WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-resonant process helps

  1. Non-resonant diagrams in radiative four-fermion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabata, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1994-06-01

    The complete tree level cross section for e + e - → e - ν-bar e ud-barγ is computed and discussed in comparison with the cross sections for e + e - → e - V-bar e u d-bar and e + e - → u-bar d u d-bar. Event generators based on the GRACE package for the non-radiative and radiative case are presented. Special interest is brought to the effect of the non-resonant diagrams overlooked so far in other studies. Their contribution to the total cross section is presented for the LEP II energy range for future linear colliders (√s = 500 GeV). (author)

  2. Natural and professional help: a process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, T J; Toro, P A

    1989-08-01

    Differences in the helping interactions formed by mental health professionals, divorce lawyers, and mutual help group leaders were examined. Fourteen members of each of these three helper groups (N = 42) met independently with a coached client presenting marital difficulties. Using ratings of ability to ameliorate the personal and emotional problems presented, the 42 helpers were divided (using a median split) into successful and less successful outcome groups. The responses of each of the pairs were coded using the Hill Counselor Verbal Response Category System. The sequence of client-helper responses were examined using log-linear analysis as they varied by type of helper and outcome. Results indicated that successful helpers (regardless of type of helper) tended to use directives (e.g., guidance and approval-reassurance) differently from less successful helpers. Successful helpers used directives following client emotional expression and not following factual description. In addition, clear differences in helper responses by helper type and outcome were found. Each helper type had unique patterns of responses that differentiated successful from less successful outcomes. Client responses were found to vary across helper type even when given the same helper preceding response. Results are discussed with respect to the unique goals of each helping relationship and the different shaping process involved in each.

  3. Helping You Help Me: The Role of Diagnostic (In)congruence in the Helping Process within Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Colin M.; Pillemer, Julianna; Amabile, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Through an inductive, multi-method field study at a major design firm, we investigated the helping process in project work and how that process affects the success of a helping episode, as perceived by help-givers and/or -receivers. We used daily diary entries and weekly interviews from four project teams, and a separate sample of critical incident interviews, to induce process models of successful and unsuccessful helping episodes. We found that, in unsuccessful episodes, help-givers and -re...

  4. Non-resonant terahertz field enhancement in periodically arranged nanoslits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    We analyze ultra strong non-resonant field enhancement of THz field in periodic arrays of nanoslits cut in ultrathin metal films. The main feature of our approach is that the slit size and metal film thickness are several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength λ of the impinging radiatio...... by the microscopic Drude-Lorentz model taking into account retardation processes in the metal film and validated by the finite difference frequency domain method. We expect sensor and modulation applications of the predicted giant broadband field enhancement.......We analyze ultra strong non-resonant field enhancement of THz field in periodic arrays of nanoslits cut in ultrathin metal films. The main feature of our approach is that the slit size and metal film thickness are several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength λ of the impinging radiation...... approaches the THz wavelength but before entering the Raleigh-Wood anomaly, the field enhancement in nanoslit stays close to that in a single isolated slit, i.e., the well-known inversefrequency dependence. Both regimes are non-resonant and thus extremely broadband for P

  5. Study on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Machining Applying the Non-Resonant Three-Dimensional Elliptical Vibration Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The poor machinability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy makes it hard to process by conventional processing methods even though it has been widely used in military and civilian enterprise fields. Non-resonant three-dimensional elliptical vibration cutting (3D-EVC is a novel cutting technique which is a significant development potential for difficult-to-cut materials. However, few studies have been conducted on processing the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using the non-resonant 3D-EVC technique, the effect of surface quality, roughness, topography and freeform surface has not been clearly researched yet. Therefore, the machinability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using the non-resonant 3D-EVC apparatus is studied in this paper. Firstly, the principle of non-resonant 3D-EVC technique and the model of cutter motion are introduced. Then the tool path is synthesized. The comparison experiments are carried out with traditional continuous cutting (TCC, two-dimension elliptical vibration cutting (2D-EVC, and the non-resonant 3D-EVC method. The experimental results shown that the excellent surface and lower roughness (77.3 nm could be obtained using the non-resonant 3D-EVC method; the shape and dimension of elliptical cutting mark also relates to the cutting speed and vibration frequency, and the concave/convex spherical surface topography are achieved by non-resonant 3D-EVC in the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. This proved that the non-resonant 3D-EVC technique has the better machinability compared with the TCC and 2D-EVC methods.

  6. Befriending for mental health problems: processes of helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gemma; Pistrang, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    One avenue for addressing the social consequences of mental health problems is through befriending, a supportive relationship in which one-to-one companionship is provided on a regular basis. Although there is some evidence that befriending can improve psychological and social functioning, little is known about how it works. This qualitative study aimed to understand the helping processes occurring in befriending relationships, from the perspectives of both befriendees and befrienders. Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually and jointly with eight befriendees and their corresponding befrienders. Thematic analysis was carried out on the data set of 23 interviews. The analysis generated nine themes concerning qualities of the relationship valued by befriendees and befrienders (e.g., empathy and mutuality), processes of making meaning (e.g., considering alternative perspectives), and how change was effected in befriendees' lives (e.g., learning how to have healthier relationships with others). The accounts emphasized the importance of the quality of the relationship itself, and highlighted aspects of the relationship that were sometimes difficult to negotiate. The findings suggest that befriending shares commonalities with other types of psychological help. However, it is also characterized by some particular challenges, such as establishing an empathic relationship and managing boundaries and endings. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  8. Non-resonant microwave absorption studies of superconducting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) studies of superconducting MgB2 and a sample containing 10% by weight of MgO in MgB2 are reported. The NRMA results indicate near absence of intergranular weak links in the pure MgB2 sample. A linear temperature dependence of the lower critical field Hc1 is ...

  9. How automation helps steer the revenue cycle process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpas, Phil

    2013-06-01

    top-of-mind issue as we see how healthcare reform plays out. Here's what our select group of experts had to say about how automation helps to steer the revenue cycle process.

  10. A phenomenological analysis of non-resonant charm meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bediaga, I.; Goebel, C.; Mendez-Galain, R.

    1997-07-01

    We analyse the consequences of the usual assumption of a constant function to fit non-resonant decays from experimental Dalitz plot describing charmed meson decays. We first show, using the D + -> K 0 π + π 0 decay channel as an example, how an inadequate extraction of the non-resonant contribution could yield incorrect measurements for the resonant channels. We analyse how the correct study of this decay will provide a test for the validity of factorization in D meson decays. Finally, we show how form factors that can be measured from the D + s -> π - π + π + decay. We emphasize its relevance for the study of the decay τ -> v t 3π and the extraction of the α 1 meson width. (author)

  11. A phenomenological analysis of non-resonant charm meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bediaga, I.; Goebel, C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mendez-Galain, R. [Montevideo Univ. (Uruguay). Facultad de Ingenieria

    1997-07-01

    We analyse the consequences of the usual assumption of a constant function to fit non-resonant decays from experimental Dalitz plot describing charmed meson decays. We first show, using the D{sup +} -> K{sup 0} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup 0} decay channel as an example, how an inadequate extraction of the non-resonant contribution could yield incorrect measurements for the resonant channels. We analyse how the correct study of this decay will provide a test for the validity of factorization in D meson decays. Finally, we show how form factors that can be measured from the D{sup +}{sub s} -> {pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup +} decay. We emphasize its relevance for the study of the decay {tau} -> v{sub t} 3{pi} and the extraction of the {alpha}{sub 1} meson width. (author) 26 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Analysis of a Non-resonant Ultrasonic Levitation Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    In this study, a non-resonant configuration of ultrasonic levitation device is presented, which is formed by a small diameter ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. The influence of different levitator parameters on the levitation performance is investigated by using a numerical model that combines the Gor'kov theory with a matrix method based on the Rayleigh integral. In contrast with traditional acoustic levitators, the non-resonant ultrasonic levitation device allows the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be adjusted continually, without requiring the separation distance to be set to a multiple of half-wavelength. It is also demonstrated, both numerically and experimentally, that the levitating particle can be manipulated by maintaining the transducer in a fixed position in space and moving the reflector in respect to the transducer.

  13. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Grismer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, wineries in the western United States and sugarcane processing for ethanol in Central and South America have experienced problems related to the treatment and disposal of process wastewater. Both winery and sugarcane (molasses wastewaters are characterized by large organic loadings that change seasonally and are detrimental to aquatic life. We examined the role of plants for treating these wastewaters in constructed wetlands. In the greenhouse, subsurface-flow flumes with volcanic rock substrates and plants steadily removed approximately 80% of organic-loading oxygen demand from sugarcane process wastewater after about 3 weeks of plant growth; unplanted flumes removed about 30% less. In field studies at two operational wineries, we evaluated the performance of similar-sized, paired, subsurface constructed wetlands with and without plants; while both removed most of the oxygen demand, removal rates in the planted system were slightly greater and significantly different from those of the unplanted system under field conditions.

  14. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  15. Non-resonant magnetic braking on JET and TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Shaing, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The non-resonant magnetic braking effect induced by a non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation is investigated on JET and TEXTOR. The collisionality dependence of the torque induced by the n = 1, where n is the toroidal mode number, magnetic perturbation generated by the error field correction coils...... in the 1/ν regime. The strongest NTV torque on JET is also located near the plasma core. The magnitude of the NTV torque strongly depends on the plasma response, which is also discussed in this paper. There is no obvious braking effect with n = 2 magnetic perturbation generated by the dynamic ergodic...

  16. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Pérez, Nicolás [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Ruta 3 km 363, 60000 Paysandú (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, Av. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  17. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position

  18. Wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Breinbjerg, Olav; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    could be properly designed to minimize undesired energy dissipation in the source coil when the power receiver is out of the range. Our basic observation paves the way for more flexible design and fabrication of non-resonant mid-range wireless energy transfer systems, thus potentially impacting......We demonstrate by theoretical analysis and experimental verification that mid-range wireless energy transfer systems may take advantage of de-tuned coupling devices, without jeopardizing the energy transfer efficiency. Allowing for a modest de-tuning of the source coil, energy transfer systems...... practical implementations of wireless energy transfer....

  19. Three-Flavoured Non-Resonant Leptogenesis at Intermediate Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, K. [Durham U., IPPP; Pascoli, S. [Durham U., IPPP; Petcov, S. T. [Tokyo U., IPMU; Schulz, H. [Cincinnati U.; Turner, J. [Fermilab

    2018-04-13

    Leptogenesis can successfully explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry via out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the early Universe. In this article we focus on non-resonant thermal leptogenesis and we study the possibility of lowering its scale through flavour effects in an exhaustive exploration of the model parameter space. We numerically solve the density matrix equations for one and two decaying heavy Majorana neutrinos and present the level of fine-tuning of the light neutrino masses within these scenarios. We demonstrate that the scale of thermal leptogenesis may be as low as $10^6$ GeV.

  20. An alternative frame of reference for rehabilitation: the helping process versus the medical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T P

    1975-03-01

    In rehabilitation the frame of reference of the helping professions is significantly different from the standard medical model in the following areas: the dynamics of the relationship, basis for client's trust of the professional, activity versus passivity of both the client and the professional, and the approach to identification and solution of client problems. "The helping process" as practiced in the helping professions is not doing the task, but assisting the client to do it himself, for himself. In this process the needs, values and feelings of both the helper and the helpee must be recognized and dealt with. For the helping process to be successful, three basic conditions are required: development of mutual trust, joint exploration of the problem(s) and listening by both sides. Also involved in attaining success in the helping process is an awareness of not only the barriers in receiving help but also the difficulties in giving help.

  1. The non-resonant decay of the fast magnetosonic wave during ICRH of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Core, W.G.; Hellsten, T.; Farrell, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The non-resonant decay of the fast magnetosonic wave into an Ion Bernstein wave and a quasi-mode is investigated from the point of view of assessing the importance of this process for the observed direct heating of the edge plasma during ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Starting from the Maxwell-Vlasov equations, expressions for the threshold electric field and the growth rates of the decay process are obtained. For JET like parameters, the thresholds for the decay are easily exceeded and the growth time for typical fast wave electric field strengths is of the order of a microsecond. The parametric dependence of the threshold on magnetic field, temperature, the density of the various ion species, and electron-ion collisions is studied. Finally the relevance of this process to the heating of plasma edge during ICRH is discussed. (author)

  2. Non-resonant energy harvesting via an adaptive bistable potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinloo, Ashkan Haji; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Narrow bandwidth and easy detuning, inefficiency in broadband and non-stationary excitations, and difficulties in matching a linear harvester’s resonance frequency to low-frequency excitations at small scales, have convinced researchers to investigate nonlinear, and in particular bistable, energy harvesters in recent years. However, bistable harvesters suffer from co-existing low and high energy orbits, and sensitivity to initial conditions, and have recently been proven inefficient when subjected to many real-world random and non-stationary excitations. Here, we propose a novel non-resonant buy-low-sell-high strategy that can significantly improve the harvester’s effectiveness at low frequencies in a much more robust fashion. This strategy could be realized by a passive adaptive bistable system. Simulation results confirm the high effectiveness of the adaptive bistable system following a buy-low-sell-high logic when subjected to harmonic and random non-stationary walking excitations compared to its conventional bistable and linear counterparts. (paper)

  3. REALIZING BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT BY HELP OF A PROCESS MAPPING DATABASE TOOL

    CERN Document Server

    Vergili, Ceren

    2016-01-01

    In a typical business sector, processes are the building blocks of the achievement. A considerable percentage of the processes are consisting of business processes. This fact is bringing the fact that business sectors are in need of a management discipline. Business Process Management (BPM) is a discipline that combines modelling, automation, execution, control, measurement, and optimization of process by considering enterprise goals, spanning systems, employees, customers, and partners. CERN’s EN – HE – HM section desires to apply the BPM discipline appropriately for improving their necessary technical, administrative and managerial actions to supply appropriate CERN industrial transport, handling and lifting equipment and to maintain it. For this reason, a Process Mapping Database Tool is created to develop a common understanding about how the section members can visualize their processes, agree on quality standards and on how to improve. It provides a management support by establishing Process Charts...

  4. Non-resonant oscillations for some third-order differential equations II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezeilo, J.O.C.; Omari, P.

    1987-11-01

    The existence of 2π-periodic solutions to the equation x'''+ax''+g(t,x')+cx=p(t) is proved, under certain non-resonance conditions on the non-linear function g(t,y). Here a,c are constants, but the case where a,c are not necessarily constants is also discussed, subject to some rather special non-resonance conditions on g. The uniqueness of the solutions is also examined. (author). 12 refs

  5. Help-seeking process of parents for psychopathology in youths with moderate to borderline intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, J.C.H.; Dekker, M.C.; de Ruiter, K.P.; Verhulst, F.C.; Koot, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the help-seeking process of parents for emotional or behavioral problems in their child with borderline to moderate intellectual disabilities. METHOD: In 2003, in a special education-based sample of 522 youths (ages 10-18years, response = 77.9%), we studied the parents'

  6. Optimizing medical device buying. Value analysis models can help you improve decision-making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Josh; Brooks, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    Value Analysis Models (VAMs) are a burgeoning analytical tool that can help materials managers, operating room managers, CFOs and others to make comparative value assessments before reaching a critical purchasing decision. Although relatively new to the hospital field, more and more manufacturers are supporting these initiatives to bring critical information to their customers and the health care industry. VAMs aren't designed to conclude that one product is better than another but to be a tool that can help make the product acquisition process much easier.

  7. Capturing dynamic processes of change in GROW mutual help groups for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Lizzie D; Bishop, Brian J; Sparrow, Neville

    2009-12-01

    The need for a model that can portray dynamic processes of change in mutual help groups for mental health (MHGMHs) is emphasized. A dynamic process model has the potential to capture a more comprehensive understanding of how MHGMHs may assist their members. An investigation into GROW, a mutual help organization for mental health, employed ethnographic, phenomenological and collaborative research methods. The study examined how GROW impacts on psychological well being. Study outcomes aligned with the social ecological paradigm (Maton in Understanding the self-help organization: frameworks and findings. Sage, Thousand Oaks 1994) indicating multifactorial processes of change at and across three levels of analysis: group level, GROW program/community level and individual level. Outcome themes related to life skills acquisition and a change in self-perception in terms of belonging within community and an increased sense of personal value. The GROW findings are used to assist development of a dynamic multi-dimensional process model to explain how MHGMHs may promote positive change.

  8. Seafloor Eruptions Offer a Teachable Moment to Help SEAS Students Understand Important Geological and Ecological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, L.; Williams, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    In education parlance, a teachable moment is an opportunity that arises when students are engaged and primed to learn, typically in response to some memorable event. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, even natural disasters, if meaningful to the student, often serve to catalyze intense learning. Recent eruptions at the East Pacific Rise offer a potential teachable moment for students and teachers involved with SEAS, a Ridge 2000 education outreach program. SEAS uses a combination of web-facilitated and teacher-directed activities to make the remote deep-sea environment and the process of science relevant and meaningful. SEAS is a web-based, inquiry-oriented education program for middle and high school students. It features the science associated with Ridge 2000 research. Since 2003, SEAS has focused on the integrated study site at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) to help students understand geological and ecological processes at mid-ocean ridges and hydrothermal vents. SEAS students study EPR bathymetry maps, images of lava formations, photomosaics of diffuse flow communities, succession in the Bio-Geo Transect, as well as current research conducted during spring cruises. In the Classroom to Sea Lab, students make direct comparisons between shallow-water mussels and vent mussels (from the EPR) to understand differences in feeding strategies. The recent eruptions and loss of seafloor fauna at this site offer the Ridge 2000 program the opportunity to help students better understand the ephemeral and episodic nature of ridge environments, as well as the realities and processes of science (particularly field science). In January 2007, the SEAS program will again sail with a Ridge 2000 research team, and will work with scientists to report findings through the SEAS website. The eruptions at the EPR covered much of the study site, and scientists' instruments and experiments, in fresh lava. We intend to highlight the recency and effect of the eruptions, using the students

  9. Entanglement Evolution of Jaynes-Cummings Model in Resonance Case and Non-resonance Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Chen, Xi; Shan, Chuan-Jia

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the entanglement evolution of a two-level atom and a quantized single model electromagnetic filed in the resonance and non-resonance cases. The effects of the initial state, detuning degree, photon number on the entanglement are shown in detail. The results show that the atom-cavity entanglement state appears with periodicity. The increasing of the photon number can make the period of quantum entanglement be shorter. In the non-resonant case, if we choose the suitable initial state the entanglement of atom-cavity can be 1.0

  10. 'Healthy Eating and Lifestyle in Pregnancy (HELP)' trial: Process evaluation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sharon A; Cassidy, Dunla; John, Elinor

    2014-07-01

    We developed and tested in a cluster RCT a theory-driven group-based intervention for obese pregnant women. It was designed to support women to moderate weight gain during pregnancy and reduce BMI one year after birth, in addition to targeting secondary health and wellbeing outcomes. In line with MRC guidance on developing and evaluating complex interventions in health, we conducted a process evaluation alongside the trial. This paper describes the development of the process evaluation framework. This cluster RCT recruited 598 pregnant women. Women in the intervention group were invited to attend a weekly weight-management group. Following a review of relevant literature, we developed a process evaluation framework which outlined key process indicators that we wanted to address and how we would measure these. Central to the process evaluation was to understand the mechanism of effect of the intervention. We utilised a logic-modelling approach to describe the intervention which helped us focus on what potential mediators of intervention effect to measure, and how. The resulting process evaluation framework was designed to address 9 core elements; context, reach, exposure, recruitment, fidelity, recruitment, retention, contamination and theory-testing. These were assessed using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches. The logic model explained the processes by which intervention components bring about change in target outcomes through various mediators and theoretical pathways including self-efficacy, social support, self-regulation and motivation. Process evaluation is a key element in assessing the effect of any RCT. We developed a process evaluation framework and logic model, and the results of analyses using these will offer insights into why the intervention is or is not effective. Copyright © 2014.

  11. Analytic hierarchy process helps select site for limestone quarry expansion in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasanta Kumar; Ramcharan, Eugene K

    2008-09-01

    Site selection is a key activity for quarry expansion to support cement production, and is governed by factors such as resource availability, logistics, costs, and socio-economic-environmental factors. Adequate consideration of all the factors facilitates both industrial productivity and sustainable economic growth. This study illustrates the site selection process that was undertaken for the expansion of limestone quarry operations to support cement production in Barbados. First, alternate sites with adequate resources to support a 25-year development horizon were identified. Second, technical and socio-economic-environmental factors were then identified. Third, a database was developed for each site with respect to each factor. Fourth, a hierarchical model in analytic hierarchy process (AHP) framework was then developed. Fifth, the relative ranking of the alternate sites was then derived through pair wise comparison in all the levels and through subsequent synthesizing of the results across the hierarchy through computer software (Expert Choice). The study reveals that an integrated framework using the AHP can help select a site for the quarry expansion project in Barbados.

  12. Non-resonant Higgs-pair production in the b anti bb anti b final state at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardrope, David; Jansen, Eric; Konstantinidis, Nikos; Cooper, Ben; Falla, Rebecca; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    We present a particle-level study of the Standard Model non-resonant Higgs-pair production process in the b anti bb anti b final state, at the Large Hadron Collider at √(s) = 14 TeV. Each Higgs boson is reconstructed from a pair of close-by jets formed with the anti-k{sub t} jet clustering algorithm, with radius parameter R = 0.4. Given the kinematic properties of the produced Higgs bosons, this Higgs reconstruction approach appears to be more suitable than the use of largeradius jets that was previously proposed in the literature.We find that the sensitivity for observing this final state can be improved significantly when the full set of uncorrelated angular and kinematic variables of the 4b system is exploited, leading to a statistical significance of 1.8 per experiment with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab{sup -1}. (orig.)

  13. [Statistical Process Control (SPC) can help prevent treatment errors without increasing costs in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, R; Llueguera, E; Melero, A; Molero, J; Soler, N; Rueda, C; Paradinas, C

    2010-01-01

    Statistical Process Control (SPC) was applied to monitor patient set-up in radiotherapy and, when the measured set-up error values indicated a loss of process stability, its root cause was identified and eliminated to prevent set-up errors. Set up errors were measured for medial-lateral (ml), cranial-caudal (cc) and anterior-posterior (ap) dimensions and then the upper control limits were calculated. Once the control limits were known and the range variability was acceptable, treatment set-up errors were monitored using sub-groups of 3 patients, three times each shift. These values were plotted on a control chart in real time. Control limit values showed that the existing variation was acceptable. Set-up errors, measured and plotted on a X chart, helped monitor the set-up process stability and, if and when the stability was lost, treatment was interrupted, the particular cause responsible for the non-random pattern was identified and corrective action was taken before proceeding with the treatment. SPC protocol focuses on controlling the variability due to assignable cause instead of focusing on patient-to-patient variability which normally does not exist. Compared to weekly sampling of set-up error in each and every patient, which may only ensure that just those sampled sessions were set-up correctly, the SPC method enables set-up error prevention in all treatment sessions for all patients and, at the same time, reduces the control costs. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-top t-channel production with off-shell and non-resonant effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanastasiou, A.S.; Frederix, R.; Hirschi, V.; Maltoni, F.

    2013-05-01

    This letter details and discusses the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to t-channel electro-weak W + bj production, where finite top-width effects are consistently taken into account. The computation is done within the aMC rate at NLO framework and includes both resonant and non-resonant contributions as well as interferences between the two. Results are presented for the LHC and compared to those of the narrow-width approximation and effective theory approaches.

  15. Reflection effect of localized absorptive potential on non-resonant and resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, A.; Kumar, N.

    1992-06-01

    The reflection due to absorptive potential (-iV i ) for resonant and non-resonant tunneling has been considered. We show that the effect of reflection leads to a non-monotonic dependence of absorption on the strength V i with a maximum absorption of typically 0.5. This has implications for the operation of resonant tunneling devices. General conceptual aspects of absorptive potentials are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs

  16. Shape of the Hα emission line in non resonant charge exchange in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susino Bueno, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Hα line shape emitted from a maxwellian hydrogen plasma and produced by non resonant change exchange has been calculated. Its explicit shape depends on the ion temperature, on background neutral energy and on the relative shape of the collision cross section. A comparison between theoretical and experimental shapes of the Hα line is carried out to check the model and to deduce the ion plasma temperature. (author) [es

  17. Braking due to non-resonant magnetic perturbations and comparison with neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Sun, Y.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Khan, M. W. M.; Liang, Y.; Drake, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    The non-resonant magnetic perturbation (MP) braking is studied in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) and the experimental braking torque is compared with the torque expected by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory. The EXTRAP T2R active coils can apply magnetic perturbations with a single harmonic, either resonant or non-resonant. The non-resonant MP produces velocity braking with an experimental torque that affects a large part of the core region. The experimental torque is clearly related to the plasma displacement, consistent with a quadratic dependence as expected by the NTV theory. The work show a good qualitative agreement between the experimental torque in a RFP machine and NTV torque concerning both the torque density radial profile and the dependence on the non-resonant MP harmonic.

  18. E-Learning in Universities: Supporting Help-Seeking Processes by Instructional Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schworm, Silke; Gruber, Hans

    2012-01-01

    University students are more responsible than school students for their own learning. The role of self-regulated learning increases in virtual e-learning course environments. Academic help-seeking is an important strategy of self-regulated learning, but many students fail to use this strategy appropriately. A lack of information and a perceived…

  19. Single-top t-channel production with off-shell and non-resonant effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Frederix, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). TH Unit; Frixione, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). TH Unit; ITPP, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hirschi, V. [ITPP, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maltoni, F. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Centre of Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology

    2013-05-15

    This letter details and discusses the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to t-channel electro-weak W{sup +}bj production, where finite top-width effects are consistently taken into account. The computation is done within the aMC rate at NLO framework and includes both resonant and non-resonant contributions as well as interferences between the two. Results are presented for the LHC and compared to those of the narrow-width approximation and effective theory approaches.

  20. Non-Resonant Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting Utilizing Phase Transformation in Relaxor Ferroelectric Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Finkel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in phase transition transduction enabled the design of a non-resonant broadband mechanical energy harvester that is capable of delivering an energy density per cycle up to two orders of magnitude larger than resonant cantilever piezoelectric type generators. This was achieved in a [011] oriented and poled domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal, mechanically biased to a state just below the ferroelectric rhombohedral (FR-ferroelectric orthorhombic (FO phase transformation. Therefore, a small variation in an input parameter, e.g., electrical, mechanical, or thermal will generate a large output due to the significant polarization change associated with the transition. This idea was extended in the present work to design a non-resonant, multi-domain magnetoelectric composite hybrid harvester comprised of highly magnetostrictive alloy, [Fe81.4Ga18.6 (Galfenol or TbxDy1-xFe2 (Terfenol-D], and lead indium niobate–lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT domain engineered relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. A small magnetic field applied to the coupled device causes the magnetostrictive element to expand, and the resulting stress forces the phase change in the relaxor ferroelectric single crystal. We have demonstrated high energy conversion in this magnetoelectric device by triggering the FR-FO transition in the single crystal by a small ac magnetic field in a broad frequency range that is important for multi-domain hybrid energy harvesting devices.

  1. Anomalous non-resonant microwave absorption in SmFeAs(O,F) polycrystalline sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onyancha, R.B., E-mail: 08muma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, 1710 (South Africa); Shimoyama, J. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Singh, S.J. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Hayashi, K.; Ogino, H. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Srinivasu, V.V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, 1710 (South Africa)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) line shape in evolved with microwave power. • Observed a cross over from ‘normal’ absorption to ‘anomalous’ absorption as a function of microwave power. • The anomalous absorption has been explained in the context of non-hysteretic Josephson junction. - Abstract: Here we present the non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) studies on SmFeAsO{sub 0.88}F{sub 0.12} polycrystalline sample measured at 6.06 K with the magnetic field swept from −250 G to +250 G at a frequency of 9.45 GHz. It was observed that the (NRMA) line shape evolves as a function of microwave power. Again, the signal intensity increases from 22.83 µW to 0.710 mW where it reaches a maximum and quite remarkably it changed from ‘normal’ absorption to ‘anomalous’ absorption at 2.247 mW, then the intensity decreases with further increase of microwave power. The crossover from ‘normal’ to ‘anomalous’ NRMA absorption and its dependence on microwave power is a new phenomenon in iron pnictides superconductors and we have attributed this anomaly to come from non-hysteretic Josephson junction.

  2. Non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for car-key applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Hehn, T.; Thewes, M.; Kuehne, I.; Frey, A.; Scholl, G.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel non-resonant electromagnetic energy harvester for application in a remote car-key, to extend the lifetime of the battery or even to realize a fully energy autonomous, maintenance-free car-key product. Characteristic for a car-key are low frequency and large amplitude motions during normal daily operation. The basic idea of this non-resonant generator is to use a round flat permanent magnet moving freely in a round flat cavity, which is packaged on both sides by printed circuit boards embedded with multi-layer copper coils. The primary goal of this structure is to easily integrate the energy harvester with the existing electrical circuit module into available commercial car-key designs. The whole size of the energy harvester is comparable to a CR2032 coin battery. To find out the best power-efficient and optimal design, several magnets with different dimensions and magnetizations, and various layouts of copper coils were analysed and built up for prototype testing. Experimental results show that with an axially magnetized NdFeB magnet and copper coils of design variant B a maximum open circuit voltage of 1.1V can be observed.

  3. Helping International Students Succeed Academically through Research Process and Plagiarism Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops on the research process and plagiarism were designed to meet the needs of international students at the University at Albany. The research process workshop covered formulating research questions, as well as locating and evaluating sources. The plagiarism workshop focused on acknowledging sources, quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing…

  4. Temporary stages and motivational variables: Two complementary perspectives in the help-seeking process for mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle Del Valle, Gema; Carrió, Carmen; Belloch, Amparo

    2017-10-09

    Help-seeking for mental disorders is a complex process, which includes different temporary stages, and in which the motivational variables play an especially relevant role. However, there is a lack of instruments to evaluate in depth both the temporary and motivational variables involved in the help-seeking process. This study aims to analyse in detail these two sets of variables, using a specific instrument designed for the purpose, to gain a better understanding of the process of treatment seeking. A total of 152 patients seeking treatment in mental health outpatient clinics of the NHS were individually interviewed: 71 had Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, 21 had Agoraphobia, 18 had Major Depressive Disorder), 20 had Anorexia Nervosa, and 22 had Cocaine Dependence. The patients completed a structured interview assessing the help-seeking process. Disorder severity and quality of life was also assessed. The patients with agoraphobia and with major depression took significantly less time in recognising their mental health symptoms. Similarly, patients with major depression were faster in seeking professional help. Motivational variables were grouped in 3 sets: motivators for seeking treatment, related to the negative impact of symptoms on mood and to loss of control over symptoms; motivators for delaying treatment, related to minimisation of the disorder; and stigma-associated variables. The results support the importance of considering the different motivational variables involved in the several stages of the help-seeking process. The interview designed to that end has shown its usefulness in this endeavour. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Business health reporting process at Bruce Power helps drive successful plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing and implementing consistent and comprehensive measures of performance on a large multi-reactor unit nuclear power plant site is a significant challenge. Linking these performance measures back to licence compliance standards and all aspects of the operations, engineering, maintenance and support activities is needed to ensure cohesive site-wide safe operations and satisfy regulatory needs. At Bruce Power, Canada's largest independently-owned nuclear power producer, a Business Health reporting process has been developed to provide a standardized performance rating scheme. The reporting process ties all self assessment activities to common management principles and process structure areas that comprise the Bruce Power Management System. The principles used for performance ratings link directly back to the operating licenses and the primary referenced management system standard. The Business Health reporting process provides a natural business and regulatory oversight framework report that is easily understood and consistently measured over time. The rating data is derived from easily understood quantitative and qualitative descriptions that can be trended over time. The results derived from semi-annual Business Health reports provide an ongoing overall measure of Bruce Power's management system effectiveness for enabling and sustaining required business results and high standards of safety. (author)

  6. Suppression of Literal Meanings in L2 Idiom Processing: Does Context Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslicka, Anna B.

    2011-01-01

    Most current idiom processing models acknowledge, after Gernsbacher and Robertson (1999) that deriving an idiomatic meaning entails suppression of contextually inappropriate, literal meanings of idiom constituent words. While embedding idioms in the rich disambiguating context can promote earlier suppression of incompatible literal meanings,…

  7. Does ERP Hands-On Experience Help Students Learning Business Process Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzo, Thomas; Han, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, more and more business schools are attempting to teach business processes (BPs) by using enterprise resource planning (ERP) software in their curricula. Currently, most studies involving ERP software in the academy have concentrated on learning and teaching via self-assessment surveys or curriculum integration. This research…

  8. Conserving forest biological diversity: How the Montreal Process helps achieve sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Nelson; Guy Robertson; Kurt. Riitters

    2015-01-01

    Forests support a variety of ecosystems, species and genes — collectively referred to as biological diversity — along with important processes that tie these all together. With the growing recognition that biological diversity contributes to human welfare in a number of important ways such as providing food, medicine and fiber (provisioning services...

  9. Angiographic determination of the left-ventricular myocardial volume with the help of digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, W.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, digital image processing could for the first time be introduced as a new method to screen the myocardium in the left-ventricular angiocardiography. The method makes a reliable quantitative determination of the muscle mass of the left ventricle possible. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Helping organizations to address their effort toward the implementation of improvements in their software process

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Mata, Mirna Ariadna; Mejia-Miranda, Jezreel; Valtierra-Alvarado, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Due to the importance of Software Development Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the software industry, it is necessary to guarantee the quality of their products. In this context, the implementation of software process improvements offers an attractive way to achieve it. Unfortunately, the lack of knowledge on how to address the improvement effort makes the implementation of software improvements in SMEs a path full of obstacles, and most of the times impossible to achieve. In order to h...

  11. Use what you can: Storage, abstraction processes and perceptual adjustments help listeners recognize reduced forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja ePoellmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three eye-tracking experiments tested whether native listeners recognized reduced Dutch words better after having heard the same reduced words, or different reduced words of the same reduction type and whether familiarization with one reduction type helps listeners to deal with another reduction type. In the exposure phase, a segmental reduction group was exposed to /b/-reductions (e.g., minderij instead of binderij, 'book binder' and a syllabic reduction group was exposed to full-vowel deletions (e.g., p'raat instead of paraat, 'ready', while a control group did not hear any reductions. In the test phase, all three groups heard the same speaker producing reduced-/b/ and deleted-vowel words that were either repeated (Experiments 1 & 2 or new (Experiment 3, but that now appeared as targets in semantically neutral sentences. Word-specific learning effects were found for vowel-deletions but not for /b/-reductions. Generalization of learning to new words of the same reduction type occurred only if the exposure words showed a phonologically consistent reduction pattern (/b/-reductions. In contrast, generalization of learning to words of another reduction type occurred only if the exposure words showed a phonologically inconsistent reduction pattern (the vowel deletions; learning about them generalized to recognition of the /b/-reductions. In order to deal with reductions, listeners thus use various means. They store reduced variants (e.g., for the inconsistent vowel-deleted words and they abstract over incoming information to build up and apply mapping rules (e.g., for the consistent /b/-reductions. Experience with inconsistent pronunciations leads to greater perceptual flexibility in dealing with other forms of reduction uttered by the same speaker than experience with consistent pronunciations.

  12. Visual speech information: a help or hindrance in perceptual processing of dysarthric speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrie, Stephanie A

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of visual speech information on perceptual processing of neurologically degraded speech. Fifty listeners identified spastic dysarthric speech under both audio (A) and audiovisual (AV) conditions. Condition comparisons revealed that the addition of visual speech information enhanced processing of the neurologically degraded input in terms of (a) acuity (percent phonemes correct) of vowels and consonants and (b) recognition (percent words correct) of predictive and nonpredictive phrases. Listeners exploited stress-based segmentation strategies more readily in AV conditions, suggesting that the perceptual benefit associated with adding visual speech information to the auditory signal-the AV advantage-has both segmental and suprasegmental origins. Results also revealed that the magnitude of the AV advantage can be predicted, to some degree, by the extent to which an individual utilizes syllabic stress cues to inform word recognition in AV conditions. Findings inform the development of a listener-specific model of speech perception that applies to processing of dysarthric speech in everyday communication contexts.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of non-resonant magneto-mechanical low-frequency vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammari, Abdullah; Caskey, Logan; Negrete, Johnny; Bardaweel, Hamzeh

    2018-03-01

    This article presents a non-resonant magneto-mechanical vibration energy harvester. When externally excited, the energy harvester converts vibrations into electric charge using a guided levitated magnet oscillating inside a multi-turn coil that is fixed around the exterior of the energy harvester. The levitated magnet is guided using four oblique mechanical springs. A prototype of the energy harvester is fabricated using additive manufacturing. Both experiment and model are used to characterize the static and dynamic behavior of the energy harvester. Measured restoring forces show that the fabricated energy harvester retains a mono-stable potential energy well with desired stiffness nonlinearities. Results show that magnetic spring results in hardening effect which increases the resonant frequency of the energy harvester. Additionally, oblique mechanical springs introduce geometric, negative, nonlinear stiffness which improves the harvester's response towards lower frequency spectrum. The unique design can produce a tunable energy harvester with multi-well potential energy characteristics. A finite element model is developed to estimate the average radial flux density experienced by the multi-turn coil. Also, a lumped parameter model of the energy harvester is developed and validated against measured data. Both upward and downward frequency sweeps are performed to determine the frequency response of the harvester. Results show that at higher excitation levels hardening effects become more apparent, and the system dynamic response turns into non-resonant. Frequency response curves exhibit frequency jump phenomena as a result of coexistence of multiple energy states at the frequency branch. The fabricated energy harvester is hand-held and measures approximately 100.5 [cm3] total volume. For a base excitation of 1.0 g [m/s2], the prototype generates a peak voltage and normalized power density of approximately 3.5 [V] and 0.133 [mW/cm3 g2], respectively, at 15.5 [Hz].

  14. Recursiveness in learning processes: An analogy to help software development for ABA intervention for autistic kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Giovambattista; Premarini, Claudio; Leuzzi, Martina; Di Blasi, Melina; Squatrito, Valeria

    2017-11-01

    The operant was conceptualized by Skinner as a class of behaviors which have common effect on the environment and that, as a class can be shown to vary lawfully in their relations to the other environmental variables, namely antecedents and consequences. And Skinner himself underlined the fact that "operant field is the very field purpose of behavior". The operant offers interesting basic and applied characteristic to conceptualize complex behavior as a recursive process of learning. In this paper we will discuss how the operant concept can be applied in the implementation of software oriented to increase cognitive skills in autistic children and provide an example.

  15. Evaluation of the professional process portfolio: an innovative tool to help develop and demonstrate leadership competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Elisabeth S; Chacko, Mariam R; Acosta, Amy B; Hergenroeder, Albert C; Wiemann, Constance M

    2015-02-01

    The professional process portfolio (PPP) was adopted by the Maternal Child and Health Bureau (MCHB) as an 'innovation' in best practice for all Leadership in Education and Adolescent Health (LEAH) Training Programs; however it had not been formally evaluated. Thus the objective was to evaluate the utility of the PPP for graduates of the LEAH training program in terms of (1) how alumni have used, adapted, and applied it since completing fellowship, (2) what fellows learned or gained through completing it, and (3) how it can be improved for continued use in training programs. Graduates from six disciplines were asked via telephone or email to participate in a survey regarding their experience with the PPP. Descriptive statistics were generated for demographic characteristics and closed-choice questions. Responses to open-ended questions were analyzed by a team of faculty using framework analysis. Sixty-one graduates completed surveys. The majority (85%) found the PPP useful and utilized it post-graduation for multiple purposes in professional development: interviewing, training, and referencing previous work. Graduates recommended that the PPP be improved by making it electronic, discipline-specific, and providing earlier and more frequent instruction from faculty on expectations of creating it. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: accomplishment, experiential learning, skills and accountability, and a best practice of learning. The PPP was an effective personal learning tool for the majority of graduates and enhanced graduates' experiences. We highlight the ways that the PPP may facilitate the development of learning experiences associated with MCH leadership competence.

  16. Radioactive waste management in France, how successive crises helped the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborini, J.

    2000-01-01

    Since the start of the nuclear program in the early 70s, the acceptance of nuclear power by the public is an evolving process which involves many different actors and more and more, the local one. The radioactive waste management field also suffered from this deterioration of public opinion concerning nuclear power. Therefore, this text explains how National Radioactive Waste Agency (ANDRA) changed its policy in this matter notably through its experience in the implementation of its high-level (HLW), long-lived waste management program. ANDRA was created in 1979 to manage waste generated by the nuclear power programme. In 1984, ANDRA was asked to ensure the replacement of the Centre de la Manche, by undertaking studies for a new disposal facility with a capacity of 1 million cubic meters. Discussions with local elected representatives and the social fabric were a key element in the successful implementation of the new disposal facility. It is important to recognise, however, that social consensus about the site was not immediate: it required more than 400 public meetings and the creation of a local information committee consisting of elected representatives, associations and ANDRA In 1987, concurrently with the construction of the Centre de l'Aube, investigations started on the implementation of underground laboratories as a preliminary step to the construction of a repository for long-lived HLW. The approach used was very similar to that for surface disposal sites. However, three years after scientific and technical work campaigns had been launched on the pre-selected sites, all reconnaissance activities had to be stopped due to the opposition of the public and elected representatives. The government finally decreed a moratorium on the management of all long-lived HLW

  17. Key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms in an emergency care - could an ERP system help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Elina; Korvenranta, Heikki; Lundgren-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms from the nursing management viewpoint in an emergency care. Through these descriptions, we aimed at identifying possibilities for using enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to support decision making in emergency care. Hospitals are increasingly moving to process-based workings and at the same time new information system in healthcare are developed and therefore it is essential to understand the strengths and weaknesses of current processes better. A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was employed. Critical Incidents were collected with an open-ended questionnaire. The sample (n=50), 13 head nurses and 37 registered nurses, was purposeful selected from three acute hospitals in southern Finland. The process of patients with heart symptoms in emergency care was described. We identified three competence categories where special focus should be placed to achieve successful process of patients with heart symptoms: process-oriented competencies, personal/management competencies and logistics oriented competencies. Improvement of decision making requires that the care processes are defined and modeled. The research showed that there are several happenings in emergency care where an ERP system could help and support decision making. These happenings can be categorized in two groups: 1) administrative related happenings and 2) patient processes related happenings.

  18. Near infrared spectroscopy based monitoring of extraction processes of raw material with the help of dynamic predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixia; Suo, Tongchuan; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Heshui; Li, Zheng

    2018-03-01

    The control of batch-to-batch quality variations remains a challenging task for pharmaceutical industries, e.g., traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) manufacturing. One difficult problem is to produce pharmaceutical products with consistent quality from raw material of large quality variations. In this paper, an integrated methodology combining the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and dynamic predictive modeling is developed for the monitoring and control of the batch extraction process of licorice. With the spectra data in hand, the initial state of the process is firstly estimated with a state-space model to construct a process monitoring strategy for the early detection of variations induced by the initial process inputs such as raw materials. Secondly, the quality property of the end product is predicted at the mid-course during the extraction process with a partial least squares (PLS) model. The batch-end-time (BET) is then adjusted accordingly to minimize the quality variations. In conclusion, our study shows that with the help of the dynamic predictive modeling, NIRS can offer the past and future information of the process, which enables more accurate monitoring and control of process performance and product quality.

  19. Nonlinear response of a forced van der Pol-Duffing oscillator at non-resonant bifurcations of codimension two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, J.C.; Zhang, N.

    2009-01-01

    Non-resonant bifurcations of codimension two may appear in the controlled van der Pol-Duffing oscillator when two critical time delays corresponding to a double Hopf bifurcation have the same value. With the aid of centre manifold theorem and the method of multiple scales, the non-resonant response and two types of primary resonances of the forced van der Pol-Duffing oscillator at non-resonant bifurcations of codimension two are investigated by studying the possible solutions and their stability of the four-dimensional ordinary differential equations on the centre manifold. It is shown that the non-resonant response of the forced oscillator may exhibit quasi-periodic motions on a two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) torus. The primary resonant responses admit single and mixed solutions and may exhibit periodic motions or quasi-periodic motions on a 2D torus. Illustrative examples are presented to interpret the dynamics of the controlled system in terms of two dummy unfolding parameters and exemplify the periodic and quasi-periodic motions. The analytical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the results of numerical integration of the original delay differential equation.

  20. Performance analysis and experimental verification of mid-range wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Wang, Jingyu; Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency analysis of a mid-range wireless energy transfer system is performed through non-resonant magnetic coupling. It is shown that the self-resistance of the coils and the mutual inductance are critical in achieving a high efficiency, which is indicated by our theoretical...

  1. Non-resonant energy harvester with elastic constraints for low rotating frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sebastián P.; Febbo, Mariano; Gatti, Claudio D.; Ramirez, José M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a non-resonant piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) which is designed to capture energy from low frequency rotational vibration. The proposed device works out of the plane of rotation where the motion of a mass-spring system is transferred to a piezoelectric layer with the intention to generate energy to power wireless structural monitoring systems or sensors. The mechanical structure is formed by two beams with rigid and elastic boundary conditions at the clamped end. On the free boundaries, heavy masses connected by a spring are placed in order to increase voltage generation and diminish the natural frequency. A mathematical framework and the equations governing the energy-harvesting system are presented. Numerical simulations and experimental verifications are performed for different rotation speeds ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 Hz. An output power of 125 μW is obtained for maximum rotating frequency demonstrating that the proposed design can collect enough energy for the suggested application.

  2. The non-resonant kink modes triggering strong sawtooth-like crashes in the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erzhong; Igochine, V.; Dumbrajs, O.; Xu, L.; Chen, K.; Shi, T.; Hu, L.

    2014-12-01

    Evolution of the safety factor (q) profile during L-H transitions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) was accompanied by strong core crashes prior to regular sawtooth behavior. These crashes appeared in the absence of q = 1 (q is the safety factor) rational surface inside the plasma. Analysis indicates that the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is destabilized and phase-locked with the m/n = 1/1 non-resonant kink mode (the q = 1 rational surface is absent) due to the self-consistent evolution of plasma profiles as the L-H transition occurs (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). The growing m/n = 1/1 mode destabilizes the m/n = 2/2 kink mode which eventually triggers the strong crash due to an anomalous heat conductivity, as predicted by the transport model of stochastic magnetic fields using experimental parameters. It is also shown that the magnetic topology changes with the amplitude of m/n = 2/2 mode and the value of center safety factor in a reasonable range.

  3. Search for resonant and enhanced non-resonant di-Higgs production in the yybb channel at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents the run 2 search for di-Higgs production in the yybb channel. In the Standard Model, this process provides a lens on the Higgs self-coupling and it is enhanced, resonantly or non-resonantly, in many extensions to the SM. It is appealing thanks to a clean diphoton trigger, relatively small backgrounds, and excellent diphoton mass resolution. It is also particularly important in the range from 260 to 400 GeV, where QCD backgrounds and combinatorics make other channels (4b, bbtautau) challenging. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 1/fb of proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Search for resonant and enhanced non-resonant di-Higgs production in the yybb channel at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the run 2 search for di-Higgs production in the yybb channel. In the Standard Model, this process provides a lens on the Higgs self-coupling and it is enhanced, resonantly or non-resonantly, in many extensions to the SM. It is appealing thanks to a clean diphoton trigger, relatively small backgrounds, and excellent diphoton mass resolution. It is also particularly important in the range from 260 to 400 GeV, where QCD backgrounds and combinatorics make other channels (4b, bbtautau) challenging. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 1/fb of proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Getting Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents & Students Home > Special Features > Getting Help Getting Help Resources from NIAAA Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding ... and find ways to make a change. Professional help Your doctor. Primary care and mental health practitioners ...

  6. Polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering from spin-density-wave modulation in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    We present a polarization study of non-resonant X-ray magnetic scattering in pure chromium. Satellite reflections are observed at +/-Q and +/-2Q, where Q is the modulation wave vector of an itinerant spin-density-wave. The first and second harmonics are confirmed to have magnetic and charge origin, respectively, by means of polarimetry without using an analyzer crystal. This alternative technique eliminates intolerable intensity loss at an analyzer by utilizing the sample crystal also as an analyzer crystal

  7. Attachment and separation-individuation process among young adults as volunteers in the field of psychosocial help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonida Kobal Možina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Distinctions among different attachment styles often appear to be unclear. These distinction inadequacies also result from superficial knowledge of psychodynamic factors of the attachment system, which the concept of internal working models often neglects. In my research I have examined the appearance of specific object relations characteristics in the adulthood period. In other words, I have examined the solution of the separation-individuation process according to the internal working models of self and other, which exist in the background of the attachment system. Twenty-one young adult volunteers included in this research took part in a psychotherapeutic camp in order to help children and adolescents with psychosocial problems. Information was gathered with the Interpersonal Relations Questionnaire (Bartholomew in Horowitz, 1991, the Test of Object Relations (Žvelc, 1998 and with two semi-structured interviews. Among volunteers with a negative self-model, dimensions of symbiotic merging, egocentrism, separation anxiety and social isolation were more evident, whereas volunteers with a negative other-model expressed fear of engulfment more clearly. Results have confirmed that volunteers with prevailingly insecure attachment styles have problems with separation-individuation process and with achieving reciprocal autonomy.

  8. [Legal issues of physician-assisted euthanasia. Part II--Help in the dying process, direct and indirect active euthanasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Johannes; Röbel, Andreas; Parzeller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In Germany, physician-assisted euthanasia involves numerous risks for the attending physician under criminal and professional law. In the absence of clear legal provisions, four different categories of euthanasia have been developed in legal practice and the relevant literature: help in the dying process, direct active euthanasia, indirect active euthanasia and passive euthanasia. The so-called "help during the dying process" by administering medically indicated analgesic drugs without a life-shortening effect is exempt from punishment if it corresponds to the will of the patient. If the physician omits to give such analgesic drugs although the patient demands them, this is deemed a punishable act of bodily injury. The same applies if the physician administers analgesics against the will of the patient. Medically indicated pain treatment which has a potential or certain life-shortening effect (indirect active euthanasia) is permitted under certain conditions: if there are no alternative and equally suitable treatment options without the risk of shortening the patient's life, if the patient has given his consent to the treatment and if the physician does not act with the intention to kill. The deliberate killing of a dying or terminally ill patient for the purpose of ending his suffering (direct active euthanasia) is prohibited. This includes both deliberately killing a patient against or without his will (by so-called "angels of death") and the killing of a patient who expressly and earnestly demands such an act from his physician (killing on request/on demand). Physician-assisted suicide is generally not liable to punishment in Germany. Nevertheless, the action may be subject to punishment if the physician omits to rescue the life of an unconscious suicide victim. "Palliative sedation" is regarded as a special case. It may become necessary if certain symptoms in the terminal stage of a fatal disease unbearable for the patient cannot be controlled by any other

  9. Control of neoclassical tearing mode by electron cyclotron current drive and non-resonant helical field application in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Kozo; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Arimoto, Hideki; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    On tokamak plasmas like ITER, it is necessary to stabilize neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) because the NTM reduces plasma temperature and fusion power output. For the analysis of stabilizing NTM in fusion plasmas, the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and the non-resonant external helical field (NRHF) application are simulated using the 1.5-dimensional equilibrium/transport simulation code (TOTAL code). The 3/2 NTM is stabilized by only external helical field, but the 2/1 mode is not stabilized by only external helical field in the present model. The stabilization time becomes shorter by the combination of ECCD and NRHF than that by ECCD alone. (author)

  10. Second and third peaks in the non-resonant microwave absorption spectra of superconducting Bi2212 crystals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Srinivasu, V V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available . Bhat, S.V., Ganguly, P., Ramakrishnan, T.V., Rao, C.N.R.: J. Phys. C 20, L559 (1987) 2. Blazey, K.W., Muller, K.A., Bednorz, J.G., Berlinger, W., Amoretti, G., Buluggiu, E., Vera, A., Matacotta, F.C.: Phys. Rev. B 36, 7241 (1987) 3. Kachaturyan, K... 10.1007/s10948-009-0530-5 O R I G I NA L PA P E R Second and Third Peaks in the Non-resonant Microwave Absorption Spectra of Superconducting Bi2212 Crystals V.V. Srinivasu Received: 19 August 2009 / Accepted: 25 August 2009 ' Springer Science...

  11. Going Online: Helping Technical Communicators Help Translators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Patricia; Lord van Slyke, Melanie; Starke-Meyerring, Doreen; Thompson, Aimee

    1999-01-01

    Explains why technical communicators should help translators. Offers tips for creating "translation-friendly" documentation. Describes the research and design process used by the authors to create an online tutorial that provides technical communicators at a medical technology company the information they need to help them write and…

  12. Maximum coherent superposition state achievement using a non-resonant pulse train in non-degenerate three-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Li; Niu, Yueping; Jin, Luling; Gong, Shangqing

    2010-01-01

    The coherent superposition state of the lower two levels in non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms is investigated using the accumulative effects of non-resonant pulse trains when the repetition period is smaller than the decay time of the upper level. First, using a rectangular pulse train, the accumulative effects are re-examined in the non-resonant two-level atoms and the modified constructive accumulation equation is analytically given. The equation shows that the relative phase and the repetition period are important in the accumulative effect. Next, under the modified equation in the non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms, we show that besides the constructive accumulation effect, the use of the partial constructive accumulation effect can also achieve the steady state of the maximum coherent superposition state of the lower two levels and the latter condition is relatively easier to manipulate. The analysis is verified by numerical calculations. The influence of the external levels in such a case is also considered and we find that it can be avoided effectively. The above analysis is also applicable to pulse trains with arbitrary envelopes.

  13. An investigation into the individual experience of seeking help for bulimia nervosa, and the process of integrating and searching for identity following recovery from bulimia.

    OpenAIRE

    Turek, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    This research dossier was developed as an integral part of the practitioner doctorate degree in counselling psychology, and has evolved over the last three years. It contains three pieces of research: one literature review and two empirical studies. The literature review particularly focuses on the available help for bulimia nervosa and the process of seeking help for this type of human distress. By exploring the current trends in the eating disorders field and implications for individuals wh...

  14. Search Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance and search help resource listing examples of common queries that can be used in the Google Search Appliance search request, including examples of special characters, or query term seperators that Google Search Appliance recognizes.

  15. Phase and ellipticity dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution in non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, M; Wane, S T, E-mail: mamadou.faye@ucad.edu.sn [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Boulevard Martin Luther King, (Corniche Ouest) BP 5005-Dakar Fann (Senegal)

    2011-03-14

    We study the ellipticity and the dependence on the phase lag (lead) (between the semimajor and the semiminor axes of the field components) of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) in the non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. We establish exact analytical expressions for azimuthal PAD for 3s, 3p and 3d excited initial states, marked by the occurrence of an asymmetric term. This term gives rise to elliptic dichroism (ED), which can be obtained in two ways: either with the left (versus right) ellipticity, or with the phase lag (versus lead); for 3s and 3p initial states, it is shown that the quantum phase of continua is directly related to the phase lag, one-photon below-threshold ionization, and indirectly one photon above. Another important result is that the magnetic sublevels, m = 0, for 3p and m = {+-}1, for 3d, do not contribute to the azimuthal PAD. Our numerical results show, for 3s and 3d, and near-threshold ionization, that the PAD has maxima either along the semimajor or the semiminor axis, while for above-threshold ionization, they are always shifted from these axes. However, the maxima of the corresponding ED coincide with the PAD maxima, while for 3p, they are shifted from the PAD minima. A strong dependence of the ED sign is noted, regardless of the state or the process. However, strong ED signals are obtained for the 3s initial state and below-threshold ionization.

  16. Software supervisor: extension to the on-line codes utilization in order to help the process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.; Dumas, M.; Evrard, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Calculation is a complex problem, which is usually solved by human experts. The complexity and the potentiality of the software increases. The introduction of the calculations in real time systems needs additional specifications. These aims cab be achieved by means of the control of the knowledge based systems, as well as by the introduction of the software techniques in the existing computer world. The following examples are given: the automatic generation of the calculation methods (in control language) in the modular code systems; the calculations monitoring by the expert systems, in order to help the on-line operations [fr

  17. Application of catastrophe theory to a point model for bumpy torus with neoclassical non-resonant electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, A; Vahala, G [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1983-12-01

    The point model for the toroidal core plasma in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (with neoclassical non-resonant electrons) is examined in the light of catastrophe theory. Even though the point model equations do not constitute a gradient dynamic system, the equilibrium surfaces are similar to those of the canonical cusp catastrophe. The point model is then extended to incorporate ion cyclotron resonance heating. A detailed parametric study of the equilibria is presented. Further, the nonlinear time evolution of these equilibria is studied, and it is observed that the point model obeys the delay convention (and hence hysteresis) and shows catastrophes at the fold edges of the equilibrium surfaces. Tentative applications are made to experimental results.

  18. A study on the complexity of a business cycle model with great excitements in non-resonant condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Junhai; Cui Yaqiang; Liulixia

    2009-01-01

    Based on the researches of Szydlowski and Krawiec, we studied the inherent complexity of a chaotic business cycle with great excitements in non-resonant condition. First, we got the first-order and second-order approximate solutions of the system by using multiple scale method. Then deduced the formulation reflecting the complex relations between vibration, phase, bifurcation parameter μ and excite frequency Ω of first-order solution. As the great excitement F varied, the global changes of the system solutions were analyzed. We also explored the different paths leading the systems with different parameter combinations into catastrophe region, fuzzy region or chaos region. Finally, we discussed the evolution trends of business cycle models under the above-mentioned conditions. Hence, this paper has some theoretical and practical significance.

  19. Helping Students Find Their Sweet Spot: A Teaching Approach Using the Sales Process to Find Jobs That Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Concha K.; Dugan, Riley G.; Popa, Eugen M.; Tarasi, Crina O.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of achieving person-job fit--and the role marketing educators play in developing students for career success--there remains a lack of guidance for faculty as they shepherd students through the career development process. This article details how the seven-stage selling process can be used as a basis for teaching the job…

  20. Coupling effects of resonant and discretized non-resonant continuum states in 4He+6Li scattering at 10 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, T.; Kanungo, R.; Samanta, C.; Ghosh, S.; Basu, P.; Rebel, H.

    1996-01-01

    Alpha- particle scattering from the resonant (3 + 1 ) and non-resonant continuum states of 6 Li is studied at incident energy 10 MeV/A. The α+d breakup continuum part within the excitation energy E ex = 1.475-2.475 MeV is discretized in two energy bins. Unlike the results at higher incident energies, here the coupled-channel calculations show significant breakup continuum coupling effects on the elastic and inelastic scattering. It is shown that even when the continuum-continuum coupling effects are strong, the experimental data of the ground state and the resonant as well as discretized non-resonant continuum states impose stringent constraint on the coupling strengths of the non-resonant continuum states. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Energy management via Internet. Process control system helps companies save energy; Energiemanagement via Internet. Prozessleitsystem hilft Unternehmen Energie sparen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-02-15

    In view of constantly rising oil and natural gas prices and the demand for environmentally compatible production processes, efficient use of energy is a decisive factor governing the productivity of an industrial company, now more than ever. (orig.)

  2. Searches for non-resonant new phenomena in final states with leptons and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Some recent searches for hints of processes beyond the standard model performed by the CMS collaboration are presented. These focused on the detection of new phenomena more indirectly than the direct observation of a resonance indicating the presence of a new particle. No significant deviation from the standard model expectations have been observed and constraints for new physics have been set in several well-motivated scenarios.

  3. Office of Adolescent Health medical accuracy review process--helping ensure the medical accuracy of Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jo Anne G; Moreno, Elizabeth L; Rice, Tara M

    2014-03-01

    The Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) developed a systematic approach to review for medical accuracy the educational materials proposed for use in Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) programs. This process is also used by the Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (ACYF) for review of materials used in the Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS) Program. This article describes the review process, explaining the methodology, the team implementing the reviews, and the process for distributing review findings and implementing changes. Provided also is the definition of "medically accurate and complete" as used in the programs, and a description of what constitutes "complete" information when discussing sexually transmitted infections and birth control methods. The article is of interest to program providers, curriculum developers and purveyors, and those who are interested in providing medically accurate and complete information to adolescents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Process Modeling for Energy Usage in “Smart House” System with a Help of Markov Discrete Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kravets

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Method for evaluating economic efficiency of technical systems using discrete Markov chains modelling illustrated by the system of “Smart house”, consisting, for example, of the three independently functioning elements. Dynamic model of a random power consumption process in the form of a symmetrical state graph of heterogeneous discrete Markov chain is built. The corresponding mathematical model of a random Markov process of power consumption in the “smart house” system in recurrent matrix form is being developed. Technique of statistical determination of probability of random transition elements of the system and the corresponding to the transition probability matrix of the discrete inhomogeneous Markov chain are developed. Statistically determined random transitions of system elements power consumption and the corresponding distribution laws are introduced. The matrix of transition prices, expectations for the possible states of a system price transition and, eventually, the cost of Markov process of power consumption throughout the day.

  5. Design of Contactlessly Powered and Piezoelectrically Actuated Tools for Non-Resonant Vibration Assisted Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Silge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents a novel design approach for vibration assisted machining (VAM. A lot of research has already been done regarding the influence of superimposed vibrations during a milling process, but there is almost no information about how to design a VAM tool where the tool is actually rotating. The proposed system consists of a piezoelectric actuator for vibration excitation, an inductive contactless energy transfer system and an electronic circuit for powering the actuated tool. The main benefit of transferring the required power without mechanical contact is that the maximum spindle speed is no longer restricted by friction of slip rings. A detailed model is shown that enables for preliminary estimation of the system’s response to different excitation signals. Experimental data are provided to validate the model. Finally, some parts are shown that have been manufactured using the contactlessly actuated milling tool.

  6. Chinese inpatients' subjective experiences of the helping process as viewed through examination of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Lin, Shu-Mei; Liao, Hsiao-Yuan; Lai, Mei-Chih

    2004-10-01

    This study examined Chinese inpatients' views on what aspects of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group worked to help their psychological and interpersonal problems and what traditional Chinese cultural values influenced their viewpoints. Nine Chinese inpatients with mental illness participated in the four-session nurses' focused, structured therapy group. After they completed the last session of therapy, they were invited to participate in a structured interview and a semi-structured interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms in nurses' focused, structured group therapy. The semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed to be further analysed according to the principal of content analysis. The results indicate that (i) all patients believed that a nurses' focused, structured group psychotherapy enhanced their interpersonal learning and improved the quality of their lives, (ii) traditional Chinese cultural values--those emphasizing the importance of maintaining harmonious interpersonal relationships--influenced the Chinese inpatients' expression of negative emotions in the group and their motivation on interpersonal learning. In conclusion, we found that transcultural modification for applying Western group psychotherapy in Chinese culture was needed. The modification included establishing a 'pseudo-kin' or 'own people' relationship among group members and the therapists, organizing warm-up exercises and structured activities, applying projective methods and focusing on the issues of interpersonal relationships and interpersonal problems. The small sample size of the present study raises questions regarding how representative the views of the sample are with respect to the majority of Chinese inpatients. Nevertheless, this preliminary study revealed a cultural aspect in nursing training that requires significant consideration in order to work effectively with Chinese patients. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  7. Client Perceptions of Helpfulness in Therapy: a Novel Video-Rating Methodology for Examining Process Variables at Brief Intervals During a Single Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocklin, Alexandra A; Mansell, Warren; Emsley, Richard; McEvoy, Phil; Preston, Chloe; Comiskey, Jody; Tai, Sara

    2017-11-01

    The value of clients' reports of their experiences in therapy is widely recognized, yet quantitative methodology has rarely been used to measure clients' self-reported perceptions of what is helpful over a single session. A video-rating method using was developed to gather data at brief intervals using process measures of client perceived experience and standardized measures of working alliance (Session Rating Scale; SRS). Data were collected over the course of a single video-recorded session of cognitive therapy (Method of Levels Therapy; Carey, 2006; Mansell et al., 2012). We examined the acceptability and feasibility of the methodology and tested the concurrent validity of the measure by utilizing theory-led constructs. Eighteen therapy sessions were video-recorded and clients each rated a 20-minute session of therapy at two-minute intervals using repeated measures. A multi-level analysis was used to test for correlations between perceived levels of helpfulness and client process variables. The design proved to be feasible. Concurrent validity was borne out through high correlations between constructs. A multi-level regression examined the independent contributions of client process variables to client perceived helpfulness. Client perceived control (b = 0.39, 95% CI .05 to 0.73), the ability to talk freely (b = 0.30, SE = 0.11, 95% CI .09 to 0.51) and therapist approach (b = 0.31, SE = 0.14, 95% CI .04 to 0.57) predicted client-rated helpfulness. We identify a feasible and acceptable method for studying continuous measures of helpfulness and their psychological correlates during a single therapy session.

  8. Divorce: Helping Children Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alicia S.; McBride, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Examines children's reactions to the divorce process and explores ways in which adults can promote growth and adjustment in children of divorce. Suggests ways in which parents, teachers, and counselors can help children. (RC)

  9. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-08-15

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  10. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  11. Simulation of non-resonant internal kink mode with toroidal rotation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, J. Y. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Tritz, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q profile and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m,n) = (1,1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2,1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode. [Breslau et al. Nucl. Fusion 51, 063027 (2011)]. The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and significant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important effects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with finite toroidal rotation using parameters and profiles of an NTSX plasma with a weakly reversed shear profile. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little effect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can significantly influence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1,1) mode and the induced (2,1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at finite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the effects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2,1) magnetic island even at a low level.

  12. The non-resonant kink modes triggering strong sawtooth-like crashes in the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Erzhong; Xu, L; Chen, K; Shi, T; Hu, L; Igochine, V; Dumbrajs, O

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of the safety factor (q) profile during L–H transitions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) was accompanied by strong core crashes prior to regular sawtooth behavior. These crashes appeared in the absence of q = 1 (q is the safety factor) rational surface inside the plasma. Analysis indicates that the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is destabilized and phase-locked with the m/n = 1/1 non-resonant kink mode (the q = 1 rational surface is absent) due to the self-consistent evolution of plasma profiles as the L–H transition occurs (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). The growing m/n = 1/1 mode destabilizes the m/n = 2/2 kink mode which eventually triggers the strong crash due to an anomalous heat conductivity, as predicted by the transport model of stochastic magnetic fields using experimental parameters. It is also shown that the magnetic topology changes with the amplitude of m/n = 2/2 mode and the value of center safety factor in a reasonable range. (paper)

  13. Phase and ellipticity dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution in non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faye, M; Wane, S T

    2011-01-01

    We study the ellipticity and the dependence on the phase lag (lead) (between the semimajor and the semiminor axes of the field components) of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) in the non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. We establish exact analytical expressions for azimuthal PAD for 3s, 3p and 3d excited initial states, marked by the occurrence of an asymmetric term. This term gives rise to elliptic dichroism (ED), which can be obtained in two ways: either with the left (versus right) ellipticity, or with the phase lag (versus lead); for 3s and 3p initial states, it is shown that the quantum phase of continua is directly related to the phase lag, one-photon below-threshold ionization, and indirectly one photon above. Another important result is that the magnetic sublevels, m = 0, for 3p and m = ±1, for 3d, do not contribute to the azimuthal PAD. Our numerical results show, for 3s and 3d, and near-threshold ionization, that the PAD has maxima either along the semimajor or the semiminor axis, while for above-threshold ionization, they are always shifted from these axes. However, the maxima of the corresponding ED coincide with the PAD maxima, while for 3p, they are shifted from the PAD minima. A strong dependence of the ED sign is noted, regardless of the state or the process. However, strong ED signals are obtained for the 3s initial state and below-threshold ionization.

  14. Will the Conscious-Subconscious Pacing Quagmire Help Elucidate the Mechanisms of Self-Paced Exercise? New Opportunities in Dual Process Theory and Process Tracing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklewright, Dominic; Kegerreis, Sue; Raglin, John; Hettinga, Florentina

    2017-07-01

    The extent to which athletic pacing decisions are made consciously or subconsciously is a prevailing issue. In this article we discuss why the one-dimensional conscious-subconscious debate that has reigned in the pacing literature has suppressed our understanding of the multidimensional processes that occur in pacing decisions. How do we make our decisions in real-life competitive situations? What information do we use and how do we respond to opponents? These are questions that need to be explored and better understood, using smartly designed experiments. The paper provides clarity about key conscious, preconscious, subconscious and unconscious concepts, terms that have previously been used in conflicting and confusing ways. The potential of dual process theory in articulating multidimensional aspects of intuitive and deliberative decision-making processes is discussed in the context of athletic pacing along with associated process-tracing research methods. In attempting to refine pacing models and improve training strategies and psychological skills for athletes, the dual-process framework could be used to gain a clearer understanding of (1) the situational conditions for which either intuitive or deliberative decisions are optimal; (2) how intuitive and deliberative decisions are biased by things such as perception, emotion and experience; and (3) the underlying cognitive mechanisms such as memory, attention allocation, problem solving and hypothetical thought.

  15. Sweden's help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Government of Sweden has decided to provide funds for the Agency to use for agreed projects in developing countries, and the Board of Governors has authorized the Director General to conclude an agreement to bring the scheme into effect. The Agency will administer the funds and will select and process requests to be considered for their use; it will also be responsible for project supervision and control. Responsibility for implementing the agreement on behalf of the Swedish Government is entrusted to the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) which functions under the auspices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and administers Swedish bilateral technical, financial and humanitarian assistance. SIDA has already provided, or has agreed to provide, assistance for a number of Agency technical co-operation programmes and for the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste. (author)

  16. The effect of time perspectives on mental health information processing and help-seeking attitudes and intentions in younger versus older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Julie; Mackenzie, Corey S; Menec, Verena H; Bailis, Daniel S

    2017-03-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory posits that changes in time perspective over the lifespan are associated with distinct goals and motivations. Time perspectives and their associated socioemotional motivations have been shown to influence information processing and memory, such that motivation-consistent information is more likely to be remembered and evaluated more positively. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of motivation-consistent mental health information on memory for and evaluations of this information, as well as help-seeking attitudes and intentions to seek mental health services. We randomly assigned an Internet-based sample of 160 younger (18-25) and 175 older (60-89) adults to read a mental health information pamphlet that emphasized time perspectives and motivations relevant to either young adulthood (future-focused) or late adulthood (present-focused). Participants completed measures assessing their time perspective, memory for and subjective evaluation of the pamphlet, and help-seeking attitudes and intentions. The time perspective manipulation had no effect on memory for pamphlet information or help-seeking attitudes and intentions. There was, however, a significant interaction between time perspective and pamphlet version on the rated liking of the pamphlet. Although motivation-consistent information only affected perceptions of that information for present-focused (mostly older) individuals, this finding has important implications for enhancing older adults' mental health literacy.

  17. Can Process Understanding Help Elucidate The Structure Of The Critical Zone? Comparing Process-Based Soil Formation Models With Digital Soil Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, T.; Román, A.; Peña, A.; Laguna, A.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    There is a need for better understanding the processes influencing soil formation and the resulting distribution of soil properties in the critical zone. Soil properties can exhibit strong spatial variation, even at the small catchment scale. Especially soil carbon pools in semi-arid, mountainous areas are highly uncertain because bulk density and stoniness are very heterogeneous and rarely measured explicitly. In this study, we explore the spatial variability in key soil properties (soil carbon stocks, stoniness, bulk density and soil depth) as a function of processes shaping the critical zone (weathering, erosion, soil water fluxes and vegetation patterns). We also compare the potential of traditional digital soil mapping versus a mechanistic soil formation model (MILESD) for predicting these key soil properties. Soil core samples were collected from 67 locations at 6 depths. Total soil organic carbon stocks were 4.38 kg m-2. Solar radiation proved to be the key variable controlling soil carbon distribution. Stone content was mostly controlled by slope, indicating the importance of erosion. Spatial distribution of bulk density was found to be highly random. Finally, total carbon stocks were predicted using a random forest model whose main covariates were solar radiation and NDVI. The model predicts carbon stocks that are double as high on north versus south-facing slopes. However, validation showed that these covariates only explained 25% of the variation in the dataset. Apparently, present-day landscape and vegetation properties are not sufficient to fully explain variability in the soil carbon stocks in this complex terrain under natural vegetation. This is attributed to a high spatial variability in bulk density and stoniness, key variables controlling carbon stocks. Similar results were obtained with the mechanistic soil formation model MILESD, suggesting that more complex models might be needed to further explore this high spatial variability.

  18. Help Helps, but Only so Much: Research on Help Seeking with Intelligent Tutoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleven, Vincent; Roll, Ido; McLaren, Bruce M.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Help seeking is an important process in self-regulated learning (SRL). It may influence learning with intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs), because many ITSs provide help, often at the student's request. The Help Tutor was a tutor agent that gave in-context, real-time feedback on students' help-seeking behavior, as they were learning with an ITS.…

  19. How can hydrological modeling help to understand process dynamics in sparsely gauged tropical regions - case study Mata Âtlantica, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künne, Annika; Penedo, Santiago; Schuler, Azeneth; Bardy Prado, Rachel; Kralisch, Sven; Flügel, Wolfgang-Albert

    2015-04-01

    To ensure long-term water security for domestic, agricultural and industrial use in the emerging country of Brazil with fast-growing markets and technologies, understanding of catchment hydrology is essential. Yet, hydrological analysis, high resolution temporal and spatial monitoring and reliable meteo-hydrological data are insufficient to fully understand hydrological processes in the region and to predict future trends. Physically based hydrological modeling can help to expose uncertainties of measured data, predict future trends and contribute to physical understanding about the watershed. The Brazilian Atlantic rainforest (Mata Atlântica) is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. After the Portuguese colonization, its original expansion of 1.5 million km² was reduced to only 7% of the former area. Due to forest fragmentation, overexploitation and soil degradation, pressure on water resources in the region has significantly increased. Climatically, the region possesses distinctive wet and dry periods. While extreme precipitation events in the rainy season cause floods and landslides, dry periods can lead to water shortages, especially in the agricultural and domestic supply sectors. To ensure both, the protection of the remnants of Atlantic rainforest biome as well as water supply, a hydrological understanding of this sparsely gauged region is essential. We will present hydrological models of two meso- to large-scale catchments (Rio Macacu and Rio Dois Rios) within the Mata Âtlantica in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The results show how physically based models can contribute to hydrological system understanding within the region and answer what-if scenarios, supporting regional planners and decision makers in integrated water resources management.

  20. A model of sexually and physically victimized women's process of attaining effective formal help over time: the role of social location, context, and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Angie C; Adams, Adrienne; Bybee, Deborah; Campbell, Rebecca; Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Sullivan, Cris

    2012-09-01

    As empirical evidence has demonstrated the pervasiveness of sexual assault and intimate partner violence in the lives of women, and the links to poor mental health outcomes, attention has turned to examining how women seek and access formal help. We present a conceptual model that addresses prior limitations and makes three key contributions: It foregrounds the influence of social location and multiple contextual factors; emphasizes the importance of the attainment of effective formal help that meets women's needs and leads to positive mental health outcomes; and highlights the role of interventions in facilitating help attainment. We conclude with research and practice implications.

  1. Physician strives to create lean, clean health care machine. Studies of manufacturing processes may one day help make your practice more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D

    2001-01-01

    Elisabeth Hager, MD, MMM, CPE, is teaming up with scientists and industrialists to teach physicians how to apply principles of lean, total-quality manufacturing to their practices. She believes innovation and efficiencies can help doctors resurrect their profession's image and their control over it--and perhaps even reinvent American health care.

  2. Using built-in functions of Adobe Acrobat Pro DC to help the selection process in systematic reviews of randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Selin; Adams, Clive E; Brailsford, David F

    2016-02-18

    This letter describes a simple way of using Adobe Acrobat Pro DC to help select and auto-extract data from Portable Document Format (PDFs) of randomised trials in order to assist swift early selection of trials for a systematic review.

  3. Fighting for life: a qualitative analysis of the process of psychotherapy-assisted self-help in patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Alastair J; Phillips, Catherine; Stephen, Joanne; Edmonds, Claire

    2002-06-01

    This exploratory study is an attempt to define psychological attributes related to longer survival in patients with metastatic cancers. Previous published analyses have been limited in two ways. First, they have almost always been carried out on patients not receiving therapy; we have followed people receiving a year of group therapy, on the assumption that if mental qualities are to affect cancer progression, substantial mental change would be needed to alter the established balance between the cancer cells and host regulatory mechanisms. Second, the methods typically used to characterize patients' psychology have been self-report inventories, and many decades of research with such methods have largely failed to produce a consensus on what mental qualities, if any, promote survival. By contrast, we have used qualitative methods, allowing a much more in-depth analysis of the patients, without preliminary assumptions as to what would be important. The present report describes the results of a detailed qualitative analysis of data collected from 22 participants over a year of weekly group therapy. Using grounded methods, categories were derived from the extensive verbal data (comprising patients' written homework and therapists' notes), and linked in a model of change. By applying ratings to some of these categories, and combining these ratings, we derived a quantitative estimate of patients' "involvement in self-help." Rankings on degree of involvement corresponded quite closely with the quality of patients' experience and with their survival duration. There was a great range in degree of involvement, and various subgroupings could be discerned. Nine of the participants were classed as "highly involved," meaning that they devoted regular daily time, often several hours, to such self-help strategies as relaxation, mental imaging, meditation, cognitive monitoring and journalling. All but 1 of these patients enjoyed a good quality of life and lived at least 2 years

  4. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it ...

  5. Help prevent hospital errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000618.htm Help prevent hospital errors To use the sharing features ... in the hospital. If You Are Having Surgery, Help Keep Yourself Safe Go to a hospital you ...

  6. Performance evaluation of functioning of natural-industrial system of mining-processing complex with help of analytical and mathematical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosikov, I. I.; Klyuev, R. V.; Revazov, V. Ch; Pilieva, D. E.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes research and analysis of hazardous processes occurring in the natural-industrial system and effectiveness assessment of its functioning using mathematical models. Studies of the functioning regularities of the natural and industrial system are becoming increasingly relevant in connection with the formulation of the task of modernizing production and the economy of Russia as a whole. In connection with a significant amount of poorly structured data, it is complicated by regulations for the effective functioning of production processes, social and natural complexes, under which a sustainable development of the natural-industrial system of the mining and processing complex would be ensured. Therefore, the scientific and applied problems, the solution of which allows one to formalize the hidden structural functioning patterns of the natural-industrial system and to make managerial decisions of organizational and technological nature to improve the efficiency of the system, are very relevant.

  7. Help with Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Help With Hives KidsHealth / For Kids / Help With Hives What's in this article? What Are ... about what happened. The doctor can try to help figure out what might be causing your hives, ...

  8. A helping hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam de Klerk; Alice de Boer; Sjoerd Kooiker; Inger Plaisier; Peggy Schyns

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Hulp geboden   The help provided to people with a care need is about to undergo major changes in the Netherlands. People who need help will be expected to rely more on help from members of their network. What are the opportunities for informal carers and volunteers, and where

  9. Helping for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Allen; Oleson, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    In "Helping for Change," Allen Neuringer and Kathryn Oleson describe another strategy that individuals can use to achieve their green goals. You might ask, "How can helping someone else help me change when I'm in the habit of not fulfilling my own promises?" The authors answer that question by explaining how the social reinforcement in a helping…

  10. Synchronization of Two Non-Identical Coupled Exciters in a Non-Resonant Vibrating System of Linear Motion. Part II: Numeric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the quantitative analysis of the coupling dynamic characteristics of two non-identical exciters in a non-resonant vibrating system. The load torque of each motor consists of three items, including the torque of sine effect of phase angles, that of coupling sine effect and that of coupling cosine effect. The torque of frequency capture results from the torque of coupling cosine effect, which is equal to the product of the coupling kinetic energy, the coefficient of coupling cosine effect, and the sine of phase difference of two exciters. The motions of the system excited by two exciters in the same direction make phase difference close to π and that in opposite directions makes phase difference close to 0. Numerical results show that synchronous operation is stable when the dimensionless relative moments of inertia of two exciters are greater than zero and four times of their product is greater than the square of their coefficient of coupling cosine effect. The stability of the synchronous operation is only dependent on the structural parameters of the system, such as the mass ratios of two exciters to the vibrating system, and the ratio of the distance between an exciter and the centroid of the system to the equivalent radius of the system about its centroid.

  11. Synchronization of Two Non-Identical Coupled Exciters in a Non-Resonant Vibrating System of Linear Motion. Part I: Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analytical approach is proposed to study the feature of frequency capture of two non-identical coupled exciters in a non-resonant vibrating system. The electromagnetic torque of an induction motor in the quasi-steady-state operation is derived. With the introduction of two perturbation small parameters to average angular velocity of two exciters and their phase difference, we deduce the Equation of Frequency Capture by averaging two motion equations of two exciters over their average period. It converts the synchronization problem of two exciters into that of existence and stability of zero solution for the Equation of Frequency Capture. The conditions of implementing frequency capture and that of stabilizing synchronous operation of two motors have been derived. The concept of torque of frequency capture is proposed to physically explain the peculiarity of self-synchronization of the two exciters. An interesting conclusion is reached that the moments of inertia of the two exciters in the Equation of Frequency Capture reduce and there is a coupling moment of inertia between the two exciters. The reduction of moments of inertia and the coupling moment of inertia have an effect on the stability of synchronous operation.

  12. TRAVELLERS: a school-based early intervention programme helping young people manage and process change, loss and transition. Pilot phase findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Pauline; Coggan, Carolyn; Bennett, Sara

    2003-06-01

    This paper outlines the conceptual background and findings from the pilot phase of TRAVELLERS--an early intervention programme designed to enhance protective factors for young people experiencing change, loss and transition events and early signs of emotional distress. The pilot study aimed to determine whether TRAVELLERS was a feasible, acceptable and promising intervention for young people within secondary schools in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The conceptual origins of the TRAVELLERS programme are described in terms of: adolescent mental health concerns; emerging mental health promotion theory and practice; and prevention and early intervention models. The key elements of the TRAVELLERS programme are described. The programme was piloted in two secondary schools, one rural and one urban with 34 participants (females n = 24, males n = 10). Evaluation methods included: review of programme materials; identification of potential selection tools appropriate to Year 9 students; analysis of selection questionnaire; and conduct of feedback from participants, facilitators and parents/caregivers. The TRAVELLERS programme provides a means of identifying and selecting young people who may benefit from participating in an early intervention programme. The programme has achieved a statistically significant reduction in participants' distress (p Young people were overwhelmingly enthusiastic about most aspects of TRAVELLERS. School personnel reported that TRAVELLERS was an appropriate and acceptable programme to the school. Targeted interventions provided within a supportive school environment can contribute to enhancing protective factors such as personal and interpersonal coping strategies, increased help-seeking behaviour, and young people feeling more positive about themselves and their lives. The pilot programme has been amended and prepared for a two year trial phase in 10 secondary schools during 2002-2003.

  13. Does Guiding Toward Task-Relevant Information Help Improve Graph Processing and Graph Comprehension of Individuals with Low or High Numeracy? An Eye-Tracker Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Carmen; Junghans, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Individuals with low numeracy have difficulties with understanding complex graphs. Combining the information-processing approach to numeracy with graph comprehension and information-reduction theories, we examined whether high numerates' better comprehension might be explained by their closer attention to task-relevant graphical elements, from which they would expect numerical information to understand the graph. Furthermore, we investigated whether participants could be trained in improving their attention to task-relevant information and graph comprehension. In an eye-tracker experiment ( N = 110) involving a sample from the general population, we presented participants with 2 hypothetical scenarios (stomach cancer, leukemia) showing survival curves for 2 treatments. In the training condition, participants received written instructions on how to read the graph. In the control condition, participants received another text. We tracked participants' eye movements while they answered 9 knowledge questions. The sum constituted graph comprehension. We analyzed visual attention to task-relevant graphical elements by using relative fixation durations and relative fixation counts. The mediation analysis revealed a significant ( P attention to task-relevant information, which did not differ between the 2 conditions. Training had a significant main effect on visual attention ( P attention to task-relevant graphical elements than individuals with low numeracy. With appropriate instructions, both groups can be trained to improve their graph-processing efficiency. Future research should examine (e.g., motivational) mediators between visual attention and graph comprehension to develop appropriate instructions that also result in higher graph comprehension.

  14. Toddlers Help a Peer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepach, Robert; Kante, Nadine; Tomasello, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Toddlers are remarkably prosocial toward adults, yet little is known about their helping behavior toward peers. In the present study with 18- and 30-month-old toddlers (n = 192, 48 dyads per age group), one child needed help reaching an object to continue a task that was engaging for both children. The object was within reach of the second child who helped significantly more often compared to a no-need control condition. The helper also fulfilled the peer's need when the task was engaging only for the child needing help. These findings suggest that toddlers' skills and motivations of helping do not depend on having a competent and helpful recipient, such as an adult, but rather they are much more flexible and general. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  15. Understanding clinician attitudes towards implementation of guided self-help cognitive behaviour therapy for those who hear distressing voices: using factor analysis to test normalisation process theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Cassie M; Strauss, Clara; Hayward, Mark; Cavanagh, Kate

    2017-07-24

    The Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) has been used to understand the implementation of physical health care interventions. The current study aims to apply the NPT model to a secondary mental health context, and test the model using exploratory factor analysis. This study will consider the implementation of a brief cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (CBTp) intervention. Mental health clinicians were asked to complete a NPT-based questionnaire on the implementation of a brief CBTp intervention. All clinicians had experience of either working with the target client group or were able to deliver psychological therapies. In total, 201 clinicians completed the questionnaire. The results of the exploratory factor analysis found partial support for the NPT model, as three of the NPT factors were extracted: (1) coherence, (2) cognitive participation, and (3) reflexive monitoring. We did not find support for the fourth NPT factor (collective action). All scales showed strong internal consistency. Secondary analysis of these factors showed clinicians to generally support the implementation of the brief CBTp intervention. This study provides strong evidence for the validity of the three NPT factors extracted. Further research is needed to determine whether participants' level of seniority moderates factor extraction, whether this factor structure can be generalised to other healthcare settings, and whether pre-implementation attitudes predict actual implementation outcomes.

  16. Grief: Helping Young Children Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Frances B.

    2008-01-01

    In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

  17. Mixed deep learning and natural language processing method for fake-food image recognition and standardization to help automated dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezgec, Simon; Eftimov, Tome; Bucher, Tamara; Koroušić Seljak, Barbara

    2018-04-06

    The present study tested the combination of an established and a validated food-choice research method (the 'fake food buffet') with a new food-matching technology to automate the data collection and analysis. The methodology combines fake-food image recognition using deep learning and food matching and standardization based on natural language processing. The former is specific because it uses a single deep learning network to perform both the segmentation and the classification at the pixel level of the image. To assess its performance, measures based on the standard pixel accuracy and Intersection over Union were applied. Food matching firstly describes each of the recognized food items in the image and then matches the food items with their compositional data, considering both their food names and their descriptors. The final accuracy of the deep learning model trained on fake-food images acquired by 124 study participants and providing fifty-five food classes was 92·18 %, while the food matching was performed with a classification accuracy of 93 %. The present findings are a step towards automating dietary assessment and food-choice research. The methodology outperforms other approaches in pixel accuracy, and since it is the first automatic solution for recognizing the images of fake foods, the results could be used as a baseline for possible future studies. As the approach enables a semi-automatic description of recognized food items (e.g. with respect to FoodEx2), these can be linked to any food composition database that applies the same classification and description system.

  18. Handi Helps, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handi Helps, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The six issues of Handi Helps presented here focus on specific issues of concern to the disabled, parents, and those working with the disabled. The two-page handi help fact sheets focus on the following topics: child sexual abuse prevention, asthma, scoliosis, the role of the occupational therapist, kidnapping, and muscular dystrophy. Each handi…

  19. Designing an intervention to help people with colorectal adenomas reduce their intake of red and processed meat and increase their levels of physical activity: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowswell George

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cases of colorectal cancer (CRC arise from adenomatous polyps and malignant potential is greatest in high risk adenomas. There is convincing observational evidence that red and processed meat increase the risk of CRC and that higher levels of physical activity reduce the risk. However, no definitive randomised trial has demonstrated the benefit of behaviour change on reducing polyp recurrence and no consistent advice is currently offered to minimise patient risk. This qualitative study aimed to assess patients’ preferences for dietary and physical activity interventions and ensure their appropriate and acceptable delivery to inform a feasibility trial. Methods Patients aged 60–74 included in the National Health Service Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (NHSBCSP were selected from a patient tracking database. After a positive faecal occult blood test (FOBt, all had been diagnosed with an intermediate or high risk adenoma (I/HRA at colonoscopy between April 2008 and April 2010. Interested patients and their partners were invited to attend a focus group or interview in July 2010. A topic guide, informed by the objectives of the study, was used. A thematic analysis was conducted in which transcripts were examined to ensure that all occurrences of each theme had been accounted for and compared. Results Two main themes emerged from the focus groups: a experiences of having polyps and b changing behaviour. Participants had not associated polyp removal with colorectal cancer and most did not remember being given any information or advice relating to this at the time. Heterogeneity of existing diet and physical activity levels was noted. There was a lack of readiness to change behaviour in many people in the target population. Conclusions This study has confirmed and amplified recently published factors involved in developing interventions to change dietary and physical activity behaviour in this population. The need to tailor

  20. Hooked on Helping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, James; McCord, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, teens presenting at a symposium on peer-helping programs describe how caring for others fosters personal growth and builds positive group cultures. Their individual thoughts and opinions are expressed.

  1. Being 'green' helps profitability?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Pollution reduction beyond regulatory compliance is gaining momentum among firms, but managers ask if being 'green' helps profitability. Evidence suggests it doesn't hurt, but when we see environmentally attractive firms with sound financial performance, it cannot yet say which is cause and which is effect [it

  2. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  3. Help with Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be placed early to help speech and language development. If your child needs “tubes” (see below), they can be put ... example, instead of saying the sound /t/, your child may always substitute the sound /k/. The words “toy” and "truck” then come out as “kay” and “ ...

  4. Helping Kids Handle Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... world around them, preteens also may worry about world events or issues they hear about on the news or at ... the news. Parents can help by discussing these issues, offering accurate ... and stress about a world event that's beyond your control, kids are likely ...

  5. Helping Them Grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidler, William J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Three articles present suggestions to help elementary teachers promote student development. The first describes games that encourage a sense of community. The second deals with making parent teacher conferences a positive experience. The third discusses how to give confused children who are involved in custody battles an alternative to acting out.…

  6. Helping Struggling Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    About 5 to 15 percent of teachers in 2.7 million public-education classrooms are marginal or incompetent. Assistance plans offer structure, purpose, and remedial help. Plans have six components: definition of the problem, statement of objectives, intervention strategies, a timeline, data-collection procedures, and final judgment. (MLH)

  7. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  8. Foundation helps refurbish buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenzind, B.

    2006-01-01

    This article looks at the activities of the Swiss 'Climate-Cent' foundation, which is helping support the energetic refurbishment of building envelopes. The conditions which have to be fulfilled to receive grants are explained. Work supported includes the replacement of windows and the insulation of roofs and attics as well as outside walls. Details on the financial support provided and examples of projects supported are given. The source of the finance needed to provide such support - a voluntary levy on petrol - and further support provided in certain Swiss cantons is commented on

  9. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  10. Natural and Professional Help during Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Paul A.; Zax, Melvin

    Although few people bring their psychological problems to mental health professionals, research in the area of 'natural' help is rudimentary. To investigate the process and effectiveness of natural professional groups in helping individuals experiencing marital disruption, 42 helpers (14 mental health professionals, 14 divorce lawyers, and 14…

  11. How NGOs have helped shape resettlement

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Slaughter

    2017-01-01

    NGOs have a rich history of involvement in case identification and referral for resettlement, and have helped to increase numbers, improve processes and make resettlement more equitable, and accountable, for refugees.

  12. Does Taking Photographs Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Since many people tend to use photographs as memory anchors, this author decided she wanted to know whether the process of capturing and manipulating an image taken during a learning activity would act as a memory anchor for children's visual, auditory and kinaesthetic memories linked to their cognitive learning at the time. In plain English,…

  13. Helping Children Cooperate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    There are occasions in life when the competitive process is appropriate. But when people consider the relationships in their lives--with friends, family members, coworkers, and the larger community--they realize the value of cooperation. When adults give children the chance to cooperate, to work together toward a solution or a common goal like…

  14. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...... studies the case of a wireless multi-layer multicast setting and shows that the judicious use of network coding allows devices with different computational capabilities to trade-off processing complexity for an improved quality of service. As a consequence, individual devices can determine their required...... effort, while bringing significant advantages to the system as a whole. Network coding is used as a key element to reduce signaling in order to deliver the multicast service. More importantly, our proposed approach focuses on creating some structure in the transmitted stream by allowing inter-layer...

  15. Plutonium helps probe protein, superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists are finding that plutonium can be a useful research tool that may help them answer important questions in fields as diverse as biochemistry and solid-state physics. This paper reports that U.S. research involving plutonium is confined to the Department of Energy's national laboratories and centers around nuclear weapons technology, waste cleanup and disposal, and health effects. But at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists also are using plutonium to probe the biochemical behavior of calmodulin, a key calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium-regulated processes in biological systems. At Argonne National Laboratory, another team is trying to learn how a superconductor's properties are affected by the 5f electrons of an actinide like plutonium

  16. Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bibliography Acknowledgements Tips to Help Your Child through Early Adolescence No Child Left Behind Printable ... Information About... Transforming Teaching Family and Community Engagement Early Learning Helping Your Child Our mission is to promote student achievement and ...

  17. Compensatory help-seeking in young and older adults: does seeking help, help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alea, Nicole; Cunningham, Walter R

    2003-01-01

    Asking other people for help is a compensatory behavior that may be useful across the life span to enhance functioning. Seventy-two older and younger men and women were either allowed to ask for help or were not allowed to ask for help while solving reasoning problems. Although the older adults answered fewer problems correctly, they did not seek additional help to compensate for their lower levels of performance. Younger adults sought more help. There were no age differences, however, in the types of help sought: indirect help (e.g., hints) was sought more often than direct help (e.g., asking for the answer). Exploratory analyses revealed that one's ability level was a better indicator than age of the utility of help-seeking. Findings are interpreted in the context of social and task-related influences on the use of help-seeking as a compensatory behavior across the life span.

  18. Helping HELP with limited resources: the Luquillo experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.N. Scatena; JR Ortiz-Zayas; J.F. Blanco-Libreros

    2008-01-01

    By definition the HELP approach involves the active participation of individuals from a wide range of disciplines and backgrounds, including representatives of industry, academics, natural resource managers, and local officials and community leaders. While there is considerable enthusiasm and support for the integrated HELP approach, a central problem for all HELP...

  19. How to become an authentic speaker. Even sincere speeches often come across as contrived. A four-step process will help you create a true emotional connection with your audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Nick

    2008-11-01

    Like the best-laid schemes of mice and men, the best-rehearsed speeches go oft astray. No amount of preparation can counter an audience's perception that the speaker is calculating or insincere. Why do so many managers have trouble communicating authenticity to their listeners? Morgan, a communications coach for more than two decades, offers advice for overcoming this difficulty. Recent brain research shows that natural, unstudied gestures--what Morgan calls the " second conversation"--express emotions or impulses a split second before our thought processes have turned them into words. So the timing of practiced gestures will always be subtly off--just enough to be picked up by listeners' unconscious ability to read body language. If you can't practice the unspoken part of your delivery, what can you do? Tap into four basic impulses underlying your speech--to be open to the audience, to connect with it, to be passionate, and to "listen" to how the audience is responding--and then rehearse your presentation with each in mind. You can become more open, for instance, by imagining that you're speaking to your spouse or close friend. To more readily connect, focus on needing to engage your listeners and then to keep their attention, as if you were speaking to a child who isn't heeding your words. To convey your passion, identify the feelings behind your speech and let them come through. To listen, think about what the audience is probably feeling when you step up to the podium and be alert to the nonverbal messages of its members. Internalizing these four impulses as you practice will help you come across as relaxed and authentic--your body language will take care of itself.

  20. Motivational interviewing: helping patients move toward change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Luann

    2012-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a valuable tool for nurses to help patients address behavior change. MI has been found effective for helping patients with multiple chronic conditions, adherence issues, and lifestyle issues change their health behaviors. For Christian nurses, MI is consistent with biblical principles and can be seen as a form of ministry. This article overviews the process of MI, stages of change, and offers direction for further learning.

  1. New Vaccines Help Protect You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues New Vaccines Help Protect You Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... with a few deaths. Therefore, this vaccine will help reduce one of our most common and potentially ...

  2. Help My House Program Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about Help My House, a program that helps participants reduce their utility bills by nearly 35 percent through low-cost loans for EE improvements. Learn more about the key features, approaches, funding sources, and achievements of this program.

  3. A Grounded Theory on Helping Behavior and Its Shaping Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Grounded Theory on Helping Behavior and Its Shaping Factors

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In social psychology, the attribution model of helping behavior suggests that beliefs of the helping target’s responsibility for the need for help evoke affective motivators such as feelings of pity, sympathy, or anger. The affective motivation leads to helping or not helping the target. The current emergent theory is an enhancement of this theory by incorporating other personal and situational variables.Through the use of classic grounded theory, I interviewed 80 participants from different De La Salle Schools in the Philippines. This yielded over 1300 individual incidents that were compared and contrasted to form codes, categories and subcategories. A theory on the decision making process of helping emerged that incorporates the helper’s personal conviction, and rational deliberations of the situation. The desire to help is based on the helper’s rationalemotive beliefs (philosophical ideals and values that nurture helping and the knowledge of the nature of risk/problem and relational-emotive ties (with the one who needs help and with a social group that nurtures helping. The desire to help undergoes a process of rationalpragmatic-deliberations on the appropriateness of the recipients need of help, the cost of helping, the helper’s capability of helping, and the logistics of helping before the actual helping occurs. The theory has implications for current social psychological theories of helping, and the use of classic grounded theory research.

  4. Help!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Caralee

    2006-01-01

    This article presents ten time-saving ideas for teachers. One great time-saving tip is to come in an hour early once or twice a week for grading papers. It is also a great idea if teachers will not give tests on Friday in order to reduce their weekend work.

  5. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  6. Cultural Intentionality: The Core of Effective Helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Lloyd by cautioning counselors regarding the centrality of multicultural awareness in counseling curricula. Maintains the primacy of culture cannot be denied as the first dimension in our thinking as professional helpers. Cultural intentionality is proposed as a metagoal of the helping process--the integration of cultural awareness…

  7. Love and her place in helping professions

    OpenAIRE

    MARTYNKOVÁ, Ester

    2011-01-01

    - Basic concepts: charity, helping professions, client, social worker, social work - describe "love if", "love it" and "I love you and love dot". Their advantages and disadvantages compared. - explanation of the meaning of unconditional love - types and application of unconditional love in the work of social worker - implementation (adoption process) - the answer to the question we need to change?

  8. How Computer Games Help Children Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David Williamson

    2008-01-01

    This book looks at how particular video and computer games--such as "Digital Zoo", "The Pandora Project", "SodaConstructor", and more--can help teach children and students to think like doctors, lawyers, engineers, urban planners, journalists, and other professionals. In the process, new "smart games" will give them the knowledge and skills they…

  9. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Page Content Article Body Teens are more ... younger the first time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to have sex ...

  10. Toddlers Selectively Help Fair Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Surian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that infants and toddlers are inclined to help prosocial agents and assign a positive valence to fair distributions. Also, they expect that positive and negative actions directed toward distributors will conform to reciprocity principles. This study investigates whether toddlers are selective in helping others, as a function of others’ previous distributive actions. Toddlers were presented with real-life events in which two actresses distributed resources either equally or unequally between two puppets. Then, they played together with a ball that accidentally fell to the ground and asked participants to help them to retrieve it. Participants preferred to help the actress who performed equal distributions. This finding suggests that by the second year children’s prosocial actions are modulated by their emerging sense of fairness.HighlightsToddlers (mean age = 25 months are selective in helping distributors.Toddlers prefer helping a fair rather than an unfair distributor.Toddlers’ selective helping provides evidence for an early sense of fairness.

  11. Process Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbertson, Keith

    2002-01-01

    Standard utilities can help you collect and interpret your Linux system's process accounting data. Describes the uses of process accounting, standard process accounting commands, and example code that makes use of process accounting utilities.

  12. Better Quality of IT Help Desk Service in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Bin Sulaiman; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Norzalina Nasirudin

    2012-01-01

    Information Technology Centre (ITC) is a part of technical support division which plays important role as technical service provider for Nuclear Malaysia. As the only IT service provider, it could not be excused from the issue of delivering quality of service for better serving organization. The implementation of IT help desk system has improved the quality of the help desk service through better management of knowledge and communication. In this system, help desk business process has been re engineered in which communications and knowledge is captured in every stage of help desk processes. Although the system is for IT Help desk, surprisingly, its framework has been successfully implemented at other technical support providers like Engineering Division (BKJ) and Instrumentation and Automation Center (IAC). This paper describes the reengeneering of IT help desk business process which focus on the management of IT knowledge and help desk communication for better quality of service. (author)

  13. Going Local to Find Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury Going Local to Find Help Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... phone numbers, maps and directions, such as To Find Out More: Visit www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/ ...

  14. Menopause: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Email Print Print and Share (PDF 375 KB) Menopause (sometimes called “the change of life”) is a ...

  15. Production of the new pixel detector for the upgrade of the CMS experiment and study of anomalous couplings in the non-resonant Higgs bosons pair production in p-p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367286; Dorigo, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The present Ph.D thesis describes the work done within the CMS collaboration on the pixel detector upgrade and on the search for non-resonant di-Higgs production in p-p collision at LHC. The CMS upgrade project foresees, inter alia, the production of a new pixel detector (CMS Phase 1 Pixel Upgrade) to be commissioned at the beginning of 2017. Crucial part of the upgrade is the new readout chip (ROC) for the silicon sensor, psi46digV2respin, designed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with a 250 nm CMOS technology. The thesis concerns the study and the development of test procedures for this new readout chip. Thanks to a long stay at PSI, I could provide an important contribution to the debug phases of the first version of the ROC and TBM, the chip that handles the various ROCs in the pixel module, and to the development of the software used by the whole collaboration for the ROC and module testing. Furthermore, I managed the ROC wafers test from the early project phases. The ROCs are produced on silicon wa...

  16. Helping Teachers Help Themselves: Professional Development That Makes a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Tannehill, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    For school administrators to facilitate impactful teacher professional development, a shift in thinking that goes beyond the acquisition of new skills and knowledge to helping teachers rethink their practice is required. Based on review of the professional development literature and our own continued observations of professional development, this…

  17. Unpaid help: who does what?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam de Klerk; Alice de Boer; Sjoerd Kooiker; Peggy Schyns

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Informele hulp: wie doet er wat? There is currently a great deal of interest in the Netherlands in people’s reliance on their own networks in times of need. What can people do for each other when someone needs help because of health problems? And what are they already

  18. Helping fans to get fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueland, Jennifer

    A health and weight loss programme supported by nurses and delivered by professional football clubs in Scotland has been hailed a success in helping men to lose weight sustainably. It uses participants love of football to motivate them to make healthy lifestyle changes.

  19. HELP: Healthy Early Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Laura A.

    2008-01-01

    A daily intensive supplemental reading and writing program was developed to assist students who were: 1. identified with a language disability and 2. identified as at-risk for reading failure in an urban elementary school. The purpose of the program was to help these students understand and develop the connection between oral and written language…

  20. Osteoporosis Treatment: Medications Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help Osteoporosis treatment may involve medication along with lifestyle change. Get answers to some of the most common ... 2017. Khan M, et al. Drug-related adverse events of osteoporosis therapy. ... and management of osteoporosis. European Journal of Rheumatology. 2017;4: ...

  1. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  2. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and more flexible Improve your balance Increase how ... To make your calves and ankle muscles stronger: Hold on to a solid ... of a chair. Stand with your back straight and slightly bend ...

  3. Identification of organic iodocompounds in the PUREX process with the help of methods for chromatographic separation and spectrometric detection as well as characterization of their behavior during extraction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaul, G.; Gibau, F.; Knoechel, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the system HNO 3 KI, Dodecan and TBP the radiolytic reactive behaviour of the described compounds during the dissolution of nuclear fuel elements was simulated. External γ-irradiation gave the best informations. As a consequence of radiolyticly induced reactions several volatile and non-volatile iodoorganic compounds like iodoalkanes, iodonitroalkanes and iodonitroalkylphosphates are formed. They were separated by gaschromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For HPLC a special photolytic/electrochemical detector with comparable sensitivity like the electroncapture detector in the GC-field was developed. With the help of the two described chromatographic techniques the different iodoorganic compounds could be separated singularily or in groups of isomers. The separation of all compounds demands two-dimensional chromatographies including the capillary-SFC, which was not available for this project. Most of the iodoorganic compounds could be identified by comparison of the retention times of well known compounds. In the other cases, the compounds were studied mass-spectrometrically. Unfortunately all available ionisation techniques (EI; CI; FAB) were too hard for the labile C-I-bond. Therefore an identification of these compounds was not possible. In any case, instructive fingerprint spectra are available enabling relationships between the generation of the iodoorganic compounds and the reaction conditions during their formation. (orig.) [de

  4. Why humans might help strangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola Jayne Raihani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans regularly help strangers, even when interactions are apparently unobserved and unlikely to be repeated. Such situations have been simulated in the laboratory using anonymous one-shot games (e.g. prisoner's dilemma where the payoff matrices used make helping biologically altruistic. As in real-life, participants often cooperate in the lab in these one-shot games with non-relatives, despite that fact that helping is under negative selection under these circumstances. Two broad explanations for such behavior prevail. The 'big mistake' or 'mismatch' theorists argue that behavior is constrained by psychological mechanisms that evolved predominantly in the context of repeated interactions with known individuals. In contrast, the cultural group selection theorists posit that humans have been selected to cooperate in anonymous one-shot interactions due to strong between-group competition, which creates interdependence among in-group members. We present these two hypotheses before discussing alternative routes by which humans could increase their direct fitness by cooperating with strangers under natural conditions. In doing so, we explain why the standard lab games do not capture real-life in various important aspects. First, asymmetries in the cost of perceptual errors regarding the context of the interaction (one-shot versus repeated; anonymous versus public might have selected for strategies that minimize the chance of making costly behavioral errors. Second, helping strangers might be a successful strategy for identifying other cooperative individuals in the population, where partner choice can turn strangers into interaction partners. Third, in many real-world situations individuals are able to parcel investments such that a one-shot interaction is turned into a repeated game of many decisions. Finally, in contrast to the assumptions of the prisoner's dilemma model, it is possible that benefits of cooperation follow a non-linear function of

  5. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  6. Use of neural network based auto-associative memory as a data compressor for pre-processing optical emission spectra in gas thermometry with the help of neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenko, S.A.; Filippov, A.V.; Pal, A.F.; Persiantsev, I.G.; Serov, A.O.

    2003-01-01

    Determination of temperature from optical emission spectra is an inverse problem that is often very difficult to solve, especially when substantial noise is present. One of the means that can be used to solve such a problem is a neural network trained on the results of modeling of spectra at different temperatures (Dolenko, et al., in: I.C. Parmee (Ed.), Adaptive Computing in Design and Manufacture, Springer, London, 1998, p. 345). Reducing the dimensionality of the input data prior to application of neural network can increase the accuracy and stability of temperature determination. In this study, such pre-processing is performed with another neural network working as an auto-associative memory with a narrow bottleneck in the hidden layer. The improvement in the accuracy and stability of temperature determination in presence of noise is demonstrated on model spectra similar to those recorded in a DC-discharge CVD reactor

  7. Perceptions of Help Given to Healthy Older Mothers by Adult Daughters: Ways of Initiating Help and Types of Help Given

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Tanya S.; Grusec, Joan E.; Bernardini, Silvia Cortese

    2003-01-01

    Older mother-adult daughter dyads (N = 43) addressed two issues pertaining to the ways in which help is initiated (offered, requested, and imposed help) and type of help given (instrumental help, advice, and emotional support) a) mothers' reasoning about these aspects of help, and b) daughters' understanding of mothers' feelings. Both groups noted…

  8. How to help teachers' voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatweber, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that teachers are at high risk of developing occupational dysphonia, and it has been widely accepted that the vocal characteristics of a speaker play an important role in determining the reactions of listeners. The functions of breathing, breathing movement, breathing tonus, voice vibrations and articulation tonus are transmitted to the listener. So we may conclude that listening to the teacher's voice at school influences children's behavior and the perception of spoken language. This paper presents the concept of Schlaffhorst-Andersen including exercises to help teachers improve their voice, breathing, movement and their posture. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Trying-out a walking help

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2016-01-01

    that constitute the trial as a joint activity in which the impaired participant becomes a competent participant and independent walker. The analysis is based on video recordings from a case study in which a person with brain injury is trying out a new type of walking help. The trial is understood as a situated...... learning process in which the participants prepare, enact and assess the performance of the technology supported walking. The paper distinguishes two iterative phases in which the impaired person is constituted as an independent walker: the adjustment and assessment of a body-device relation and, further...

  10. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Piotti

    Full Text Available Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor. The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the

  11. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  12. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  13. Organizational Development: Can MBO Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Eric L.

    1973-01-01

    Author describes Organization Development as a process of diagnosis, selection of appropriate interventions'' or solutions to the problem, and reinforcing the new behavior so that it becomes a way of life. (GB)

  14. REACHING THE COMPUTING HELP DESK

    CERN Multimedia

    Miguel MARQUINA; Roger WOOLNOUGH; IT/User Support

    1999-01-01

    The way to contact the Computing Help Desk (also known as 'UCO' and hosted by IT Division as an entry point for general computing issues) has been streamlined in order to facilitate access to it. A new telephone line and email address have been set: Phone number: 78888Email: Helpdesk@cern.chhopefully easier to remember. Both entries are operational since last December. The previous number and email address remain valid and have been turned into aliases of the above. However we encourage using the latter at your convenience from now on. For additional information please see the article published at the CERN Computing Newsletter 233:http://consult.cern.ch/cnl/233/art_uco.htmlDo not hesitate to contact us (by email to User.Relations@cern.ch) for additional information or feedback regarding this matter.Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina, Roger WoolnoughIT/UserSupport

  15. REACHING THE COMPUTING HELP DESK

    CERN Multimedia

    Miguel Marquina

    2000-01-01

    You may find it useful to glue the information below, e.g. near/at your computer, for those occasions when access to computer services is not possible. It presents the way to contact the Computing Help Desk (hosted by IT Division as an entry point for general computing issues). Do not hesitate to contact us (by email to User.Relations@cern.ch) for additional information or feedback regarding this matter.Your contact for general computing problems or queriesPhone number:(+41 22 76) 78888Opening Hours:From Monday to Friday 8:30-17:30Email:Helpdesk@cern.chWeb:http://consult.cern.ch/service/helpdeskMiguel MarquinaIT Division/UserSupport

  16. Intervention: Help a Loved One Overcome Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intervention: Help a loved one overcome addiction An intervention can motivate someone to seek help for alcohol or drug misuse, compulsive eating, or ... successful. By Mayo Clinic Staff It's challenging to help a loved one struggling with any type of ...

  17. K-Based Help desk System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Norzalina Nasirudin; Khairiel Adyani Abdul Ghani

    2011-01-01

    K-based Help desk system is a knowledge oriented web based system that provides support to technical service providers in order to improve delivery of their services. It is a multi-centric system which focuses not only on end-users but the various levels of technical support services as well as the management through the utilization of knowledge which resides and grows within the system. Though providing user friendly system and capturing technical knowledge to improve efficiencies are the main objectives of this system, educating users with technical information through the knowledge utilization system are the spin-off target from this implementation. This is achieved by preventing the service providers from handling repetitive complaints which may have similarity in nature. Once a complaint has been resolved, the system captures the solution as an item in the knowledge database. The captured knowledge will then enable service requesters or users to get some ideas regarding their complaints from information or knowledge of other similar complaints besides providing relevant knowledge to the service provider such as the techniques used in solving problems and the performance among the technical support staffs. As for the management, this system helps in the decision making process in which the statistics features provide some knowledge on the number of equipment that frequently and consistently failed. This then leads to some understanding of the equipment that may create lost to the organization in terms of time and money. This system has been tested and implemented in IT Center (IT) and Engineering Division (BKJ) and is at the initial process of implementation in the Instrumentation and Automation Center (IAC) at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). The system has helped in achieving a higher level of user satisfaction and a faster growth in technical knowledge repository that will serve as the institutional memory of Nuclear Malaysia and this will be

  18. Observing human movements helps decoding environmental forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Myrka; La Scaleia, Barbara; Miller, William L; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Vision of human actions can affect several features of visual motion processing, as well as the motor responses of the observer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that action observation helps decoding environmental forces during the interception of a decelerating target within a brief time window, a task intrinsically very difficult. We employed a factorial design to evaluate the effects of scene orientation (normal or inverted) and target gravity (normal or inverted). Button-press triggered the motion of a bullet, a piston, or a human arm. We found that the timing errors were smaller for upright scenes irrespective of gravity direction in the Bullet group, while the errors were smaller for the standard condition of normal scene and gravity in the Piston group. In the Arm group, instead, performance was better when the directions of scene and target gravity were concordant, irrespective of whether both were upright or inverted. These results suggest that the default viewer-centered reference frame is used with inanimate scenes, such as those of the Bullet and Piston protocols. Instead, the presence of biological movements in animate scenes (as in the Arm protocol) may help processing target kinematics under the ecological conditions of coherence between scene and target gravity directions.

  19. Memory retrieval processes help explain the incumbency advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spälti, A.K.; Brandt, M.J.; Zeelenberg, M.

    2017-01-01

    Voters prefer political candidates who are currently in office (incumbents) over new candidates (challengers). Using the premise of query theory (Johnson, Häubl & Keinan, 2007), we clarify the underlying cognitive mechanisms by asking whether memory retrieval sequences affect political decision

  20. Helping Teachers Use Research Findings: The Consumer-Validation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Robert E.; Huffman, James O.

    A program stressing teacher involvement and classroom implementation of educational research findings is described. The program was designed to familiarize teachers with current findings, have them apply the findings in their classrooms, analyze their own teaching behavior, and critically evaluate the findings in terms of their applicability to…

  1. Helping Emotionally Disturbed Children Deal with the Separation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreger, Robert D.; Kreger, Linda R.

    1989-01-01

    The article presents examples of emotionally disturbed children's reactions to separation from a teacher with whom they have become involved. Suggestions are offered for facilitating healthy separation from the teacher. (JDD)

  2. The geological thought process: A help in developing business instincts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.A. [Dean Witter Reynolds, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Since the beginning of modern-day geology it has been understood that the present is the key to the past. However, when attempting to apply current geological models one discovers that there are no exact look-alikes. Thus, the geological discipline inherently accepts modifications, omissions, and relatively large margins of error compared with engineering. Geologists are comfortable in a world of non-unique solutions. Thus the experience in working with numerous geological settings is extremely critical in selecting the most reasonable geological interpretations, often by using a composite of specific models. One can not simply replace a dynamic geologist`s life-time of experiences and geologic instinct with simply a book-smart young upstart. Petroleum corporations accept geologic risk and manage it by drilling numerous wells in various geological provenances. Oil corporations have attempted to quantify and manage risk by using Monte Carlo simulations, thus invoking a formal discipline of risk. The acceptance of risk, results in an asset allocation approach to investing. Asset allocators attempt to reduce volatility and risk, inherently understanding that in any specific time interval anything can happen. Dollar cost averaging significantly reduces market risk over time, however it requires discipline and commitment. The single most important ingredient to a successful investing plan is to assign a reasonable holding period. Historically, a majority of the investment community demands instant gratification causing unneeded anxiety and failure. As in geology nothing can replace experience.

  3. Alliancing process helps BP control Prudhoe Bay costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darley, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Production and revenues from America's largest oil field are declining. The cost of operating it is rising. If both trends were to continue unchecked, oil production at Prudhoe Bay on Alaska's North Slope could become uneconomic in the next decade. Simply maintaining operating expenditures at current levels - barring a dramatic, lasting increase in oil prices - would postpone the day of reckoning by only a few years. Despite ongoing investments in tempering the decline - gas and water handling expansions, development drilling, enhanced oil recovery, and well maintenance and repair programs - production will continue to decline. That's why it's imperative we reverse the tide of rising costs. This paper reports that to continue to produce oil at Prudhoe well into the 21st century, we must immediately - and continually - cut costs to reflect declining production and revenues

  4. WORKPAD : process management and geo-collaboration help disaster response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catarci, T.; Leoni, de M.; Marrella, A.; Mecella, M.; Russo, A.; Steinmann, R.; Bortenschlager, M.

    2011-01-01

    In complex emergency/disaster scenarios, persons from teams from various emergency-response organizations collaborate to achieve a common goal. In these scenarios, the use of smart mobile devices and applications can improve the collaboration dynamically. The lack of basic interaction principles can

  5. Memory retrieval processes help explain the incumbency advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spälti, Anna Katharina; Brandt, Mark J.; Zeelenberg, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Voters prefer political candidates who are currently in office (incumbents) over new candidates (challengers). Using the premise of query theory (Johnson, Häubl & Keinan, 2007), we clarify the underlying cognitive mechanisms by asking whether memory retrieval sequences affect political decision

  6. Helping Students Develop Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cárdenas Beltrán Melba Libia

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Listening practice is often neglected or handled inappropriately in the teachinglearning process. This poses problem because listening is an integral part of conversations. Oral skills without equally welldeveloped listening abilities are of little practical value. In this article, I will take a look at issues related to the area of listening that may be considered when guiding students toward developing listening comprehension.

  7. Program Helps Simulate Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James; Mcintire, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Neural Network Environment on Transputer System (NNETS) computer program provides users high degree of flexibility in creating and manipulating wide variety of neural-network topologies at processing speeds not found in conventional computing environments. Supports back-propagation and back-propagation-related algorithms. Back-propagation algorithm used is implementation of Rumelhart's generalized delta rule. NNETS developed on INMOS Transputer(R). Predefines back-propagation network, Jordan network, and reinforcement network to assist users in learning and defining own networks. Also enables users to configure other neural-network paradigms from NNETS basic architecture. Small portion of software written in OCCAM(R) language.

  8. Help for the Steel Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA Lewis Research Center (LRC) and Gladwin Engineering resulted in the adaptation of aerospace high temperature metal technology to the continuous casting of steel. The continuous process is more efficient because it takes less time and labor. A high temperature material, once used on the X-15 research plane, was applied to metal rollers by a LRC developed spraying technique. Lewis Research Center also supplied mold prototype of metal composites, reducing erosion and promoting thermal conductivity. Rollers that previously cracked due to thermal fatigue, lasted longer. Gladwin's sales have increased, and additional NASA-developed innovations are anticipated.

  9. Paying it forward: How helping others can reduce the psychological threat of receiving help

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, K.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that receiving help could be psychologically harmful for recipients, and passing on help to others after receiving help ("helping forward") is a good strategy to improve and restore help recipients' self-competence. Participants (N=87) received autonomy- or dependency-oriented help

  10. Helping to expand scientific knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear research has spread rapidly across practically all of the established sciences. It has been a dynamic and creative process in which the Agency has been able to play a constructive role. One of the methods has been the programme of research contracts. This has provided financial support for research involving some form of nuclear technology to physicists, chemists, medical doctors, hydrologists, entomologists, geneticists and scientists in many other disciplines. It is a system almost unique within the United Nations family, though the World Health Organization (WHO) also supports medical research under contract. An examination of the programme and its catalysing and co-ordinating effects in the expansion of scientific knowledge is made here by Clarence O'Neal, of the Division of Research and Laboratories. (author)

  11. Nurturing a Self-Help Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha A. Schubert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In April 1987, the parent of a child who was both learning disabled and intellectually gifted and talented and a professional educator (the author founded Parents of Gifted and Learning-Disabled Students of Northern Virginia, a self-help group for people who were dealing with the challenges posed by such children. The article begins with a background explaining the need for such a group followed by a history of the group and a description of how it functioned. It then details ways in which the author and the group interacted over the course of 5 years. A major component of this interaction was the members’ partnering in a research study with the author—a process now known as participatory action research (PAR—and the outcomes of that partnership.

  12. Tips to Help You Get Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Step in the Right Direction Tips to Help You Get Active View or Print All Sections ... and quality of life. Being more active may help you manage your weight. Starting Physical Activity Healthy ...

  13. Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough Language: English (US) ... Emails Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, ...

  14. Help, Resources and Information: National Opioids Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Help, Resources and Information National Opioids Crisis Search Search Need Help? Call the National Helpline ... HHS 5-POINT STRATEGY TO COMBAT THE OPIOIDS CRISIS BETTER ADDICTION PREVENTION, TREATMENT, AND RECOVERY SERVICES BETTER ...

  15. Self-Help Groups and Professional Helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Suggests innovative solutions for mutual benefits for self-help groups and the professionals. Through a derivative paradigm the role of the professional helper within self-help groups is presented. (Author/BL)

  16. Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe July 2014 Print this issue Health Capsule Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile En español Send us your comments A carefully structured, moderate physical activity program helped vulnerable older people maintain their mobility. ...

  17. Anticipated Guilt for Not Helping and Anticipated Warm Glow for Helping Are Differently Impacted by Personal Responsibility to Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Arvid; Jungstrand, Amanda Å.; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    One important motivation for people behaving prosocially is that they want to avoid negative and obtain positive emotions. In the prosocial behavior literature however, the motivations to avoid negative emotions (e.g., guilt) and to approach positive emotions (e.g., warm glow) are rarely separated, and sometimes even aggregated into a single mood-management construct. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anticipated guilt if not helping and anticipated warm glow if helping are influenced similarly or differently when varying situational factors related to personal responsibility to help. Helping scenarios were created and pilot tests established that each helping scenario could be formulated both in a high-responsibility version and in a low-responsibility version. In Study 1 participants read high-responsibility and low-responsibility helping scenarios, and rated either their anticipated guilt if not helping or their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e., separate evaluation). Study 2 was similar but here participants rated both their anticipated guilt if not helping and their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e., joint evaluation). Anticipated guilt was clearly higher in the high-responsibility versions, but anticipated warm glow was unaffected (in Studies 1a and 1b), or even higher in the low-responsibility versions (Study 2). In Studies 3 (where anticipated guilt and warm glow were evaluated separately) and 4 (where they were evaluated jointly), personal responsibility to help was manipulated within-subjects. Anticipated guilt was again constantly higher in the high-responsibility versions but for many types of responsibility-manipulations, anticipated warm glow was higher in the low-responsibility versions. The results suggest that we anticipate guilt if not fulfilling our responsibility but that we anticipate warm glow primarily when doing over and beyond our responsibility. We argue that future studies investigating motivations for helping

  18. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  19. 6 FAQs About Helping Someone Quit Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many people want to help their friends and loved ones quit smoking. But, they often don't know how. Here are 6 frequently asked questions about how to help someone quit smoking to help you get the information you need.

  20. Helping Youth Decide: A Workshop Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Donna Marie; Boo, Katherine

    This guide was written to complement the publication "Helping Youth Decide," a manual designed to help parents develop effective parent-child communication and help their children make responsible decisions during the adolescent years. The workshop guide is intended to assist people who work with families to provide additional information and…

  1. Meteorology/Oceanography Help - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › Help › Meteorology/Oceanography Help USNO Logo USNO Info Meteorology/Oceanography Help Send an e-mail regarding meteorology or oceanography products. Privacy Advisory Your E-Mail

  2. Helping Your Partner with Chronic Pain: The Importance of Helping Motivation, Received Social Support, and Its Timeliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, Sara; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Josephy, Haeike; Bernardes, Sonia F; Goubert, Liesbet

    2018-02-02

    Like all intentional acts, social support provision varies with respect to its underlying motives. Greater autonomous or volitional motives (e.g., enjoyment, full commitment) to help individuals with chronic pain (ICPs) are associated with greater well-being benefits for the latter, as indexed by improved satisfaction of their psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. The present study investigates the processes explaining why partners' autonomous or volitional helping motivation yields these benefits. A total of 134 couples, where at least one partner had chronic pain, completed a 14-day diary. Partners reported on their daily helping motives, whereas ICPs reported on their daily received support, timing of help, need-based experiences, and pain. On days when partners provided help for volitional motives, ICPs indicated receiving more help, which partially accounted for the effect of autonomous helping motivation on ICP need-based experiences. Timing of help moderated the effects of daily received support on ICP need-based experiences. Findings highlight the importance of ICPs of receiving support in general and the role of timing in particular, which especially matters when there is little support being received. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Helping Behavior in Executives' Global Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Stewart; Mors, Marie Louise; McDonald, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on research on helping behavior in networks at the upper echelons, we develop and test theory about helping behavior in senior executive networks. We examine the location and relational dependence of the network contact. Our results reveal that executives are more likely to perceive...... insiders in their network to be helpful, but geographic location has no effect on expectations of receiving help. With regards to relational dependence: executives who are more dependent on their contacts are more likely to perceive them to be helpful. We also look at whether perceived helpfulness affects...... an executive’s willingness to engage in risky new business development -- an important performance indicator - and indeed find that those executives that perceive their networks to be helpful are more likely to be willing to take risky decisions. We test these arguments using primary data on 1845 relationships...

  4. Deep Help in Complex Project Work: Guiding and Path-Clearing Across Difficult Terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Colin M.; Pillemer, Julianna; Amabile, Teresa M.

    2017-01-01

    How do teams working on complex projects get the help they need? Our qualitative investigation of the help provided to project teams at a prominent design firm revealed two distinct helping processes, both characterized by deep, sustained engagement that far exceeds the brief interactions described in the helping literature. Such deep help consisted of (1) guiding a team through a difficult juncture by working with its members in several prolonged, tightly clustered sessions, or (2) path-clea...

  5. Effects of Oxytocin Administration on Receiving Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Lauren J; Woolley, Joshua D; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2017-11-27

    Receiving help can be a "mixed blessing." Despite the many psychosocial benefits it can carry, it sometimes has negative psychological consequences, such as loss in self-esteem or enhanced guilt. It is, therefore, important to understand the factors that modify responses to receiving help from others. We explored the role of the hormone oxytocin (OT) on affective and social responses to receiving help, given the putative role of OT in social bonding and attunement. To this end, we manipulated whether help was received from a same-sex interaction partner (confederate) versus a control condition, crossed with a double-blind administration of intranasal OT (vs. placebo), and examined subjective and observer-rated participant responses to help. We observed significant interactions between OT and the help manipulation. In the placebo condition, receiving help from the interaction partner compared with the control condition had negative consequences, such that participants reported greater negative affect and came to view themselves and their interaction partners more negatively after interacting together on several tasks. What is important, however, is that OT administration buffered against these negative subjective responses to receiving help. Further, outside observers rated participants who received OT administration as expressing greater happiness and gratitude in response to help, relative to those who received placebo. In sum, in the context of receiving help from a stranger, oxytocin administration fostered more positive affective and social responses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, J. [MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  7. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, J.

    2016-01-01

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  8. Formal home help services and institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Siersma, Volkert; Avlund, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The effect of home help services has been inconsistent. Raising the hypothesis that receiving small amounts of home help may postpone or prevent institutionalization, the aim of the present study is to analyze how light and heavy use of home help services was related to the risk...... for institutionalization. The study was a secondary analysis of a Danish intervention study on preventive home visits in 34 municipalities from 1999 to 2003, including 2642 home-dwelling older people who were nondisabled and did not receive public home help services at baseline in 1999 and who lived at home 18 months...... after baseline. Cox regression analysis showed that those who received home help services during the first 18 months after baseline were at higher risk of being institutionalized during the subsequent three years than those who did not receive such services. However, receiving home help for less than 1h...

  9. Risk of power in helping professions.

    OpenAIRE

    BÁRTEK, Lukáš

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses aspects of helping professions that could represent a certain ?risk? of using power; it especially focuses on a social work sphere. In the first part, the thesis deals with basic terms that are essential for this issue. It pays attention to power itself and its specifications and connections to the helping professions. Further, it focuses on characteristics of terms that apply to the helping professions and social work or on a formulation of aspects which represent a ris...

  10. User experience with HydroHelp programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verner, J.S. [Brookfield Power, Gatineau, PQ (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Advances in the field of geographical information systems (GIS) have simplified the process of finding suitable sites for new hydroelectric projects. However, estimating the construction cost remains a challenge. The HydroHelp program is a cost evaluation program developed specifically to determine if a project will be economically feasible. The program is made up of 4 programs, depending on the type of turbine suitable for the site. Once a turbine selection is made, users can choose the program according to Kaplan, Impulse or Francis turbines. Users must rely on GIS, since the program requires a thorough understanding of the site geology and topography. Knowledge of hydroelectric plants is also necessary in order to obtain a credible construction cost. This paper demonstrated the capacity and flexibility of the software along with its different functions and available options. A detailed cost breakdown can be obtained along with an energy estimate and project specifications. In addition, the software can be used to optimize the project through different options by changing the facility's layout in terms of the type of dam, spillway, conduit length and diameter, turbine type and flood level. 17 figs.

  11. Anticipated Guilt for not Helping and Anticipated Warm Glow for Helping are Differently Impacted by Personal Responsibility to Help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Erlandsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One important motivation for people behaving prosocially is that they want to avoid negative and obtain positive emotions. In the prosocial behavior literature however, the motivations to avoid negative emotions (e.g. guilt and to approach positive emotions (e.g. warm glow are rarely separated, and sometimes even aggregated into a single mood-management construct. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anticipated guilt if not helping and anticipated warm glow if helping are influenced similarly or differently when varying situational factors related to personal responsibility to help. Helping scenarios were created and pilot tests established that each helping scenario could be formulated both in a high-responsibility version and in a low-responsibility version. In Study 1 participants read high-responsibility and low-responsibility helping scenarios, and rated either their anticipated guilt if not helping or their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. separate evaluation. Study 2 was similar but here participants rated both their anticipated guilt if not helping and their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. joint evaluation. Anticipated guilt was clearly higher in the high-responsibility versions, but anticipated warm glow was unaffected (in Studies 1a and 1b, or even higher in the low-responsibility versions (Study 2. In Studies 3 (where anticipated guilt and warm glow were evaluated separately and 4 (where they were evaluated jointly, personal responsibility to help was manipulated within-subjects. Anticipated guilt was again constantly higher in the high-responsibility versions but for many types of responsibility-manipulations, anticipated warm glow was higher in the low-responsibility versions. The results suggest that we anticipate guilt if not fulfilling our responsibility but that we anticipate warm glow primarily when doing over and beyond our responsibility. We argue that future studies investigating motivations for

  12. The Relational Antecedents of Interpersonal Helping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2017-01-01

    networks are also associated with cognitive costs, which may reduce the focal employee's ability to both recognize the need for help and engage in helping behaviours. For these reasons, the authors assert an inverted U-shaped relation between the size of an ego's social network and engagement in helping...... behaviour. However, high-quality relationships imply higher mutual understanding between the actors, and hence lower cognitive costs. In turn, the position (and threshold) of the curve between network size and interpersonal helping should be influenced by the quality of the relationship between the provider...

  13. Children's Recognition of Pride and Guilt as Consequences of Helping and Not Helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, David N.; McClelland, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between young children's age and their recognition that helping or choosing not to help can cause feelings of pride or guilt. Found age differences in identifying helping-action or inaction as causes, but little support for the hypothesis that identification of guilt as a consequence of not helping would…

  14. Promoting Awareness of a High School Peer Helping Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Sarah; Pili, Chris; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helping has recently been adopted by many schools, but use of these services remains mixed. The different ways in which peer helpers can be selected are described and examples of effective programs already in place are offered. The two types of cognitive processes used to evaluate advertising campaigns--automatic and strategic--are discussed…

  15. Library Dream Machines: Helping Students Master Super Online Catalogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how automation has transformed the library and how super-catalogs have affected the process of doing research. Explains how faculty and librarians can work together to help students to use the available databases effectively, by teaching them Boolean logic, standard record formats, filing rules, etc. (DMM)

  16. Quantum entanglement helps in improving economic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jiangfeng; Ju Chenyong; Li Hui

    2005-01-01

    We propose an economic regulation approach based on quantum game theory for the government to reduce the abuses of oligopolistic competition. Theoretical analysis shows that this approach can help government improve the economic efficiency of the oligopolistic market, and help prevent monopoly due to incorrect information. These advantages are completely attributed to the quantum entanglement, a unique quantum mechanical character

  17. Helping Your Child Who is Overweight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check your child's overall health and growth over time and tell you if weight management may be helpful. Many children who are still ... jungle gym at the playground or joining a sports team or dance class. Help your child find ... time with the computer, television, cell phone, and other ...

  18. High School Peer Helping: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgariff, Lisa; Solomon, Mindy; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helpers can act as liaisons to high school guidance departments by identifying problems, making appropriate referrals, and encouraging others to obtain professional help if necessary. An active program can help ensure that in the future students are better prepared to handle conflicts that arise within marriage, career, and family. This study…

  19. Helping Elementary Teachers Understand Children and Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrymak, Marilyn J.; Smart, Laura S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a workshop designed to help elementary teachers understand the recent literature on the effects of divorce on children and help the children through the crisis. Indicates that secondary home economics teachers may have to deal with students who have not adjusted to divorce. (JOW)

  20. Helping Young Children in Frightening Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents ways parents and other adults can help young children deal with tragedy and violence in the wake of terrorist attacks on the United States. Suggests giving reassurance and physical comfort, providing structure and stability, expecting a range of reactions, helping children to talk if they are ready, turning off the television, and…

  1. Causal Indicators Can Help to Interpret Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The latent factor in a causal indicator model is no more than the latent factor of the factor part of the model. However, if the causal indicator variables are well-understood and help to improve the prediction of individuals' factor scores, they can help to interpret the meaning of the latent factor. Aguirre-Urreta, Rönkkö, and Marakas (2016)…

  2. Servant Leadership: Teaching the Helping Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Joyce W.; Thompson, Karen C.; Hawkins, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Robert Greenleaf's principles of servant leadership are relevant to the helping professions, including empowerment and development of others, service to others, and open and participatory leadership. The study of servant leadership was infused into an undergraduate senior capstone experience (an internship) for emerging helping professionals…

  3. Helping Behavior in Multinational Executive Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mors, Marie Louise; Miller, Stewart; McDonald, Michael

    This study develops a framework that draws upon the socio-psychology and network literatures to explain helping behavior in an executive’s multinational network. Focusing on executives' perceptions of willingness to help, we examine network structure (geographic and organizational boundaries), st...

  4. Quantum entanglement helps in improving economic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Ju, Chenyong; Li, Hui

    2005-02-01

    We propose an economic regulation approach based on quantum game theory for the government to reduce the abuses of oligopolistic competition. Theoretical analysis shows that this approach can help government improve the economic efficiency of the oligopolistic market, and help prevent monopoly due to incorrect information. These advantages are completely attributed to the quantum entanglement, a unique quantum mechanical character.

  5. BPMN process views construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yongchareon, S.; Liu, Chengfei; Zhao, X.; Kowalkiewicz, M.; Kitagawa, H.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Process view technology is catching more attentions in modern business process management, as it enables the customisation of business process representation. This capability helps improve the privacy protection, authority control, flexible display, etc., in business process modelling. One of

  6. College Students Rarely Seek Help Despite Serious Substance Use Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Kasperski, Sarah J.; Sharma, Eva; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of substance use disorders (SUD) and aspects of the help-seeking process among a high-risk sample of 946 students at one large public university were assessed in personal interviews during the first three years of college. After statistically adjusting for purposive sampling, an estimated 46.8%wt of all third-year students met DSM-IV criteria for SUD involving alcohol and/or marijuana at least once. Of 548 SUD cases, 3.6% perceived a need for help with substance use problems; 16.4% were encouraged by someone else to seek help. Help-seeking was rare among SUD cases (8.8%), but significantly elevated among individuals who perceived a need (90.0%) or experienced social pressures from parents (32.5%), friends (34.2%), or another person (58.3%). Resources accessed for help included educational programs (38%), health professionals (27%), and twelve-step programs (19%). College students have high rates of substance use problems but rarely recognize a need for treatment or seek help. Results highlight the opportunity for early intervention with college students with SUD. PMID:19553064

  7. Process for testing noise emission from containers or pipelines made of steel, particularly for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, E.; Stipsits, G.; Sommer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for noise emission testing of steel containers or pipelines, particularly for testing primary circuit components of nuclear reactor plants, measuring sensors and/or associated electronic amplifiers are used, which are tuned for receiving the frequency band of the sound emission spectrum above a limiting frequency f G , but are limited or non-resonant for frequency bands less than f G . (orig./HP) [de

  8. Process development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuegerl, K

    1984-01-01

    The item 'process development' comprises the production of acetonic/butonal with C. acetobylicum and the yeasting of potato waste. The target is to increase productivity by taking the following measures - optimation of media, on-line process analysis, analysis of reaction, mathematic modelling and identification of parameters, process simulation, development of a state estimator with the help of the on-line process analysis and the model, optimization and adaptive control.

  9. Why may allopregnanolone help alleviate loneliness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, S; Cacioppo, J T

    2015-12-01

    Impaired biosynthesis of Allopregnanolone (ALLO), a brain endogenous neurosteroid, has been associated with numerous behavioral dysfunctions, which range from anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors to aggressive behavior and changes in responses to contextual fear conditioning in rodent models of emotional dysfunction. Recent animal research also demonstrates a critical role of ALLO in social isolation. Although there are likely aspects of perceived social isolation that are uniquely human, there is also continuity across species. Both human and animal research show that perceived social isolation (which can be defined behaviorally in animals and humans) has detrimental effects on physical health, such as increased hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, and increased depressive behavior. The similarities between animal and human research suggest that perceived social isolation (loneliness) may also be associated with a reduction in the synthesis of ALLO, potentially by reducing BDNF regulation and increasing HPA activity through the hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), especially during social threat processing. Accordingly, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursor, such as pregnenolone), in humans may help alleviate loneliness. Congruent with our hypothesis, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursors) in humans has been shown to improve various stress-related disorders that show similarities between animals and humans i.e., post-traumatic stress disorders, traumatic brain injuries. Because a growing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of ALLO in socially isolated animals, we believe our ALLO hypothesis can be applied to loneliness in humans, as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Can Viral Videos Help Beaver Restore Streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J. M.; Pollock, M. M.; Lewallen, G.; Jordan, C.; Woodruff, K.

    2015-12-01

    Have you watched YouTube lately? Did you notice the plethora of cute animal videos? Researchers, including members of our Beaver Restoration Research team, have been studying the restoration potential of beaver for decades, yet in the past few years, beaver have gained broad acclaim and some much deserved credit for restoration of aquatic systems in North America. Is it because people can now see these charismatic critters in action from the comfort of their laptops? While the newly released Beaver Restoration Guidebook attempts to answer many questions, sadly, this is not one of them. We do, however, address the use of beaver (Castor canadensis) in stream, wetland, and floodplain restoration and discuss the many positive effects of beaver on fluvial ecosystems. Our team, composed of researchers from NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, and Portland State University, has developed a scientifically rigorous, yet accessible, practitioner's guide that provides a synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. Divided into two broad sections -- Beaver Ecology and Beaver Restoration and Management -- the guidebook focuses on the many ways in which beaver improve habitat, primarily through the construction of dams that impound water and retain sediment. In Beaver Ecology, we open with a discussion of the general effects that beaver dams have on physical and biological processes, and we close with "Frequently Asked Questions" and "Myth Busters". In Restoration and Management, we discuss common emerging restoration techniques and methods for mitigating unwanted beaver effects, followed by case studies from pioneering practitioners who have used many of these beaver restoration techniques in the field. The lessons they have learned will help guide future restoration efforts. We have also included a comprehensive beaver ecology library of over 1400 references from scientific journals

  11. How Helpful is Colour-Cueing of PIN Entry?

    OpenAIRE

    Renaud, Karen; Ramsay, Judith

    2014-01-01

    21st Century citizens are faced with the need to remember numbers of PINs (Personal Identification Numbers) in order to do their daily business, and they often have difficulties due to human memory limitations. One way of helping them could be by providing cues during the PIN entry process. The provision of cues that would only be helpful to the PIN owner is challenging because the cue should only make sense to the legitimate user, and not to a random observer. In this paper we report on an e...

  12. HIV and AIDS: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Free Publications HIV and AIDS--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet ... You take these combination drugs along with other HIV drugs.) Brand Name Other Names Combivir lamivudine and ...

  13. Helping children express grief through symbolic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, R M

    1984-12-01

    Communication barriers erected by grieving children delay problem resolution. Use of the expressive arts--music, art, and body movement--in symbolic communication helps them to express overwhelming feelings and cope with trauma and stress.

  14. Parental Money Help to Children and Stepchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henretta, John C; Van Voorhis, Matthew F; Soldo, Beth J

    2014-07-01

    Divorce and remarriage have reshaped the American family giving rise to questions about the place of stepchildren in remarried families. In this article, we examine money transfers from a couple to each of their children. We introduce characteristics of the family and estimate the role of shared family membership affecting all children in the family as well as the difference that stepchild status and other individual characteristics make in transfer flows. Data are from the Health and Retirement Study. There are two central results in the analysis. Overall, provision of financial help from parents to children is a family phenomenon. While help to a particular child is episodic, differences between families in provision of help were much greater than the differences in helping one child versus another within families. Second, stepchild status does differentiate one child from another within a family. Stepchildren are disadvantaged, particularly stepchildren of the wife.

  15. Practical-theological facilitation as skilled helping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmo Pienaar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discussed the idea of skilled helping in relation to what has been put forward as practical theological facilitation. It has been argued that various helping relationships, amongst which the author refers to coaching, facilitation, and therapy has more in common than what differentiates them if epistemology is viewed as a unifying concept. As such the scope of practical theology in terms of the contexts and themes in which it might be involved is said to widen. The public dimension of the organisational context, more so than the congregational context, has been put forward as an important habitus of practical-theological facilitation. The organisational involvement of the practical-theological facilitator in terms of professional-vocational skilled helping takes on an actual role through facilitation and other helping modalities.

  16. Smoking - Medicines to Help You Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Smoking - Medicines To Help You Quit Share Tweet Linkedin ... associated with the use of the medicine. Quit Smoking Tips Quit Smoking… for yourself and for those ...

  17. Are There Treatments That Can Help Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impact on your life. Are there treatments that can help me? Tinnitus does not have a cure ... preparations has been proved effective in clinical trials. Can I do anything to prevent tinnitus or keep ...

  18. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  19. Depression--Medicines To Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Depression--Medicines To Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... medicines for depression. Important Warnings about Medicines for Depression Children and teens who take antidepressants may be ...

  20. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  1. Proper project planning helps minimize overruns and delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, G.; Cooney, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes planning methods to help minimize cost overruns during the construction of oil and gas pipelines. These steps include background data collection methods, field surveys, determining preliminary pipeline routes, regulatory agency pre-application meetings, and preliminary engineering. Methods for planning also include preliminary aerial mapping, biological assessments, cultural resources investigations, wetlands delineation, geotechnical investigations, and environmental audits. Identification of potential problems can allow for rerouting of the pipeline or remediation processes before they are raised during the permitting process. By coordinating these events from the very beginning, significant cost savings will result that prevent having to rebudget for them after the permitting process starts

  2. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  3. Sociological perspectives on self-help groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, L; Rasmussen, J M

    2001-01-01

    and significance of self-help groups. FINDINGS: New empirical sociological evidence shows that health care professionals - nurses, psychologists, social workers - have become an integrated part and thus essential actors in self-help groups within as well as outside the framework of the formal health care system...... that it is necessary to introduce new aspects and themes for discussion in the health care debate and the work that goes beyond the predominantly individual orientated treatment and care function....

  4. Family involvement and helping behaviour in teams

    OpenAIRE

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement (family structure, family tasks, family support) affects helping behavior in teams. Based on a sample of 495 team members, the results show that having a supportive partner and performing care tasks increase helpi...

  5. Asking for Help: A Relational Perspective on Help Seeking in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; van de Wiel, Margje W. J.; De Maeyer, Sven; Gijselaers, Wim H.; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the complexity of today's organizations, help seeking behavior is considered as an important step to problem solving and learning in organizations. Yet, help seeking has received less attention in organizational literature. To increase the potential impact of help seeking on learning, it is essential to understand which…

  6. Help-Seeking and Help-Giving for Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on numerous research projects conducted by the authors on adolescent dating violence. It reviews the results of those projects as they relate to how teens seek help for dating violence and how teens provide help to their friends in violent dating relationships. It concludes with helpful strategies for adults who work with…

  7. Persuading people with depression to seek help: respect the boomerang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienemann, Brianna A; Siegel, Jason T; Crano, William D

    2013-01-01

    People with depression are likely to process information with a negative bias when confronted with self-relevant information. Accordingly, we feared exposing depressed people to a public service announcement (PSA) addressing the stigma of depression would possibly boomerang and result in less intention to seek help and in increased self-stigma. College students (N = 271; Mage  = 22.51, SD = 4.71; 63.1% female; 37.3% White, 31.9% Hispanic, 12.9% Asian, 6.8% multiethnic, 3.4% Black, 7.6% other) were randomly assigned to receive a print ad focused on depression or a nonrelevant comparison ad. A paper-and-pencil survey consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Self-Stigma of Seeking Help scale, help-seeking intentions, and demographics followed. Regression analysis indicated that viewing a depression ad caused people with greater depressive symptoms to experience greater levels of self-stigma than depressed people exposed to a nonrelevant comparison ad. Bootstrap mediation analysis showed that for individuals who viewed a depression PSA, self-stigma mediated the relationship between depressive symptoms and professional help-seeking intentions. While this current study offers no direct evidence in regard to the utility of current and past depression campaigns, results indicate a definite need for caution when developing materials targeting people with depression to seek help.

  8. Vietnam seeks help expanding voluntary surgical contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piet-pelon, N J; Sukop, S

    1992-07-01

    Recent surveys by the Vietnamese Ministry of Health suggest that 60% of married women desire no more children. Yet only 2% of currently married women and less than 1/2 of 1% of their partners use sterilization. Underscoring the high unmet need for effective family planning, over 1 million abortions (legal in Vietnam for the past 20 years) are performed annually. This rate corresponds to 1 abortion for every live birth. The Ministry of Health has recently welcomed a variety of organizations, including AVSC, whose assistance can help expand the country's family planning programs. Sorely lacking in supplies, equipment, and trained personnel, Vietnam has merited priority status--2nd only to China and India--from the UNFPA, which has committed $36 million over the next 4 years. Other organizations currently working in Vietnam include the Population Council, the Population Crisis Committee, and the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Despite enormous casualties during the war years, and a decrease since the 1970s in average family size from 6 to 4 children, the population of Vietnam has continued to grow rapidly, far outpacing economic growth. Currently 67 million, the population is expected to reach 80 million by the year 2000. The average Vietnamese annual income is only $195, among the lowest in the world. Doi moi, the process of economic reform begun in 1986, coupled with new government incentives for families who have no more than 2 children, is changing the face of family planning in Vietnam. Newly opened pharmacies sell imported birth control pills and condoms (to those who can afford them), while government hospitals and health clinics provide mainly IUDs, in addition to limited supplies of pills and condoms. Throughout the country, some 8000 community-level health centers are staffed by nurse-midwives trained in family planning. Voluntary sterilization is available at the district, provincial, and national hospitals. All married women may obtain family

  9. Currency hedging with help of derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Riederová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The high volatility combined with unpredictable fluctuations of CZK had shown one more time to the Czech exporting companies the necessity of currency hedging. This article is focused on finding of suitable currency hedging instrument for exporting company, working with the currency pair of CZK/EUR. In the first part, the time series analysis is made for volatility, interest rates and exchange rate. Based on the real market data – gained from Thomson REUTERS and CNB for the time period starting in 2002 – the detailed analysis is made in graphical form. The main goal is to find out the future trends with help of liner regression analysis, based on the historical data. Several graphs are provided with the trend line end estimated interval (min and max for the each variable. The calculated values are clearly marked, to be separated from the real market data. Exchange rate curve shows the market behaviour in the last years and is to be used as most important indicator for the future trends. Interest rates curves are very important for the calculation of the BIPS (basis points, determining the price of the forwards. The difference between landing and deposit rates for the same period of time and different currencies are showing the market estimation of the future development of each currency. Forward price is to be seen as a benchmark for the all other financial instruments. And finally the volatility (quoted as middle is very important part in the pricing of currency options.The second part is closely connected with the first one. Based on the results of provided analyses, it recommends a suitable hedging product for the next period of time. All of the analyses are taken as an input in different ways. The volatility is important for the decision of selling or purchasing the specific part of currency option. The exchange rate outlook together with the interest rates is the indicator of the future development of the currency pair and is playing

  10. Predicting help-seeking behavior: The impact of knowing someone close who has sought help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disabato, David J; Short, Jerome L; Lameira, Diane M; Bagley, Karen D; Wong, Stephanie J

    2018-02-15

    This study sought to replicate and extend research on social facilitators of college student's help seeking for psychological problems. We collected data on 420 ethnically diverse college students at a large public university (September 2008-May 2010). Students completed a cross-sectional online survey. We found that students who were aware of close others' (eg, family, friends) help seeking were two times more likely to have sought formal (eg, psychologist) and informal (eg, clergy) help themselves. Tests of moderation revealed the incremental effect (ie, controlling for help-seeking attitudes, internalizing symptoms, cultural demographics) of close others' formal help seeking was strong and significant for men (R 2 = 0.112), while it was negligible and nonsignificant for women (R 2 = .002). We discuss the importance for students-particularly men-to learn about close others' help seeking for facilitating their own help seeking during times of distress.

  11. Assessing the Utility of the Willingness/Prototype Model in Predicting Help-Seeking Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Vogel, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research on professional psychological help-seeking behavior has operated on the assumption that the decision to seek help is based on intentional and reasoned processes. However, research on the dual-process prototype/willingness model (PWM; Gerrard, Gibbons, Houlihan, Stock, & Pomery, 2008) suggests health-related decisions may also…

  12. Chimpanzees help each other upon request.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yamamoto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of altruism has been explained mainly from ultimate perspectives. However, it remains to be investigated from a proximate point of view how and in which situations such social propensity is achieved. We investigated chimpanzees' targeted helping in a tool transfer paradigm, and discuss the similarities and differences in altruism between humans and chimpanzees. Previously it has been suggested that chimpanzees help human experimenters by retrieving an object which the experimenter is trying to reach. In the present study, we investigated the importance of communicative interactions between chimpanzees themselves and the influence of conspecific partner's request on chimpanzees' targeted helping.We presented two tool-use situations (a stick-use situation and a straw-use situation in two adjacent booths, and supplied non-corresponding tools to paired chimpanzees in the two booths. For example, a chimpanzee in the stick-use situation was supplied with a straw, and the partner in the straw-use situation possessed a stick. Spontaneous tool transfer was observed between paired chimpanzees. The tool transfer events occurred predominantly following recipients' request. Even without any hope of reciprocation from the partner, the chimpanzees continued to help the partner as long as the partner required help.These results provide further evidence for altruistic helping in chimpanzees in the absence of direct personal gain or even immediate reciprocation. Our findings additionally highlight the importance of request as a proximate mechanism motivating prosocial behavior in chimpanzees whether between kin or non-kin individuals and the possible confounding effect of dominance on the symmetry of such interactions. Finally, in contrast to humans, our study suggests that chimpanzees rarely perform acts of voluntary altruism. Voluntary altruism in chimpanzees is not necessarily prompted by simple observation of another's struggle to attain a goal

  13. Responses to Change Helping People Make Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing state of many organizations is one of change. People who experience major change tend to exhibit one of four patterns of response: entrenched, overwhelmed, poser, or learner. As a leader, you need to understand the patterns of response that people express and to customize intervention strategies to help them make the transition. People can pass through a given response stage and move to one that is more effective--especially if you provide timely intervention and support. This guidebook will help you understand how people, including yourself, are responding to change and what you c

  14. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Why are blue-collar blacks less likely to help jobseekers than jobholders from other ethnoracial groups or even than more affluent blacks? Drawing from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 97 black and Latino workers at one large, public sector employer, we find that blue-collar black workers both helped less proactively and rejected more requests for assistance than did blue-collar Latino and white-collar black workers. We attribute blue-collar blacks’ more passive engagement to their...

  15. WORD ORIGIN HELPS EXPAND LEARNERS’ VOCABULARY A VOCABULARY TEACHING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jing

    2012-01-01

    Word origin (motivation) deals with the connection between name and sense, explaining how a word originated. With the knowledge of how words are originated, learners can grasp a word easier and thus expand their vocabulary more quickly. The introduction to word origin (motivation) by teachers can also help the learners gain interest in the process of learning and learn more about the cultural and historical background of the English-speaking countries. This paper tries to clarify this method ...

  16. Why seeking help from teammates is a blessing and a curse: a theory of help seeking and individual creativity in team contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jennifer S; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-03-01

    Research has not explored the extent to which seeking help from teammates positively relates to a person's own creativity. This question is important to explore as help seeking is commonly enacted in organizations and may come with reciprocation costs that may also diminish creativity. Results based on 291 employees in a single division of a large multinational organization revealed that seeking help predicted creativity and mediated the relationship between intrinsic motivation and creativity. However, help seekers also incurred reciprocation costs in that they tended to give more help to teammates, and giving help to teammates was negatively related to creativity. In general, giving higher levels of help attenuated the positive relationship between help seeking and creativity. We also tested an integrated model to show that help giving moderated the mediated relationship between intrinsic motivation and creativity via help seeking, such that higher levels of help giving attenuated this mediated effect. We discuss theoretical and practical implications recommending additional research regarding the interpersonal creative process in team contexts. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Helping Families Succeed in Two Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vivian

    Kamehameha Schools' Prekindergarten Educational Program (PREP) was started in 1978 to prepare at-risk Hawaiian families and their children for success in school. PREP's direct services include: (1) parent-infant educational services, including home visits to help parents prepare for a new baby and later learn appropriate child development…

  18. Helping Children Develop Resiliency: Providing Supportive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, Katharine C.; Malley, Catherine Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Helping children develop resiliency begins with positive, meaningful connections between teachers and students. This article defines the importance of encouraging children to develop characteristics related to resiliency including confidence in their ability to bounce back from setbacks, overcome challenges and frustrations. Furthermore, critical…

  19. Survivors of Downsizing: Helpful and Hindering Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Norman E.; Borgen, William A.; Jordan, Sharalyn; Erlebach, Anne C.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one downsizing survivors from both the private and public sector were interviewed to determine incidents that either helped or hindered their transition through 1 or more organizational downsizings. A critical incident technique was used to analyze and organize the data around themes that emerged, themes were represented by both positive…

  20. Helicopter Parents Help Students, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Helicopter parents, notorious for hovering over their college-age children, may actually help students thrive, according to this year's National Survey of Student Engagement. Students whose parents intervene on their behalf--38 percent of freshmen and 29 percent of seniors--are more active in and satisfied with college, says the monstrous annual…

  1. Text Maps: Helping Students Navigate Informational Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda H.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that a text map is an instructional approach designed to help students gain fluency in reading content area materials. Discusses how the goal is to teach students about the important features of the material and how the maps can be used to build new understandings. Presents the procedures for preparing and using a text map. (SG)

  2. Perceived Helpfulness of Teachers in Clinical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moate, Randall M.; Holm, Jessica M.; West, Erin M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical courses are important in the development of students pursuing a master's degree in clinical mental health counseling (CMHC). Despite the importance of clinical courses, little is known about what CMHC students perceive as being helpful about their teachers of clinical courses. To investigate this, we sought the viewpoints of beginning…

  3. How Advertising History Helps Explain Current Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranco, Leonard W.

    Students majoring in advertising can benefit from a study of that field in its historical context because such study helps them to understand current practices and to foresee future developments. One model of teaching advertising history within a required course about advertising and society begins with some basic definitions of the advertising…

  4. Helping Young Children See Math in Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Amy Noelle; Blom, Diana Chang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for recognizing meaningful mathematics in common play contexts in early childhood classrooms and to offer suggestions for how teachers might intervene in these moments to help children attend to the mathematical ideas embedded in their play. In particular, the author's focus on the concepts of…

  5. Changing Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    Despite the increasing acceptance of the value of psychotherapy, there are still those who think people should solve their own problems. A study was conducted to investigate the attitudes of college students toward seeking professional help before and after taking a course in abnormal psychology to determine whether exposure to the purposes and…

  6. Helping Nevada School Children Become Sun Smart

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast features Christine Thompson, Community Programs Manager at the Nevada Cancer Coalition, and author of a recent study detailing a school-based program to help Nevada school children establish healthy sun safety habits and decrease UV exposure. Christine answers questions about her research and what impact her what impact the program had on children's skin health.

  7. Teacher Burnout: Will Talking about It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossnickle, Donald R.

    1980-01-01

    Teachers are beginning to collectively voice their complaints about the stresses they face in school. While talking about the problems of low morale and poor school climate won't solve these problems, the public is being alerted that teachers need help, not further criticism. (SJL)

  8. CERN helps Grid cmputing into the mainstream

    CERN Multimedia

    Moran, Nuala

    2006-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, has launched the seocnd phase of Openlab, its partnership with IT companies for the development of advanced computing facilities. The industrial partners in this phase, Hewlett Packard, Intel and Oracle, will help build on the experience from the last three years when Openlab worked on cluster and Grid computing (1 page)

  9. Social Exchange in the Natural Helping Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Karen S.; Kenkel, Mary Beth

    1989-01-01

    Examines rewards and costs to "natural helpers," service-providers separate from any established group. Survey of 19 rural helpers identifies lack of appreciation, time and energy loss, and emotional-spiritual fatigue as costs of helping. Suggests mental health professionals collaborate with helpers. Recommends ways of enlisting helpers'…

  10. Teaching Primary Science: How Research Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlen, Wynne

    2010-01-01

    The very first edition of "Primary Science Review" included an article entitled "Teaching primary science--how research can help" (Harlen, 1986), which announced that a section of the journal would be for reports of research and particularly for teachers reporting their classroom research. The intervening 24 years have seen…

  11. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... affects millions of people worldwide each year. Pneumonia can often be prevented and can usually be treated. ...

  12. Family involvement and helping behavior in teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, A.G. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement ( family

  13. Family involvement and helping behaviour in teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement (family

  14. Help Your Child Learn To Write Well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    Addressing parents, this pamphlet describes ways to help children learn to write well and thereby excel in school, enjoy self-expression, and become more self-reliant. Writing is discussed as a practical, job-related, stimulating, social, and therapeutic activity that receives inadequate attention in many schools. It is emphasized that writing is…

  15. Erikson's Psychosocial Theories Help Explain Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, M. Lee

    1988-01-01

    Middle school educators can design a learning environment for early adolescents based on Erik Erikson's social development theories, which divide human life into eight psychological stages. The identity versus role confusion stage characterizing adolescence will significantly determine the developing person's future. Schools can help learners…

  16. Tips for Helping a Person With Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-04

    This podcast gives suggestions for helping a person with diabetes manage the disease.  Created: 10/4/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/6/2007.

  17. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  18. Women Empowerment Through Self-Help Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemu, Sintayehu Hailu; Kempen, Van Luuk; Ruben, Ruerd

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact of self-help groups (SHGs) in apple production on empowering women in the Chencha district of Southern Ethiopia. Impact is traced on the basis of a cross-sectional survey among SHG members and nonmembers, using propensity score matching. Apart from the attitudinal

  19. Helping Students Reflect: Lessons from Cognitive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gary; Jones, Lydia; Whitfield, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of teaching students to reflect on experience and, thus, learn from it, are better understood with the application of constructs from cognitive psychology. The present paper focuses on two such constructs--self-schemas and scripts--to help educators better understand both the threats and opportunities associated with effective…

  20. Factors influencing intention to help and helping behaviour in witnesses of bullying in nursing settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-León, Carmen; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Aguirre-Camacho, Aldo; Olmos, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    The role played by witnesses of bullying in nursing settings remains little studied, despite their potential relevance in explaining the onset and development of bullying. The objective of this study was to develop a model to account for witnesses' intention to help and helping behaviour in response to bullying in a nursing setting. Three hundred and thirty-seven witnesses completed self-report measures of variables predicting intention to help and helping behaviour. A full structural model was constructed using structural equation modelling. The intention to help victims was elicited by tension, group identity, support to peers' initiative to intervene and absence of fear of retaliation. However, engagement in helping behaviour was only predicted by the absence of fear of retaliation. This study shows that witnesses of bullying in nursing settings do not remain impassive, but their experienced discomfort and intention to help victims is not sufficient to predict helping behaviour. Fear of possible retaliation if intervening in favour of victims constitutes a crucial factor explaining witnesses' hesitation to help victims. Several implications for the implementation of policies directed at eradicating bullying in nursing settings are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Can Biogeochemists Help To Enhance Urban Resilience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Throughout history, many human settlements have collapsed, often caused or triggered by extreme climatic fluctuation, resource depletion, or pollution. In today's world, with rapid urbanization, much of it in "informal" peri-urban settlements, increasing per capita wealth and consumption, climate warming, and widespread pollution, the potential for collapse of modern cities is a realistic hazard. This presentation addresses the question: can biogeochemists contribute knowledge, and translate that knowledge, into greater resilience of urban systems? I argue that we can, and present four examples, each illustrated with case studies. The first is an example of resource depletion - the eventual exhaustion of P rock used for fertilizer. Phosphate rock reserves are limited, at least in the U.S., causing us to import fertilizer P. Prices are rising, prompting more efficient use. Over the long term, depletion of phosphate rock globally may lead to a "brown devolution". We have started a process of tracking P from agricultural watersheds to the "urban plate", and the potential for recycling urban wastes back to agriculture. Early findings in our lab show that agricultural P use in a high-production watershed is now quite efficient, but urban P use is extremely inefficient. A P balance of the Minneapolis-St. Paul region showed that only 4% of input P was recycled, but 75% recycling was possible, even with off-the-shelf technologies. Recycling urban P to agricultural systems, at least for cities in agricultural regions, could close the P cycle and add resilience to the urban food system. A second example is the loss of resilience caused by pollution. Cities often pollute their groundwater, especially with nitrate, salts, and bacteria, limiting the potential for using underlying aquifers for water supply during drought periods and reducing the resilience of the urban system. This is a serious problem in cities in the developing world that do not have water-based waste removal

  2. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  3. Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

    1984-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, m...

  4. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  5. Psychological Help-Seeking Attitudes and Barriers to Help-Seeking in Young People in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Selda; Erel, Ozge; Yumurtaci, Duygu; Sahin, Gozde Nur

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research sought to understand the needs of Turkish university students related to adjustment to university, the sources they seek help from, their attitudes about and barriers to psychological help-seeking. Data analysis of interview transcriptions from 15 undergraduates identified several themes. Interpersonal problems,…

  6. Help Central: Creating a Help Desk and Knowledge Portal in SharePoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Lisa A.; Tims, Randy S.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the authors' implementation of Help Central, a site within the Lister Hill Library Collection on the University of Alabama-Birmingham's SharePoint server. Initially, Help Central was designed to address the inadequacies in the library's old, static HTML web-based support system, including haphazard issue reporting by staff…

  7. Knowledge Based Help desk System in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Norzalina Nasirudin; Khairiel Adyani Abdul Ghani; Abdul Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge based (K-based) Help desk system is a knowledge oriented web based system that provides support to business process of the technical service providers. It is a multi-centric system which focuses on end-users, technical workers and higher level management through utilization of knowledge which resides and grows within the system. The objectives of the system are to be a user-friendly, capture technical knowledge for efficient performance and educating users for self reliance. These were achieved through the improvement of the help desk business process and better management of technical knowledge. This system has been tested and implemented in Information Technology Center (IT), Engineering Division (BKJ) and Instrumentation and Automation Center (IAC) at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). Higher levels of user satisfaction and faster growth in technical knowledge repository have been recorded in the system. This paper describes the help desk system in the perspective of management of its technical knowledge contributing to strengthening organizational knowledge asset of Nuclear Malaysia as national nuclear research institution. (Author)

  8. Real-world scenarios help improve selection of radiology employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, C L; Groff, K; Phillips, M

    1998-01-01

    Choosing the right candidate through the interview process is critical, particularly in light of rapidly changing skills in various technologies. The authors have changed the interviewing process at Jeanes Hospital in Philadelphia in order to examine and evaluate multiple objectives simultaneously. To do this, they created an instrument that elicits impromptu responses to real-world radiology situations. Such responses help assess a potential candidate's training, emotional strength, technical experience and growth potential. They also determine how much additional training the potential candidate will need to be effective in the department. Using the instrument helps sharpen the assessment of candidate traits such as face-to-face communication skills and response time. The impact on hiring is positive. Quality staff, improved patient care and improved patient safety are only some of the results. Many of the questions included on the instrument come from past problem situations and help the interviewers to determine whether a candidate understands underlying issues and the seriousness of situations. The goal is to ensure that patient care and productivity are not hampered by unusual situations. When a concrete difference is detected between a candidate's response and the department's needs, it is possible to assess the cost-effectiveness of training for the discrepancy. For entry-level candidates, the question is whether the person is trainable. Consistently using this interview document forces hiring managers to identify specific abilities, traits and experience desirable in the workplace.

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex modulates the propensity to help in costly helping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chong; Wu, Song; Luo, Yue-Jia; Guan, Qing; Cui, Fang

    2018-05-01

    Social decision-making engages traditional decision-making processes (e.g. valuation), as well as social cognition processes (e.g. inferring the affective and mental states of another person). Neuroimaging and neuro-stimulation studies have suggested the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in a variety of social decision-making tasks. Yet no study has investigated the effect of the cortical excitability of mPFC in the decision-making of costly helping behavior. Here, we used tDCS to demonstrate the causal relationship between the cortical excitability of mPFC and costly helping decision-making. Subjects assigned to the anodal, cathodal and sham groups were required to decide whether they would like to cost their own money to relieve another subject (a confederate actually) from painful electrical shocks with a certain probability of success. Results showed that the subjects receiving anodal stimulation acted more prosaically than the subjects receiving cathodal stimulation. And this effect was only significant when the probability of success was high. We proposed that tDCS induced modulation of the cortical excitability, targeting the mPFC, can affect the prosocial propensity in costly helping behavior, and the possible underlying mechanisms were discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Helping older adults to help themselves: the role of mental health literacy in family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Margaret; Casey, Leanne

    2017-11-01

    Family members may play an important role in the health and well-being of older adults. However, little is known about the factors that influence the likelihood of family members supporting older relatives to seek help from mental health professionals for mental health concerns. Mental health literacy is associated with people's help-seeking intentions regarding their own mental health concerns, and some studies have suggested it may play a role in help-seeking on behalf of others. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mental health literacy is associated with adults' likelihood of supporting an older relative to seek professional help for mental health concerns. Two hundred and sixty-three participants completed a measure of mental health literacy and responded to a hypothetical scenario by indicating their likelihood of supporting an older relative experiencing mental health problems to seek help from various sources. Mental health literacy was positively associated with intentions to support older relative's help-seeking. Interventions to increase the mental health literacy of the relatives of older adults may lead to additional support for older adults' help-seeking for mental health concerns.

  11. Learning to recommend helpful hotel reviews

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mahony, Michael P.; Smyth, Barry

    2009-01-01

    User-generated reviews are a common and valuable source of product information, yet little attention has been paid as to how best to present them to end-users. In this paper, we describe a classification-based recommender system that is designed to recommend the most helpful reviews for a given product. We present a large-scale evaluation of our approach using TripAdvisor hotel reviews, and we show that our approach is capable of suggesting superior reviews compared to a number of alternat...

  12. Mythbusting Medical Writing: Goodbye, Ghosts! Hello, Help!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Cindy W; Gertel, Art; Jacobs, Adam; Marchington, Jackie; Weaver, Shelley; Woolley, Karen

    To meet ethical and scientific obligations, authors should submit timely, high-quality manuscripts. Authors, however, can encounter ethical (e.g., authorship designation) and practical (e.g., time and resource limitations) challenges during manuscript preparation. Could professional medical writers-not ghostwriters-help authors address these challenges? This essay summarizes evidence countering three myths that may have hindered authors from considering the use of professional medical writers. Authors with sufficient time, writing expertise, and reporting guideline knowledge may meet their obligations without writing assistance. Unfortunately, not all authors are in this position. Decisions about writing support should be based on evidence, not myths.

  13. Helping Nevada School Children Become Sun Smart

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-28

    This podcast features Christine Thompson, Community Programs Manager at the Nevada Cancer Coalition, and author of a recent study detailing a school-based program to help Nevada school children establish healthy sun safety habits and decrease UV exposure. Christine answers questions about her research and what impact her what impact the program had on children’s skin health.  Created: 11/28/2017 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/28/2017.

  14. How to help the patient motivate himself?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, A

    2012-03-01

    In order to help a patient with a chronic disease motivate himself, caregivers spontaneously make use of reason with a view to having the patient share the caregivers' point of view, in other words, to some extent, transforming the care recipient into a caregiver. However, it is not unusual for a caregiver suffering from the disease in which he specializes not to treat himself in compliance with the rules he recommends to his patients. Man is a trinity with three instances of the self. In addition to the "rational self" that tends towards the universal, there is also an "animal self" subject to powerful, frequently imperious, primary needs which may be compared to impulsions, compulsions and addictions. Lastly, there is an "identity self", an irreducible singularity, governed by the law of optimizing pleasure or, in any event, avoiding moral distress. The patient has to learn to navigate between objectives oriented by reason, more or less imperious urges and the striving for well-being and avoidance of moral distress. These various instances of the "self" have a distinct relationship with the norm and with time. Psychologists recognize two types of motivation: intrinsic motivation, an activity implemented for itself, and extrinsic motivation, an activity practiced for its secondary beneficial effects. Clearly, caring for oneself derives from an extrinsic motivation. This motivation may be very powerful but is frequently of limited duration. Helping a patient suffering from a chronic disease motivate himself over time thus consists in helping the patient take on board an extrinsic motivation in order for the treatment to become a routine or a source of satisfaction or even pleasure. The physician has to promote the acquisition of self-care skills and a feeling of success in the patient. The physician is also to help the patient negotiate the optimum compromise between his "rational self" and his "identity self" by acting as the advocate of the two parties, while not

  15. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  16. Keyword: help! Online resources for disaster preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Amadie H; Cushman, Margaret J

    2002-01-01

    Health care organizations such as home care agencies should have post-disaster contingency plans in place that include contacts with the local, county, or state emergency management office, local branch of the Red Cross, and a clearly identified point person within the agency to coordinate disaster response efforts. Home care agencies must plan for the far-reaching effects that disasters can have on people in the community. This article provides some online resources to help you, your organization, and your family prepare for unexpected events.

  17. Helping CERN give back to society

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society mission: ‘To spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society.’   Digital library schools in Africa, Arts@CERN, a beam line for schools competition and perhaps soon a dedicated biomedical research facility: CERN infrastructure and expertise have a great influence on society, and we have the potential to do much more. For that, however, we need help, and that’s why we have launched the CERN & Society initiative, which this week sees the publication of a new website for those who want to understand more about how our research touches everyday life, as well as for those who wish to help CERN in this new endeavour. Fundamental research fulfils a very human need. The quest to understand the universe we live in is as old as humanity itself, and CERN is in the vanguard of that effort today. For our scientists and engineers, pushing technology to the limit is part of their day job, and in doing so they ...

  18. Insomnia patients' help-seeking experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Glozier, Nicholas; Saini, Bandana

    2014-03-04

    Timely access to appropriate treatment is important for optimizing insomnia management. To date, little is known about insomnia patients' treatment experiences or how they access and engage with the available health care resources. This study sought to capture the help-seeking experiences and behavioral patterns of patients with insomnia who are seeking or receiving specialist care. A purposive sample of 26 insomnia patients from specialist sleep and mental health clinics located in metropolitan New South Wales, Australia was recruited. Participants completed a brief questionnaire, followed by an in-depth, semi-structured interview. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using framework analysis. Three key themes emerged from the data: patients' sleep beliefs, treatment beliefs, and accessing specialized care. The findings show that daytime symptoms arising from insomnia serve as important illness cues for patients to seek medical help. In addition, participants' treatment pathways highlight factors that prevent the widespread use of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), including limited awareness about CBT-I, tentative referral mechanisms, limited service providers, and the high cost of CBT-I.

  19. Scale model helps Duke untie construction snags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power plant model, only 60 percent complete, has helped Duke Power identify over 150 major design interferences, which, when resolved, will help cut capital expense and eliminate scheduling problems that normally crop up as revisions are made during actual plant construction. The model has been used by construction, steam production, and design personnel to recommend changes that should improve material handling, operations, and maintenance procedures as well as simplifying piping and cabling. The company has already saved many man-hours in material take-off, material management, and detailed drafting and expects to save even more with greater use of, and improvement in, its modeling program. Duke's modeling program was authorized and became operational in November 1974, with the first model to be the Catawba Nuclear Station. This plant is a two-unit station using Westinghouse nuclear steam supply systems in tandem with General Electric turbine-generators, horizontal feedwater heaters, and Foster Wheeler triple pressure condensers. Each unit is rated 1142 MWe

  20. Help-seeking for child psychopathology: pathways to informal and professional services in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Ende, J. van der; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Verhulst, F.C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To devise and test a model describing the process of help-seeking for child psychopathology in professional and informal service settings. METHOD: Using structural equation modeling, associations between several help-seeking stages, and the influence of child, family, and context

  1. Towards Understanding How to Assess Help-Seeking Behavior across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogan, Amy; Walker, Erin; Baker, Ryan; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.; Soriano, Jose Carlo; Castro, Maynor Jimenez

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in automatically assessing help seeking, the process of referring to resources outside of oneself to accomplish a task or solve a problem. Research in the United States has shown that specific help-seeking behaviors led to better learning within intelligent tutoring systems. However, intelligent…

  2. Could positive affect help engineer robot control systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Markus; Hertzberg, Joachim; Kuhl, Julius; Stephan, Achim

    2011-11-01

    Emotions have long been seen as counteracting rational thought, but over the last decades, they have been viewed as adaptive processes to optimize human (but also animal) behaviour. In particular, positive affect appears to be a functional aspect of emotions closely related to that. We argue that positive affect as understood in Kuhl's PSI model of the human cognitive architecture appears to have an interpretation in state-of-the-art hybrid robot control architectures, which might help tackle some open questions in the field.

  3. Work teams help independents make best use of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.F.; Rees, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that application of new technology in multidisciplinary team environments can help independent producers prosper in the world's evolving oil and gas industry. Independents face changes on both a macro and micro level involving resource access, capital pricing, tools, systems, and processes which are progressing at a disconcerting pace. Many opportunities, challenges, successes, and failures will transpire in this environment. Organizations and individuals will succeed or fail based on the ability to adapt, create, capitalize, and excel in a business world that fails to offer a clear vision

  4. WORD ORIGIN HELPS EXPAND LEARNERS’ VOCABULARY A VOCABULARY TEACHING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Word origin (motivation deals with the connection between name and sense, explaining how a word originated. With the knowledge of how words are originated, learners can grasp a word easier and thus expand their vocabulary more quickly. The introduction to word origin (motivation by teachers can also help the learners gain interest in the process of learning and learn more about the cultural and historical background of the English-speaking countries. This paper tries to clarify this method of teaching from four aspects: onomatopoeia, word formation, cultural and historical background and cognitive linguistics.

  5. Strategically Integrated Design – Helping Brands to Keep Their Promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krohn Michael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many companies incorporate design into their processes much too late and work sequentially instead of in an integrated manner. If, however, the important conceptual, technical or market-relevant decisions have already been made and the product or service is almost ready for launch, then design “cosmetics” will not help much. Design creates images that stick in your mind, and if these images are thought out at the last minute, there’s a risk that they will not optimally promote the overall brand image.

  6. HELPFUL ASPECTS OF THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP IN INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Urška Modic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a qualitative study of helpful aspects of the therapeutic relationship in Integrative Psychotherapy. Participants of the study were sixteen clients who were in the process of Integrative Psychotherapy for at least a year. Participants were interviewed with the adapted version of the Change Interview (Elliott, 1999, which involves a semi-structured empathic exploration of the client's experience in therapy. The analysis of the clients’ experience of Integrative Psychotherapy revealed six categories of helpful aspects of therapeutic relationship: the therapist’s empathic attunement, the therapist’s acceptance, the match between the client and the therapist, feelings of trust and safety, feeling of connection, and experience of a new relational experience. Based on results of the research, we developed a model of the healing relationship in integrative psychotherapy. This model describes the interrelatedness of these six helpful aspects of the therapeutic relationship. The categories of empathic attunement and acceptance proved to be the most important categories relating to the therapist’s contribution to the healing therapeutic relationship. Clients described that the therapist’s empathic attunement and acceptance influenced the development of safety and trust, feelings of connection and promotion of new relational experiences. The results of this study are discussed in relation to the theories of Integrative Psychotherapy and research regarding the therapeutic relationship in psychotherapy.

  7. Cognitive processes in CBT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vrijsen, J.N.; Hofmann, S.G.; Asmundson, G.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Automatic cognitive processing helps us navigate the world. However, if the emotional and cognitive interplay becomes skewed, those cognitive processes can become maladaptive and result in psychopathology. Although biases are present in most mental disorders, different disorders are characterized by

  8. Helping Veterans and Their Families Fight On!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Hazle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This new generation of veterans is coming home to families, friends, employers, and communities that likely do not understand military culture, nor the effects that military service and reintegration have on a veteran’s life, leading to the next war – the Reintegration War. Military servicemembers, veterans, and their families face challenges within the Reintegration War that are different from their civilian counterparts and are complicated by military-specific circumstances. In order to more effectively and efficiently address the challenges servicemembers, veterans, and their families face, we need to work together in a comprehensive effort. Strategies are presented to help win the Reintegration War and ease the transition for servicemembers, veterans, and their families.

  9. Market forces can help lower waste volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavins, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Market forces can go a long way toward helping communities solve their mounting solid-waste problems. In most communities the increasing costs of solid-waste disposal are invisible to the average homeowner because they are buried in local property tax rates. Even in the few communities that list disposal costs separately on tax bills, individual costs are not related to the volume of waste generated. Fundamental to an effective waste-management strategy is the removal of these distortions by getting the prices right. But even with improved price signals, there is no silver bullet of public policy for solid- and hazardous-waste management. Until the ubiquitous NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) problem is addressed, even the most innovative set of waste management policies will remain, at best, a partial solution

  10. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Samothrakis

    Full Text Available Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  11. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman’s model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear. PMID:26524352

  12. Parenting from prison: helping children and mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P J; Harm, N J

    2000-01-01

    Incarceration of a mother disrupts the mother-child relationship and the child's emotional development. The researchers evaluated a 15-week parenting program in a women's prison that was designed to enhance mother-child interactions during imprisonment. Pre- and postmeasures for the 104 women were Hudson's (1982) Index of Self-Esteem, Bavolek's (1984) Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory, and semistructured questionnaires. Self-esteem and attitudes about expectations of children, corporal punishment, and family roles improved significantly. Empathy and mother-child interactions through visits and letters improved. Participants identified the most helpful components of the program. Those who had been physically, sexually, and emotionally abused and those who had used drugs and alcohol had positive results. Findings support the value of parent education for self-development of incarcerated mothers and for the welfare of their children.

  13. Helping Your Heart with Nuclear Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Michael Amdi

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA is helping in the fight against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) by assisting its Member States in using nuclear science and technology to track and monitor CVDs. Nuclear imaging techniques allow doctors to look inside a patient’s body and see how organs function without running the risk of surgery. CVDs kill more people than just about anything else on the planet. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that roughly 30 per cent of all deaths in 2008 were caused by CVDs. That number is increasing, and by 2030 the WHO estimates that more than 23 million people will die annually from CVDs. For comparison, that is equivalent to roughly the entire population of a medium-sized country

  14. Managing Data in Help4Mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria K. Wolters

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Help4Mood is a system that supports the treatment of people with depression in the community. It collects rich cognitive, psychomotor, and motor data through a Personal Monitoring System and a Virtual Agent, which is then analysed by a Decision Support System; analysis results are fed back to patients and their treating clinicians. In this paper, we describe how the complex data is managed and discuss ethical issues. Data is stored in functional units that correspond to treatment relevant entities. Custom XML DTDs are defined for each unit, which are used to exchange information between system components. As far as possible, observations and findings are coded using SNOMED CT to ensure interoperability with other applications such as Electronic Health Records.

  15. Peer support: helping to influence cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Breastfeeding peer support schemes in Blackpool and Lancashire work closely with midwifery and other partners to offer additional support and encouragement to breastfeeding mothers. Employed and volunteer peer supporters deliver a systematic service in target areas delivering workshops to pregnant mothers, supporting new mothers in hospital, including in the neonatal units, in mothers' homes and in groups at children's centres. Working with health, children's centres, public health and councils, the peer supporters were instrumental in Fleetwood town agreeing to always welcome breastfeeding. They worked with teachers, public health and infant feeding coordinators to deliver a month-long breastfeeding campaign at a local college and, working with health visitors, have engaged with grandmothers to find out how they feel they can help support new mothers. Skilled supervision is essential to ensuring peer supporters work safely and continue to develop their skills and knowledge. Volunteer coordinators play a key role in valuing and organising volunteers.

  16. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  17. Can Resilience Help? Coping with Job Stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uju Violet Alola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Workplace incivility is a serious issue in an organization, this is of the fact that uncivil act is costly to the organization, employee health, performance, turnover intention. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the importance of workplace incivility on hotel employees using IBM Amos 22. And, using questionnaire method as a research tool for the quantitative study, a total of 153 questionnaires were used to assess the effect of workplace incivility on hotel employees in four and five star-hotels in Lagos Nigeria. Bagozzi’s Appraisal-Emotional reactions theory was applied to this study. We found out that resilience fully mediated the relationship between work place incivility and turnover intention. The estimated results obtained suggest that workplace incivility has a negative effect on employee. Suggestions were made to human resource management on how to help employee stand the stress of this effect.

  18. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  19. OSART Works to Help Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety is a never ending pursuit for improvement, and one of the more prominent IAEA efforts that help Member States achieve higher levels of safety is the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme. In OSART missions, the IAEA coordinates internationally-based teams of experts who conduct reviews of operational safety performance at nuclear power plants. The IAEA on 14 June 2013 marked the 30th anniversary of OSART. In 1983, the Agency conducted its first OSART mission to the Kori Nuclear Power Plant in the Republic of Korea, and it conducted a total of 174 OSART missions over the following 30 years. The reviews have been done in 34 nations at 103 nuclear sites. (author)

  20. Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In April, two semiautonomous drones, developed by Saildrone, a marine tech startup based in Alameda, California, in close collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C., are set to return from an 8-month tour of the Pacific Ocean. This the first scientific test for the drones, which are powered only by the wind and sun, in the Pacific Ocean. The voyage is an important step in showing that such drones, carrying 15 different sensors, could help replace an aging and expensive array of buoys that are the main way scientists sniff out signs of climate-disrupting El Niño events. If successful, scientists envision fleets of similar drones spreading across the ocean, inviting thoughts of what it could be like to do oceanography without a ship.

  1. Tanker self-help spill recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, J B; Wainwright, J G; Ehman, T K

    1991-12-01

    An investigation was conducted of the circumstances in which oil spills occur from tankers at sea by analyzing available historical oil spill data. A data base of marine oil spills greater than 134 tonnes occurring from 1974 and June 1990, included in an appendix, was among the information analyzed. The analysis showed that marine oil spills of 5,000 tonnes and greater account for 39.4% of the accidents yet 94.7% of the total spilled quantity; 84% of those spills occur in vessels of 20,000 deadweight tonnes and larger. Of spills over 5,000 tonnes, 78.5% occur outside of harbor or pier areas where spill response equipment may not be readily available. Over 50% of spills are caused by groundings or collisions where the vessel crew might be able to respond in mitigating and controlling the outflow of oil. The review suggested that tanker self-help systems warrant serious consideration. Potential self-help systems are described, ranging from additives such as bioremediation, dispersants, and solidifiers to equipment such as portable pumps, booms, and skimmers. Candidate systems were examined in terms of their safety, ease of operation, practicability, and effectiveness. Their possible performance was then assessed for the case of major marine oil spills that have occurred in Canadian waters. Four systems are identified as potential candidates for further evaluation and possible implementation: internal oil transfer, hydrostatic loading, external oil lightering, and contingency planning. A system design is evaluated and its benefits and possible implementation are outlined, based on integration of the preferred attributes of the above four options. Recommendations for implementation are also provided. 28 refs., 6 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. Family planning and development helping women world-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1989-04-01

    This article discusses the need for family planning (FP) as part of the development process, applauds its successes and rallies continued momentum of the FP movement. 500,000 women die each year from pregnancy- or labor-related conditions, and 10s of millions of women suffer pregnancy-related illnesses and impairments that undermine their social and economic productivity. Moreover, the 4 major factors that lead to high-risk pregnancies, namely, becoming pregnant before the age of 20, after the age of 35, after 4 or more pregnancies, and 2 years after an earlier pregnancy, all reveal the need for FP. These tragedies could be avoided by assuring better nutrition, primary health care for all, good antenatal attention and proper facilities and help in childbirth, access to good obstetric care in emergency situations, and universally available FP services. FP organizations must empower women with the knowledge of FP and the means to put it into practice. Developing countries, such as China, India, Indonesia, Thailand and Mexico, in addition to affluent industrialized countries have made strides in FP with the help of such organizations as the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). IPPF has helped to motivate large numbers of men and women to determine their ideal family size. It has provided the means for them to reach such goals and has ensured that acceptance of FP has been on a voluntary basis. IPPF has also advised and cajoled governments into becoming involved in FP. In the future, national strategies must produce the building blocks for better policies to help women become more responsible for their lives. The education of women will be vital to achieving this objective as well as other aspects of development.

  3. A simple tool to help decision making in infrastructure planning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... a tool to help decision making for planning and management of phytotreatment ... mental studies aimed at the quantitative estimation of biologi- cal processes .... water has been simulated with a logistic model assuming an.

  4. HELPing older people with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HELP-COPD): mixed-method feasibility pilot randomised controlled trial of a novel intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Susan; Kendall, Marilyn; Ferguson, Susie; MacNee, William; Sheikh, Aziz; White, Patrick; Worth, Allison; Boyd, Kirsty; Murray, Scott A; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-04-16

    Extending palliative care to those with advanced non-malignant disease is advocated, but the implications in specific conditions are poorly understood. We piloted a novel nurse-led intervention, HELPing older people with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HELP-COPD), undertaken 4 weeks after discharge from hospital, which sought to identify and address the holistic care needs of people with severe COPD. This 6-month mixed-method feasibility pilot trial randomised (ratio 3:1) patients to HELP-COPD or usual care. We assessed the feasibility of using validated questionnaires as outcome measures and analysed the needs/actions recorded in the HELP-COPD records. Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of patients, carers and professionals explored the perceptions of HELP-COPD. Verbatim transcriptions and field notes were analysed using Normalisation Process Theory as a framework. We randomised 32 patients (24 to HELP-COPD); 19 completed the study (death=3, ill-health=4, declined=6). The HELP-COPD record noted a mean of 1.6 actions/assessment, mostly provision of information or self-help actions: only five referrals were made. Most patients were positive about HELP-COPD, discussing their concerns and coping strategies in all domains, but the questionnaires were burdensome for some patients. Adaptation to their slowly progressive disability and a strong preference to rely on family support was reflected in limited acceptance of formal services. Professionals perceived HELP-COPD as addressing an important aspect of care, although timing overlapped with discharge planning. The HELP-COPD intervention was well received by patients and the concept resonated with professionals, although delivery post discharge overlapped with existing services. Integration of brief holistic care assessments in the routine primary care management of COPD may be more appropriate.

  5. Gore offers to help drug companies pursue research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-08

    A meeting convened between Vice President Al Gore and executives of leading pharmaceutical companies to determine means of accelerating efforts to develop vaccines, therapeutics, and microbicides for people with HIV. Gore explained that the administration will work with pharmaceutical companies to determine the long-term effectiveness of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), work with international groups to increase investment in vaccine development, help develop new microbicides for women with HIV, and identify promising areas of AIDS research. According to advocates, the Clinton Administration has made great strides in improving and accelerating the FDA's drug approval process. The next goal of the pharmaceutical research agenda should be to include consumer advocates in the decision-making process.

  6. Understanding coping with cancer: how can qualitative research help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittem, Mahati

    2014-01-01

    Research in psycho-oncology investigates the psycho-social and emotional aspects of cancer and how this is related to health, well-being and overall patient care. Coping with cancer is a prime focus for researchers owing to its impact on patients' psychological processing and life in general. Research so far has focused mainly on quantitative study designs such as questionnaires to examine the coping strategies used by cancer patients. However, in order to gain a rich and deep understanding of the reasons, processes and types of strategies that patients use to deal with cancer, qualitative study designs are necessary. Few studies have used qualitative designs such as semi-structured interviews to explore coping with cancer. The current paper aims to review the suitability and benefits of using qualitative research designs to understand coping with cancer with the help of some key literature in psycho-oncology research.

  7. Rewiring the network. What helps an innovation to diffuse?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Szwabiński, Janusz; Weron, Rafał; Weron, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question related to innovation diffusion is how the structure of the social network influences the process. Empirical evidence regarding real-world networks of influence is very limited. On the other hand, agent-based modeling literature reports different, and at times seemingly contradictory, results. In this paper we study innovation diffusion processes for a range of Watts–Strogatz networks in an attempt to shed more light on this problem. Using the so-called Sznajd model as the backbone of opinion dynamics, we find that the published results are in fact consistent and allow us to predict the role of network topology in various situations. In particular, the diffusion of innovation is easier on more regular graphs, i.e. with a higher clustering coefficient. Moreover, in the case of uncertainty—which is particularly high for innovations connected to public health programs or ecological campaigns—a more clustered network will help the diffusion. On the other hand, when social influence is less important (i.e. in the case of perfect information), a shorter path will help the innovation to spread in the society and—as a result—the diffusion will be easiest on a random graph. (paper)

  8. Help Me Please!: Designing and Developing Application for Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ng Ken; Hafit, Hanayanti; Wahid, Norfaradilla; Kasim, Shahreen; Yusof, Munirah Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Help Me Please! Application is an android platform emergency button application that is designed to transmit emergency messages to target receivers with real time information. The purpose of developing this application is to help people to notify any emergency circumstances via Short Message Service (SMS) in android platform. The application will receive the current location from Global Positioning System (GPS), will obtain the current time from the mobile device and send this information to the receivers when user presses the emergency button. Simultaneously, the application will keep sending the emergency alerts to receivers and will update to database based on the time interval set by user until user stop the function. Object-oriented Software Development model is employed to guide the development of this application with the knowledge of Java language and Android Studio. In conclusion, this application plays an important role in rescuing process when emergency circumstances happen. The rescue process will become more effective by notifying the emergency circumstances and send the current location of user to others in the early hours.

  9. A grounded theory of bisexual individuals' experiences of help seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Jenna; Robinson, Margaret; Pinder, Sarah; Ross, Lori E

    2017-01-01

    Bisexual people constitute the largest sexual minority group in North America and experience significant mental health disparities in relation to heterosexuals, gays, and lesbians. In this article, we will examine the process and experience of help seeking among bisexuals. This was a community-based study that collected qualitative interview data from 41 diverse bisexual people from across Ontario, Canada. We analyzed the interview data using grounded theory and constructed an understanding of bisexuals' experiences of help seeking. We have conceptualized an overarching model that illustrates 4 interrelated stages: (a) the consideration of services, (b) the process of finding services, (c) barriers and facilitators to accessing services, and (d) experience of service utilization. This model is nonlinear, in that participants do not necessarily move through stages in sequence. Although many stages are experienced at the individual level, they are simultaneously informed by multiple factors at interpersonal and system levels. Our findings suggest a need for interventions at the policy, service and provider levels to improve accessibility of culturally competent services for this population. Understanding the mental health experiences of bisexual people will allow mental health professionals to build competencies working with this population and thereby contribute to a reduction in mental health disparities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Preferences for third-party help in workplace conflict: A cross-cultural comparison of Chinese and Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebels, Ellen; Yang, H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines conflict parties’ preferences for different types of third-party help and how this may be influenced by cultural differences in terms of individualism/ collectivism. We focus our analysis on process-related nonsubstantive help and identify three types of thirdparty help in

  11. Ancient Pyramids Help Students Learn Math Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney D.; Stump, Amanda M.; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an activity that allows students to use mathematics and critical-thinking skills to emulate processes used by the ancient Egyptians to prepare the site for the Pyramids of Giza. To accomplish this, they use three different methods. First, they create a square using only simple technological tools that were available to the…

  12. Feedforward: helping students interpret written feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Hurford, Donna; Read, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    "Assessment for Learning is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by learners... "(Assessment Reform Group, 2002, p.2): for the Higher Education tutor, written feedback forms an integral part of this. This short article reports on teaching methods to engage students in feedback and assessment of their written work.

  13. Irradiation could help Irish food processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, Edward

    1985-01-01

    The applications of irradiation processing in the food industry are reviewed, and the present situation in Ireland outlined. The caution of legislators, choice of product labelling and consumer acceptance are seen as major factors in the adoption of this technology by Irish industry, although at least two concerns are considering setting up a service facility near Dublin

  14. Research helps improve food security and nutrition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    Foundation, Global Affairs Canada and IDRC. The 5.5-year, ... South and South East Asia. ... in post-harvest processing, which is largely done by women in South Asia. ... services allowed mainly indigenous and women fishers to invest in fish.

  15. Horses help to maintain CERN's forests

    CERN Multimedia

    François Briard

    2016-01-01

    On the initiative of the Office National des Forêts, France’s forestry commission, horses are helping to remove trees cut down in CERN’s forests.   The CERN site covers 625 hectares, of which around 200 are fenced sites used for CERN’s research activities. The rest of the land consists of fields rented out to farmers and about 90 hectares of forests, mainly in France and managed by the French forestry commission, the Office National des Forêts (ONF), under an agreement with CERN signed in 2010. The upkeep of CERN’s forests requires regular maintenance work, which includes thinning out seedlings, selecting the strongest saplings and harvesting mature trees. This June, the ONF has decided to involve horses in the removal of felled trees from CERN’s woods in Prévessin.  As Florent Daloz, the logger entrusted with this activity by the ONF, explains, the use of horses to haul timber completely died out i...

  16. Isotopes Help Design Better Nutrition Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, Daud

    2014-01-01

    Good nutrition is essential for good health. To ensure proper nutrition, energydense fat, protein and carbohydrates need to be accompanied by vitamins and minerals. Malnutrition is the result of too much food or too little food and a lack of variety in the kinds of food eaten. More than 30% of young children suffer from some form of malnutrition with devastating consequences for health, learning, future earning potential, economic development, resilience and security. Undernutrition in early life, when accompanied by excessive weight gain later in childhood, increases the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally, with at least 2.8 million adults dying each year from diseases related to overweight or obesity such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and some forms of cancer. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in the development and monitoring of interventions against malnutrition. Compared to other conventional techniques, these methods, which do not involve radiation, offer much more sensitive and specific measurements. They can be used to establish the ratio of lean tissue to fat in body composition; to estimate the number of calories spent each day; to determine whether breastfed babies are exclusively breastfed according to the recommendations issued by the World Health Organization (WHO); to assess a person’s vitamin A reserves; and to establish how well iron and zinc are utilized from local foods and diets. This provides Member States with information to help them design or improve their national health and nutrition programmes

  17. Evolving minds: Helping students with cognitive dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramschreiber, Terry L.

    Even 150 years after Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species, public school teachers still find themselves dealing with student resistance to learning about biological evolution. Some teachers deal with this pressure by undermining, deemphasizing, or even omitting the topic in their science curriculum. Others face the challenge and deliver solid scientific instruction of evolutionary theory despite the conflicts that may arise. The latter were the topic of this study. I interviewed five teachers that had experience dealing with resistance to learning evolution in their school community. Through these in-depth interviews, I examined strategies these teachers use when facing resistance and how they help students deal with the cognitive dissonance that may be experienced when learning about evolution. I selected the qualitative method of educational criticism and connoisseurship to organize and categorize my data. From the interviews, the following findings emerged. Experienced teachers increased their confidence in teaching evolution by pursuing outside professional development. They not only learned more about evolutionary theory, but about creationist arguments against evolution. These teachers front-load their curriculum to integrate the nature of science into their lessons to address misunderstandings about how science works. They also highlight the importance of learning evolutionary theory but ensure students they do not have an agenda to indoctrinate students. Finally these experienced teachers work hard to create an intellectually safe learning environment to build trusting and respectful relationships with their students.

  18. Neuropathic pain: is quantitative sensory testing helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Elena K; Geber, Christian; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is characterised by a combination of positive and negative sensory symptoms. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) examines the sensory perception after application of different mechanical and thermal stimuli of controlled intensity and the function of both large (A-beta) and small (A-delta and C) nerve fibres, including the corresponding central pathways. QST can be used to determine detection, pain thresholds and stimulus-response curves and can thus detect both negative and positive sensory signs, the second ones not being assessed by other methods. Similarly to all other psychophysical tests QST requires standardised examination, instructions and data evaluation to receive valid and reliable results. Since normative data are available, QST can contribute also to the individual diagnosis of neuropathy, especially in the case of isolated small-fibre neuropathy, in contrast to the conventional electrophysiology which assesses only large myelinated fibres. For example, detection of early stages of subclinical neuropathy in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus can be helpful to optimise treatment and identify diabetic foot at risk of ulceration. QST assessed the individual's sensory profile and thus can be valuable to evaluate the underlying pain mechanisms which occur in different frequencies even in the same neuropathic pain syndromes. Furthermore, assessing the exact sensory phenotype by QST might be useful in the future to identify responders to certain treatments in accordance to the underlying pain mechanisms.

  19. Will online chat help alleviate mood loneliness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mu

    2009-04-01

    The present study examines the relationship between social Internet use and loneliness and reviews the studies about this topic from both social psychology and computer-mediated communication literature, as a response to the call for interdisciplinary research from scholars in these two areas. Two hundred thirty-four people participated in both the survey testing trait loneliness and a 5-condition (face-to-face chatting, instant message chatting, watching video, writing assignments, and "do nothing") experiment. Participants reported increase of mood loneliness after chatting online. The level of mood loneliness after online chat was higher than that in face-to-face communication. For people with high trait loneliness, the mood loneliness increase in the computer-mediated communication condition was significantly higher than in the face-to-face communication condition. The author of the current study hopes to help clarify the mixed research findings in previous social Internet use literature about this topic and reminds communication researchers of the need to explore the constructs included in "psychological well-being" in terms of their nature, mechanism, causes, consequences, and furthermore, how they are related to communication.

  20. Implementing healthcare information security: standards can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Andrej; Bernik, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Using widely spread common approaches to systems security in health dedicated controlled environments, a level of awareness, confidence and acceptance of relevant standardisation is evaluated. Patients' information is sensitive, so putting appropriate organisational techniques as well as modern technology in place to secure health information is of paramount importance. Mobile devices are becoming the top priorities in advanced information security planning with healthcare environments being no exception. There are less and less application areas in healthcare without having a need for a mobile functionality which represents an even greater information security challenge. This is also true in emergency treatments, rehabilitation and homecare just to mention a few areas outside hospital controlled environments. Unfortunately quite often traditional unsecured communications principles are still in routine use for communicating sensitive health related information. The security awareness level with users, patients and care professionals is not high enough so potential threats and risks may not be addressed and the respective information security management is therefore weak. Standards like ISO/IEC 27000 ISMS family, the ISO/IEC 27799 information security guidelines in health are often not well known, but together with legislation principles such as HIPAA, they can help.

  1. Health information technology: help or hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchersid, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The practice of medicine in general and nephrology in particular grows increasingly complex with each passing year. In parallel with this trend, the purchasers of health care are slowly shifting the reimbursement paradigm from one based on rewarding transactions, or work performed, to one that rewards value delivered. Within this context, the health-care value equation is broadly defined as quality divided by costs. Health information technology has been widely recognized as 1 of the foundations for delivering better care at lower costs. As the largest purchaser of health care in the world, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deployed a series of interrelated programs designed to spur the adoption and utilization of health information technology. This review examines our known collective experience in the practice of nephrology to date with several of these programs and attempts to answer the following question: Is health information technology helping or hindering the delivery of value to the nation's health-care system? Through this review, it was concluded overall that the effect of health information technology appears positive; however, it cannot be objectively determined because of the infancy of its utilization in the practice of medicine. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sound effects: Multimodal input helps infants find displaced objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinskey, Jeanne L

    2017-09-01

    Before 9 months, infants use sound to retrieve a stationary object hidden by darkness but not one hidden by occlusion, suggesting auditory input is more salient in the absence of visual input. This article addresses how audiovisual input affects 10-month-olds' search for displaced objects. In AB tasks, infants who previously retrieved an object at A subsequently fail to find it after it is displaced to B, especially following a delay between hiding and retrieval. Experiment 1 manipulated auditory input by keeping the hidden object audible versus silent, and visual input by presenting the delay in the light versus dark. Infants succeeded more at B with audible than silent objects and, unexpectedly, more after delays in the light than dark. Experiment 2 presented both the delay and search phases in darkness. The unexpected light-dark difference disappeared. Across experiments, the presence of auditory input helped infants find displaced objects, whereas the absence of visual input did not. Sound might help by strengthening object representation, reducing memory load, or focusing attention. This work provides new evidence on when bimodal input aids object processing, corroborates claims that audiovisual processing improves over the first year of life, and contributes to multisensory approaches to studying cognition. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject Before 9 months, infants use sound to retrieve a stationary object hidden by darkness but not one hidden by occlusion. This suggests they find auditory input more salient in the absence of visual input in simple search tasks. After 9 months, infants' object processing appears more sensitive to multimodal (e.g., audiovisual) input. What does this study add? This study tested how audiovisual input affects 10-month-olds' search for an object displaced in an AB task. Sound helped infants find displaced objects in both the presence and absence of visual input. Object processing becomes more

  3. Help! A simple method for getting back-up help to the reference desk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Furuta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the "net send" command, native to Windows XP, librarians at the University of California, Riverside created a "help button" for the reference desk. The simple script file sends a message to librarians' workstations in their offices and logs the date and time of use. This paper describes that program.

  4. Bounded helping : How morality and intergroup relations shape children's reasoning about helping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this book was to provide insight into children’s (8-13 years) cognition about helping behavior. Whereas developmental research has examined children’s prosociality in terms of dispositions and abilities, it tends to overlook the relation between recipient and helper as well as the

  5. Could plants help tame the greenhouse?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, Y.

    1993-01-01

    It's easy to see how climate change might affect the globe's vegetation, driving hardwood forests into regions now covered with evergreens and causing deserts to shift. It's less easy to picture the other side of the coin: biology's impact on the atmosphere. So mathematician Berrien Moore III of the University of New Hampshire, who heads the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program task force on global analysis, interpretation, and modeling, staged a simple demonstration. He modeled the effects of a biosphere fertilized by increased CO 2 - and found that it could first help, then hinder, human efforts to slow the buildup of greenhouse gases. To simulate such a biotic carbon sink, Moore combined a simple model of CO 2 uptake by the ocean with an equally simple model of its uptake by photosynthesis on land and its release by deforestation and plant decay. He then forced this simple ocean-atmosphere-vegetation model with fossil fuel CO 2 emissions from 1860 to the present. As expected, his model ended up with too much carbon in the atmosphere. So he turned up photosynthesis, fertilizing plant growth in his model, until the rate of CO 2 buildup just matched the observed increase. Moore then explored how this terrestrial carbon sink would respond if the CO 2 buildup slowed. The result: If you were to cap the rate of CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning, [this terrestrial] sink would reduce the atmospheric lifetime of CO 2 by a factor of four or five. This cleansing effect would operate on timescales of years or decades, compared with centuries for the ocean, says Moore - fast enough to aid human efforts to slow the CO 2 buildup. However, it doesn't do it forever. If at some point emissions cuts and the terrestrial sink succeeded in reducing atmospheric CO 2 , plant growth would drop and CO 2 levels would bounce back up as all the extra biomass rotted away

  6. Google searches help with diagnosis in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Montassar; Feroz, Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have tried to assess the usefulness of Google search as a diagnostic aid. The results were discordant and have led to controversies. To investigate how often Google search is helpful to reach correct diagnoses in dermatology. Two fifth-year students (A and B) and one demonstrator (C) have participated as investigators in this paper. Twenty-five diagnostic dermatological cases were selected from all the clinical cases published in the Web only images in clinical medicine from March 2005 to November 2009. The main outcome measure of our paper was to compare the number of correct diagnoses provided by the investigators without, and with Google search. Investigator A gave correct diagnoses in 9/25 (36%) cases without Google search, his diagnostic success after Google search was 18/25 (72%). Investigator B results were 11/25 (44%) correct diagnoses without Google search, and 19/25 (76%) after this search. For investigator C, the results were 12/25 (48%) without Google search, and 18/25 (72%) after the use of this tool. Thus, the total correct diagnoses provided by the three investigators were 32 (42.6%) without Google search, and 55 (73.3%) when using this facility. The difference was statistically significant between the total number of correct diagnoses given by the three investigators without, and with Google search (p = 0.0002). In the light of our paper, Google search appears to be an interesting diagnostic aid in dermatology. However, we emphasize that diagnosis is primarily an art based on clinical skills and experience.

  7. Help Seeking in Online Collaborative Groupwork: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    This study examined predictive models for students' help seeking in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Results from multilevel analysis revealed that most of the variance in help seeking was at the individual student level, and multiple variables at the individual level were predictive of help-seeking behaviour. Help seeking was…

  8. Making process improvement 'stick'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Quint

    2014-06-01

    To sustain gains from a process improvement initiative, healthcare organizations should: Explain to staff why a process improvement initiative is needed. Encourage leaders within the organization to champion the process improvement, and tie their evaluations to its outcomes. Ensure that both leaders and employees have the skills to help sustain the sought-after process improvements.

  9. Outgroup helping as a tool to communicate ingroup warmth

    OpenAIRE

    Van, Leeuwen E.A.C.; Täuber, S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors extend previous research on the effects of metastereotype activation on outgroup helping by examining in more detail the role of group impression management motives and by studying direct helping (i.e., helping the outgroup believed to hold a negative view of the ingroup). Data from three experiments provided full support for the communicative nature of direct outgroup helping by demonstrating that outgroup helping in response to a negative metastereotype was predicted by particip...

  10. Neurodharma Self-Help: Personalized Science Communication as Brain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Jenny

    2017-09-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This article examines some of the ways in which the medical and scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at large the imperative of brain fitness for the promotion of health, wellbeing and happiness. The study identifies claims being made in popular outlets that, by and large, bypass traditional mass media, such as self-help books, websites and online videos. By treating this material as a form of personalized science communication, this article contributes to the body of literature that understands science communication as a continuum and the boundary between science and popularized science as the outcome of human negotiations. The study finds that processes of personalization help to build bridges between scientific findings and their supposed application, that they infuse science with subjective meaning, and turn expert communication with the public into a moral vocation.

  11. Helping organizations help others: organization development as a facilitator of social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Neil M

    2011-01-01

    This article explores organization development (OD) interventions and their likelihood of increasing social change outcomes in public agencies. The central argument of this work is that public and nonprofit organizations can deliver better social outcomes by systematically engaging in OD interventions. An in-depth survey was conducted in 3 agencies of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania at the end of the gubernatorial administration of Tom Ridge (1995-2002). During his administration, Governor Ridge led the agencies of Pennsylvania government through a large-scale change effort to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of service delivery to the citizens of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The change effort was a remarkable event for the Commonwealth because no other governor in the history of the state had attempted to conceptualize and deliver a comprehensive large-scale change management initiative. The successes and setbacks served as a fertile context to shed light on the following research question: Do OD interventions increase the likelihood that public organizations will deliver better social outcomes? This question is important in that public organizations may need to engage in organization development activities to improve their internal operations, which in turn may help them provide exemplary social outcomes to those whom they serve. In short, organization development interventions might allow public organizations to help themselves to help others.

  12. Does self-help increase rates of help seeking for student mental health problems by minimizing stigma as a barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E; Krafft, Jennifer; Levin, Crissa

    2018-01-01

    This study examined whether self-help (books, websites, mobile apps) increases help seeking for mental health problems among college students by minimizing stigma as a barrier. A survey was conducted with 200 college students reporting elevated distress from February to April 2017. Intentions to use self-help were low, but a significant portion of students unwilling to see mental health professionals intended to use self-help. Greater self-stigma related to lower intentions to seek professional help, but was unrelated to seeking self-help. Similarly, students who only used self-help in the past reported higher self-stigma than those who sought professional treatment in the past. Although stigma was not a barrier for self-help, alternate barriers were identified. Offering self-help may increase rates of students receiving help for mental health problems, possibly by offering an alternative for students unwilling to seek in-person therapy due to stigma concerns.

  13. Helping UN negotiators protect the poorest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysinghe, Achala Chandani

    2011-07-15

    UN climate change negotiations are beehives of intense activity. Parallel negotiating sessions, contact groups, drafting sessions and side events all contribute to the complexity. During high-stake conferences like the one held in Copenhagen in 2009, negotiators labour through deadlocked all-night meetings. Adaptation, mitigation, technology transfer and finance are just a few of the controversial and technically challenging issues on the table. The UNFCCC process itself imposes an additional labyrinth that participants must learn. To meet these demands and participate in the negotiations effectively, countries need talented teams of negotiators and expert advisors. The most powerful countries send dozens of delegates: Japan's team has 114 members, and the United States has 155. But Gambia, which leads the 48 countries in the least developed countries (LDC) group, has only four. For the poorest countries, the UN provides funds to support just two delegates.

  14. Help the desk: an SSM investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Certo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This is case study about a groupware system adoption that, despite the efforts beyond the technical aspects, did not led to the expected improvements. Through a SSM (Soft System Methodology process of inquiry, a consistent pattern of social involvement needs emerges. The generalisable lesson deduced from the findings is that a system is more profitable - or at least more difficult to be opposed - when participated and agreed in its parts. Yet, this may not suffice: as change sometimes needs to be imposed, divergent and never stable-for-too-long standpoints always exist, incentive devices are effective in enforce the above and conduct the actor’s actions towards a wanted path.

  15. Gamma radiation a help to archeological woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balibar, F.

    1981-01-01

    Waterlogged archeological wood falls into dust once extracted from the water. In order to prevent this destruction several processes have been thought up. In France, the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre has developed a method of consolidation by resin impregnation and gamma irradiation. The object is first immersed in a vessel containing liquid resin which spreads throughout the wood thereby driving off the water. During the second stage of the treatment, the impregnated objects are irradiated by gamma radiation emitted by a rectangular grid of cobalt 60, so as to polymerize the resin inside the wood. The irradiated objects are Gallo-Roman statuettes discovered during digs at the sources of the river Seine. The wood consolidated right through to the core then becomes sufficiently solid for the restorer to work on the surface of these objects [fr

  16. Neck Pain: Clinical Practice Guidelines Help Ensure Quality Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    In 2008, physical therapists published the first neck pain clinical practice guidelines. These guidelines have been updated and are now available in the July 2017 issue of JOSPT. To update these guidelines, physical therapists teamed with the International Collaboration on Neck Pain to identify leading practices. These revised guidelines provide direction to clinicians as they screen, evaluate, diagnose, and make treatment-based classifications of neck pain. They also outline the best nonsurgical treatment options based on the published literature. At the end of the day, the best care is a combination of the leading science, the clinical expertise of your health care provider, and your input as the patient. These guidelines help inform the first step in this process. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(7):513. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0508.

  17. Helping decision makers frame, analyze, and implement decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.; McDonald-Madden, Eve

    2018-01-01

    All decisions have the same recognizable elements. Context, objectives, alternatives, consequences, and deliberation. Decision makers and analysts familiar with these elements can quickly see the underlying structure of a decision.There are only a small number of classes of decisions. These classes differ in the cognitive and scientific challenge they present to the decision maker; the ability to recognize the class of decision leads a decision maker to tools to aid in the analysis.Sometimes we need more information, sometimes we don’t. The role of science in a decision-making process is to provide the predictions that link the alternative actions to the desired outcomes. Investing in more science is only valuable if it helps to choose a better action.Implementation. The successful integration of decision analysis into environmental decisions requires careful attention to the decision, the people, and the institutions involved.

  18. Couples with Intimate Partner Violence Seeking Relationship Help: Associations and Implications for Self-Help and Online Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, McKenzie K; Georgia, Emily J; Doss, Brian D

    2017-04-20

    In-person conjoint treatments for relationship distress are effective at increasing relationship satisfaction, and newly developed online programs are showing promising results. However, couples reporting even low levels intimate partner violence (IPV) are traditionally excluded from these interventions. To improve the availability of couple-based treatment for couples with IPV, the present study sought to determine whether associations with IPV found in community samples generalized to couples seeking help for their relationship and whether web-based interventions for relationship distressed worked equally well for couples with IPV. In the first aim, in a sample of 2,797 individuals who were seeking online help for their relationship, the levels and correlates of both low-intensity and clinically significant IPV largely matched what is found in community samples. In the second aim, in a sample of 300 couples who were randomly assigned to a web-based intervention or a waitlist control group, low-impact IPV did not moderate the effects of the intervention for relationship distress. Therefore, web-based interventions may be an effective (and easily accessible) intervention for relationship distress for couples with low-intensity IPV. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  19. Do electronic cigarettes help with smoking cessation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Smoking causes around 100,000 deaths each year in the UK, and is the leading cause of preventable disease and early mortality. Smoking cessation remains difficult and existing licensed treatments have limited success. Nicotine addiction is thought to be one of the primary reasons that smokers find it so hard to give up, and earlier this year DTB reviewed the effects of nicotine on health. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are nicotine delivery devices that aim to mimic the process of smoking but avoid exposing the user to some of the harmful components of traditional cigarettes. However, the increase in the use of e-cigarettes and their potential use as an aid to smoking cessation has been subject to much debate. In this article we consider the regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of e-cigarettes, and their efficacy in smoking cessation and reduction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. How helpful is nanotechnology in agriculture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditta, Allah

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has great potential, as it can enhance the quality of life through its applications in various fields like agriculture and the food system. Around the world it has become the future of any nation. But we must be very careful with any new technology to be introduced regarding its possible unforeseen related risks that may come through its positive potential. However, it is also critical for the future of a nation to produce a trained future workforce in nanotechnology. In this process, to inform the public at large about its advantages is the first step; it will result in a tremendous increase in interest and new applications in all the domains will be discovered. With this idea, the present review has been written. There is great potential in nanoscience and technology in the provision of state-of-the-art solutions for various challenges faced by agriculture and society today and in the future. Climate change, urbanization, sustainable use of natural resources and environmental issues like runoff and accumulation of pesticides and fertilizers are the hot issues for today's agriculture. This paper reviews some of the potential applications of nanotechnology in the field of agriculture and recommends many strategies for the advancement of scientific and technological knowledge currently being examined. (review)

  1. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-06-01

    Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. In this non-interventional clinical study (NIS), 39 patients with meningococcal septicaemia with or without of meningitis were included, and compared regarding the impact of dexamethasone (DXM), as an adjunctive treatment, on the outcome of IMD. SPSS statistics is used for statistical processing of data. Thirty (76.9%) patients with IMD had sepsis and meningitis, and 9 (23.1%) of them had sepsis alone. Dexamethasone was used in 24 (61.5%) cases, in both clinical groups. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 6 patients (15.4%), arthritis in 3 of them (7.7%), and subdural effusion in one patient (2.6%). The data showed a significant statistical difference on the length of hospitalization, and WBC normalization in groups of patients treated with DXM. The use of DXM as adjunctive therapy in invasive meningococcal disease has a degree of proven benefits and no harmful effects. In fighting this very dangerous and complex infection, even a limited benefit is sufficient to recommend the use of DXM as adjunctive treatment in invasive meningococcal disease.

  2. Preemptive financial strategies help IPAs avoid insolvency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karling, J; Silberman, L

    2000-11-01

    The 1999 collapse in California of practice management giants FPA Medical Management, Inc. and MedPartners, Inc. has caused healthcare provider organizations, particularly independent practice associations (IPAs), to examine critical issues related to financial solvency. Problems such as declining membership, ineffective management, weak contracting, and lack of strategic vision frequently are encountered by troubled provider organizations. The common thread that runs through IPA failures is a combination of unreliable accounting data and inadequate reporting systems. This lack of satisfactory financial and reporting information impairs the ability of the provider group to maintain sufficient funds to cover expenses and pay physicians. Successful, financially stable provider networks use well-defined reporting procedures based on fundamental accounting and financial concepts, as well as a sound methodology for measuring and calculating claims liability estimates. In California, new regulations aimed at encouraging provider organizations to assume preemptive financial strategies are in the process of being adopted. IPAs in every state should consider reviewing these regulations as benchmarks by which to assess their financial procedures.

  3. Helping with the clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1990-01-01

    Successes in public involvement efforts for nuclear waste management are so few that they deserve careful documentation and analysis. This paper chronicles the goals, process, problems and outcomes of one such success, the Northwest Defense Waste Citizens Forum (CF), created by the DOE-Richland manager in 1986 to advise DOE on its plans for nuclear waste disposal and cleanup of the Hanford site n eastern Washington state. In the evolving, often-controversial, highly-visible area of agency-public interactions, citizen task forces (TFs) have been shown to be useful in developing public policy at the local level. Making them work at the state level is more problematic. This case shows that a diverse, two-state citizen group can make significant contributions to complex EIS evaluations with heavy technical components. The CFs principal contribution to public policy was communication of its findings to business and professional groups, to area political representatives and state agencies, thereby laying the ground work for refocusing the Northwest upon the need for action on DW cleanup at Hanford. In going well beyond NEPA requirements for public involvement in agency decision making, DOE-Richland demonstrated innovative ways of dealing with the difficult issues of public confidence and public trust by means of agency openness, responsiveness to citizen needs for information, and good faith two-way communication. The success of this pro-active DOE initiative was due to many factors including selecting the right issue (existing wastes), structuring the CF at a broad, regional level, and intensive implementation of trust-building strategies

  4. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. Methods: In this non-interventional clinical study (NIS), 39 patients with meningococcal septicaemia with or without of meningitis were included, and compared regarding the impact of dexamethasone (DXM), as an adjunctive treatment, on the outcome of IMD. SPSS statistics is used for statistical processing of data. Results: Thirty (76.9%) patients with IMD had sepsis and meningitis, and 9 (23.1%) of them had sepsis alone. Dexamethasone was used in 24 (61.5%) cases, in both clinical groups. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 6 patients (15.4%), arthritis in 3 of them (7.7%), and subdural effusion in one patient (2.6%). The data showed a significant statistical difference on the length of hospitalization, and WBC normalization in groups of patients treated with DXM. Conclusion: The use of DXM as adjunctive therapy in invasive meningococcal disease has a degree of proven benefits and no harmful effects. In fighting this very dangerous and complex infection, even a limited benefit is sufficient to recommend the use of DXM as adjunctive treatment in invasive meningococcal disease. PMID:28974828

  5. PACMan to Help Sort Hubble Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Every year, astronomers submit over a thousand proposals requesting time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Currently, humans must sort through each of these proposals by hand before sending them off for review. Could this burden be shifted to computers?A Problem of VolumeAstronomer Molly Peeples gathered stats on the HST submissions sent in last week for the upcoming HST Cycle 25 (the deadline was Friday night), relative to previous years. This years proposal round broke the record, with over 1200 proposals submitted in total for Cycle 25. [Molly Peeples]Each proposal cycle for HST time attracts on the order of 1100 proposals accounting for far more HST time than is available. The proposals are therefore carefully reviewed by around 150 international members of the astronomy community during a six-month process to select those with the highest scientific merit.Ideally, each proposal will be read by reviewers that have scientific expertise relevant to the proposal topic: if a proposal requests HST time to study star formation, for instance, then the reviewers assigned to it should have research expertise in star formation.How does this matching of proposals to reviewers occur? The current method relies on self-reported categorization of the submitted proposals. This is unreliable, however; proposals are often mis-categorized by submitters due to misunderstanding or ambiguous cases.As a result, the Science Policies Group at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) which oversees the review of HST proposals must go through each of the proposals by hand and re-categorize them. The proposals are then matched to reviewers with self-declared expertise in the same category.With the number of HST proposals on the rise and the expectation that the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will elicit even more proposals for time than Hubble scientists at STScI and NASA are now asking: could the human hours necessary for this task be spared? Could a computer program

  6. Using Digital Storytelling to Help First-Grade Students' Adjustment to School

    OpenAIRE

    Fokides, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    When coming to school for the first time, children might face a number of adjustment problems. The study presents the results of a project which used digital storytelling for helping first-grade primary school students during this transitional period. It was examined whether, through the development of the digital stories, students could understand how the school functions and whether this process helped them to change their attitudes and behaviors, thus achieving a smoother adaptation to the...

  7. Do comprehensive performance measurement systems help or hinder managers' mental model development?

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Hall

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether and how the process of updating and changing mental models (learning) helps to explain how performance measurement systems (PMS) affect individual performance. Although prior studies (e.g., Hall, 2008; Burney and Widener, 2007; Burney et al., 2009) highlight the important role of particular cognitive and motivational mechanisms, such as role clarity and organizational justice, they do not consider how PMS can improve performance by helping individuals to update the...

  8. Love your job Make work work for you with help from classic self-help thinkers

    CERN Document Server

    Ideas, Infinite

    2012-01-01

    Love your job is a practical collection of tips and techniques that will bring you success at work. It brings together some of the greatest ideas on work and careers from self-help classics: Napoleon Hill's Think and grow rich; Benjamin Franklin's The way to wealth; George S.Clason's The richest man in Babylon, books that inspired generations of readers with simple and effective ideas that continue to resonate today. The wise lessons from these books have been interpreted here using twenty-first century case studies and modern careers and motivational advice. These 50 short, entertaining chapt

  9. Building Self-Esteem: A Self-Help Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ways you can help yourself to feel better. Charles G. Curie, M.A., A.C.S.W. Administrator ... Thoughts About Yourself to Positive Ones Activities That Will Help You Feel Good About Yourself In Conclusion ...

  10. Ten Warning Signs Your Older Family Member May Need Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Warning Signs Your Older Family Member May Need Help Changes in physical and cognitive abilities that may ... and their family members, friends, and caregivers. To help in determining when an older adult may need ...

  11. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... v/K5u3sb-Dbkc Watch additional videos about getting help. Behind the Scenes see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Be There: Help Save a Life see more videos from Veterans ...

  12. Help Stop the Flu | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Shot Help Stop the Flu Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table ... CDC recommends that Americans do the following to help stop the flu: Cover nose and mouth with ...

  13. Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests Send Us Your ... them through the procedure. A caring grownup can help the child cope with any physical pain or ...

  14. How to Help a Person with a Serious Burn Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How To Help A Person With A Serious Burn Injury Wellness For Parents Professionals Caregivers Printable Version ... volunteer to help out! Kathy Edwards is a burn survivor and professor in the Department of Communication ...

  15. Obama administration's National Drought Resilience Partnership to help

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESEARCH COASTS CAREERS National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States Department of Administration today announced an interagency National Drought Resilience Partnership to help communities better across the nation, and the Obama Administration took every possible measure to help," said

  16. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Embedded YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/v/ ... the Scenes see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Be There: Help Save a Life see more ...

  17. Outgroup helping as a tool to communicate ingroup warmth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Esther; Täuber, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    The authors extend previous research on the effects of metastereotype activation on outgroup helping by examining in more detail the role of group impression management motives and by studying direct helping (i.e., helping the outgroup believed to hold a negative view of the ingroup). Data from three experiments provided full support for the communicative nature of direct outgroup helping by demonstrating that outgroup helping in response to a negative metastereotype was predicted by participants' concern for the image of their ingroup, but not by their self-image concerns. Moreover, group image concerns predicted outgroup helping but not ingroup helping and predicted outgroup helping only when a negative metastereotype was activated, compared with a positive metastereotype, or a (negative or positive) autostereotype. The results also ruled out an alternative explanation in terms of denying the self-relevance of the metastereotype.

  18. Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Asthma ... Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day Fall 2013 Issue: Volume 8 Number 3 Page ...

  19. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Embedded YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/ ... Behind the Scenes see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Be There: Help Save a Life see ...

  20. Grain investigation by the help of satellite observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedemann, C.

    1988-01-01

    Interstellar grains are investigated by the help of satellite observatories taking into account extraterrestrical ultraviolet observations, infrared astronomy by the help of orbiting cooled telescopes, observed ultraviolet properties of interstellar grains, and consequences of infrared astronomy for dust investigation

  1. Related Rules and Programs that Help States Attain PM Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s national and regional rules to reduce emissions of pollutants that form particle pollution will help state and local governments meet the PM NAAQS. A number of voluntary programs also are helping areas reduce fine PM pollution.

  2. Transactional Relations between Motivational Beliefs and Help Seeking from Teachers and Peers across Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Jamie; Wang, Ming-Te

    2017-08-01

    Adolescents often avoid seeking academic help when needed, making it important to understand the motivational processes that support help seeking behavior. Using expectancy-value theory as a framework, this study examined transactional relations between motivational beliefs (i.e., academic self-concept or academic importance) and seeking help from teachers and peers across adolescence (i.e., from approximately age 12 to 17 years). Data were collected from 1479 adolescents (49% female; 61.9% African American, 31.2% European American, 6.9% other race). Analyses were conducted with cross-lagged panel models using three waves of data from seventh, ninth, and eleventh grade. Results indicated that both academic self-concept and academic importance were associated with increases in teacher help seeking in earlier adolescence, but were associated only with increases in peer help seeking in later adolescence. Help-seeking behavior positively influenced motivational beliefs, with teacher help seeking increasing academic self-concept earlier in adolescence and peer help seeking increasing academic importance later in adolescence. These transactional relations differed by adolescents' prior achievement and racial background, but not by adolescents' gender.

  3. Pseudoinefficacy: negative feelings from children who cannot be helped reduce warm glow for children who can be helped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Slovic, Paul; Mayorga, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of "not helping all"? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of "pseudoinefficacy" that is non-rational. We should not be deterred from helping whomever we can because there are others we are not able to help.

  4. Pseudoinefficacy: Negative feelings from children who cannot be helped reduce warm glow for children who can be helped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eVästfjäll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of not helping all? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of pseudoinefficacy that is nonrational. We should not be deterred from helping whomever we can because there are others we are not able to help.

  5. Family Functioning and Adolescent Help-Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Barry J.; Bowles, Terry V. P.

    2001-01-01

    Examined relationship between help seeking behavior and family functioning. Adolescents who sought help clustered into two groups of families - one high in conflict and low in democratic parenting style, and one low in conflict and high in democratic parenting style. Complex relationships between help seeking behavior, type of family, and type of…

  6. 29 CFR 1625.4 - Help wanted notices or advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Help wanted notices or advertisements. 1625.4 Section 1625.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AGE DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT ACT Interpretations § 1625.4 Help wanted notices or advertisements. (a) Help wanted notices or advertisements may not contain...

  7. 25 CFR 103.2 - Who does the Program help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who does the Program help? 103.2 Section 103.2 Indians... INTEREST SUBSIDY General Provisions § 103.2 Who does the Program help? The purpose of the Program is to... direct function of the Program is to help lenders reduce excessive risks on loans they make. That...

  8. Help-Seeking Behaviors of Accounting Principles I Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Susan M.; Sanders, Joseph C.

    This study examined the help-seeking propensities of college students enrolled in a "Principles of Financial Accounting I" course. A total of 364 students responded to a questionnaire on various aspects of help-seeking behavior. It was found that the most frequently used source of help was friends or classmates, followed by the instructor and the…

  9. Interplay of Early Adolescents' Friendship and Helping Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsewijk, Louise; Snijders, Thomas; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Steglich, Christian; Veenstra, David

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to unravel the interrelatedness of friendship and help, and to examine the characteristics of friendship and help networks. We examined effects of mutual relations versus one-sided relations in the help network on friendship initiation and maintenance, and vice versa. We

  10. Outgroup helping as a tool to communicate ingroup warmth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; van Leeuwen, Esther

    2012-01-01

    The authors extend previous research on the effects of metastereotype activation on outgroup helping by examining in more detail the role of group impression management motives and by studying direct helping (i.e., helping the outgroup believed to hold a negative view of the ingroup). Data from

  11. Outgroup helping as a tool to communicate ingroup warmth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, E. van; Tauber, S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors extend previous research on the effects of metastereotype activation on outgroup helping by examining in more detail the role of group impression management motives and by studying direct helping (i.e., helping the outgroup believed to hold a negative view of the ingroup). Data from

  12. Assessing Adolescents' Prosocial Behavior: The Family Helping Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midlarsky, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied the structure and psychometric properties of a self-report measure of adolescents' helping behavior within the family. Factor analyses yielded four internally consistent subscales for the Sibling Helping Scale and five for the Parent Helping Scale, all of which were conceptually related to inventories reflecting family support among…

  13. Gendered Help at the Workplace: Implications for Organizational Power Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyak-Hai, Lily; Waismel-Manor, Ronit

    2018-01-01

    One of the most thoroughly studied aspects of prosocial workplace behavior is organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Yet, the definition of OCB seems to overlook the fact that help-giving acts may be of different types with different consequences for both giver and recipient. The present research explores workplace help-giving behavior by investigating the importance of gender as a factor that facilitates or inhibits specific types of help that empower and disempower independent coping: autonomy- and dependency-oriented help, respectively. A pilot and two following studies were conducted. The pilot study empirically assessed which acts would be clearly perceived by participants as representing both types of help. Then, using the descriptions of these acts, Study 1 examined which type of help would be perceived as most likely to be given by a male or female employee to a male or female colleague in a sample of 226 participants (78% women). Study 2 explored which type of help participants perceived as one they would rather receive from a male or female helper in a sample of 170 participants (65% women). Our findings indicate that male and female respondents who rated men giving help were more likely to expect them to give autonomy-oriented help, especially to women. There were no significant differences in dependency-oriented help. Further, women preferred to receive more autonomy-oriented help than men did, regardless of the help-giver's gender; no significant results were found for men. Implications for OCB and workplace power relations are discussed.

  14. Toddlers' Prosocial Behavior: From Instrumental to Empathic to Altruistic Helping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlova, Margarita; Nichols, Sara R.; Brownell, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored how the meaning of prosocial behavior changes over toddlerhood. Sixty-five 18- and 30-month-olds could help an adult in 3 contexts: instrumental (action based), empathic (emotion based), and altruistic (costly). Children at both ages helped readily in instrumental tasks. For 18-month-olds, empathic helping was significantly more…

  15. Helping behavior, dispositional empathic concern, and the principle of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, M.O.; Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates the relative strength of two correlates of helping behavior: dispositional empathic concern and a moral principle to care about others. The empathy–helping and care–helping relationships are investigated using data from the General Social Survey, a nationally

  16. [Performance of self-help groups and their economic evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, H D; Trojan, A; Nickel, S

    2009-01-01

    Hoffmann von Fallersleben is quoted with the sentence "Self-help is worthwhile, because it does not demand anything from others". This sounds catchy; it is, however, wrong: Self-help groups ask for support, particularly for financial resources for the work of either individual, highly organized self-help associations or for general support of self-help groups via local contact and information centers ("contact points for self-help groups"). With this request for economic "investments" in self-help, the question arises whether this is profitable for the country, the local authority or the social health insurance. In principle, the initial answer to this is: yes, the work of self-help groups is worthwhile for a single person, but also for the larger community, as various kinds of services are provided by self-help groups and organizations. Despite many surveys of members or co-operation partners which show positive effects of self-help groups, the question remains whether services of self-help groups can be measured and economically evaluated. The socio- political question regarding funding is closely connected to the idea of an economic evaluation of self-help groups. The aim of this article is to summarize and discuss which empiric approaches and findings are available on this subject. The monetary value for the work done per member of self-help groups and year lies between approximately 700 and 900 EUR.

  17. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  18. Study of eigenfrequencies with the help of Prony's method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobakhin, O. O.; Olevskyi, O. V.; Olevskyi, V. I.

    2017-10-01

    Eigenfrequencies can be crucial in the design of a construction. They define many parameters that determine limit parameters of the structure. Exceeding these values can lead to the structural failure of an object. It is especially important in the design of structures which support heavy equipment or are subjected to the forces of airflow. One of the most effective ways to acquire the frequencies' values is a computer-based numerical simulation. The existing methods do not allow to acquire the whole range of needed parameters. It is well known that Prony's method, is highly effective for the investigation of dynamic processes. Thus, it is rational to adapt Prony's method for such investigation. The Prony method has advantage in comparison with other numerical schemes because it provides the possibility to process not only the results of numerical simulation, but also real experimental data. The research was carried out for a computer model of a steel plate. The input data was obtained by using the Dassault Systems SolidWorks computer package with the Simulation add-on. We investigated the acquired input data with the help of Prony's method. The result of the numerical experiment shows that Prony's method can be used to investigate the mechanical eigenfrequencies with good accuracy. The output of Prony's method not only contains the information about values of frequencies themselves, but also contains data regarding the amplitudes, initial phases and decaying factors of any given mode of oscillation, which can also be used in engineering.

  19. Can theories of visual representation help to explain asymmetries in amygdala function?

    OpenAIRE

    McMenamin, Brenton W.; Marsolek, Chad J.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional processing differs between the left and right hemispheres of the brain, and functional differences have been reported more specifically between the left amygdala and right amygdala, subcortical structures heavily implicated in emotional processing. However, the empirical pattern of amygdalar asymmetries is inconsistent with extant theories of emotional asymmetries. Here we review this discrepancy, and we hypothesize that hemispheric differences in visual object processing help to ex...

  20. Interaction in Spoken Word Recognition Models: Feedback Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, James S.; Mirman, Daniel; Luthra, Sahil; Strauss, Ted; Harris, Harlan D.

    2018-01-01

    Human perception, cognition, and action requires fast integration of bottom-up signals with top-down knowledge and context. A key theoretical perspective in cognitive science is the interactive activation hypothesis: forward and backward flow in bidirectionally connected neural networks allows humans and other biological systems to approximate optimal integration of bottom-up and top-down information under real-world constraints. An alternative view is that online feedback is neither necessary nor helpful; purely feed forward alternatives can be constructed for any feedback system, and online feedback could not improve processing and would preclude veridical perception. In the domain of spoken word recognition, the latter view was apparently supported by simulations using the interactive activation model, TRACE, with and without feedback: as many words were recognized more quickly without feedback as were recognized faster with feedback, However, these simulations used only a small set of words and did not address a primary motivation for interaction: making a model robust in noise. We conducted simulations using hundreds of words, and found that the majority were recognized more quickly with feedback than without. More importantly, as we added noise to inputs, accuracy and recognition times were better with feedback than without. We follow these simulations with a critical review of recent arguments that online feedback in interactive activation models like TRACE is distinct from other potentially helpful forms of feedback. We conclude that in addition to providing the benefits demonstrated in our simulations, online feedback provides a plausible means of implementing putatively distinct forms of feedback, supporting the interactive activation hypothesis. PMID:29666593

  1. Interaction in Spoken Word Recognition Models: Feedback Helps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, James S; Mirman, Daniel; Luthra, Sahil; Strauss, Ted; Harris, Harlan D

    2018-01-01

    Human perception, cognition, and action requires fast integration of bottom-up signals with top-down knowledge and context. A key theoretical perspective in cognitive science is the interactive activation hypothesis: forward and backward flow in bidirectionally connected neural networks allows humans and other biological systems to approximate optimal integration of bottom-up and top-down information under real-world constraints. An alternative view is that online feedback is neither necessary nor helpful; purely feed forward alternatives can be constructed for any feedback system, and online feedback could not improve processing and would preclude veridical perception. In the domain of spoken word recognition, the latter view was apparently supported by simulations using the interactive activation model, TRACE, with and without feedback: as many words were recognized more quickly without feedback as were recognized faster with feedback, However, these simulations used only a small set of words and did not address a primary motivation for interaction: making a model robust in noise. We conducted simulations using hundreds of words, and found that the majority were recognized more quickly with feedback than without. More importantly, as we added noise to inputs, accuracy and recognition times were better with feedback than without. We follow these simulations with a critical review of recent arguments that online feedback in interactive activation models like TRACE is distinct from other potentially helpful forms of feedback. We conclude that in addition to providing the benefits demonstrated in our simulations, online feedback provides a plausible means of implementing putatively distinct forms of feedback, supporting the interactive activation hypothesis.

  2. Interaction in Spoken Word Recognition Models: Feedback Helps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Magnuson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Human perception, cognition, and action requires fast integration of bottom-up signals with top-down knowledge and context. A key theoretical perspective in cognitive science is the interactive activation hypothesis: forward and backward flow in bidirectionally connected neural networks allows humans and other biological systems to approximate optimal integration of bottom-up and top-down information under real-world constraints. An alternative view is that online feedback is neither necessary nor helpful; purely feed forward alternatives can be constructed for any feedback system, and online feedback could not improve processing and would preclude veridical perception. In the domain of spoken word recognition, the latter view was apparently supported by simulations using the interactive activation model, TRACE, with and without feedback: as many words were recognized more quickly without feedback as were recognized faster with feedback, However, these simulations used only a small set of words and did not address a primary motivation for interaction: making a model robust in noise. We conducted simulations using hundreds of words, and found that the majority were recognized more quickly with feedback than without. More importantly, as we added noise to inputs, accuracy and recognition times were better with feedback than without. We follow these simulations with a critical review of recent arguments that online feedback in interactive activation models like TRACE is distinct from other potentially helpful forms of feedback. We conclude that in addition to providing the benefits demonstrated in our simulations, online feedback provides a plausible means of implementing putatively distinct forms of feedback, supporting the interactive activation hypothesis.

  3. Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Mozeleski, Jin E; Tsoh, Janice Y; Gildengorin, Ginny; Cao, Lien H; Ho, Tiffany; Kohli, Sarita; Lam, Hy; Wong, Ching; Stewart, Susan; McPhee, Stephen J; Nguyen, Tung T

    2017-11-11

    Culture impacts help-seeking preferences. We examined Vietnamese Americans' help-seeking preferences for depressive symptoms, through a telephone survey (N = 1666). A vignette describing an age- and gender-matched individual with depression was presented, and respondents chose from a list of options and provided open-ended responses about their help-seeking preferences. Results showed that 78.3% would seek professional help, either from a family doctor, a mental health provider, or both; 54.4% preferred to seek help from a family doctor but not from a mental health provider. Most (82.1%) would prefer to talk to family or friends, 62.2% would prefer to look up information, and 50.1% would prefer to get spiritual help. Logistic regression analysis revealed that preferences for non-professional help-seeking options (such as talking to friends or family, looking up information, and getting spiritual help), health care access, and perceived poor health, were associated with increased odds of preferring professional help-seeking. This population-based study of Vietnamese Americans highlight promising channels to deliver education about depression and effective help-seeking resources, particularly the importance of family doctors and social networks. Furthermore, addressing barriers in access to care remains a critical component of promoting professional help-seeking.

  4. The Impact of Help Seeking on Individual Task Performance: The Moderating Effect of Help Seekers' Logics of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Dvora; Bamberger, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from achievement-goal theory and the social psychological literature on help seeking, we propose that it is the variance in the logic underpinning employees' help seeking that explains divergent findings regarding the relationship between help seeking and task performance. Using a sample of 110 newly hired customer contact employees, a…

  5. The likelihood of Latino women to seek help in response to interpersonalvictimization: An examination of individual, interpersonal and socioculturalinfluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sabina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Help-seeking is a process that is influenced by individual, interpersonal, and sociocultural factors. Thecurrent study examined these influences on the likelihood of seeking help (police, pressing charges,medical services, social services, and informal help for interpersonal violence among a national sample ofLatino women. Women living in high-density Latino neighborhoods in the USA were interviewed by phonein their preferred language. Women reporting being, on average, between "somewhat likely" and "verylikely" to seek help should they experience interpersonal victimization. Sequential linear regression resultsindicated that individual (age, depression, interpersonal (having children, past victimization, andsociocultural factors (immigrant status, acculturation were associated with the self-reported likelihood ofseeking help for interpersonal violence. Having children was consistently related to a greater likelihood toseek all forms of help. Overall, women appear to respond to violence in ways that reflects their ecologicalcontext. Help-seeking is best understood within a multi-layered and dynamic context.

  6. Community helping services: dynamic of formation and expressiveness of the cultural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, Fátima Luna Pinheiro

    2006-01-01

    Community helping services is an expression used by the social movements to designate families that live in shacks installed in a public area intended for building of own house at a community helping system. Studies in ethnonursing that aimed: in order to detail dynamic configuration in a community helping service. It took place in an community helping area located in the outskirts of Fortaleza, Ceará. The community members acting as general informants from the local culture, while eight (8) women heads-of-families, working as key informers. The data collect used the Observation-Participation-Reflection Model. The analyses were processing by the time that the dates were collected, considering the categories: inserting in the community helping culture to obtain their history; community helping is not a slum -describing the formation dynamic. Established that the formation dynamic of the community helping go on the own house representation as a symbol of " a better life". To assimilate such expression introducing in own cultural universe is a challenge for the nursing to assist a care culture congruent.

  7. Sociocultural determinants of the help-seeking behavior of patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K M; Inui, T S; Kleinman, A M; Womack, W M

    1982-02-01

    This descriptive study employed semistructured interviewing and questionnaire administration to delineate the sociocultural determinants of the help-seeking process in 48 psychiatric patients. The help-seeking process is considered in two stages. The first stage starts from the recognition of initial symptoms and ends in the first contact with a mental health professional. The second stage is defined as that time between the first contact and actual participation in a planned treatment program. In both stages, patients typically go through phases of lay consultation, nonpsychiatric professional consultation, and referral. The multiple steps which are usually involved in help seeking often result in significant delay of both mental health contact and treatment. The help-seeking process was found to correlate strongly with ethnicity. Both Asians and Blacks showed more extended family involvement, and the involvement of key family members tended to be persistent and intensive in Asians. Ethnicity was also associated with the length of delay, with Asians showing the longest delay and Caucasians the least. These ethnic differences were also reflected in help-seeking pathway assignment using Lin's criteria. Although modernity and parochialism, as measured by the level of modernization and the cohesiveness of the social network system of the subjects, were also found to be correlated with delay, they appeared to exert an influence independent from that of ethnicity.

  8. A view from the field: phone help line in India helps indentify HIV risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandiramani, R

    1998-01-01

    TARSHI, a confidential phone help line in India, provides sexuality information, counseling, and referrals in English and Hindi. About 80% of callers are men and 70% are in the 15-30 year age group. An analysis of the subject matter of these calls indicates widespread ignorance about HIV transmission, a cultural belief that masturbation is an unacceptable way to satisfy sexual desires, lack of awareness of the connection between sexually transmitted diseases and HIV, exposure to misleading Westernized images of sexuality through the mass media, clandestine premarital sexual activity engineered to protect the hymen, lack of knowledge about conception, the belief that women who appear respectable and healthy could not be HIV-infected, societal dismissal of the reality of homosexual relationships in India, unprotected intercourse with commercial sex workers, women's fears of insisting on protected sex, child sexual abuse, the widespread practice of sexual relations between young men and older women, and the emergence of advertisements for sexual services. It is essential that HIV/AIDS prevention programs in India recognize these factors and address people's needs in a clear, nonjudgmental manner.

  9. IAEA to Help West African Countries Diagnose Ebola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will provide specialized diagnostic equipment to help Sierra Leone in its efforts to combat an ongoing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano announced today. Later, the support is planned to be extended to Liberia and Guinea. The support is in line with a UN Security Council appeal and responds to a request from Sierra Leone. The IAEA assistance will supplement the country's ability to diagnose EVD quickly using a diagnostic technology known as Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The assistance, expected to be delivered in the coming weeks, initiates broader IAEA support to African Member States to strengthen their technological abilities to detect diseases transmitted from animals to humans - zoonotic diseases. The IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations have been at the forefront of developing RT-PCR, a nuclear-derived technology which allows EVD to be detected within a few hours, while other methods require growing on a cell culture for several days before a diagnosis is determined. Early diagnosis of EVD, if combined with appropriate medical care, increases the victims' chance of survival and helps curtail the spread of the disease by making it possible to isolate and treat the patients earlier. Health authorities in Sierra Leone and other affected countries are already applying RT-PCR, but their diagnostic capability is limited; there is a shortage of the diagnostic kits and other materials needed for the process and backup equipment is needed to avoid diagnostic downtime in case of equipment failure. The IAEA will support the most affected countries' sustained ability to detect the disease in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response. The IAEA, as part of its ongoing work, has helped 32 African countries and several other Member States develop skills

  10. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  11. Depression literacy and help-seeking in Australian police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola J; Milner, Allison J; Martin, Angela; Too, Lay San; Papas, Alicia; Witt, Katrina; Keegel, Tessa; LaMontagne, Anthony D

    2018-02-01

    To assess depression literacy, help-seeking and help-offering to others in members of the police force in the state of Victoria, Australia. All staff in police stations involved in a cluster randomised controlled trial of an integrated workplace mental health intervention were invited to participate. Survey questions covered sociodemographic and employment information, recognition of depression in a vignette, stigma, treatment beliefs, willingness to assist co-workers with mental health problems, help-giving and help-seeking behaviours, and intentions to seek help. Using the baseline dataset associated with the trial, the paper presents a descriptive analysis of mental health literacy and helping behaviours, comparing police station leaders and lower ranks. Respondents were 806 staff, comprising 618 lower-ranked staff and 188 leaders. Almost 84% of respondents were able to correctly label the problem described in the vignette. Among those who had helped someone with a mental health problem, both lower ranks and leaders most commonly reported 'talking to the person' although leaders were more likely to facilitate professional help. Leaders' willingness to assist the person and confidence in doing so was very high, and over 80% of leaders appropriately rated police psychologists, general practitioners, psychologists, talking to a peer and contacting welfare as helpful. However, among both leaders and lower ranks with mental health problems, the proportion of those unlikely to seek professional help was greater than those who were likely to seek it. Knowledge about evidence-based interventions for depression was lower in this police sample than surveys in the general population, pointing to the need for education and training to improve mental health literacy. Such education should also aim to overcome barriers to professional help-seeking. Interventions that aim to improve mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviour appear to be suitable targets for better

  12. Mathematic anxiety, help seeking behavior and cooperative learning

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Gholamali Lavasani; Farah Khandan

    2011-01-01

    Present project assess the effectiveness of cooperative learning over the mathematic anxiety and review the behavior of help seeking in first grade high school girl students. The experimental research procedure was in the form of pre-post tests after a period of 8 sessions of teaching. To measure the variables, the questionnaire of mathematic anxiety (Shokrani, 2002) and the questionnaire of help seeking technique (Ghadampour, 1998) were practiced (accepting or avoiding help seeking).To perfo...

  13. Ties that bind, and double-bind: visual impairment, help, and the shaping of relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, Heidi; Watermeyer, Brian; Swartz, Leslie

    2018-03-16

    Scholars agree that effective rehabilitation relies on a bedrock of reciprocity, relational trust, and authenticity. It is therefore essential for practitioners to develop insight into the complex dynamics within helping relationships. This study aims to provide an in-depth understanding of visually impaired students' experience of informal helping relationships. Ten visually impaired students at a South African university participated in one of two semi-structured focus group interviews (six and four in each group, respectively) wherein we explored their experience of informal helping relationships. Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to make sense of the data. Help, according to the participants, can militate against visibility and complete acceptance, and has the potential to cause helpers to feel entrapped. By contrast, some students found that help offered benefits to relationships by boosting the helper's self-esteem and affording disabled students the opportunity to make friends. Decisions whether to accept help were mediated more by relationship factors than by the need for help. These findings are important for rehabilitation professionals, as deep relationship can come into being during the course of a rehabilitation process. Although this study was conducted in an informal setting, the relational dynamics that we explore are also applicable to clinical relationships between disabled persons and rehabilitation professionals. Implications for rehabilitation In this paper, we provide an overview of the intricacies involved in care and helping relationships; In order for rehabilitation to be successful, these relationships should ideally be real, trusting, and authentic; Yet, authenticity and spontaneity often get lost in helping relationships, as help-recipients may deny help when they need it, and accept help when perfectly able to cope without it. These decisions are mediated more by relationship factors than by the need for help; In their

  14. Using Relational Reasoning Strategies to Help Improve Clinical Reasoning Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Denis; Torre, Dario M; Durning, Steven J

    2018-05-01

    Clinical reasoning-the steps up to and including establishing a diagnosis and/or therapy-is a fundamentally important mental process for physicians. Unfortunately, mounting evidence suggests that errors in clinical reasoning lead to substantial problems for medical professionals and patients alike, including suboptimal care, malpractice claims, and rising health care costs. For this reason, cognitive strategies by which clinical reasoning may be improved-and that many expert clinicians are already using-are highly relevant for all medical professionals, educators, and learners.In this Perspective, the authors introduce one group of cognitive strategies-termed relational reasoning strategies-that have been empirically shown, through limited educational and psychological research, to improve the accuracy of learners' reasoning both within and outside of the medical disciplines. The authors contend that relational reasoning strategies may help clinicians to be metacognitive about their own clinical reasoning; such strategies may also be particularly well suited for explicitly organizing clinical reasoning instruction for learners. Because the particular curricular efforts that may improve the relational reasoning of medical students are not known at this point, the authors describe the nature of previous research on relational reasoning strategies to encourage the future design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional interventions for relational reasoning within the medical education literature. The authors also call for continued research on using relational reasoning strategies and their role in clinical practice and medical education, with the long-term goal of improving diagnostic accuracy.

  15. Predicting Intentions to Seek Psychological Help Among Botswana University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho M. Pheko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study had two main objectives. The first was to investigate Botswana’s university students’ intentions to seek psychological help. The second was to investigate whether (a Attitude Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help (ATSPPH, (b Self-Stigma of Seeking Help (SSOSH, and (c Social Stigma of Receiving Psychological Help (SSRPH predicted the students’ intentions to seek psychological help. A total of N = 519 (283 females and 236 males students from the University of Botswana completed the survey. Results indicated that generally, the students had moderate intentions of seeking psychological help. Multiple regression analysis revealed that of the three predictors, only ATSPPH and SSRPH significantly predicted intentions to seek psychological help. The current study is important because while it has been established that university students are a high-risk population for mental health problems, there is close to nothing documented on university students in Botswana. Findings of the current study will undoubtedly increase knowledge relating to psychological help-seeking and its predictors in Botswana and may inform interventions that aim to encourage young people to seek psychological or counseling help.

  16. Getting help from others: the effects of demand and supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Douglas A

    2014-11-01

    This article investigates whether the help with care needs that is received from others depends on the potential supply of family helpers. Data from the first round of survey data collected in the National Health and Aging Trends Study are used to create measures of whether help is received, the number of helpers, and the hours of help received. Regression analysis is used to relate these outcomes to indicators of the demand for and supply of helpers. Analyses suggest limited evidence that the receipt of help is a supply-driven phenomenon. Although the measures of child-caregiver supply are not associated with a binary indicator of help received, caregiver-supply factors are associated with the number of helpers and the total hours of help received. Findings on the total number of helpers and total hours of care have implications for the division of care labor within families and between families and nonfamily members. Foreseeable trends in the demand for and the supply of help suggest further evolution in patterns of elders' receipt of help with care needs. Even if those with needs for care continue to have their needs addressed by one or more helpers, the number of helpers, and the aggregate amount of help they provide, is likely to undergo adjustment in response to changing family patterns. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Getting Help From Others: The Effects of Demand and Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This article investigates whether the help with care needs that is received from others depends on the potential supply of family helpers. Methods. Data from the first round of survey data collected in the National Health and Aging Trends Study are used to create measures of whether help is received, the number of helpers, and the hours of help received. Regression analysis is used to relate these outcomes to indicators of the demand for and supply of helpers. Results. Analyses suggest limited evidence that the receipt of help is a supply-driven phenomenon. Although the measures of child–caregiver supply are not associated with a binary indicator of help received, caregiver-supply factors are associated with the number of helpers and the total hours of help received. Discussion. Findings on the total number of helpers and total hours of care have implications for the division of care labor within families and between families and nonfamily members. Foreseeable trends in the demand for and the supply of help suggest further evolution in patterns of elders’ receipt of help with care needs. Even if those with needs for care continue to have their needs addressed by one or more helpers, the number of helpers, and the aggregate amount of help they provide, is likely to undergo adjustment in response to changing family patterns. PMID:25342824

  18. Help Others and Yourself Eventually: Exploring the Relationship between Help-Giving and Employee Creativity under the Model of Perspective Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Liao, Shudi

    2017-01-01

    Although a plethora of studies have examined the antecedents of creativity, empirical studies exploring the role of individual behaviors in relation to creativity are relatively scarce. Drawing on the model of perspective taking, this study examines the relationship between help-giving during creative problem solving process and employee creativity. Specifically, we test perspective taking as an explanatory mechanism and propose organization-based self-esteem as the moderator. In a sample collected from a field survey of 247 supervisor-subordinate dyads from 2 large organizations in China at 3 time points, we find that help-giving during creative problem solving process positively related with perspective taking; perspective taking positively related with employees’ creativity; employees’ organization-based self-esteem strengthened the link between perspective taking and creativity; besides, there existed a moderated mediation effect. We conclude this paper with discussions on the implications for theory, research, and practice. PMID:28690566

  19. Help Others and Yourself Eventually: Exploring the Relationship between Help-Giving and Employee Creativity under the Model of Perspective Taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a plethora of studies have examined the antecedents of creativity, empirical studies exploring the role of individual behaviors in relation to creativity are relatively scarce. Drawing on the model of perspective taking, this study examines the relationship between help-giving during creative problem solving process and employee creativity. Specifically, we test perspective taking as an explanatory mechanism and propose organization-based self-esteem as the moderator. In a sample collected from a field survey of 247 supervisor-subordinate dyads from 2 large organizations in China at 3 time points, we find that help-giving during creative problem solving process positively related with perspective taking; perspective taking positively related with employees’ creativity; employees’ organization-based self-esteem strengthened the link between perspective taking and creativity; besides, there existed a moderated mediation effect. We conclude this paper with discussions on the implications for theory, research, and practice.

  20. Help Others and Yourself Eventually: Exploring the Relationship between Help-Giving and Employee Creativity under the Model of Perspective Taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Liao, Shudi

    2017-01-01

    Although a plethora of studies have examined the antecedents of creativity, empirical studies exploring the role of individual behaviors in relation to creativity are relatively scarce. Drawing on the model of perspective taking, this study examines the relationship between help-giving during creative problem solving process and employee creativity. Specifically, we test perspective taking as an explanatory mechanism and propose organization-based self-esteem as the moderator. In a sample collected from a field survey of 247 supervisor-subordinate dyads from 2 large organizations in China at 3 time points, we find that help-giving during creative problem solving process positively related with perspective taking; perspective taking positively related with employees' creativity; employees' organization-based self-esteem strengthened the link between perspective taking and creativity; besides, there existed a moderated mediation effect. We conclude this paper with discussions on the implications for theory, research, and practice.

  1. Can Automatic Classification Help to Increase Accuracy in Data Collection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Lang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The authors aim at testing the performance of a set of machine learning algorithms that could improve the process of data cleaning when building datasets. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is centered on cleaning datasets gathered from publishers and online resources by the use of specific keywords. In this case, we analyzed data from the Web of Science. The accuracy of various forms of automatic classification was tested here in comparison with manual coding in order to determine their usefulness for data collection and cleaning. We assessed the performance of seven supervised classification algorithms (Support Vector Machine (SVM, Scaled Linear Discriminant Analysis, Lasso and elastic-net regularized generalized linear models, Maximum Entropy, Regression Tree, Boosting, and Random Forest and analyzed two properties: accuracy and recall. We assessed not only each algorithm individually, but also their combinations through a voting scheme. We also tested the performance of these algorithms with different sizes of training data. When assessing the performance of different combinations, we used an indicator of coverage to account for the agreement and disagreement on classification between algorithms. Findings: We found that the performance of the algorithms used vary with the size of the sample for training. However, for the classification exercise in this paper the best performing algorithms were SVM and Boosting. The combination of these two algorithms achieved a high agreement on coverage and was highly accurate. This combination performs well with a small training dataset (10%, which may reduce the manual work needed for classification tasks. Research limitations: The dataset gathered has significantly more records related to the topic of interest compared to unrelated topics. This may affect the performance of some algorithms, especially in their identification of unrelated papers. Practical implications: Although the

  2. Lessons from the Other Side of the Teacher's Desk: Discovering Insights to Help Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Most language teachers become teachers because they are fascinated by language. They like the way languages work, they are intrigued by differences between their native tongues and other languages, and they enjoy the process of helping their students learn. Most language teachers have had positive experiences as language students themselves…

  3. Augmentative Device Helps Max Speak. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c75

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Action Information Sheet follows a family's process of selecting and using augmentative and alternative communication to help their young son, Max, speak. Max is affected by global dyspraxia, which makes learning new motor skills--especially speech--quite difficult. For the first years of his life, Max could not say words. Before he and his…

  4. Helping Spanish SMEs Staff to Develop Their Competence in Writing Business Letters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foz-Gil, Carmen; Gonzalez-Pueyo, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a website tool aimed at helping Spanish small and medium enterprises (SMEs) staff to write their commercial correspondence in English. It describes the steps involved in the tool system design process, making an emphasis on the methodological criteria and rational that guided us to develop the site. In…

  5. Students Losing Interest? How to Help them Adapt to Changes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Gay

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how reform affects students and how teachers can help them adapt to change. After explaining the principles of change and how they affect students, the paper examines the stages of change (comfortable dependence, anxiety, and comfortable independence); discusses students and the process of change; explains the supports that students need…

  6. Pathways to care : help-seeking for child and adolescent mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although emotional and behavioural problems are relatively common in children and adolescents, they are rarely brought to the attention of general practitioners (GPs) or mental health professionals. The main aim of this study was to investigate the process of help-seeking for child and adolescent

  7. Victims of Domestic Violence and Front-Line Workers: A Helping Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Scott W.; Trepal, Heather C.; de Vries, Sabina M.; Day, Sally W.; Leeth, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Victims of domestic violence present a challenge to law enforcement and emergency room personnel. The authors propose a helping approach to assist these professionals. This paradigm is composed of: active and empathetic listening, acceptance without judgment, identifying victims' strengths, honoring victims as experts, and the process of leaving…

  8. Late-Night Stress on the IT Help Desk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Dan

    2007-01-01

    With more and more students--especially those taking online courses--demanding access to technology help at all hours of the day and night, colleges are responding by extending help-desk hours. More than half are open late into the evening, according to a recent survey by Educause, the educational technology consortium, and a few are available…

  9. Seeking Professional Help: Etiology Beliefs about Mental Illness across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua; Mak, Winnie W. S.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the authors examined the contributions of cultural beliefs about the etiology of mental illness to the seeking of help from mental health professionals among college students in 4 cultural groups, European Americans, Chinese Americans, Hong Kong Chinese, and Mainland Chinese. Group differences were found in help-seeking…

  10. Fostering Helping Relationships: An Interview with W. Brad Johnson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Brad; Robison, Susan

    2017-01-01

    There are many kinds of helping relationships--coaching, mentoring, psychotherapy, and others. In this interview with W. Brad Johnson, Susan Robison explores how some of his insights about mentoring can be applicable to other types of helping relationships, like coaching. Mentoring is viewed as a broader relationship, but does include many of the…

  11. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Laboratory Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    SpeakUP TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Laboratory Services To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM ... are more likely to get better faster. To help prevent health care mistakes, patients are urged to “ ...

  12. Assessing Multicultural Competence of Helping-Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on assessing multicultural competence of helping-profession students. The "Multicultural Competence Scale of Helping-Profession Students" was used for data collection. The aim of the research was to find out the level of students' multicultural competence due to the current lack of this information in Central…

  13. Helping While Learning: A Skilled Group Helper Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a developmental group training workshop for training experienced counselors to do group counseling. Discusses stages of training including exploration, understanding, and action, which can help counselors learn helping skills for counseling that can often transfer to their own interpersonal lives and interactions with others. (JAC)

  14. A Magnetic Set-Up to Help Teach Newton's Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Sujarittham, Thanida; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Tanamatayarat, Jintawat; Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai

    2009-01-01

    A set-up comprising a magnetic disc, a solenoid and a mechanical balance was used to teach first-year physics students Newton's third law with the help of a free body diagram. The image of a floating magnet immobilized by the solenoid's repulsive force should help dispel a common misconception of students as regards the first law: that stationary…

  15. Barriers to Chinese College Students Seeking Psychological Help from Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese students were found less likely to seek professional help for psychological problems compared to their western counterparts. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the barriers to Chinese college students seeking psychological help from professionals. Quantitative data on Asian values, social supports, self-stigma,…

  16. Who Helps Whom? Investigating the Development of Adolescent Prosocial Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijsewijk, Loes; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Pattiselanno, Kim; Steglich, Christian; Veenstra, René

    2016-01-01

    We investigated adolescent prosocial relations by examining social networks based on the question "Who helps you (e.g., with homework, with repairing a flat [bicycle] tire, or when you are feeling down?)." The effects of individual characteristics (academic achievement, symptoms of depressive mood, and peer status) on receiving help and…

  17. Helping Students on the Margin Succeed in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Michelle Schoen; Cumming, Brenda

    1996-01-01

    Addresses how Apple Valley High School (Minnesota) has been able to help marginal students succeed in school. The fundamental actions that contributed to the effectiveness of study-team efforts to help marginal students are discussed, and what has been learned through these efforts is considered. (GR)

  18. Crossing a Broad Gray Line to Help Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Helping students with mental health issues sometimes presents teachers with the dilemma of following the letter of school rules or doing what is best for the child. One teacher tells her story of crossing such lines, but only in service to children. She also outlines what teachers can and should do to help students who need mental health services.

  19. Demonstrating knowledge : The effects of group status on outgroup helping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Esther; Täuber, Susanne

    We examined, in two experiments, the notion that members of low status groups, more than members of high status groups, use outgroup helping as a strategic tool to demonstrate their group's knowledge and boost its reputation. In Study 1 (N=103), we compared outgroup helping in response to requests

  20. How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? KidsHealth / For Teens / How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What's in ... them? If so, what should you do? It can be hard to understand why a friend might ...

  1. Restoring Hope: You Can Help Save A Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense Submit Search Restoring Hope Sep. 1, 2010 You Can Help Save A Life More Focus Needed to of Staff Videos Pentagon Channel Restoring Hope: 90 min. Special - Part 1 | Part 2 More Pentagon Prevention Month: Marine Corps Team Helps Save Lives. I Will Never Quit on Life Sept.8, 2010 - Mrs. Mullen on

  2. Perceptions of Helpfulness of Teachers in Didactic Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moate, Randall M.; Cox, Jane A.; Brown, Steven R.; West, Erin M.

    2017-01-01

    Thirty-five novice counselors completed a Q sort that assessed their perceptions of what was most helpful about teachers of didactic classes in their master's degree program. Participants perceived teachers who used a contextual teaching pedagogy and had an authentic, empathic, and compassionate way of being as helpful to their learning.

  3. EPIC: Helping School Life and Family Support Each Other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David

    1992-01-01

    Born out of a 1981 murder, Buffalo (New York) Public Schools' EPIC (Effective Parenting Information for Children) program successfully combines parenting, effective teaching, and community programs to help family and school life support each other. Under EPIC, teachers are advised to help students acquire 23 skills involving self-esteem, rules,…

  4. Stigma in Help-Seeking: The Case of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Zipora; Vogel, David L.; Strass, Haley A.; Heath, Patrick J.

    2018-01-01

    Stigma associated with seeking help has been found to be a key help-seeking barrier, however its role is less clear for: (a) adolescents, (b) groups outside the United States and (c) different types of therapy. This study addresses these omissions by examining the relationships between perceptions of public stigma of mental illness and the…

  5. Online Help to End-Users in a Networked Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the need for online help for end-users based on experiences with an online public access catalog (OPAC) at the University of Cape Town libraries. The concept of end users is examined, the role of search intermediaries in information systems is explained, and online help and systems design is discussed. (LRW)

  6. An Evaluation of Online Help for the NOTIS OPAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of online help systems in online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a study that evaluated the online help system for the NOTIS (Northwestern Online Total Integrated System) OPAC. Features of the system reviewed include online functions; training features; general interface features; access points; and message content and display…

  7. Social Goals and Willingness to Seek Help for School Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.

    2012-01-01

    The relation between students' social goals and their willingness to seek help for school violence was examined. Four hundred and sixty-two students from sixth, eighth, and tenth grades responded to vignettes used to assess willingness to seek help from teachers and friends for dealing with relational and physical violence. Intimacy goals enhanced…

  8. Attitude and help-seeking for hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vandenBrink, RHS; Wit, HP; Kempen, GIJM; vanHeuvelen, MJG

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate help-seeking for hearing impairment in the elderly, and to compare groups showing dissimilar help-seeking on their attitude toward hearing loss and hearing aids. Attitude factors were based on a revised version of the Health Belief Model, and included

  9. Helping Competencies of Student Affairs Professionals: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather student affairs professionals' perceptions of the knowledge and skills needed to effectively help students. Using the Delphi method, 159 entry-level and mid-level student affairs administrators from institutions across the United States were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the helping skills they use…

  10. Suicidal Behavior and Help Seeking among Diverse College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Chris; Becker, Martin Swanbrow; Shadick, Richard; Jaggars, Shanna S.; Nitkin-Kaner, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal and help-seeking behaviors of students of color remain a significant problem on college campuses. Self-reported suicidal experiences and help-seeking behavior of diverse students are examined on the basis of results from a national survey of college student mental health. The results suggest significant differences in the expression of…

  11. Helping yourself helps others: Linking children's emotion regulation to prosocial behavior through sympathy and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Hyun; Colasante, Tyler; Malti, Tina

    2018-06-01

    Although emotionally well-regulated children are more likely to behave prosocially, the psychological processes that connect their emotion regulation abilities and prosocial behavior are less clear. We tested if other-oriented sympathy and trust mediated the links between emotion regulation capacities (i.e., resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA], negative emotional intensity, and sadness regulation) and prosocial behavior in an ethnically diverse sample of 4- and 8-year-olds (N = 131; 49% girls). Resting RSA was calculated from children's electrocardiogram data in response to a nondescript video. Sympathy was child and caregiver reported, whereas negative emotional intensity, sadness regulation, trust, and prosocial behavior were caregiver reported. Regardless of age, higher resting RSA was linked to higher sympathy, which was associated with higher prosocial behavior. The positive link between sadness regulation and prosocial behavior was mediated by higher sympathy and trust. Children's other-oriented psychological processes may play important roles in translating certain emotion regulation capacities into prosocial behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Help Preferences Among Employees Who Wish to Change Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard; Villadsen, Ebbe; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-08-01

    To examine the help preferences of employees in the Danish police who had acknowledged that they wished to change health behaviors. In addition, we explored whether preferences varied with age, gender, chronic health concerns, positive expectations of good health, and past experiences of in-house health promotion services (i.e., wellness service). Respondents to an electronic questionnaire who acknowledged wishing to change health behaviors in relation to smoking (n = 845), alcohol (n = 684), eating (n = 4,431), and physical activity (n = 5,179) were asked to choose up to three help alternatives on a predefined list. In descending order, smokers preferred help from nicotine gum, no help, and help and support from family and friends. Alcohol consumers preferred no help or help and support from family and friends or "other" forms. Employees who wanted to change eating habits preferred a free fruit bowl, free nutritional guidance, and healthy food at work. Employees who wanted to change physical activity patterns preferred exercise at work, offers of free exercise, and exercise in a social/collegial context. Wishing to change health behaviors is not always accompanied by perceiving a need for assistance. The no-help option was selected fairly frequently and mostly in relation to alcohol and smoking. A fruit bowl was the most preferred option for help, followed by exercise at work and free exercise. Help from traditional health services was ranked low, possibly reflecting that they are primarily viewed as a solution for stopping disease rather than promoting health. © 2013 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. Perceived barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking in young people: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Kathleen M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents and young adults frequently experience mental disorders, yet tend not to seek help. This systematic review aims to summarise reported barriers and facilitators of help-seeking in young people using both qualitative research from surveys, focus groups, and interviews and quantitative data from published surveys. It extends previous reviews through its systematic research methodology and by the inclusion of published studies describing what young people themselves perceive are the barriers and facilitators to help-seeking for common mental health problems. Methods Twenty two published studies of perceived barriers or facilitators in adolescents or young adults were identified through searches of PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database. A thematic analysis was undertaken on the results reported in the qualitative literature and quantitative literature. Results Fifteen qualitative and seven quantitative studies were identified. Young people perceived stigma and embarrassment, problems recognising symptoms (poor mental health literacy, and a preference for self-reliance as the most important barriers to help-seeking. Facilitators were comparatively under-researched. However, there was evidence that young people perceived positive past experiences, and social support and encouragement from others as aids to the help-seeking process. Conclusions Strategies for improving help-seeking by adolescents and young adults should focus on improving mental health literacy, reducing stigma, and taking into account the desire of young people for self-reliance.

  14. Perceived barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking in young people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Amelia; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen

    2010-12-30

    Adolescents and young adults frequently experience mental disorders, yet tend not to seek help. This systematic review aims to summarise reported barriers and facilitators of help-seeking in young people using both qualitative research from surveys, focus groups, and interviews and quantitative data from published surveys. It extends previous reviews through its systematic research methodology and by the inclusion of published studies describing what young people themselves perceive are the barriers and facilitators to help-seeking for common mental health problems. Twenty two published studies of perceived barriers or facilitators in adolescents or young adults were identified through searches of PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database. A thematic analysis was undertaken on the results reported in the qualitative literature and quantitative literature. Fifteen qualitative and seven quantitative studies were identified. Young people perceived stigma and embarrassment, problems recognising symptoms (poor mental health literacy), and a preference for self-reliance as the most important barriers to help-seeking. Facilitators were comparatively under-researched. However, there was evidence that young people perceived positive past experiences, and social support and encouragement from others as aids to the help-seeking process. Strategies for improving help-seeking by adolescents and young adults should focus on improving mental health literacy, reducing stigma, and taking into account the desire of young people for self-reliance.

  15. Helping or punishing strangers: neural correlates of altruistic decisions as third-party and of its relation to empathic concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Strang, Sabrina; Weber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Social norms are a cornerstone of human society. When social norms are violated (e.g., fairness) people can either help the victim or punish the violator in order to restore justice. Recent research has shown that empathic concern influences this decision to help or punish. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we investigated the neural underpinnings of third-party help and punishment and the involvement of empathic concern. Participants saw a person violating a social norm, i.e., proposing unfair offers in a dictator game, at the expense of another person. The participants could then decide to either punish the violator or help the victim. Our results revealed that both third-party helping as well as third-party punishing activated the bilateral striatum, a region strongly related with reward processing, indicating that both altruistic decisions share a common neuronal basis. In addition, also different networks were involved in the two processes compared with control conditions; bilateral striatum and the right lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) during helping and bilateral striatum as well as left lPFC and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) during punishment. Further we found that individual differences in empathic concern influenced whether people prefer to help or to punish. People with high empathic concern helped more frequently, were faster in their decision and showed higher activation in frontoparietal regions during helping compared with punishing. Our findings provide insights into the neuronal basis of human altruistic behavior and social norm enforcement mechanism.

  16. Do fights prohibit helping? : the influence of task interdependence and conflict norms on helping behavior during task conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of group conflict norms and task interdependence on individuals' willingness to help others under conditions of task conflict to better understand how group characteristics influence individual helping behavior.

  17. Helping organizations to address their effort toward the implementation of improvements in their software process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Ariadna Muñoz-Mata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Debido a la importancia de las pequeñas y medianas empresas (pymes de desarrollo de software para la industria del software, es importante garantizar la calidad de sus productos, para lo cual la mejora de sus procesos ofrece un camino atractivo para lograrlo. Desafortunadamente, la falta de conocimientos que existe en las pymes sobre cómo o dónde dirigir su esfuerzo de mejora hace que la implementación de mejoras sea un camino lleno de obstáculos, la mayoría de veces imposible de lograr. Este artículo presenta un marco de trabajo cuyo objetivo es ayudar a las pymes a encontrar un punto de inicio para dirigir sus esfuerzos de mejora, basado en la identifi cación de sus problemas principales. Además, el marco de trabajo proporciona una guía para iniciar la implementación de la mejora (punto de inicio, referente a los modelos, estándares y/o metodologías ágiles que pueden ser usados como referencia, basada en sus necesidades, características y cultura de trabajo. Finalmente, el artículo incluye un caso de estudio en el que se muestran los resultados de la implementación del marco de trabajo en cuatro pymes de la región de Zacatecas.

  18. Greater support and debriefing may help student midwives to process traumatic birth experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson-Reynolds, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Implications for practice and researchIncorporating resilience training and a multidisciplinary debriefing approach within clinical and academic environments would develop a culture of support and compassion for the workforce and ultimately effective care for women using maternity services. Further research surrounding the effectiveness of resilience education for student midwives is required to elicit greater understanding of the effect on woman-centred care.

  19. Local health department translation processes: potential of machine translation technologies to help meet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anne M; Mandel, Hannah; Capurro, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Limited English proficiency (LEP), defined as a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English, is associated with health disparities. Despite federal and state requirements to translate health information, the vast majority of health materials are solely available in English. This project investigates barriers to translation of health information and explores new technologies to improve access to multilingual public health materials. We surveyed all 77 local health departments (LHDs) in the Northwest about translation needs, practices, barriers and attitudes towards machine translation (MT). We received 67 responses from 45 LHDs. Translation of health materials is the principle strategy used by LHDs to reach LEP populations. Cost and access to qualified translators are principle barriers to producing multilingual materials. Thirteen LHDs have used online MT tools. Many respondents expressed concerns about the accuracy of MT. Overall, respondents were positive about its potential use, if low costs and quality could be assured.

  20. Electronic keyboard instruments as a helping tool in the process of teaching music

    OpenAIRE

    Rosiński, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The following article shows the usage of new technology in the widely understood music teaching in schools of general profile. Innovative usage of electronic keyboard instruments in music lessons on a significant level expands children’s and teenagers’ musicality and music sensitivity, which was proven with research and observations. The usage of new tools by an educator will influence the quality of performed service so that they can meet the criteria that support the course of lesson. Ch...

  1. Citizen Action Can Help the Code Adoption Process for Radon-Resistant New Construction: Decatur, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adopting a code requiring radon-resistant new construction (RRNC) in Decatur, Alabama, took months of effort by four people. Their actions demonstrate the influence that passionate residents can have on reversing a city council’s direction.

  2. Can cognitive processes help explain the success of instructional techniques recommended by behavior analysts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, Rebecca A.; Weinstein, Yana

    2018-01-01

    The fields of cognitive psychology and behavior analysis have undertaken separate investigations into effective learning strategies. These studies have led to several recommendations from both fields regarding teaching techniques that have been shown to enhance student performance. While cognitive psychology and behavior analysis have studied student performance independently from their different perspectives, the recommendations they make are remarkably similar. The lack of discussion between the two fields, despite these similarities, is surprising. The current paper seeks to remedy this oversight in two ways: first, by reviewing two techniques recommended by behavior analysts—guided notes and response cards—and comparing them to their counterparts in cognitive psychology that are potentially responsible for their effectiveness; and second, by outlining some other areas of overlap that could benefit from collaboration. By starting the discussion with the comparison of two specific recommendations for teaching techniques, we hope to galvanize a more extensive collaboration that will not only further the progression of both fields, but also extend the practical applications of the ensuing research.

  3. Prototype and Evaluation of AutoHelp: A Case-based, Web-accessible Help Desk System for EOSDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.; Thurman, David A.

    1999-01-01

    AutoHelp is a case-based, Web-accessible help desk for users of the EOSDIS. Its uses a combination of advanced computer and Web technologies, knowledge-based systems tools, and cognitive engineering to offload the current, person-intensive, help desk facilities at the DAACs. As a case-based system, AutoHelp starts with an organized database of previous help requests (questions and answers) indexed by a hierarchical category structure that facilitates recognition by persons seeking assistance. As an initial proof-of-concept demonstration, a month of email help requests to the Goddard DAAC were analyzed and partially organized into help request cases. These cases were then categorized to create a preliminary case indexing system, or category structure. This category structure allows potential users to identify or recognize categories of questions, responses, and sample cases similar to their needs. Year one of this research project focused on the development of a technology demonstration. User assistance 'cases' are stored in an Oracle database in a combination of tables linking prototypical questions with responses and detailed examples from the email help requests analyzed to date. When a potential user accesses the AutoHelp system, a Web server provides a Java applet that displays the category structure of the help case base organized by the needs of previous users. When the user identifies or requests a particular type of assistance, the applet uses Java database connectivity (JDBC) software to access the database and extract the relevant cases. The demonstration will include an on-line presentation of how AutoHelp is currently structured. We will show how a user might request assistance via the Web interface and how the AutoHelp case base provides assistance. The presentation will describe the DAAC data collection, case definition, and organization to date, as well as the AutoHelp architecture. It will conclude with the year 2 proposal to more fully develop the

  4. Gendered Manifestations of Depression and Help Seeking Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod B; Shafer, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Men who do not seek help for mental health problems may experience unnecessary suffering which ultimately affects the well-being of themselves and others. Gendered manifestations of depressive symptoms may play an important role in why some men do not seek help for mental health issues. Using data from 2,382 male respondents in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, the authors examined the relationship that both traditional and male-typical symptoms of depression had on the help-seeking behaviors of men. Traditional symptoms increased the odds of seeking help for depression for all men. Male-typical symptoms, however, did not increase the odds of seeking help for depression or another mental health concern. Both traditional and male-typical symptoms increased the odds of initially seeking help from a medical provider, and men with male-typical symptoms had an overall higher likelihood of seeking help from a medical provider. Consequently, it is important that medical professionals assess for depression even when it is not a presenting concern.

  5. Factors Influencing Professional Help-Seeking for Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin; Batterham, Philip J; Calear, Alison L; Randall, Rebecca

    2018-05-01

    Evidence suggests that the majority of people with suicidality do not seek help. Little systematic evaluation of factors influencing professional help-seeking has been done. To systematically evaluate the factors that influence professional help-seeking for suicidality. Published quantitative and qualitative studies in Medline and PsycInfo databases were reviewed following PRISMA. In all, 55 relevant studies were identified. Of these, 15 studies examined professional help-seeking intentions for perceived suicidal ideation, among people with or without suicidality; 21 studies examined professional help-seeking behavior among people with suicidality; and 19 studies examined suicidal decedents' health services use. Several potential important barriers were identified including high self-reliance, lack of perceived need for treatment, and stigmatizing attitudes toward suicide, toward mental health issues, and toward seeking professional treatment. The presence of suicidality and mental health issues was found to generally decrease help-seeking intentions for perceived suicidal ideation while facilitating actual service use. Social support and informal support from family and friends also played an important role in professional help-seeking. Although the majority of the included studies were of sound quality, some of the factors identified in the review were assessed in relatively few studies, and most of the included studies were conducted in industrialized countries. Further quantitative and qualitative studies examining the potential important factors in broader community samples, especially in developing countries, are needed.

  6. [Men and depression: gender-related help-seeking behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M

    2000-11-01

    As epidemiological data concerning gender-related help-seeking behaviour indicate, consultation rate and help-seeking by men is consistently lower, especially in the case of emotional problems and depressive symptoms. There is empirical evidence that the poor treatment rate of men cannot be explained by a better health but must be attributed to a discrepancy of need and help-seeking behaviour. Social change and epidemiological trends in depression point to the male gender-role being an important factor of increasing rates among young men as well as an important determinant of help-seeking behaviour. It is argued that social norms of traditional masculinity make help-seeking more difficult because of the inhibition of expressiveness affecting symptom perception and symptomatology of depression. Besides these predisposing factors of male help-seeking other medical and social factors are mentioned producing further barriers to help-seeking. Further research is needed to investigate the question whether changing masculinity implies gender-role conflict or positive health effects.

  7. Rats demonstrate helping behavior toward a soaked conspecific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nobuya; Tan, Ling; Tate, Kazushi; Okada, Maya

    2015-09-01

    Helping behavior is a prosocial behavior whereby an individual helps another irrespective of disadvantages to him or herself. In the present study, we examined whether rats would help distressed, conspecific rats that had been soaked with water. In Experiment 1, rats quickly learned to liberate a soaked cagemate from the water area by opening the door to allow the trapped rat into a safe area. Additional tests showed that the presentation of a distressed cagemate was necessary to induce rapid door-opening behavior. In addition, it was shown that rats dislike soaking and that rats that had previously experienced a soaking were quicker to learn how to help a cagemate than those that had never been soaked. In Experiment 2, the results indicated that rats did not open the door to a cagemate that was not distressed. In Experiment 3, we tested behavior when rats were forced to choose between opening the door to help a distressed cagemate and opening a different door to obtain a food reward. Irrespective of how they learned to open the door, in most test trials, rats chose to help the cagemate before obtaining a food reward, suggesting that the relative value of helping others is greater than the value of a food reward. These results suggest that rats can behave prosocially and that helper rats may be motivated by empathy-like feelings toward their distressed cagemate.

  8. Principle of Care and Giving to Help People in Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkers, René; Ottoni-Wilhelm, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Theories of moral development posit that an internalized moral value that one should help those in need-the principle of care-evokes helping behaviour in situations where empathic concern does not. Examples of such situations are helping behaviours that involve cognitive deliberation and planning, that benefit others who are known only in the abstract, and who are out-group members. Charitable giving to help people in need is an important helping behaviour that has these characteristics. Therefore we hypothesized that the principle of care would be positively associated with charitable giving to help people in need, and that the principle of care would mediate the empathic concern-giving relationship. The two hypotheses were tested across four studies. The studies used four different samples, including three nationally representative samples from the American and Dutch populations, and included both self-reports of giving (Studies 1-3), giving observed in a survey experiment (Study 3), and giving observed in a laboratory experiment (Study 4). The evidence from these studies indicated that a moral principle to care for others was associated with charitable giving to help people in need and mediated the empathic concern-giving relationship. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Personality published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Association of Personality Psychology.

  9. Who Seeks Help Online for Self-Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Mareka; Casey, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify differences between young people who seek help online for self-injury and those who self-injure but do not seek help online, in order to improve online services for young people at high risk of suicide. Young people reporting a history of self-injury (N = 679) were identified as part of larger study (N = 1,463) exploring help-seeking. One third of young people with a history of self-injury reported online help-seeking for self-injury. Online help-seekers were significantly more distressed, suicidal, and had a greater degree of self-injury compared to those who did not seek help online. The Internet provides an important form of support to the most at risk young people in this population, and may be a proximal step to face-to-face help-seeking. Further research is required to investigate the forms of support currently accessed by young people online, and their effectiveness.

  10. SELF-HELP GROUPS FOR PARENTS WITH MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaska STANCHEVA-POPKOSTADINOVA

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available This presentation concerns a group for parents of mentally retarded children.A group of these parents receives professional help and environmental support. The parents are encouraged to assume responsibility in the everyday life educational process of their children.As Baker / 1980 / states: “ If parents cope better on daily basis with the child who has mental retardation, not only the child but also the parents would benefit”.Taking part in the group gave the parents:· the opportunity to meet other parents with the same children;· to talk to other parents and feel less isolated;· to share information and experiences, skills and ideas;· the opportunity to listen to the needs and problems of other parents;· to change the ways of working to meet the child’s needs;· share information about the possibilities of education and services;· parents are encouraged to meet together to support one another;· parents need a special approach to many problems existing in their families.· the education in the group puts the beginning of the work with the parents.The idea is to gather the efforts of specialists from different fields and to establish multi-disciplinary group aiming to work with the parents and create a good collaboration and partnership between them in order to improve the living conditions and services to the retarded persons.This paper reports on the development, evaluation and dissemination of the program for education of parents with mentally retarded children. At the Symposium we will be able to present the results of the effectiveness of the education.

  11. Life or death decisions: framing the call for help.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Y Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic blood shortages in the U.S. would be alleviated by small increases, in percentage terms, of people donating blood. The current research investigated the effects of subtle changes in charity-seeking messages on the likelihood of people responses to a call for help. We predicted that "avoid losses" messages would lead to more helping behavior than "promote gains" messages would. METHOD: Two studies investigated the effects of message framing on helping intentions and behaviors. With the help and collaboration of the Red Cross, Study 1, a field experiment, directly assessed the effectiveness of a call for blood donations that was presented as either death-preventing (losses or life-saving (gains, and as being of either more or less urgent need. With the help and collaboration of a local charity, Study 2, a lab experiment, assessed the effects of the gain-versus-loss framing of a donation-soliciting flyer on individuals' expectations of others' monetary donations as well their own volunteering behavior. Study 2 also assessed the effects of three emotional motivators - feelings of empathy, positive affect, and relational closeness. RESULT: Study 1 indicated that, on a college campus, describing blood donations as a way to "prevent a death" rather than "save a life" boosted the donation rate. Study 2 showed that framing a charity's appeals as helping people to avoid a loss led to larger expected donations, increased intentions to volunteer, and more helping behavior, independent of other emotional motivators. CONCLUSION: This research identifies and demonstrates a reliable and effective method for increasing important helping behaviors by providing charities with concrete ideas that can effectively increase helping behavior generally and potentially death-preventing behavior in particular.

  12. Life or Death Decisions: Framing the Call for Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Eileen Y.; Murnighan, J. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic blood shortages in the U.S. would be alleviated by small increases, in percentage terms, of people donating blood. The current research investigated the effects of subtle changes in charity-seeking messages on the likelihood of people responses to a call for help. We predicted that “avoid losses” messages would lead to more helping behavior than “promote gains” messages would. Method Two studies investigated the effects of message framing on helping intentions and behaviors. With the help and collaboration of the Red Cross, Study 1, a field experiment, directly assessed the effectiveness of a call for blood donations that was presented as either death-preventing (losses) or life-saving (gains), and as being of either more or less urgent need. With the help and collaboration of a local charity, Study 2, a lab experiment, assessed the effects of the gain-versus-loss framing of a donation-soliciting flyer on individuals’ expectations of others’ monetary donations as well their own volunteering behavior. Study 2 also assessed the effects of three emotional motivators - feelings of empathy, positive affect, and relational closeness. Result Study 1 indicated that, on a college campus, describing blood donations as a way to “prevent a death” rather than “save a life” boosted the donation rate. Study 2 showed that framing a charity’s appeals as helping people to avoid a loss led to larger expected donations, increased intentions to volunteer, and more helping behavior, independent of other emotional motivators. Conclusion This research identifies and demonstrates a reliable and effective method for increasing important helping behaviors by providing charities with concrete ideas that can effectively increase helping behavior generally and potentially death-preventing behavior in particular. PMID:23483903

  13. Help-Seeking on Facebook Versus More Traditional Sources of Help: Cross-Sectional Survey of Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Alan R; Marsh, Heather E; Liebow, Samuel B L; Chen, Jason I; Forsberg, Christopher W; Nicolaidis, Christina; Saha, Somnath; Dobscha, Steven K

    2018-02-26

    The media has devoted significant attention to anecdotes of individuals who post messages on Facebook prior to suicide. However, it is unclear to what extent social media is perceived as a source of help or how it compares to other sources of potential support for mental health problems. This study aimed to evaluate the degree to which military veterans with depression use social media for help-seeking in comparison to other more traditional sources of help. Cross-sectional self-report survey of 270 adult military veterans with probable major depression. Help-seeking intentions were measured with a modified General Help-Seeking Questionnaire. Facebook users and nonusers were compared via t tests, Chi-square, and mixed effects regression models. Associations between types of help-seeking were examined using mixed effects models. The majority of participants were users of social media, primarily Facebook (n=162). Mean overall help-seeking intentions were similar between Facebook users and nonusers, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Facebook users were very unlikely to turn to Facebook as a venue for support when experiencing either emotional problems or suicidal thoughts. Compared to help-seeking intentions for Facebook, help-seeking intentions for formal (eg, psychologists), informal (eg, friends), or phone helpline sources of support were significantly higher. Results did not substantially change when examining users of other social media, women, or younger adults. In its current form, the social media platform Facebook is not seen as a venue to seek help for emotional problems or suicidality among veterans with major depression in the United States. ©Alan R Teo, Heather E Marsh, Samuel B L Liebow, Jason I Chen, Christopher W Forsberg, Christina Nicolaidis, Somnath Saha, Steven K Dobscha. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 26.02.2018.

  14. Social Influences of Help-Seeking Behaviour Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lee Lan; Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the influence of social networks such as family members, friends, peers, and health care providers toward the help-seeking behaviour (HSB) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the public and private primary care settings. In-depth interviews of 12 patients, 9 family members, and 5 health care providers, as well as 3 focus groups among 13 health care providers were conducted. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim for qualitative analysis. Social influences play a significant role in the help-seeking process; once diagnosed, patients source information from people around them to make decisions. This significant influence depends on the relationship between patients and social networks or the level of trust, support, and comforting feeling. Thus, the impacts on patients' help-seeking behavior are varied. However, the help-seeking process is not solely an individual's concern but a dynamic process interacting with the social networks within the health care system. © 2015 APJPH.

  15. Fastdata processing with Spark

    CERN Document Server

    Karau, Holden

    2013-01-01

    This book will be a basic, step-by-step tutorial, which will help readers take advantage of all that Spark has to offer.Fastdata Processing with Spark is for software developers who want to learn how to write distributed programs with Spark. It will help developers who have had problems that were too much to be dealt with on a single computer. No previous experience with distributed programming is necessary. This book assumes knowledge of either Java, Scala, or Python.

  16. weHelp: A Reference Architecture for Social Recommender Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Swapneel; Arora, Nipun; Murphy, Christian; Kaiser, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems have become increasingly popular. Most of the research on recommender systems has focused on recommendation algorithms. There has been relatively little research, however, in the area of generalized system architectures for recommendation systems. In this paper, we introduce weHelp : a reference architecture for social recommender systems - systems where recommendations are derived automatically from the aggregate of logged activities conducted by the system's users. Our architecture is designed to be application and domain agnostic. We feel that a good reference architecture will make designing a recommendation system easier; in particular, weHelp aims to provide a practical design template to help developers design their own well-modularized systems.

  17. The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Help Evasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the relationship between self-efficacy and not wanting help to change health behaviors. Method. All employees in the Danish police department were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire. All respondents expressing a desire to change health behaviors in relation...... to reporting that one did not want help. Conclusion. A high belief in one's own ability to change lifestyle behaviors in relation to smoking, alcohol, eating, and physical activity may lead to avoidance of help offers in a workplace setting. © 2013 Society for Public Health Education....

  18. Predicting attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help among Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Murrell, Brittany; Swift, Joshua K

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine the role of current/previous treatment experience, stigma (social and self), and cultural identification (Caucasian and Alaska Native [AN]) in predicting attitudes toward psychological help seeking for ANs. Results indicated that these variables together explained roughly 56% of variance in attitudes. In particular, while self-stigma and identification with the Caucasian culture predicted a unique amount of variance in help-seeking attitudes, treatment use and identification with AN culture did not. The results of this study indicate that efforts to address the experience of self-stigma may prove most useful to improving help-seeking attitudes in ANs.

  19. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  20. Conceptual measurement framework for help-seeking for mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickwood D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Debra Rickwood, Kerry ThomasFaculty of Health, University of Canberra, ACT, AustraliaBackground: Despite a high level of research, policy, and practice interest in help-seeking for mental health problems and mental disorders, there is currently no agreed and commonly used definition or conceptual measurement framework for help-seeking.Methods: A systematic review of research activity in the field was undertaken to investigate how help-seeking has been conceptualized and measured. Common elements were used to develop a proposed conceptual measurement framework.Results: The database search revealed a very high level of research activity and confirmed that there is no commonly applied definition of help-seeking and no psychometrically sound measures that are routinely used. The most common element in the help-seeking research was a focus on formal help-seeking sources, rather than informal sources, although studies did not assess a consistent set of professional sources; rather, each study addressed an idiosyncratic range of sources of professional health and community care. Similarly, the studies considered help-seeking for a range of mental health problems and no consistent terminology was applied. The most common mental health problem investigated was depression, followed by use of generic terms, such as mental health problem, psychological distress, or emotional problem. Major gaps in the consistent measurement of help-seeking were identified.Conclusion: It is evident that an agreed definition that supports the comparable measurement of help-seeking is lacking. Therefore, a conceptual measurement framework is proposed to fill this gap. The framework maintains that the essential elements for measurement are: the part of the help-seeking process to be investigated and respective time frame, the source and type of assistance, and the type of mental health concern. It is argued that adopting this framework will facilitate progress in the field by

  1. Advancing mission in the marketplace. Integrated strategic planning and budgeting helps a system remain accountable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smessaert, A H

    1992-10-01

    In the late 1980s Holy Cross Health System (HCHS), South Bend, IN, began to implement a revised strategic planning and budgeting process to effectively link the system's mission with its day-to-day operations. Leaders wanted a process that would help system employees internalize and act on the four major elements articulated in the HCHS mission statement: fidelity, excellence, empowerment, and stewardship. Representatives from mission, strategic planning, and finance from the corporate office and subsidiaries examined planning and budgeting methods. From the beginning, HCHS leaders decided that the process should be implemented gradually, with each step focusing on refining methodology and improving mission integration. As the process evolved. HCHS developed a sequence in which planning preceded budgeting. The system also developed a variety of educational and collaborative initiatives to help system employees adapt to the organization's change of direction. One critical aspect of HCHS's ongoing education is an ethical reflection process that helps participants balance ethical considerations by viewing an issue from three perspectives: social vision, multiple responsibility, and self-interest.

  2. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra

  3. Helping me, helping you: self-referencing and gender roles in donor advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfer, M E

    2006-06-01

    Donor advertising typically emphasizes altruism, but an appeal to individual self-interest may be more effective in heightening blood donation intentions among youthful nondonors. A total of 292 undergraduate business students at a Canadian university provided complete data in response to a between-subjects full-factorial advertising experiment with sex, self-referencing, and message strategy factors. Self-referencing, or mental processing that links information to the self-concept, was elicited at either a low or moderate level, whereas the message strategy was either agentic (donate blood because you may need it yourself) or communal (donate blood because someone close to you may need it). Dependent variables included identification with the ad, donation intentions, and a discrimination measure of recognition memory. A three-way interaction among sex, self-referencing level (low or moderate), and message (agentic or communal) was found. Two-way self-referencing by message graphs of donation intentions and ad identification showed a parallel structure for males in that their responses were generally more favorable when self-referencing was at a moderate level, regardless of the message type. Among women, however, crossover interactions between the level of self-referencing and the message type (agentic vs. communal) were observed, such that the message's effect differed with the level of self-referencing. For both men and women, the agentic message was more effective than communal ad copy when a moderate level of self-referencing was achieved. Collection agencies should consider appealing to young nondonors by suggesting that they give blood to make it available for themselves if required.

  4. Help-seeking by substance dependants presenting to healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benzodiazepine, ecstasy, cocaine and inhalant dependency at general practitioners, private psychiatrists, treatment centres and non-prescribing therapists was compared. Different patterns of help seeking for substance dependence from the various professional groups were detected. Regarding alcohol dependence ...

  5. THE ECONOMIC ROLE OF SELF-HELP GROUP

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. S. Selvendran

    2018-01-01

    “All for all” principle behind self-help group (SHG) concept. It is mainly concerned with poor people and it is for the people, by the people and of the people gandhian sarvodaya contained with this.

  6. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Crisis Line Skip to Main Content SuicidePreventionLifeline.org Get Help Materials Get Involved Crisis Centers About Be There ... see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Veterans Crisis Line -- After the Call see more videos from ...

  7. Got Anxiety? Get Help: Tips for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems, secondary conditions such as substance abuse or depression, and —in extreme cases —suicide. Early treatment can help prevent these problems. Visit your campus health or counseling center to ...

  8. PPARC: Grid technology helps astronomers keep pace with the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intelligent Agent" computer programs are roaming the Internet and watching the skies. These programs, using Grid computing technology, will help astronomers detect some of the most dramatic events in the universe, such as massive supernova explosions (1 page).

  9. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH ...

  10. Diabetes: How and RDN Can Help with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that your daily cup (or three!) provides some health benefits. How an RDN Can Help with Diabetes Maintaining ... Keep Your Picnic Safe Food Safety Tips for Outdoor Dining Keep Your Picnic Safe Dads and Breast- ...

  11. Parent Guidelines for Helping Children After an Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent Guidelines for Helping Children after an Earthquake Being in an earthquake is very frightening, and the days, weeks, and months following are very stressful. Your children and family will recover ...

  12. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... facility near you. Spread the Word Download logos, Web ads, and materials and help get the word ... Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does not store mobile phone numbers of users ...

  13. 10 Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and do better in school. You can help boost your child's attention span, concentration, and memory by ... interested in his or her education. Keep in mind, though, that while some middle school students like ...

  14. What helps volunteers to continue with their work? | Marincowitz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice ... Aim: The aim of the study was to understand what volunteers perceived to be the factors helping them to continue ... Findings: The volunteers feel that their work consists of various forms of support to patients.

  15. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grief at Work Working Through Grief About Us Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members By ... fatal heart attacks occur in the workplace. Other deaths — from accidents, for example — can also happen during ...

  16. Elder Abuse and Help-Seeking Behavior in Elderly Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Elsie

    2015-09-01

    Elder abuse is a prevalent phenomenon resulting in physical, emotional, and social costs to individuals, families, and society. Timely and effective intervention is crucial because victims are often involved in relationships where re-victimization is common. Most elder abuse victims, however, are reluctant to seek help from outside their families. The aim of the present study is to explore factors associated with help-seeking behaviors among mistreated elders in Hong Kong. In-depth interviews were conducted with 40 elder abuse survivors. Although almost all of the participants could provide some examples of elder abuse, most denied that their own experience was abusive. Personal and professional social networks were important determinants of help seeking. Social isolation, cultural barriers, self-blame, and lack of knowledge were major barriers to help seeking. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. College Students and Alcohol Abuse: New Resources Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. College Students and Alcohol Abuse: New Resources Can Help Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... to curb college alcohol abuse. NIAAA Tools You Can Use The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and ...

  18. "Depression Can Disguise Itself…" —But There Is Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression "Depression Can Disguise Itself…" —But There Is Help Past ... 20 million Americans. What are the signs of depression? Sadness or inability to enjoy things are hallmarks ...

  19. Access to water: Technical and social solutions help communities ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... English · Français ... Access to water: Technical and social solutions help communities make the most of ... IDRC-supported research engages communities, and countries, in developing durable solutions to water problems.

  20. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Spread the Word Videos Homeless Resources Additional Information Make the Connection Get Help When To Call ... Suicide Spread the Word Videos Homeless Resources Additional Information Make the Connection Resource Locator If you or ...