 42.7 (95% CI 31-55 to 88.6 (95% CI 73-100. No occurrence of early postoperative complications have been reported. Statistically significant improvements of knee function in patients after unicompartmental arthroplasty have been observed. Unicompartmental arthroplasty currently can be considered as an advanced treatment option for medial knee joint pathology. Meniscal bearing cemented prostheses such as Oxford III are preferable.

  8. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    significantly higher area of 7.7 (0.5-17) (p=0.023). Average BMI was 21.6 versus 20.2 for surgical and non-surgical patients, respectively, significantly higher for those who underwent surgery (p=0.002). Most common procedure was fixation with 1.6 mm bioabsorbable nails (54.2%), using an average of 4 nails (1-9). Only 2 cases were fixed using metallic headless screws. Other surgical treatments were drilling (13.9%), microfracture (13.9%), microfracture + fixation (6.9%), removal of loose body/chondroplasty (6.9%), and allograft transplantation (4.2%). Fixation was achieved all-arthroscopic in 43.1% of the cases, and 61.3% of the lesions that were fixed underwent curettage of the subchondral bone. Revision surgery was required in 14 knees (19.4%). The most common revision procedures were microfracture, removal of hardware, chondroplasty and allograft implantation, where some revisions had combined procedures. Most surgical patients had postoperative MRIs (55 knees), with an average radiological follow-up of 14.5 months (range 2.1-55.4). Conclusion: JOCD occurs more frequently in young adolescent athlete boys, affecting the middle third of the medial femoral condyle. In our cohort, 1/3 of the patients had surgery, where bigger lesions and higher BMI were risk factors for operative treatment. At short-term follow up, the success rate following surgery was above 80%.

  9. Knee arthrodesis – ultima ratio for the treatment of the infected knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemann, Andreas H. H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The irretrievable destruction of the knee due to trauma, tumor or infection is the indication for knee arthrodesis. The main reason for knee arthrodesis in terms of infection ist the infected total knee arthroplasty. Central problem is the definition of the term “irretrievable”. It is based on the subjective opinion of the attending physician and depends on his expert knowledge of this specific entity. The preservation of a functioning extremity is the main goal.This article shows the typical indications and contraindications for knee arthrodesis following septic knee diseases. In addition it gives insight into the biomechanical and technical considerations to be kept in mind. Finally the postoperative care and outcome of different techniques are analysed.

  10. Human knee joint anatomy revisited: morphometry in the light of sex-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargel, Jens; Michael, Joern W P; Feiser, Janna; Ivo, Roland; Koebke, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates differences in the anatomy of male and female knee joints to contribute to the current debate on sex-specific total knee implants. Morphometric data were obtained from 60 human cadaver knees, and sex differences were calculated. All data were corrected for height, and male and female specimens presenting with an identical length of the femur were analyzed as matched pairs. Male linear knee joint dimensions were significantly larger when compared with females. When corrected for differences in height, medial-lateral dimensions of male knees were significantly larger than female; however, matched paired analysis did not prove these differences to be consistent. Although implant design should focus interindividual variations in knee joint anatomy, our data do not support the concept of a female-specific implant design.

  11. Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment with the KineSpring Knee Implant System: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Hayes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a leading cause of disability in middle-aged and older adults with the prevalence expected to increase by 40% by 2025. This dramatic projected increase in OA reflects, in large part, the alarming obesity epidemic. Indeed, it is now well understood that abnormal loading across the knee joint due to malalignment and/or excessive weight gain is responsible for accelerating OA progression. Consequently, there is a therapeutic need for alternative knee OA treatments that directly address joint overload to fill the gap between ineffective conservative care and invasive joint-modifying surgical procedures. We describe two cases that presented with bilateral knee OA resistant to conservative treatments, each with one knee previously and unsuccessfully treated with high tibial osteotomy to improve alignment and the contralateral knee successfully treated with a joint-preserving, load-absorbing implant (KineSpring Knee Implant System.

  12. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  13. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  14. Knee joint vibroarthrographic signal processing and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the cutting-edge technologies of knee joint vibroarthrographic signal analysis for the screening and detection of knee joint injuries. It describes a number of effective computer-aided methods for analysis of the nonlinear and nonstationary biomedical signals generated by complex physiological mechanics. This book also introduces several popular machine learning and pattern recognition algorithms for biomedical signal classifications. The book is well-suited for all researchers looking to better understand knee joint biomechanics and the advanced technology for vibration arthrometry. Dr. Yunfeng Wu is an Associate Professor at the School of Information Science and Technology, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, China.

  15. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA.

  16. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  17. Bicompartmental individualized knee replacement : Use of patient-specific implants and instruments (iDuo™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, A F; Beckmann, J; Holzapfel, B M; Rudert, M; Arnholdt, J

    2017-02-01

    Bicompartmental knee replacement in patients with combined osteoarthritis (OA) of the medial or lateral and patellofemoral compartment. Patient-specific instruments and implants (ConforMIS iDuo™) with a planning protocol for optimal implant fit. Bicompartmental OA of the knee (Kellgren & Lawrence stage IV) affecting both the medial or lateral and patellofemoral compartment after unsuccessful conservative or joint-preserving surgery. Tricompartmental OA, knee ligament instabilities, knee deformities >15° (varus, valgus, extension deficit). Relative contraindication: body mass index >40; prior unicompartmental knee replacement or osteotomies. Midline or parapatellar medial skin incision, medial arthrotomy; identify mechanical contact zone of the intact femoral condyle (linea terminalis); remove remaining cartilage and all osteophytes that may interfere with the correct placement of the individually designed instruments. Balance knee in extension with patient-specific balancing chips. Resection of proximal tibia with an individual cutting block; confirm axial alignment using an extramedullary alignment guide, balance flexion gap using spacer blocks in 90° flexion. Final femur preparation with resection of the anterior trochlea. After balancing and identification of insert heights, final tibial preparation is performed. Implant is cemented in 45° of knee flexion. Remove excess cement and final irrigation, followed by closure. Sterile wound dressing; compressive bandage. No limitation of active/passive range of motion (ROM). Partial weight bearing the first 2 weeks, then transition to full weight bearing. Follow-up directly after surgery, at 12 and 52 weeks, then every 1-2 years. In all, 44 patients with bicompartmental OA of the medial and patellofemoral compartment were treated. Mean age 59 years. Minimum follow-up 12 months. Implant converted to TKA due to tibial loosening (1 patient); patella resurfacing (3 patients). No further revisions or

  18. The Relation Between Volume of ACL Reconstruction and Future Knee Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W.; Marx, Robert G.; Dempsey, Brendan; Ge, Yile; Lyman, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A large body of volume-outcomes literature has now demonstrated a strong positive relationship between increasing annual surgical volume and improved patient outcomes across a wide variety of surgical procedures, including orthopedics. Unfortunately, most previous research has been limited by methods that arbitrarily assign cutoffs of “low” or “high” volume that may not be clinically meaningful. Thus, it is unknown how many cases should be performed each year to maintain competence in the procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine meaningful annual volume thresholds for ACL reconstruction. Methods: We identified ACL reconstructions performed in New York (NY) State hospitals between 2003 and 2014 using the NY-SPARCS hospital in-patient and ambulatory surgery database. These cases were followed until subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery (revision ACL, meniscus/cartilage surgery, or total knee replacement) or until the end of the study period, December 31, 2014. Surgeon volume was calculated as the number of ACL reconstructions performed by that surgeon in the 365 days prior to the case of interest. Stratum specific likelihood ratio (SSLR) analysis is a method to identify clinically meaningful cutpoints by correlating volume with outcomes through evaluating a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to measure the effect of surgeon annual ACL reconstruction volume on risk of subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery adjusting for patient characteristics: age, sex, race, and insurance type. Results: Between 2003 and 2014, 77,899 ACL reconstructions were performed in NY State by 1,316 surgeons. Mean patient age was 30.8+/- 12.5 years, and patients were 61% male, 65% white race, and 74% covered by private insurance. SSLR analysis revealed 2 meaningful cutpoints in risk of subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery: 17 & 35 cases per year. The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated a 29% decreased risk

  19. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Klenow, Tyler D; Kahle, Jason T; Wernke, Matthew M; Carey, Stephanie L; Miro, Rebecca M; Lura, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds.

  20. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.;

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  2. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  3. Interior Design: Revision as Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smede, Shelly D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author teaches her eighth-grade students to revise their writing, providing "working revision days" in class, offering direction and structure, and thereby helping students learn how much impact going back to a piece of writing and making sweeping changes can have on the end result. (SR)

  4. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, M. J.; Nutton, R. W.; Wade, F. A.; Evans, S. L.; Pankaj, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Up to 40% of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) revisions are performed for unexplained pain which may be caused by elevated proximal tibial bone strain. This study investigates the effect of tibial component metal backing and polyethylene thickness on bone strain in a cemented fixed-bearing medial UKA using a finite element model (FEM) validated experimentally by digital image correlation (DIC) and acoustic emission (AE). Materials and Methods A total of ten composite tibias implanted with all-polyethylene (AP) and metal-backed (MB) tibial components were loaded to 2500 N. Cortical strain was measured using DIC and cancellous microdamage using AE. FEMs were created and validated and polyethylene thickness varied from 6 mm to 10 mm. The volume of cancellous bone exposed to 3000 µε and > 7000 µε maximum principal (tensile) microstrain was computed. Results Experimental AE data and the FEM volume of cancellous bone with compressive strain FEM data correlated: R = 0.838, R2 = 0.702, percentage error 4.5% (p FEM strain patterns included MB lateral edge concentrations; AP concentrations at keel, peg and at the region of load application. Cancellous strains were higher in AP implants at all loads: 2.2- (10 mm) to 3.2-times (6 mm) the volume of cancellous bone compressively strained < -7000 µε. Conclusion AP tibial components display greater volumes of pathologically overstrained cancellous bone than MB implants of the same geometry. Increasing AP thickness does not overcome these pathological forces and comes at the cost of greater bone resection. Cite this article: C. E. H. Scott, M. J. Eaton, R. W. Nutton, F. A. Wade, S. L. Evans, P. Pankaj. Metal-backed versus all-polyethylene unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: Proximal tibial strain in an experimentally validated finite element model. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:22–30. DOI:10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0142.R1 PMID:28077394

  5. OSTEOARTICULAR ALLOGRAFTS IN PAEDIATRIC BONE TUMOR RECONSTRUCTION OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanacci, D A; Dursky, S; Totti, F; Frenos, F; Scoccianti, G; Beltrami, G; Capanna, R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarticular allografts represent a reconstructive option after bone tumor resection around the knee in growing children. The major advantage is the chance to preserve the growth plate of the remaining bone, but the disadvantage is the high failure rate eventually requiring definitive prosthetic replacement at skeletal maturity. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients who underwent osteoarticular allograft reconstructions of the distal femur (16) or proximal tibia (6). There were 12 females and 10 males with an average age at surgery of 11 years (7-15). The diagnosis was osteosarcoma in 19 cases and Ewing sarcoma in 3. All patients underwent pre- and post-operative chemotherapy. At an average follow-up of 103 months (12-167), 18 patients (82%) were alive and 4 had died (18%). We observed 10 allograft failures requiring prosthetic replacement, 6 in distal femur and 4 in proximal tibia reconstructions. At last follow-up 8 allografts (36%) were still in place. Overall allograft survival was 79.6% at five and 45.8% at ten years. In distal femur, allograft survival was 86.2% at five and 59.1% at ten years. In proximal tibia, allograft survival was 62.5% at 5 years and 31.2% at 67 months. Average limb shortening was 3 cm (0- 5) in 8 patients with the allograft still in situ and 2 cm (0-4) in 10 patients after prosthetic replacement. Average MSTS functional score of the whole series was 25 (83.7%). The MSTS score of patients after revision with prosthetic replacement was 24 (80%) while patients who still had the allograft retained had an average MSTS scores of 26.8 (89.3%). In conclusion, osteoarticular allograft reconstruction of the knee after bone tumor resection in pediatric age can be considered a temporary solution with the aim to limit limb length discrepancy before definitive prosthetic replacement after skeletal maturity.

  6. Update management below knee intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2009-02-01

    The application of percutaneous techniques for the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) has gained widespread interest over the last decade. Together with the development of new endovascular tools and with an increasing operator experience, the minimal invasive percutaneous therapy became first line therapy at many institutions. Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) due to infrapopliteal lesions are often no good candidates infra-geniculate bypass surgery (IBS), as they often present with prohibitive comorbidities, inadequate conduit, and lack of suitable distal targets for revascularization. Therefore, CLI patients due to blockage of below-the-knee (BTK) arteries are in benefit of the endovascular approach: it offers the advantages of local anesthesia, potentially reduced costs (even anticipating the need for reintervention in many patients), shorter hospital stays The current article provides an overview of the diagnosis and endovascular treatment strategies for infrapopliteal lesions in patients with CLI and gives recommendations for future infrapopliteal device technology advancements.

  7. Lockable Knee Brace Speeds Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center develops key transportation and propulsion technologies for the Space Agency. The Center manages propulsion hardware and technologies of the space shuttle, develops the next generation of space transportation and propulsion systems, oversees science and hardware development for the International Space Station, manages projects and studies that will help pave the way back to the Moon, and handles a variety of associated scientific endeavors to benefit space exploration and improve life here on Earth. It is a large and diversified center, and home to a great wealth of design skill. Some of the same mechanical design skill that made its way into the plans for rocket engines and advanced propulsion at this Alabama-based NASA center also worked its way into the design of an orthotic knee joint that is changing the lives of people with weakened quadriceps.

  8. Osteonecrosis in the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, M.

    1981-12-01

    The following forms are discussed: spontaneous osteonecrosis (Ahlbaeck's necrosis), which extends subchondrally into one of the femur condyles. It usually occurs in older patients, especially females. Blunt trauma may cause similar lesions. These often occur with cartilage and bone avulsions (flake fractures), which are often diagnosed much later (arthroscopy). Patellar chondropathy is increasing in frequency due to more intensive participation in sports. Pain localized at the apex of the patella (patellar apex syndrome) can develop from chondropathy, tendon lesions or primary juvenile necrosis of the patellar apex. Gas emboli occur near the knee joint during deep sea diving. Similar cartilage infarctions are seen in many hemoglobinopathies. The incidence of this is increasing due to the increased number of people immigrating from regions where these diseases are common. We have also observed vascular juvenile lesions of the epi- and metaphyses in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber's syndrome. Their radiological appearance is similar to that of necroses.

  9. Surgical scar revision: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods.

  10. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee......Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI...... osteoarthritis according to the ACR criteria. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed. Subjects walked barefoot at self-selected walking speed. The first peak magnitude KI from all three planes were calculated using inverse dynamics. Results Frontal plane kinematics contributed with 59.3% (SD 25.6) of KI...

  11. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  12. Knee System Utilizing Personalized Solutions Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTUNE® Knee System utilizing the TRUMATCH® Personalized Solutions Instrumentation Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  14. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  15. Knee tuberculosis masquerading as pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Meena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence, which is attributable to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and immigration from endemic areas. Tuberculous arthritis is difficult to diagnose early because of its atypical insidious clinical manifestations and nonspecific imaging findings. TB is also known as the ′great mimicker′. Specifically, monoarticular tuberculosis of the knee may mimic pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS. The present report describes a young patient with tuberculous arthritis of knee joint. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate management was delayed due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, such as, hemosiderin deposits and a nodular mass around the knee joint, suggestive of a diffuse type of PVNS. Our findings suggest that the first step in the diagnosis of tuberculous knee arthritis is to have a high index of suspicion.

  16. Is Running Bad for Your Knees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162903.html Is Running Bad for Your Knees? Study suggests it may ... THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, ...

  17. Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164282.html Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success Results similar after procedure to repair meniscus in ... the surgery and they would have the same success as someone who is not as heavy," he ...

  18. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties in partici...

  19. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  20. Multiligament Injury of the Knee. First Intrarticular or Posterior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Show our experience about the multiligament injury of the knee. In the surgical technique it is most popular and recommended stabilized first all posterior and lateral (Ligament cruciate Posterior (LCP) and postero-lateral corner) if is a case. We show our experience stabilized first all intra-articular ACL and LCP. Methods: Prospective study and Case Series. The study includes, 45 cases in 15 years of experience. The patients have two or more ligaments with rupture, and associated lesions, like meniscus, cartilages, fractures, etc. 45 cases with a ACL rupture, 40 PCL, 7 posteromedial corner, 25 postero-lateral corner, 30 meniscus medial, 28 meniscus lateral, 1 vascular lesion, and 3 fibular nerve. In the surgical technique always use autograft. Prefer hamstrings, quadricipital tendon, contralateral hamstrings, BTB and sometimes peroneus brevis. We hope 1 or 2 weeks for the surgery. I never use pump, and use tourniquet for two hours. We start for the meniscus lesions and cartilage lesion and first reconstruction ligaments intra-articular. Finalized we open the tourniquet and stabilized the postero-lateral o posteromedial corner if is necessary. In the first cases we did a surgery in two times, but now we stabilized in one surgical time. Results: 3 to 6 days in the hospital 2 weeks immobilized and star rehabilitation with brace for more two weeks. Use crutches for 4-6 weeks. Worked in rehabilitation for a one year and star competition in one year. Complications: 1 case of amputation for vascular lesion, 9 arthrofibrosis, 2 medial instability, 1 lateral instability and1 LCP instability. One case needs a revision two years after the first surgery, for a new trauma in the work. All other cases had a new surgery for revision the residual instability. Conclusion: The multiligament injury of the knee it is not frequently, but every year I receive more cases, and more difficult. In the surgical technique have two options. The more recommended stabilized first

  1. POST TRAUMATIC KNEE FRACTURE ( X-RAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jalaja Prakash.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 51 year old male patient met with a road traffic accident on August 2010. On examination thepatient was unable to stand and walk. His right knee was swollen and complained of pain withinstability. The X-Ray of patient showed transverse fracture of patella along with comminutedfracture of lower end of femur. He was treated with “K” wire and internal fixation. The patient wasadvised early physiotherapy which include range of motion exercises, knee strengthening and gaittraining.

  2. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundu Z

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods : 22 male patients (age range 20-45 years with posttraumatic knee stiffness following distal femoral fractures underwent Thompson′s quadricepsplasty where knee flexion range was less than 45°. The index injury in these patients was treated with plaster cast (n=5, plates (n=3, intramedullary nailing (n=3 and external fixator for open fractures (n=9. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty was performed in all the patients using anterior approach, with incision extending from upper thigh to tibial tubercle. Release of rectus femoris from underlying vastus intermedius and release of intraarticular adhesions were performed. After surgery the patients needed parentral analgesia for three days and then oral analgesics for three weeks. Active assisted knee mobilization exercises were started on the first post-operative day. Continous passive motion machine was used from the same day. Supervised physiotherapy was continued in hospital for six weeks followed by intensive knee flexion and extension exercise including cycling at home for atleast another six months. Results : Out of 22 patients, 20 had excellent to good results and two patients had poor results using criteria devised by Judet. One poor result was due to peroperative fracture of patella which was then internally fixed and hence the flexion of knee could not be started immediately. There was peroperative avulsion of tibial tuberosity in another patient who finally gained less than 50° knee flexion and hence a poor result. Conclusion : Thompsons quadricepsplasty followed by a strict and rigourous

  3. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    OpenAIRE

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Knight, Kenneth L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the kne...

  4. Battling Obesity : efforts in preventing knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Bastiaan

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis describes the results of the first preventive randomized controlled trial worldwide in the field of knee osteoarthritis. The preventive effectiveness of a tailor-made lifestyle intervention, consisting of diet and exercise, is described in detail. Short-term results are briefly discussed, but the focus is on long-term results and the achieved behavioural changes in lifestyle. Additionally, the preventive effect of oral glucosamine sulfate on incident knee osteoarth...

  5. Synovial Hemangioma in the Knee: MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial hemangiomas are rare benign tumors of vascular origin. A 23-year-old boy presented with knee pain and swelling. The boy had developed symptoms 18-months earlier. He was diagnosed with synovial hemangioma based on magnetic resonnance imaging examination and histopathologic findings of the arthroscopic biopsy tissue. We present the magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic findings of synovial hemangioma of the knee.

  6. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2004-11-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multibody knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer's CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously.

  7. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Renu, E-mail: renu.chundru@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nardo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.nardo@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nevitt, Michael C., E-mail: MNevitt@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Lynch, John, E-mail: JLynch@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); McCulloch, Charles E., E-mail: CMcCulloch@epi.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: tmlink@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain.

  8. How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

    2010-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone.

  9. What have we learned from 100% success of press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized knees?: A 5-10 years followup by a nondesigner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Virani, Siddharth; Phunde, Rajendra; Mahajan, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total joint arthroplasties of the hip and knee represent a remarkable feat of modern medicine in terms of reducing pain and restoring function to millions of patients afflicted with severe arthritis. Oftentimes, the performance and longevity of new implants and devices are based on limited data. This is the first study by a non-designer on the press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized (PFC-RP-PS) design with 100’ success. This has a relevance, vis-á -vis bias that one may have in terms of reproducibility of technique and funding from the manufacturer. We associate our excellent mid-term results to intra operative technical aspects and stringent intra operative exclusion criteria. Materials and Methods: Our study includes a cohort of 121 selected knees operated between January 2003 and October 2010. We used cemented, posterior stabilized (PS), mobile bearing (MB), and RP prosthesis from the same manufacturer in all these 121 knees. The patients were evaluated bi-annually with the calculation of their Knee Society Scores (KSS) and a radiological assessment for loosening/osteolysis. Results: 120 knees were available for followup. The average Knee Society clinical and functional scores, respectively, were 27 points and 40 points preoperatively and 93 points and 95 points postoperatively. This indicates a mean increase of about 71’ in the clinical score and about 58’ in the functional score, which is statistically significant. The mean postoperative flexion was 124°, a mean increase of 23° from the preoperative flexion of 101°. There were no revisions (Kaplan-–Meier survivorship of 100’). Conclusions: We feel durable and reproducible results of PFC-RP-PS design knees are very technique sensitive. The way ahead with the PFC-RP-PS knees looks promising when the exclusion criteria for this design are strictly met. Coming from a non-designer, this study acquires a higher degree of relevance without any designer's or manufacturer

  10. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Patella Eversion Reduces Early Knee Range of Motion and Muscle Torque Recovery after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Comparison between Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty and Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokifumi Majima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that patella eversion during total knee arthroplasty (TKA reduces early return of active knee extension and flexion, quadriceps muscle strength, and postoperative pain. In 100 conventional TKA knees and 100 minimally invasive TKA (MIS TKA knees, we compared knee range of motion (ROM, postoperative pain, and quadriceps muscle strength at 1 day, 4 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, 1 year, and 5 years after surgery. The differences of surgical approach between MIS TKA and conventional TKA of this study are length of skin incision with subcutaneal flap and patella eversion. In MIS TKA, skin incision is shorter than conventional TKA. Furthermore, patella is not everted in MIS TKA procedure. There were no significant differences in preoperative factors. Postoperative improvement of ROM, postoperative muscle strength recovery, and postoperative improvement of visual analog scale were faster in patients with MIS TKA when compared to that in patients with conventional TKA. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in complication, 5-year clinical results of subjective knee function score, and the postoperative component angle and lower leg alignment. These results indicate that patella eversion may affect muscle strength recovery and postoperative pain.

  12. Serum Metal Ion Concentrations in Paediatric Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Megaprostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Friesenbichler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum in the serum of paediatric tumour patients after fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty. Further, these metal ion levels were compared with serum metal ion levels of patients with other orthopaedic devices such as hip and knee prostheses with metal-on-metal or metal-on-polyethylene articulation to find differences between anatomical locations, abrasion characteristics, and bearing surfaces. After an average follow-up of 108 months (range: 67 to 163 of 11 paediatric patients with fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty, the mean concentrations for Co and Cr were significantly increased while Mo was within the limits compared to the upper values from the reference laboratory. Furthermore, these serum concentrations were significantly higher compared to patients with a standard rotating hinge device (P=0.002 and P<0.001 and preoperative controls (P<0.001. On the other hand, the serum levels of patients following MoM THA or rotating hinge arthroplasty using megaprostheses were higher. Therefore, periodic long-term follow-ups are recommended due to the rising concerns about systemic metal ion exposure in the literature. Upon the occurrence of adverse reactions to metal debris the revision of the fixed hinge implant should be considered.

  13. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  14. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  15. Opinions among Danish knee surgeons about indications to perform total knee replacement showed considerable variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Schrøder, Henrik; Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, the incidence of primary total knee replacement (TKA) surgery in Denmark has approximately doubled. This increase could be due to weakened indications to perform TKA surgery. We aimed to investigate variation in opinions about indications to perform TKA among Danish knee...

  16. Correlation between subcutaneous knee fat thickness and chondromalacia patellae on magnetic resonance imaging of the knee.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-08-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a common cause of anterior knee pain in young patients and can be detected noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the correlation between subcutaneous fat thickness around the knee joint on axial MRIs as a surrogate marker of obesity, with the presence or absence of chondromalacia patellae.

  17. The knee adduction moment measured with an instrumented force shoe in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den Josien C.; Esch, van der Martin; Steultjens, Martijn P.M.; Dekker, Joost; Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Peter H.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    The external knee adduction moment (KAdM) during gait is an important parameter in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). KAdM measurement is currently restricted to instruments only available in gait laboratories. However, ambulatory movement analysis technology, including instrumented force shoes

  18. Effects of prophylactic knee bracing on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan K; Vincent, Hayley; Richards, Jim D

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a prophylactic knee brace on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements. Repeated measures. Laboratory. Twenty university first team level female netball players. Participants performed three movements, run, cut and vertical jump under two conditions (brace and no-brace). 3-D knee joint kinetics and kinematics were measured using an eight-camera motion analysis system. Knee joint kinetics and kinematics were examined using 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA whilst the subjective ratings of comfort and stability were investigated using chi-squared tests. The results showed no differences (p > 0.05) in knee joint kinetics. However the internal/external rotation range of motion was significantly (p knee brace improved knee stability in all movements. Further study is required to determine whether reductions in transverse plane knee range of motion serve to attenuate the risk from injury in netballers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure... as measured with the test probe-mounted accelerometer must be not less than 3450 N (776 lbf) and not... tibia may contact any exterior surface. (3) Align the test probe so that throughout its stroke and...

  20. Knee extensor strength and risk of structural, symptomatic and functional decline in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Ruhdorfer, Anja; Juhl, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: Meta-analysis showed that lower knee extensor strength is associated with an increased risk of symptomatic and functional deterioration, but not tibiofemoral JSN. The risk of patellofemoral deterioration in the presence of knee extensor strength deficits is inconclusive. This article is protected...

  1. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase ago...

  2. Knee extensor muscle weakness is a risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oiestad, B E; Juhl, C B; Eitzen, I

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor muscle weakness and the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with literature searches in Medline, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, C...

  3. Total knee arthroplasty for treatment of post-traumatic arthritis: Systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hesham; Yu, Stephen; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review and report functional outcomes, complications, and survivorship associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the treatment of post-traumatic arthritis (PTA). METHODS We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS in December 2015 for English-language clinical research studies, both prospective and retrospective, examining the use of TKA for the treatment of PTA. All relevant articles were accessed in full. The manual search included references of retrieved articles. We extracted data on patients’ demographics and clinical outcomes, including preoperative diagnosis and pre- and post-operative functional scores. We summarized the data and reported the results in tables and text. RESULTS Sixteen studies, four prospective and ten retrospective, examined patients who underwent TKA for PTA due to fractures of the proximal tibia, patella, and/or distal femur. Eleven studies utilized the Knee Society Scores criteria to assess functional outcomes. All studies utilizing these criteria reported an improvement in functional and knee scores of patients following TKA. Further, studies reported an increased range of motion (ROM) and reduction of pain following surgery. The most commonly reported complications with TKA included infection, stiffness, wound complications, intraoperative rupture of tendons, and osteolysis/polyethylene wear. The overwhelming majority of these complications occurred within the first two years following surgery. Six studies examined the survivorship of TKA with subsequent revision for any reason as an endpoint. Compared to patients with osteoarthritis, patients with PTA required more revisions, the majority for polyethylene wear. CONCLUSION Although associated with higher complication rates, TKA is an effective treatment for PTA, as it improves ROM, pain and functional outcomes. PMID:27672572

  4. Predictors of participation in sports after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel H; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive P; Garbuz, Donald S

    2012-02-01

    While the primary objective of joint arthroplasty is to improve patient quality of life, pain, and function, younger active patients often demand a return to higher function that includes sporting activity. Knowledge of rates and predictors of return to sports will help inform expectations in patients anticipating return to sports after joint arthroplasty. We measured the rate of sports participation at 1 year using the UCLA activity score and explored 11 variables, including choice of procedure/prosthesis, that might predict return to a high level of sporting activity, when controlling for potential confounding variables. We retrospectively evaluated 736 patients who underwent primary metal-on-polyethylene THA, metal-on-metal THA, hip resurfacing arthroplasty, revision THA, primary TKA, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and revision TKA between May 2005 and June 2007. We obtained UCLA activity scores on all patients; we defined high activity as a UCLA score of 7 or more. We evaluated patient demographics (age, sex, BMI, comorbidity), quality of life (WOMAC score, Oxford Hip Score, SF-12 score), and surgeon- and procedural/implant-specific variables to identify factors associated with postoperative activity score. Minimum followup was 11 months (mean, 12.1 months; range, 11-13 months). Preoperative UCLA activity score, age, male sex, and BMI predicted high activity scores. The type of operation and implant characteristics did not predict return to high activity sports. Our data suggest patient-specific factors predict postoperative activity rather than factors specific to type of surgery, implant, or surgeon factors. Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  6. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  7. Design of a Knee Exoskeleton Using Foot Pressure and Knee Torque Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of a modular knee exoskeleton system that supports the knee joints of hemiplegic patients. The device is designed to realize the polycentric motion of real human knees using a fourbar linkage and to minimize its total weight. In order to determine the user’s intention, force-sensitive resistors (FSRs in the user’s insole, a torque sensor on the robot knee joint, and an encoder in the motor are used. The control algorithm is based on a finite state machine (FSM, where the force control, position control and virtual damping control are applied in each state. The proposed hardware design and algorithm are verified by performing experiments on the standing, walking and sitting motion controls while wearing the knee exoskeleton.

  8. Translation and validation of the new version of the Knee Society Score - The 2011 KS Score - into Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana Lucia Pastore E; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Pecora, José Ricardo; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2017-01-01

    Translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of the new version of the Knee Society Score - The 2011 KS Score - into Brazilian Portuguese and verification of its measurement properties, reproducibility, and validity. In 2012, the new version of the Knee Society Score was developed and validated. This scale comprises four separate subscales: (a) objective knee score (seven items: 100 points); (b) patient satisfaction score (five items: 40 points); (c) patient expectations score (three items: 15 points); and (d) functional activity score (19 items: 100 points). A total of 90 patients aged 55-85 years were evaluated in a clinical cross-sectional study. The pre-operative translated version was applied to patients with TKA referral, and the post-operative translated version was applied to patients who underwent TKA. Each patient answered the same questionnaire twice and was evaluated by two experts in orthopedic knee surgery. Evaluations were performed pre-operatively and three, six, or 12 months post-operatively. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between the two applications. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha. The ICC found no difference between the means of the pre-operative, three-month, and six-month post-operative evaluations between sub-scale items. The Brazilian Portuguese version of The 2011 KS Score is a valid and reliable instrument for objective and subjective evaluation of the functionality of Brazilian patients who undergo TKA and revision TKA.

  9. The association between submaximal quadriceps force steadiness and the knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Langberg, Henning; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between quadriceps force steadiness and knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that quadriceps force steadiness is impaired in patients with knee......, and knee pain was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain subscale and a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Regression analyses showed that quadriceps force steadiness did not predict the peak knee adduction moment (adjusted R2 = 0.05, P = .41). Inclusion of covariates did...

  10. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  11. Total knee arthroplasty using computer assisted navigation in patients with severe valgus deformity of the knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jun-jie; ZHANG Xian-long; WANG Qi; CHEN Yun-su; SHEN Hao; JIANG Yao

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe valgus deformity often has bone defect and laxity of the medial ligamentous, and total knee arthroplasty in severe valgus knee is, in most cases, more challenging for surgeons. The usefulness of a computer assisted navigation system in reestablishing the mechanical axis has been well established. Hence, the interest for surgeons is how the navigation system makes the procedure of total knee arthroplasty with severe valgus knee easier.Methods From June 2006 to March 2008 in Department of Joint Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, 6 patients (7 knees) with severe valgus knee underwent total knee arthroplasty using the Stryker Navigation system, which is an active wireless and imageless system. All the patients were followed up for 12 to 18 months after surgery. The X-ray radiographs for whole limbs were obtained on all patients to determine preoperative and postoperative alignments.Results A primary, posterior stabilized prosthesis was utilized in all cases. The average preoperative overall mechanical axis of the seven knees was 19.6°±4.6° of valgus (range 16° to 29°), and the average postoperative mechanical axis was 0.4°±0.7° (range 0.8° varus to 1.4° valgus ).Conclusions The navigation system is a very effective and useful tool for accurate intraoperative restoration of alignment in the face of significant deformity with valgus knee. To prevent component malposition, we did not reduce the knee before solidification of bone cement but controlled alignment using the navigation system up to implantation of the final component.

  12. Subsequent Surgery after Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, David; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Failure or reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can lead to recurrent instability and concomitant intra-articular injuries. While revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) can be performed to restore knee stability and improve patient activity level, outcomes after these surgeries are reported to be inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. Further reoperation after rACLR can have an even more profound effect on patient satisfaction and outcome. Yet, there is a current lack of information regarding the rate and risk factors for subsequent surgery after rACLR. Methods: 1205 patients who underwent rACLR were enrolled between 2006 and 2011, comprising the prospective cohort. Two-year questionnaire follow-up was obtained on 989 (82%), while telephone follow-up was obtained on 1112 (92%). If a patient reported having a subsequent surgery, operative reports detailing the subsequent procedure(s) were obtained and categoriezed. A repeated meaures ANOVA was used to reveal significatnt differences in patient reported outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for reoperation. Results: One hundred and twenty-two patients (10.1%) underwent a total of 172 subsequent procedures on the ipsilateral knee at 2-year follow-up. Of the reoperation procedures, 26.7% were meniscus procedures (69% meniscectomy, 26% repair), 18.6% were subsequent rACLR, 17.4% were cartilage procedures (61% chondroplasty, 17% microfracture, and 13% mosaicplasty), 10% hardware removal, and 9.3% were procedures for arthrofibrosis such has lysis of adhesions and synovectomy. Patients who had reoperations had significantly lower IKDC, KOOS symptoms and pain scores, and WOMAC stiffness scores at two-year follow up. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients under 20 years old were 2.1 times more likely than patients aged 20-29 to have a reoperation. Use of allograft at the time of rACLR and staged revision (bone grafting of

  13. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  14. 170 - 174_Yarube_revised

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    acquisition, organization, utilization, and revision of knowledge ... The test was originally developed for use in rats to overcome stress ..... insulin or insulin resistance is associated with memory ... cerebral atrophy and white matter changes.

  15. Short-term survival analysis of the all-polyethylene tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Bin; YANG Jing; PEI Fu-xing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiological results of 24 total knee arthroplasty in which all-polyethylene tibial components were used. Methods: Between December 2000 and December 2002, 24 cemented total knee arthroplasty in 21 patients were performed using all-polyethylene tibial components. The mean age of the 21 patients (9 men and 12 women) at operation was 55 years, ranging 48-61 years. The mean preoperative hospital for special surgery (HSS)score was 40.2 (range, 36-43). The diagnoses were degenerative osteoarthritis in 15 patients, rheumatoid arthritis in 5 and traumatic arthritis in 1. All the operations were performed by the same surgeon group and there were unilateral operations in 18 patients and bilateral operations in 3.Results: Eighteen patients were followed up with a follow-up rate of 85.7%. The mean follow-up is 2.5 years (range, 1-3 years) and mean postoperative HSS scores was 87.5 (range, 83-89). Among them, 18 were excellent, 3 good, 3 poor and none was fair (the results of three lost patients were classified as poor). Of those reviewed, the prosthesis was all in situ and no revision occurred. Radiological assessment of these patients revealed 4 (16.67%) tibial components with radiolucent lines (mean width≤2 mm) distributed mainly in zone 1 and zone 4. None of these knees was symptomatic.Conclusions: The result of total knee arthroplasty using all-polyethylene tibial components is encouraging. The operative techniques are similar to those in arthroplasty using metal-backed tibial component.

  16. Analysis of the efficacy and prognosis of limb-salvage surgery for osteosarcoma around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P X; Yong, B C; Wang, J; Huang, G; Yin, J Q; Zou, C Y; Xie, X B; Tang, Q L; Shen, J N

    2012-12-01

    Limb-salvage surgery has become the standard of care for extremity osteosarcoma. In this study, we investigated the survival and functional outcomes of patients with osteosarcoma around the knee who were treated with limb-salvage surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data for 120 patients with osteosarcoma around the knee who were treated with limb-salvage surgery between 1998 and 2008. The sample included 75 males and 45 females. The mean age of the patients was 18.9 years. Osteosarcoma was diagnosed in the distal femur in 78 patients and in the proximal tibia in 42 patients. Statistical analyses were conducted to process and record the patient data and analyse the surgery's efficacy, prognosis and survival rates. All patients were followed for 6-144 months (mean of 56.8 months). The overall 5-year survival rate was 61.8%. Lung metastasis developed in 31 patients. Local recurrence developed in 9 patients. The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score (MSTS) was 25.5 points on a 30-point scale. Sixteen patients underwent prosthesis revision and twelve patients underwent amputation. The overall survivorship of the prosthesis based on Kaplan-Meier estimates was 77% at five years and 71% at ten years. There was a higher incidence of extensor lag for the patients with osteosarcoma in the proximal tibia than for those with osteosarcoma in the distal femur (P osteosarcoma around the knee with limb-salvage surgery can preserve most of the knee's functionality. Attention must be paid to prevent the relatively high incidence of postoperative complications. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pressure sore revision surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsche, Karin Marion

    2010-02-22

    Pressure sores are a major problem for patients as well as society in general. Immobilised patients are especially at risk. This group of patients with pressure sores should be hospitalised to perform surgical revision of the wound and reconstruction using a flap. Such surgery demands extensive postoperative relief of the flap. The University Centre for Wound Healing at Odense University Hospital has tested the effects of a reduction of the formerly recommended relief period from three to two weeks. In this article we report results covering all patients who have undergone surgery and reconstruction of pressure sores during the period from 1st October 2001 to 1st November 2008. The results are divided into two periods: the period before and the period after the introduction of the reduced relief period. A total of 80 patients were included; 34 in the first period and 46 in the second period. We achieved a considerable reduction in median length of stay from 38 to 27 days with no increase in surgical or complication frequency. Furthermore, the share of fully healed remained unchanged. We believe that there is no risk in shortening the immobile postoperative relief phase following reconstruction of pressure wounds in immobilised patients.

  18. Revision du Genre Aseraggodes Kaup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanaud, P.

    1930-01-01

    Le présent travail comprend la définition du genre Aseraggodes Kaup et la revision, sous forme d'une clef dichotomique, de toutes les espèces qui le composent, revision établie d'après les types eux-mêmes de ces espèces. Ce genre Aseraggodes appartient à la famille des Soleidae et à la sousfamille

  19. A study on scar revision

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh Talwar; Neerja Puri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims:...

  20. Varus thrust in women with early medial knee osteoarthritis and its relation with the external knee adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Armaghan; van Dieen, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Baert, Isabel Ac; Faber, Gert S; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Sabine Mp

    2016-11-01

    Varus thrust, defined as an abrupt increase of the knee varus angle during weight-bearing in gait, has been shown to be present in patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis and is considered to be one of the risk factors for progression of symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis. We evaluated the presence and magnitude of varus thrust and its relation with the Knee Adduction Moment in women with early medial knee osteoarthritis, and compared it to that in a group of controls and in a group of subjects with established medial knee osteoarthritis. Twenty-seven women with early medial knee osteoarthritis, 20 women with established medial knee osteoarthritis and 24 asymptomatic controls were evaluated. Varus thrust was estimated as an increase of the knee varus angle during the weight-bearing phase of gait at self-selected speed, assessed by 3D motion analysis. Varus thrust was significantly higher in both early and established osteoarthritis groups compared to the control group (Pthrust was significantly correlated with the second peak knee adduction moment. Higher varus thrust was found both in early and established stages of knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that problems with dynamic stabilization of the knee are present early in the development of knee osteoarthritis. This highlights the necessity of considering dynamic alignment in rehabilitation already in the early stages of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Taking Opioids Before Knee Surgery Could Raise Pain Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedure. Knee replacement is used to treat knee osteoarthritis. But patients spend an average of 13 years before surgery using non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, injections and painkillers, the study authors noted. "Although ...

  2. Functional state of knee arthritis patients and related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study is to provide a direction for efficient management of arthritis through the analysis of multiple factors related to the functional state of patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Visual Analog Scale, Knee Society Knee Score & Function Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Short Form-36 Health Survey and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index for a total of 135 patients with knee arthritis were determined with a survey. [Results] There is a significant correlation between age, pain, Knee Society Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Knee Society Function Score, and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score. [Conclusion] It is necessary to improve the factors that affect knee function and quality of life, and a study on knee joint muscle strength is suggested as a follow-up study. PMID:28265166

  3. The Optimal Analgesic Block for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Thomas Fichtner; Moriggl, Bernhard; Chan, Vincent W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve block for total knee arthroplasty is ideally motor sparing while providing effective postoperative analgesia. To achieve these goals, one must understand surgical dissection techniques, distribution of nociceptive generators, sensory innervation of the knee, and nerve topography ...

  4. Myofascial Pain in Patients Waitlisted for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA.

  5. Is cold therapy really efficient after knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kuyucu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: After knee arthroplasty, the preoperative and postoperative use of cryotherapy is effective in terms of the pain control and functional knee scores without a significant change in surgical blood loss.

  6. [Patella fractures in knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A; Ghanem, M; Fakler, J

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic patella fractures occur both with and without retropatellar joint replacement. A non-operative treatment yields satisfactory results with low morbidity. It can be applied in minimally displaced fractures that have an intact retropatellar component and an intact extensor mechanism, combined with an initial immobilization. The surgical treatment is associated with relatively poor results and with high complication rates. There was only minor improvement of functional results, no matter which surgical technique was used. Surgical intervention is still required in fractures with a loosening of the patellar component, considerable dislocations of fragments, and damage to or rupture of the extensor mechanism. In particular, type II fractures require repair of the extensor mechanism and the fracture or patellectomy. Type III fractures require a revision or resection of the patella, a patelloplasty or total patellectomy. In addition, early or late reconstruction using allograft to restore the extensor mechanism can be taken in consideration.

  7. Cooling does not affect knee proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmun, J C; Thieme, H A; Ingersoll, C D; Knight, K L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90 degrees to 60 degrees , 60 degrees to 30 degrees , and 30 degrees to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception.

  8. Prevalence of knee bursitis in the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Manac'h, A P; Ha, C; Descatha, A; Imbernon, E; Roquelaure, Y

    2012-12-01

    Knee bursitis (KB) is a common disorder in specific occupations requiring frequent and/or sustained kneeling postures. To assess the prevalence of KB in the general working population. Between 2002 and 2005, a total of 3710 workers of a French region were randomly included in the study. A standardized physical examination of the knee was performed when knee pain was reported by the worker during the preceding 12 months. The criteria for diagnosis of KB were (i) the presence of pain and/or tenderness in the anterior face of the knee at the date of the examination (or for at least 4 days in the preceding week) and (ii) the presence of swelling and/or pressure-induced pain of the pre- or infra-patellar bursa. Occupational risk factors were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of uni- or bilateral cases of knee bursitis was low: 0.6% [0.2-0.9] in men and 0.2% [0.0-0.6] in women. The highest prevalence was observed in the construction sector (2.3% [0.8-5.4]) and in the food and meat processing industries (1.4% [0.4-3.5)]. More blue-collar workers were affected than other occupation categories (0.8% [0.3-1.2] versus 0.1% [0.0-0.4]). The study showed a concentration of cases among male workers exposed to heavy workloads and frequent kneeling.

  9. "Forgotten knee" after total knee replacement: A pragmatic study from a single-centre cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, Florent; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Katsahian, Sandrine; Chevalier, Xavier; Bercovy, Michel

    2015-05-01

    After total knee replacement (TKR), some patients find their operated knee totally natural and can be said to have "forgotten" it, while others, although satisfied with their results, remain conscious of their prosthesis. This is not well assessed on conventional end-points. Since 2001, we have studied the prevalence of "forgotten knee" (FK) after TKR in a prospective pragmatic cohort, with comparison to conventional scores. Patients undergoing TKR were enrolled between January 2001 and January 2008. Preoperative medical history and anthropometric and clinical data were recorded, and composite scores (Knee Society Score (KSS), Lequesne) were assessed. At each follow-up visit, FK acquisition was assessed by the closed question "Do you feel the operated knee to be always normal in all everyday activities?". Five hundred and eighty-four TKRs in 485 patients were included. Among the TKR, 91.6% were performed for severe osteoarthritis of the knee. FK frequency at a mean 75.8 months' follow-up was 42.9% while 86.1% of TKRs had excellent (KS Knee Score (KSKS)>80) or 34.9% perfect (KSKS=100) outcome. Only 66.1% of the 204 TKRs with perfect outcome on KSKS were reported as FK. Most patients achieved FK within 18 months. In this prospective study, 42.9% of TKRs were considered always forgotten in all everyday activities. Copyright © 2014 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The knee pain map: reliability of a method to identify knee pain location and pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura R; Boudreau, Robert; Hannon, Michael J; Newman, Anne B; Chu, Constance R; Jansen, Mary; Nevitt, Michael C; Kwoh, C Kent

    2009-06-15

    To describe the location and pattern of knee pain in patients with chronic, frequent knee pain using the Knee Pain Map, and to evaluate the inter- and intrarater reliability of the map. A cohort of 799 participants from the University of Pittsburgh Osteoarthritis Initiative Clinical Center who had knee pain in the last 12 months were studied. Trained interviewers assessed and recorded participant-reported knee pain patterns into 8 local areas, 4 regional areas, or as diffuse. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed using Fleiss' kappa. Participants most often reported localized (69%) followed by regional (14%) or diffuse (10%) knee pain. In those with localized pain, the most commonly reported locations were the medial (56%) and lateral (43%) joint lines. In those with regional pain, the most commonly reported regions were the patella (44%) and medial region (38%). There was excellent interrater reliability for the identification of localized and regional pain patterns (kappa = 0.7-0.9 and 0.7-0.8, respectively). The interrater reliability for specific locations was also excellent (kappa = 0.7-1.0) when the number of participants with pain in a location was >4. For regional pain, the kappa for specific regions varied from 0.7-1.0. The majority of participants could identify the location of their knee pain, and trained interviewers could reliably record those locations. The variation in locations suggests that there are multiple sources of pain in knee OA. Additional studies are needed to determine whether specific knee pain patterns correlate with discrete pathologic findings on radiographs or magnetic resonance images.

  11. Knee joint anatomy predicts high-risk in vivo dynamic landing knee biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Scott G; Lucey, Sarah M; Rohrer, Suzan; Brandon, Catherine

    2010-10-01

    With knee morphology being a non-modifiable anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factor, its consideration within injury prevention models is limited. Knee anatomy, however, directly influences joint mechanics and the potential for injurious loads. With this in mind, we explored associations between key knee anatomical and three-dimensional biomechanical parameters exhibited during landings. We hypothesized that lateral and medial posterior tibial slopes and their ratio, and tibial plateau width, intercondylar distance and their ratio, were proportional to peak stance anterior knee joint reaction force, knee abduction and internal rotation angles. Twenty recreationally active females (21.2 (1.7) years) had stance phase three-dimensional dominant limb knee biomechanics recorded during ten single leg land-and-cut tasks. Six anatomical indices were quantified for the same limb via a series of two dimensional (sagittal, transverse and coronal) magnetic resonance images. Linear stepwise regression analyses examined which of these anatomical factors were independently associated with each of the three mean subject-based peak knee biomechanical measures. Lateral tibial slope was significantly (Pknee joint reaction force, explaining 60.9% of the variance. Both tibial plateau width:intercondylar distance (Pknee abduction angle, explaining 75.4% of the variance. The medial tibial slope:lateral tibial slope ratio was also significantly (Pknee internal rotation angle, explaining 49.2% of the variance. Knee anatomy is directly associated with high-risk knee biomechanics exhibited during dynamic landings. Continued understanding of multifactorial contributions to the anterior cruciate ligament injury mechanism should dictate future injury screening and prevention efforts in order to successfully cater to individual joint vulnerabilities. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies.

  13. Modeling of the condyle elements within a biomechanical knee model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Ana; Rasmussen, John; Flores, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    The development of a computational multibody knee model able to capture some of the fundamental properties of the human knee articulation is presented. This desideratum is reached by including the kinetics of the real knee articulation. The research question is whether an accurate modeling of the...

  14. Perioperative blood saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstmann, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores and discusses different aspects of blood loss and blood-saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty. Background: Worldwide, approximately 1 million total hip and 1 million total knee prostheses are implanted each year. Total hip arthroplasty and total knee art

  15. Experimental quadriceps muscle pain impairs knee joint control during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans

    2007-01-01

    of the quadriceps muscle, resulting in impaired knee joint control and joint instability during walking. The changes are similar to those observed in patients with knee pain. The loss of joint control during and after pain may leave the knee joint prone to injury and potentially participate in the chronicity...

  16. Atlas-based knee osteophyte assessment with ultrasonography and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koski, J M; Kamel, Ayadi; Waris, P

    2016-01-01

    . METHOD: Forty adult patients with knee pain were enrolled in this study. Knee CR and US scanning of the medial and lateral bone margins were performed on all patients. A novel atlas for the US grading of knee osteophytes was used in the evaluation. The number and size of the osteophytes were evaluated...

  17. Obesity and disability in the symptomatic Irish knee osteoarthritis population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common disorder with significant social and financial implications. Obesity is the strongest modifiable risk factor of knee OA. There is little data on obesity in Irish knee OA populations and its relationship to other measures of disease severity.

  18. Early and late synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C M; Poulsen, S; Ostergren, M

    1991-01-01

    The results after open knee synovectomy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were investigated in a retrospective study including 44 patients with 55 knees. Median observation time was 73 months. Early synovectomy showed significant pain-relief and improvement of knee function, effusion...... treatment has failed. Late synovectomy must be regarded as a palliative procedure in order to postpone TKA....

  19. Material properties of the human posterior knee capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H.H.; Janssen, D.W.; van Tienen, T.; Diercks, R.L.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Fernandes, Paulo; Folgado, Joao; Silva, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest to develop accurate subject-specific biomechanical models of the knee. Most of the existing models currently do not include a representation of the posterior knee capsule. In order to incorporate the posterior capsule in knee models, data is needed on its

  20. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); A. Furlan (Alessandro); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee art

  1. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  2. Congenital fibrous hamartoma of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioni, Cesare; Bellini, Carlo; Risso, Francesco Maria; Scopesi, Fabio; Serra, Giovanni [University of Genoa, Neonatal Pathology Service, Department of Paediatrics, Institute G. Gaslini, Genoa (Italy); Oddone, Mauro; Toma, Paolo [Institute G. Gaslini, Radiology Service, Genoa (Italy); Nozza, Paolo [Institute G. Gaslini, U. O. di Anatomia Patologica, Genoa (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    A full-term male infant presented at birth with a hard swelling of the left knee. The lemon-sized lesion was fixed to the underlying knee muscles, while the overlying skin was stretched and shiny; there was no bruit. Radiography, sonography and MRI suggested a soft-tissue tumour. After surgical excision, histology showed the presence of fibrous and mesenchymal tissue, with mature adipose tissue. Fibrous hamartoma of infancy was diagnosed. Among soft-tissue tumours, fibrous hamartoma of infancy is a rare and benign lesion, occurring in the first 2 years of life. The tumour mainly affects the trunk, axilla, and upper extremities. This infant had unique involvement of the knee. The treatment of choice is local excision. (orig.)

  3. Arthroscopic releases for arthrofibrosis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael R; Dragoo, Jason L

    2011-11-01

    Intra-articular inflammation or fibrosis may lead to decreased soft-tissue and capsular compliance, which may result in pain or loss of motion within the knee. Etiology of intra-articular fibrosis may include isolated anterior interval scarring and posterior capsular contracture, as well as fibrosis that involves the suprapatellar pouch or arthrofibrosis that involves the entire synovial space. Initial nonsurgical management, including compression, elevation, and physical therapy, can decrease knee pain and inflammation and maintain range of motion. Surgical management is indicated in the patient who fails conservative treatment. Surgical options include arthroscopic releases of the anterior interval, posterior capsule, and peripatellar and suprapatellar regions. Recent advances in arthroscopic technique have led to improved outcomes in patients with intra-articular fibrosis of the knee.

  4. Arthrofibrosis of the knee following ligament surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Kenneth E; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Sebastianelli, Wayne J

    2003-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is one of the most serious complications that can result from ligament surgery. Reported incidence of arthrofibrosis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ranges from 4% to 35%. The loss of motion caused by arthrofibrosis can be even more disabling than the instability for which the reconstruction was performed, often requiring extensive physical therapy and/or surgical lysis of adhesions. With aggressive rehabilitation and modifications in the bracing of knees undergoing ligament reconstruction, the incidence of this complication has decreased significantly. Additionally, delaying anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction until the acute inflammatory period has resolved has also been shown to be a significant factor in the reduction of postoperative knee stiffness.

  5. Multicentric giant cell tumor around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgia Anil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multicentric giant cell tumor with synchronous occurrence in all three bones around the knee is reported here in view of its rarity. A 33-year-old average built male reported with complaints of severe pain, gradually increasing swelling around the right knee. A 3 x 2 cm swelling was present on the lateral aspect of the distal end of the right femur and a 3 x 3 cm swelling on the proximal part of the right tibia. Plain X-ray of right knee showed subarticular eccentrically located expansile lytic lesion in the lateral tibia condyle, lateral condyle of femur and patella. Fine needle aspiration cytology and subsequent histology ascertained the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of the bone. The patient was treated successfully with curettage, bone grafting and methyl methacrylate cementing (Sandwich technique.

  6. Patient satisfaction and functional status after treatment of infection at the site of a total knee arthroplasty with use of the PROSTALAC articulating spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, R M Dominic; Masri, Bassam A; Dunlop, David; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; McGraw, Robert; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-10-01

    Two-stage exchange arthroplasty remains the standard treatment of infection at the site of a total knee arthroplasty. The clinical and functional outcomes associated with the use of an articulating antibiotic spacer for two-stage revision for infection are not well established. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the outcomes associated with the use of the PROSTALAC articulating spacer between the first and second stages. Fifty-eight patients underwent two-stage revision total knee arthroplasty for infection between January 1997 and December 1999. Of these, fifty-four were alive at the time of follow-up and forty-seven were available for inclusion in the present retrospective study. In all patients, a prosthesis of antibiotic-loaded acrylic cement (the PROSTALAC system) was implanted during the first stage after débridement. The amount of osteolysis that occurred between the stages and the range of motion of the knee joint were measured. After two years of follow-up, outcomes were assessed with use of the WOMAC, Oxford-12, and SF-12 instruments as well as a satisfaction questionnaire. At a minimum of two years (average, forty-one months) after revision arthroplasty, two patients (4%) had had a recurrence of infection. The amount of bone loss was unchanged between stages, and the range of movement of the knee improved from 78.2 degrees before the first stage to 87.1 degrees at two years. The average normalized WOMAC function and pain scores were 68.9 and 77.1, respectively; the average Oxford-12 score was 67.3; the average SF-12 mental and physical scores were 53.7 and 41.2, respectively; and the average satisfaction score was 71.7. A revision operation for infection at the site of a total knee replacement with use of an articulating spacer was associated with reasonable function and satisfaction scores. These findings may be related to the articulating features of the PROSTALAC system, which permits full active movement of the knee in the early

  7. EFFICIENCY OF USING ULTRASONIC FOR REMOVING BONE CEMENT IN REVISION ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Reznik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment on 5 dogs weighing from 6 to 10 kg the results of applying ultrasonic technology of polymer removal and treatment of bone mantle in revision total hip and knee arthroplasty were examined. As a source of high-amplitude low-frequency ultrasound an ultrasonic surgical apparatus «Tier», operating at 42 kHz, and provides the intensity of exposure at the end of the waveguide to 1200 W / cm2 was applied. The physical parameters of the influence of ultrasound on the bone were studied. The analysis of the rate of removal of the old plastic mantle was performed. The results of experimental and clinical studies proved that the use of ultrasound frequency of 42.5 kHz facilitates the removal of old bone cement in revision arthroplasty of large joints, reduces the duration and severity of the operation.

  8. Re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture in a young professional martial arts athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Bonifazi, A M; Bolle, G; Ferretti, A

    2012-09-01

    A 27-year-old professional martial arts athlete experienced recurrent right knee patellar tendon rupture on three occasions. He underwent two operations for complete patellar tendon rupture: an end-to-end tenorrhaphy the first time, and revision with a bone-patellar-tendon (BPT) allograft. After the third episode, he was referred to our department, where we performed a surgical reconstruction with the use of hamstring pro-patellar tendon, in a figure-of-eight configuration, followed by a careful rehabilitation protocol. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were realized at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1 and 2 years postop, with an accurate physical examination, the use of recognized international outcome scores, and radiograph and MRI studies. As far as we know, this is the first paper to report a re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture.

  9. What Is the Role for Patelloplasty With Gullwing Osteotomy in Revision TKA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gililland, Jeremy M; Swann, Presley; Pelt, Christopher E; Erickson, Jill; Hamad, Nadia; Peters, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Management of the patella in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is challenging as a result of the deficient or unusable bone stock for patellar resurfacing that is frequently encountered. Options proposed in this setting include various patelloplasty procedures, patellectomy, and special patellar components. We sought to better define the role and results of one patelloplasty procedure, the gullwing osteotomy, used in revision TKA. (1) How much improvement in the outcome measures of range of motion and Knee Society scores was seen after revision TKA with a gullwing osteotomy? (2) What are the radiographic results of this osteotomy as judged by patellar healing and patellar tracking? (3) What complications are associated with the gullwing osteotomy in revision TKA? Between December 2003 and July 2012, we used a gullwing osteotomy on patients undergoing revision TKA (n = 238) in which the patellar remnant was avascular or less than 12 mm thick. This uncommon procedure was used in 17 of 115 (15%) of the patellae revised during this time. We performed manual chart reviews on all patients to collect preoperative and postoperative range of motion and Knee Society scores as well as radiographic review at last followup to assess patellar healing and tracking. In patients with at least 2 years of followup, the preoperative range of motion was a median -7.5° of extension (interquartile range [IQR], -15°-0°) and 90° of flexion (IQR, 90°-100°). Postoperative extension improved to 0° (IQR, 0°-0°; p = 0.015). With the numbers available, median flexion arc did not change at last followup (110°; IQR, 95°-120°; p = 0.674). The Knee Society score improved from a combined (clinical + functional) mean of 86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 56-116) preoperatively to 142 (95% CI, 121-163; p osteotomy with osseous union and one patient healed with a fibrous union. Nine of the 10 patients with at least 2 years of followup had a centrally tracking gullwing osteotomized

  10. Soft tissue twisting injuries of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.; Shapiro, M. [Neuroimaging Inst., Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Twisting injuries occur as a result of differential motion of different tissue types in injuries with some rotational force. These injuries are well described in brain injuries but, to our knowledge, have not been described in the musculoskeletal literature. We correlated the clinical examination and MR findings of 20 patients with twisting injuries of the soft tissues around the knee. Design and patients: We prospectively followed the clinical courses of 20 patients with knee injuries who had clinical histories and MR findings to suggest twisting injuries of the subcutaneous tissues. Patients with associated internal derangement of the knee (i.e., meniscal tears, ligamentous or bone injuries) were excluded from this study. MR findings to suggest twisting injuries included linear areas of abnormal dark signal on T1-weighted sequences and abnormal bright signal on T2-weighted or short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences and/or signal to suggest hemorrhage within the subcutaneous tissues. These MR criteria were adapted from those established for indirect musculotendinous junction injuries. Results: All 20 patients presented with considerable pain that suggested internal derangement on physical examination by the referring orthopedic surgeons. All presented with injuries associated with rotational force. The patients were placed on a course of protected weight-bearing of the affected extremity for 4 weeks. All patients had pain relief by clinical examination after this period of protected weight-bearing. Twisting injuries of the soft tissues can result in considerable pain that can be confused with internal derangement of the knee on physical examination. Soft tissue twisting injuries need to be recognized on MR examinations as they may be the cause of the patient's pain despite no MR evidence of internal derangement of the knee. The demonstration of soft tissue twisting injuries in a patient with severe knee pain but no documented internal derangement on MR

  11. Polyethylene damage and deformation on fixed-bearing, non-conforming unicondylar knee replacements corresponding to progressive changes in alignment and fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Melinda K; Schmitt, Sabine; Rössing, Sven; Banks, Scott A; Sharf, Hans-Peter; Viceconti, Marco; Hodge, W Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Deviations from nominal alignment of unicondylar knee replacements impact knee biomechanics, including the load and stress distribution at the articular contact surfaces. This study characterizes relationships between the biomechanical environment, distinguished by progressive changes in alignment and fixation, and articular damage and deformation in a consecutive series of retrieved unicondylar knee replacements. Twenty seven fixed-bearing, non-conforming unicondylar knee replacements of one design were retrieved after 2 to 13 years of in vivo function. The in vivo biomechanical environment was characterized by grading component migration measured from full-length radiographs and grading component fixation based on intraoperative manual palpation. Articular damage patterns and linear deformation on the polyethylene inserts were measured using optical photogrammetry and contact point digitization. Articular damage patterns and surface deformation on the explanted polyethylene inserts corresponded to progressive changes in component alignment and fixation. Component migration produced higher deformation rates, whereas loosening contributed to larger damage areas but lower deformation rates. Migration and loosening of the femoral component, but not the tibial component, were factors contributing to large regions of abrasion concentrated on the articular periphery. Classifying component migration and fixation at revision proved useful for distinguishing common biomechanical conditions associated with the varied polyethylene damage patterns and linear deformation for this fixed-bearing, non-conforming design. Pre-clinical evaluations of unicondylar knee replacements that are capable of reproducing variations in clinical alignment and predicting the observed wear mechanisms are necessary to better understand the impact of knee biomechanics and design on unicondylar knee replacement longevity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Method of Evaluating Knee Joint Stability of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Multiscale Entropy Analysis with A Knee-Aiming Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Diange; Zhang, Shijie; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-03-23

    Deteriorating knee stability is a local risk factor that reflects the occurrence and aggregative of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the many biomechanics-based methods for assessing the structural stability of knee joints in clinics, these methods have many limitations. The stability of the knee joint relies on not only biomechanical factors, but also proprioception and the central nervous system. In this study, we attempt to depict the stability of knee joint from a holistic viewpoint, and a novel index of knee joint stability (IKJS) was thus extracted. We compared the differences of IKJS in 57 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with OA before and after total knee replacement (TKR). Analysis of Variance results demonstrated that there existed significant differences in IKJS among the three participating groups (knee OA increased remarkably after TKR (p knee-aiming task is feasible for quantitatively determining knee stability. It can provide a potentially valuable and convenient tool to evaluate the effect of postoperative rehabilitation for patients with knee OA.

  13. Effect of Knee Extensor Strength on Incident Radiographic and Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis in Individuals with Meniscal Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Felson, David T; Segal, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High knee extensor strength may be important to protect against development of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in populations at elevated risk, such as individuals with meniscal pathology. We investigated the extent to which high knee extensor muscle strength was associated with a decreased r...

  14. High knee valgus in female subjects does not yield higher knee translations during drop landings: a biplane fluoroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Michael R; Shelburne, Kevin B; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J Erik; Pennington, W Wesley; Krong, Jacob P; Peterson, Daniel S; Steadman, J Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the "at risk" female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. Three-dimension knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system, and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate, and high groups and peak ATT, MTT, and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = 0.05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < 0.0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < 0.0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT, and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high-peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = 0.80; LTT: p = 0.25; MTT: p = 0.72); or, in peak ATT (p = 0.61), LTT (p = 0.26) and MTT (p = 0.96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high.

  15. High Knee Valgus in Female Subjects Does Not Yield Higher Knee Translations During Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the ‘at risk’ female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. 3D knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate and high groups and peak ATT, MTT and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = .05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p knee abduction moment (p knee valgus angles (ATT: p = .80; LTT: p = .25; MTT: p = .72); or, in peak ATT (p = .61), LTT (p = .26) and MTT (p = .96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high. PMID:22968826

  16. Secondary knee instability caused by fracture of the stabilizing insert in a dual-articular total knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Morten P; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard; Husted, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A case of a fractured polyethylene stabilizing insert causing secondary knee instability in a Dual-articular total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is presented. A 65-year-old woman who underwent surgery with a Dual-articular TKA 4 years earlier had a well-functioning prosthesis until a fall, after which......-articular knee....

  17. Therapeutic ultrasound and effectiveness in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Ganidagli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, ultrasound is one of the most commonly used methods for physical therapy of knee osteoarthritis. Therapeutic ultrasound affects the cells and tissues by thermal and nonthermal ways. As well as being used as an agent for deep heating, it has effects like stimulation of tissue regeneration, soft tissue repair, regulation of blood flow in chronic ischemic tissues, protein synthesis and bone repair.In this manuscript, detailed technical information on ultrasound is given and studies on knee osteoarthritis in recent years are reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 170-183

  18. Elastoplastic analysis of knee bracing frame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhen; LI Qing-song; CHEN Long-zhu

    2005-01-01

    The knee bracing steel frame (KBF) is a new kind of energy dissipating frame, which combines excellent ductility and lateral stiffness. As the structural fuse of the frame, the knee element will yield first during a severe earthquake so that no damage occurs to the major structural members and the rehabilitation is easy and economical. To help fully understand the relations between its seismic performance and the structural parameters, systematic elastoplastic analysis of the KBF structure with finite element method was conducted in this work. Finally, general design recommendations were made according to the results of the analysis.

  19. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  20. Imaging of postoperative knee extensor mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-57, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hame, Sharon L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Box 956902, 76-143 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Disorders of the anterior knee are common and include patellofemoral syndrome, patella instability, patella fracture, and patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures. Depending on the operative procedure performed, the post-operative imaging appearance of these knees may be confusing. It is crucial for the radiologist to be familiar with the procedures performed in order to recognize the postoperative findings. Radiologists must be able to interpret hardware (anchors, screw and wires) and disruptions in soft tissue planes that may persist with these types of procedures.

  1. Insert dissociation after fixed bearing PS constrained Genesis II total knee arthroplasty. A case series of nine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuijl, Timothy; Nijenhuis, Thijs A; Van Hellemondt, Gijs G; Goosen, Jon H M

    2015-12-01

    Dissociation of the polyethylene insert after fixed bearing posterior stabilized Genesis II total knee arthroplasty has been rarely described. We present a case series of nine patients with a dissociation of the insert within a period of two years after surgery. Revision surgery was performed in all patients. In this report we discuss clinical presentation, patient characteristics and possible etiologies for tibial insert dissociation seen in the presented cases. In conclusion, tibial insert dissociation does not lead to a uniform clinical presentation. Therefore, in this point of view regular physical examination and imaging after TKA regardless the presence of symptoms seems to be indicated.

  2. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao; Liang Wen; Tie-Bing Qu; Li-Li Hou; Dong Xiang; Jia Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background:The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics.Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration.Here,kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data.Methods:Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy,anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs,including the femur,tibia,patella,fibula,distal femur cartilage,and medial and lateral menisci,as well as the anterior cruciate,posterior cruciate,medial collateral,and lateral collateral ligaments.The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis,which was then validated by comparison with a previous study.The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion.Results:Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study,suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses.The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient,or insufficiently aggressive,"rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee.In addition,a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis.Conclusions:There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee,suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis.The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  3. Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship after total knee arthroplasty using a rotating platform knee prosthesis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopley, Colin D J; Crossett, Lawrence S; Chen, Antonia F

    2013-01-01

    A systematic search identified 29 papers reporting survivorship and clinical and function Knee Society Scores (KSS) of 6437 total knee replacements using the Low Contact Stress (LCS) Rotating Platform (RP) mobile bearing knee. Low Contact Stress RP survivorship and KSS outcomes were compared with non-LCS knees in the Swedish knee registry at comparable time periods and in 2 independent systematic reviews of knee arthroplasty outcomes. There is a substantial body of mainly observational evidence supporting the LCS RP knee. Knee Society Score outcomes were comparable for LCS RP and non-LCS RP knees at up to 15 years of follow-up, with mean clinical and function scores ranging from 72 to 96 and 58 to 90, respectively. Survivorship of LCS RP knees up to 14 years was higher than that for all knees in the Swedish Knee Registry.

  4. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  5. Knee flexion deformity and patella alta in spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotman, D B

    1976-06-01

    A study on spastic knee flexion deformity has revealed a recurrence rate of 32 per cent following attempted surgical correction on 170 knees (103 patients). This rate appeared to be unrelated to concomitant surgery for correction of hip and ankle deformity. An additional study demonstrated patella alta in 72 per cent of 100 spastic knees (50 patients) and only 2 per cent and 50 knees of a comparable group of 25 non-spastic patients. It is suggested that restoration of a normal patello-femoral relationship may reduce both the functional disability and recurrence rate of spastic knee flexion deformity when this disease is managed surgically.

  6. Outcome of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in octogenarians with tricompartmental osteoarthritis: A longer followup of previously published report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv KS Marya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA has specific indications, producing excellent results. It, however, has a limited lifespan and needs eventual conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA. It is, therefore, a temporizing procedure in select active young patients with advanced unicompartmental osteoarthritis (UCOA. Being a less morbid procedure it is suggested as an alternative in the very elderly patients with tricompartmental osteoarthritis (TCOA. We performed UKA in a series of 45 octogenarians with TCOA predominant medial compartment osteoarthritis (MCOA and analyzed the results. Materials and Methods: Forty five octogenarian patients with TCOA predominant MCOA underwent UKA (19 bilateral from January 2002 to January 2012. All had similar preoperative work-up, surgical approach, procedure, implants and postoperative protocol. Clinicoradiological assessment was done at 3-monthly intervals for the first year, then yearly till the last followup (average 72 months, range 8-128 months. Results were evaluated using the knee society scores (KSS, satisfaction index [using the visual analogue scale (VAS] and orthogonal radiographs (for loosening, subsidence, lysis or implant wear. Resurgery for any cause was considered failure. Results: Four patients (six knees died due to medical conditions, two patients (three knees were lost to followup, and these were excluded from the final analysis. Barring two failures, all the remaining patients were pain-free and performing well at the final followup. Indications for resurgery were: medial femoral condyle fracture needing fixation subsequent conversion to TKA at 2 years (n=1 and progression of arthritis and pain leading to revision TKA at 6 years (n=1. Conclusion: UKA has shown successful outcomes with regards to pain relief and function with 96.4% implant survival and 94.9% good or excellent outcomes. Due to lower demands, early rehabilitation, less morbidity, and relative short life

  7. Knee awareness and functionality after simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latifi Yaghin, Roshan; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Kallemose, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate knee awareness and functional outcomes in patients treated with simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Through a database search, we identified 210 patients who had undergone unilateral TKA (UTKA) and 65 patients who had undergone......-surgical treatments were failed, thus preoperatively the patients had poor functionality. All patients were asked to complete Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) questionnaires. The patients were matched according to age, gender, year of surgery, Kellgren-Lawrence score and pre- and postoperative...... overall knee alignment. The FJS and OKS questionnaire results of the two groups were then compared. RESULTS: A mixed-effects model was used to analyze differences between SBTKA and UTKA. OKS: The mean difference in the OKS between the patients who had undergone SBTKA and those who had undergone UTKA was 1...

  8. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty.

  9. Segmentation of multiple knee bones from CT for orthopedic knee surgery planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dijia; Sofka, Michal; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhou, S Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific orthopedic knee surgery planning requires precisely segmenting from 3D CT images multiple knee bones, namely femur, tibia, fibula, and patella, around the knee joint with severe pathologies. In this work, we propose a fully automated, highly precise, and computationally efficient segmentation approach for multiple bones. First, each bone is initially segmented using a model-based marginal space learning framework for pose estimation followed by non-rigid boundary deformation. To recover shape details, we then refine the bone segmentation using graph cut that incorporates the shape priors derived from the initial segmentation. Finally we remove overlap between neighboring bones using multi-layer graph partition. In experiments, we achieve simultaneous segmentation of femur, tibia, patella, and fibula with an overall accuracy of less than 1mm surface-to-surface error in less than 90s on hundreds of 3D CT scans with pathological knee joints.

  10. Knee Joint Loading in Knee Osteoarthritis: Influence of Abdominal and Thigh Fat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MESSIER, STEPHEN P; BEAVERS, DANIEL P; LOESER, RICHARD F; CARR, J JEFFERY; KHAJANCHI, SHUBHAM; LEGAULT, CLAUDINE; NICKLAS, BARBARA J; HUNTER, DAVID J; DEVITA, PAUL

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSEUsing three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint...

  11. Lower limb biomechanics in individuals with knee osteoarthritis before and after total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinger, Pazit; Menz, Hylton B; Morrow, Adam D; Feller, Julian A; Bartlett, John R; Bergman, Neil R

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the biomechanical changes that occur in the lower limb following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics were evaluated in 32 patients before and 12 months following TKA and 28 age-matched controls. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni-adjusted post-hoc tests showed no significant changes in knee joint kinematics and kinetics following TKA despite significant improvements in pain and function. Significant increases in peak ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion moments and ankle power generation were observed which may be a compensatory response to impaired knee function to allow sufficient power generation for propulsion. Differences in knee gait parameters may arise as a result of the presence of osteoarthritis and mechanical changes associated with TKA as well as retention of the pre-surgery gait pattern.

  12. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA......). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark......), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0-10). RESULTS: Two patients were lost to follow...

  13. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Duane Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months. Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees, congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient, bacterial septic arthritis (one knee, malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee, and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee. The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options.

  14. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  15. A bio-inspired test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Xu, Lei; Fu, Qiang; Yuan, Gang

    2013-04-01

    Recently, prosthetic knees in the developing stage are usually tested by installing them on amputees' stumps directly or on above-knee prostheses (AKPs) test platforms. Although amputees can fully provide the actual motion state of the thigh, immature prosthetic knees may hurt amputees. For AKPs test platforms, it just can partly simulate the actual motion state of the thigh with limitation of the motion curve of the thigh, the merits or demerits of newly developed bionic above-knee prosthetic knees cannot be accessed thoroughly. Aiming at the defects of two testing methods, this paper presents a bio-inspired AKPs test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees. The proposed bio-inspired AKPs test system is composed of a AKPs test platform, a control system, and a bio-inspired system. The AKPs test platform generates the motion of the thigh simulation mechanism (TSM) via two screw pairs with servo motors. The bio-inspired system includes the tester and the bio-inspired sensor wore by the tester. The control system, which is inspired by the bio-inspired system, generates the control command signal to move the TSM of the AKPs test platform. The bio-inspired AKPs test system is developed and experimentally tested with a commercially available prosthetic knee. The research results show that the bio-inspired AKPs test system can not only ensure the safety of the testers, but also track all kinds of the actual motion state of the thigh of the testers in real time.

  16. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  17. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (pforces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  18. The intramedullary nailing using a single knee incision for treatment of extraarticular floating knee (nine cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Dahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Floating knee injuries are uncommon and complex injuries. Management of this injury has been variously described in the literature. Aims: We present the outcome of the intramedullary nailing using a single knee incision for treatment of extraarticular floating knee. Materials and Methods: We report a retrospective series of nine patients with extraarticular floating knee. Results: There were seven men and two women with an average age of 35 years. At least one of the fractures was open in three cases. The average Injury Severity Score was 17. According to Fraser′s classification, 100% of the cases are type I. All our patients were treated by the intramedullary nailing using a single knee incision. The mean operating time was 146 min. The mean follow-up is 19 months. According to the Karlstrφm criteria, the end results were excellent in two cases, good in four, acceptable in two, and poor in one. Bone union was achieved in eight cases with an average period of 93 days. Conclusions: The intramedullary nailing using a single knee incision has shown in this series better results.

  19. Recognizing knee pathologies by classifying instantaneous screws of the six degrees-of-freedom knee motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alon; Degani, Amir

    2007-05-01

    We address the problem of knee pathology assessment by using screw theory to describe the knee motion and by using the screw representation of the motion as an input to a machine learning classifier. The flexions of knees with different pathologies are tracked using an optical tracking system. The instantaneous screw parameters which describe the transformation of the tibia with respect to the femur in each two successive observation is represented as the instantaneous screw axis of the motion given in its Plücker line coordinates along with its corresponding pitch. The set of instantaneous screw parameters associated with a particular knee with a given pathology is then identified and clustered in R(6) to form a "signature" of the motion for the given pathology. Sawbones model and two cadaver knees with different pathologies were tracked, and the resulting screws were used to train a classifier system. The system was then tested successfully with new, never-trained-before data. The classifier demonstrated a very high success rate in identifying the knee pathology.

  20. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rasnick

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05. No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.