WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-related herbicide amiprophosmethyl

  1. The Shibata Shift and the Transformation of Etioplasts to Chloroplasts in Wheat with Clomazone (FMC 57020) and Amiprophos-Methyl (Tokunol M) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus, Nancy N.; Ryberg, Margareta; Lindsten, Agneta; Ryberg, Hans; Sundqvist, Christer

    1992-01-01

    The Shibata shift is a change in the absorption maximum of chlorophyllide from 684 to 672 nanometers that occurs within approximately 0.5 hour of phototransformation of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. Two compounds, clomazone and amiprophos-methyl, which previously have been shown to inhibit the Shibata shift in vivo, were used to look for correlations between the Shibata shift and other processes that occur during etioplast to chloroplast transformation. Leaf sections from 6-day-old etiolated wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv Walde) were treated with 0.5 millimolar clomazone or 0.1 millimolar amiprophos-methyl in darkness. In addition to the Shibata shift, the esterification of chlorophyllide to chlorophyll and the relocation of protochlorophyllide reductase from the prolamellar bodies to the developing thylakoids were inhibited by these treatments. Prolamellar body transformation did not appear to be affected by amiprophos-methyl and was only slightly affected by clomazone. The results indicate that: (a) there is a strong correlation between the occurrence of the Shibata shift and esterification activity; (b) transformation of the prolamellar bodies does not depend on the Shibata shift; and (c) the occurrence of the Shibata shift may be a prerequisite to the relocation of protochlorophyllide reductase from prolamellar bodies to thylakoids. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668622

  2. The Shibata Shift and the Transformation of Etioplasts to Chloroplasts in Wheat with Clomazone (FMC 57020) and Amiprophos-Methyl (Tokunol M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus, N N; Ryberg, M; Lindsten, A; Ryberg, H; Sundqvist, C

    1992-01-01

    The Shibata shift is a change in the absorption maximum of chlorophyllide from 684 to 672 nanometers that occurs within approximately 0.5 hour of phototransformation of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. Two compounds, clomazone and amiprophos-methyl, which previously have been shown to inhibit the Shibata shift in vivo, were used to look for correlations between the Shibata shift and other processes that occur during etioplast to chloroplast transformation. Leaf sections from 6-day-old etiolated wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv Walde) were treated with 0.5 millimolar clomazone or 0.1 millimolar amiprophos-methyl in darkness. In addition to the Shibata shift, the esterification of chlorophyllide to chlorophyll and the relocation of protochlorophyllide reductase from the prolamellar bodies to the developing thylakoids were inhibited by these treatments. Prolamellar body transformation did not appear to be affected by amiprophos-methyl and was only slightly affected by clomazone. The results indicate that: (a) there is a strong correlation between the occurrence of the Shibata shift and esterification activity; (b) transformation of the prolamellar bodies does not depend on the Shibata shift; and (c) the occurrence of the Shibata shift may be a prerequisite to the relocation of protochlorophyllide reductase from prolamellar bodies to thylakoids.

  3. Microbial degradation of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Kashmir

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides remain the most effective, efficient and economical way to control weeds; and its market continues to grow even with the plethora of generic products. With the development of herbicide-tolerant crops, use of herbicides is increasing around the world that has resulted in severe contamination of the environment. The strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. In this review, an attempt has been made to pool all the available literature on the biodegradation of key herbicides, clodinafop propargyl, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, metolachlor, diuron, glyphosate, imazapyr, pendimethalin and paraquat under the following objectives: (1) to highlight the general characteristic and mode of action, (2) to enlist toxicity in animals, (3) to pool microorganisms capable of degrading herbicides, (4) to discuss the assessment of herbicides degradation by efficient microbes, (5) to highlight biodegradation pathways, (6) to discuss the molecular basis of degradation, (7) to enlist the products of herbicides under degradation process, (8) to highlight the factors effecting biodegradation of herbicides and (9) to discuss the future aspects of herbicides degradation. This review may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for cleanup of soil and water contaminated with such compounds.

  4. Herbicidal Control of Grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Om Prakash; Srinivasan Ramanujam

    1980-01-01

    Necessity of the herbicidal application for controlling undesirable grasses, by the Defence Services, Military farms and Inter Service Organisations is highlighted. Control of grasses by herbicidal chemicals, registered under the Insecticides Act 1968 in this country, is reviewed apart from a mention of non-chemical methods.

  5. Annual Herbicide Loadings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and...

  6. Herbicide Safeners: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosinger, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of herbicides used in cereals, corn and rice owe their strong efficacy aligned with crop selectivity to safeners. The first commercial safener was 1,8-naphthalic anhydride used as a seed treatment in corn. Since then approximately 20 Safeners have been commercialized in monocot crops, although several were superseded. According to independent market research, in 2011 approximately 30% of herbicide use value from all companies in corn and cereals came from products containing safeners. In rice the percentage was 6%. Almost all safeners work by inducing the expression of genes which code for enzymes involved in herbicide detoxification. Thereby, herbicides are degraded rapidly enough to ensure a damaging concentration is not reached. This gene induction may occur in just one crop or several. For commercial success no significant induction of herbicide degradation should occur in the weeds. The actual molecular target(s of safeners is/are not known and therefore the reasons for species specificity are unclear. Bayer CropScience has a strong track record of safener discovery and has developed product portfolios based on its safeners mefenpyr-diethyl, isoxadifen-ethyl and cyprosulfamide. Atlantis® WG and Laudis® OD are important Bayer CropScience-products in Germany. These contain mefenpyr-diethyl to safen wheat and isoxadifen-ethyl to safen corn, respectively. The safeners provide an enabling technology which together with strong herbicide molecules has helped farmers to optimize their crop productivity through improved weed management.

  7. Herbicide resistance screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Herbicide resistance screening is a method that can be used not only to determine presence of the enzyme, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase, encoded by either the Bar or the Pat gene in transgenic maize, but also to assess the inheritance ratio of those genes in a segregating population. Herbicide screening can also be used to study linkage of a transgene of interest that was cotransformed with the herbicide resistance marker gene. By combining the herbicide screen assay with a PCR-based screen of leaf tissue DNA for the presence of both the Bar or the Pat gene marker and a cotransformed transgene of interest from the same seedling tissue and maintaining that seedling identity, the researcher can identify linkage or the possible breakdown in linkage of the marker gene and the transgene of interest. Further, the occurrence of "DNA silencing" can be evaluated if an individual seedling that was susceptible to the applied herbicide nonetheless gave PCR data that indicated presence of the gene responsible for herbicide resistance. Similarly, "DNA silencing" of the gene of interest may be investigated if the seeds can be screened and scored for that phenotypic trait in a nondestructive manner prior to planting.

  8. Herbicide-resistant crops and weed resistance to herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Micheal D K; Zelaya, Ian A

    2005-03-01

    The adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops has increased dramatically during the last 3 years, and currently over 52 million hectares of GM crops are planted world-wide. Approximately 41 million hectares of GM crops planted are herbicide-resistant crops, which includes an estimated 33.3 million hectares of herbicide-resistant soybean. Herbicide-resistant maize, canola, cotton and soybean accounted for 77% of the GM crop hectares in 2001. However, sugarbeet, wheat, and as many as 14 other crops have transgenic herbicide-resistant cultivars that may be commercially available in the near future. There are many risks associated with the production of GM and herbicide-resistant crops, including problems with grain contamination, segregation and introgression of herbicide-resistant traits, marketplace acceptance and an increased reliance on herbicides for weed control. The latter issue is represented in the occurrence of weed population shifts, the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed populations and herbicide-resistant crops becoming volunteer weeds. Another issue is the ecological impact that simple weed management programs based on herbicide-resistant crops have on weed communities. Asiatic dayflower (Commelina cumminus L) common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L) and wild buckwheat (Polygonum convolvulus L) are reported to be increasing in prominence in some agroecosystems due to the simple and significant selection pressure brought to bear by herbicide-resistant crops and the concomitant use of the herbicide. Finally, evolution of herbicide-resistant weed populations attributable to the herbicide-resistant crop/herbicide program has been observed. Examples of herbicide-resistant weeds include populations of horseweed (Conyza canadensis (L) Cronq) resistant to N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate). An important question is whether or not these problems represent significant economic issues for future agriculture. Copyright 2005 Society of Chemical Industry

  9. The herbicide glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J; Barry, G; Kishore, G

    1989-03-01

    Glyphosate has broad spectrum herbicidal activity against a wide range of annual and perennial weeds. The environmental properties of this herbicide such as its soil immobility, rapid soil inactivation and soil biodegradation are outstanding. This herbicide is practically non-toxic to non-plant life forms such as aquatic and avian species, animals and man. Metabolism studies with pure bacterial cultures indicate that glyphosate is metabolized to either aminomethylphosphonate and glyoxylate or sarcosine and phosphate in most bacteria. The enzyme C-P lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond of phosphonates including glyphosate, appears to be complex, containing multiple subunits. Mode of action studies have demonstrated that glyphosate kills plants by inhibiting the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. The status of our understanding of these aspects of glyphosate is reviewed.

  10. Effects of herbicides on fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Keith R.; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Volz, David

    2013-01-01

    Herbicides are used to control weeds and are usually targeted to processes and target sites that are specific to plants. As a result, most herbicides are not acutely toxic to fish. Exceptions to this general rule are uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and some herbicides that interfere...... have been observed in fish exposed to herbicides, these have either been observed at large concentrations that would be rarely found in surface waters inhabited by fish or, as in the case of behavior and olfaction, have not been linked to ecologically relevant responses on survival, growth, development......, and reproduction. As with all pesticides, herbicides may have indirect effects in fish. These effects are mediated by herbicide-induced changes in food webs or in the physical environment. Indirect effects can only occur if direct effects occur first and would be mediated by the killing of plants by herbicides...

  11. Postemergence herbicides for calendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calendula is an alternative oilseed crop whose seed oil is valued as a substitute for tung oil and a replacement for petroleum-based volatile organic compounds in paints and other coatings. Calendula is not yet grown extensively as an agronomic crop, and its tolerances to most herbicides are unknown...

  12. Mechanisms of Herbicide-resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Hong; CHEN Yibing; TAO Bo

    2006-01-01

    This paper discussed mechanisms of herbicide-resistance. There are at least four mechanisms identified by which weeds become resistant to a herbicide. The two most common mechanisms are those involving metabolic reactions and changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid sequence (mutations) that alter the structure and features of the target proteins. The other two mechanisms involve either an alteration in the penetration or translocation of the herbicides to the target site or the depolarization of membrane within the weed.

  13. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems.

  14. Herbicidal properties of antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Maxime G; Leroux, Julie; Stubbs, Keith A; Mylne, Joshua S

    2017-03-31

    The evolutionary relationship between plants and the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum is well established and underscored by the P. falciparum apicoplast, an essential chloroplast-like organelle. As a result of this relationship, studies have demonstrated that herbicides active against plants are also active against P. falciparum and thus could act as antimalarial drug leads. Here we show the converse is also true; many antimalarial compounds developed for human use are highly herbicidal. We found that human antimalarial drugs (e.g. sulfadiazine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, cycloguanil) were lethal to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at similar concentrations to market herbicides glufosinate and glyphosate. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of these herbicidal antimalarial compounds were similar to commercially used herbicides. The implications of this finding that many antimalarial compounds are herbicidal proffers two novel applications: (i) using the genetically tractable A. thaliana to reveal mode-of-action for understudied antimalarial drugs, and (ii) co-opting antimalarial compounds as a new source for much needed herbicide lead molecules.

  15. A Review and Prospect on Herbicide Adjuvants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The history, present status and future prospects of adjuvants application in herbicides were briefly reviewed. Adjuvants can be separated into two groups, activator adjuvants and utility adjuvants. The former directly enhances the efficacy of a herbicide through increasement of herbicide absorption, spreading, cuticular penetration, rainfastness and retention enhancement, and photodegradation of the herbicide can also be decreased. And the latter is utilized for improving application characteristics, behaviors and physical properties of herbicides and reducing or minimizing unwanted side effects on application.

  16. Performance comparison of non-relational database systems

    OpenAIRE

    Žlender, Rok

    2011-01-01

    Deciding on which data store to use is one of the most important aspects of every project. Besides the established relational database systems non-relational solutions are gaining in their popularity. Non-relational database systems provide an interesting alternative when we are storing large amount of data or when we are looking for greater flexibility with our data model. Purpose of this thesis is to measure and analyze how chosen non-relational database systems compare against each othe...

  17. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  18. Sensor-based assessment of herbicide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streibig, Jens Carl; Rasmussen, Jesper; Andújar, D.;

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive assessment of herbicide effects may be able to support integrated weed management. To test whether effects of herbicides on canopy variables could be detected by sensors, two crops were used as models and treated with herbicides at BBCH 20 using a logarithmic sprayer. Twelve days...

  19. Best management practices for herbicide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  20. Reduced herbicide rates: present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per

    2014-01-01

    Applying herbicides at rates lower than the label recommendation has been the rule rather than the exception in Denmark since the late 1980’s. Justifications for reducing herbicide rates can be 1) that the dominant weed species in the field are very susceptible to the herbicide, i.e. even reduced...

  1. Natural compounds with herbicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Montemurro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Research about phytotoxic activity of natural compounds could lead both to find new herbicidal active ingredients and to plan environmental friendly weed control strategies. Particularly, living organisms could be a source of compounds that are impossible, for their complexity, to synthesize artificially. More over, they could have alternative sites of action respect to the known chemical herbicides and, due to their origin, they should be more environmental safe. Many living organism, such as bacteria, fungi, insects, lichens and plants, are able to produce bioactive compounds. They generally are secondary metabolites or simply waste molecules. In this paper we make a review about these compounds, highlighting potential and constraints.

  2. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  3. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  4. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  5. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  6. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mercurio

    Full Text Available Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR. The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities. Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1 so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated

  7. Estimates of herbicide use for the 20 most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the 20 most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in Gianessi and Puffer (1991)....

  8. Genetically modified organisms : herbicide-resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Retuerta, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Pòster Due to the overgrowth of weeds, and the fact that herbicides cannot differentiate between crops and weeds, herbicide-resistant crops have been developed. This kind of genetically modified organisms (GMO) allows farmers to eliminate all weeds in a unique implementation of the herbicide meaning: less spraying, less “traffic” in the field and lower operating costs. However, this, like any other innovation, has generated much controversy

  9. Photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine-Khodja, Amina; Boulkamh, Abdelaziz; Boule, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    The photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides in aqueous solution is highly dependent on the nature and position of substituents on the ring. Most of these herbicides are methylated on the urea moiety, the other substituents are usually halogens or methoxy groups. The main reaction involving the aromatic ring of unhalogenated phenylureas excited at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm is an intramolecular rearrangement, similar to photo-Fries rearrangement, whereas with halogenated derivatives, photohydrolysis is the main transformation pathway. In the particular case of para-halogenated phenylureas, the intermediate formation of a carbene is observed. When the urea moiety is substituted with a methoxyl group, demethoxylation is a competitive reaction. N-Demethylation or oxidation of methyl groups is also observed, but with a lower yield. Photooxidation of phenylureas can also be induced by photocatalysis, iron salts or humic substances. In the absence of water, the main route for phototransformation of diuron is the oxidation or elimination of methyl groups. It is entirely possible that a photochemical intermediate could turn out to be more toxic than the initial herbicide.

  10. Reduced herbicide rates: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudsk, Per

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Applying herbicides at rates lower than the label recommendation has been the rule rather than the exception in Denmark since the late 1980’s. Justifications for reducing herbicide rates can be 1 that the dominant weed species in the field are very susceptible to the herbicide, i.e. even reduced rates will result in maximum effects, 2 that the conditions at and around the time of application, e.g. growth stage of weeds, crop vigour and climatic condition are optimum promoting the activity of the herbicide and thus allows for the use of reduced herbicides rates, or 3 that less than maximum effects are accepted because the weed flora is not considered to have a significant effect on crop yield. “Crop Protection Online-Weed” (CPO-Weed is a web-based decision support system that was developed to support farmers in their choice of herbicide and herbicide rate. CPOWeed will, based on information on crop development and status and the composition of the weed flora, provide farmers with a list of herbicide solutions often recommending the use of reduced rates. The potential of CPO-Weed to reduced herbicide input has been proven in numerous validation trials. In recent years the use of reduced herbicide rates has been linked to the increasing number of cases of non-target resistance in outcrossing grass weed species like Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium ssp. The underlying hypothesis is that the least susceptible individuals in the population will survive the use of reduced rates and that recombination will lead to a gradual increase in the resistance level in the weed population. This scenario is only valid if the use of reduced herbicide rates is prompted by acceptance of a lower effect but not if a high susceptibility of the weed species present in the field or optimum conditions are the reasons for reducing herbicide rates. This is an aspect that is often overlooked in the on-going discussion on herbicide rates and resistance. Large weed

  11. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Unsworth, J.B.; Harris, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide re

  12. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  13. Post-emergence herbicides useful in calendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easy and effective weed control is required by growers who are considering new industrial crops. Post-emergence herbicides typically are the products of choice by today’s growers. Unfortunately, post-emergence herbicides with proven safety margins are not known for calendula (Calendula officinalis),...

  14. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  15. Differential Clomazone, Herbicide Tolerance among Sweetpotato Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clomazone (Command 3ME) is a broad spectrum preemergence herbicide that is registered for use in sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)]. It controls several important annual weeds that are not controlled by the other sweetpotato herbicides. Following clomazone application for weed control in the ...

  16. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management.

  17. Herbicide-resistant weeds: Management strategies and upcoming technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides have contributed to substantial increase in crop yields over the past seven decades. Over reliance on herbicides for weed control has led to rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Increased awareness of herbicide resistance and adoption of diversified weed control tactics by f...

  18. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jeffrey A; Tranel, Patrick J; Hager, Aaron G; Schutte, Brian; Wu, Chenxi; Chatham, Laura A; Davis, Adam S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing the evolutionary responses of pests and pathogens to control efforts is essential to human health and survival. Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds undermine agricultural sustainability, productivity and profitability, yet the epidemiology of resistance evolution - particularly at landscape scales - is poorly understood. We studied glyphosate resistance in a major agricultural weed, Amaranthus tuberculatus (common waterhemp), using landscape, weed and management data from 105 central Illinois grain farms, including over 500 site-years of herbicide application records. Glyphosate-resistant (GR) A. tuberculatus occurrence was greatest in fields with frequent glyphosate applications, high annual rates of herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) turnover and few MOAs field(-1) year(-1) . Combining herbicide MOAs at the time of application by herbicide mixing reduced the likelihood of GR A. tuberculatus. These findings illustrate the importance of examining large-scale evolutionary processes at relevant spatial scales. Although measures such as herbicide mixing may delay GR or other HR weed traits, they are unlikely to prevent them. Long-term weed management will require truly diversified management practices that minimize selection for herbicide resistance traits. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Representing Non-Relational Databases with Darwinian Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Martins de Andrade

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Darwinian networks (DNs are first introduced by Dr Butz [1] to simplify and clarify how to work with Bayesian networks (BNs. DNs can unify modeling and reasoning tasks into a single platform using the graphical manipulation of the probability tables that takes on a biological feel. From this view of the DNs, we propose a graphical library to represent and depict non-relational databases using DNs. Because of the growing of this kind of databases, we need even more tools to help in the management work, and the DNs can help with these tasks.

  1. THE HERBICIDES ANTIDOTES OF AGRICULTURAL CROPS (OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yablonskaya Y. K.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The extensive overview of the currently used herbicides antidotes of agricultural crops is reviewed in this article. The most important results are discussed and the technology of combined application is described

  2. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  3. Use of allelopathic plant extract with herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tansel SERİM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides are one of the plant protection products that have been discussed due to their adversely effects caused by the usage of them although they have an important role on the sustainability of crop production. Researches on the plant protection practices, such as the development of new herbicide application techniques, the reduction of the application rate, the use of adjuvant, changing herbicide application time and the use of allelopathic plant extract, and the applications based on the results of these research have increased in recent years. The cost of weed control may exceed the economic benefits because a large amount of plant extract is needed to control weeds alone with allelopathic chemicals. Using the mixture of plant extracts with the reduced rate of herbicides is important both to reduce environmental and economic losses and to prevent some problem caused by use of herbicide. The extracts of plants which have got allelopathic character, such as sunflower, sorghum, brassica and rice, are commonly used for this aim. The aim of presented review is to emphasize the efficacy of allelopathic plant extract with herbicide to control weeds and its economical contribution.

  4. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  5. Herbicide resistance and biodiversity: agronomic and environmental aspects of genetically modified herbicide-resistant plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Gesine; Eckerstorfer, Michael; Rastelli, Valentina; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Restrepo-Vassalli, Sara; Ruohonen-Lehto, Marja; Saucy, Anne-Gabrielle Wuest; Mertens, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Farmland biodiversity is an important characteristic when assessing sustainability of agricultural practices and is of major international concern. Scientific data indicate that agricultural intensification and pesticide use are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss. The analysed data and experiences do not support statements that herbicide-resistant crops provide consistently better yields than conventional crops or reduce herbicide amounts. They rather show that the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops impacts agronomy, agricultural practice, and weed management and contributes to biodiversity loss in several ways: (i) many studies show that glyphosate-based herbicides, which were commonly regarded as less harmful, are toxic to a range of aquatic organisms and adversely affect the soil and intestinal microflora and plant disease resistance; the increased use of 2,4-D or dicamba, linked to new herbicide-resistant crops, causes special concerns. (ii) The adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has reduced crop rotation and favoured weed management that is solely based on the use of herbicides. (iii) Continuous herbicide resistance cropping and the intensive use of glyphosate over the last 20 years have led to the appearance of at least 34 glyphosate-resistant weed species worldwide. Although recommended for many years, farmers did not counter resistance development in weeds by integrated weed management, but continued to rely on herbicides as sole measure. Despite occurrence of widespread resistance in weeds to other herbicides, industry rather develops transgenic crops with additional herbicide resistance genes. (iv) Agricultural management based on broad-spectrum herbicides as in herbicide-resistant crops further decreases diversity and abundance of wild plants and impacts arthropod fauna and other farmland animals. Taken together, adverse impacts of herbicide-resistant crops on biodiversity, when widely adopted, should be expected and are indeed very hard

  6. Amino acids conferring herbicide resistance in tobacco acetohydroxyacid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dung Tien; Choi, Jung-Do; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2010-01-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) (EC 4.1.3.18) is a target of commercially available herbicides such as sulfonylurea, imidazolinone, and triazolopyrimidine. In plants and microorganisms, AHAS catalyzes the first common reaction in the biosynthesis pathways leading to leucine, isoleucine and valine. Intensive studies using different approaches - including site-directed mutagenesis, molecular modeling and structural analysis - on plant AHAS-s have contributed to the understanding of the herbicide-AHAS interaction. Knowledge of the critical roles of amino acid residues of plant AHAS in conferring herbicide resistance will enable the creation of new herbicide-tolerant AHAS which could be used to develop herbicide-resistant transgenic plants. Moreover, such information will also elucidate design strategies for more efficient herbicides that could also kill weeds resistant to previously used AHAS-inhibiting herbicides. In this review, we summarize the results of intensive searches for amino acid residues and their substitutions that confer herbicide resistance in tobacco AHAS.

  7. Cultural control of weeds in herbicide-free annual forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adoption of zero tillage systems improves soil water conservation, allowing for increased crop intensification and diversification in the semiarid northern Great Plains. Zero tillage systems rely primarily on herbicides for weed management, increasing selection pressure for herbicide resistance...

  8. Removal of triazine herbicides from freshwater systems using photosynthetic microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Barreiro, O. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Rioboo, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Herrero, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, A. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: cid@udc.es

    2006-11-15

    The uptake of the triazine herbicides, atrazine and terbutryn, was determined for two freshwater photosynthetic microorganisms, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. An extremely rapid uptake of both pesticides was recorded, although uptake rate was lower for the cyanobacterium, mainly for atrazine. Other parameters related to the herbicide bioconcentration capacity of these microorganisms were also studied. Growth rate, biomass, and cell viability in cultures containing herbicide were clearly affected by herbicide uptake. Herbicide toxicity and microalgae sensitivity were used to determine the effectiveness of the bioconcentration process and the stability of herbicide removal. C. vulgaris showed higher bioconcentration capability for these two triazine herbicides than S. elongatus, especially with regard to terbutryn. This study supports the usefulness of such microorganisms, as a bioremediation technique in freshwater systems polluted with triazine herbicides.

  9. Herbicide resistance modelling: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Michael; Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Thornby, David; Vila-Aiub, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Computer simulation modelling is an essential aid in building an integrated understanding of how different factors interact to affect the evolutionary and population dynamics of herbicide resistance, and thus in helping to predict and manage how agricultural systems will be affected. In this review, we first discuss why computer simulation modelling is such an important tool and framework for dealing with herbicide resistance. We then explain what questions related to herbicide resistance have been addressed to date using simulation modelling, and discuss the modelling approaches that have been used, focusing first on the earlier, more general approaches, and then on some newer, more innovative approaches. We then consider how these approaches could be further developed in the future, by drawing on modelling techniques that are already employed in other areas, such as individual-based and spatially explicit modelling approaches, as well as the possibility of better representing genetics, competition and economics, and finally the questions and issues of importance to herbicide resistance research and management that could be addressed using these new approaches are discussed. We conclude that it is necessary to proceed with caution when increasing the complexity of models by adding new details, but, with appropriate care, more detailed models will make it possible to integrate more current knowledge in order better to understand, predict and ultimately manage the evolution of herbicide resistance.

  10. The benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant crops, primarily glyphosate-resistant soybean, corn, cotton and canola, have helped to revolutionize weed management and have become an important tool in crop production practices. Glyphosate-resistant crops have enabled the implementation of weed management practices that have improved yield and profitability while better protecting the environment. Growers have recognized their benefits and have made glyphosate-resistant crops the most rapidly adopted technology in the history of agriculture. Weed management systems with glyphosate-resistant crops have often relied on glyphosate alone, have been easy to use and have been effective, economical and more environmentally friendly than the systems they have replaced. Glyphosate has worked extremely well in controlling weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops for more than a decade, but some key weeds have evolved resistance, and using glyphosate alone has proved unsustainable. Now, growers need to renew their weed management practices and use glyphosate with other cultural, mechanical and herbicide options in integrated systems. New multiple-herbicide-resistant crops with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides will expand the utility of existing herbicide technologies and will be an important component of future weed management systems that help to sustain the current benefits of high-efficiency and high-production agriculture.

  11. Importance of herbicide resistance in weeds of natural areas

    OpenAIRE

    DiTomaso, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the majority of the plant species that are developing herbicide resistance are those that occur as weeds in agricultural environments, on roadsides and in other rights-of-way. In contrast, herbicide resistance is not nearly so common in weeds of natural areas or rangelands. A search of the International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds ( weedscience.com ) revealed no herbicide-resistant weeds (i.e., invasive nonnative species) listed for terrestrial natural areas anywhere in the...

  12. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-08

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  13. Inheritance of evolved resistance to a novel herbicide (pyroxasulfone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Gaines, Todd A; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Agricultural weeds have rapidly adapted to intensive herbicide selection and resistance to herbicides has evolved within ecological timescales. Yet, the genetic basis of broad-spectrum generalist herbicide resistance is largely unknown. This study aims to determine the genetic control of non-target-site herbicide resistance trait(s) that rapidly evolved under recurrent selection of the novel lipid biosynthesis inhibitor pyroxasulfone in Lolium rigidum. The phenotypic segregation of pyroxasulfone resistance in parental, F1 and back-cross (BC) families was assessed in plants exposed to a gradient of pyroxasulfone doses. The inheritance of resistance to chemically dissimilar herbicides (cross-resistance) was also evaluated. Evolved resistance to the novel selective agent (pyroxasulfone) is explained by Mendelian segregation of one semi-dominant allele incrementally herbicide-selected at higher frequency in the progeny. In BC families, cross-resistance is conferred by an incompletely dominant single major locus. This study confirms that herbicide resistance can rapidly evolve to any novel selective herbicide agents by continuous and repeated herbicide use. The results imply that the combination of herbicide options (rotation, mixtures or combinations) to exploit incomplete dominance can provide acceptable control of broad-spectrum generalist resistance-endowing monogenic traits. Herbicide diversity within a set of integrated management tactics can be one important component to reduce the herbicide selection intensity.

  14. Forecasting residual herbicide concentrations in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Gavan; Scanlan, Craig; van Zwieten, Lukas; Rose, Mick; Rose, Terry

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of herbicides remaining in soil at the time of planting can adversely impact agricultural production and lead to off-site impacts in streams and groundwater. Being able to forecast the likelihood of residual concentrations at specific times in the future offers the potential to improve environmental and economic outcomes. Here we develop a solution for the full transient probability density function for herbicide concentrations in soil as a function of rainfall variability. Quasi-analytical solutions that account for rainfall seasonality are also demonstrated. In addition, new rapid and relatively cost-effective bioassays to quantify herbicide concentrations in near real-time, offers opportunities for data assimilation approaches to improve forecast risks.

  15. Ethical reflections on herbicide-resistant crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Madsen, Kathrine Hauge

    2005-01-01

    associatedwith herbicide-resistant crops are presented from the point of view of experts and lay people. In thepublic perception, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are troublesome because of their association with twotechnologies: genetic engineering of crops and the use of herbicides. These technologies......The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has caused a fierce public debate in Europe.Much of the controversy centres on possible risks to the environment. A specific problem here is thatrisk perception of the scientific experts differs from that of the public. In this paper, risks...... are perceived asrisky because they seem to share certain features: in particular, their long-term effects are unknown andthey are dreaded. Other value questions also come into play. The public seems to be concerned that risksare not outweighed by usefulness, that using HR crops is the wrong path to sustainable...

  16. Performance of herbicides in sugarcane straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilaine Araldi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of mechanical harvesting of sugarcane generates a large deposition of straw on the soil surface, providing a coverage that several studies have found important for reducing the weed population. Although such coverage reduces weed infestations, additional management, including chemical control, is still needed. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the leaching of atrazine, pendimethalin, metribuzin, clomazone, diuron and hexazinone in sugarcane straw. The experiment was conducted at the School of Agronomic Engineering at UNESP (Sao Paulo State University - Botucatu/SP. The sugarcane straw was collected in the field, cut and placed in quantities of 10t ha-1 in the capsules used as experimental units. The experimental design was completely randomized, using six herbicide treatments and four replications. Within 24 hours after the herbicides were applied in capsules with straw, five different rainfalls (5, 10, 20, 50 and 100mm were simulated. The leached water was collected for chromatographic analysis. The herbicide percentages that crossed the straw layer were statistically correlated with the rainfall amount by the Mitscherlich model that compares the facility of herbicide removal from sugarcane straw. In summary, pendimethalin did not present quantified transposition of the product by sugarcane straw even with a rain simulation of 100 mm. Furthermore, two different profiles of facility to transpose the herbicides in straw were found: one for metribuzin and hexazinone that crossed quickly through the straw layer and another for atrazine, diuron and clomazone that required more rainfall to be leached from coverage to the soil according to the maximum removable amount of each herbicide.

  17. Evolved polygenic herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum by low-dose herbicide selection within standing genetic variation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between environment and genetic traits under selection is the basis of evolution. In this study, we have investigated the genetic basis of herbicide resistance in a highly characterized initially herbicide-susceptible Lolium rigidum population recurrently selected with low (below recommended label) doses of the herbicide diclofop-methyl. We report the variability in herbicide resistance levels observed in F1 families and the segregation of resistance observed in F2 and back-cr...

  18. Evolved polygenic herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum by low-dose herbicide selection within standing genetic variation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between environment and genetic traits under selection is the basis of evolution. In this study, we have investigated the genetic basis of herbicide resistance in a highly characterized initially herbicide-susceptible Lolium rigidum population recurrently selected with low (below recommended label) doses of the herbicide diclofop-methyl. We report the variability in herbicide resistance levels observed in F1 families and the segregation of resistance observed in F2 and back-cr...

  19. Methods for Rapid Screening in Woody Plant Herbicide Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stanley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Methods for woody plant herbicide screening were assayed with the goal of reducing resources and time required to conduct preliminary screenings for new products. Rapid screening methods tested included greenhouse seedling screening, germinal screening, and seed screening. Triclopyr and eight experimental herbicides from Dow AgroSciences (DAS 313, 402, 534, 548, 602, 729, 779, and 896 were tested on black locust, loblolly pine, red maple, sweetgum, and water oak. Screening results detected differences in herbicide and species in all experiments in much less time (days to weeks than traditional field screenings and consumed significantly less resources (<500 mg acid equivalent per herbicide per screening. Using regression analysis, various rapid screening methods were linked into a system capable of rapidly and inexpensively assessing herbicide efficacy and spectrum of activity. Implementation of such a system could streamline early-stage herbicide development leading to field trials, potentially freeing resources for use in development of beneficial new herbicide products.

  20. Effect of herbicides on microbiological properties of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nada A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms decompose herbicides and they may serve as bioindicators of soil changes following herbicide application. Certain microbial species may be used as bioherbicides. This study has shown that Azotobacter is most sensitive to herbicide application; it is, therefore, a reliable indicator of the biological value of soil. The numbers of this group of nitrogen-fixing bacteria decrease considerably in the period of 7-14 days after herbicide application. Simultaneously, the numbers of Actinomycetes and less so of fungi increase, indicating that these microorganisms use herbicides as sources of biogenous elements. Rate of herbicidal decomposition depends on the properties of the preparation applied herbicide dose as well as on the physical and chemical soil properties, soil moisture and temperature, ground cover, agrotechnical measures applied and the resident microbial population.

  1. Herbicides as stimulators regulators and ripeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of low doses of herbicide as plant growth regulators to increase sugar concentrations (ripen) in sugarcane prior to harvest plays an important role in the profitable and sustainable production of sugarcane in the U.S. as well as in other sugarcane industries around the world. Several studies...

  2. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  3. Enantioselectivity in the phytotoxicity of herbicide imazethapyr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingyan; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Yongsong; Liu, Weiping

    2009-02-25

    Chiral compounds usually behave enantioselectively in phyto-biochemical processes. With the increasing application of chiral herbicides, their enantioselective phytotoxicity to plants merits further study, and little information is available in this area. The purpose of this study was to examine the enantioselective phytotoxicity of the herbicide imazethapyr (IM) on the roots of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Enantiomers of IM were separated by HPLC, and their absolute configurations were confirmed as S-(+)-IM and R-(-)-IM by the octant rule. Plant growth measurements and morphological, microscopic, and ultrastructural observations were conducted after treatment with individual IM enantiomers and the racemate. Observations of root morphology showed that the root diameter significantly increased, whereas the root volume, surface area, and number of root tips decreased significantly. IM enantiomers selectively damaged root hair growth and significantly reduced the sloughing of border cells from the tips. IM also had adverse effects on cell organelles, such as statocytes, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum in maize roots. Moreover, cell membranes and cell walls were thicker than usual after IM treatment. All of the results showed the same trend that the R-(-)-IM affected the root growth of maize seedlings more severely than the S-(+)-IM. The inhibition abilities of (+/-)-IM was between S-(+)- and R-(-)-IM. The behavior of the active enantiomer, instead of just the racemate, may have more relevance to the herbicidal effects and ecological safety of IM. Therefore, enantiomeric differences should be considered when evaluating the bioavailability of the herbicide IM.

  4. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  5. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  6. Multiple herbicide resistance in Lolium multiflorum and identification of conserved regulatory elements of herbicide resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of L. multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them a reliable marker. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of Lolium multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O.sativa and A.thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward towards a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  7. Evolved polygenic herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum by low-dose herbicide selection within standing genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    The interaction between environment and genetic traits under selection is the basis of evolution. In this study, we have investigated the genetic basis of herbicide resistance in a highly characterized initially herbicide-susceptible Lolium rigidum population recurrently selected with low (below recommended label) doses of the herbicide diclofop-methyl. We report the variability in herbicide resistance levels observed in F1 families and the segregation of resistance observed in F2 and back-cross (BC) families. The selected herbicide resistance phenotypic trait(s) appear to be under complex polygenic control. The estimation of the effective minimum number of genes (N E), depending on the herbicide dose used, reveals at least three resistance genes had been enriched. A joint scaling test indicates that an additive-dominance model best explains gene interactions in parental, F1, F2 and BC families. The Mendelian study of six F2 and two BC segregating families confirmed involvement of more than one resistance gene. Cross-pollinated L. rigidum under selection at low herbicide dose can rapidly evolve polygenic broad-spectrum herbicide resistance by quantitative accumulation of additive genes of small effect. This can be minimized by using herbicides at the recommended dose which causes high mortality acting outside the normal range of phenotypic variation for herbicide susceptibility.

  8. Maize, switchgrass, and ponderosa pine biochar added to soil increased herbicide sorption and decreased herbicide efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Sharon A; Krack, Kaitlynn K; Bruggeman, Stephanie A; Papiernik, Sharon; Schumacher, Thomas E

    2016-08-02

    Biochar, a by-product of pyrolysis made from a wide array of plant biomass when producing biofuels, is a proposed soil amendment to improve soil health. This study measured herbicide sorption and efficacy when soils were treated with low (1% w/w) or high (10% w/w) amounts of biochar manufactured from different feedstocks [maize (Zea mays) stover, switchgrass (Panicum vigatum), and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)], and treated with different post-processing techniques. Twenty-four hour batch equilibration measured sorption of (14)C-labelled atrazine or 2,4-D to two soil types with and without biochar amendments. Herbicide efficacy was measured with and without biochar using speed of seed germination tests of sensitive species. Biochar amended soils sorbed more herbicide than untreated soils, with major differences due to biochar application rate but minor differences due to biochar type or post-process handling technique. Biochar presence increased the speed of seed germination compared with herbicide alone addition. These data indicate that biochar addition to soil can increase herbicide sorption and reduce efficacy. Evaluation for site-specific biochar applications may be warranted to obtain maximal benefits without compromising other agronomic practices.

  9. Herbicide resistances in Amaranthus tuberculatus: a call for new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranel, Patrick J; Riggins, Chance W; Bell, Michael S; Hager, Aaron G

    2011-06-08

    Amaranthus tuberculatus is a major weed of crop fields in the midwestern United States. Making this weed particularly problematic to manage is its demonstrated ability to evolve resistance to herbicides. Herbicides to which A. tuberculatus has evolved resistance are photosystem II inhibitors, acetolactate synthase inhibitors, protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors, and glyphosate. Many populations of A. tuberculatus contain more than one of these resistances, severely limiting the options for effective herbicide control. A survey of multiple-herbicide resistance in A. tuberculatus revealed that all populations resistant to glyphosate contained resistance to acetolactate synthase inhibitors, and 40% contained resistance to protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors. The occurrences of multiple-herbicide resistances in A. tuberculatus illustrate the need for continued herbicide discovery efforts and/or the development of new strategies for weed management.

  10. Non-target-site herbicide resistance: a family business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Joshua S; Tranel, Patrick J; Stewart, C Neal

    2007-01-01

    We have witnessed a dramatic increase in the frequency and diversity of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes over the past two decades, which poses a threat to the sustainability of agriculture at both local and global levels. In addition, non-target-site mechanisms of herbicide resistance seem to be increasingly implicated. Non-target-site herbicide resistance normally involves the biochemical modification of the herbicide and/or the compartmentation of the herbicide (and its metabolites). In contrast to herbicide target site mutations, fewer non-target mechanisms have been elucidated at the molecular level because of the inherently complicated biochemical processes and the limited genomic information available for weedy species. To further understand the mechanisms of non-target-site resistance, we propose an integrated genomics approach to dissect systematically the functional genomics of four gene families in economically important weed species.

  11. Herbicide Orange Site Characterization Study, Eglin AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    SCFILE cue ESL-TR-86-22 HERBICIDE ORANGE SITE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY EGLIN AFB 10 A.B. CROCKETT, A. PROPP , T. KIMES EG&G IDAHO, INC O I P.O. BOX...Orange Site Characterization Study.4lin AFB 12- PERSONAL AIITHOS(S) Crockett, A.B. , Propp , A., Kinies T. / \\ 4 Final FROM APX 84/TO Sen 86 1 ... I

  12. Pigment analysis and ammonia excretion in herbicide tolerant cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, G; Gopalaswamy, G; Kannaiyan, S

    2002-08-01

    Isolation of cyanobacteria was attempted from herbicide applied rice soils. The predominant genera were Westiellopsis followed by Anabaena, Nostoc and Oscillatoria. The herbicide tolerance was further tested by growing the cyanobacterial cultures in BG-11 medium supplemented with varying concentrations of the commonly used rice herbicide, viz butachlor under in vitro condition. The chlorophyll-a, phycobiliproteins and ammonia excretion were assessed at periodic intervals. Westiellopsis showed the maximum tolerance followed by Anabaena, Nostoc and Oscillatoria.

  13. Assessing herbicide leaching from field measurements and laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas Sánchez, Mª Victoria; Calderón, M.J.; Fernández Luque, José Enrique; Hermosín, M.C.; Moreno Lucas, Félix; Cornejo, J.

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments with undisturbed soil columns were performed for assessing the mobility and persistence of chloridazon and lenacil in a clayey soil in the marshes of Lebrija, southwest Spain. In the laboratory we tried to evaluate the herbicides fate when applied with doses greater than normal, as it happens by overlap when spraying the herbicides. Thus, the herbicides doses in the field experiments were similar to those applied by the growers in the area, while the doses app...

  14. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50 over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ', indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect

  15. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples.

  16. Electrochemical degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick; Doan, Tuan Linh; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, Hoai Chau

    2017-01-23

    The presence of herbicide is a concern for both human and ecological health. Glyphosate is occasionally detected as water contaminants in agriculture areas where the herbicide is used extensively. The removal of glyphosate in synthetic solution using advanced oxidation process is a possible approach for remediation of contaminated waters. The ability of electrochemical oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide was investigated using Ti/PbO2 anode. The current intensity, treatment time, initial concentration and pH of solution are the influent parameters on the degradation efficiency. An experimental design methodology was applied to determine the optimal condition (in terms of cost/effectiveness) based on response surface methodology. Glyphosate concentration (C0 = 16.9 mg L(-1)) decreased up to 0.6 mg L(-1) when the optimal conditions were imposed (current intensity of 4.77A and treatment time of 173 min). The removal efficiencies of glyphosate and total organic carbon were 95 ±16% and 90.31%, respectively. This work demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation is a promising process for degradation and mineralization of glyphosate.

  17. Ethical reflections on herbicide-resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kathrine Hauge; Sandøe, Peter

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has caused a fierce public debate in Europe. Much of the controversy centres on possible risks to the environment. A specific problem here is that risk perception of the scientific experts differs from that of the public. In this paper, risks associated with herbicide-resistant crops are presented from the point of view of experts and lay people. In the public perception, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are troublesome because of their association with two technologies: genetic engineering of crops and the use of herbicides. These technologies are perceived as risky because they seem to share certain features: in particular, their long-term effects are unknown and they are dreaded. Other value questions also come into play. The public seems to be concerned that risks are not outweighed by usefulness, that using HR crops is the wrong path to sustainable agriculture, that the individual's right to choose GM-free products may be violated, and that these crops are unnatural. In contrast, on the issue of the uncertainty inherent in risk assessment, experts and the public seem to share a good deal of ground.

  18. Soil microbial and faunal responses to herbicide tolerant maize and herbicide in two soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, Bryan; Caul, Sandra; Thompson, J.

    2008-01-01

    ), Orient (non HT near isogenic control for T25) and Monumental (a conventional, non HT variety) were grown in contrasting sandy loam and clay loam soils, half were sprayed with the appropriate herbicide as used in the field and soil samples were taken at the five-leaf and flowering plant growth stage....... The main effects on all measured parameters were those of soil type and plant growth stage, with four categories of subsequent interaction: (1) there were no effects of herbicide on plant growth or soil microarthropods: (2) the maize cultivar (but not the GM HT trait) had effects on the decomposition...... of cotton strips and the nematode community; (3) herbicide application in general altered the community level physiological profile of the microbial community and reduced both soil basal respiration and the abundance of protozoa; and (4) the specific application of glufosinate-ammonium to T25 maize altered...

  19. Uses of thaxtomin and thaxtomin compositions as herbicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunen, Marja; Marrone, Pamela

    2016-12-27

    There is a need for a selective, low-risk herbicide that can be used to control weeds in cereal cultures and turf. The present invention discloses that a bacterial secondary metabolite, thaxtomin and optionally another herbicide is an effective herbicide on broadleaved, sedge and grass weeds. Thaxtomin A and structurally similar compounds can be used as natural herbicides to control the germination and growth of weeds in cereal, turf grass, Timothy grass and pasture grass cultures with no phytotoxicity to these crops. As a natural, non-toxic compound, thaxtomin can be used as a safe alternative for weed control in both conventional and organic farming and gardening systems.

  20. Fitness Costs Associated with Evolved Herbicide Resistance Alleles in Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin M. Vila-Aiub; Paul Neve; Stephen B. Powles

    2009-01-01

    .... There have been many studies quantifying the fitness costs associated with novel herbicide resistance alleles, reflecting the importance of fitness costs in determining the evolutionary dynamics of resistance...

  1. DNA analysis of herbarium Specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides reveals herbicide resistance pre-dated herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications.

  2. DNA analysis of herbarium Specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides reveals herbicide resistance pre-dated herbicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Délye

    Full Text Available Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications.

  3. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components Ⅲ. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca2 + -, Mg2 + -. Al3 + -and Fe3 + -saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ ≤ Fe3+ which coincided with the iucreasing aciditv of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  4. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  5. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  6. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  7. Decision Support System for Optimized Herbicide Dose in Spring Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Mette; Kudsk, Per; Mathiassen, Solvejg K;

    2014-01-01

    Crop Protection Online (CPO) is a decision support system, which integrates decision algorithms quantifying the requirement for weed control and a herbicide dose model. CPO was designed to be used by advisors and farmers to optimize the choice of herbicide and dose. The recommendations from CPO...

  8. MLHD online : manual for the herbicide dose calculation module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRI,; Kempenaar, C.

    2004-01-01

    MLHD is short for Minimum Lethal Herbicide Dose. MLHD is a new concept within chemical weed control. It supports effective weed control while herbicide doses are kept at minimum effective levels (minimum lethal doses). This manual describes how to use of the MLHD calculation module for users from ou

  9. Predicting herbicidal plant mortality with mobile photosynthesis meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempenaar, C.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Snel, J.F.H.; Smutny, V.; Zhang, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide dose optimisation, i.e. maximising weed control and crop yield with herbicide dose, is an important part of integrated weed management strategies. However, the adoption of optimised dose technology and variable rate application has been limited because of the relatively long period between

  10. Development of herbicide resistant crops through induced mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is an innate characteristic of crop plants. It enables them to survive and propagate even in the presence of lethal doses of herbicides in the surroundings. Genetic tolerance in crops towards herbicides may have several benefits. It may increases safety margins between weed and crop sensitivity and also expands applicability of a particular herbicide. Besides, it can also lower the operating cost for weed control as compared to manual weeding and crop rotation which is normally prohibited by herbicide persistence. Herbicide resistant crops are developed through transformation of a plant with either native or mutant resistant genes, seed mutagenesis, plant cell or tissue culture and through other traditional plant breeding techniques. Seed mutagenesis is a non-transgenic approach, which is found to be most economical and perfect approach. Moreover, all commercial herbicide tolerant crops were derived from single nucleotide substitution of genes and trait can be incorporated into elite varieties because of incomplete dominance and non-pleiotropic effect of the alleles of all commercial herbicide tolerant mutations.

  11. Cross and Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance of Palmer amaranth (PA) to ALS inhibitor herbicides was discovered in Georgia in 2000 and resistance to glyphosate was in 2005. A study was conducted to evaluate two different families of ALS herbicides, imazapic (imidazolinone) and diclosulam (sulfonanilides) for absorption and mobility ...

  12. Lessons Learned From the History of Herbicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The selection of herbicide resistant weed populations began with the introduction of synthetic herbicides in the late 1940s. For the first 20 years after introduction, there were limited reported cases of resistance. This changed in 1968 with the discovery of triazine resistant common groundsel. ...

  13. Expanding the eco-evolutionary context of herbicide resistance research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Paul; Busi, Roberto; Renton, Michael; Vila-Aiub, Martin M

    2014-09-01

    The potential for human-driven evolution in economically and environmentally important organisms in medicine, agriculture and conservation management is now widely recognised. The evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds is a classic example of rapid adaptation in the face of human-mediated selection. Management strategies that aim to slow or prevent the evolution of herbicide resistance must be informed by an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary factors that drive selection in weed populations. Here, we argue for a greater focus on the ultimate causes of selection for resistance in herbicide resistance studies. The emerging fields of eco-evolutionary dynamics and applied evolutionary biology offer a means to achieve this goal and to consider herbicide resistance in a broader and sometimes novel context. Four relevant research questions are presented, which examine (i) the impact of herbicide dose on selection for resistance, (ii) plant fitness in herbicide resistance studies, (iii) the efficacy of herbicide rotations and mixtures and (iv) the impacts of gene flow on resistance evolution and spread. In all cases, fundamental ecology and evolution have the potential to offer new insights into herbicide resistance evolution and management.

  14. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  15. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  16. IN-VITRO EFFECTS OF HERBICIDES ON SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AABID HUSSAIN LONE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of six different herbicides representing four chemical families on soil microbial communities was studied using laboratory microcosm approach. The herbicides tested were isoproturon, metribuzin, clodinafop propargyl, atlantis (Mesosulfuron methyl 3% + Idosulfuron Methyl Sodium 0.6% WG and sulfosulfuron applied at normal agricultural rates, and UPH-110 (Clodinafop propargyl 12% + Metribuzin 42% WG tested at four different application rates. Microbial response to the applied herbicides was studied following cultivation dependent approach. The microbial community showed a mixed response towards applied herbicides. With a few exceptions, metribuzin displayed a negative, clodinafop a positive and sulphonylurea herbicides a neutral effect while as the effect of isoproturon was variable. Significant toxic impact of UPH-110 was mostly observed at higher concentrations (@ 600 and 1000 g ha-1. The magnitude of hazard and duration of toxicity increased as the dose of UPH-110 increased. The influence whether positive or negative, was only transitory in nature and recovered to the level of untreated microcosms by or before 30th day of application. Among the microbial groups studied, fungal population was least affected at field rate, bacteria, actinomycetes and Azotobacter showed mixed response while as the phosphorus solubilizers population showed a tendency to increase in response to the applied herbicides.The herbicidal impact on soil microbial population was found to depend on the nature and dose of herbicide used and also the type of microbial group

  17. Cassava physiological responses to the application of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evander Alves Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence has been used to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of photosynthesis, as well as in the evaluation of plant photosynthetic capacity altered by biotic or abiotic stresses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of cassava plants to herbicides with different mechanisms of action, as well as the damage caused by the application of herbicides on the photosynthetic apparatus of these plants. An experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with four replications. The treatments were constituted of the application of the following post- emergence herbicides in cassava: bentazon, clomazone, fomesafen, fluazifop-p-buthyl, glyphosate, nicosulfuron, chlorimuron, fluazifop-p-buthyl + fomesafen, sulfentrazone, besides a control without application. The visual intoxication and chlorophyll a fluorescence assessments were performed at 2, 9, 16 and 23 days after herbicide application. The herbicides evaluated affected differently the cassava plants. Sulfentrazone and glyphosate promoted plant death. Herbicides clomazone, fomesafen, fluazifop-p-buthyl and chlorimuron-ehtyl caused low toxicity to cassava plants and did not affect the ratio Fv / Fm and ETR. However, for the mixture nicossulfuron and fluazifop-p-buthyl + fomesafen values of Fv / Fm were suboptimal in the first evaluation times but plants treated with these herbicides had recovered. Physiological evaluations can be used as a way to evaluate the selectivity of herbicides in cassava crop as presented similar answers to those observed for visual intoxication symptoms.

  18. Estimation of herbicide bioconcentration in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luiz Cerdeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important crop for sugar and biofuel production in Brazil. Growers depend greatly on herbicides to produce it. This experiment used herbicide physical-chemical and sugarcane plant physiological properties to simulate herbicide uptake and estimate the bioconcentration factor (BCF. The (BCF was calculated for the steady state chemical equilibrium between the plant herbicide concentration and soil solution. Plant-water partition coefficient (sugarcane bagasse-water partition coefficient, herbicide dilution rate, metabolism and dissipation in the soil-plant system, as well as total plant biomass factors were used. In addition, we added Tebuthiuron at rate of 5.0kg a.i. ha-1 to physically test the model. In conclusion, the model showed the following ranking of herbicide uptake: sulfentrazone > picloram >tebuthiuron > hexazinone > metribuzin > simazine > ametryn > diuron > clomazone > acetochlor. Furthermore, the highest BCF herbicides showed higher Groundwater Ubiquity Score (GUS index indicating high leaching potential. We did not find tebuthiuron in plants after three months of herbicide application

  19. Influence des herbicides sur les principaux paramètres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    28 févr. 2015 ... adventices Lyba (faible tallage) et Homari (tige courte) ont ... each comprising a control (no herbicide) and three herbicides: the Quartz super dose (1.0 ..... Levée complète. Tallage complet. Montaison Épiaison Floraison.

  20. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Gyorödi; Robert Gyorödi; Roxana Sotoc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. W...

  1. Herbicides: a new threat to the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen E; Brodie, Jon E; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Maughan, Mirjam; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Schaffelke, Britta

    2009-01-01

    The runoff of pesticides (insecticides, herbicides and fungicides) from agricultural lands is a key concern for the health of the iconic Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Relatively low levels of herbicide residues can reduce the productivity of marine plants and corals. However, the risk of these residues to Great Barrier Reef ecosystems has been poorly quantified due to a lack of large-scale datasets. Here we present results of a study tracing pesticide residues from rivers and creeks in three catchment regions to the adjacent marine environment. Several pesticides (mainly herbicides) were detected in both freshwater and coastal marine waters and were attributed to specific land uses in the catchment. Elevated herbicide concentrations were particularly associated with sugar cane cultivation in the adjacent catchment. We demonstrate that herbicides reach the Great Barrier Reef lagoon and may disturb sensitive marine ecosystems already affected by other pressures such as climate change.

  2. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gyorödi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. We will also present the advantages of using a non-relational database compared to a relational database integrated in a web-based application, which needs to manipulate a big amount of data.

  4. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  5. Selectivity of herbicides in crambe crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sasso Ferreira Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The low productivity of crambe can be associated with many factors, among these, the competition with weeds, which reduces the yield, harvest affects and contributes to the increase in seed moisture. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the tolerance of crambe plants cv. FMS Brilhante to herbicides applied in preplant incorporated (PPI, preemergence (PRE, and postemergence (POST. The study was installed in a green-house and the treatments consisted of the herbicide application in: pre-plant incorporated ofdiclosulam, flumetsulam, metribuzin, and trifluralin;preemergence applicationof atrazine, diclosulam, diuron, flumetsulam, metribuzim, S-metolachlor, sulfentrazone, and trifluralin; and postemergence application ofbentazon, carfentrazone-ethyl, clefoxydim, cletodim + fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, ethoxysulfuron, fomesafen, fluazifop-p-butyl, flumioxazin, halosulfuron, imazamox, imazapic, lactofen, nicosulfuron, oxadiazon, quinclorac, and setoxydim. Visual evaluations of phytotoxicity on crambe plants were realized after applications, the seedlings were counted and the height and plant dry matter were determined in the end of the evaluation period. In conditions where the studies were conducted, we can conclude that only the trifluralin application in PRE and the application of clefoxidim+fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, fluazifop-p-butyl, quinclorac, setoxydim and clefoxydim in POST showed selectivity and potential use for FMS Brilhante crambe cultivar.

  6. Surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kefeng; Deletic, Ana; Page, Declan; McCarthy, David T

    2015-09-15

    Real time monitoring of suitable surrogate parameters are critical to the validation of any water treatment processes, and is of particularly high importance for validation of natural stormwater treatment systems. In this study, potential surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters (also known as stormwater bio-retention or rain-gardens) were assessed using field challenge tests and matched laboratory column experiments. Differential UV absorbance at 254mn (ΔUVA254), total phosphorus (ΔTP), dissolved phosphorus (ΔDP), total nitrogen (ΔTN), ammonia (ΔNH3), nitrate and nitrite (ΔNO3+NO2), dissolved organic carbon (ΔDOC) and total suspended solids (ΔTSS) were compared with glyphosate, atrazine, simazine and prometryn removal rates. The influence of different challenge conditions on the performance of each surrogate was studied. Differential TP was significantly and linearly related to glyphosate reduction (R(2) = 0.75-0.98, P herbicides were reliable under normal and challenge dry conditions, but weaker correlations were observed under challenge wet conditions. Of those tested, ΔTP is the most promising surrogate for glyphosate removal and ΔUVA254 is a suitable surrogate for triazines removal in stormwater biofilters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  8. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  9. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff.

  10. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called 'new chemistries' are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as older herbicides (e.g. the protoporphyrinogen-oxidase-inhibiting pyrimidinedione saflufenacil or the very-long-chain fatty acid elongase targeting sulfonylisoxazoline herbicide pyroxasulfone). Therefore, the number of tools to manage weeds, and in particular those that can control herbicide-resistant weeds, is diminishing rapidly. There is an imminent need for truly innovative classes of herbicides that explore chemical spaces and interact with target sites not previously exploited by older active ingredients. This review proposes a rationale for a natural-products-centered approach to herbicide discovery that capitalizes on the structural diversity and ingenuity afforded by these biologically active compounds. The natural process of extended-throughput screening (high number of compounds tested on many potential target sites over long periods of times) that has shaped the evolution of natural products tends to generate molecules tailored to interact with specific target sites. As this review shows, there is generally little overlap between the mode of action of natural and synthetic phytotoxins, and more emphasis should be placed on applying methods that have proved beneficial to the pharmaceutical industry to solve problems in the agrochemical industry.

  11. Potential roles for microbial endophytes in herbicide tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétard-Jones, Catherine; Edwards, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Herbicide tolerance in crops and weeds is considered to be monotrophic, i.e. determined by the relative susceptibility of the physiological process targeted and the plant's ability to metabolise and detoxify the agrochemical. A growing body of evidence now suggests that endophytes, microbes that inhabit plant tissues and provide a range of growth, health and defence enhancements, can contribute to other types of abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The current evidence for herbicide tolerance being bitrophic, with both free-living and plant-associated endophytes contributing to tolerance in the host plant, has been reviewed. We propose that endophytes can directly contribute to herbicide detoxification through their ability to metabolise xenobiotics. In addition, we explore the paradigm that microbes can 'prime' resistance mechanisms in plants such that they enhance herbicide tolerance by inducing the host's stress responses to withstand the downstream toxicity caused by herbicides. This latter mechanism has the potential to contribute to the growth of non-target-site-based herbicide resistance in weeds. Microbial endophytes already contribute to herbicide detoxification in planta, and there is now significant scope to extend these interactions using synthetic biology approaches to engineer new chemical tolerance traits into crops via microbial engineering.

  12. Fitness costs associated with evolved herbicide resistance alleles in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen B

    2009-12-01

    Predictions based on evolutionary theory suggest that the adaptive value of evolved herbicide resistance alleles may be compromised by the existence of fitness costs. There have been many studies quantifying the fitness costs associated with novel herbicide resistance alleles, reflecting the importance of fitness costs in determining the evolutionary dynamics of resistance. However, many of these studies have incorrectly defined resistance or used inappropriate plant material and methods to measure fitness. This review has two major objectives. First, to propose a methodological framework that establishes experimental criteria to unequivocally evaluate fitness costs. Second, to present a comprehensive analysis of the literature on fitness costs associated with herbicide resistance alleles. This analysis reveals unquestionable evidence that some herbicide resistance alleles are associated with pleiotropic effects that result in plant fitness costs. Observed costs are evident from herbicide resistance-endowing amino acid substitutions in proteins involved in amino acid, fatty acid, auxin and cellulose biosynthesis, as well as enzymes involved in herbicide metabolism. However, these resistance fitness costs are not universal and their expression depends on particular plant alleles and mutations. The findings of this review are discussed within the context of the plant defence trade-off theory and herbicide resistance evolution.

  13. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  15. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  16. Relative toxicity of herbicide use in the United States 1990 to 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R Kniss

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide use is among the most criticized aspects of modern farming operations, especially in response to widespread adoption of genetically-engineered (GE) herbicide-resistant crops. Many previous analyses of herbicide use have relied on flawed metrics in an attempt to evaluate trends in herbicide intensity and toxicity. Here, it is shown that herbicide use intensity has increased over the last 25 years in corn, cotton, rice, and wheat. Although GE glyphosate-resistant crops have been previ...

  17. Genetic control of a cytochrome P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance mechanism in Lolium rigidum

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of herbicide resistance evolution in plants are influenced by many factors, especially the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance. Herbicide resistance can be endowed by enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism because of the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, although in weedy plants the genetic control of cytochrome P450-endowed herbicide resistance is poorly understood. In this study we have examined the genetic control of P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance in a w...

  18. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Emmanuel Dayan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl-(2E,4E-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid. However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 µM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 µM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 µM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to

  19. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Novel 5-Substituted Benzenesulfonylureas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mei-yi; MU Xiao-li; GUO Wan-cheng; LI Yong-hong; LI Zheng-ming

    2007-01-01

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been widely used because of their low application rates, good crop selectivities and low mammalian toxicities. However, some sulfonylureas might persist unfavourably in the environment with residual problems. In order to look for ecologically safer and environmentally benign sulfonylureas, and on keeping the pyrimidine ring being monosubstituted, 15 novel C5-monosubstituted benzenesulfonylurea compounds were synthesized. The structures of all the compounds synthesized were confirmed by elemental analysis and 1H NMR. Preliminary herbicidal activities of these new sulfonylurea compounds were determined by ALS screening (in vitro) and pot bioassay experiments(in vivo). The herbicidal results show that some novel sulfonylureas are comparable to commercial Foramsulfuron and Monosulfuron.

  20. Herbicide resistance-what have we learned from other disciplines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Harry J

    2014-10-01

    Herbicide resistance is a growing threat to agriculture and has parallels to resistances to fungicides and insecticides. However, there are many reasons to treat the resistance to herbicides differently. To highlight these similarities and differences, three pests, a weed, an insect, and a disease that have shown the ability to rapidly develop resistance to a variety of products and product classes were used as illustrations. The situation in herbicide resistance is approaching a point already experienced by the other pest control disciplines, and thus, it is worthwhile to revisit their experiences.

  1. Using integrated inter- row cultivation and herbicide band application in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris weed management for reducing herbicide use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gholamreza maleki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to investigate different weed management methods for reduce herbicide use in sugar beet at Arak Agriculture & Natural Research Center in 2005.Trial was designed in split-plot and consisted of 18 treatments with four replication. Each plot contains four 50 cm. rows. distance in inter row and 25cm. between plants on row. Main factor was inter row (with & without cultivation. Sub factors were herbicide dosages in two application methods (band & spread application. Herbicides were Desmedipham(Betanal A. M. plus Chloridazon (pyramin that used as tank mix application. Inter row cultivation done with tender wheal tractor and spraying by stable pressure charging sprayer with drop raining nozzle. The result showed no significance difference between main plots in crop characteristics evaluated. Highest root yield, plant total weight and more reduce weed biomass and control was obtained with 100 and 75 percent of the recommended dosages of the herbicide in spread application and 75 percent recommended dosages in band application. Therefore, in order to decreasing herbicide use toward environmental safety aspects and increasing economical profit for farmers, it is recommended to use 75 percent herbicide dosage in spread and band application in integrated with cultivation instead of complete dose alone in sugar beet. Keywords: Weed management, sugar beet, reduced herbicide dose, inter-row soil manipulation.

  2. High survival frequencies at low herbicide use rates in populations of Lolium rigidum result in rapid evolution of herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, P; Powles, S

    2005-12-01

    The frequency of phenotypic resistance to herbicides in previously untreated weed populations and the herbicide dose applied to these populations are key determinants of the dynamics of selection for resistance. In total, 31 Lolium rigidum populations were collected from sites with no previous history of exposure to herbicides and where there was little probability of gene flow from adjacent resistant populations. The mean survival frequency across all 31 populations following two applications of commercial rates (375 g ha(-1)) of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) inhibiting herbicide, diclofop-methyl was 0.43%. Survivors from five of these populations were grown to maturity and seed was collected. Dose-response experiments compared population level resistance to diclofop-methyl in these selected lines with their original parent populations. A single cycle of herbicide selection significantly increased resistance in all populations (LD(50) R:S ratios ranged from 2.8 to 23.2), confirming the inheritance and genetic basis of phenotypic resistance. In vitro assays of ACCase inhibition by diclofop acid indicated that resistance was due to a non-target-site mechanism. Following selection with diclofop-methyl, the five L. rigidum populations exhibited diverse patterns of cross-resistance to ACCase and ALS-inhibiting herbicides, suggesting that different genes or gene combinations were responsible for resistance. The relevance of these results to the management of herbicide resistance are discussed.

  3. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil I. Structural influence of chloroacetanilide herbicide for their adsorption on soils and its components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicide acetochlor,alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on soils and soil components was determined, and the structural differences of these herbicides were used to explain the order of sorptivity. Adsorption isotherms for all herbicide-soil combinations conformed to the Freundlich equation, and Kf increased with increasing soil organic carbon content. Kd on soil humic acid was greater than that on clay, but association of humic acid with clay reduced the overall adsorption. On all soils and soil humic acids, herbicide adsorption decreased in the order: metolachlor > acetochlor > propachlor > alachlor. On Ca2+-montmorrilonite, the order changed to metolachlor > acetochlor > alachlor > propachlor. FT-IR spectra of herbicide-clay or herbicide-humic acid-clay mixtures showed that H-bonding and charge transfer were the primary interaction pathways between these compounds and the surface of clay or humic acids. The different moieties attached to 2-chloro-acetanilide and their unique arrangement may have influenced the binding mechanisms and thus the sorptivity of these herbicides. This study indicates that the structural difference of pesticides in the same classes may be used as a molecular probe to obtain a better understanding of sorption mechanisms of pesticides on soil.

  4. Variability of herbicide losses from 13 fields to surface water within a small catchment after a controlled herbicide application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Christian; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian; Müller, Stephan R; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2004-07-15

    Diffuse losses from agricultural fields are a major input source for herbicides in surface waters. In this and in a companion paper, we present the results of a comprehensive field study aimed at assessing the overall loss dynamics of three model herbicides (i.e., atrazine, dimethenamid, and metolachlor) from a small agricultural catchment (2.1 km2) and evaluating the relative contributions of various fields having different soil and topographical characteristics. An identical mixture of the three model herbicides as well as an additional pesticide for identification of a given field were applied within 12 h on 13 cornfields (total area approximately 12 ha), thus ensuring that the herbicides were exposed to identical meteorological conditions. After the simultaneous application, the concentrations of the compounds were monitored in the soils and at the outlets of three subcatchments containing between 4 and 5 cornfields each. Particular emphasis was placed on the two rain events that led to the major losses of the herbicides. The rank orders of herbicide dissipation in the soils and of the compound-specific mobilization into runoff were the same in all three subcatchments and were independent of the field characteristics. In contrast, the field properties caused the relative losses from two subcatchments to differ by up to a factor of 56 during the most important event, whereas compound-specific differences of the three neutral herbicides caused the losses to vary only by a factor of 2 during the same event. The enormous spatial variability was mainly caused by factors influencing the fraction of rain that was lost to surface water by fast transport mechanisms. Thus, the key factors determining the spatially variable herbicide losses were the permeability of the soils, the topography, and the location of subsurface drainage systems. These results illustrate the large potential to reduce herbicide losses by avoiding application on risk areas.

  5. Estimates of herbicide use for the eighty-first through the ninety-sixth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the eighty-first through the ninety-sixth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  6. Estimates of herbicide use for the forty-first through the sixtieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the forty-first through the sixtieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  7. Estimates of herbicide use for the twenty-first through the fortieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the twenty-first through the fortieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  8. Estimates of herbicide use for the sixty-first through the eightieth most-use herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the sixty-first through the eightieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  9. Herbicide Glyphosate Impact to Earthworm (E. fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Dajoraitė

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a broad spectrum weed resistant herbicide. Glyphosate may pose negative impact on land ecosystems because of wide broad usage and hydrofilic characteristic. The aim of this study was to investigate negative effects of glyphosate on soil invertebrate organisms (earthworm Eisenia fetida. The duration of experiment was 8 weeks. The range of the test concentrations of glyphosate were: 0,1, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg. To investigate the glyphosate impact on earthworm Eisenia fetida the following endpoints were measured: survival, reproduction and weight. The exposure to 20 mg/kg glyphosate has led to the 100% mortality of earthworms. Glyphosate has led to decreased E. fetida reproduction, the cocoons were observed only in the lowest concentration (0,1 mg/kg. In general: long-term glyphosate toxicity to earthworms (E. fetida may be significant.

  10. New effects of Roundup on amphibians: predators reduce herbicide mortality; herbicides induce antipredator morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea, Rick A

    2012-03-01

    The use of pesticides is important for growing crops and protecting human health by reducing the prevalence of targeted pest species. However, less attention is given to the potential unintended effects on nontarget species, including taxonomic groups that are of current conservation concern. One issue raised in recent years is the potential for pesticides to become more lethal in the presence of predatory cues, a phenomenon observed thus far only in the laboratory. A second issue is whether pesticides can induce unintended trait changes in nontarget species, particularly trait changes that might mimic adaptive responses to natural environmental stressors. Using outdoor mesocosms, I created simple wetland communities containing leaf litter, algae, zooplankton, and three species of tadpoles (wood frogs [Rana sylvatica or Lithobates sylvaticus], leopard frogs [R. pipiens or L. pipiens], and American toads [Bufo americanus or Anaxyrus americanus]). I exposed the communities to a factorial combination of environmentally relevant herbicide concentrations (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg acid equivalents [a.e.]/L of Roundup Original MAX) crossed with three predator-cue treatments (no predators, adult newts [Notophthalmus viridescens], or larval dragonflies [Anax junius]). Without predator cues, mortality rates from Roundup were consistent with past studies. Combined with cues from the most risky predator (i.e., dragonflies), Roundup became less lethal (in direct contrast to past laboratory studies). This reduction in mortality was likely caused by the herbicide stratifying in the water column and predator cues scaring the tadpoles down to the benthos where herbicide concentrations were lower. Even more striking was the discovery that Roundup induced morphological changes in the tadpoles. In wood frog and leopard frog tadpoles, Roundup induced relatively deeper tails in the same direction and of the same magnitude as the adaptive changes induced by dragonfly cues. To my knowledge, this

  11. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides,acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organicmatters addition were measured during 35 days laboratoryincubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS(sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid)mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in thedifferent treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soilalone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation.Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlorbiodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. Thebiodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone,soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6d, 6.1d, 5.4d, and5.3d, 4.9d, and 5.3d respectively. The biodegradation products werehydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, andhydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  12. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  13. Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted during 2005 and 2006 at Stoneville, MS to determine control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, pendimethalin, clomazone, ...

  14. Molecular basis for the herbicide resistance of Roundup Ready crops

    OpenAIRE

    Funke, Todd; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha L.; Fischer, Markus; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    The engineering of transgenic crops resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate has greatly improved agricultural efficiency worldwide. Glyphosate-based herbicides, such as Roundup, target the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, the functionality of which is absolutely required for the survival of plants. Roundup Ready plants carry the gene coding for a glyphosate-insensitive form of this enzyme, obtained from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4. Onc...

  15. Protoporphyrin IX Content Correlates with Activity of Photobleaching Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Jose M.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1989-01-01

    Several laboratories have demonstrated recently that photobleaching herbicides such as acifluorfen and oxadiazon cause accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a photodynamic pigment capable of herbicidal activity. We investigated, in acifluorfen-treated tissues, the in vivo stability of PPIX, the kinetics of accumulation, and the correlation between concentration of PPIX and herbicidal damage. During a 20 hour dark period, PPIX levels rose from barely detectable concentrations to 1 to 2 nanomoles per 50 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledon discs treated with 10 micromolar acifluorfen. When placed in 500 micromoles per square meter per second PAR, PPIX levels decayed logarithmically, with an initial half-life of about 2.5 hours. PPIX levels at each time after exposure to light correlated positively with the cellular damage that occurred during the following 1 hour in both green and yellow (tentoxin-treated) cucumber cotyledon tissues. PPIX levels in discs incubated for 20 hours in darkness correlated positively with the acifluorfen concentration in which they were incubated. In cucumber, the level of herbicidal damage caused by several p-nitrodiphenyl other herbicides, a p-chlorodiphenylether herbicide, and oxadiazon correlated positively with the amount of PPIX induced to accumulate by each of the herbicide treatments. Similar results were obtained with acifluorfen-treated pigweed and velvetleaf primary leaf tissues. In cucumber, PPIX levels increased within 15 and 30 minutes after exposure of discs to 10 micromolar acifluorfen in the dark and light, respectively. These data strengthen the view that PPIX is responsible for all or a major part of the photobleaching activity of acifluorfen and related herbicides. PMID:16666869

  16. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of benzothiazole N,O-acetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiqin; Zhou, Fengxing; Wei, Shaopeng

    2015-10-01

    A new series of N,O-acetals were prepared via a simple one-pot reaction by the condensation of 2-amino-methybenzothiazole with aldehydes and alcohols. The title compounds were obtained in moderate to good yields in the presence of acid catalyst. Bioassay results indicated that some synthesized compounds had good herbicidal activity against both dicotyledon and monocotyledon weeds. This investigation provided a new type of herbicidal lead compounds, as well as its facile preparation method.

  17. Exploiting the Evolutionary Relationship between Malarial Parasites and Plants To Develop New Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Maxime G; Leroux, Julie; Tresch, Stefan; Newton, Trevor; Stubbs, Keith A; Mylne, Joshua S

    2017-08-07

    Herbicide resistance is driving a need to develop new herbicides. The evolutionary relationship between apicomplexan parasites, such as those causing malaria, and plants is close enough that many antimalarial drugs are herbicidal and so represent novel scaffolds for herbicide development. Using a compound library from the Medicines for Malaria Venture, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and a physicochemical database of known herbicides, a compound was discovered that showed post-emergence herbicidal activity equal to commercial herbicides. Using structure-activity analysis, important points for its potency were found. The compound was also tested and found to be active against common crop weeds. Physiological profiling suggested the compound was a photosystem II inhibitor, representing a new scaffold for herbicide development. Overall this approach demonstrates the viability of using antimalarial compounds as lead compounds for the development of much needed new herbicides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  19. Molecular genotyping of herbicide resistance in P. minor: ACCase resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajender; Sharma, Davinder; Raghav, Nishu; Chhokar, Rajender Singh; Sharma, Indu

    2015-02-01

    Little seed canary grass (Phalaris minor Retz.) populations resistant to herbicides that inhibit acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) represent an increasingly important weed control problem in northern India. The objective of this study was to develop DNA-based markers to differentiate herbicide-resistant and herbicide-susceptible population of P. minor. Primers were designed to amplify the conserved region carrying two reported mutations Trp2027 to Cys and Ile2041 to Asn conferring ACCase inhibitor resistance in several grass weeds and subjected to single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) to detect the mutations. Five distinctive electrophoretic patterns on non-denaturing PAGE were observed, and four patterns were found to be associated with ACCase herbicide resistance in P. minor. The PCR-SSCP test developed in this study confirmed 17 resistant populations to contain mutations in CT domain of ACCase gene. This is the first report of rapid and easy molecular diagnosis of ACCase herbicide-resistant and herbicide-sensitive population of P. minor through PCR-SSCP analysis.

  20. Cytogenetic characteristics of herbicide production workers in Ufa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaioumova, D F; Khabutdinova, L Kh

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of dioxin-containing products on the cytogenetic characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes of herbicide plant workers in Ufa. We found that the mean incidence of cells with chromosomal abberations (CHA) was two fold higher in the herbicide plant workers than the mean incidence level of controls groups consisting of people with no professional contact to herbicides or hospital stuff working in the close vicinity of the herbicide plant in Ufa (for both cases: p < 0.05). Moreover, the mean CHA cell incidence in the controls groups was also two times higher than the average level of spontaneous abberations in humans. The chemical herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenol (2,4,5-T) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxiacetic acid (2,4-D) appeared to affect various cellular cycle phases. Chromosomal type abberations occurred in the G0 stage of cellular cycle and chromatic type aberrations in the G2 stage. In the S stage, the aberrations of both types were observed. Our results indicate that the herbicides 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D have mutagenic effects in humans.

  1. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-09-07

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification.

  2. Metabolism-based herbicide resistance and cross-resistance in crop weeds: a threat to herbicide sustainability and global crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Metabolism-Based Herbicide Resistance and Cross-Resistance in Crop Weeds: A Threat to Herbicide Sustainability and Global Crop Production1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. PMID:25106819

  4. Tricolorin A as a Natural Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas Lotina-Hennsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tricolorin A acts as pre- and post-emergence plant growth inhibitor. In pre-emergence it displays broad-spectrum weed control, inhibiting germination of both monocotyledonous (Lolium mutliflorum and Triticum vulgare and dicotyledonous (Physalis ixocarpa and Trifolium alexandrinum seeds, being the dicotyledonous seeds the most inhibited. Tricolorin A also inhibited seedling growth, and seed respiration, and since the concentrations required for inhibiting both germination and respiration were similar, we suggest that respiration is one of its targets. Tricolorin A at 60 µM acts as a post- emergence plant growth inhibitor by reducing dry plant biomass by 62%, 37%, 33%, and 22% for L. multiflorum, T. alexandrinum, T. vulgare, and P. ixocarpa, respectively, 18 days after its application. In order to determine the potency of tricolorin A as a plant growth inhibitor, paraquat was used as control; the results indicate that tricolorin A acts as a non-selective post-emergence plant growth inhibitor similar to paraquat, since both reduced the biomass production in P. ixocarpa and T. alexandrinum. Therefore, we suggest that tricolorin A will be a good biodegradable herbicide for weeds.

  5. Response of Soybean to Halosulfuron Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Nandula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, halosulfuron injury in soybean through off-target movement of halosulfuron when applied to rice fields has been reported. Sulfonylurea-tolerant (ST soybean varieties have enhanced tolerance for sulfonylurea herbicides and might provide an option for mitigating injury to soybean from halosulfuron drift. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of halosulfuron on growth and yield of selected soybean varieties with ST trait alone and stacked with glyphosate resistance trait. Soybean plants were treated with halosulfuron at 0, 0.0043, 0.0087, 0.017, 0.034, and 0.069 kg ai/ha rate at the V3 growth stage in the greenhouse and at 0.034 kg/ha rate (labeled use rate in rice in the field studies. All soybean varieties containing the ST trait exhibited some halosulfuron injury, but survived the halosulfuron application in the greenhouse. In field studies, a single POST application of halosulfuron at 0.034 kg/ha to soybean at three-trifoliolate leaf stage or at full bloom stage resulted in halosulfuron injury to a certain extent regardless of ST trait. Halosulfuron did not have a significant effect on yield of ST varieties compared to their respective nontreated controls. Severe halosulfuron injury in two non-ST varieties resulted in yield loss.

  6. Herbicide phosphinothricin causes direct stimulation hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragićević, Milan; Platiša, Jelena; Nikolić, Radomirka; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Mitić, Nevena; Simonović, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) inhibits glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, thus causing ammonia accumulation, glutamine depletion and eventually plant death. However, the growth response of Lotus corniculatus L. plants immersed in solutions with a broad range of PPT concentrations is biphasic, with pronounced stimulating effect on biomass production at concentrations ≤ 50 μM and growth inhibition at higher concentrations. The growth stimulation at low PPT concentrations is a result of activation of chloroplastic isoform GS2, while the growth suppression is caused by inhibition of both cytosolic GS1 and GS2 at higher PPT concentrations. Since the results are obtained in cell-free system (e.g. protein extracts), to which the principles of homeostasis are not applicable, this PPT effect is an unambiguous example of direct stimulation hormesis. A detailed molecular mechanism of concentration-dependent interaction of both PPT and a related GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine, with GS holoenzymes is proposed. The mechanism is in concurrence with all experimental and literature data.

  7. Acute oral poisoning due to chloracetanilide herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO₃⁻ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure.

  8. Sorption of polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites by biochar-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechene, Annika; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-08-01

    Biochar-amended soil has been proven to possess superior sorption capacities for several environmental pollutants compared with pure soil. However, the role of biochar in the immobilization of polar pesticides and their metabolites has hardly been tested. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of a soil amendment with biochar on the sorption of selected polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites (log Kow 0.3-chloridazon, metazachlor oxalic acid, metazachlor sulfonic acid) were tested, i.e. three anionic and one neutral polar compound. The results showed that the presence of biochar increased the sorption capacity of the soil only in the case of the uncharged compound methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, for which the average distribution coefficients in biochar-amended soils were higher than in pure soil by a factor of 2.1-2.5. However, this effect rather seemed to reflect the increased soil organic carbon content after the addition of biochar than a preferred sorption of methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon to biochar. In the case of the three anionic compounds imazamox, metazachlor oxalic acid and metazachlor sulfonic acid, biochar amendment did not increase the sorption capacity of the soil for these compounds, presumably as a result of its negative net charge. Similarly, desorption experiments did not show any significant effect of the biochar amendment on desorption. This suggests that the potential of using biochar to mitigate the leaching of the tested polar pesticides or metabolites is limited.

  9. Induction and characterization of micronuclei in plant cells. Perspectives for micronucleus-mediated chromosome transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, micronucleation in plant cells has been investigated and systems for isolation and transfer of organelles have been established.The discovery, described in chapter two, that the phosphoric amide herbicide amiprophos-methyl induced micronuclei at a high frequency in cell suspensions o

  10. Induction and characterization of micronuclei in plant cells : perspectives for micronucleus-mediated chromosome transfer = Inductie en karakterisering van microkernen in plantecellen : perspectieven voor chromosoom overdracht via microkernen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, micronucleation in plant cells has been investigated and systems for isolation and transfer of organelles have been established.
    The discovery, described in chapter two, that the phosphoric amide herbicide amiprophos-methyl induced micronuclei at a high frequency

  11. Recurrent selection with reduced herbicide rates results in the rapid evolution of herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    There has been much debate regarding the potential for reduced rates of herbicide application to accelerate evolution of herbicide resistance. We report a series of experiments that demonstrate the potential for reduced rates of the acetyl-co enzyme A carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicide diclofop-methyl to rapidly select for resistance in a susceptible biotype of Lolium rigidum. Thirty-six percent of individuals from the original VLR1 population survived application of 37.5 g diclofop-methyl ha(-1) (10% of the recommended field application rate). These individuals were grown to maturity and bulk-crossed to produce the VLR1 low dose-selected line VLR1 (0.1). Subsequent comparisons of the dose-response characteristics of the original and low dose-selected VLR1 lines demonstrated increased tolerance of diclofop-methyl in the selected line. Two further rounds of selection produced VLR1 lines that were resistant to field-applied rates of diclofop-methyl. The LD50 (diclofop-methyl dose required to cause 50% mortality) of the most resistant line was 56-fold greater than that of the original unselected VLR1 population, indicating very large increases in mean population survival after three cycles of selection. In vitro ACCase inhibition by diclofop acid confirmed that resistance was not due to an insensitive herbicide target-site. Cross-resistance studies showed increases in resistance to four herbicides: fluazifop-P-butyl, haloxyfop-R-methyl, clethodim and imazethapyr. The potential genetic basis of the observed response and implications of reduced herbicide application rates for management of herbicide resistance are discussed.

  12. Reducing the risks of herbicide resistance: best management practices and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides are the foundation of weed control in commercial crop production. However, herbicide-resistant weed populations are developing rapidly in response to selection pressure. Critical practices include reducing selection through diversification of weed control techniques, minimizing spread of ...

  13. Effect of some herbicides on the growth of two Drechslera species

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Fabisiewicz; Joanna Mikołajska

    2014-01-01

    Effect of auxinlike herbicides on growth of Drechslera sorokiniana and D. teres in vitro was investigated. All herbicides in high concentrations inhibited mycelial growth, sporulation and germination of conidia.

  14. Effect of some herbicides on the growth of two Drechslera species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Fabisiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of auxinlike herbicides on growth of Drechslera sorokiniana and D. teres in vitro was investigated. All herbicides in high concentrations inhibited mycelial growth, sporulation and germination of conidia.

  15. Plant reproduction is altered by simulated herbicide drift toconstructed plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide drift may have unintended impacts on native vegetation, adversely affecting structure and function of plant communities. However, these potential effects have been rarely studied or quantified. To determine potential ecological effects of herbicide drift, we construct...

  16. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei [Nankai; (Queens); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2012-05-24

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.

  17. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  18. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnke, Amy E; Grue, Christian E; Hayes, Marc P; Troiano, Alexandra T

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  19. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  20. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  1. Dynamics of chloroacetanilide herbicides in various types of mesocosm wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongbing; Chen, Yi; Vymazal, Jan; Kule, Lumír; Koželuh, Milan

    2017-01-15

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) for pesticide mitigation from agricultural runoff became widespread in the last decade. However, comparison of different types of CWs at one location is missing. Therefore, site by site comparison of three different types (subsurface flow, surface flow and floating hydroponic root mat) of CWs treating four chloroacetanilide herbicides (acetochlor, s-metolachlor, metazachlor, dimethachlor) were carried out. All three planted systems are effective in removing the four herbicides with removal efficiency >92% after 9days. The metabolites ethane sulfonic acids (ESA) and oxanilic acids (OA) of the four herbicides peaked at 9days in the surface flow CWs with soil, but all the metabolites didn't peaked in the subsurface flow with gravel systems and the floating hydroponic root mat system after 21days. All the detected metabolites account about 20% of the mother compounds. There is no noticeable metabolites accumulation in the control system (no plants and no substrate), which indicate no microbial degradation taken place. Plant accumulation and soil adsorption are negligible for the removal of the four herbicides, which are floating hydroponic root mat is the most cost-efficient alternatives for chloroacetanilide herbicides removal due to the absence of substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of Herbicides When Spray Solution Application Is Delayed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Eure

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information is limited concerning the impact of delaying applications of pesticides after solution preparation on efficacy. Experiments were conducted to determine weed control when diclosulam, dimethenamid-P, flumioxazin, fomesafen, imazethapyr, pendimethalin, and S-metolachlor were applied preemergence the day of solution preparation or 3, 6, and 9 days after solution preparation. Herbicide solutions were applied on the same day regardless of when prepared. Control of broadleaf signalgrass, common lambsquarters, entireleaf morningglory, and Palmer amaranth by these herbicides was not reduced regardless of when herbicide solutions were prepared. Surprisingly entireleaf morningglory control by all herbicides increased when herbicide application was delayed by 9 days. In separate experiments, control of broadleaf signalgrass by clethodim, common ragweed by glyphosate and lactofen, entireleaf morningglory by lactofen, Italian rye grass by glyphosate and paraquat, and Palmer amaranth by atrazine, dicamba, glufosinate, glyphosate, imazethapyr, lactofen, and 2,4-D was affected more by increase in weed size due to delayed application than the time between solution preparation and application.

  3. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2012-04-01

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesised in the authors' laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. The Symptoms of Herbicidal Action: The Case of Aclonifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Kıvılcım Kılınç

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The symptoms which were directly bound to the biochemical mode of action of an herbicide, other symptoms result from an indirect consequence of this action. The symptoms of herbicidal action deeply differed and that the climatic factors during the two first weeks after treatment could change definitely the result of the selective herbicide action. The repetitive observation of symptoms allows to inform the farmer about the tolerance or resistance of certain plant species, including the culture, for instance through the appearance of symptoms on the first leaves of the seedlings and their absence in the following leaves. As a whole, the accurate observation of herbicidal symptoms on plants is the essential, rapid and non-expensive analysis of treatment effectiveness at the field scale. The purpose of the current report is to describe the symptoms of a very complex herbicidal action, that of aclonifen involving two modes of action for the same molecule, approximately at the same concentration, and to compare these symptoms under field conditions and under controlled conditions, for a better understanding.

  5. Aging effects on the availability of herbicides to runoff transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louchart, Xavier; Voltz, Marc

    2007-02-15

    Realistic estimation of sorption parameters is essential to predict long-term herbicide availability in soils and their contamination of surface water and groundwater. This study examined the temporal change of an effective partition coefficient Kd(eff) for the herbicides simazine, diuron, and oryzalin from a 0.12 ha field experiment during 7 vineyard growing seasons. Kd(eff) is the ratio of solvent extractable herbicide concentrations in the top soil (0-2 cm) to the average concentrations in runoff water and is considered to assess the effective availability of herbicides to runoff transfer. Kd(eff) increased largely with aging time since application, from values similar to those of the literature (determined in 24 h batch conditions, Kd(ref)), up to 88, 164, and 30 times these initial values for simazine, diuron, and oryzalin respectively. The seasonal variation of Kd(eff) values between years and compounds could be adequately described by a unique model, taking into account the cumulative rainfall since application and Kd(ref) of each compound. This simple model was able to represent the influence of the soil moisture content and its changes in the different biological and physicochemical processes that may contribute to the (bio)available, sorbed, or entrapped state of any of the studied herbicides with aging time under Mediterranean climate.

  6. Combining cutting and herbicide application for Ambrosia artemisiifolia control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sölter, Ulrike

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect on Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed of combining cutting and herbicide application was studied in pot experiments in Germany and Denmark in 2013. Single plants of common ragweed were established in 2 L pots in glasshouses. Two cutting treatments were conducted: cutting to 10 cm height at the beginning of male budding (BBCH 51-59 and no cutting. Clopyralid (in Germany: Lontrel 600, in Denmark: Matrigon, mesotrione (in Germany and Denmark: Callisto and glyphosate (in Germany: Clinic, in Denmark: Roundup Bio were applied at 4 doses at three different timings: on the day of cutting, one week and two weeks after cutting. The plants were harvested 5 weeks after the last herbicide application. At both sites clopyralid and mesotrione had a low efficacy on common ragweed when applied on developed plants with only minor differences in efficacy at the three timings. Application after cutting improved the efficacy of clopyralid at both sites and of mesotrione in Denmark. In Germany glyphosate had a higher efficacy on noncut plants in comparison to the cut plants, in Denmark it was vice versa. The highest dose of glyphosate provided higher control levels on developed plants than clopyralid and mesotrione at both sites. In Denmark the highest effects were obtained shortly after cutting with the maximum dose of each herbicide and declined with time between cutting and herbicide application. In summary the results demonstrated that herbicides can be applied shortly after cutting without loss of efficacy.

  7. 75 FR 17857 - Removal of Obsolete References to Herbicides Containing Dioxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 1 RIN 2900-AN56 Removal of Obsolete References to Herbicides Containing Dioxin AGENCY... containing dioxin and radiation to remove the obsolete references to herbicides containing dioxin. This final... health effects of exposure to herbicides containing dioxin. This document makes non-substantive changes...

  8. How benthic diatoms within natural communities respond to eight common herbicides with different modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicides are common pollutants of rivers in agricultural regions. These contaminants include various types of chemicals with different modes of toxic action. Herbicides can have toxic effects on freshwater benthic diatoms, the base of the aquatic food web. We examined the effects of (non-mixture) herbicide exposure to the health of diatoms for eight common herbicides with three different modes of action; the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors: atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and diuron; two auxinic herbicides: MCPA and 2,4-D; and the EPSP synthase inhibitor: glyphosate. Benthic diatoms within riverine communities were exposed to each herbicide in rapid toxicity tests at concentrations of 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). The most sensitive taxa were Gomphonema spp. and Encyonema gracilis. Navicula cryptotenella was the most tolerant to herbicide exposure. There was no significant effect of the different herbicide modes of action at the community level. Herbicide mode of action did not alter which taxa were most sensitive within the community and sensitivity rankings of the dominant diatom taxa were similar for each of the eight herbicides. The consistency of the results between herbicides suggests that freshwater benthic diatoms may be suitable in situ indicators for detecting the toxicity of herbicides with differing modes of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Why have no new herbicide modes of action appeared in recent years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage the evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remained dormant owing to concerns that glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have reduced the market for a new herbicide. The capture of a large fraction of the herbicide market by glyphosate with GR crops led to significantly diminished herbicide discovery efforts. Some of the reduced herbicide discovery research was also due to company consolidations and the availability of more generic herbicides. Another problem might be that the best herbicide molecular target sites may have already been discovered. However, target sites that are not utilized, for which there are inhibitors that are highly effective at killing plants, suggests that this is not true. Results of modern methods of target site discovery (e.g. gene knockout methods) are mostly not public, but there is no evidence of good herbicides with new target sites coming from these approaches. In summary, there are several reasons for a long dry period for new herbicide target sites; however, the relative magnitude of each is unclear. The economic stimulus to the herbicide industry caused by the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, especially GR weeds, may result in one or more new modes of action becoming available in the not too distant future. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. 81 FR 35767 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Herbicide Resistance Management Labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    ... draft PR Notice (2016-XX) communicates the Agency's approach to addressing herbicide-resistant weeds by...-resistant weeds by providing guidance on labeling, education, training, and stewardship for herbicides... approach to slow the development and spread of herbicide- resistant weeds, and prolong the useful...

  11. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  12. Soil microbial community response to surfactants and herbicides in two soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of herbicides on more than just the target weed and the effect of some herbicides on the soil biota is of environmental interest. The surfactants that are often used with herbicides are also coming under fire as a potential harm to the soil life. We used a silt loam and a silty clay loam ...

  13. Intraregional and inter-regional variability of herbicide sensitivity in common arable weed populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mol, Friederike; Gerowitt, Bärbel; Kaczmarek, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    The question on intraregional versus inter-regional variability in herbicide sensitivity for weed populations is of major importance, both in extrapolation of model parameters and in herbicide zonal approval procedures. We hypothesised that inter-regional variability in herbicide sensitivity for ...

  14. Herbicide tolerance and seed survival of grain amaranth (Amaranthus sp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per; Taberner, Andreu; de Troiani, Rosa M.;

    2012-01-01

    Amaranth is receiving increasing attention as an alternative crop to small grain cereals. From a weed control point of view cultivation of amaranth poses two problems. Firstly, amaranth grows slowly after emergence and hence is very susceptible to competition by weeds and secondly, seed losses...... at harvest are significant due to an uneven maturing and volunteer amaranth plants could potentially become a weed problem in following crops. Nonetheless, no studies are available on the tolerance of amaranth to herbicides or the survival of seeds in the soil. In this study we examined 1) the tolerance...... of amaranth to a range of herbicides in a series of outdoor pot experiments and in one field experiment and 2) the survival of amaranth seeds buried at 4 depths (2.5, 5, 10 and 25 cm) in 3 countries. The results showed that amaranth is very susceptible to broadleaved weed herbicides. Of the broadleaved...

  15. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Substituted Pyrazole Isothiocyanates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates and substituted pyrazoles were combined to form a series of novel isothiocyanates with highly effective herbicidal activity. The target compounds were analyzed by elemental analysis, 1H-NMR, EI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The synthesized compounds, particularly compounds 3-1 and 3-7, exhibited good herbicidal activities against four weeds. The EC50 values of compound 3-1 against Echinochloa crusgalli L., Cyperus iria L., Dactylis glomerata L., and Trifolium repens L. were 64.32, 65.83, 62.42, and 67.72 µg/mL, respectively. The EC50 values of compound 3-7 against E. crusgalli L., C. iria L., D. glomerata L., T. repens L. were 65.33, 64.90, 59.41 and 67.41 µg/mL, respectively. Compounds 3-1 and 3-7 may be further optimized as lead compounds for new herbicides.

  16. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Novel Sulfonylurea Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Gang; WANG Mei-yi; WANG Ming-zhong; WANG Su-hua; LI Yong-hong; LI Zheng-ming

    2011-01-01

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been applied worldwide in agriculture. Some sulfonylurea residues might exist in soil longer than that people expected. However, flupyrsulfuron-methyl-sodium which was firstly reported as a new 5-substituted sulfonylurea herbicide has less than one month residual life. Therefore, 5-substituted benzenesulfonylureas are potential molecules to regulate its residual situation. In order to develop new sulfonylurea derivatives,the substituent on the critical 5-posotion of the benzene ring was optimized. On the basis of our former work on sulfonylureas which contains a characteristic mono-substituted pyrimidine moiety, twenty-six new sulfonylurea derivatives were synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1H NMR, 31p NMR and elemental analysis. The greenhouse bioassay tests show that some title compounds exhibit potent herbicidal activity.

  17. The influence of oil additives on the effectiveness of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chwedoruk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to decrease herbicide doses without reducing their weed controlling effectiveness was investigated in two microplots and one field experiment. The following herbicides were used: atrazine, mixture of atrazine with terbutrine, MCPA + MCPP, MCPA + dikamba, desmedipham and phenmedipham (Betanal 31, 32 or 37. They were combined with one or several of the following adjuvants: parafinic oil, refuse product of rape oil rafination, oil mixture from the Institute of Organic Chemistry Industry (IPO-Warsaw, surfactant Rokafenol N-1O, mineral oil Nr 8 (Aviol. It was shown that the doses of herbicides could be lowered by 30-50% without loosing their phytotoxic effect on weeds due to addition of adjuvants. The mineral oil 8 was very active in a mixture with Betanal 37 and was completly non toxic toward sugar beets. The oil mixture from IPO and Rokafenol N-10 were very active in mixtures with atrazine or atraizine with terbutrine.

  18. Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaundun, Shiv S

    2014-09-01

    Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase herbicides is documented in at least 43 grass weeds and is particularly problematic in Lolium, Alopecurus and Avena species. Genetic studies have shown that resistance generally evolves independently and can be conferred by target-site mutations at ACCase codon positions 1781, 1999, 2027, 2041, 2078, 2088 and 2096. The level of resistance depends on the herbicides, recommended field rates, weed species, plant growth stages, specific amino acid changes and the number of gene copies and mutant ACCase alleles. Non-target-site resistance, or in essence metabolic resistance, is prevalent, multigenic and favoured under low-dose selection. Metabolic resistance can be specific but also broad, affecting other modes of action. Some target-site and metabolic-resistant biotypes are characterised by a fitness penalty. However, the significance for resistance regression in the absence of ACCase herbicides is yet to be determined over a practical timeframe. More recently, a fitness benefit has been reported in some populations containing the I1781L mutation in terms of vegetative and reproductive outputs and delayed germination. Several DNA-based methods have been developed to detect known ACCase resistance mutations, unlike metabolic resistance, as the genes remain elusive to date. Therefore, confirmation of resistance is still carried out via whole-plant herbicide bioassays. A growing number of monocotyledonous crops have been engineered to resist ACCase herbicides, thus increasing the options for grass weed control. While the science of ACCase herbicide resistance has progressed significantly over the past 10 years, several avenues provided in the present review remain to be explored for a better understanding of resistance to this important mode of action.

  19. Accidental Chemical Burns of Oral Mucosa by Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S P Deo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate (GlySH is a broad spectrum, nonselective herbicide, widely used in agriculture. This case report describes a 25-year-old man presenting with extensive chemical burns and ulceration of the oral cavity as a result of accidental exposure to GlySH. This paper aims to illustrate the typical appearance of GlySH related chemical mucosal burn and to demonstrate the severity of the corrosive effect of GlySH which need team approach to prevent unfavorable sequelae such as microstomia. Keywords: Chemical burns, corrosive injury, glyphosate poisoning, herbicide, microstomia, oral mucosal burn.

  20. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  1. Temperature and Light Modulation of Herbicide Toxicity on Algal and Cyanobacterial Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pedrosa Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HIGHLIGHTSWe reviewed the interaction between light, temperature and herbicides on algal and cyanobacterial physiology.Temperature is the main factor affecting herbicide toxicity to algae and cyanobacteria.Changes in light environment may modulate the effects of photosynthesis-targeting herbicides.Important interactions between climatic parameters and herbicide toxicity have been discussed in the literature. As climate changes are expected to influence the growth conditions of aquatic photosynthetic organisms over the next century by modifying the physicochemical parameters of the environment (such as temperature and incident light characteristics, the following questions arise: How will variations in climatic conditions influence herbicide toxicity in algae and cyanobacteria? Are these coupled effects on aquatic photosynthetic organism physiology antagonistic, additive, or synergistic? We discuss here the physiological responses of algae and cyanobacteria to the combined effects of environmental changes (temperature and light and herbicide exposure. Both temperature and light are proposed to influence herbicide toxicity through acclimation processes that are mainly related to cell size and photosynthesis. Algal and cyanobacterial responses to interactions between light, temperature, and herbicides are species-specific, making it difficult today to establish a single model of how climate changes will affect toxicity of herbicides. Acclimation processes could assure the maintenance of primary production but total biodiversity should decrease in communities exposed to herbicides under changing temperature and light conditions. The inclusion of considerations on the impacts of environmental changes on toxicity of herbicides in water quality guidelines directed toward protecting aquatic life is now urgently needed.

  2. Management of herbicide resistance in wheat cropping systems: learning from the Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael J; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Herbicide resistance continues to escalate in weed populations infesting global wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops, threatening grain production and thereby food supply. Conservation wheat production systems are reliant on the use of efficient herbicides providing low-cost, selective weed control in intensive cropping systems. The resistance-driven loss of herbicide resources combined with limited potential for new herbicide molecules means greater emphasis must be placed on preserving existing herbicides. For more than two decades, since the initial recognition of the dramatic consequences of herbicide resistance, the challenge of introducing additional weed control strategies into herbicide-based weed management programmes has been formidable. Throughout this period, herbicide resistance has expanded unabated across the world's wheat production regions. However, in Australia, where herbicide resources have become desperately depleted, the adoption of harvest weed seed control is evidence, at last, of a successful approach to sustainable weed management in wheat production systems. Growers routinely including strategies to target weed seeds during crop harvest, as part of herbicide-based weed management programmes, are now realising significant weed control and crop production benefits. When combined with an attitude of zero weed tolerance, there is evidence of a sustainable weed control future for wheat production systems. The hard-learned lessons of Australian growers can now be viewed by global wheat producers as an example of how to stop the continual loss of herbicide resources in productive cropping systems.

  3. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality.

  4. Herbicide-resistance conferred by expression of a catalytic antibody in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yael; Shulman, Avidor; Ben Shir, Irina; Keinan, Ehud; Wolf, Shmuel

    2006-06-01

    Engineering herbicide resistance in crops facilitates control of weed species, particularly those that are closely related to the crop, and may be useful in selecting lines that have undergone multiple transformation events. Here we show that herbicide-resistant plants can be engineered by designing an herbicide and expressing a catalytic antibody that destroys the herbicide in planta. First, we developed a carbamate herbicide that can be catalytically destroyed by the aldolase antibody 38C2. This compound has herbicidal activity on all three plant species tested. Second, the light chain and half of the heavy chain (Fab) of the catalytic antibody were targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum in two classes of Arabidopsis thaliana transformants. Third, the two transgenic plants were crossed to produce an herbicide-resistant F1 hybrid. The in vitro catalytic activity of the protein from F1 hybrids corroborates that catalytic antibodies can be constitutively expressed in transgenic plants, and that they can confer a unique trait.

  5. Fourier transform of delayed fluorescence as an indicator of herbicide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that delayed fluorescence (DF) from Photosystem II (PSII) of plant leaves can be potentially used to sense herbicide pollution and evaluate the effect of herbicides on plant leaves. The research of using DF as a measure of herbicides in the literature was mainly conducted in time domain and qualitative correlation was often obtained. Fourier transform is often used to analyze signals. Viewing DF signal in frequency domain through Fourier transform may allow separation of signal components and provide a quantitative method for sensing herbicides. However, there is a lack of an attempt to use Fourier transform of DF as an indicator of herbicide. In this work, the relationship between the Fourier transform of DF and herbicide concentration was theoretically modelled and analyzed, which immediately yielded a quantitative method to measure herbicide concentration in frequency domain. Experiments were performed to validate the developed method.

  6. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  7. Application of pre-emergence herbicides in poplar nursery production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Verica Vasic; Sasa Orlovic; Predrag Pap; Branislav Kovacevic; Milan Drekic; Leopold Poljakovic Pajnik; Zoran Galic

    2015-01-01

    In addition to pests and diseases, weeds are a major problem in poplar nursery production. The possibili-ties of herbicide application in juvenile poplar growth were researched, taking into account that weeds are one of the main limiting factors. The following pre-emergence herbi-cides were tested: acetochlor, S-metolachlor, metribuzin, oxifluorfen, and dimethenamid during two vegetation sea-sons at two locations, which differed by the soil physico-chemical characteristics. The study results show that the number of weeds on sample plots was significantly reduced by the tested herbicides when compared to control plots. The highest reduction in the number of weeds was achieved using the herbicides acetochlor and metribuzin. However, me-tribuzin showed a phytotoxic effect on sandy soil. Metribu-zin application is recommended only on the soils with higher contents of organic matter, where the phytotoxic effect was absent. Acetochlor, S-metolachlor, oxifluorfen, and dime-thenamid were not phytotoxic to poplars and can be used for weed suppression in the production of poplar plants.

  8. Analysis of Herbicide Transport from Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental impacts caused by herbicide loss from agricultural production are well documented in the surface runoff-prone claypan region. The most widely known impact was for atrazine, which caused the Mark Twain Lake to be listed in the original 303(d) list for impaired waters. While this lake ha...

  9. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds.

  10. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, E. A.; Huang, C.; Smith, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factos such as time in tillage practice and type and distribution of residue cover, are weighed against inherent tillage impacts to soil structure in terms of relative effects on herbicide transport with runoff water. In this study, two small watersheds (one in no-till (NT) and one rotational till (RT)) were monitored during the first three years since conversion of the RT watershed from NT. In addition, rainfall simulation was applied to plots within each watershed during the first, third, and fifth years since the conversion. Runoff atrazine and glyphosate losses from RT areas were compared to losses from NT areas as a ratio of RT:NT. Results indicate a trend of increasing RT:NT value with time in tillage. Watershed monitoring indicated greater herbicide loading to runoff water from the NT watershed than the RT watershed during the first year since RT conversion, but this relationship reversed by the third year since conversion to RT. In addition, rainfall simulations were performed on small boxes of NT or RT soil having varying types and levels of residue cover in an attempt to isolate residue cover effects from true tillage effects.

  11. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cespedes, F.F.; Sanchez, M.V.; Garcia, S.P.; Perez, M.F. [University of Almeria, Almeria (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2007-10-15

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism.

  12. Evolving understanding of the evolution of herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    A greater number of, and more varied, modes of resistance have evolved in weeds than in other pests because the usage of herbicides is far more extensive than the usage of other pesticides, and because weed seed output is so great. The discovery and development of selective herbicides are more problematic than those of insecticides and fungicides, as these must only differentiate between plant and insect or pathogen. Herbicides are typically selective between plants, meaning that before deployment there are already some crops possessing natural herbicide resistance that weeds could evolve. The concepts of the evolution of resistance and the mechanisms of delaying resistance have evolved as nature has continually evolved new types of resistance. Major gene target-site mutations were the first types to evolve, with initial consideration devoted mainly to them, but slowly 'creeping' resistance, gradually accruing increasing levels of resistance, has become a major force owing to an incremental accumulation of genetic changes in weed populations. Weeds have evolved mechanisms unknown even in antibiotic as well as other drug and pesticide resistances. It is even possible that cases of epigenetic 'remembered' resistances may have appeared.

  13. Inheritance study on the stable herbicide resistance of transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUMingguo; HUAZhihua; LINJianrong; XUERui; WANGXiaoling; HUANGDanian

    1999-01-01

    The transgene technology showed a potentiality in crop improvement such as disease and insect resistance, anti-adversity, and grain quality. The inheritance of bar gene for herbicide BASTA resistance in stable transformed rice lines was studied for an understanding of the foreign gene inheritance pattern.

  14. Molecular Evaluation of Resistant to Aryloxyphenoxypropionate Herbicides in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rastgoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular experiment was conducted to confirm resistant to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in winter wild oat (Avena ludoviciana Duriu. populations of wheat fields in Khuzestan province, at Faculty of Agriculture of Ferdowsi University, during year of 2006. First, 44 wild oat populations from Ahvaz, Andimeshk, Shush, Shushtar, Ramhormoz, Susangerd, and Dezful cities with a susceptible population were examined in screening experiments. According to these experiments, 37 populations of winter wild oat biotypes selected as suspected resistance populations, and used for molecular experiment to determine resistance mechanism. dCAPS method was carried out in three steps consisting of PCR, enzyme digestion, and gel electrophoresis. Results showed that mutation at position 1781 of ACCase enzyme resulted in resistance in 10 winter wild oat populations from Andimeshk (5, Shush (1, Shushtar (2, and Susangerd (2 to clodinafop propargyl, diclofop methyl, and fenoxaprop p ethyl herbicides. While, in other suspected resistance populations other mechanism such as metabolism is probable. Also, it was concluded that this method is a good technique to detect herbicide resistance and mechanism of herbicide resistance in winter wild oat.

  15. Sorption of the herbicide aminocyclopyrachlor by cation modified clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a newly registered herbicide for the control of broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines and woody species in non-crops, turf, sod farms, and residential areas. At typical soil pH levels, aminocyclopyrachlor is in the anionic form. Anionic pesticides are generally weakly retained by mo...

  16. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Novel Sulfonylureas Containing Thiadiazol Moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen novel sulfonylureas containing thiadiazole moiety were synthesized in a two-step reaction. Their structures were determined using IR, 1H NMR, HRFTMS, and elemental analysis. Herbicidal activities of these compounds were determined in the green house bio-assay. The results show that four compounds among them exhibit some activity toward four tested herbs.

  17. Herbicide resistance in weeds: Survey, characterization, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this paper is to present a systematic diagnostic approach towards the characterization of herbicide resistance in a given weed population with regards to profile (single, multiple, cross resistance), magnitude (fold level), mechanism, and related bio-physiological aspects. Diagnosing her...

  18. Identification of citrullus lanatus germplasm lines tolerant to clomazone herbicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clomazone herbicide is registered for use in watermelon; however, crop tolerance is marginal and the recommended use rates (0.07 to 0.1 kg ai ha-1) are lower for watermelon than for some other crops. In a greenhouse germplasm evaluation experiment including 56 germplasm accessions and watermelon cu...

  19. Tolerance to the Herbicide Clomazone in Watermelon Plant Introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pre-emergence herbicide clomazone (trade name: Command 3ME), is widely used in watermelon production in the US for suppression of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds growing in between plastic beds. Exposure of young watermelon plants to clomazone can cause moderate or severe injury that is expr...

  20. Citrullus Germplasm Lines Vary in Clomazone Herbicide Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differences between Citrullus germplasm lines in clomazone injury were first observed when the herbicide was used for weed control in fields containing germplasm lines of watermelon breeding project at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC. The objectives of this investigation were to asses...

  1. Herbicide activity of extracts from Ailanthus altissima (Simaroubaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersini, Cristiano; Bergamin, Massimo; Aroulmoji, Vincent; Baldini, Sanzio; Picchio, Rodolfo; Pesce, Patricia Gutierrez; Ballarin, Luca; Murano, Erminio

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to isolate and characterize ailanthone-rich materials from the bark of the deciduous tree Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and to assess their herbicide activity on selected herbaceous species. Ailanthone-rich fractions were obtained from A. altissima bark by extraction with dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and subsequent purification of these crude extracts, and of the remaining water mixture after solvent extraction, by means of gel permeation chromatography. A number of fractions were isolated and characterized for ailanthone content. A dichloromethane fraction was shown to contain 92% w/w of ailanthone, as demonstrated by HPLC and NMR analysis. A significant pre-emergence herbicide activity was found for most of the extracts which was directly correlated to ailanthone concentration. A remarkable combined pre- and post-emergence herbicide activity was found for a specific fraction. These results indicate that the bark of A. altissima may represent an interesting source for the production of natural herbicides for use in agriculture.

  2. Palmer Amaranth Identification and Documentation of Herbicide Resistance in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer amaranth (Amaranthuspalmeri S. Wats.) has greatly disrupted agricultural practices in the US with its rapid growth and rapid evolution of herbicide resistance. This weed species is now suspected in Argentina. To document whether the suspected plant populations are indeed Palmer amaranth, mo...

  3. Adaptive responses of sorghum reproductive domain to herbicide action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. О. Oginova

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term study of sorghum reproductive features under the field conditions has been allowed to determine the significance of herbicide influence on panicles and pollen state of the cultivated plants. Informational characteristics of appropriate systems and possible ways of their further development were fixed.

  4. Effect of atrazine (Herbicide) on blood parameters of common carp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    the environment the atrazine or triazine based herbicides are not degraded by ... biological effects of environmental pollution in waters. Monitoring of blood .... leading to an excess utilization of stored carbohydrates. Hussein et al. (1996) ... Acute toxicity of ammonia and its sublethal effects on selected haematological and.

  5. Vinegar as a broadcast herbicide for spring-transplanted onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The weed control challenges for onion production are formidable; however, these challenges are even greater for those considering organic crop production. Organic onion producers need additional organic herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Field research was conducted...

  6. s-triazinte herbicides from southern ethiopian lakes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydrophobic membrane in a similar flow system used for SLM. .... separately and merged in a PTFE tee connection at an angle of 60". Further mixing was ..... herbicides and insecticides. to various fartns sprayed by farm workers and air plane.

  7. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Céspedes, F; Villafranca Sánchez, M; Pérez García, S; Fernández Pérez, M

    2007-10-01

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T(50), were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. Sorption capacity of the sorbents for chloridazon and metribuzin, ranging from 0.53mgkg(-1) for the metribuzin sorption on bentonite to 2.03x10(5)mgkg(-1) for the sorption of chloridazon on the activated carbon, was the most important factor modulating the herbicide release.

  8. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: Aquatic Plant Identification and Herbicide Use Guide. Volume 2. Aquatic Plants and Susceptibility to Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    bristle - a stiff hair or hairlike growth internode - stem region between calyx - the usually green, outer whorl nodes of the perianth, composed of...herbicide with species-specific trans- location properties. " Primary action is by blockage of photosynthesis (electron transport pathways ), but rapid action

  9. Effect of new auxin herbicide formulations on control of herbicide resistant weeds and on microbial activities in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread distribution of glyphosate-resistant weeds in soybean-growing areas across Mississippi has economically affected soybean planting and follow-up crop management operations. New multiple herbicide-resistant crop (including soybean) technologies with associated formulations will soon be comm...

  10. A comparison of the herbicide tolerances of rare and common plants in an agricultural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, J Franklin; Graham, Ian M; Mortensen, David A

    2014-03-01

    Declining plant biodiversity in agroecosystems has often been attributed to escalating use of chemical herbicides, but other changes in farming systems, including the clearing of seminatural habitat fragments, confound the influence of herbicides. The present study introduces a new approach to evaluate the impacts of herbicide pollution on plant communities at landscape or regional scales. If herbicides are in fact a key factor shaping agricultural plant diversity, one would expect to see the signal of past herbicide impacts in the current plant community composition of an intensively farmed region, with common, successful species more tolerant to widely used herbicides than rare or declining species. Data from an extensive field survey of plant diversity in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA, were compared with herbicide bioassay experiments in a greenhouse to test the hypothesis that common species possess higher herbicide tolerances than rare species. Five congeneric pairs of rare and common species were treated with 3 commonly used herbicide modes of action in bioassay experiments, and few significant differences were found in the tolerances of rare species relative to common species. These preliminary results suggest that other factors beyond herbicide exposure may be more important in shaping the distribution and abundance of plant species diversity across an agricultural landscape.

  11. Genetic control of a cytochrome P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance mechanism in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, R; Vila-Aiub, M M; Powles, S B

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of herbicide resistance evolution in plants are influenced by many factors, especially the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance. Herbicide resistance can be endowed by enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism because of the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, although in weedy plants the genetic control of cytochrome P450-endowed herbicide resistance is poorly understood. In this study we have examined the genetic control of P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance in a well-characterized Lolium rigidum biotype. The phenotypic resistance segregation in herbicide resistant and susceptible parents, F1, F2 and backcross (BC) families was analyzed as plant survival following treatment with the chemically unrelated herbicides diclofop-methyl or chlorsulfuron. Dominance and nuclear gene inheritance was observed in F1 families when treated at the recommended field doses of both herbicides. The segregation values of P450 herbicide resistance phenotypic traits observed in F2 and BC families was consistent with resistance endowed by two additive genes in most cases. In obligate out-crossing species such as L. rigidum, herbicide selection can easily result in accumulation of resistance genes within individuals.

  12. Pesticide use in the U.S. and policy implications: a focus on herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, P; Colborn, T

    1999-01-01

    This article examines herbicide use in the United States, providing estimates of poundage, land surface covered, distribution, and recent trends based on federal and state figures. Herbicides are by far the most widely used class of pesticide in the US, where 556 million lbs of herbicide active ingredients (AIs) were applied in 1995. Agriculture accounts for the majority of herbicide use, totaling 461 million lbs of AIs in 1995. Over 60% of the poundage of all agricultural herbicides consist of those that are capable of disrupting the endocrine and/or reproductive systems of animals. In addition, at least 17 types of 'inert ingredients,' which can equal 90% or more of a pesticide product, have been identified as having potential endocrine-disrupting effects. Atrazine is the predominant herbicide used according to poundage, with 68-73 million lbs of AIs applied in 1995. However, 2,4-D is the most widespread herbicide, covering 78 million acres for agricultural uses alone. Both of these herbicides are reported endocrine disruptors. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors, namely the sulfonylureas and imidazolinones, are one of the fastest growing classes of herbicides. Many of these herbicides are 100 times more toxic to select plant species than their predecessors, so they can be applied at rates approximately 100 times lower. Consequently, they can affect plant species at concentration levels so low that no standard chemical protocol can detect them. Due in part to these more potent herbicides, the poundage of herbicides used in the US has decreased since the mid-1980s; however, the available data suggest that the number of treated acres has not significantly declined. A thorough assessment of potential exposure to herbicides by wildlife and humans is limited due to the inaccessibility of production and usage data.

  13. Mitigating effects of salicylic acid against herbicidal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh N. B.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background, the context and purpose of the study: Pendimethalin [N-(1-ethyl propyl-2, 6-dinitro-3, 4 xylidine] is one of the most commonly used herbicides. It induces harmful effect on non-target plants besides controlling the weed emergence. Salicylic acid (SA plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance. Present study was to assess the comparative efficacy of SA in combination with different concentrations of pendimethalin on black gram (Vigna mungo. The seeds of test plant were treated with field relevant concentrations (2, 5 and 10 ppm of pendimethalin (P and in combination with SA (0.5 mM to observe effect of SA against herbicide toxicity. Experiment was performed in petri dish as well as in pot culture. The toxic effect of pendimethalin and SA on seed germination (SG, radicle length (RL and mitotic index (MI was evaluated in petri dish culture. Seedling height, pigments, protein, sugar contents and lipid peroxidation (LP of 15 days old seedling were measured in pot culture. Total antioxidants (TA were monitored as plant defence against oxidative stress. Results, the main findings: Results showed that SG and seedling growth of Vigna mungo decreased under P1, P2 and P3 treatments. RL and MI were also reduced significantly (p<0.05 in treatments with herbicide and reduction was more pronounced in P3 treatment. A slight increase of SG and seedling growth was observed in P2 treatment compared to P1. Herbicide treatment remarkably declined pigment, protein and sugar contents of the seedlings when compared with control. TA and malondialdehyde (MDA content increase significantly under pendimethalin treated seedlings. Combined treatment (P+SA elevated growth of the seedlings. As a consequence of herbicidal stress, SA enhanced SG, RL, MI, pigment, protein and sugar content significantly. Under combined treatments,LP and TA were decreased when compared with pendimethalin treatment. Conclusions, brief summary and potential implications: SA

  14. Application of electrokinetic soil flushing to four herbicides: A comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, E Vieira; Souza, F; Saez, C; Cañizares, P; Lanza, M R V; Martinez-Huitle, C A; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-06-01

    In this work, four bench-scale plants containing soil spiked with four herbicides (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), oxyfluorfen, chlorsulfuron and atrazine) undergo treatment consisting of an electrokinetic soil flushing (EKSF). Results clearly demonstrate that efficiency of EKSF depends on the chemical characteristic of the pesticide used. The amount of pesticide collected in the anode well is more significant than that collected in the cathode wells, indicating that the electromigration is much more important than drainage by electro-osmotic flux for this application. After 15 d of treatment, the 2,4-D is the pesticide most efficiently removed (95% of removal), while chlorsulfuron is the pesticide more resilient to the treatment. Additionally, volatilization was found to be a process of the major significance in the application of electrokinetic techniques to soil polluted with herbicides and because of that it should always be taken into account in the future design of full-scale processes.

  15. Degradation of chlorophenoxy herbicides by coupled Fenton and biological oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Sonia; Polo, Alicia M; Tobajas, Montserrat; Rodriguez, Juan J; Mohedano, Angel F

    2013-09-01

    A combined treatment for the degradation of the chlorophenoxy herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA in water by means of Fenton and biological oxidation has been studied. The chemical oxidation step was necessary to achieve an efficient removal of these pollutants due to their toxicity and low biodegradability. Aqueous herbicide solutions (180mgL(-1)) were subjected to Fenton oxidation upon different H2O2 doses (from the theoretical stoichiometric amount referred to initial COD to 20% of this value). The toxicity and biodegradability tests of the Fenton effluents suggested that the ones resulting upon treatment with 80% and 60% of stoichiometric H2O2 were the optimal for subsequent biological treatment dealing with 2,4-D and MCPA, respectively. These effluents were treated in a sequencing batch reactor achieving nearly 90% conversion of organic matter measured as COD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid polyelectrolyte-based membrane immunoassay for the herbicide butachlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzantiev, B B; Byzova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Hennion, M C

    2005-01-01

    Oppositely charged water-soluble polyelectrolytes were used in the developed membrane immunoenzyme assay for the herbicide butachlor. High-affinity and rapid binding between polyanion polymethacrylate and polycation poly(N-ethyl-4-vinylpyridinium) was applied to separate reacted and free immunoreactants. Competitive immunoassay format with peroxidase-labeled antigen was realized. The insoluble colored product of the peroxidase reaction was formed by bound labeled immune complexes and was reflectometrically detected. The assay combines short duration (15 min), high sensitivity (0.03 g/mL) and availability for out-of-laboratory testing. Different image processing algorithms were used to determine the herbicide content. Low variation coefficients of the measurements in the proposed quantitative assay, namely 4.8-9.0% for the range of antigen concentrations from 0.1 to 3.0 ng/mL, are evidence of the assay effectiveness. Possibility to control the butachlor content in mineral, artesian, and drinking water was demonstrated.

  17. IMPACT OF HERBICIDES ON CONSUMPTION CHARACTERS OF POTATO TUBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Gugała

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the undertaken studies was to determine the effect of the herbicides used in the experiment on important features of the consumption values of three varieties of edible potato. Test results come from a field experiment conducted in 2007–2010. The experiment was established as two-factor in the split-plot system in three repetitions. Two factors were tested in the experiment: factor I - potato varieties: Satina, Tajfun, Cekin; factor II – five methods of weed control. Darkening of the pulp of cooked tubers after 10 min, 2 and 24 hours shape the ways of weed control of the plantation and the genotype of the grown varieties. The use of herbicides in 2–5 variants has significantly increased the darkening of the pulp. The Tajfun variation darkened to the lowest degree, and Cekin to the largest degree.

  18. Environmental behavior and toxicity of herbicides atrazine and simazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Barbosa do Carmo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article shows some environmental and toxicology aspects of triazine herbicides atrazine and simazine. These compounds are used to control weeds in sugar and corn crops. Despite being partially soluble, they can be detected in ground and surface water. Their mobility and biodegradation in the soil-water system can vary depending on the intrinsic characteristics of each matrice, such as organic matter content. Although considered slightly toxic, these herbicides have a strong ability to interfere in the nervous and endocrine systems of human and wild biota. The detoxification mechanisms are similar to other xenobiotics; however, little is known about the effects on human health caused by simazine. Therefore, the use of these compounds should be revised due to their environmental behavior and toxicological effects.

  19. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  20. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected.

  1. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, John D; Chen, Xue Dong; Johnson, Catherine S

    2012-05-01

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24-36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Weed emergence on long years’ not herbicide treated fields - duration of the after-effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a long-term field trial plots were not treated with herbicides for 12 years (from 1996 to 2007. Two different crop rotations with 50% or 66% of cereals in the rotation were tested. At the same time in each crop rotation two different plant protection strategies were established. Since autumn 2007 the former controls not sprayed with any herbicide have been treated with herbicides. The crop rotation was unified. In that long-term field trial plots always treated with herbicides exist also. Weeds were counted by number and species before herbicide treatments. The comparison of these two different plots (treated and untreated shows what after-effect exists on the formerly untreated plots even after eight years. The emergence of weeds is still higher. Also the different crop rotations are still perceptible. For the plant protection strategy with the lower herbicide amounts the differences blur now.

  3. The influence of caregiver depression on children in non-relative foster care versus kinship care placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio; O'Reilly, Amanda; Matone, Meredith; Kim, Minseop; Long, Jin; Rubin, David M

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how the challenges faced by caregivers influence the variation in social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) outcomes of youth placed in kinship versus non-relative foster care. This study examined SEB symptoms among youth in kinship and non-relative foster care settings, hypothesizing that changes in caregiver depression would modify children's change in behavior over time. Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessments of 199 children placed with kinship and non-relative foster care providers in a Mid-Atlantic city were conducted at time of placement and 6-12 months post-placement. Linear regression estimated CBCL change scores for youth across placement type and caregiver depression trajectories. Kinship caregivers were more likely to become depressed or remained depressed than non-relative foster caregivers. Youth in kinship care always exhibited better change in SEB outcomes than youth in non-relative foster care, but these positive outcomes were principally observed among families where caregivers demonstrated a reduction in depression over time or were never depressed. Adjusted change scores for non-relative foster care youth were always negative, with the most negative scores among youth whose caregivers became depressed over time. Caregiver well-being may modify the influence of placement setting on SEB outcomes for youth placed into out-of-home care. Findings lend to policy relevance for child welfare systems that seek kinship settings as a panacea to the challenges faced by youth, without allocating resources to address caregiver needs.

  4. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoar...

  5. Genotoxicity of the herbicide butachlor in cultured human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, S; Panneerselvam, N; Shanmugam, G

    1995-08-01

    Butachlor, a pre-emergence herbicide was investigated for its ability to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml) of butachlor for 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results indicate a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment with butachlor. No SCE was promoted by butachlor.

  6. NEUTRALIZATION OF HERBICIDE NEGATIVE IMPACT ON SUGAR BEET WITH BIOSTIMULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko D. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Most modern chemicals designed to protect crop also actually cause negative effects on the protected plants mostly due to side effects and/or not following the application procedures correctly. It is possible to neutralize the negative effects of herbicides they have on cultivated plants with precise use of immunostimulants which will increase the plants' natural immunity against the negative effects of biotic and abiotic environmental factors

  7. Leaching and residual activity of imidazolinone herbicides in lowland soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Refatti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Herbicides used in the Clearfield® rice (Oryza sativa L. production system have a potential for leaching. This can result in contamination of underground water resources and cause injury to not tolerant crops that are sown in a succession and/or crop rotation. The objective of this study was to determine the leaching potential and the residual activity of the herbicides used in the Clearfield® rice system. The experiment was conducted over a period of two years and consisted of conducting a field test to be followed by two bioassays with a year of difference between their implementation. Initially an experiment was conducted in lowland area where it was planted the cultivar of rice ‘PUITA INTA CL’. Approximately one and two years thereafter, soil samples from each plot were collected at intervals of 5cm to a depth of 30cm (B factor for the bioassay to evaluate persistence of herbicides. Factor A was composed of mixtures formulated of imazethapyr + imazapic (75 + 25g a.i. L-1, imazapyr + imazapic (525 + 175g a.i. kg-1 in two doses, imazethapyr (100g a.i. L-1 and treatment control without application. Basing on results, it was concluded that the mixtures imazethapyr + imazapic, imazapyr + imazapic and imazethapyr leached into the soil, reaching depths of up to 25cm in lowland soil. Imidazolinone herbicides used today in the irrigated rice Clearfield® system are persistent in soil, and their phytotoxic activity can be observed up to two years after application.

  8. Combining cutting and herbicide application for Ambrosia artemisiifolia control

    OpenAIRE

    Sölter, Ulrike; Matthiassen, Solvejg K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect on Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed) of combining cutting and herbicide application was studied in pot experiments in Germany and Denmark in 2013. Single plants of common ragweed were established in 2 L pots in glasshouses. Two cutting treatments were conducted: cutting to 10 cm height at the beginning of male budding (BBCH 51-59) and no cutting. Clopyralid (in Germany: Lontrel 600, in Denmark: Matrigon), mesotrione (in Germany and Denmark: Callisto) and glyphosate (in Germa...

  9. Simultaneous Adoption of Herbicide-Resistance and Conservation-Tillage Cotton Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Roland K.; Burton C. English; Gao, Qi; Larson, James A.

    2006-01-01

    If adoption of herbicide-resistant seed and adoption of conservation-tillage practices are determined simultaneously, adoption of herbicide-resistance seed could indirectly reduce soil erosion and adoption of conservation-tillage practices could indirectly reduce residual herbicide use and increase farm profits. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between these two technologies for Tennessee cotton production. Evidence from Bayes' theorem and a two-equation logit model suggested a ...

  10. SulE, a sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification esterase from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Bao-Jian; Hong, Qing; Xie, Xiang-Ting; Huang, Xing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; He, Jian; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-01

    De-esterification is an important degradation or detoxification mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide in microbes and plants. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification are still unknown. In this study, a novel esterase gene, sulE, responsible for sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification, was cloned from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113. The gene contained an open reading frame of 1,194 bp, and a putative signal peptide at the N terminal was identified with a predicted cleavage site between Ala37 and Glu38, resulting in a 361-residue mature protein. SulE minus the signal peptide was synthesized in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified to homogeneity. SulE catalyzed the de-esterification of a variety of sulfonylurea herbicides that gave rise to the corresponding herbicidally inactive parent acid and exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency toward thifensulfuron-methyl. SulE was a dimer without the requirement of a cofactor. The activity of the enzyme was completely inhibited by Ag(+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), methamidophos, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. A sulE-disrupted mutant strain, ΔsulE, was constructed by insertion mutation. ΔsulE lost the de-esterification ability and was more sensitive to the herbicides than the wild type of strain S113, suggesting that sulE played a vital role in the sulfonylurea herbicide resistance of the strain. The transfer of sulE into Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 conferred on it the ability to de-esterify sulfonylurea herbicides and increased its resistance to the herbicides. This study has provided an excellent candidate for the mechanistic study of sulfonylurea herbicide metabolism and detoxification through de-esterification, construction of sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant transgenic crops, and bioremediation of sulfonylurea herbicide-contaminated environments.

  11. Taking stock of herbicide-resistant crops ten years after introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2005-03-01

    Since transgenic, bromoxynil-resistant cotton and glufosinate-resistant canola were introduced in 1995, planting of transgenic herbicide-resistant crops has grown substantially, revolutionizing weed management where they have been available. Before 1995, several commercial herbicide-resistant crops were produced by biotechnology through selection for resistance in tissue culture. However, non-transgenic herbicide-resistant crops have had less commercial impact. Since the introduction of glyphosate-resistant soybean in 1996, and the subsequent introduction of other glyphosate-resistant crops, where available, they have taken a commanding share of the herbicide-resistant crop market, especially in soybean, cotton and canola. The high level of adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops by North American farmers has helped to significantly reduce the value of the remaining herbicide market. This has resulted in reduced investment in herbicide discovery, which may be problematic for addressing future weed-management problems. Introduction of herbicide-resistant crops that can be used with selective herbicides has apparently been hindered by the great success of glyphosate-resistant crops. Evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds and movement of naturally resistant weed species into glyphosate-resistant crop fields will require increases in the use of other herbicides, but the speed with which these processes compromise the use of glyphosate alone is uncertain. The future of herbicide-resistant crops will be influenced by many factors, including alternative technologies, public opinion and weed resistance. Considering the relatively few recent approvals for field testing new herbicide-resistant crops and recent decisions not to grow glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet and wheat, the introduction and adoption of herbicide-resistant crops during the next 10 years is not likely to be as dramatic as in the past 10 years.

  12. Social Costs of Herbicide Resistance: The Case of Resistance to Glyphosate

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Sally P.; Llewellyn, Rick S.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    Unlike in the pesticide and antibiotic resistance literature, potential social costs and externalities associated with herbicide resistance have not generally been considered by economists. The economics of managing herbicide resistance in weeds has focused on cost-effective responses by growers to the development of resistance at the individual farm and field level. Economic analyses of optimal herbicide use have focused on optimising farmer returns in the long run. Weeds have been considere...

  13. Rice Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Possible Herbicide Quinclorac Detoxification Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying eXu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide, and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world’s rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed and hormone interactions affect quinclorac signaling. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and environmental health problems.In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C and CYP72A genes were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes for the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment.We conduct rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution.

  14. A novel polymeric herbicide based on phenoxyacetic acid derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimol Klaichim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel polymeric herbicide based on phenoxyacetic acid derivatives was prepared by the reaction of epoxidised liquid natural rubber (ELNR with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D or 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid(MCPA. The liquid natural rubber (LNR was firstly obtained from the degradation of natural rubber latex with tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cobalt acetylacetonate at 65oC for 72 hrs. The epoxidised liquid natural rubber was prepared from thereaction of LNR with formic acid and hydrogen peroxide at 50oC for 6 hrs. The reaction of epoxidised liquid natural rubber with 2,4-D or MCPA using triethylamine as a catalyst in toluene was performed at 70, 80, and 90oC for 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24hrs. The polymeric herbicides obtained were characterized and the grafting percentage of 2,4-D or MCPA onto liquid natural rubber were also determined by FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the grafting percentage increased with increasing amount of reactants, temperature, and reaction time. The release of 2,4-D and MCPA from polymeric herbicides was investigated in pH 6, 7, and 8 buffers at room temperature. The results show that the slowest release of 2,4-D and MCPA was found to be constant at pH 7 for 14 and 10 days, respectively.

  15. A glutathione s-transferase confers herbicide tolerance in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhang Hu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs have been a focus of attention due to their role in herbicide detoxification. OsGSTL2 is a glutathione S-transferase, lambda class gene from rice (Oryza sativa L.. Transgenic rice plants over-expressing OsGSTL2 were generated from rice calli by the use of an Agrobacterium transformation system, and were screened by a combination of hygromycin resistance, PCR and Southern blot analysis. In the vegetative tissues of transgenic rice plants, the over-expression of OsGSTL2 not only increased levels of OsGSTL2 transcripts, but also GST and GPX expression, while reduced superoxide. Transgenic rice plants also showed higher tolerance to glyphosate and chlorsulfuron, which often contaminate agricultural fields. The findings demonstrate the detoxification role of OsGSTL2 in the growth and development of rice plants. It should be possible to apply the present results to crops for developing herbicide tolerance and for limiting herbicide contamination in the food chain.

  16. Fate of herbicides in deep subsurface limestone and sandy aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janniche, Gry Sander

    afgørende for at vurdere herbiciders skæbne i underjord og grundvandsmagasiner. PhD-projektet har undersøgt sorption og nedbrydning af fire model-herbicider (atrazin, acetochlor, mecoprop og isoproturon) i kalksten og sandede grundvands¬magasiner. Desuden er den rumlige småskala-variation af herbicidernes...... tydelig selv inden for få cm afstand over dybden, og betydningen af denne variation afhænger af den samlede udbredelse af lag med forhøjet sorption eller nedbrydning; 2) at kalk/kalksten yder ringe beskyttelse mod grundvands¬forurening med mecoprop, atrazin, isoproturon og acetochlor, da sorptionen er lav...... og mineraliseringen meget langsom for isoproturon, acetochlor og mecoprop, og atrazin ikke er nedbrydeligt; 3) at i sandede grundvands¬magasiner er sorptionen af de fire herbicider generelt lav, men kan under reducerede forhold være kraftig for især isoproturon og acetochlor. Mecoprop, isoproturon og...

  17. The Herbicidal Activity of Mutant Isolates from Botrytis cinerea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-lin; ZHANG Li-hui; LIU Ying-chao; MA Juan; LI Chuan; DONG Jin-gao

    2006-01-01

    Fifteen mutant isolates were obtained by ultraviolet mutation from parent isolate Botrytis cinerea BC-4. Among them three mutant isolates, BC4-1, BC4-2, and BC4-15, showed strong herbicidal activity. BC4-1 showed maximum herbicidal activity for inhibition of germination and growth of Digitaria sanguinalis L. and Amaranthus retroflexus L. The results also showed that herbicidal activity was influenced by differing pH of PD media, with pH value of 4.0 being the optimum.The crude toxin was extracted using chloroform, petroleum ether, and ethyl acetate, respectively, and the ethyl acetate extracts showed the strongest inhibitory activity on the germination and growth of D. sanguinalis L. and A. retroflexus L.Using HPLC, one fraction with an absorption peak at 271 nm was separated from the crude toxin. This fraction could strongly inhibit the growth of D. sanguinalis L. at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 and could completely inhibit the seed germination of D. sanguinalis L. and A. retroflexus L. at a concentration of 50 mg L-1.

  18. Herbicides as weed control agents: state of the art: II. Recent achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehmer, Hansjoerg; van Almsick, Andreas; Beffa, Roland; Dietrich, Hansjoerg; Eckes, Peter; Hacker, Erwin; Hain, Ruediger; Strek, Harry John; Stuebler, Hermann; Willms, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    In response to changing market dynamics, the discovery of new herbicides has declined significantly over the past few decades and has only seen a modest upsurge in recent years. Nevertheless, the few introductions have proven to be interesting and have brought useful innovation to the market. In addition, herbicide-tolerant or herbicide-resistant crop technologies have allowed the use of existing nonselective herbicides to be extended into crops. An increasing and now major challenge is being posed by the inexorable increase in biotypes of weeds that are resistant to herbicides. This problem is now at a level that threatens future agricultural productivity and needs to be better understood. If herbicides are to remain sustainable, then it is a must that we adopt diversity in crop rotation and herbicide use as well as increase the use of nonchemical measures to control weeds. Nevertheless, despite the difficulties posed by resistant weeds and increased regulatory hurdles, new screening tools promise to provide an upsurge of potential herbicide leads. Our industry urgently needs to supply agriculture with new, effective resistance-breaking herbicides along with strategies to sustain their utility.

  19. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm‧) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l-1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l-1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm‧.

  20. Effects Of Spring Herbicide Treatments On Winter Wheat Growth And Grain Yield*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamouz P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides provide a low-cost solution for protecting crops from significant yield losses. If weed infestations are below damage thresholds, however, then herbicide application is unnecessary and can even lead to yield loss. A small-plot field trial was conducted to examine the effect of herbicides on winter wheat yields. Weeds were removed manually from the trial area before herbicide application. Twenty-four treatments were tested in four replications. Treatment 1 consisted of an untreated weed-free control, whereas the other treatments comprised applications of the following herbicides and their combinations: metsulfuron-methyl + tribenuron-methyl (4.95 + 9.99 g ha−1, pinoxaden (30 g ha−1, fluroxypyr (175 g ha−1, and clopyralid (120 g ha−1. Water (250 l ha−1 or a urea-ammonium nitrate fertilizer solution (UAN, 120.5 l ha−1 was used as the herbicide carrier. Crop injury 30 days after treatment and yield loss were recorded. Results showed minor crop injury by herbicides and their combinations when applied without UAN and moderate injury caused by UAN in combination with herbicides. Yield losses reached 5.3% and 4.3% in those treatments where all of the tested herbicides were applied with and without UAN, respectively. The effect of all treatments on crop yield was, however, statistically insignificant (P = 0.934.

  1. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-11-30

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'.

  2. Dicotyledon Weed Quantification Algorithm for Selective Herbicide Application in Maize Crops: Statistical Evaluation of the Potential Herbicide Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stigaard Laursen, Morten; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Midtiby, Henrik Skov;

    on the initial weed coverage. However, additional field trials covering more seasons and locations are needed to verify the generalisation of these results. There is a potential for further herbicide savings as the time interval between the first and second spraying session was not long enough for the weeds......This work contributes a statistical model and simulation framework yielding the best estimate possible for the potential herbicide reduction when using the MoDiCoVi algorithm all the while requiring an efficacy comparable to conventional spraying. In June 2013 a maize field located in Denmark were...... seeded. The field was divided into parcels which were assigned to one of two main groups: 1) Control, consisting of subgroups of no spray and full dose spray; 2) MoDiCoVi algorithm subdivided into five different leaf cover thresholds for spray activation. Also approximately 25% of the parcels were seeded...

  3. GWN-3189 B – A new selective herbicide based on Triallate for control of herbicide resistant grass weed in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlschlegel, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With substantial work on the formulation, Gowan offers a new herbicide (GWN-3189 B based on Triallate for use on winter wheat, winter barley, winter rye, winter triticale and spring barley. GWN-3189B will be applied from pre-emergence to early post-emergence of the crop and offers a broad spectrum against grass-weeds. GWN-3189 B is selective on all cereal species. As soil herbicide GWN-3189 B offers interesting alternatives in grass-weed resistance management. The efficacy on grass weed, especially on Alopecurus myosuroides (blackgrass, Apera spica venti (silky bentgrass and Lolium multiflorum (italian ryegrass is demonstrated with results of field trials performed in France, Great Britain and Germany.

  4. Monitoring of services with non-relational databases and map-reduce framework

    CERN Document Server

    Babik, M; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2012-01-01

    Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) is a well-established monitoring framework that performs regular measurements of the core site services and reports the corresponding availability and reliability of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure. One of the existing extensions of SAM is Site Wide Area Testing (SWAT), which gathers monitoring information from the worker nodes via instrumented jobs. This generates quite a lot of monitoring data to process, as there are several data points for every job and several million jobs are executed every day. The recent uptake of non-relational databases opens a new paradigm in the large-scale storage and distributed processing of systems with heavy read-write workloads. For SAM this brings new possibilities to improve its model, from performing aggregation of measurements to storing raw data and subsequent re-processing. Both SAM and SWAT are currently tuned to run at top performance, reaching some of the limits in storage and processing power of their exi...

  5. Weed response to herbicides: regional-scale distribution of herbicide resistance alleles in the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchari, Yosra; Camilleri, Christine; Michel, Séverine; Brunel, Dominique; Dessaint, Fabrice; Le Corre, Valérie; Délye, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Effective herbicide resistance management requires an assessment of the range of spatial dispersion of resistance genes among weed populations and identification of the vectors of this dispersion. In the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides (black-grass), seven alleles of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) gene are known to confer herbicide resistance. Here, we assessed their respective frequencies and spatial distribution on two nested geographical scales (the whole of France and the French administrative district of Côte d'Or) by genotyping 13 151 plants originating from 243 fields. Genetic variation in ACCase was structured in local populations at both geographical scales. No spatial structure in the distribution of resistant ACCase alleles and no isolation by distance were detected at either geographical scale investigated. These data, together with ACCase sequencing and data from the literature, suggest that evolution of A. myosuroides resistance to herbicides occurred at the level of the field or group of adjacent fields by multiple, independent appearances of mutant ACCase alleles that seem to have rather restricted spatial propagation. Seed transportation by farm machinery seems the most likely vector for resistance gene dispersal in A. myosuroides.

  6. The experimental evolution of herbicide resistance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii results in a positive correlation between fitness in the presence and absence of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, T; Lagator, M; Colegrave, N; Neve, P

    2012-10-01

    Pleiotropic fitness trade-offs will be key determinants of the evolutionary dynamics of selection for pesticide resistance. However, for herbicide resistance, empirical support for a fitness cost of resistance is mixed, and it is therefore also questionable what further ecological trade-offs can be assumed to apply to herbicide resistance. Here, we test the existence of trade-offs by experimentally evolving herbicide resistance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although fitness costs are detected for all herbicides, we find that, counterintuitively, the most resistant populations also have the lowest fitness costs as measured by growth rate in the ancestral environment. Furthermore, after controlling for differences in the evolutionary dynamics of resistance to different herbicides, we also detect significant positive correlations between resistance, fitness in the ancestral environment and cross-resistance to other herbicides. We attribute this to the highest levels of nontarget-site resistance being achieved by fixing mutations that more broadly affect cellular physiology, which results in both more cross-resistance and less overall antagonistic pleiotropy on maximum growth rate. Consequently, the lack of classical ecological trade-offs could present a major challenge for herbicide resistance management.

  7. Intensive herbicide use has selected for constitutively elevated levels of stress-responsive mRNAs and proteins in multiple herbicide-resistant Avena fatua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Barbara K; Burns, Erin E; Bothner, Brian; Carey, Charles C; Mazurie, Aurélien J; Hilmer, Jonathan K; Biyiklioglu, Sezgi; Budak, Hikmet; Dyer, William E

    2017-05-09

    Intensive use of herbicides has led to the evolution of two multiple herbicide-resistant (MHR) Avena fatua (wild oat) populations in Montana that are resistant to members of all selective herbicide families available for A. fatua control in US small grain crops. We used transcriptome and proteome surveys to compare constitutive changes in MHR and herbicide-susceptible (HS) plants associated with non-target site resistance. Compared to HS plants, MHR plants contained constitutively elevated levels of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with functions in xenobiotic catabolism, stress response, redox maintenance and transcriptional regulation that are similar to abiotic stress-tolerant phenotypes. Proteome comparisons identified similarly elevated proteins including biosynthetic and multifunctional enzymes in MHR plants. Of 25 DEGs validated by RT-qPCR assay, differential regulation of 21 co-segregated with flucarbazone-sodium herbicide resistance in F3 families, and a subset of 10 of these were induced or repressed in herbicide-treated HS plants. Although the individual and collective contributions of these DEGs and proteins to MHR remain to be determined, our results support the idea that intensive herbicide use has selected for MHR populations with altered, constitutively regulated patterns of gene expression that are similar to those in abiotic stress-tolerant plants. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. The toxicity of herbicides to non-target aquatic plants and algae: assessment of predictive factors and hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Streibig, Jens C

    2005-12-01

    Widely used herbicides sometimes inadvertently contaminate surface waters. In this study we evaluate the toxicity of herbicides to aquatic plants and algae and relate it to environmental herbicide concentrations and exposure scenarios, herbicide formulation and mode of action. This was done experimentally for ten herbicides, using the aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor L. and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (Korshikov) Hindak, supplemented with a database study comprising algae toxicity data for 146 herbicides. The laboratory study showed that herbicide formulations in general did not enhance herbicide efficacy in the aquatic environment. The Roundup formulation of glyphosate proved to be the only exception, decreasing the EC(50) of the technical product for both L. minor and P. subcapitata approximately fourfold. Comparison of the sensitivity of L. minor and P. subcapitata revealed up to 1000-fold higher sensitivity of L. minor for the herbicides categorized as weak acids (pK(a) action, was significantly more toxic than another. Synthetic auxins were the exception as they are virtually non-toxic to unicellular algae. There was no strong correlation between toxicity to algae and K(ow) of the herbicides, not even within groups having the same site of action. Evaluating all data, few herbicides were toxic at concentrations below 1 microg l(-1), which is the 99.9th percentile of the herbicide concentrations measured in the Danish surveillance programme. Joint action of several herbicides cannot however be excluded.

  9. Toxicity assessment of herbicides quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop towards Rhizobium pea symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahemad, Munees; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2009-06-01

    In modern conventional agriculture, herbicides are frequently used to prevent yield losses due to weeds. Herbicides also affect negatively the productivity of legumes. With these considerations, we evaluated the effects of soil applications of different concentrations of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop on the performance of Rhizobium inoculated pea, grown in clay pots. In this study, the concentration of herbicides higher than the recommended rates of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop adversely affected the dry matter accumulation, symbiotic properties, grain yield and nutrient status of pea plants. Toxicity of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop to pea plants increased progressively with increase in rates of herbicides. Of the two herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl was more toxic than clodinafop. In contrast, when herbicide tolerant Rhizobium strain MRP1 was also used with herbicide, it increased the measured parameters at all concentrations. A maximum increase of 11%, 17%, 46%, 33%, 21% and 7% in the root N, shoot N, root P, shoot P, seed yield and seed protein, respectively, was observed when MRP1 was used with 120 microg quizalafop-p-ethyl kg(-1) soil while with 1,200 microg clodinafop kg(-1) soil it increased the root N, shoot N, root P, shoot P, seed yield and seed protein by 20%, 9%, 56%, 56%, 29% and 7%, respectively, compared with the un-inoculated but herbicide treated control. This study suggested that the toxic effects of herbicides on pea plants could be attenuated by applying growth promoting herbicide tolerant strain of Rhizobium under herbicide stressed soil environment.

  10. The potential benefits of herbicide regulation: a cautionary note for the Great Barrier Reef catchment area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A M; Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; Benson, Ash

    2014-08-15

    Industry transitions away from traditional photosystem II inhibiting (PSII) herbicides towards an 'alternative' herbicide suite are now widely advocated as a key component of improved environmental outcomes for Australia's Great Barrier Reef and improved environmental stewardship on the part of the Queensland sugar industry. A systematic desktop risk analysis found that based on current farming practices, traditional PSII herbicides can pose significant environmental risks. Several of the 'alternatives' that can directly fill a specific pre-emergent ('soil residual') weed control function similar to regulated PSII herbicides also, however, presented a similar environmental risk profile, regardless of farming systems and bio-climatic zones being considered. Several alternatives with a pre-emergent residual function as well as alternative post-emergent (contact or 'knockdown') herbicides were, predicted to pose lower environmental risks than the regulated PSII herbicides to most trophic levels, although environmental risks could still be present. While several herbicides may well be viable alternatives in terms of weed control, they can still present equal or possibly higher risks to the environment. Imposing additional regulations (or even de-registrations) on particular herbicides could result in marginal, and possibly perverse environmental impacts in the long term, if usage shifts to alternative herbicides with similar risk profiles. Regardless of any regulatory efforts, improved environmental sustainability outcomes in pesticide practices within the Great Barrier Reef catchment area will hinge primarily on the continuing adoption of integrated, strategic pest management systems and technologies applied to both traditional and 'alternative' herbicides. One of the emerging policy challenges is ensuring the requisite technical and extension support for cane growers to ensure effective adoption of rapidly evolving farming system technologies, in a very dynamic and

  11. The Value of Green Manuring in the Integrated Management of Herbicide-Resistant Annual Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)

    OpenAIRE

    Monjardino, Marta; Pannell, David J.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2000-01-01

    Herbicide resistance has become a major problem in Australian dryland agriculture. This situation has resulted from the repeated use of herbicides in place of the traditional weed control provided by cultivation and grazing. Farmers have addressed the problem of herbicide resistance by adopting a system of integrated weed management that allows weed control with a range of different techniques and herbicides. One of the non-chemical methods being considered by farmers is “green manuring”, whi...

  12. Post-directed application of a potential organic herbicide for bell peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, an...

  13. Integration of agronomic practices with herbicides for sustainable weed management in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Mohamed, M T M; Uddin, M K; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point.

  14. Assessing the extent and effects of herbicide drift into Danish hedgerows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus; Andersen, H. V.; Strandberg, M. T.

    Very low dosages of herbicides are known to cause effects on bird cherry (Prunus avium) and hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna). It is not yet known whether other hedgerow trees and shrubs are equally sensitive to herbicide drift, to which extent spray drift into hedges and other habitats close to fields...

  15. Study on the biochemical characterization of herbicide detoxification enzyme, glutathione S-transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Young; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2007-01-01

    To gain further insight into herbicide detoxification, we studied the herbicide activity and specificity toward glutathione S-transferases from human and rice. In this study, the genes of the plant specific phi and tau class GST enzymes from Oryza sativa (OsGST) and human pi class GST enzyme (hGSTP1-1) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with the pET and pKK vector systems, respectively. The gene products were purified to homogeneity by GSH Sepharose affinity column chromatography. The herbicide specificity of the enzymes was investigated by enzyme-catalyzed conjugation of GSH with chloroacetanilide, diphenylether and chloro-s-triazine herbicides. The hGSTP1-1 showed very high specific activity toward atrazine. On the other hand, the phi class OsGST enzymes showed high specific activity toward chloroacetanilide herbicides, acetochlor, alachlor and metolachlor. The tau class GST enzymes displayed remarkable activity toward the diphenylether herbicide, fluorodifen. From these results, we conclude that the phi and the tau class GST enzymes show herbicide specificities and also they play an important role in the detoxification reaction of plant toward herbicides.

  16. Detection of herbicide subclasses by an optical multibiosensor based on an array of photosystem II mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Guzzella, Licia; Euzet, Pierre; Rouillon, Regis; Esposito, Dania

    2005-07-15

    Massive use of herbicides in agriculture over the last few decades has become a serious environmental problem. The residual concentration of these compounds frequently exceeds the maximum admissible concentration in drinking water for human consumption and is a real environmental risk for the aquatic ecosystem. Herbicides inhibiting photosynthesis via targeting photosystem II function still represent the basic means of weed control. A multibiosensor was constructed for detecting herbicides using as biosensing elements photosynthetic preparations coupled to an optical fluorescence transduction system (Giardi et al. EU patent EP1134585, 01830148.1-2204); this paper is about its application in the detection of herbicide subclasses in river water. Photosynthetic material was immobilized on a silicio septum inside a series of flow cells, close to diodes so as to activate photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. The principle of the detection was based on the factthat herbicides selectively modify PSII fluorescence activity. The multibiosensor has the original feature of being able to distinguish the subclasses of the photosynthetic herbicides by using specific immobilized biomediators isolated from mutated organisms. This setup resulted in a reusable, portable multibiosensor for the detection of herbicide subclasses with a half-life of 54 h for spinach thylakoids and limit of detection of 3 x 10(-9) M for herbicides present in river water.

  17. Oxidative stress caused by the use of preemergent herbicides in rice crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Langaro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the methods of weed control, stands out chemical control. However, even selective, herbicides can trigger the production of reactive species of oxygen and cause oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in photosynthetic parameters, oxidative damage, antioxidant enzyme activity and altered metabolism of rice plants after applying pre-emergent herbicides. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse and herbicides used were oxadiazon, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen, beyond the control without herbicide. There was a reduction of photosynthetic rate and efficiency of carboxylation, compared to the control, when applied herbicides oxyfluorfen and pendimethalin. The major lipid peroxidation and proline accumulation was observed for the herbicide oxyfluorfen. The oxyfluorfen and oxadiazon herbicides also resulted in increased activity of superoxide dismutase, compared to control. When evaluated ascorbate peroxidase activity, there was a higher enzyme activity in plants treated with oxadiazon and pendimethalin. Even selective herbicides registered for weed control in rice crops cause phytotoxicity, reduce height and alter the metabolism of plants, generating reactive oxygen species, which activate enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems and result in the degradation of photosynthetic pigments and in reduced protein content.

  18. The changes of glutation reductase activity in maize seedlings under heavy metals and herbicide frontjere influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Bilchuk

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In modelling experiment joint action of heavy metal ions (lead, cadmium and cloroacetanilide herbicide frontjere on glutationreductase activity in maize seedlings at initial stages of ontogenesis was investigated. The increasing of enzyme activity in a sprouting grain at herbicide and ions of lead and cadmium presence and variation of enzyme activity in seedlings were established at joint action of toxicants.

  19. Banded applications are highly effective in minimising herbicide migration from furrow-irrigated sugar cane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Danielle P; Anderson, Jenny S; Davis, Aaron; Lewis, Stephen; Brodie, Jon; Kookana, Rai

    2014-01-01

    Runoff from farm fields is a common source of herbicide residues in surface waters in many agricultural industries around the world. In Queensland, Australia, the runoff of PSII inhibitor herbicides (in particular diuron and atrazine) is a major concern due to their potential impact on the Great Barrier Reef. This study compared the conventional practice of broadcast application of herbicides in sugarcane production across the whole field with the banded application of particular herbicides onto raised beds only using a shielded sprayer. This study found that the application of two moderately soluble herbicides, diuron and atrazine, to only the raised beds decreased the average total load of both herbicides moving off-site by >90% compared with the conventional treatment. This was despite the area being covered with the herbicides by the banded application being only 60% less than with the conventional treatment. The average total amount of atrazine in drainage water was 7.5% of the active ingredient applied in the conventional treatment compared with 1.8% of the active ingredient applied in the banded application treatment. Similarly, the average total amount of diuron in drainage water was 4.6% of that applied in the conventional treatment compared with 0.9% of that applied in the banded application treatment. This study demonstrates that the application of diuron and atrazine to raised beds only is a highly effective way of minimising migration of these herbicides in drainage water from furrow irrigated sugarcane.

  20. Herbicide Resistant Weeds: Do Economic Thresholds Still Have a Role in Weed Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern over the development of herbicide resistant weeds has prompted a closer look at the validity of using economic thresholds (ET) as a basis for making treatment decisions. In situations where herbicide resistance is suspected, growers are often advised to employ control measures to completely ...

  1. Controlling herbicide-resistant weeds: consider incorporating alfalfa in a corn/soybean rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide resistant weeds (HRW) are a serious problem in the U.S. In 1968, the first confirmed case of herbicide resistance in weeds was reported in Washington state. In the 46 years since, the number of HRW in the U.S. has increased dramatically. A major reason for the recent increase in HRW has be...

  2. Long distance pollen-mediated flow of herbicide resistance genes in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Yu, Qin; Barrett-Lennard, Robert; Powles, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Gene flow promotes genetic exchange among plant populations mediating evolutionary dynamics; yet, the importance of gene flow at distance via pollen movement is poorly understood. A field experiment at the landscape level was conducted with Lolium rigidum herbicide-susceptible individuals (population VLR1) placed into an otherwise Lolium-free bushland environment at increasing distances from adjacent large commercial crop fields infested with herbicide-resistant L. rigidum. Herbicide resistance was used as a marker to quantify the distance and the rate of pollen-mediated gene flow. About 21,245 seeds were produced on the isolated, susceptible mother plants of which 3,303 seedlings were tested for herbicide resistance and 664 seedlings were found to be resistant. Pollen-mediated gene flow occurred at 3,000 m (maximum tested distance). Both Mendelian and molecular analyses (sequencing and CAPS markers) confirmed the introgression of herbicide resistance genes. This is the first documented case of long-distance gene flow in L. rigidum. The results are important for future modeling simulations of herbicide resistance evolution and subsequent mobility. The adoption of integrated agronomic strategies, the control of potential receptor plants on fields' margins and conservative use of herbicides can be realistic options to minimize herbicide resistance spread.

  3. Herbicide resistance of transgenic rice plants expressing human CYP1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) metabolize herbicides to produce mainly non-phytotoxic metabolites. Although rice plants endogenously express multiple P450 enzymes, transgenic plants expressing other P450 isoforms might show improved herbicide resistance or reduce herbicide residues. Mammalian P450s metabolizing xenobiotics are reported to show a broad and overlapping substrate specificity towards lipophilic foreign chemicals, including herbicides. These P450s are ideal for enhancing xenobiotic metabolism in plants. A human P450, CYP1A1, metabolizes various herbicides with different structures and modes of herbicide action. We introduced human CYP1A1 into rice plants, and the transgenic rice plants showed broad cross-resistance towards various herbicides and metabolized them. The introduced CYP1A1 enhanced the metabolism of chlorotoluron and norflurazon. The herbicides were metabolized more rapidly in the transgenic rice plants than in non-transgenic controls. Transgenic rice plants expressing P450 might be useful for reducing concentrations of various chemicals in the environment.

  4. Gene Amplification Is A Mechanism For Rapid Weed Evolution To Herbicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the U.S. and other parts of the world following the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops were created by introduction of a modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, the herbicide target site. Increased use of ...

  5. Questions concerning the potential impact of glyphosate-based herbicides on amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Norman; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Teichmann, Hanka; Tappeser, Beatrix; Lötters, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides is increasing worldwide. The authors review the available data related to potential impacts of these herbicides on amphibians and conduct a qualitative meta-analysis. Because little is known about environmental concentrations of glyphosate in amphibian habitats and virtually nothing is known about environmental concentrations of the substances added to the herbicide formulations that mainly contribute to adverse effects, glyphosate levels can only be seen as approximations for contamination with glyphosate-based herbicides. The impact on amphibians depends on the herbicide formulation, with different sensitivity of taxa and life stages. Effects on development of larvae apparently are the most sensitive endpoints to study. As with other contaminants, costressors mainly increase adverse effects. If and how glyphosate-based herbicides and other pesticides contribute to amphibian decline is not answerable yet due to missing data on how natural populations are affected. Amphibian risk assessment can only be conducted case-specifically, with consideration of the particular herbicide formulation. The authors recommend better monitoring of both amphibian populations and contamination of habitats with glyphosate-based herbicides, not just glyphosate, and suggest including amphibians in standardized test batteries to study at least dermal administration.

  6. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  7. Investigation of 10 herbicides in surface waters of a horticultural production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, Graeme; Bui, AnhDuyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Wightwick, Adam M; Allinson, Mayumi; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Herbicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the levels and potential ecotoxicological impact of herbicides in horticultural catchments in southern Australia. This study investigated the presence of 10 herbicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period in horticulturally important areas of the Yarra Valley in southeastern Australia. Seven of the 10 herbicides were detected in the streams, in 39 % of spot water samples, in 25 % of surface sediment samples, and in >70 % of the passive sampler systems deployed. Few samples contained residues of ≥2 herbicides. Simazine was the herbicide most frequently detected in water, sediment, and passive sampler samples and had the highest concentrations in water (0.67 μg/L) and sediment (260 μg/kg dry weight). Generally the concentrations of the herbicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, including those for aquatic plants and algae, suggesting that concentrations of individual chemicals in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, little is known about the combined effects of simultaneous, low-level exposure of multiple herbicides of the same mode of action on Australian aquatic organisms nor their contribution when found in mixtures with other pesticides. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of pesticides in Victorian aquatic environments.

  8. Ectomycorrhizal formation in herbicide-treated soils of differing clay and organic matter content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt D. Busse; Gary O. p Fiddler; Alice W. Ratcliff

    2004-01-01

    Herbicides are commonly used on private timberlands in the western United States for site preparation and control of competing vegetation. How non-target soil biota respond to herbicide applications, however, is not thoroughly understood. We tested the effects of triclorpyr, imazapyr, and sulfometuron methyl on ectomycorrhizal formation in a greenhouse study. Ponderosa...

  9. Limited fitness costs of herbicide-resistance traits in Amaranthus tuberculatus facilitate resistance evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenxi; Davis, Adam S; Tranel, Patrick J

    2017-08-18

    The fitness cost of herbicide resistance (HR) in the absence of herbicide selection plays a key role in HR evolution. Quantifying the fitness cost of resistance, however, is challenging, and there exists a knowledge gap in this area. A synthetic (artificially generated) Amaranthus tuberculatus population segregating for five types of HR was subjected to competitive growth conditions in the absence of herbicide selection for six generations. Fitness costs were quantified by using a combination of phenotyping and genotyping to monitor HR frequency changes over generations. In the absence of herbicide selection, a significant fitness cost was observed for resistance to acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides, but not for resistances to atrazine (non-target-site resistance mechanism), protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors, 4-hydroxyphenylpryuvate dioxygenase inhibitors or glyphosate. Glyphosate resistance was conferred by multiple mechanisms in the synthetic population, and further analysis revealed that one mechanism, amplification of the 5-enolypyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene, did decrease in frequency. Our results indicate that herbicide-resistance mitigation strategies (e.g. herbicide rotation) that rely on the existence of fitness costs in the absence of herbicide selection likely will be largely ineffective in many cases. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Structural basis of cyanobacterial photosystem II Inhibition by the herbicide terbutryn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the Q(B) site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B). Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3

  11. Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae as an indicator of toxicity of herbicides registered for corn in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claubert W.G de Menezes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of plants in agricultural systems benefits natural enemies. Herbicides are used in weed management in corn (Zea mays L. to reduce competition and productivity losses, but they can impact natural enemies and contaminate the environment. The objective was to evaluate toxicity of herbicides on pupae parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare and LaSalle, 1993 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae. The treatments were represented by the host pupae Tenebrio molitor L., 1785 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae and herbicides atrazine, nicosulfuron, paraquat, and tembotrione in commercial doses compared to a control treatment with water. Pupae of T. molitor were immersed in the solution of herbicides and exposed to parasitism by six females of P. elaeisis each. The herbicides atrazine and paraquat were highly toxic and, therefore, not selective to P. elaeisis. Nicosulfuron reduced the sex ratio of P. elaeisis (0.20 ± 0.03, which may affect subsequent generations. Moreover, the herbicide tembotrione was selective to P. elaeisis, showing results comparable to the control. Floristic diversity of weeds can increase food source, habitat, shelter, breeding places and microclimates for insect parasitoids but herbicides formulations can be toxic and these products can affect P. elaeisis or its hosts by direct or indirect contact, showing the importance of selectivity studies for this natural enemy. However, the herbicide tembotrione was selective to P. elaeisis and it can be recommended for programs of sustainable management of weeds in corn crop with this parasitoid.

  12. Controlling herbicide-susceptible, -tolerant and -resistant weeds with microbial bioherbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The management of weeds is a necessary but expensive challenge. Public concerns of health, safety, and sustainability have increased interest in reducing the use of synthetic chemicals for weed control. Alternatives to chemical herbicides, such as bioherbicides, may offer an alternative to herbicide...

  13. Lawn Weed Control with Herbicides. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 123.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Information and diagrams are given for identification and treatment of weed grasses and broadleaf weeds. Herbicides are suggested for use against each weed and instructions are given for proper application. Information is given for buying herbicides, and applying sprays and cleaning sprayers. (BB)

  14. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051). The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  15. A simple agar plate method, using micro-algae, for herbicide bio-assay or detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S J

    1975-07-01

    A simple, inexpensive method is described for the bio-assay of herbicides using micro-algae growing on agar plates. A result is obtainable in 2 days and the method is suitable for biodetection of herbicide residues, or toxicity studies on soil or aquatic pollutants.

  16. Joe Celko's complete guide to NoSQL what every SQL professional needs to know about non-relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Celko, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Joe Celko's Complete Guide to NoSQL provides a complete overview of non-relational technologies so that you can become more nimble to meet the needs of your organization. As data continues to explode and grow more complex, SQL is becoming less useful for querying data and extracting meaning. In this new world of bigger and faster data, you will need to leverage non-relational technologies to get the most out of the information you have. Learn where, when, and why the benefits of NoSQL outweigh those of SQL with Joe Celko's Complete Guide to NoSQL. This book covers three areas that make toda

  17. Downy Brome (Bromus tectorum L. and Broadleaf Weed Control in Winter Wheat with Acetolactate Synthase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W. Geier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted for three seasons in northwest Kansas, USA to evaluate acetolactate synthase (ALS-inhibiting herbicides for downy brome (Bromus tectorum L. and winter annual broadleaf weed control in winter wheat. Herbicides included pyroxsulam at 18.4 g ai ha−1, propoxycarbazone-Na at 44 g ai ha−1, premixed propoxycarbazone-Na & mesosulfuron-methyl at 27 g ai ha−1, and sulfosulfuron at 35 g ai ha−1. The herbicides were applied postemergence in fall and spring seasons. Averaged over time of application, no herbicide controlled downy brome more than 78% in any year. When downy brome densities were high, control was less than 60%. Pyroxsulam controlled downy brome greater than or similar to other herbicides tested. Flixweed (Descurainia sophia L., blue mustard [Chorispora tenella (Pallas DC.], and henbit (Lamium amplexicaule L. control did not differ among herbicide treatments. All herbicides tested controlled flixweed and blue mustard at least 87% and 94%, respectively. However, none of the herbicides controlled henbit more than 73%. Fall herbicide applications improved weed control compared to early spring applications; improvement ranged from 3% to 31% depending on the weed species. Henbit control was greatly decreased by delaying herbicide applications until spring compared to fall applications (49% vs. 80% control. Herbicide injury was observed in only two instances. The injury was ≤13% with no difference between herbicides and the injury did not impact final plant height or grain yield.

  18. On the optimization of low dosage application systems : Improvement of dose advice and early detection of herbicidal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riethmuller-Haage, I.C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Application of herbicides at rates below the recommended label dose has received considerable attention in recent years as it is a means of reducing overall herbicide use. To minimize the risk of inadequate weed control in these situations, the Minimum Lethal Herbicide Dose (MLHD) technology, which

  19. Triaziflam and Diaminotriazine derivatives affect enantioselectively multiple herbicide target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, K; Tresch, S; Plath, P

    2001-01-01

    Enantiomers of triaziflam and structurally related diaminotriazines were synthesized and their herbicidal mode of action was investigated. The compounds caused light and dark-dependent effects in multiple test systems including heterotrophic cleaver and photoautotrophic algal cell suspensions, the Hill reaction of isolated thylakoids and germinating cress seeds. Dose-response experiments revealed that the (S)-enantiomers of the compounds preferentially inhibited photosystem II electron transport (PET) and algae growth with efficacies similar to that of the herbicide atrazine. In contrast, the (R)-enantiomers of the diaminotriazines were up to 100 times more potent inhibitors of growth in cleaver cell suspensions and cress seedlings in the dark than the (S)-enantiomers. The most active compound, the (R)-enantiomer of triaziflam, inhibited shoot and root elongation of cress and maize seedlings at concentrations below 1 microM. The meristematic root tips swelled into a club shape which is typical for the action of mitotic disrupter herbicides and cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors. Microscopic examination using histochemical techniques revealed that triaziflam (R)-enantiomer blocks cell division in maize root tips 4 h after treatment. The chromosomes proceeded to a condensed state of prometaphase but were unable to progress further in the mitotic cycle. Disruption of mitosis was accompanied by a loss of spindle and phragmoplast micotubule arrays. Concomitantly, cortical microtubules decreased which could lead to isodiametric cell growth and consequently to root swelling. In addition, a decline in cellulose deposition in cell walls was found 24 h after treatment. Compared to the (R)-form, triaziflam (S)-enantiomer was clearly less active. The results suggest that triaziflam and related diaminotriazines affect enantioselectively multiple sites of action which include PET inhibitory activity, mitotic disruption by inhibiting microtubule formation and inhibition of

  20. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996–2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the ‘conventional alternative’ have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased

  1. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  2. Electrochemical Study of Diphenyl Ether Derivatives Used as Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zaouak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of five nitro diphenyl ethers used as herbicides is investigated in acetonitrile. A detailed study by cyclic voltammetry and exhaustive electrolysis is carried out for the anodic oxidation of 2-Chloro-6-nitro-3-phenoxyaniline (aclonifen and shows that the major oxidation product is a dimeric compound. A mechanistic scheme involving a coupling process is postulated for the electrochemical oxidation of this compound. Furthermore, the use of differential pulse voltammetry on a glassy carbon electrode permits the selective determination of aclonifen. The limit of detection is 0.6 μg/mL.

  3. Biodegradation of the herbicide Diuron in soil by indigenous actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, E; Paulillo, S M; Manfio, G P

    1998-08-01

    Three actinomycete strains isolated from soil treated with 2,4-D were able to degrade the herbicide Diuron in vitro. Strain CCT 4916 was the most efficient, degrading up to 37% of applied Diuron (100 mg Kg-1 soil) in 7 days, as measured by HPLC and UV/VIS spectroscopy. All strains showed protease and urease activity; intracellular activity of metapyrocatechase and pyrocatechase were not found. Actinomycete strain CCT 4916 produced manganese peroxidase, which could be potentially related to degradation of Diuron.

  4. Spray boom for selectively spraying a herbicidal composition onto dicots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a method and spray boom for discriminating cereal crop (monocot) and weeds (dicots). The spray boom includes means for digitally recording an image of a selected area to be treated by a nozzle on the spray boom, whereby a plant material is identified based on a segmentation...... procedure; and means for detecting the edges and estimating the angles of the edges of the leaves so as to discriminate between dicots and monocots; and means for activating one or more of the spray nozzles in response to detected dicots so as to selectively apply the herbicidal composition onto the sensed...... area containing the dicots....

  5. Influence of nitrogen rate on the efficacy of herbicides with different modes of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Mette; Swanton, C. J.; Kudsk, Per Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    -methyl. An increased susceptibility at high nitrogen rate was also observed for Anagallis arvensis, but in contrast to T. inodorum, growth of unsprayed A. arvensis was unaffected by nitrogen rate. Growth of unsprayed Chenopodium album was also promoted by nitrogen supply. However, no influence of nitrogen rate...... affected herbicide efficacy for some but not all combinations of weed species and herbicide. Decreased herbicide efficacy was only observed at very low nitrogen rates. The results suggest that the effect of nitrogen rates on herbicide efficacy will be marginal in intensive farming systems with high......Outdoor pot experiments and field experiments were conducted to examine the influence of nitrogen rate on herbicide efficacy. Growth of unsprayed Tripleurospermum inodorum increased with increasing nitrogen rate in pot experiments; increasing nitrogen also increased the susceptibility to tribenuron...

  6. Herbicide-resistant weeds: from research and knowledge to future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Beckie, Hugh J; Gaines, Todd A; Goggin, Danica E; Kaundun, Shiv S; Lacoste, Myrtille; Neve, Paul; Nissen, Scott J; Norsworthy, Jason K; Renton, Michael; Shaner, Dale L; Tranel, Patrick J; Wright, Terry; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic herbicides have been used globally to control weeds in major field crops. This has imposed a strong selection for any trait that enables plant populations to survive and reproduce in the presence of the herbicide. Herbicide resistance in weeds must be minimized because it is a major limiting factor to food security in global agriculture. This represents a huge challenge that will require great research efforts to develop control strategies as alternatives to the dominant and almost exclusive practice of weed control by herbicides. Weed scientists, plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists should join forces and work towards an improved and more integrated understanding of resistance across all scales. This approach will likely facilitate the design of innovative solutions to the global herbicide resistance challenge.

  7. Genetic transformation of calli from maize and regen-eration of herbicide-resistant plantlets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The herbicide-resistant gene als of Arabidopsis thaliana has been transferred into embryonic calli of maize by microprojectile bombardment. We have obtained chlor-sulfuron-resistant calli and regenerated plantlets through selection by herbicide chlorsulfuron. The results of PCR analysis and Southern blotting indicate that gene als has been transferred into some plantlets. The test of spraying chlorsulfuron indicated that the transgenic plantlets had favorable herbicide-resistant trait. The purpose of the re-search was to obtain chlorsulfuron-resistant transgenic ma-ize and hope that this kind of high efficient herbicide could be widely used in rotation soil of wheat and maize. In addi-tion, through spraying herbicide, we could eliminate the hybrid plants and thereby increase the purity of F1 seeds.

  8. Mechanism of the plant cytochrome P450 for herbicide resistance: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinfan; Fang, Yupeng; Li, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Huibin; Kang, Zhuo; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua

    2013-12-01

    Plant cytochrome P450 is a key enzyme responsible for the herbicide resistance but the molecular basis of the mechanism is unclear. To understand this, four typical plant P450s and a widely resistant herbicide chlortoluron were analysed by carrying out homology modelling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. Our results demonstrate that: (i) the putative hydrophobic residues located in the F-helix and polar residues in I-helix are critical in the herbicide resistance; (ii) the binding mode analysis and binding free energy calculation indicate that the distance between catalytic site of chlortoluron and heme of P450, as well as the binding affinity are key elements affecting the resistance for plants. In conclusion, this work provides a new insight into the interactions of plant P450s with herbicide from a molecular level, offering valuable information for the future design of novel effective herbicides which also escape from the P450 metabolism.

  9. Study of different herbicide molecules for the control of durum wheat weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Perniola

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the chances to rotate the herbicide molecules, the effectiveness of a new molecule, pinoxaden, was tested, comparing it with other herbicides used in wheat weed control. The trial was carried out comparing the following herbicide mixtures: 1 no weed control treatment; 2 Tribenuron Methyl (TM; 3 Clodinafop (C; 4 Tribenuron Methyl + Clodinafop (TM+C; 5 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile (PCP; 6 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile + Triasulfuron (PCP+T; 7 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile + absolute Ioxinil and Mecoprop (PCP+IM. The new PCP+T herbicides mixture didn’t differ statistically from the traditional TMC treatment in terms of effectiveness, but the agronomic result of the new mixture was totally satisfactory, even taking into account that the marketing of this mixture is not aimed to compete with other existing herbicides but to widen the chance to rotate active principles in time and space, in order to control the onset of resistance phenomena.

  10. Adsorption of Acetanilide Herbicides on Soil and Its Components: IV. Sorption of Acetanilide Herbicides on Soils and Its Correlation with Soil Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of acetanilide herbicides, metolachlor, acetochlor, pretilachlor and butachlor on eight soils with various physical and chemical properties was studied. The adsorption isotherms could fit Freundlich equation well (r2 >= 0.91) and the adsorption extents increased in the order: metolachlor < acetochlor < pretilachlor < butachlor. The product of Freundlich adsorption constants, Kf (1/n), showed to have a good correlation with organic matter content (OM) of soils for each of these herbicides, suggesting that OM is the primary factor dominating in the adsorption process of these acetanilide herbicides. Multivariant correlation regression between Kf(i/n) and two factors, water solubility (Sw) of herbicides and OM, was also performed. Kf(1/n) correlated with 1/Sw and OM/Sw well, showing that high Sw corresponds to a weak tendency to adsorb on soils. Infrared (IR) spectra and electron spin resonance (ESR) parameters confirmed that multifunctional H-bonds and charge-transfer bonds were the main adsorption mechanisms of these acetanilide herbicides. The abilities of herbicides to form these adsorption bonds with HA increased in the same order as the extent of adsorption.

  11. Adsorption of Acetanilide Herbicides on Soil and Its COmponents: Ⅳ.Sorption of Acetanilide Herbicides on Soils and Its Correlation with Soil Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUWEIPING; WANGQIQUAN; 等

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of acetanilide herbicides,metolachlor,acetochlor,pretilachlor and butachlor on eight soils with various physical and chemical properties was studied,The adsporption isotherms could fit Freundlich equation well(r2≥0.91) and the adsorption extents increased in the order:metolachlorherbicides,suggesting that OM is the primary factor dominating in the adsorption process of these acetanilide herbicides.Multivariant orrelation regression between Kf(1/n) and two factors,water solubility(Sw) of herbicides and OM,was also performed,Kf(1/n) correlated with 1/Sw and OM/Sw well showing that high Sw corresponds to a weak tendency to adsorb on soils.Infrared(IR) spectra and electron pin resonance(ESR) parameters confirmed that multifunctional H-bonds and charge-transfer bonds were the mian adsorption mechanismes of these acetanilitde herbicides,The abilities of herbicides to form these adsorption bonds with HA increased in the same order as the extent of adsorption.

  12. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DIMETHYLAMINE VAPORS EMISSION: HERBICIDE PRODUCTION PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Arsenijević

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The widely used herbicide, dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D-DMA, is usually prepared by mixing a dimethylamine (DMA aqueous solution with a solid 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. The vapors of the both, reactants and products, are potentially hazardous for the environment. The contribution of DMA vapors in overall pollution from this process is most significant, concerning vapor pressures data of these pollutants. Therefore, the control of the air pollution in the manufacture and handling of methylamines is very important. Within this paper, the optimal air pollution control system in preparation of 2,4-D-DMA was developed for the pesticides manufacturing industry. This study employed the simple pollution prevention concept to reduce the emission of DMA vapors at the source. The investigations were performed on the pilot plant scale. To reduce the emission of DMA vapors, the effluent gases from the herbicide preparation zone were passed through the packed bed scrubber (water - scrubbing medium, and the catalytic reactor in sequence. The end result is a substantially improved air quality in the working area, as well as in the urbanized areas located near the chemical plant.

  13. Weed supression by smother crops and selective herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a smother crop is thought to suppress weed density and to add other beneficial effects in sustainable agricultural systems. Weed suppression ought to be considered an essential component of integrated weed management. However, very little is known about the effects of green manure plants on weeds. This study evaluated the influence of three green manure species on weed suppression and selectivity of herbicides. A field experiment was designed to determine the effect of the green manure species Crotalaria juncea, Arachis pintoi and pigeon pea on the weeds Brachiaria decumbens, guineagrass and hairy beggarticks, and on the natural weed infestation in the inter rows area of an avocado orchard. The weed species were suppressed differently by each green manure species. Soil samples collected from the field experiment presented a residual effect, of at least 30 d, in suppressing weed seed bank recruitment; this residual effect was caused by the residues of the green manure present in the soil. When the green manure was incorporated into the top 5 cm of soil or left on the surface, in a greenhouse experiment, the emergence of weed seeds was significantly inhibited, depending on the species, and on the amount and depth of green manure incorporation. Greenhouse experiments indicate that pre-emergence herbicides cause lower phytotoxicity than post-emergence Arachis pintoi. Smother crops using green manure species, when well established in an area, provide additional weed control to the cropping system and are effective and valuable tools in integrated weed management.

  14. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10−7 M and linearity to 10−6 M for phenylarsenite and 5×10−6 M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters. PMID:24359149

  15. Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

  16. Biochar-mediated reductive transformation of nitro herbicides and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seok-Young; Son, Jong-Gil; Chiu, Pei C

    2013-03-01

    Biochar, a subset of black carbon produced via pyrolysis of biomass, has received much attention in recent years due to its potential to address many important issues, from energy and climate to agriculture and environmental quality. Biochar is known to influence the fate and transport of organic contaminants, although its role has been generally assumed to be as an adsorbent. In this study, the authors investigated the ability of biochar to catalyze the reductive reactions of nitro herbicides and explosives. Two biochars, derived from poultry litter and wastewater biosolids, were found to promote the reductive removal of the dinitro herbicides pendimethalin and trifluralin and the explosives 2,4-dinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by dithiothreitol. Parallel experiments using another black carbon material, graphite powder or granular activated carbon, in place of a biochar resulted in comparable rate enhancement to show reduction products, such as 2,4-diaminotoluene and formaldehyde. A cyclization product of trifluralin and reduction products of dinitrotoluene and RDX were detected only when biochar and dithiothreitol were both present, supporting the ability of biochar to promote redox reactions. Three possible catalysts, including graphene moieties, surface functional groups, and redox-active metals, in biochar may be responsible for the biochar-mediated reactions. The environmental significance, implications, and applications of this previously unrecognized role of biochar are discussed. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  17. Developmental toxicity of diphenyl ether herbicides in nestling American kestrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Spann, J.W.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Bunck, C.M.; Rattner, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Beginning the day after hatching, American kestrel (Falco sparverius) nestlings were orally dosed for 10 consecutive days with 5 microliters/g of corn oil (controls) or one of the diphenyl ether herbicides (nitrofen, bifenox, or oxyfluorfen) at concentrations of 10, 50, 250, or 500 mg/kg in corn oil. At 500 mg/kg, nitrofen resulted in complete nestling mortality, bifenox in high (66%) mortality, and oxyfluorfen in no mortality. Nitrofen at 250 mg/kg reduced nestling growth as reflected by decreased body weight, crownrump length, and bone lengths including humerus, radiusulna, femur, and tibiotarsus. Bifenox at 250 mg/kg had less effect on growth than nitrofen, but crownrump, humerus, radiusulna, and femur were significantly shorter than controls. Liver weight as a percent of body weight increased with 50 and 250 mg/kg nitrofen. Other manifestations of impending hepatotoxicity following nitrofen ingestion included increased hepatic GSH peroxidase activity in all nitrofentreated groups, and increased plasma enzyme activities for ALT, AST, and LDHL in the 250mg/kg group. Bifenox ingestion resulted in increased hepatic GSH peroxidase activity in the 50and 250mg/kg groups. Nitrofen exposure also resulted in an increase in total plasma thyroxine (T4) concentration. These findings suggest that altricial nestlings are more sensitive to diphenyl ether herbicides than young or adult birds of precocial species.

  18. Transformation of herbicide propachlor by an agrochemical thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Yates, Scott R; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin

    2004-12-15

    Propachlor and other chloroacetanilide herbicides are frequently detected contaminants of groundwater and surface water in agricultural regions. The purpose of this work was to develop a new approach to remove propachlor residues from the environment via chemical remediation by the nitrification inhibitor thiourea. The transformation processes of propachlor and thiourea mixed in aqueous solution, sand, and soil were elucidated. Analysis of transformation products and reaction kinetics indicated that an S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reaction occurred, in which the chlorine of propachlor was replaced by thiourea, detoxifying the herbicide. It appears that propachlor undergoes a catalytic reaction in sand or soil amended with thiourea, which results in a significantly accelerated transformation rate as compared to the reaction in aqueous solution. The second-order reaction process was examined at different temperatures to investigate the role of the activation energy. The enthalpy of activation (deltaH) for the reaction of propachlor with thiourea was demonstrated to be significantly lower in sand than in aqueous solution, which provides evidence that a catalytic transformation mechanism occurs in thiourea-amended sand. The chemical reaction rate increased proportionally to the amount of thiourea added to the sand. Column experiments further suggested that the remediation strategy could be used to remove propachlor residues from sand or soil to reduce leaching and prevent contamination of surface water and groundwater.

  19. The Effect of Herbicides on Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Isolated Vacuoles of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of herbicides on the hydrogen peroxide generation in vacuolar extracts of red beet root (Beta vulgaris L. was investigated. Belonging to different chemical classes of herbicide compounds have been used. Herbicides differ from each other in the mechanism of effects on plants. Clopyralid (aromatic acid herbicide, derivative of picolinic acid and 2.4-D (phenoxyacetic herbicide, characterized by hormone-like effects, contributed to the formation of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Fluorodifen (nitrophenyl ether herbicide and diuron (urea herbicide also have increased contents H2O2. These compounds inhibit the electron transport, photosynthesis, and photorespiration in sensitive plants. Herbicidal effect of glyphosate (organophosphorus herbicide is due to the inhibition of amino acid synthesis in plant cells. Glyphosate did not affect the content of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Herbicide dependent H2O2-generation did not occur with oxidoreductase inhibitors, potassium cyanide and sodium azide. The results suggest that the formation of ROS in the vacuoles due to activity of oxidoreductases, which could interact with herbicides.

  20. A comparison of effects of several herbicides on photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic cultured tobacco cells and seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, F; Takeda, S; Yamada, Y

    1987-12-01

    The effects of herbicides with different primary modes of action were examined on the growth of photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic, and heterotrophic cultures of tobacco cells. These responses were compared with those of tobacco seedlings to the same herbicides. Herbicides, which primarily inhibit or disturb photosynthetic processes, suppressed the growth of photoautotrophic cells most strongly, as compared to photomixotrophic and heterotrophic cells (atrazine, diuron, paraquat). Herbicides having a primary mode of action other than the inhibition of photosynthetic processes, suppressed the growth of all types of cultured cells at similar concentrations (2,4-D, diphenamid, glyphosate, dinoseb, sodium chlorate, bialaphos, DTP), but the photoautotrophic cells were still the most sensitive to all kinds of herbicides except sodium chlorate. Furthermore, photoautotrophic cells responded to most of the herbicides as did the seedlings, with the exception of glyphosate and diphenamid. The possibility of photoautotrophically cultured cells as a model system to study the effects of herbicides are discussed.

  1. Mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide resistance in the broadleaf weed, Kochia scoparia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, L.L.; Cotterman, J.C.; Primiani, M.M. (E.I. duPont de Nemours Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Selection of kochia (Kochia scoparia) biotypes resistant to the sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron has occurred through the continued use of this herbicide in monoculture cereal-growing areas in the United States. The apparent sulfonylurea resistance observed in kochia was confirmed in greenhouse tests. Fresh and dry weight accumulation in the resistance kochia was 2- to >350-fold higher in the presence of four sulfonylurea herbicides as compared to the susceptible biotype. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) activity isolated from sulfonylurea-resistant kochia was less sensitive to inhibition by three classes of ALS-inhibiting herbicides, sulfonylureas, imidazolinones, and sulfonanilides. The decrease in ALS sensitivity to inhibition (as measured by the ratio of resistant I{sub 50} to susceptible I{sub 50}) was 5- to 28-fold, 2- to 6-fold, and 20-fold for sulfonylurea herbicides, imidazolinone herbicides, and a sulfonanilide herbicide, respectively. No differences were observed in the ALS-specific activities or the rates of ({sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron uptake, translocation, and metabolism between susceptible and resistant kochia biotypes. The K{sub m} values for pyruvate using ALS from susceptible and resistant kochia were 2.13 and 1.74 mM, respectively. Based on these results, the mechanism of sulfonylurea resistance in this kochia biotype is due solely to a less sulfonylurea-sensitive ALS enzyme.

  2. Source, extent, and degradation of herbicides in a shallow aquifer near Hesston, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and metribuzin were detected in water from a domestic well completed in a shallow aquifer underlying the Harvey County Experiment Field near Hesston, Kansas. The study described in this report investigated the source, extent, and degradation of these five herbicides. Hydrogeologic analysis of the site enabled estimation of the degradation half-lives of the herbicides in the saturated zone. The most probable source of the contamination was back- siphonage or spillage of herbicides from a sprayer tank into a trench backfilled with sand. The herbicides moved downgradient to the domestic well and then moved into the aquifer via the annular space in the well. Once in the aquifer, the contaminants remained nearly stationary with very little lateral movement away from the point of injection. Decreases in herbicide concentrations were caused mainly by degradation of the parent compounds and to a lesser degree, by extensive pumping of the well. Estimated herbicide degradation half-lives in the saturated environment were 1,000 days for atrazine, 400 days for alachlor, 250 days for cyanazine, 350 days for metolachlor, and 350 days for metribuzin. The herbicides will likely be eliminated from the soil and groundwater at the experiment field by continued natural degradation at the land surface and by degradation in and continued pumping of water from the aquifer. Pumping will remove any degradation products as well as the remaining parent compounds. (USGS)

  3. Cardiovascular Effects and Fatality May Differ According to the Formulation of Glyphosate Salt Herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Mi; Chun, Byeong Jo; Cho, Yong Soo; Lee, Sung Do; Hong, Young Joon; Shin, Min Ho; Jung, Eu Jene; Ryu, Hyun Ho

    2017-06-13

    This study aimed to compare adverse cardiovascular events and fatalities and to identify the risk factors for fatalities associated with the glyphosate salt herbicide formulation. Additionally, we examined whether glyphosate ammonium salt herbicides increased serum ammonia levels. One hundred forty-seven patients were divided into an ammonium group (glyphosate ammonium salt herbicide) and an isopropylamine (IPA) group (glyphosate IPA salt herbicide) according to the type of glyphosate salt formulation ingested. Although no differences in the variables were observed between the groups, the IPA group had more fatalities, a higher incidence of QTc prolongation and a higher tendency for PR prolongation than the ammonium group. Additionally, the IPA group required a longer duration of vasopressor administration. PR prolongation and age were independently associated with fatalities in glyphosate IPA salt poisoning cases in the multivariate regression. Serum ammonia levels were higher at presentation and decreased continuously during the first 48 h after presentation in the ammonium group. This study is the first to suggest potentially different toxicities, especially cardiovascular effects, of glyphosate herbicide poisoning in humans based on the glyphosate salt herbicide formulation and to determine the association between PR prolongation and fatality in glyphosate IPA salt herbicide poisoning cases.

  4. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Meichao [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wen, Yuezhong, E-mail: wenyuezhong@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. - Highlights: • It is necessary to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis. • Phytotoxicity of bromacil is investigated in an enantiomeric level. • Bromacil disturbed enantioselectively the photosystem II of Arabidopsis thaliana. • S-bromacil caused severer damage to photosynthesis of Arabidopsis than R-bromacil. • Photosynthesis should be considered for phytotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  5. Chitosan/tripolyphosphate nanoparticles loaded with paraquat herbicide: an environmentally safer alternative for weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Renato; Pereira, Anderson E S; Nishisaka, Caroline S; de Lima, Renata; Oehlke, Kathleen; Greiner, Ralf; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2014-08-15

    Paraquat is a fast acting nonselective contact herbicide that is extensively used worldwide. However, the aqueous solubility and soil sorption of this compound can cause problems of toxicity in nontarget organisms. This work investigates the preparation and characterization of nanoparticles composed of chitosan and sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) to produce an efficient herbicidal formulation that was less toxic and could be used for safer control of weeds in agriculture. The toxicities of the formulations were evaluated using cell culture viability assays and the Allium cepa chromosome aberration test. The herbicidal activity was investigated in cultivations of maize (Zea mays) and mustard (Brassica sp.), and soil sorption of the nanoencapsulated herbicide was measured. The efficiency association of paraquat with the nanoparticles was 62.6 ± 0.7%. Encapsulation of the herbicide resulted in changes in its diffusion and release as well as its sorption by soil. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that the nanoencapsulated herbicide was less toxic than the pure compound, indicating its potential to control weeds while at the same time reducing environmental impacts. Measurements of herbicidal activity showed that the effectiveness of paraquat was preserved after encapsulation. It was concluded that the encapsulation of paraquat in nanoparticles can provide a useful means of reducing adverse impacts on human health and the environment, and that the formulation therefore has potential for use in agriculture.

  6. Genetics, Development, and Application of Cytoplasmic Herbicide Resistance in Foxtail Millet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Gui-su; DU Rui-heng; HOU Sheng-lin; CHENG Ru-hong; WANG Xin-yu; ZHAO Xiu-ping

    2007-01-01

    The effect of cytoplasmic herbicide resistant gene in millet plants was studied. The heterozygous populations and isogenic lines with homocaryotic alloplasmic genes were obtained by crossing and reciprocal crossing of cytoplasmic herbicide resistant plants with susceptive plants of foxtail millet. The characters of F1, F2, backcross and composite cross groups, and the growth and development of isogenic lines were compared. The cytoplasmic herbicide resistant gene slowed the development of seedling, delayed heading, and shortened the milking stage in the foxtail millet plant. Yield capacity and main agronomic characters were all affected by the cytoplasmic herbicide resistant gene in most of the backcross, composite cross, and F2 populations. However, there was stronger hybrid vigor in F1. The backcrosses,composite crosses, and F2 populations were widely separated and some of them had good characters similar to those of susceptive groups. The plant characters and development of foxtail millet were negatively affected by the cytoplasmic herbicide resistant gene. The authors proposed a method of using hybrid vigor to obtain high yield and avoid the negative effects of herbicide resistance cytoplasm in plant growth. The expected results could be obtained by selecting individuals in separate populations of fast developed seedlings, well-developed roots, and with capacities of early heading and fast milking. Guided by the principal mentioned above, many high yield lines and hybrid crosses of foxtail millet with herbicide resistant cytoplasm were obtained.

  7. Phytotoxicity of four herbicides on Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Huiyun; LI Xiaolu; XU Xiaohua; GAO Shixiang

    2009-01-01

    The physiological effects of 4 herbicides (butachlor, quinclorac, bensulfuron-methyl and atrazine) on 3 submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii) were tested in laboratory conditions. The variables of the relative growth rate and the photosynthetic pigments content showed that all of the tested herbicides affected the growth of the plants obviously. The abnormal growth of the plants was observed in most treatment groups, even at the lowest concentration (0.0001 mg/L). Except for the C. demersum treated with quinclorac at 0.005 and 0.01 mg/L, the relative growth rates of the plants were inhibited significantly (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis of Chl-a content was carried out with both the t-test and one-way ANOVA to determine the difference between the treatment groups and control. The results showed that Chl-a contents of the plants in all treatment groups were affected by herbicides significantly, except for the C. demersum treated with bensulfuron-methyl at 0.0005 mg/L. The decrease content in Chl-a was positively correlated to the dosage of the herbicides in most treatment groups. It was suggested that herbicides in water body might potentially affect the growth of aquatic macrophytes. Since the Chl-a content of submerged macrophytes responded to the stress of herbicides sensitively and directly, it could be used as biomaker in environmental monitoring or in the ecological risk assessment of herbicide contamination.

  8. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halley Caixeta Oliveira

    Full Text Available Poly(epsilon-caprolactone (PCL nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 10(12 particles mL(-1 and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL(-1 resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits.

  9. Multiple-Herbicide Resistance Is Widespread in Roadside Palmer Amaranth Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagavathiannan, Muthukumar V; Norsworthy, Jason K

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth is a widespread issue in row-crop production in the Midsouthern US. Palmer amaranth is commonly found on roadside habitats in this region, but little is known on the degree of herbicide resistance in these populations. Herbicide resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations can represent the spread of an adaptive trait across a selective landscape. A large-scale survey was carried out in the Mississippi Delta region of eastern Arkansas to document the level of resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations to pyrithiobac and glyphosate, two important herbicides with broad history of use in the region. A total of 215 Palmer amaranth populations collected across 500 random survey sites were used in the evaluations. About 89 and 73% of the surveyed populations showed >90% survival to pyrithiobac and glyphosate, respectively. Further, only 3% of the populations were completely susceptible to glyphosate, while none of the populations was completely controlled by pyrithiobac. Among the 215 populations evaluated, 209 populations showed multiple resistance to both pyrithiobac and glyphosate at varying degrees. Dose-response assays confirmed the presence of high levels of herbicide resistance in the five selected populations (≥ 25-fold compared to a susceptible standard). Results demonstrate the prevalence of multiple-herbicide resistance in roadside Palmer amaranth populations in this region. Growers should be vigilant of Palmer amaranth infestation in roadsides adjacent to their fields and implement appropriate control measures to prevent likely spread of herbicide resistance into their fields.

  10. Leaf anatomy of emerald grass submitted to quantitative application of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Pereira Marques

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the selectivity of herbicides applied in post-emergence on Zoysia japonica Steud (Poaceae and determine associations with the leaf anatomy of this grass. The experimental design was randomized blocks with four replications. The treatments were the application of the herbicides bentazon (720 g ha-1, nicosulfuron (50 g ha-1, halosulfuron (112.5 g ha-1, oxadiazon (875 g ha-1 and 2.4-D (698 g ha-1, plus a control treatment without herbicide application. Phytotoxicity was assessed every seven days after application (DAA of the herbicides until the symptoms disappeared. Foliar anatomical analyses of the leaves in the collected grass were conducted until the 35th DAA. The quantitative characters of the keel and wing region of the blade of Z. japonica were assessed, as well as the biometric characters, which were submitted to an analysis of variance F test, and the averages were compared by Tukey’s test at a probability of 5%. The values of the anatomical characters of the foliar blade were tested by cluster analysis. The application of herbicides did not negatively influence the height of the plants but did reduce their dry mass. Toxic symptoms disappeared after 21 DAA, with the only symptoms of injury observed in plants treated with the herbicides oxadiazon and nicosulfuron. In addition, the cluster analysis indicated the formation of a unique discriminatory group. Thus, the results show that the herbicides applied to Z. japonica were selective for the species.

  11. Validation of the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging method (CFI for early detection of herbicide resistance in weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menegat, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of herbicide tolerant weed populations is illustrating the increasing demand for reliable methods for an accelerated detection of herbicide tolerance compared to greenhouse studies. Several methods for resistance quick detection have been published in previous years. One of the recent methods is the Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Method (CFI. For this method changes in photosynthetic activity of the target organisms, caused by herbicides, are determined. General assumption of this method in terms of herbicide resistance detection is that each herbicidal compound, independent of the mode of action, will cause changes within the photosynthetic apparatus of the target organisms. This effect already could be confirmed for several modes of action (PSII, ALS, ACCase, EPSPS, synth. Auxins. Aim of this study is to validate this novel method on the basis of greenhouse experiments and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP analysis. The resistance profiles of 10 black-grass populations (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. have been determined in greenhouse herbicide efficacy trials and constitutive SNP analyses of the survivors. With the CFI-method it was possible to detect the resistance profile as well as the resistance frequency within the populations. The results from the greenhouse experiments could be reproduced with conformity of 94%. This result is valid for the tested herbicides mesosulfuron, pyroxsulam as well as clodinafop and pinoxaden.

  12. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 1012 particles mL-1 and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL-1 resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  13. Herbicides affect fluorescence and electron transfer activity of spinach chloroplasts, thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2010-08-01

    In this work, studies on the effects produced by atrazine, terbutryn or diuron onto spinach photosynthetic materials were performed by observing changes in fluorescence emission and in electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of such herbicides; chloroplasts, thylakoids, Photosystem II-enriched thylakoids (BBYs) and isolated Photosystem II (PSII) were employed. This approach evidenced differences in the herbicide-photosynthetic material interactions going up-down from chloroplasts to proteins. Rapid emission increments were detected for chloroplasts and thylakoids, in particular in the presence of terbutryn; no remarkable emission increment was recorded when BBYs or PSII were used for this assay. The dependences of the chloroplast and thylakoid emission intensities upon herbicide concentration were investigated with responses even at concentrations below 10(-7)M. The influence of lowering the temperature was also tested, and the stabilizing effects on the resistances of the bio-samples against herbicides were recorded. Furthermore, Hill Reaction-based colorimetric assays were performed to monitor the electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of herbicides, after brief incubations. As a result, chloroplasts and thylakoids resulted to be sensitive tools in responding to concentrations even lower than 10(-7)M of most herbicides; nevertheless, an interesting sensitivity to herbicides was also observed for PSII. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of growth regulator of cytokinin type for enhancement and modification of herbicide activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakotov, S D; Zheltova, E V; Putsykin, Y G; Balakin, K V; Shapovalov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The herbicidal action of Betanal Express (BPAM) on Chine jute (Abutilon theophrasti) weed was studied in the presence of a new plant growth regulator of urea type, N-phenyl-N-(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)urea (PhenylTriazolylUrea, PTU). In the past years, Chine jute has become a major limiting factor in sugar beet production in the southern Russia due to its resistance to BPAM which is an essential herbicide widely used for sugar beet protection. When PTU was added to BPAM, the combination appeared to be more effective than the herbicide alone. The influence of phytohormone PTU was observed at very low application rate of 20-100 g/ha, thus herbicide dose in the ecosystem was reduced. The main visual signs of herbicidal action of the combination BPAM + PTU on Chine jute were inhibition of growth of overground plant and stem, leaves changes and sharp inhibition of root growth. No sugar beet injury was observed when this tank mixture was used. It was found that enhanced performance of the novel herbicide formulation is determined by increased herbicidal action of Ethofumesate, one of the active ingredients of BPAM.

  15. Recent Advances in Development of Herbicide Resistant Transgenic Hybrid Rice in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Guo-ying

    2009-01-01

    In addition to weed control in direct seeding field of hybrid rice, herbicide resistance genes were used by Chinese scientists to increase and identify the purity of hybrid seeds, and to realize the mechanization of hybrid seed production. The elite restorer lines, such as Minghui 63, R752, T461, R402, D68 and E32 were transformed directly with herbicide resistance genes, in which D68 and E32 are restorer lines of two-line system and the others are of three-line system. Because almost all of important restorer lines are indica varieties and are recalcitrant in transformation, many herbicide resistant near-isogenic restorer lines were developed by sexual hybridization of indica and japonica varieties and backcross with indica restorer lines later, such as Ce 64, Minghui 63, Teqing, Milyang 46, R402 and 9311, in which 9311 is a restorer line of two-line system. The elite photoperiod-sensitive/thermo-sensitive genic male sterile lines, such as Pei'ai 64S, P88S, 4008S and 7001S, were transformed with herbicide resistance genes. A few herbicide resistant male sterile lines were developed through sexual hybridization and subsequently systemic selection, such as Bar1259S, Bar2172S, 05Z221A and 05Z227A. With the employment of herbicide resistant male sterile lines or herbicide resistant restorer lines, a few herbicide resistant hybrid rice combinations were developed, such as Xiang 125S/Bar 68-1 and Pei'ai 64S/Bar 9311. Based on herbicide resistance, the research was marching on to investigate the parental lines of hybrid rice with insect resistance, drought tolerance, etc.

  16. Pre-breeding of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) for herbicide resistance through seed mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Jawad; Abbas, Ghulam; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Shimelis, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Lentil is a poor competitor of weeds and its sensitivity to herbicides is a major hurdle for large scale production. The present study was conducted to select herbicide resistant lentil genotypes through seed mutagenesis. Seeds of three advanced lentil genotypes (LPP 11001, LPP 11100 and LPP 11116) were treated with two different concentrations of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; 0.1 and 0.2%), hydrazine hydrate (HH; 0.02 and 0.03%) and sodium azide (SA; 0.01 and 0.02%) to develop M1 seed. The M2 was screened against two herbicides including Ally Max 28.6% SG (X = 34.58 g/ha and 1.5X = 51.87 g/ha) and Atlantis 3.6% WG (X = 395.2 g/ha and 1.5X = 592.8 g/ha) using the following three screening methods: post plant emergence (PPE), pre-plant incorporation (PPI) and seed priming (SP). Data were recorded on survival index and survival percentage from each experimental unit of every population. Plants in all populations were categorized following their reaction to herbicides. The newly developed populations showed greater variation for herbicide resistance when compared to their progenitors. Phenotypic traits were significantly reduced in all the screening environments. Overall, 671 herbicide resistant mutants were selected from all testing environments. The seeds from selected plants were re-mutagenized at 150 Gy of gamma radiation and evaluated against higher dose of herbicides. This allowed selection of 134 herbicide resistant mutants. The selected mutants are useful germplasm for herbicide resistance breeding of lentil. PMID:28196091

  17. Transmission of herbicide resistance from a monoecious to a dioecious weedy Amaranthus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranel, J.; Wassom, J.; Jeschke, R.; Rayburn, L.

    2002-10-01

    The genus Amaranthus includes several important monoecious and dioecious weed species, and several populations of these species have developed resistance to herbicides. These species are closely related and two or more species often coexist in agricultural settings. Collectively, these attributes raise the concern that herbicide resistance might transfer from one weedy Amaranthus species to another. We performed research to determine if a dominant allele encoding a herbicide-insensitive form of acetolactate synthase (ALS) could be transferred from a monoecious species, A. hybridus, to a dioecious species, A. rudis. Numerous F(1) hybrids were obtained from controlled crosses in a greenhouse between A. rudis and herbicide-resistant A. hybridus, and most (85%) of these hybrids were herbicide-resistant. Molecular analysis of the ALS gene was used to verify that herbicide-resistant hybrids contained both an A. rudis and an A. hybridus ALS allele. Although hybrids had greatly reduced fertility, 42 BC(1) plants were obtained by backcrossing 33 hybrids with male A. rudis. Fertility was greatly restored in BC(1) progeny, and numerous BC(2) progeny were obtained from a second backcross to A. rudis. The herbicide-resistance allele from A. hybridus was transmitted to 50% of the BC(1) progeny. The resistance allele was subsequently transmitted to and conferred herbicide resistance in 39 of 110 plants analyzed from four BC(2) families. Parental species, hybrids, and BC(2) progeny were compared for 2C nuclear DNA contents. The mean hybrid 2C nuclear DNA content, 1.27 pg, was equal to the average between A. rudis and A. hybridus, which had 2C DNA contents of 1.42 and 1.12 pg, respectively. The mean 2C DNA content of BC(2) plants, 1.40 pg, was significantly (alpha herbicide resistance can be acquired by A. rudis through a hybridization event with A. hybridus.

  18. Effect of Nitrogen on Weed Infestation and Performance of Boro Rice Under Two Selected Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Morshed, MN Bari, QA Khaliq, MS Alam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted at the experimental farm of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU, Salna, Gazipur from November 2013 to May 2014 to determine the effect of nitrogen and herbicide on weed infestation and performance of Boro rice (cv. BRRIdhan28. Five nitrogen doses i.e. 0 , 50.6 , 101.2 , 151.8 and 202.4 kg ha-1 under selected pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides along with one weed free and control (unweeded treatment were imposed in the experiment. Nine weed species was found to dominate in the experimental plots where Scirpus maritimus L. showed the maximum visual abundance (58% followed by Leersia hexandra sw., Paspalam distichum L. and Fimbristylis miliacea L. Post-emergence herbicide contributed to higher control efficiency than that in pre-emergence herbicide. Post-emergence herbicide without receiving nitrogen showed the highest weed control efficiency (97.39 at 60 days after transplanting. Treatment receiving N @ 200.4 kg ha-1 under post-emergence herbicide showed the highest number of tiller per hill (13.00, total dry matter (1568.6 g m-2, panicles per hill (10.60, filled grains per panicle (125.20 and grain yield (6.46 t/ha. N-dose 151.8 kg ha-1 under postemergence herbicide contributed to the second highest grain yield (6.41 t ha-1 with the highest benefit cost ratio of 1.60 but 50.6 kg N ha-1 under post-emergence herbicide showed the maximum Nitrogen use efficiency of 0.49. The study revealed that nitrogen dose up to 151.8 kg ha-1 might be increased above the recommended dose under coverage of a suitable post-emergence herbicide for profitable rice production.

  19. Comparison of field-scale herbicide runoff and volatilization losses: an eight-year field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Timothy J; Prueger, John H; Daughtry, Craig S T; Kustas, William P; McKee, Lynn G; Russ, Andrew L; Hatfield, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    An 8-yr study was conducted to better understand factors influencing year-to-year variability in field-scale herbicide volatilization and surface runoff losses. The 21-ha research site is located at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, MD. Site location, herbicide formulations, and agricultural management practices remained unchanged throughout the duration of the study. Metolachlor [2-chloro--(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)--(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and atrazine [6-chloro--ethyl--(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine] were coapplied as a surface broadcast spray. Herbicide runoff was monitored from a month before application through harvest. A flux gradient technique was used to compute volatilization fluxes for the first 5 d after application using herbicide concentration profiles and turbulent fluxes of heat and water vapor as determined from eddy covariance measurements. Results demonstrated that volatilization losses for these two herbicides were significantly greater than runoff losses ( < 0.007), even though both have relatively low vapor pressures. The largest annual runoff loss for metolachlor never exceeded 2.5%, whereas atrazine runoff never exceeded 3% of that applied. On the other hand, herbicide cumulative volatilization losses after 5 d ranged from about 5 to 63% of that applied for metolachlor and about 2 to 12% of that applied for atrazine. Additionally, daytime herbicide volatilization losses were significantly greater than nighttime vapor losses ( < 0.05). This research confirmed that vapor losses for some commonly used herbicides frequently exceeds runoff losses and herbicide vapor losses on the same site and with the same management practices can vary significantly year to year depending on local environmental conditions.

  20. An evaluation of herbicides for post-emergence use in short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, D.J.

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the project was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a range of herbicides and mixtures of herbicides, with both contact and residual activity, for the post-emergence control of weeds in newly planted willow short rotation coppice (SRC). This report provides growers and advisers of short rotation coppice with important (but still limited) information on how to achieve improved weed control of problem weeds increasingly prevalent in SRC fields. This may provide guidance towards often-essential emergency treatments when the crop establishment is under considerable pressure and the potential safety, or otherwise, of certain weed-specific herbicides. (author)

  1. Synthesis and herbicidal evaluation of novel benzothiazole derivatives as potential inhibitors of D1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tonghui; Sun, Jie; An, Lin; Zhang, Lixian; Han, Cuiping

    2016-04-01

    D1 protease is a C-terminal processing protease that has been predicted to be an ideal herbicidal target. Three novel series of benzothiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their herbicidal activities against Brassica napus (rape) and Echinochloa crusgalli (barnyard grass). The preliminary bioassay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds possess promising D1 protease inhibitory activities and considerable herbicidal activities. Molecular docking was performed to position representative compounds into the active site of D1 protease to determine a probable binding model.

  2. Ecological review of black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. propagation abilities in relationship with herbicide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maréchal, PY.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. (black-grass has always been a major concern for cereal growers, and the development of herbicide resistance does not improve the situation. This review article summarizes the different traits involved in the dispersal pattern of herbicide resistant black-grass individuals within a susceptible field population. Therefore, the whole life cycle of black-grass is depicted from the seed to the seed. From the early vegetative development to the seed falling, every stage is described, taking into account how herbicide resistance can influence or exert a different impact compared to susceptible plants.

  3. A further evaluation of herbicides for post-emergence use in short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, D.J.

    2002-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project evaluating the safety and efficiency of eleven herbicides for controlling weeds in newly plated willow short rotation coppices, and provides growers with information on post-emergence herbicide options, control of problem weeds, and emergency treatments. Weed germination, crop safety, and the encouraging results obtained using Reflex T and Impuls are discussed. It is suggested that a Technical Register of herbicide applications with contributions by growers and advisers should be considered by the British Biogen trade industry body.

  4. Benefits, Potential Risks and Environmental Safety Assessments of Herbicide-resistant Transgenic Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei; LI Xinhai; WANG Zhenhua

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide-resistant transgenic soybean was rapidly and commercially utilized in the world since 1996, and the planted percentage was up to 77% in 2009. Although multiple benefits have achieved through transgenic soybean utilization, the potential risk to environment is widely being concerned. It is essential to reduce the environmental risks for transgenic soybean and for other similar transgenic crops by using available biosafty knowledge to establish the risk assessment system. This review emphasized the herbicide- resistant transgenic soybean production, research and development, benefits and potential risks, and environment risk assessing methods for giving advisory opinion to commercially plant herbicide-resistant transgenic soybean in China.

  5. Removal of glyphosate herbicide from water using biopolymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Rafael T A; Taketa, Thiago B; Gomes Neto, Reginaldo J; Oliveira, Jhones L; Campos, Estefânia V R; de Moraes, Mariana A; da Silva, Camila M G; Beppu, Marisa M; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-03-15

    Enormous amounts of pesticides are manufactured and used worldwide, some of which reach soils and aquatic systems. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide that is effective against all types of weeds and has been used for many years. It can therefore be found as a contaminant in water, and procedures are required for its removal. This work investigates the use of biopolymeric membranes prepared with chitosan (CS), alginate (AG), and a chitosan/alginate combination (CS/AG) for the adsorption of glyphosate present in water samples. The adsorption of glyphosate by the different membranes was investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models, as well as the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The membranes were characterized regarding membrane solubility, swelling, mechanical, chemical and morphological properties. The results of kinetics experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium was reached within 4 h and that the CS membrane presented the best adsorption (10.88 mg of glyphosate/g of membrane), followed by the CS/AG bilayer (8.70 mg of glyphosate/g of membrane). The AG membrane did not show any adsorption capacity for this herbicide. The pseudo-second order model provided good fits to the glyphosate adsorption data on CS and CS/AG membranes, with high correlation coefficient values. Glyphosate adsorption by the membranes could be fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. There was a high affinity between glyphosate and the CS membrane and moderate affinity in the case of the CS/AG membrane. Physico-chemical characterization of the membranes showed low values of solubility in water, indicating that the membranes are stable and not soluble in water. The SEM and AFM analysis showed evidence of the presence of glyphosate on CS membranes and on chitosan face on CS/AG membranes. The results showed that the glyphosate herbicide can be adsorbed by chitosan membranes and the proposed membrane-based methodology was successfully used to

  6. Sulfonylurea herbicides – methodological challenges in setting aquatic limit values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Baun, Anders; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    reported for SUs in duckweed tests in the literature. Therefore, we decided to further investigate the effects of four SUs on Lemna gibba by studying how different test parameters affected the toxicity of the SUs. The SUs used were metsulfuron methyl, thifensulfuron methyl, flupyrsulfuron methyl......Lemna spp. have been shown to be up to 1000 times more sensitive to some sulfonylurea herbicides (SUs) than the green alga (e.g., P. subcapitata) which is commonly used as a representative organism for aquatic primary producers in environmental risk assessments. When the compounds are evaluated...... and rimsulfuron. The following parameters were varied during testing: pH, exposure duration, temperature and light/dark cycle. Preliminary results show that a decrease in pH causes an increase in toxicity for all compounds. Exposure to a high concentration for 24 hours caused a reduction in growth rate, from...

  7. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) of polar Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Michael; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of aquatic systems makes it challenging to assess the environmental fate of chiral micropolutants. As an example, chiral herbicides are frequently detected in the environment (Buser and Muller, 1998); however, hydrological data is needed to determine their degradability from concentration measurements. Otherwise declining concentrations cannot unequivocally be attributed to degradation, but could also be caused by dilution effects. In contrast, isotope ratios or enantiomeric ratios are elegant alternatives that are independent of dilution and can even deliver insights into reaction mechanisms. To combine the advantages of both approaches we developed an enatioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) method to investigate the fate of the chiral herbicides 4-CPP ((RS)-2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-propionic acid), mecoprop (2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-propionic acid) and dichlorprop (2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)-propionic acid). After testing the applicable concentration range of the method, enantioselective isotope fractionation was investigated by microbial degradation using dichlorprop as a model compound. The method uses enantioselective gas-chromatography (GC) to separate enantiomers. Subsequently samples are combusted online to CO2 and carbon isotope ratios are determined for each enantiomer by isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry (IRMS). Because the analytes contain a polar carboxyl-group, samples were derivatised prior to GC-IRMS analysis with methanolic BF3 solution. Precise carbon isotope analysis (2σ ≤0.5‰) was achieved with a high sensitivity of ≥ 7 ng C that is needed on column for one analysis. Microbial degradation of the model compound dichlorprop was conducted with Delftia acidovorans MC1 and pronounced enantiomer fractionation, but no isotope fractionation was detected. The absence of isotope fractionation can be explained by two scenarios: either the degrading enzyme has no isotopic preference, or another step in the reaction without an isotopic

  8. Cytogenetic effects of the herbicide chloridazon in cultured sheep lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviková, K; Dianovský, J

    1997-01-01

    The effect of in vitro exposure to the herbicide chloridazon on the induction of chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was studied in cultured sheep peripheral lymphocytes. A positive clastogenic effect was observed in chloridazon-treated cultures at a dose of 7 x 10(-4) M both in the presence and absence of the S9 fraction, but no significant increase of chromosome breaks was seen at lower doses (7 x 10(-6) M and 7 x 10(-5) M, respectively). A clear dose-dependence and significant differences were found in chloridazon potency to induce SCEs. Induction of cell cycle delays as compared to the controls was not observed.

  9. Acute gastroduodenal injury after ingestion of diluted herbicide pendimethalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, K; Azuhata, H; Katoh, H; Kuwano, H

    2009-03-01

    The herbicide, pendimethalin, is used worldwide, but its acute toxicity is not yet widely known. There have been some reported acute pendimethalin poisoning cases in humans and most of them intentionally ingested the concentrated formulation. We describe a 73-year-old man who developed corrosive gastroduodenal injury after accidental ingestion of the diluted (300 times with water) pendimethalin formulation. He had a history of reflux oesophagitis and had been taking omeprazol (10 mg/day) for a year. He consumed alcohol two hours after the accidental ingestion and then had nausea and epigastric pain. Endoscopy performed three days post-exposure revealed gastroduodenal injury. As he had consumed alcohol every day for years and had no history of gastroduodenal ulcer, the accidental ingestion may be associated with this injury. He was successfully treated by increasing his dosage of omeprazol (20 mg/day) for two weeks. This case indicates that ingestion of a small quantity of pendimethalin can provoke gastroduodenal injury.

  10. Herbicide tolerance and seed survival of grain amaranth (Amaranthus sp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per; Taberner, Andreu; de Troiani, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    crop damage applied at the 4-6 leaf stage compared to the 2-4 leaf stage while clopyralid was selective at both growth stages. The seed survival studies revealed differences between the countries with higher viability in Spain (up to 18%) than in Argentina and Denmark (up to 6%). Our results showed......Amaranth is receiving increasing attention as an alternative crop to small grain cereals. From a weed control point of view cultivation of amaranth poses two problems. Firstly, amaranth grows slowly after emergence and hence is very susceptible to competition by weeds and secondly, seed losses...... at harvest are significant due to an uneven maturing and volunteer amaranth plants could potentially become a weed problem in following crops. Nonetheless, no studies are available on the tolerance of amaranth to herbicides or the survival of seeds in the soil. In this study we examined 1) the tolerance...

  11. Hydroxyl radical induced transformation of phenylurea herbicides: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mile, Viktória; Harsányi, Ildikó; Kovács, Krisztina; Földes, Tamás; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2017-03-01

    Aromatic ring hydroxylation reactions occurring during radiolysis of aqueous solutions are studied on the example of phenylurea herbicides by Density Functional Theory calculations. The effect of the aqueous media is taken into account by using the Solvation Model Based on Density model. Hydroxyl radical adds to the ring because the activation free energies (0.4-47.2 kJ mol-1) are low and also the Gibbs free energies have high negative values ((-27.4) to (-5.9) kJ mol-1). According to the calculations in most of cases the ortho- and para-addition is preferred in agreement with the experimental results. In these reactions hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radicals form. In a second type reaction, when loss of chlorine atom takes place, OH/Cl substitution occurs without cyclohexadienyl type intermediate.

  12. Environmental and agronomic impact of the herbicide tolerant GM rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdjelar Gordana R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of genetically modified herbicide tolerant rapeseed has raised questions concerning the possible transfer of transgenes into wild relatives or neighbouring fields with similar crops. Pollen of rapeseed can be spread in the area and if a non-GM crop is fertilised by GM pollen, some percentage of the collected seed product will contain GM. Current regulation in the EU limits the allowed content. For conventional crops the critical level of GM contamination is in practice below 0.9%, which is the threshold value for labelling of GM in food and feed by the EU, although the limit for seeds is 0.1% in Serbia. In organic farming, the regulations do not allow the use of genetic engineering in the grain production system.

  13. Microchip capillary electrophoresis based electroanalysis of triazine herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Kamrul; Chand, Rohit; Han, Dawoon; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The number of pesticides used in agriculture is increasing steadily, leading to contamination of soil and drinking water. Herein, we present a microfluidic platform to detect the extent of contamination in soil samples. A microchip capillary electrophoresis system with in-channel electrodes was fabricated for label-free electroanalytical detection of triazine herbicides. The sample mixture contained three representative triazines: simazine, atrazine and ametryn. The electropherogram for each individual injection of simazine, atrazine and ametryn showed peaks at 58, 66 and 72 s whereas a mixture of them showed distinct peaks at 59, 67 and 71 s respectively. The technique as such may prove to be a useful qualitative and quantitative tool for the similar environmental pollutants.

  14. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  15. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta. Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine

  16. Structural and functional effects of herbicides on non-target organisms in aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, James; Kortekamp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide use has increased dramatically around the world over the past 6 decades (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). Few herbicides were in use in the 1950s. However, by 2001 approximately 1.14 billion kilograms of herbicides were applied globally for the control of undesireable vegetation in agricultural, silvicultural, lawncare, aquacultural, and irrigation/recreational water management activities (Kiely et al., 2004). Twenty-eight percent of the total mass of herbicides is applied in the United States, with the remaining 72 percent being applied elsewhere around the globe (Kiely et al., 2004). Herbicides represent 36% of global pesticide use, followed by insecticides (25%), fungicides (10%) and other chemical classes (Kiely et al., 2004). Agricultural production accounts for approximately 90% of herbicide use in the U.S. (Kiely et al., 2004). Gianessi and Reigner (2007) indicated that herbicides are routinely used on more than 90% of the area designated for large commercial crops including corn, soybeans, cotton, sugar beets, peanuts, and rice. Increased farm mechanization, technological advancements in production of inexpensive sources of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer (e.g., anhydrous ammonia), and conversion of forest, grassland, and wetland habitats to cropland has led to a tremendous increase in global food production over the past half-century. Herbicides have augmented advances in large-scale agricultural systems and have largely replaced mechanical and hand-weeding control mechanisms (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). The wide-spread use of herbicides in agriculture has resulted in frequent chemical detections in surface and groundwaters (Gilliom, 2007). The majority of herbicides used are highly water soluble and are therefore prone to runoff from terrestrial environments. In additon, spray drift and atmospheric deposition can contribute to herbicide contamination of aquatic environments. Lastly, selected herbicides are deliberately applied to aquatic environments

  17. A generalised individual-based algorithm for modelling the evolution of quantitative herbicide resistance in arable weed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Bridges, Melissa E; Kaundun, Shiv S; Glasgow, Les; Owen, Micheal Dk; Neve, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Simulation models are useful tools for predicting and comparing the risk of herbicide resistance in weed populations under different management strategies. Most existing models assume a monogenic mechanism governing herbicide resistance evolution. However, growing evidence suggests that herbicide resistance is often inherited in a polygenic or quantitative fashion. Therefore, we constructed a generalised modelling framework to simulate the evolution of quantitative herbicide resistance in summer annual weeds. Real-field management parameters based on Amaranthus tuberculatus (Moq.) Sauer (syn. rudis) control with glyphosate and mesotrione in Midwestern US maize-soybean agroecosystems demonstrated that the model can represent evolved herbicide resistance in realistic timescales. Sensitivity analyses showed that genetic and management parameters were impactful on the rate of quantitative herbicide resistance evolution, whilst biological parameters such as emergence and seed bank mortality were less important. The simulation model provides a robust and widely applicable framework for predicting the evolution of quantitative herbicide resistance in summer annual weed populations. The sensitivity analyses identified weed characteristics that would favour herbicide resistance evolution, including high annual fecundity, large resistance phenotypic variance and pre-existing herbicide resistance. Implications for herbicide resistance management and potential use of the model are discussed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands.

  19. Transfer of auxinic herbicide resistance from Brassica kaber to Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa through embryo rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithila, J; Hall, J Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Auxinic herbicides are widely used in agriculture to selectively control broadleaf weeds. Prolonged use of auxinic herbicides has resulted in the evolution of resistance to these herbicides in some biotypes of Brassica kaber (wild mustard), a common weed in agricultural crops. In this study, auxinic herbicide resistance from B. kaber was transferred to Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa, two commercially important Brassica crops, by traditional breeding coupled with in vitro embryo rescue. A high frequency of embryo regeneration and hybrid plant establishment was achieved. Transfer of auxinic herbicide resistance from B. kaber to the hybrids was assessed by whole-plant screening of hybrids with dicamba, a widely used auxinic herbicide. Furthermore, the hybrids were tested for fertility (both pollen and pistil) and their ability to produce backcross progeny. The auxinic herbicide-resistant trait was introgressed into B. juncea by backcross breeding. DNA ploidy of the hybrids as well as of the backcross progeny was estimated by flow cytometry. Creation of auxinic herbicide-resistant Brassica crops by non-transgenic approaches should facilitate effective weed control, encourage less tillage, provide herbicide rotation options, minimize occurrence of herbicide resistance, and increase acceptance of these crops.

  20. Isolation and Structural Identiifcation of Herbicidal Active Substance from Root of Flaveria bident (L.) Kuntze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Jing-qian; XING Ji-hong; ZHANG Li-hui; KANG Zhan-hai; ZHANG Jin-lin

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the composition and structure of herbicidal active substance from the root of Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze, the isolation and structural identiifcation were researched in this paper. The crude extract from the root of F. bidentis (L.) Kuntze was extracted by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and water saturation of n-butyl alcohol, respectively, and the extraction lfuid was separated by using the method of TLC, then the main fraction was separated by HPLC, and the structure of the herbicidal active substance was analyzed by LC-MS, elemental analysis and 1H-NMR. The results showed that the petroleum extraction had the strongest herbicidal activity, and the purple blue stripe separated by TLC had the strongest effect on Digitaria sanguinalis. The herbicidal active substance was identiifed as α-terthienyl according to the data of LC-MS, elemental analysis and 1H-NMR.

  1. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  2. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of pyridyl sulfonylureas:More convenient preparation process of phenyl pyrimidylcarbamates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ma; Zhi Jin Fan; Bao Lei Wang; Yong Hong Li; Zheng Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Four 4-monosubstituted pyrimidine pyridyl sulfonylureas were synthesized from pyridinesulfonamide and phenyl pyrimidyl-carbamate and screened for herbicidal activities.We also reported a convenient preparation process of phenyl pyrimidylcarbamates from pyrimidineamine and phenyl chloroformate.

  3. How-To-Do-It: Glyphosate: Herbicidal Effects, Mode of Action and Degradation in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafarski, Pawel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the usefulness of glyphosate for a demonstration of its herbicidal properties. Includes a list of the materials, preparation of solutions, procedures, data collection and analysis for three activities involving this chemical. (CW)

  4. Herbicide and algal population monitoring at DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Herbicide and water quality measurements were taken over two years in DeSoto Lake, Marquardt Pond and Young's Ditch on DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge. Previous...

  5. The development of sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) plants from in vitro selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pofelis, S; Le, H; Grant, W F

    1992-02-01

    Herbicide-resistant lines of birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L. cv 'Leo') were isolated after sequential selection at the callus, shoot, and whole plant levels to the sulfonylurea (SU) herbicide Harmony {DPX-M6316; 3-[[[(4-methoxy-6methyl-1,3,5, triazine-2-yl) amino] carbonyl] amino] sulfonyl-2-thiophenecarboxylate}. In field and growth chamber tests the Harmony regenerant lines displayed an increased tolerance as compared to control plants from tissue culture and controls grown from seed. Results of evaluation of callus cultures of regenerated mutant lines signify stability of the resistance. Outcrossed seeds collected from field trials, and tested in vitro for herbicide resistance, indicate that the trait is heritable and that resistance may be due to reduced sensitivity of acetolactate synthase to SU inhibition. Genetically stable herbicide-resistant lines of birdsfoot trefoil were successfully isolated using in vitro selection.

  6. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Herbicidal Activities of 2-Cyanoacrylates Containing 1,3,4-Thiadiazole Moieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tingting; Miao Wenke; Wu Shanshan; Bing Guifang; Zhang Xin; Qin Zhenfang; Yu Haibo; Qin Xue; Fang Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Three series of novel 2-cyanoacrylates 7a-7f, 9a-9f, 10a-10f containing 1,3,4-thiadiazole ring moieties were synthesized as herbicidal inhibitors of photosystem Ⅱ (PS Ⅱ) electron transportation. Their structures were clearly verified by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, elemental analysis (or HRMS analysis) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Bioassay showed that a suitable group at the 3-position of acrylates was essential for high herbicidal activ-ity. In particular, compound 7e showed the best herbicidal activities and gave 100% inhibitory activity against rape and amaranth pigweed at a dose of 1.5 kg/ha. Introduction of substituent with higher polarity such as sulfinyl or sulfonyl to the 5-position of 1,3,4-thiadiazole decreased herbicidal activities.

  7. Crops with target-site herbicide resistance for Orobanche and Striga control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2009-05-01

    It is necessary to control root parasitic weeds before or as they attach to the crop. This can only be easily achieved chemically with herbicides that are systemic, or with herbicides that are active in soil. Long-term control can only be attained if the crops do not metabolise the herbicide, i.e. have target-site resistance. Such target-site resistances have allowed foliar applications of herbicides inhibiting enol-pyruvylshikimate phosphate synthase (EPSPS) (glyphosate), acetolactate synthase (ALS) (e.g. chlorsulfuron, imazapyr) and dihydropteroate synthase (asulam) for Orobanche control in experimental conditions with various crops. Large-scale use of imazapyr as a seed dressing of imidazolinone-resistant maize has been commercialised for Striga control. Crops with two target-site resistances will be more resilient to the evolution of resistance in the parasite, if well managed.

  8. Acetolactate synthase mutation conferring imidazolinone-specific herbicide resistance in Amaranthus hybridus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Federico; Hager, Aaron G; Tranel, Patrick J

    2006-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) catalyzes the first common step in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids in plants and is the target of several herbicides. ALS inhibitors have enjoyed popularity as herbicides due to numerous attributes, although their current adequacy in weed control programs is hampered by herbicide resistance. Most cases of ALS-inhibitor resistance have resulted from selection of an altered target site. The study herein reports on an alanine by threonine amino acid substitution at position 122 of ALS as the basis for imidazolinone-specific resistance in an A. hybridus population from Illinois. In vitro inhibition of enzymatic activity (I(50)) required 1000-fold greater concentration of imazethapyr in the resistant population compared with a susceptible control. This mutation represents the second ALS alteration associated with herbicide resistance in a natural A. hybridus population.

  9. Degradation of 2,4-D herbicide by microorganisms isolated from Brazilian contaminated soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silva, Tatiane M; Stets, Maria I; Mazzetto, André M; Andrade, Fabiana D; Pileggi, Sônia A. V; Fávero, Paulo R; Cantú, Marcelo D; Carrilho, Emanuel; Carneiro, Paulo I.B; Pileggi, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate microorganisms from Brazilian soil contaminated with 2,4-D herbicide, and analyze the efficiency for 2,4D degradation, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC...

  10. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... causal relationship exists between exposure to the herbicides and the illness. That statute provides that..., NAS reaffirmed the conclusion in each of its prior reports that no data suggests that exposure to...

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  12. Evaluation of herbicide combinations for livid amaranth (Amaranthus blitum) control in tuberous begonia (Begonia x tuberhybrida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, M; van Labeke, M C

    2004-01-01

    In the past years livid amaranth (Amaranthus blitum) is observed increasingly in begonia production fields. Control of weeds in begonia is generally done by a combined application of the soil herbicides isoxaben + simazin followed 10 days later by application of the contact herbicide bentazone. This treatment usually controls the weed population sufficiently with exception of amaranth. In 2003 a field trial was conducted to evaluate control of livid amaranth in tuberous begonia with isoxaben, simazin. S-metolachloor, phenmedipham + desmedipham and bentazone. These herbicides were used as combinations of soil treatment and contact herbicides. The results suggest that a soil treatment of isoxaben + S-metolachloor significantly reduces livid amaranth compared to isoxaben + simazin, without a pronounced negative effect on tuber yield. Application of phenmedipham + desmedipham however did not improve control of livid amaranth compared to bentazone.

  13. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINES BY CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential modulation of catecholamines by chlorotriazine herbicides in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in vitro.Das PC, McElroy WK, Cooper RL.Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA.Epidemiological, wildlife, and lab...

  14. Crystal structures of two novel sulfonylurea herbicides in complex with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Lee, Patrick K.-M; Dong, Yu-Hui; Pang, Siew Siew; Duggleby, Ronald G; Li, Zheng-Ming; Guddat, Luke W;

    2009-01-01

    .... However, resistance in the field is now a serious problem worldwide. To address this, two new sulfonylureas, monosulfuron and monosulfuron ester, have been developed as commercial herbicides in China...

  15. Crystal structures of two novel sulfonylurea herbicides in complex with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jian‐Guo; Lee, Patrick K.‐M; Dong, Yu‐Hui; Pang, Siew Siew; Duggleby, Ronald G; Li, Zheng‐Ming; Guddat, Luke W

    2009-01-01

    .... However, resistance in the field is now a serious problem worldwide. To address this, two new sulfonylureas, monosulfuron and monosulfuron ester, have been developed as commercial herbicides in China...

  16. Effects of four rice herbicides on some metabolic and toxicology parameters of teleost fish (Leporinus obtusidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Bibiana Silveira; Loro, Vania Lúcia; Glusczak, Lissandra; Pretto, Alexandra; Menezes, Charlene; Marchezan, Enio; de Oliveira Machado, Sérgio

    2007-07-01

    Effects of different herbicides on acetylcholinesterase (AChE), catalase and TBARS formation in teleost fish (Leporinus obtusidens) were studied. Fish were exposed during 30 days at concentrations of herbicides used in rice field. AChE activity in the brain decreased significantly after exposure to the herbicides clomazone and quinclorac. However, AChE activity increased significantly in muscle tissue after exposure to clomazone, propanil and metsulfuron methyl. Fish exposed to quinclorac, propanil and metsulfuron methyl showed TBARS decreased levels in brain and muscle tissues. However, TBARS and catalase activity increased in liver tissue after clomazone and propanil exposure. This study pointed out long-term effects on AChE activity, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme catalase in tissues of L. obtusidens after exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of rice field herbicides. These parameters have been used to monitor fish toxicity in rice field system.

  17. Influence of biological control damage on efficacy of penoxsulam and two other herbicides on waterhyacinth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of waterhyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms.) in the southeastern U.S. have been reduced by widespread herbicidal control and by introduced waterhyacinth weevils (Neochetina spp) and native pathogens. However, damaging populations of this weed persist and integrated approaches ...

  18. The efficacy and safety of bromacil based herbicide for the control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy and safety of bromacil based herbicide for the control of the invasive bush species ... rangelands and reduce cost and drudgery associated with other methods of bush control. ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  19. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of 3-Subsituted Amino-6-(substituted phenoxyl)pyridazine Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU,Fang-Zhong; WANG,Zhan-Ping; LI,Yong-Hong; YANG,Hua-Zheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ In recent years, many pyridazine derivatives have shown highly biological activities, such as fungicides, insecticides and herbicides. Especially, the researches of 3-(substituted phenoxyl)pyridazine derivatives have become the focus of pesticidal chemistry.

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION OF THE HERBICIDE TEBUTHIURON USING DSA (R)-TYPE ELECTRODE

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Suellen A.; Ferreira,Tanare C. R.; Lanza, Marcos Roberto Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    ELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION OF THE HERBICIDE TEBUTHIURON USING DSA (R)-TYPE ELECTRODE. Tebuthiuron (TBH) is a herbicide widely used in different cultures and known for its toxic effects. Electrochemical methods are promising for removing pollutants such as pesticides. This study showed the degradation of TBH using a DSA (R) anode operated at current densities of 50 to 200 mA cm(-2). Removal presented pseudo-first order kinetics while high-pressure liquid chromatography (UV detection) showed two...

  1. An identification of potential new herbicides for short rotation coppice (Task 4). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to identify potential new herbicides and their suitability for weed control in commercial short rotation coppice (SRC) crops, and to establish the safety of the crops. The arrangements for the use of 'off-label' pesticides, which are permitted for use on other crops, on SRC are discussed along with the importance of the use of laboratory pot trials and field trials. Several herbicides are proposed for larger scale field trials.

  2. Impact of the ahas transgene for herbicides resistance on biological nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungria, Mariangela; Nakatani, André Shigueyoshi; Souza, Rosinei Aparecida; Sei, Fernando Bonafé; de Oliveira Chueire, Ligia Maria; Arias, Carlos Arrabal

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of transgenes in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and the associated use of specific herbicides on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are still few, although it is important to ensure minimal impacts on benefits provided by the root-nodule symbiosis. Cultivance CV127 transgenic soybean is a cultivar containing the ahas gene, which confers resistance to herbicides of the imidazolinone group. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the ahas transgene and of imidazolinone herbicide on BNF parameters and soybean yield. A large-scale set of field experiments was conducted, for three cropping seasons, at nine sites in Brazil, with a total of 20 trials. The experiment was designed as a completely randomized block with four replicates and the following treatments: (T1) near isogenic transgenic soybean (Cultivance CV127) + herbicide of the imidazolinone group (imazapyr); (T2) near isogenic transgenic soybean + conventional herbicides; and (T3) parental conventional soybean (Conquista) + conventional herbicides; in addition, two commercial cultivars were included, Monsoy 8001 (M-SOY 8001) (T4), and Coodetec 217 (CD 217) (T5). At the R2 growth stage, plants were collected and BNF parameters evaluated. In general, there were no effects on BNF parameters due to the transgenic trait or associated with the specific herbicide. Similarly, at the final harvest, no grain-yield effects were detected related to the ahas gene or to the specific herbicide. However, clear effects on BNF and grain yield were attributed to location and cropping season.

  3. Impact of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides on the freshwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Robert; Habibi, Hamid R; Hontela, Alice

    2014-05-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] is a broad spectrum, post emergent herbicide and is among the most widely used agricultural chemicals globally. Initially developed to control the growth of weed species in agriculture, this herbicide also plays an important role in both modern silviculture and domestic weed control. The creation of glyphosate tolerant crop species has significantly increased the demand and use of this herbicide and has also increased the risk of exposure to non-target species. Commercially available glyphosate-based herbicides are comprised of multiple, often proprietary, constituents, each with a unique level of toxicity. Surfactants used to increase herbicide efficacy have been identified in some studies as the chemicals responsible for toxicity of glyphosate-based herbicides to non-target species, yet they are often difficult to chemically identify. Most glyphosate-based herbicides are not approved for use in the aquatic environment; however, measurable quantities of the active ingredient and surfactants are detected in surface waters, giving them the potential to alter the physiology of aquatic organisms. Acute toxicity is highly species dependant across all taxa, with toxicity depending on the timing, magnitude, and route of exposure. The toxicity of glyphosate to amphibians has been a major focus of recent research, which has suggested increased sensitivity compared with other vertebrates due to their life history traits and reliance on both the aquatic and terrestrial environments. This review is designed to update previous reviews of glyphosate-based herbicide toxicity, with a focus on recent studies of the aquatic toxicity of this class of chemicals.

  4. Perspectives on transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in the United States almost 20 years after introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2015-05-01

    Herbicide-resistant crops have had a profound impact on weed management. Most of the impact has been by glyphosate-resistant maize, cotton, soybean and canola. Significant economic savings, yield increases and more efficacious and simplified weed management have resulted in widespread adoption of the technology. Initially, glyphosate-resistant crops enabled significantly reduced tillage and reduced the environmental impact of weed management. Continuous use of glyphosate with glyphosate-resistant crops over broad areas facilitated the evolution of glyphosate-resistant weeds, which have resulted in increases in the use of tillage and other herbicides with glyphosate, reducing some of the initial environmental benefits of glyphosate-resistant crops. Transgenic crops with resistance to auxinic herbicides, as well as to herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, stacked with glyphosate and/or glufosinate resistance, will become available in the next few years. These technologies will provide additional weed management options for farmers, but will not have all of the positive effects (reduced cost, simplified weed management, lowered environmental impact and reduced tillage) that glyphosate-resistant crops had initially. In the more distant future, other herbicide-resistant crops (including non-transgenic ones), herbicides with new modes of action and technologies that are currently in their infancy (e.g. bioherbicides, sprayable herbicidal RNAi and/or robotic weeding) may affect the role of transgenic, herbicide-resistant crops in weed management. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Titanium Dioxide-Mediated Photcatalysed Degradation of Two Herbicide Derivatives Chloridazon and Metribuzin in Aqueous Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, A.; Mir, N. A.; M. Faisal; Muneer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to find out the optimal degradation condition for two potential environmental pollutants, chloridazon and metribuzin (herbicide derivatives), employing advanced oxidation process using TiO2 photocatalyst in aqueous suspensions. The degradation/mineralization of the herbicide was monitored by measuring the change in pollutant concentration and depletion in TOC content as a function of time. A detailed degradation kinetics was studied under different conditions such as ...

  6. Photostabilization of the herbicide norflurazon microencapsulated with ethylcellulose in the soil-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopena, Fatima, E-mail: fsopenav@irnase.csic.es [Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology (CSIC), Reina Mercedes 10, Apdo 1052, 41080 Seville, ES (Spain); Villaverde, Jaime; Maqueda, Celia; Morillo, Esmeralda [Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology (CSIC), Reina Mercedes 10, Apdo 1052, 41080 Seville, ES (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Herbicide photodegradation studies using ethylcellulose-microencapsulated formulations (ECF) in soil and water. {yields} Greater herbicide photo-protection observed from EFC than from its commercial form. {yields} Photo-protective effect due to the gradual herbicide release and the presence of ethylcellulose. {yields} Herbicide photo-stability conditioned by soil colloidal components, especially by goethite and humic acids. {yields} EFC could reduce the field herbicide losses by photolysis. - Abstract: Ethylcellulose-microencapsulated formulations (ECFs) of norflurazon have been shown to reduce leaching, maintaining a threshold concentration in the topsoil than the commercial formulation (CF). Since photodegradation contributes to field dissipation of norflurazon, the objective of the present work was to study if such formulations can also protect from its photodescomposition. For this purpose, aqueous solutions of CF and ECFs, containing the most important soil components (goethite, humic and fulvic acids and montmorillonite) were tested. To get a more realistic approach, studies in soil were also performed. The results were well explained by a simple first order model. DT{sub 50} value was 3 h for CF under irradiation, which was considerably lower than those corresponding to the systems where ECF was used (35 h for ECF; 260 h for ECF-goethite; 53 h for ECF-humic acids; 33 h for ECF-montmorillonite; and 28 h for ECF-fulvic acids). ECF protected against photodegradation in both aqueous solution and soil due to the gradual release of the herbicide, which reduced the herbicide available to be photodegraded. These lab-scale findings proved that ECF could reduce the herbicide dosage, minimizing its photolysis, which would be especially advantageous during the first hours after foliar and soil application.

  7. Impact of the safener Mefenpyr-diethyl on herbicide resistance evolution in Alopecurus myosuroides (Huds. biotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenhauer, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of herbicide resistance is an important topic in plant protection and agricultural practice. Safeners are commonly used in herbicides to protect crops against herbicidal damage. Although no effect on the weed control is expected, it has been theorized that the rate of evolution of non-target site resistance (NTSR in weeds in cereals may be enhanced by use of herbicide products containing safeners. One of the most important safeners in cereals is mefenpyr-diethyl. Therefore, the possible influence of mefenpyr on herbicide resistance was studied in cooperative trials between Bayer CropScience (BCS, F-Höchst and FH Bingen. The trials tested in parallel different herbicide resistant black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides (Huds. biotypes under greenhouse conditions. The biotypes where chosen due to known NTSR against Atlantis WG® (4 highly resistant and 5 moderately resistant as well as two susceptible biotypes. The populations were treated with the following three herbicide/safener regimes in six concentrations adjusted according to the anticipated biotype resistance levels. (1 mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron + without safener formulation, (2 mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron + constant mefenpyr concentration (45g/ha, (3 mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron + varying mefenpyr concentrations (ratio 5:1:15. The treatments were applied in post-emergence based on mesosulfuron to iodosulfuron ratios in Atlantis WG® (5:1. The trials were assessed visually (% effect and by fresh weight. Dose-response curves were performed and ED50 values for each treatment and biotype were calculated. Results showed a varying effect of safeners which was in the most cases negligible. Depending on the biotypes mostly no impact on the safener was found for herbicide resistance. In conclusion, the trials from Bingen and F-Höchst gave evidence, that there is no significant and consistent influence of the safener mefenpyr on evolution of NTSR black-grass.

  8. Climate change increases the risk of herbicide-resistant weeds due to enhanced detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Seiwert, Bettina; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2016-12-01

    Global warming will increase the incidence of metabolism-based reduced herbicide efficacy on weeds and, therefore, the risk for evolution of non-target site herbicide resistance. Climate changes affect food security both directly and indirectly. Weeds are the major biotic factor limiting crop production worldwide, and herbicides are the most cost-effective way for weed management. Processes associated with climatic changes, such as elevated temperatures, can strongly affect weed control efficiency. Responses of several grass weed populations to herbicides that inhibit acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) were examined under different temperature regimes. We characterized the mechanism of temperature-dependent sensitivity and the kinetics of pinoxaden detoxification. The products of pinoxaden detoxification were quantified. Decreased sensitivity to ACCase inhibitors was observed under elevated temperatures. Pre-treatment with the cytochrome-P450 inhibitor malathion supports a non-target site metabolism-based mechanism of herbicide resistance. The first 48 h after herbicide application were crucial for pinoxaden detoxification. The levels of the inactive glucose-conjugated pinoxaden product (M5) were found significantly higher under high- than low-temperature regime. Under high temperature, a rapid elevation in the level of the intermediate metabolite (M4) was found only in pinoxaden-resistant plants. Our results highlight the quantitative nature of non-target-site resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence for temperature-dependent herbicide sensitivity based on metabolic detoxification. These findings suggest an increased risk for the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds under predicted climatic conditions.

  9. Thermodynamic and Extrathermodynamic Studies of Enantioseparation of Imidazolinone Herbicides on Chiralcel OJ Column

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjian Lao

    2013-01-01

    A homologous series of chiral imidazolinone herbicide was previously resolved on Chiralcel OJ column in high performance liquid chromatography. However, the mechanism of the chiral separation remains unclear. In this study, chromatographic behaviors of five chiral imidazolinone herbicides were characterized by thermodynamic and extrathermodynamic methods in order to enhance the understanding of the chiral separation. Thermodynamic parameters of this study were derived from equilibrium constan...

  10. Validation of a set of reference genes to study response to herbicide stress in grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Petit Cécile; Pernin Fanny; Heydel Jean-Marie; Délye Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-target-site based resistance to herbicides is a major threat to the chemical control of agronomically noxious weeds. This adaptive trait is endowed by differences in the expression of a number of genes in plants that are resistant or sensitive to herbicides. Quantification of the expression of such genes requires normalising qPCR data using reference genes with stable expression in the system studied as internal standards. The aim of this study was to validate referenc...

  11. O-Glucosyltransferase activities toward phenolic natural products and xenobiotics in wheat and herbicide-resistant and herbicide-susceptible black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, Melissa; Cole, David J; Edwards, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Herbicide safeners manipulate herbicide selectivity by enhancing the activities of detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs) and cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases (CYPs) in cereal crops. As part of a study examining the importance of O-glucosyltransferases (OGTs) in pesticide metabolism in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), seedlings were grown in the presence of dichlormid, a safener used in maize and cloquintocet mexyl, a wheat safener. The efficacy of the treatments was confirmed by monitoring changes in the abundance of phi and tau class GSTs. OGT activities in the root and shoot tissue were assayed using phenolics of natural and xenobiotic origin to determine if they were enhanced by safeners. Cloquintocet mexyl selectively increased OGT activities toward xenobiotics (4-nitrophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol) and flavonoids, (quercetin, luteolin, genistein and coumestrol) in both the roots and shoots. However, OGT activity towards simple phenols and phenylpropanoids was not enhanced by cloquintocet mexyl. Dichlormid was a much weaker enhancer of OGT activity, with the same subset of OGT activities increased as determined with cloquintocet mexyl, but with the effect being largely restricted to the roots. OGT activities were also determined in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides L.), an agronomically important weed in wheat. Two populations of black-grass differing in their sensitivity to herbicides were analysed. The population Peldon, which is resistant to multiple classes of herbicides due in part to the elevated expression of CYPs and GSTs active in herbicide detoxification, contained higher OGT activities than herbicide sensitive black-grass. Unlike wheat, treatment with cloquintocet mexyl or dichlormid, had no effect on OGT activities in either black-grass population.

  12. Mechanism of resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides in wild oat (Avena fatua ) from Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; Osuna, Maria D; Dominguez-Valenzuela, Jose A; Espinoza, Nelson; De Prado, Rafael

    2011-07-13

    Whole-plant response of two suspected resistant Avena fatua biotypes from Chile and Mexico to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides [aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD), and pinoxaden (PPZ)] and the mechanism behind their resistance were studied. Both dose-response and ACCase enzyme activity assays revealed cross-resistance to the three herbicide families in the biotype from Chile. On the other hand, the wild oat biotype from Mexico exhibited resistance to the APP herbicides and cross-resistance to the CHD herbicides, but no resistance to PPZ. Differences in susceptibility between the two biotypes were unrelated to absorption, translocation, and metabolism of the herbicides. PCR generated fragments of the ACCase CT domain spanning the potential mutations sited in the resistant and susceptible biotypes were sequenced and compared. A point mutation was detected in the aspartic acid triplet at the amino acid position 2078 in the Chilean biotype and in isoleucine at the amino acid position 2041 in the Mexican wild oat biotype, which resulted in a glycine triplet and an asparagine triplet, respectively. On the basis of in vitro assays, the target enzyme (ACCase) in these resistant biotypes contains a herbicide-insensitive form. This is the first reported evidence of resistance to pinoxaden in A. fatua.

  13. Effects of the herbicide dicamba on nontarget plants and pollinator visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenblust, Eric W; Vaudo, Anthony D; Egan, J Franklin; Mortensen, David A; Tooker, John F

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 80% of all pesticides applied to row crops are herbicides, and these applications pose potentially significant ecotoxicological risks to nontarget plants and associated pollinators. In response to the widespread occurrence of weed species resistant to glyphosate, biotechnology companies have developed crops resistant to the synthetic-auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); and once commercialized, adoption of these crops is likely to change herbicide-use patterns. Despite current limited use, dicamba and 2,4-D are often responsible for injury to nontarget plants; but effects of these herbicides on insect communities are poorly understood. To understand the influence of dicamba on pollinators, the authors applied several sublethal, drift-level rates of dicamba to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Eupatorium perfoliatum L. and evaluated plant flowering and floral visitation by pollinators. The authors found that dicamba doses simulating particle drift (≈1% of the field application rate) delayed onset of flowering and reduced the number of flowers of each plant species; however, plants that did flower produced similar-quality pollen in terms of protein concentrations. Further, plants affected by particle drift rates were visited less often by pollinators. Because plants exposed to sublethal levels of dicamba may produce fewer floral resources and be less frequently visited by pollinators, use of dicamba or other synthetic-auxin herbicides with widespread planting of herbicide-resistant crops will need to be carefully stewarded to prevent potential disturbances of plant and beneficial insect communities in agricultural landscapes.

  14. Are herbicides a once in a century method of weed control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adam S; Frisvold, George B

    2017-11-01

    The efficacy of any pesticide is an exhaustible resource that can be depleted over time. For decades, the dominant paradigm - that weed mobility is low relative to insect pests and pathogens, that there is an ample stream of new weed control technologies in the commercial pipeline, and that technology suppliers have sufficient economic incentives and market power to delay resistance - supported a laissez faire approach to herbicide resistance management. Earlier market data bolstered the belief that private incentives and voluntary actions were sufficient to manage resistance. Yet, there has been a steady growth in resistant weeds, while no new commercial herbicide modes of action (MOAs) have been discovered in 30 years. Industry has introduced new herbicide tolerant crops to increase the applicability of older MOAs. Yet, many weed species are already resistant to these compounds. Recent trends suggest a paradigm shift whereby herbicide resistance may impose greater costs to farmers, the environment, and taxpayers than earlier believed. In developed countries, herbicides have been the dominant method of weed control for half a century. Over the next half-century, will widespread resistance to multiple MOAs render herbicides obsolete for many major cropping systems? We suggest it would be prudent to consider the implications of such a low-probability, but high-cost development. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Enzyme activity and microorganisms diversity in soil contaminated with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Jan; Tomkiel, Monika; Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-07-02

    Next-generation herbicides are relatively safe when used properly, but the recommended rates are relatively low, which can lead to overdosing. This study evaluated the responses of soil-dwelling microorganisms and soil enzymes to contamination with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide. The analyzed product contains active ingredients flufenacet and isoxaflutole. All tests were performed under laboratory conditions. The analyzed material was sandy clay. Boreal 58 WG was introduced to soil in four doses. Soil without the addition of the herbicide served as the control. The soil was mixed with the tested herbicide, and its moisture content was maintained at 50% of capillary water capacity. Biochemical and microbiological analyses were performed on experimental days 0, 20, 40, 80 and 160. Accidental contamination of soil with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide led to a relatively minor imbalance in the soil microbiological and biochemical profile. The herbicide dose influenced dehydrogenase activity in only 0.84%, urease activity in 2.04%, β-glucosidase activity in 8.26%, catalase activity in 12.40%, arylsulfatase activity in 12.54%, acid phosphatase activity in 42.11%, numbers of organotrophic bacteria in 18.29%, actinomyces counts in 1.31% and fungi counts in 6.86%.

  16. Resistance risk assessment within herbicide authorisation--a call for sensitivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulber, Lena; Nordmeyer, Henning; Zwerger, Peter

    2013-02-01

    In most European countries, the risk of herbicide resistance is assessed as part of the authorisation of herbicides in accordance with EPPO Standard PP 1/213(2). Because the susceptibility of weed populations to a certain herbicide may vary greatly, one part of resistance risk assessment is the testing for sensitivity variation among different populations of target weed species with a high resistance risk. This paper emphasises the importance of sensitivity data provision with regard to the recent EU Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 concerning the placing of plant protection products on the market and outlines the main technical requirements for sensitivity data. A useful principle is that sensitivity data should be provided for all herbicides with a high resistance risk regardless of whether resistance has already evolved against the herbicidal substance. Methodical details regarding the generation of sensitivity data are discussed, together with remaining questions that will need to be addressed if a harmonised assessment of herbicide resistance risk is to be achieved.

  17. Nanoparticles Based on Chitosan as Carriers for the Combined Herbicides Imazapic and Imazapyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Cintia Rodrigues; Guilger, Mariana; Pascoli, Mônica; Bileshy-José, Natalia; Abhilash, P. C.; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; de Lima, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The use of lower concentrations and fewer applications of herbicides is one of the prime objectives of the sustainable agriculture as it decreases the toxicity to non-targeted organisms and the risk of wider environmental contamination. In the present work, nanoparticles were developed for encapsulation of the herbicides imazapic and imazapyr. Alginate/chitosan and chitosan/tripolyphosphate nanoparticles were manufactured, and their physicochemical stability was evaluated. Determinations were made of the encapsulation efficiency and release kinetics, and the toxicity of the nanoparticles was evaluated using cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays. The effects of herbicides and herbicide-loaded nanoparticles on soil microorganisms were studied in detail using real-time polymerase chain reactions. The nanoparticles showed an average size of 400 nm and remained stable during 30 days of storage at ambient temperature. Satisfactory encapsulation efficiencies of between 50 and 70% were achieved for both types of particles. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the encapsulated herbicides were less toxic, compared to the free compounds, and genotoxicity was decreased. Analyses of soil microbiota revealed changes in the bacteria of the soils exposed to the different treatments. Our study proves that encapsulation of the herbicides improved their mode of action and reduced their toxicity, indicating their suitability for use in future practical applications.

  18. Efficacy of Apirus, Total, Atlantis and Chevalier Herbicides on Weed Control in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Malekian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of Apirus, Total, Atlantis and Chevalier herbicides at different doses on winter wheat, a two-year field experiment was conducted in Research Farm of College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, during 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 growing seasons. The experimental design was a randomized complete blocks with four replications. Treatments were Apirus at 24, 27 and 30 g ha-1, Total at 35, 40 and 45 g ha-1, Atlantis at 1.2, 1.5 and 1.8 L ha-1, Chevalier at 300, 400 and 500 g ha-1, and two weedy and weed free checks. The results showed that application of herbicides in both growing seasons reduced weed dry matter and weeds density compared to the weedy check. Among herbicide treatments, Total at 45 g ha-1, reduced weeds dry matter by 95.9 and 100% that was not significantly different from other doses. Application of Chevalier herbicide, especially at 300 g ha-1, decreased wheat yield compared to the weed free check and did not provide acceptable weed control. The present study showed that Total herbicide was more efficient than other treatments in terms of weed control even at limited doses, and it could be recommended to farmers under Shiraz climatic condition. Further researches for understanding efficacy of these herbicides in winter wheat in different weed densities are recommended.

  19. Identification of a 32-34-kilodalton polypeptide as a herbicide receptor protein in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, J E; Arntzen, C J

    1981-04-13

    Photosystem II particles which retained high rates of herbicide-sensitive activity were used to examine the site(s) of action of various herbicides. A polypeptide of 32-34 kdaltons was identified as the triazine-herbicide binding site based upon: (a) parallel loss of atrazine activity and the polypeptide during either trypsin treatment or selective detergent depletion of protein in the Photosystem II complex, and (b) covalent labeling of the polypeptide by a 14C-labeled photoaffinity triazine. In Photosystem II particles depleted of the 32-34-kdalton polypeptide, electron transport was still active and was slightly sensitive to DCMU and largely sensitive to dinoseb (urea and nitrophenol herbicides, respectively). On the basis of this result it is proposed that the general herbicide binding site common to atrazine, DCMU and dinoseb is formed by a minimum of two polypeptides which determine affinity and/or mediate herbicide-induced inhibition of electron transport on the acceptor side of Photosystem II.

  20. Stress-physiological reactions of the green alga Scenedesmus opoliensis to water pollution with herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Gyula KERESZTES

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater green alga Scenedesmus opoliensis proves to be a suitable bioindicator of water pollution with different herbicides. One of the best molecular markers of stress condition imposed by herbicides is overproduction of malondialdehyde resulting from lipid peroxidation in the damaged membranes. Methylviologen, a largely used pre-emergence herbicide which generates reactive oxygen species in the illuminated chloroplasts, triggers the accumulation of ascorbic acid and enhances the enzymatic activity of catalase, both of these substances being involved in the antioxidative protection of algal cells. Diuron, a herbicide that inhibits photosynthetic electron transport on the acceptor side of photosystem II, causes a decline in oxygen production and in biomass accumulation of algae. Glufosinate induces accumulation of toxic ammonia and leads to enhanced net oxygen production, associated with a low rate of carbon assimilation. Long-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of herbicides results in significant changes in the rate of cell division, in hotosynthetic parameters and in the intensity of antioxidative defense. A proper bioindication of toxic effects of herbicides on algae requires a selected combination of different physiological and biochemical parameters which reflect the degree of stress exerted on living organisms by water pollution with xenobiotic organic compounds.

  1. Triangulation theory applied to conflict over hormone herbicide drift in Natal, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Whyte, Robert A.; Laing, Mark D.

    1994-05-01

    Policies that arise out of conflict or collaboration between specific interest groups and government agencies are often explained by theoretical constructs that fall under the umbrella of group theory. Triangulation theory is one of these constructs and serves to explain the mutuality of interests that exist between government agencies and interest groups expressed as points linking geometric forms. Conflict tends to occur when competing interest groups are excluded from the linkage, in this case between the opponents and proponents of hormone herbicides in the Tala area in Natal, South Africa. In opposition to the use of hormone herbicides were vegetable farmers and their supporters: in linked support were agricultural interest groups who used hormone herbicides, the manufacturers of the herbicides, and the government agency responsible for agriculture. Because of the influence exerted through mutual support by the proponents of hormone herbicides, the formulation of policy decisions directed towards the resolution of the conflict was delayed. When the minister of agriculture finally intervened, the policy decisions were designed to secure the support of those opposing the use of hormone herbicides by introducing issues that cut across those maintaining the discord.

  2. Application of bioassay technique to determine onduty herbicide resistance in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, F. A. A.; Ismail, B. S.; Bajrai, F. S. M.

    2016-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the resistance of OnDuty herbicide in paddy soil with different concentrations by using a broadleaf plant, Brassica juncea. The herbicide was used in the Clearfield® Production System that was adopted in Malaysia to overcome problems mainly caused by weedy rice. Evaluation of herbicide half-life was based on bioassay technique with different concentrations, i.e 0% (control), 50% (half dose), 100% (recommended dose) and 200% (double dose). The study was done in three replicates and followed the Complete Randomized Block Design (CRBD). Results showed that there was a correlation between the amount of herbicide doses and degradation period. The highest half-life value was shown by root inhibition in the double dose concentration of 33 days half-life, followed by the recommended dose with 23 days half-life. Meanwhile, the half dose treatment indicated a half-life value of 17 days for root and 11 days for shoot. Therefore, application of herbicides should follow the recommended dose as the degradation period will not be too long, hence providing maximum effectiveness of the herbicide to overcome weed infestation problems.

  3. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Toxicity of herbicides used in the sugarcane crop to diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de Oliveira Procópio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to identify herbicides used in the sugarcane crop that affects neither the growth, the development, of nor the process of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF by the diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae. Eighteen herbicides (paraquat, ametryne, tebuthiuron, amicarbazone, diuron, metribuzin, [hexazinone + diuron], [hexazinone + clomazone], clomazone, isoxaflutole, sulfentrazone, oxyfluorfen, imazapic, imazapyr, [trifloxysulfuron sodium + ametryne], glyphosate, MSMA e 2,4-D were tested in their respective commercial doses regarding their impact on the growth of the bacteria in liquid medium DIGs. For this, we determined the duration of lag phase, generation time and maximum cell density of H. seropedicae, calculated from optical density data obtained at regular intervals during the incubation of cultures for 33 h at 32oC. We also evaluated the impact of herbicides on nitrogenase activity of H. seropedicae grown in semi-solid N-free JNFb medium. The effects of herbicides on the growth variables and the ARA were compared with the untreated control by Dunnett test. A completely randomized design was used. The herbicides paraquat, imazapyr, ametryne, glyphosate and oxyfluorfen inhibited the growth of H. seropedicae in vitro. Ametryne, oxyfluorfen and glyphosate caused a small reduction in the duration of the lag phase of diazotrophic bacteria H. seropedicae. Oxyfluorfen, ametryne and imazapyr resulted in increased the generation time by H. seropedicae. Glyphosate promoted drastic reduction in biological nitrogen fixation in vitro by H. seropedicae. The other tested herbicides did not affect the growth or the same BNF by H. seropedicae.

  5. Chitosan and alginate biopolymer membranes for remediation of contaminated water with herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini de Moraes, Mariana; Cocenza, Daniela Sgarbi; da Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Beppu, Marisa Masumi

    2013-12-15

    This study investigated the adsorption behavior of the herbicides diquat, difenzoquat and clomazone on biopolymer membranes prepared with alginate and chitosan (pristine and multi-layer model) for contaminated water remediation applications. Herbicides, at concentrations ranging from 5 μM to 200 μM, were adsorbed in either pure alginate, pure chitosan or a bilayer membrane composed of chitosan/alginate. No adsorption of clomazone was observed on any of the membranes, probably due to lack of electrostatic interactions between the herbicide and the membranes. Diquat and difenzoquat were only adsorbed on the alginate and chitosan/alginate membranes, indicating that this adsorption takes place in the alginate layer. At a concentration of 50 μM, diquat adsorption reaches ca. 95% after 120 min on both the alginate and chitosan/alginate membranes. The adsorption of difenzoquat, at the same concentration, reaches ca. 62% after 120 min on pure alginate membranes and ca. 12% on chitosan/alginate bilayer membranes. The adsorption isotherms for diquat and difenzoquat were further evaluated using the isotherm models proposed by Langmuir and by Freundlich, where the latter represented the best-fit model. Results indicate that adsorption occurs via coulombic interactions between the herbicides and alginate and is strongly related to the electrostatic charge, partition coefficients and dissociation constants of the herbicides. Biopolymer based membranes present novel systems for the removal of herbicides from contaminated water sources and hold great promise in the field of environmental science and engineering.

  6. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A T; Tylka, G L; Hartzler, R G

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 +/- 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 mug/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 mug/ml but not 500 mug/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines.

  7. Photochemical oxidation processes for the elimination of phenyl-urea herbicides in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Garcia, Carolina

    2006-11-16

    Four phenyl-urea herbicides (linuron, chlorotoluron, diuron, and isoproturon) were individually photooxidized by monochromatic UV radiation in ultra-pure aqueous solutions. The influence of pH and temperature on the photodegradation process was established, and the first-order rate constants and quantum yields were evaluated. The sequence of photodecomposition rates was: linuron>chlorotoluron>diuron>isoproturon. The simultaneous photooxidation of mixtures of the selected herbicides in several types of waters was then performed by means of UV radiation alone, and by UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide. The types of waters used were: ultra-pure water, a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and a lake water. The influence of the independent variables in these processes - the presence or absence of tert-butyl alcohol, types of herbicide and waters, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide - were established and discussed. A kinetic study was performed using a competitive kinetic model that allowed various rate constants to be evaluated for each herbicide. This kinetic model allows one to predict the elimination of these phenyl-urea herbicides in contaminated waters by the oxidation systems used (UV alone and combined UV/H2O2). The herbicide concentrations predicted by this model agree well with the experimental results that were obtained.

  8. Weed control based on real time patchy application of herbicides using image analysis as a non-destructive estimation method for weed infestation and herbicide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali

    There is an increasing concern about excessive use of herbicides for weed control in arable lands. Usually the whole field is sprayed uniformly, while the distribution of weeds often is non-uniform. Often there are spots in a field where weed pressure is very low and has no significant effect on ...... to estimate infestation of weeds at early growth stage. The image analysis method was further developed to estimate colour response of applying increasing doses of herbicides in selectivity experiments and to evaluate the weed-suppressing effect of mulches....

  9. Dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction of herbicides in vegetable oil with metal-organic framework MIL-101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Liyuan; Nian, Li; Cao, Bocheng; Wang, Zhibing; Lei, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Sui, Jiaqi; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2015-03-04

    Dispersive microsolid-phase extraction based on metal-organic framework has been developed and applied to the extraction of triazine and phenylurea herbicides in vegetable oils in this work. The herbicides were directly extracted with MIL-101 from diluted vegetables oils without any further cleanup. The separation and determination of herbicides were carried out on high performance liquid chromatography. The effects of experimental parameters, including volume ratio of n-hexane to oil sample, mass of MIL-101, extraction time, centrifugation time, eluting solvent, and elution time were investigated. The Student's t test was applied to evaluate the selected experimental conditions. The limits of detection for the herbicides ranged from 0.585 to 1.04 μg/L. The recoveries of the herbicides ranged from 87.3 to 107%. Our results showed that the present method is rapid, simple, and effective for extracting herbicides in vegetable oils.

  10. 除草剂抗性基因的研究进展%Advances of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国增; 李轶女; 张志芳; 沈桂芳

    2011-01-01

    This review overviewed mainly about the kinds of herbicide resistance genes, their main resource and the application of herbicide resistance genes. Moreover, we also discussed the discovery of the novel herbicide resistance genes, the modification of herbicide resistance gene using genetic and protein engineering, the mechanisms of herbicide resistance and new herbicide resistance transgenic crops breeding.%概述了除草剂抗性基因的种类,主要来源以及抗除草剂基因的应用。并对新的抗除草剂基因的发掘、既有的抗除草剂基因的改良、除草剂抗性机理研究以及新的抗除草剂作物的培育等方面的进一步研究进行了探讨。

  11. Efficient callus formation and plant regeneration of goosegrass [Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemets, A I; Klimkina, L A; Tarassenko, L V; Blume, Y B

    2003-02-01

    Efficient methods in totipotent callus formation, cell suspension culture establishment and whole-plant regeneration have been developed for the goosegrass [ Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.] and its dinitroaniline-resistant biotypes. The optimum medium for inducing morphogenic calli consisted of N6 basal salts and B5 vitamins supplemented with 1-2 mg l(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2 mg l(-1) glycine, 100 mg l(-1) asparagine, 100 mg l(-1) casein hydrolysate, 30 g l(-1) sucrose and 0.6% agar, pH 5.7. The presence of organogenic and embryogenic structures in these calli was histologically documented. Cell suspension cultures derived from young calli were established in a liquid medium with the same composition. Morphogenic structures of direct shoots and somatic embryos were grown into rooted plantlets on medium containing MS basal salts, B5 vitamins, 1 mg l(-1) kinetin (Kn) and 0.1 mg l(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 3% sucrose, 0.6% agar, pH 5.7. Calli derived from the R-biotype of E. indica possessed a high resistance to trifluralin (dinitroaniline herbicide) and cross-resistance to a structurally non-related herbicide, amiprophosmethyl (phosphorothioamidate herbicide), as did the original resistant plants. Embryogenic cell suspension culture was a better source of E. indica protoplasts than callus or mesophyll tissue. The enzyme solution containing 1.5% cellulase Onozuka R-10, 0.5% driselase, 1% pectolyase Y-23, 0.5% hemicellulase and N(6) mineral salts with an additional 0.2 M KCl and 0.1 M CaCl(2) (pH 5.4-5.5) was used for protoplast isolation. The purified protoplasts were cultivated in KM8p liquid medium supplemented with 2 mg l(-1) 2,4-D and 0.2 mg l(-1) Kn.

  12. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doppler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most.

    Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2 with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess.

    Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as

  13. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doppler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may differ considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most.

    Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2 with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. For two months after application in 2009, water samples were taken at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess. This is in contrast to earlier studies in the Swiss Plateau, demonstrating that saturation excess overland flow was the dominant process.

    Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not directly reach the channel. It mostly got retained in small sinks in the catchment. From there, it reached

  14. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  15. Chemograph analysis of two herbicides in a German karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The dynamic of spring discharge of mature karst aquifers shows after strong precipitation events: Karst spring discharge increases rapidly and strongly, the chemical composition of the spring water is altered and contaminants may be transported from the land-surface towards the spring with the percolating rainwater. Contrary to rapid water transport, high travel times have been observed for parts of the spring discharge, employing stable isotopes as indicators. Monitoring the concentrations of Ca2+ and Cl- in spring water after a precipitation event one may observe the following: After a first increase, the concentrations of Ca2+ drop below the pre-event value, due to dilution with lowly mineralized rain water. On the other hand the concentrations of Cl- increase quickly and return to their background values nearly as fast. This difference in behavior arises from the different origins of these two inorganic ions. Ca2+ in spring water originates mainly from the dissolution of the carbonatic bedrock, while Cl- might be transported from the land-surface (e.g. from road salt) towards the spring. To investigate the dynamic of water in the Gallusquelle catchment in southwest Germany a one year sampling campaign was conducted, using different herbicides as indicator compounds. Depending on discharge conditions the sampling interval varied between 3 hours and several days. Among others, the currently applied and chemically unstable metazachlor was observed together with atrazine, which is prohibited since more than 20 years in Germany. While the detection frequency of atrazine in the spring water samples was nearly 100%, the concentrations ranged only up to 5.2 ng/L. On the other hand, the currently applied metazachlor was only detected in 30.7% of the samples, but its maximum concentration was 71.9 ng/L. An interesting feature was the different temporal concentration pattern of the two investigated herbicides: After precipitation events the concentration of metazachlor in

  16. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation - Selection of herbicide-resistant cell lines by using {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Yeon [Sunchun University, Sunchun (Korea); Seo, Yong Weon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In order to develop the herbicide resistant cell lines, micro calli derived from rice anther culture and mature seed of wheat cultivars were irradiated with gamma rays. 1) The callus was dedifferentiated by 7 or 21 day pretreatment at 7 deg. C in two rice cultivars, Ilpumbyeo ad Dongjinbyeo. 2) To check the optimum concentration of herbicide, three herbicides were tested with micro calli. 3) The optimum dose of gamma ray to seeds of wheat seemed to be from 100 to 150 Gy. 4) AFLP and RAPD technique were established to develope herbicide resistant molecular marker in rice. 34 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  17. Short-term disruption of a leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) biocontrol program following herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.; Grace, J.B.; Rabie, P.A.; Andersen, P.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) for invasive plant species is being advocated by researchers and implemented by land managers, but few studies have evaluated the success of IPM programs in natural areas. We assessed the relative effects of components of an IPM program for leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), an invasive plant, at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota. Effects of herbicides on leafy spurge abundance and on dynamics of flea beetles (Aphthona spp.) used to control leafy spurge were evaluated over three field seasons following herbicide application. We monitored leafy spurge-infested plots with established flea beetle populations that had received picloram plus 2,4-D in September 1997 or 1998, imazapic in September 1998, versus those with no chemical treatment. Mature stem counts did not differ significantly between treated and untreated plots in 2001, suggesting that leafy spurge stands had recovered from herbicide treatment. Flea beetles were less abundant on plots with a history of herbicide treatment. Structural equation models indicated that in 2000 negative correlations between relative abundances of the two flea beetle species were greater on plots that had received herbicide treatments than on those that had not, but by 2001 no differences were apparent between treated and untreated plots. These results suggest that the most effective component of IPM for leafy spurge at this site is biological control. All herbicide effects we observed were short-lived, but the increased negative correlation between flea beetle relative abundances during 2000 implies that herbicide application may have temporarily disrupted an effective biological control program at this site. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In-field frequencies and characteristics of oilseed rape with double herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz-Pfeilstetter, Antje; Zwerger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    When growing different transgenic herbicide-resistant oilseed rape cultivars side by side, seeds with multiple herbicide resistance can arise, possibly causing problems for the management of volunteer plants. Large-scale field experiments were performed in the years 1999/2000 and 2000/2001 in order to investigate the frequencies and the consequences of the transfer of herbicide resistance genes from transgenic oilseed rape to cultivars grown on neighboring agricultural fields. Transgenic oilseed rape with resistance to glufosinate-ammonium (LibertyLink, LL) and with glyphosate resistance (RoundupReady, RR), respectively, was sown in adjacent 0.5 ha plots, surrounded by about 8 ha non-transgenic oilseed rape. The plots and the field were either in direct contact (0.5 m gap width) or they were separated by 10 m of fallow land. Seed samples taken during harvest in the transgenic plots at different distances were investigated for progeny with resistance to the respective other herbicide. It was found that outcrossing frequencies were reduced to different extents by a 10 m isolation distance. In addition to pollen-mediated transgene flow as a result of outcrossing, we found considerable seed-mediated gene flow by adventitious dispersal of transgenic seeds through the harvesting machine. Volunteer plants with double herbicide resistance emerging in the transgenic plots after harvest were selected by suitable applications of the complementary herbicides Basta and Roundup Ultra. In both years, double-resistant volunteers were largely restricted to the inner edges of the plots. Expression analysis under controlled laboratory conditions of double-resistant plants generated by manual crosses revealed stability of transgene expression even at elevated temperatures. Greenhouse tests with double-resistant oilseed rape plants gave no indication that the sensitivity to a range of different herbicides is changed as compared to non-transgenic oilseed rape.

  19. Treatment influence on herbicide resistance level of Belgian Alopecurus myosuroides populations (black-grass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, P Y; Henriet, F; Bodson, B

    2009-01-01

    Black-grass is a common grass weed, widely spread in Northern Europe and also in Belgium. For ages, it has been an increasing problem in industrial crops, especially winter cereals. Therefore, farmers started to spray herbicide intensively and soon cases of failure occurred for different molecules and different modes of action. Black-grass populations have been tested in greenhouses to assess the influence of an herbicide treatment as to the resistance level regarding three different herbicides: chlortoluron, fenoxaprop-P and mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron. Black-grass seeds were collected in field trials in six locations in Belgium, on individuals which have survived the herbicide treatment. Each population comes from trial plots, measuring 2 meters wide by 5 meters long and characterized by a single or a combination of products. Herbicides sprayed were isoproturon, flufenacet+diflufenican, ACCase inhibitors and ALS inhibitors. Seeds were also collected in the untreated plots. The population present in these last ones corresponds to the former population, before the herbicide selection pressure was applied. In the glasshouse assay, this population was used as the standard population to compare with other populations issued from the same field. The 'R' rating system was set up with this population to assess the evolution of resistance level, year in, year out. Rothamsted and Peldon populations were also included as cross-reference. Each field population presented different behaviours towards herbicide applied in greenhouses and some cases of resistance can be highlighted. Generally, a reduction of treatment efficiency between field and greenhouse results was clearly visible for the whole of studied active ingredients. Indeed, a distribution shift of the populations towards higher resistance classes could be observed. This is particularly remarkable for active ingredients sharing the same mode of action. For example, it has been found that populations already sprayed

  20. Robust crop resistance to broadleaf and grass herbicides provided by aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase transgenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Terry R.; Shan, Guomin; Walsh, Terence A.; Lira, Justin M.; Cui, Cory; Song, Ping; Zhuang, Meibao; Arnold, Nicole L.; Lin, Gaofeng; Yau, Kerrm; Russell, Sean M.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Peterson, Mark A.; Simpson, David M.; Zhou, Ning; Ponsamuel, Jayakumar; Zhang, Zhanyuan

    2010-01-01

    Engineered glyphosate resistance is the most widely adopted genetically modified trait in agriculture, gaining widespread acceptance by providing a simple robust weed control system. However, extensive and sustained use of glyphosate as a sole weed control mechanism has led to field selection for glyphosate-resistant weeds and has induced significant population shifts to weeds with inherent tolerance to glyphosate. Additional weed control mechanisms that can complement glyphosate-resistant crops are, therefore, urgently needed. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an effective low-cost, broad-spectrum herbicide that controls many of the weeds developing resistance to glyphosate. We investigated the substrate preferences of bacterial aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase enzymes (AADs) that can effectively degrade 2,4-D and have found that some members of this class can act on other widely used herbicides in addition to their activity on 2,4-D. AAD-1 cleaves the aryloxyphenoxypropionate family of grass-active herbicides, and AAD-12 acts on pyridyloxyacetate auxin herbicides such as triclopyr and fluroxypyr. Maize plants transformed with an AAD-1 gene showed robust crop resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides over four generations and were also not injured by 2,4-D applications at any growth stage. Arabidopsis plants expressing AAD-12 were resistant to 2,4-D as well as triclopyr and fluroxypyr, and transgenic soybean plants expressing AAD-12 maintained field resistance to 2,4-D over five generations. These results show that single AAD transgenes can provide simultaneous resistance to a broad repertoire of agronomically important classes of herbicides, including 2,4-D, with utility in both monocot and dicot crops. These transgenes can help preserve the productivity and environmental benefits of herbicide-resistant crops. PMID:21059954

  1. Degradation of Herbicides Atrazine and Bentazone Applied Alone and in Combination in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Bin; CHENG Jing-Tao; WANG Xiao-Fang; ZHOU Ying; LIU Wei-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The application of a mixture of bentazone (3-isopropyl-lH-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one-2,2-dioxide) and atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropy1-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) is a practical approach to enhance the herbicidal effect.Labo-ratory incubation experiments were performed to study the degradation of bentazone and atrazine applied in combination and individually in maize rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils.After a lag phase,the degradation of each individual herbicide in the non-autoclaved soil could be adequately described using a first-order kinetic equation.During a 30-d in-cubation,in the autoclaved rhizosphere soil,bentazone and atrazine did not noticeably degrade,but in the non-autoclaved soil,they rapidly degraded in both non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soils with half-lives of 19.9 and 20.2 d for bentazone and 29.1 and 25.7 d for atrazine,respectively.The rhizosphere effect significantly enhanced the degradation of atrazine,but had no significant effect on bentazone.These results indicated that biological degradation accounted for the degrada-tion of both herbicides in the soil.When compared with the degradation of the herbicide applied alone,the degradation rates of the herbicides applied in combination in the soils were lower and the lag phase increased.With the addition of a surfactant,Tween-20,a reduced lag phase of degradation was observed for both herbicides applied in combination.The degradation rate of bentazone accelerated,whereas that of atrazine remained nearly unchanged.Thus,when these two herbicides were used simultaneously,their persistence in the soil was generally prolonged,and the environmental contamination potential increased.

  2. Seedling Performance Associated with Live or Herbicide Treated Tall Fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Halvorson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tall fescue is an important forage grass which can host systemic fungal endophytes. The association of host grass and endophyte is known to influence herbivore behavior and host plant competition for resources. Establishing legumes into existing tall fescue sods is a desirable means to acquire nitrogen and enhance the nutritive value of forage for livestock production. Competition from existing tall fescue typically must be controlled to ensure interseeding success. We used a soil-on-agar method to determine if soil from intact, living (L, or an herbicide killed (K tall fescue sward influenced germination and seedling growth of three cultivars of tall fescue (E+, MaxQ, and E− or legumes (alfalfa, red clover, and white clover. After 30 days, seedlings were larger and present in greater numbers when grown in L soil rather than K soil. Root growth of legumes (especially white clover and tall fescue (especially MaxQ were not as vigorous in K soil as L soil. While shoot biomass was similar for all cultivars of tall fescue in L soil, MaxQ produced less herbage when grown in K soil. Our data suggest establishing legumes or fescue cultivars may not be improved by first killing the existing fescue sod and seedling performance can exhibit significant interseasonal variation, related only to soil conditions.

  3. Aquatic risk assessment of the new rice herbicide profoxydim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Paloma [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of the Environment, INIA, Crta De La Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: arguello@inia.es; Kubitza, Johanna [BASF-AG, Agricultural Center Limburgerhof, P.O. Box 120, D-67114 Limburgerhof (Germany); Peter Dohmen, G. [BASF-AG, Agricultural Center Limburgerhof, P.O. Box 120, D-67114 Limburgerhof (Germany); Tarazona, Jose V. [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of the Environment, INIA, Crta De La Coruna Km 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    A tiered protocol for assessing ecological risks has been applied to the rice pesticide profoxydim. The initial assessment (Tier I) was based on toxicity exposure ratio (TER) calculations based on laboratory data using a worst-case rice scenario. The first refinement (Tier II) was based on direct toxicity assessment (DTA) of water samples collected during a field-mesocosm study. Finally, a higher-tier assessment on the in situ assessment of paddy community responses (field-mesocosm-Tier III) was performed. A successive application of three pesticides, the herbicides azimsulfuron, propanil and the insecticide malathion, was used as reference controls. The refined assessments indicated a lower risk than that predicted from TER estimations. DTA-based Tier II showed toxicity effects only for concentrations above the recommended dose of profoxydim. Effects for reference controls were observed in DTA which were not expected from Tier I. The field-mesocosm study confirmed these effects but also showed that they were transient and of low relevance. - Risk refinement assessment of rice pesticides starting with DTA and moving to community studies is a cost-effective approach, only if required.

  4. The organochlorine herbicide chloridazon interacts with cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Norris, B; Quevedo, L

    1998-07-01

    Chloridazon is a widely used organochlorine herbicide. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect on cell membranes it was made to interact with human erythrocytes, frog adrenergic neuroepithelial synapse and molecular models. These consisted in multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and of dimyristoylphosphatidyltidylcholine (DMPC), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner and outer monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that chloridazon interacted preferentially with DMPC multilayers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 0.1 mM chloridazon induced erythrocyte crenation. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this is due to the preferential insertion of chloridazon in the phosphatidylcholine-rich external moiety of the red cell membrane. Electrophysiological measurements showed that nerve stimulation was followed immediately by a transient increase in short-circuit current (SCC) and in the potential difference (PD) of the neuroepithelial synapse. Increasing concentrations of chloridazon caused a dose-dependent and reversible decrease of the responses of both parameters to 76% of their control values. The pesticide induced a similar (28%) significant time-dependent decrease in the basal values of the SCC and of PD. These results are in accordance with a perturbing effect of chloridazon on the phospholipid moiety of the nerve fibre membrane leading to interference with total ion transport across the nerve skin junction.

  5. Overexpression of glutamine synthetases confers transgenic rice herbicide resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hui; Huang Qiman; Su Jin

    2005-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, E.C.6.3.1.2) is a key enzyme involved in the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in higher plants and gram-negative microorganisms. GS is the targeting enzyme of a herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) or Basta. In order to generate PPT-resistant transgenic rice via overexpression of GS, we constructed a plant expression vector p2GS harboring two different isoenzymes GS1 and GS2 cDNAs under the control of constitutive promoters of rice Act1 and maize Ubiquitin(Ubi) genes. The p2GS was introduced into rice genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and confirmed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. GS-transgene expression was first detected by Northern blot analyses. Results from Basta test indicated that GS-transgenic plants can tolerate as high as 0.3% Basta solution. In addition, our results also demonstrated that GS overexpression conferred transformed rice calli PPT resistance. Thus, GS cassette can serve as a selective marker gene instead of bar cassette for selection of PPT transformants.

  6. Pretreatment of Herbicides Production Wastewater by Different Electrolyte Fillers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingliang XIE; Hao DU; Zhong PENG; Fuhao WANG

    2015-01-01

    Objective] The aim was to study the pretreatment effect of herbicides production wastewater by different types of micro-electrolysis fil er. [Method] The re-search performed comparison on the effects of three types of micro-electrolysis fil er treatment of pesticide wastewater by changing the role of time and pH. [Result] The results showed that the best treatment effect was spherical packing, fol owed by tooth fil er; poor treatment effect and easy to harden were iron shavings. With pH of the influent of 2 and reaction time of 160 min, the removals of CODcr and chro-maticity which was with spherical packing reached 24.79% and 97.5%; the removals of CODcr and chromaticity which Dentate micro-electrolysis fil er treated reached 21.74% and 93.75%. With pH of the influent at 3 and reaction time of 120min, the removal of CODcr and chromaticity which was treated with iron ingot reached 13.59% and 87.5%. [Conclusion] By comparison analysis, the spherical packing is better suited to handle wastewater .

  7. Optimization of benzoxazinones as natural herbicide models by lipophilicity enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Francisco A; Marín, David; Oliveros-Bastidas, Alberto; Molinillo, José M G

    2006-12-13

    Benzoxazinones are plant allelochemicals well-known for their phytotoxic activity and for taking part in the defense strategies of Gramineae, Ranunculaceae, and Scrophulariceae plants. These properties, in addition to the recently optimized methodologies for their large-scale isolation and synthesis, have made some derivatives of natural products, 2,4-dihydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3-(4H)-one (DIBOA) and its 7-methoxy analogue (DIMBOA), successful templates in the search for natural herbicide models. These new chemicals should be part of integrated methodologies for weed control. In ongoing research about the structure-activity relationships of benzoxazinones and the structural requirements for their phytotoxicity enhancement and after characterization of the optimal structural features, a new generation of chemicals with enhanced lipophilicity was developed. They were tested on selected standard target species and weeds in the search for the optimal aqueous solubility-lipophilicity rate for phytotoxicity. This physical parameter is known to be crucial in modern drug and agrochemical design strategies. The new compounds obtained in this way had interesting phytotoxicity profiles, empowering the phytotoxic effect of the starting benzoxazinone template in some cases. Quantitative structure-activity relationships were obtained by bioactivity-molecular parameters correlations. Because optimal lipophilicity values for phytotoxicity vary with the tested plant, these new derivatives constitute a more selective way to take advantage of benzoxazinone phytotoxic capabilities.

  8. Reproductive toxicity of Roundup herbicide exposure in male albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owagboriaye, Folarin O; Dedeke, Gabriel A; Ademolu, Kehinde O; Olujimi, Olarenwaju O; Ashidi, Joseph S; Adeyinka, Aladesida A

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of infertility in human is on the increase and the use of Roundup herbicide and presence of its residues in foodstuff is a major concern. This study therefore aim to assess the effect of Roundup on the reproductive capacity of 32 adult male albino rats randomized into 4 groups of 8 rats per group orally exposed to Roundup at 3.6mg/kg body weight(bw), 50.4mg/kgbw and 248.4mg/kgbw of glyphosate concentrations for 12 weeks while the control group was given distilled water. Serum level of reproductive hormone (testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin), oxidative stress indices in the testicular tissue, epididymal sperm morphology assessment and testicular histopathology of the rats were used as a diagnostic marker of reproductive dysfunction. Significant (p<0.05) alterations in the level of all the reproductive hormones and oxidative stress markers assayed were observed in rats exposed to Roundup. Significant reductions (p<0.05) in sperm count, percentage motility and significant (p<0.05) increased in abnormal sperm cells were observed in the exposed rats. Histopathologically, severe degenerative testicular architectural lesions were seen in the Roundup exposed rats. Roundup may interfere with spermatogenesis and impair fertility in male gonad. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. ADAPTIVE RESPONSES OF CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM TO HERBICIDE BUTACHLOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishav Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Present paper deals with the herbicide Butachlor (5,10 ,20,40 and 80ppm-induced changes in physiological and biochemical parameters related to photosynthesis and defense systems in paddy field cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum grown under laboratory conditions. Growth and photosynthetic pigments, i.e., chlorophyll a and carotenoids were adversely affected by Butachlor treatment and the inhibition was found to be dose dependent. The toxic effect of Butachlor was more pronounced protein; however, a considerable reduction in chlorophyll a, and carotenoids was also noticed. Furthermore, Butachlor with increasing doses accelerated the formation of active oxygen species, i.e., O2- and H2O2, in cells progressively. As a consequence of active oxygen species (AOS generation in Butachlor -treated cells, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD was enhanced considerably. Besides the accelerated action of enzymatic defense systems, Protein damage also showed an increasing trend with the rising concentration of Butachlor (5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm.

  10. Toxicity of the herbicide glyphosate to Chordodes nobilii (Gordiida, Nematomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiorno, Cecilia L; Villalobos, Cristina de; Ferrari, Lucrecia

    2008-05-01

    Nematomorpha (horsehair worms) is a poorly known group of worm-like animals similar to nematodes. Adults are free-living and reproduction takes place in freshwater environments, where preparasitic larvae undergo development. All species have a parasitic juvenil stage and infection may result in the host's death, insects being the most frequent host. Most of the life cycle occurs in freshwater environments, which are often contaminated by different pollutants. Based on the lack of information on the toxicity of herbicides to horsehair worms, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of glyphosate (technical grade and formulated product) on Chordodes nobilii (Gordiida, Nematomorpha). Bioassays were performed with embryos and larvae (preparasitic stages), and adults (postparasitic stage). Test organisms were exposed for a short period of time to concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 8 mga.e.l(-1) of glyphosate (technical and formulated). Although embryo development was not inhibited, there was a significant decrease in the infective capacity of larvae derived from eggs that had been exposed to >or= 0.1mg/l. Similar results were obtained for directly exposed larvae. No differences in toxicity were detected between the active ingredient and formulated product. Adult exposed for 96 h to 1.76 mgl(-1) formulated Gly shown a mortality of 50%. Results indicate that C. nobilii is affected at glyphosate concentrations lower than those expected to be found in freshwater environments and those specified in the legislation.

  11. Ethoxylated rapeseed oil derivatives as novel adjuvants for herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Brancq, Bernard; Milius, Alain; Okori, Nathalie; Vaille, Claude; Gauvrit, Christian

    2002-12-01

    Ethoxylates of rapeseed oil and of methylated rapeseed oil were synthesized and tested as adjuvants for 2,4-D and phenmedipham. Provided they had less than 6 units of ethylene oxide (EO), 1.0 to 10 g litre(-1) ethoxylates in water induced droplet spreading on barley leaves. In an acetone-based medium all derivatives strongly promoted the foliar uptake of 2,4-D, with no clear influence of the ethoxylation degree. In the same medium there was a negative influence of ethoxylate chain length on the foliar uptake of phenmedipham. In a water-based medium, phenmedipham applied with rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (20 EO) rapeseed oil displayed uptake rates close to a commercial preparation. The same was true for phenmedipham applied with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil. In bioassays, phenmedipham prepared with methylated rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (20 EO) rapeseed oil was as efficacious on barley as a commercial formulation. The same was true for phenmedipham prepared with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil. However, neither rapeseed oil nor methylated rapeseed oil emulsified with ethoxylated (2 EO) methylated rapeseed oil conferred good efficacy to phenmedipham. Hence, ethoxylated rapeseed oil derivatives are promising adjuvants or formulants for herbicides.

  12. Advanced Formulation Technology and its benefits for Clomazone containing herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennens, David

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clomazone is an important compound for effective weed control in winter oilseed rape and spring crops as potatoes and vegetables. Both when applied solo and as a complementary partner to other active ingredients, clomazone offers good and reliable control on a range of key weed species and crop safety. Its unique mode of action brings valuable contribution to anti-resistance weed management strategies. Clomazone effects on susceptible weed species are the typical bleaching symptoms. FMC developed and patented a unique CS microencapsulation technology for clomazone formulations. This technology as used in Centium 36 CS maintains efficacy and crop safety and reduces the risk of potential damage to non-target plants. In addition FMC introduces two novel formulation platforms, Synchronized Technology (SYNCTEC and Dual Active Matrix Technology (DAMTEC. Synchronized Technology (SYNCTEC means co-microencapsulation of multiple active ingredients and synchronized delivery to the target after application, hence making the different herbicides available at their optimal timing. Dual Active Matrix Technology (DAMTEC combines a microencapsulated active ingredient with a second active ingredient in granular form. Both proprietary technologies are specifically designed for co-formulated products and preserve the unique properties of the different active ingredients and all benefits from the CS microencapsulation system including control of volatility and high efficacy performance.

  13. Removal of clomazone herbicide from a synthetic effluent by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincá, Cristina; Vargas, Fernanda T; Martins, Manoel L; Gonçalves, Fábio F; Vargas, Rodrigo P; Freire, Flavio B; Zanoelo, Everton F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the kinetics of removal of clomazone herbicide from an aqueous solution by electrocoagulation. The experiments were performed in a cylindrical batch reactor with six aluminum electrodes in monopolar mode, arranged in series and connected to a digital DC power. The aqueous solution (tap water + clomazone) with initial pH close to 7.9 was always treated at ambient temperature (≈20 °C) and atmospheric pressure for 5,400 s. For a confidence level of 95% the rate constant of electrocoagulation and the efficiency of removal of clomazone at equilibrium were 2.1 × 10(-3) ± 0.5 × 10(-3) s(-1) and 97.7 ± 2.2%, respectively. The final chemical oxygen demand was 88% lower than that measured initially, while turbidity and apparent color were totally removed from the synthetic solution at a rate close to that of formation of aluminum hydroxides. Some reaction intermediates, such as benzonitrile-2-chloro and 2-chloro-hex-2,4-diene-1,6-dioic-acid determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, explain the ratio of equilibrium to initial total organic carbon approximately between 0.6 and 0.8 at a probability of 95%.

  14. Sequential bio- and phototransformation of the herbicide methabenzthiazuron in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouki, Moulay Abderrahmane; Giry, Géraldine; Besse, Pascale; Combourieu, Bruno; Sancelme, Martine; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Richard, Claire; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2003-09-01

    We investigated the transformation of methabenzthiazuron in water by microorganisms and solar light. This compound was very slowly phototransformed when irradiated at lambda > 290 nm, but it could be successfully oxidized into 6-hydroxymethabenzthiazuron by Aspergillus niger, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The toxicity of this metabolite, as determined by the standardized Microtox test, was sixfold lower than that of the parent molecule. The 6-hydroxymethabenzthiazuron was not further metabolized by A. niger but was photooxidized with ring cleavage of the aromatic ring and photodimerized on irradiation at lambda > 290 nm. In the presence of humic substances, the photodegradation was slower. We demonstrate that the transformations of methabenzthiazuron, observed either with the fungus A. niger or by the action of solar light, do not proceed via the urea chain N-dealkylation, as usually reported, but only via hydroxylation or cleavage of the benzene ring. This work shows the complementarity of both approaches, photo- and biodegradation, to study the fate of herbicides in the environment.

  15. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  16. Discovery of Putative Herbicide Resistance Genes and Its Regulatory Network in Chickpea Using Transcriptome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir A. Iquebal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. contributes 75% of total pulse production. Being cheaper than animal protein, makes it important in dietary requirement of developing countries. Weed not only competes with chickpea resulting into drastic yield reduction but also creates problem of harboring fungi, bacterial diseases and insect pests. Chemical approach having new herbicide discovery has constraint of limited lead molecule options, statutory regulations and environmental clearance. Through genetic approach, transgenic herbicide tolerant crop has given successful result but led to serious concern over ecological safety thus non-transgenic approach like marker assisted selection is desirable. Since large variability in tolerance limit of herbicide already exists in chickpea varieties, thus the genes offering herbicide tolerance can be introgressed in variety improvement programme. Transcriptome studies can discover such associated key genes with herbicide tolerance in chickpea.Results: This is first transcriptomic studies of chickpea or even any legume crop using two herbicide susceptible and tolerant genotypes exposed to imidazoline (Imazethapyr. Approximately 90 million paired-end reads generated from four samples were processed and assembled into 30,803 contigs using reference based assembly. We report 6,310 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, of which 3,037 were regulated by 980 miRNAs, 1,528 transcription factors associated with 897 DEGs, 47 Hub proteins, 3,540 putative Simple Sequence Repeat-Functional Domain Marker (SSR-FDM, 13,778 genic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP putative markers and 1,174 Indels. Randomly selected 20 DEGs were validated using qPCR. Pathway analysis suggested that xenobiotic degradation related gene, glutathione S-transferase (GST were only up-regulated in presence of herbicide. Down-regulation of DNA replication genes and up-regulation of abscisic acid pathway genes were observed. Study further reveals

  17. Sonophotocatalytic degradation of alazine and gesaprim commercial herbicides in TiO2 slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahena, Cristina Lizama; Martínez, Susana Silva; Guzmán, Daniel Morales; Del Refugio Trejo Hernández, Ma

    2008-03-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of alazine and gesaprim commercial herbicides was carried out in aqueous TiO(2) suspensions under UV light (15W, 352 nm). Degradation of these herbicides was also observed by the combined effects of photocatalysis with sonolysis (sonophotocatalysis) using an ultrasound source of 20kHz. Degradation profiles were recorded by measuring the concentration of the active compounds present in the alazine (alachlor and atrazine) and gesaprim (atrazine) by HPLC as a function of irradiation time (sound and/or light). Over 90% of the active component in the gesaprim was abated and those in alazine were completely degraded. The content of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand was also monitored. Mineralization of the commercial herbicides was achieved. Over 80% of chemical oxygen demand abatement was attained for both herbicides with sonophotocatalysis at 150 min of irradiation time. The photocatalytic degradation of the herbicides followed a pseudo-first order kinetics and their rate constant was increased by the combined effects of sonolysis.

  18. Rapid fluorescence determination of diquat herbicide in food grains using quantum dots as new reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; Simonet, Bartolome M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-04-29

    CdSe/ZnS QDs have demonstrated capacity to act as reducing agent in organic media such as acetonitrile and ethanol. By using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, it has been demonstrated that QDs reduce diquat herbicide to its monocation radical. The reaction is characterized to present a high reaction rate making possible to perform the reaction by simple filtration of the solution containing the herbicide through a QDs modified filter. The monocation radical presents a high fluorescence emission spectrum which was selected as the analytical signal to quantify the diquat herbicide. The method described here for the analysis of diquat herbicide in oat grains is simple and fast allowing the analysis of trace level of herbicide in only 6 min. The excellent sensitivity and reproducibility of the methods indicate that the reaction is favoured from both thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. The results presented open up the possibility to use QDs as redox agent. The sensitivity of the method expressed as detection limit was only of 0.01 mg kg{sup -1}.The lineal range was between 0.05 and 0.5 mg kg{sup -1}. The time of analysis per sample, including extraction, reaction and fluorescent measurement was only of 6 min.

  19. Response of vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea to pre- or post-emergence applied herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasilakoglou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad-leaved weeds constitute a serious problem in the production of winter legumes, but few selective herbicides controlling these weeds have been registered in Europe. Four field experiments were conducted in 2009/10 and repeated in 2010/11 in Greece to study the response of common vetch (Vicia sativa L., lentil (Lens culinaris Medik., chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and red pea (Lathyrus cicera L. to several rates of the herbicides pendimethalin, S-metolachlor, S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine and flumioxazin applied pre-emergence, as well as imazamox applied post-emergence. Phytotoxicity, crop height, total weight and seed yield were evaluated during the experiments. The results of this study suggest that common vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea differed in their responses to the herbicides tested. Pendimethalin at 1.30 kg ha-1, S-metolachlor at 0.96 kg ha-1 and flumioxazine at 0.11 kg ha-1 used as pre-emergence applied herbicides provided the least phytotoxicity to legumes. Pendimethalin at 1.98 kg ha-1 and both rates of S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine provided the greatest common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. control. Imazamox at 0.03 to 0.04 kg ha-1 could also be used as early post-emergence applied herbicide in common vetch and red pea without any significant detrimental effect.

  20. Potential environmental impacts associated with large-scale herbicide-tolerant GM oilseed rape crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellous Marc

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Biomolecular Engineering Commission considers that the knowledge acquired in the last three years has provided significant information in reply to the points raised in its review dated 16 February 2001. The Commission has studied the potential environmental impacts associated with large-scale herbicidetolerantGMoilseed rape crops, making a distinction between direct and indirect impacts. Direct impacts stem from the intrinsic properties of herbicide-tolerant GM oilseed rape crops whereas indirect impacts result from practices associated with the farming of these crops. The Commission considers that, in the absence of the use of the herbicide in question in and outside of farmed land, there is no direct environmental risk (development of invasive crops per se associated with the presence of a herbicide-tolerance gene in oilseed rape (or related species. Nevertheless, since the interest of these tolerant crops lies in the use of the herbicide in question, indirect effects, to varying extents, have been identified and must be taken into account: the use of the herbicide in question, applied to agricultural fields containing the herbicide-tolerant crop could lead to an increase in oilseed rape volunteer populations in crop rotations; the selective pressure exerted by non-specific herbicides (to which the crops have been rendered tolerant may be very high in cases of continuous and uncontrolled use of these herbicides, and may result in the persistence of rare events such as the reproduction of fertile interspecies hybrids; the change to the range of herbicides used should be conveyed by more effective weed control and, like any change in farming practices, induce indirect effects on the agri-ecosystem, particularly in terms of changes to weeds and the associated animal life. Accordingly, the Biomolecular Engineering Commission recommends a global approach in terms of the large-scale farming of herbicide-tolerant crops that: accounts for the

  1. INFLUENCE OF SOIL TILLAGE AND LOW HERBICIDE DOSES ON WEED POPULATIONS AND SPRING BARLEY YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Knežević

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different tillage variants and low herbicide doses of triasulfuron & chlortoluron mixture (Dicuran forte 80 WP on weed populations and crop yield were studied in spring barley on lessive pseudogley soil in North-Eastern Croatia at the Čačinci locality in 1999. Tillage had no significant influence on annual broad-leaved weed biomass production, which was 22 kg ha-1 , on the average. Chisel ploughing and disk harrowing significantly increased perennial weed biomass by 21 and 44 times, respectively compared to mouldboard ploughing. The average efficacy of total weed biomass control was 95, 89 and 81% at full, onehalf and one-quarter of the recommended herbicide dose, respectively and did not differ very much between tillage treatments. Both reduced herbicide doses ensured very good biomass control of the most abundant weed populations such as Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., Chenopodium album L., Ch. polyspermum L. and Polygonum lapathifolium L. No significant tillage and herbicide dose effects were recorded in barley yields, which ranked from 4.93 t ha-1 in chisel ploughing to 4.48 t ha-1 in disk harrowing. These results suggested a possibility of mouldboard ploughing substitution with reduced tillage practices on lessive pseudogley soil and herbicide dose reduction of triasulfuron & chlortoluron mixture to 50% or more in spring barley.

  2. Titanium Dioxide-Mediated Photcatalysed Degradation of Two Herbicide Derivatives Chloridazon and Metribuzin in Aqueous Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to find out the optimal degradation condition for two potential environmental pollutants, chloridazon and metribuzin (herbicide derivatives, employing advanced oxidation process using TiO2 photocatalyst in aqueous suspensions. The degradation/mineralization of the herbicide was monitored by measuring the change in pollutant concentration and depletion in TOC content as a function of time. A detailed degradation kinetics was studied under different conditions such as types of TiO2 (anatase/anatase-rutile mixture, catalyst concentration, herbicide concentration, initial reaction pH, and in the presence of electron acceptors (hydrogen peroxide, ammonium persulphate, potassium persulphate in addition to atmospheric oxygen. The photocatalyst, Degussa P25, was found to be more efficient catalyst for the degradation of both herbicides as compared with two other commercially available TiO2 powders like Hombikat UV100 and PC500. Chloridazon (CHL was found to degrade more efficiently under acidic condition, whereas metribuzin (MET degraded faster under alkaline medium. All three electron acceptors tested in this study were found to enhance the degradation rate of both herbicides.

  3. Safener responsiveness and multiple herbicide resistance in the weed black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Ian; Bryant, David N; Edwards, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Safeners enhance the selectivity of graminicidal herbicides such as fenoxaprop ethyl in cereals, by increasing their rates of detoxification in the crop. While studying the selectivity of fenoxaprop ethyl in wheat, we determined that the safeners mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl also enhanced herbicide tolerance in the competing weed black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides). Fenoxaprop ethyl was detoxified by conjugation with glutathione in both wheat and black-grass, with the resulting metabolites processed to the respective cysteine derivatives, which were then N-glycosylated. In black-grass, these detoxification pathways were only slightly enhanced by safeners, suggesting that metabolism alone was unlikely to account for increased herbicide tolerance. Instead, it was determined that safening was associated with an accumulation of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione and enzymes with antioxidant functions including phi and lambda glutathione transferases, active as glutathione peroxidases and thiol transferases respectively. These safener-induced changes closely mirrored those determined in two independent black-grass populations that had acquired multiple herbicide resistance (MHR) in the field. In addition to enhanced glutathione metabolism, both safener treatment and MHR resulted in elevated levels of flavonoids in the foliage of black-grass plants, notably flavone-C-glycosides and anthocyanins. Our results demonstrate that safening in a grass weed is associated with an inducible activation in antioxidant and secondary metabolism which mirrors the biochemical phenotype exhibited in plants that are resistant to multiple classes of herbicides.

  4. Resistência de plantas daninhas aos herbicidas Weed resistance to herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Christoffoleti

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A resistência de plantas daninhas aos herbicidas ocorre em função de um processo evolutivo. O desenvolvimento de biótipos de plantas daninhas resistentes é imposto pela agricultura moderna, através da pressão de seleção causada pelo uso intensivo dos herbicidas. O conhecimento dos mecanismos e fatores que favorecem o aparecimento de biótipos de plantas daninhas resistentes é fundamental para que técnicas de manejo sejam utilizadas no sentido de evitar ou retardar o aparecimento de plantas resistentes em uma área. São poucos os relatos ou citações de literatura no Brasil. Sendo assim, este trabalho de revisão procura relatar os principais avanços e descobertas na área de plantas daninhas resistentes aos herbicidas.Weed herbicide resistance has evolved from weed evolution. The modern agriculture is responsible for this evolution because of the intensive use of herbicides. The knowledge of mechanisms and factors that influence the weed herbicide resistance play an important role in the weed manegement techniques used to avoid or delay herbicide resistance appearence. There are not many report or scientific papers about herbi cide resistance in Brasil. Therefore, this literature review aims to provide information about the main advances and discoveries in the field of weed herbicide resistance.

  5. Effect of Butachlor Herbicide on Earthworm Eisenia fetida—Its Histological Perspicuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukaruppan Gobi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of the Green Revolution, there has been a quantum leap in the use of synthetic herbicides and pesticides throughout the world to sustain high yielding crop varieties. Continuous use of these synthetic chemicals leads to loss of soil fertility and soil organisms. To explore the effect of exposure to commercial herbicide (Butachlor on the life history parameters (biomass, clitellum development, and cocoon production and the histological changes in the earthworm Eisenia fetida over 60 days, the dried cow dung was contaminated with 0.2575 mg kg−1, 0.5150 mg kg−1, and 2.5750 mg kg−1 of butachlor based on the LC50 value, and a control was maintained. The mean earthworm biomass was found to be decreased with increasing herbicide concentration. Similarly, cocoon production was also reduced by the increasing herbicide concentration. A possible explanation is an increased demand for energy, needed for the regulation and detoxification of herbicide. All earthworms in the exposed group were found to have glandular cell enlargement and to be vacuolated.

  6. Structure-toxicity relationship of chloroacetanilide herbicides: relative impact on soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Supradip; Dutta, Debashis; Karmakar, Rajib; Ray, Deb Prasad

    2012-09-01

    The research was carried out to ascertain the effect of three chloroacetanilide herbicides, alachlor, butachlor and pretilachlor on soil microbial biomass growth and activity. Laboratory experiments were performed in a silty clay loam soil to relate changes of soil enzymatic activity to the herbicide persistence under laboratory condition up to 42 days at three application rates. The results showed that all the three herbicides caused enhancement of dehydrogenase activity. Higher concentrations of herbicide resulted in enhancement of the enzymatic activity. In addition, a similar trend was observed in β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase activity, although urease activity decreased upon incubation for 42 days as compared with initial soil incubation values. Based on the extent of impact for dehydrogenase activity in soil, the order was pretilachlor>alachlor>butachlor; whereas in case of urease activity, the order changed to pretilachlor>butachlor>alachlor. The soil half-lives of alachlor, butachlor and pretilachlor respectively, were 9.3, 12.7 and 7.3 days, which could be accounted for in terms of their respective chemical structures, as well as variable adsorption, degradation, differential effects of the agents on soil microbes. Soil management practices and the differing physicochemical properties of the herbicides may contribute to their rates of decay in soil.

  7. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides.

  8. Naturally occurring phytotoxins in allelopathic plants help reduce herbicide dose in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Matloob, Amar; Tanweer, Asif; Khan, Muhammad Bismillah

    2012-01-01

    Field studies were carried out to evaluate the influence of allelopathic plant water extracts applied alone or tank-mixed with a reduced herbicide dose on the weeds of wheat. Water extracts of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.) + sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) + mulberry (Morus alba L.) were used alone (each at 20 L ha(-1)) or combined with iodo + mesosulfuron (3.6 and 7.2 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1); 25 and 50% of the recommended dose, respectively). The recommended dose of herbicide, a weedy check and a weed-free treatment were included for comparison. Allelopathic water extracts alone suppressed the density of canary grass (Phalaris minor Retz.) and wild oat (Avena fatua L.) by 34-42%, and dry weight by 59-67%. The mixture of allelopathic plant water extracts combined with reduced doses of iodo + mesosulfuron gave weed control equal to the recommended dose of the herbicide. Integration of plant water extracts with reduced herbicide rates provide effective weed control and a wheat yield comparable to using the recommended herbicide dose.

  9. A clomazone immunoassay to study the environmental fate of the herbicide in rice (Oryza sativa) agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Mariana; Mathó, Cecilia; Cantou, Guillermina; Sanborn, James R; Last, Jerold A; Hammock, Bruce D; Roel, Alvaro; González, David; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2010-04-14

    The environmental impact of rice agriculture is poorly studied in developing countries, mainly due to limitations of the analytical capacity. Here, we report the development of a clomazone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a fast and cost-effective tool to monitor the dissipation of this herbicide along the harvest. Antibodies were prepared using different strategies of hapten conjugation, and the best hapten/antibody pair was selected. It proved to be a reliable tool to measure the herbicide in the 2.0-20 ng/mL range in field samples, with excellent correlation with high-performance liquid chromatography results. The assay was used to study the dissipation of the herbicide in the floodwater of experimental rice paddies in Uruguay. Large differences in the residual amounts of herbicide were observed depending on the flooding practices. Because of its robustness and simplicity, the assay may be useful to delineate and monitor management practices that can contribute to minimizing the release of the herbicide in the environment.

  10. Determination of commonly used polar herbicides in agricultural drainage waters in Australia by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Doble, Philip

    2007-03-01

    The present study describes the application of different extraction techniques for the preconcentration of ten commonly found acidic and non-acidic polar herbicides (2,4-D, atrazine, bensulfuron-methyl, clomazone, dicamba, diuron, MCPA, metolachlor, simazine and triclopyr) in the aqueous environment. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with dichloromethane, solid-phase extraction (SPE) using Oasis HLB cartridges or SBD-XC Empore disks were compared for extraction efficiency of these herbicides in different matrices, especially water samples from contaminated agricultural drainage water containing high concentrations of particulate matter. Herbicides were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an ultraviolet detector. SPE using SDB-XC Empore disks was applied to determine target herbicides in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area (NSW, Australia) during a two-week survey from October 2005 to November 2005. The daily aqueous concentrations of herbicides from 24-h composite samples detected at two sites increased after run-off from a storm event and were in the range of: 0.1-17.8 microg l(-1), < 0.1-0.9 microg l(-1) and 0.2-17.8 microg l(-1) at site 1; < 0.1-3.5 microg l(-1), < 0.1-0.2 microg l(-1) and < 0.2-3.2 microg l(-1) at site 2 for simazine, atrazine and diuron, respectively.

  11. A further evaluation of herbicides for post-emergence use in short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, D.J.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a study of the safety and efficacy of a range of herbicides and mixtures of herbicides (with both contact and residual activity) for the post-emergence control of weeds in newly planted willow short rotation coppice (SRC). Severe competition from weeds that have not been controlled adequately by pre-emergence herbicide application is one of the commonest causes of SRC crop failure. In the study, the effects of 11 herbicide treatments currently recommendation for weed control with cereals, legumes or potatoes were compared with an untreated control. There was minimal crop death from any treatment, though most of the treatments caused varying degrees of phytotoxicity. Two commercial products, Reflex T and Impuls, gave the best overall crop safety and weed control results. The report provides growers of SRC and their advisors with some information on how to achieve improved weed control in SRC fields, and recommends that British Biogen (the trade industry body) should consider the compilation of a technical register of herbicide applications based on information supplied by growers and advisers, including field treatment details.

  12. Seasonal variability in irradiance affects herbicide toxicity to the marine flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eSjollema

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR and Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR of the solar spectrum affect microalgae directly and modify the toxicity of phytotoxic compounds present in water. As a consequence seasonal variable PAR and UVR levels are likely to modulate the toxic pressure of contaminants in the field. Therefore the present study aimed to determine the toxicity of two model contaminants, the herbicides diuron and Irgarol®1051, under simulated irradiance conditions mimicking different seasons. Irradiance conditions of spring and autumn were simulated with a set of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs. Toxicity of both herbicides was measured individually and in a mixture by determining the inhibition of photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII of the marine flagellate Dunaliella teriolecta using Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM fluorometry. Toxicity of the single herbicides was higher under simulated spring irradiance than under autumn irradiance and this effect was also observed for mixtures of the herbicides. This irradiance dependent toxicity indicates that herbicide toxicity in the field is seasonally variable. Consequently toxicity tests under standard light conditions may overestimate or underestimate the toxic effect of phytotoxic compounds.

  13. Fermentation and alternative oxidase contribute to the action of amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Zabalza, Ana; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase inhibitors (ALS-inhibitors) and glyphosate (GLP) are two classes of herbicide that act by the specific inhibition of an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain or aromatic amino acids, respectively. The physiological effects that are detected after application of these two classes of herbicides are not fully understood in relation to the primary biochemical target inhibition, although they have been well documented. Interestingly, the two herbicides' toxicity includes some common physiological effects suggesting that they kill the treated plants by a similar pattern despite targeting different enzymes. The induction of aerobic ethanol fermentation and alternative oxidase (AOX) are two examples of these common effects. The objective of this work was to gain further insight into the role of fermentation and AOX induction in the toxic consequences of ALS-inhibitors and GLP. For this, Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1 and AOX1a were used. The results found in wild-type indicate that both GLP and ALS-inhibitors reduce ATP production by inducing fermentation and alternative respiration. The main physiological effects in the process of herbicide activity upon treated plants were accumulation of carbohydrates and total free amino acids. The effects of the herbicides on these parameters were less pronounced in mutants compared to wild-type plants. The role of fermentation and AOX regarding pyruvate availability is also discussed.

  14. Glyphosate and dicamba herbicide tank mixture effects on native plant and non-genetically engineered soybean seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed species are becoming resistant to intensive and extensive use of specific herbicides associated with the production of herbicide resistant crops, e.g., the use of glyphosate for weed management with glyphosate resistant soybeans. To counter this resistance, crops engineered ...

  15. Different cross-resistance patterns to AHAS herbicides of two tribenuron-methyl resistant flixweed (Descurainiasophia L.) biotypes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Cao, Yuan; Yang, Qian; Liu, Ming Jie; Mei, Yu; Zheng, Ming Qi

    2014-06-01

    Flixweed (Descurainiasophia L.) is a troublesome weed in winter wheat fields in China. Two flixweed accessions, HB08 and HB16 with a Pro-197-Leu and Pro-197-Ser AHAS-mutation respectively, have evolved very high levels resistance to sulfonylurea (SU) herbicide, tribenuron-methyl. Cross resistance of HB08 and HB16 to AHAS herbicides of SU, imidazolinone (IMI), triazolopyrimidine (TP) and pyrimidinyl-thiobenozoate (PTB) families was investigated by dose-response experiments. In addition, the effects of AHAS herbicides on the activity of AHAS extracted from HB08 and HB16 plants were evaluated. HB16 exhibited cross resistance to SU herbicides halosulfuron-methyl and triasulfuron, TP herbicides flumetsulam and penoxsulam, but displayed more sensitivity to IMI herbicide imazethapyr. By contrast, HB08 only showed cross resistance to SU herbicides halosulfuron-methyl and triasulfuron. The in vitro sensitivity of AHAS to AHAS herbicides is consistent with the results of dose-response experiments and the estimated Pearson's r values for HB08 and HB16 are 0.996 and 0.912 respectively. These indicated that altered AHAS sensitivity was responsible mainly for cross resistance patterns observed in the two resistant biotypes.

  16. Vapor movement of the synthetic auxin herbicides, aminocyclopyrachlor and its methyl ester under laboratory and enclosed chamber environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor (DPX MAT28) a newly discovered synthetic auxin herbicide and its methyl ester (DPX KJM44) appear to control a number of perennial broadleaf weeds. The potential volatility of this new herbicide and its methyl ester were determined under laboratory conditions and were also compar...

  17. Glyphosate and dicamba herbicide tank mixture effects on native plant and non-genetically engineered soybean seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed species are becoming resistant to intensive and extensive use of specific herbicides associated with the production of herbicide resistant crops, e.g., the use of glyphosate for weed management with glyphosate resistant soybeans. To counter this resistance, crops engineered ...

  18. Herbicide impact on the growth and reproduction of characteristic and rare arable weeds of winter cereal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotchés-Ribalta, Roser; Boutin, Céline; Blanco-Moreno, José M; Carpenter, David; Sans, F Xavier

    2015-07-01

    The decline of arable species characteristic of winter cereal fields has often been attributed to different factors related to agricultural intensification but most importantly to herbicide use. Herbicide phytotoxicity is most frequently assessed using short-term endpoints, primarily aboveground biomass. However, short-term sensitivity is usually not sufficient to detect actual effects because plants may or may not recover over time following sublethal herbicide exposures. Therefore, it is important to assess the long-term effects of herbicide applications. Annual species rely on renewable seed production to ensure their persistence; hence, assessment of herbicide sensitivity is more accurately estimated through effects on reproduction. Here we aim to assess the phytotoxicity of two commonly used herbicides: tribenuron and 2,4-D on eight plant species belonging to four families, each with one rare and one more common species. Specifically we examined the pattern of sensitivity using short-term and long-term endpoints (total aboveground biomass, total seed biomass and number of seeds) of these species; we determined the levels of and time to recovery in terms of stem length and fruit number, and assessed whether their rarity relates to their sensitivity to herbicide application. Our results suggest that although differences in herbicide sensitivity are not a direct cause of rarity for all species, it may be an important driver of declining arable plants.

  19. Dual action of phosphonate herbicides in plants affected by herbivore--model study on black bean aphid Aphis fabae rearing on broad bean Vicia faba plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipok, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    The interactions between plants, herbicides and herbivore insects were studied as an aspect of possible side effect of the using of phosphonate herbicides. The experimental system was composed of phosphonate herbicides, broad bean Vicia faba (L.) plants and black bean aphid Aphis fabae (Scopoli). Two means of herbicide application, namely standard spraying and direct introduction of the herbicide into stem via glass capillary, were examined. The results obtained for N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its derivatives show 10 times higher inhibition of the plant growth if glass capillary mode was used. When plants were infested by aphids 24h after the use of herbicide, a significant decrease in plant growth rate was observed in relation to plants treated with herbicides alone. Moreover, the sensitivity of aphids towards glyphosate, N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its 3-methyl derivative introduced to artificial diet indicated that these herbicidal phosphonates possessed also insecticidal activity if applied in a systemic manner. Additionally, olfactometer measurements revealed that aphids preferred intact V. faba leaves over those that had been treated with sublethal doses of herbicides. The results achieved in these experiments indicate that the use of phosphonate herbicides decreases plant resistance and influences the number of aphids accompanied with treated plants. Regarding these facts it can be concluded that the combined effect of herbicide-induced stress and insect herbivory reduced plant fitness and thus should be considered as also a factor enabling the reduction of herbicide doses.

  20. Biomass, Leaf Area, and Resource Availability of Kudzu Dominated Plant Communities Following Herbicide Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.T. Rader

    2001-10-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens the forests of the southern U.S. Five herbicides were tested with regard to their efficacy in controlling kudzu, community recover was monitored, and interactions with planted pines were studied. The sites selected were old farm sites dominated by kudzu.These were burned following herbicide treatment. The herbicides included triclopyr, clopyralid, metsulfuron, tebuthiuron, and picloram plus 2,4-D. Pine seedlings were planted the following year. Regression equations were developed for predicting biomass and leaf area. Four distinct plant communities resulted from the treatments. The untreated check continued to be kudzu dominated. Blackberry dominated the clopyradid treatment. Metsulfron, trychlopyr and picloram treated sites resulted in herbaceous dominated communities. The tebuthiuron treatment maintained all vegetation low.

  1. Microevolution of ALS inhibitor herbicide resistance in loose silky bentgrass (Apera spica-venti)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babineau, Marielle

    2017-01-01

    Apera spica-venti is one of the most serious weed in Central and Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries. Many populations have evolved resistance to three herbicide site of action, especially to the ALS inhibitors, and some populations evolved multiple resistance to all three sites of action....... The genetic mechanisms of herbicide resistance remain tentative in this species. Chemical control has become a less viable solution in view of multiple resistance and stricter legislation to reduce pesticide use. A better understanding of the evolutionary processes involved in the early development...... of herbicide resistance in A. spica-venti could improve non-chemical management strategies. This PhD study aimed to 1) determine cross and multiple resistance of ALS resistant neighboring populations of A. spica-venti as well as the spatial distribution pattern of ALS resistance, 2) identify genes involved...

  2. Biotransformation of benzonitrile herbicides via the nitrile hydratase-amidase pathway in rhodococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, Alicja B; Pelantová, Helena; Sulc, Miroslav; Macková, Martina; Lovecká, Petra; Thimová, Markéta; Pasquarelli, Fabrizia; Pičmanová, Martina; Pátek, Miroslav; Bhalla, Tek Chand; Martínková, Ludmila

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the ability of rhodococci to transform 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile (chloroxynil), 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile (bromoxynil), 3,5-diiodo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile (ioxynil) and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil); to identify the products and determine their acute toxicities. Rhodococcus erythropolis A4 and Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 converted benzonitrile herbicides into amides, but only the former strain was able to hydrolyze 2,6-dichlorobenzamide into 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and produced also more of the carboxylic acids from the other herbicides compared to strain PA-34. Transformation of nitriles into amides decreased acute toxicities for chloroxynil and dichlobenil, but increased them for bromoxynil and ioxynil. The amides inhibited root growth in Lactuca sativa less than the nitriles but more than the acids. The conversion of the nitrile group may be the first step in the mineralization of benzonitrile herbicides but cannot be itself considered to be a detoxification.

  3. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  4. Herbicide impact on non-target plant reproduction: what are the toxicological and ecological implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, C; Strandberg, B; Carpenter, D; Mathiassen, S K; Thomas, P J

    2014-02-01

    Declining plant diversity and abundance have been widely reported in agro-ecosystems of North America and Europe. Intensive use of herbicides within cropfields and the associated drift in adjacent habitats are partly responsible for this change. The objectives of this work were to quantify the phenological stages of non-target plants in in-situ field situations during herbicide spray and to compare plant susceptibility at different phenological stages. Results demonstrated that a large number of non-target plants had reached reproductive stages during herbicide spray events in woodlots and hedgerows, both in Canada and Denmark where vegetation varies considerably. In addition, delays in flowering and reduced seed production occurred widely on plants sprayed at the seedling stage or at later reproductive periods, with plants sprayed at reproductive stages often exhibiting more sensitivity than those sprayed as seedlings. Ecological risk assessments need to include reproductive endpoints.

  5. Enhancing the viability of carp larvae by probiotic preparation BPS-44 under the herbicide roundup influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Barbukho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different concentrations of the herbicide roundup (active ingredient – izopropilamine salt of glyphosate, 480 g/l on survival of the carp larvae (Cyprinus carpio L. and the compensation of the adverse effects by probiotic BPS-44 are studied. Roundup (concentrations from 0.01 to 80 mg/dm3 makes negative effect on the carp larvae. Primary herbicide stress in prenatal period of ontogenesis leads to some increase of larvae viability only in minimal concentration – 0.001 mg/dm3, in all other cases it leads to considerable increase of the larvae mortality. The preparation BPS-44 enhances the viability of carp larvae under conditions of medium toxic stress of the herbicide (0.02–0.80 mg/dm3.

  6. Effect of rice husk gasification residue application on herbicide behavior in micro paddy lysimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Junghun; Pisith, Sok; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Effects of rice husk gasification residues (RHGR) application on the fate of herbicides, butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, in paddy water were investigated using micro paddy lysimeters (MPLs). The dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water was faster in the RHGR treated MPL than in the control MPL. The average concentrations of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water in the lysimeter treated with RHGR during 21 days were significantly reduced by 51% and 48%, respectively, as compared to those in the lysimeter without RHGR application. The half-lives (DT50) of butachlor in paddy water for control and treatment were 3.1 and 2.3 days respectively, and these values of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl were 3.0 and 2.2 days, respectively. Based on this study, RHGR application in rice paddy environment is an alternative method to reduce the concentration of herbicide in paddy field water and consequently to reduce potential pollution to aquatic environment.

  7. Herbicide and fertilizers promote analogous phylogenetic responses but opposite functional responses in plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Wisz, Mary S.; Strandberg, Beate

    2014-01-01

    on long-term experiment we show that fertilizer and herbicides (glyphosate) have contrasting effects on functional structure, but can increase phylogenetic diversity in semi-natural plant communities. We found that an increase in nitrogen promoted an increase in the average specific leaf area and canopy...... height at the community level, but an increase in glyphosate promoted a decrease in those traits. Phylogenetic diversity of plant communities increased when herbicide and fertilizer were applied together, likely because functional traits facilitating plant success in those conditions were......Throughout the world, herbicides and fertilizers change species composition in agricultural communities, but how do the cumulative effects of these chemicals impact the functional and phylogenetic structure of non-targeted communities when they drift into adjacent semi-natural habitats? Based...

  8. Evaluating grass strips trapping efficiency of sediments and herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguet, Maria; Guzmán, Gema; de Luna, Elena; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    Water erosion and associated offsite contamination are major environmental risks in many Mediterranean crops such as olives or vineyards (Beaufoy, 2001; Gómez et al., 2011). The use of cover crops has been prescribed as a mitigation measure for both problems because permanent cover crops have demonstrated to reduce sediment and agrochemical loads (e.g. Gómez, 2009a, b). However, large uncertainty remains about its effectiveness degree to reduce sediment and agrochemical contribution to streams due to the limited number of available studies, and the large variability observed under field conditions (Taguas et al., 2012). Furthermore, the determination of sediment and herbicide sources using suitable sediment tracing/fingerprinting properties has been noted as one tool to evaluate the effectiveness and functioning of vegetated filters at the catchment scale (Koiter et al., 2013). The objectives of the present study were twofold: [1] to explore the combined use of natural and simulated rainfall and magnetic iron oxide in understanding the performance of vegetation strips on runoff and soil and herbicide losses at plot scale and, [2] to evaluate the effectiveness degree of vegetation strips in buffering sediment and herbicide from bare soil areas under different conditions compared to a control situation with no strips. This study encompasses six rainfall simulations under four different soil managements combining the use of a magnetic iron oxide as a sediment tracer to obtain a better understanding of the vegetation strips trapping efficiency. Three runoff plots of 6 m × 14 m were established in a 20% hillslope under a Fluvisol alluvial terrace. Each of the plots contained three bare strips tagged with magnetic iron oxide and three strips with Lolium multiflorum L. The soil management simulated scenarios were: immediately after sowing the vegetation cover (June 2011cover crop), with settled vegetation cover (June 2012cover crop), after 5 cm of deep ploughing

  9. Herbicide treatments for the control of resistant black grass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different herbicide treatments were tested in the year 2010 – 2013 at eight locations in the north-west of Bavaria in Franken to control herbicide resistant black grass (Alopecurus myosuroides, Huds.. Application of Atlantis (Mesosulfuron + Iodosulfuron + Mefenpyr was essential for the control of black grass in winter wheat. Combination with other herbicides was also in focus of the trial program as different treatment methods, application timing, application sequences, herbicide rate and the use of adjuvants. As a result of the trials sequence applications were more effective than single applications. The use of soil active herbicides in autumn and spring application of Atlantis was one of the best solutions to control resistant black grass in winter wheat. Reduced rate of Atlantis have to be compensated by addition of appropriate adjuvants. Higher level of resistance depends on implementation of integrated weed management to serve economic wheat production.

  10. Structural and functional effects of herbicides on non-target organisms in aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, James; Kortekamp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide use has increased dramatically around the world over the past 6 decades (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). Few herbicides were in use in the 1950s. However, by 2001 approximately 1.14 billion kilograms of herbicides were applied globally for the control of undesireable vegetation in agricultural, silvicultural, lawncare, aquacultural, and irrigation/recreational water management activities (Kiely et al., 2004). Twenty-eight percent of the total mass of herbicides is applied in the United States, with the remaining 72 percent being applied elsewhere around the globe (Kiely et al., 2004). Herbicides represent 36% of global pesticide use, followed by insecticides (25%), fungicides (10%) and other chemical classes (Kiely et al., 2004).

  11. Epistatic interactions among herbicide resistances in Arabidopsis thaliana: the fitness cost of multiresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Fabrice; Camilleri, Christine; Giancola, Sandra; Brunel, Dominique; Reboud, Xavier

    2005-11-01

    The type of interactions among deleterious mutations is considered to be crucial in numerous areas of evolutionary biology, including the evolution of sex and recombination, the evolution of ploidy, the evolution of selfing, and the conservation of small populations. Because the herbicide resistance genes could be viewed as slightly deleterious mutations in the absence of the pesticide selection pressure, the epistatic interactions among three herbicide resistance genes (acetolactate synthase CSR, cellulose synthase IXR1, and auxin-induced AXR1 target genes) were estimated in both the homozygous and the heterozygous states, giving 27 genotype combinations in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. By analyzing eight quantitative traits in a segregating population for the three herbicide resistances in the absence of herbicide, we found that most interactions in both the homozygous and the heterozygous states were best explained by multiplicative effects (each additional resistance gene causes a comparable reduction in fitness) rather than by synergistic effects (each additional resistance gene causes a disproportionate fitness reduction). Dominance coefficients of the herbicide resistance cost ranged from partial dominance to underdominance, with a mean dominance coefficient of 0.07. It was suggested that the csr1-1, ixr1-2, and axr1-3 resistance alleles are nearly fully recessive for the fitness cost. More interestingly, the dominance of a specific resistance gene in the absence of herbicide varied according to, first, the presence of the other resistance genes and, second, the quantitative trait analyzed. These results and their implications for multiresistance evolution are discussed in relation to the maintenance of polymorphism at resistance loci in a heterogeneous environment.

  12. RESISTANCE TO ALS-INHIBITING HERBICIDES IN WEED POPULATIONS FROM BELGIAN WHEAT FIELDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Claerhout; B, De Cauwer

    2015-01-01

    In modern agriculture, most farmers rely on herbicides for weed control. The intensive use of herbicides in crops has led to the development of herbicide resistance in numerous weeds worldwide. In Belgium, farmers have encountered problems with controlling populations of Alopecurus myosuroides, Matricaria recutita, Stellaria media and Popover rhoeas in some wheat fields with the conventionally used acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Dose response assays were conducted in the greenhouse to test the sensitivity of these populations to the key ALS-inhibiting herbicides mesosulfuron-methyl + iodosulfuron-methyl for A. myosuroides and metsulfuron-methyl and florasulam for M. recutita, S. media and P. rhoeas. The ED₉₀- and ED₅₀-values (effective dose for resp. 90% and 50% biomass reduction) were compared with those of sensitive reference populations and the resistance index (RI) was calculated. High levels of resistance were detected forA. myosuroides (RI: 24.3) after treatment with mesosulfuron-methyl and for M. recutita (RI: 36.4 to 49.5), S. media (RI > 20) and P. rhoeas (RI: 23.6) after treatment with metsulfuron-methyl. However, the metsulfuron-methyl resistant populations of M. recutita and S. media were sufficiently controlled with florasulam at the maximum authorised field dose. This was not the case for P. rhoeas. The metsulfuron-methyl resistant P. rhoeas population were also high-level resistant against florasulam (RI: 29.5). Integrated weed management practices (crop rotation, herbicide mixing, ...) should be applied to reduce the selection pressure for resistant weeds.

  13. iMAR: An Interactive Web-Based Application for Mapping Herbicide Resistant Weeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Panozzo

    Full Text Available Herbicides are the major weed control tool in most cropping systems worldwide. However, the high reliance on herbicides has led to environmental issues as well as to the evolution of herbicide-resistant biotypes. Resistance is a major concern in modern agriculture and early detection of resistant biotypes is therefore crucial for its management and prevention. In this context, a timely update of resistance biotypes distribution is fundamental to devise and implement efficient resistance management strategies. Here we present an innovative web-based application called iMAR (interactive MApping of Resistance for the mapping of herbicide resistant biotypes. It is based on open source software tools and translates into maps the data reported in the GIRE (Italian herbicide resistance working group database of herbicide resistance at national level. iMAR allows an automatic, easy and cost-effective updating of the maps a nd provides two different systems, "static" and "dynamic". In the first one, the user choices are guided by a hierarchical tree menu, whereas the latter is more flexible and includes a multiple choice criteria (type of resistance, weed species, region, cropping systems that permits customized maps to be created. The generated information can be useful to various stakeholders who are involved in weed resistance management: farmers, advisors, national and local decision makers as well as the agrochemical industry. iMAR is freely available, and the system has the potential to handle large datasets and to be used for other purposes with geographical implications, such as the mapping of invasive plants or pests.

  14. Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Fitness Penalty in Herbicide Resistant Brachypodium hybridum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Eyal; Matzrafi, Maor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide-resistance mutations may impose a fitness penalty in herbicide-free environments. Moreover, the fitness penalty associated with herbicide resistance is not a stable parameter and can be influenced by ecological factors. Here, we used two Brachypodium hybridum accessions collected from the same planted forest, sensitive (S) and target-site resistance (TSR) to photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors, to study the effect of agro-ecological parameters on fitness penalty. Both accessions were collected in the same habitat, thus, we can assume that the genetic variance between them is relatively low. This allow us to focus on the effect of PSII TSR on plant fitness. S plants grains were significantly larger than those of the TSR plants and this was associated with a higher rate of germination. Under low radiation, the TSR plants showed a significant fitness penalty relative to S plants. S plants exhibiting dominance when both types of plants were grown together in a low-light environment. In contrast to previous documented studies, under high-light environment our TSR accession didn’t show any significant difference in fitness compared to the S accession. Nitrogen deficiency had significant effect on the R compared to the S accession and was demonstrated in significant yield reduction. TSR plants also expressed a high fitness penalty, relative to the S plants, when grown in competition with wheat plants. Two evolutionary scenarios can be suggested to explain the coexistence of both TSR and S plants in the same habitat. The application of PSII inhibitors may have created selective pressure toward TSR dominancy; termination of herbicide application gave an ecological advantage to S plants, creating changes in the composition of the seed bank. Alternatively, the high radiation intensities found in the Mediterranean-like climate may reduce the fitness penalty associated with TSR. Our results may suggest that by integrating non-herbicidal approaches into weed

  15. The influence of different herbicide doses on weed infestation of winter triticale cultivated in monoculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kraska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in 2003-2005 in the Bezek Experimental Farm (University of Life Sciences in Lublin. The experimental field was situated on light loamy sand soil. The phosphorus content in soil was high, in potassium medium, in magnesium low. The humus content was 1.2%. The experiment was carried out in randomized blocks in three replications. The aim of the investigation was to compare three doses of herbicides in winter triticale canopy (Janko cv., Woltario cv., Krakowiak cv. cultivated in monoculture. The herbicides Atlantis 04 WG and Factor 365 EC were applied at full recommended doses (200 g×ha-1, at doses reduced to 75% and 50%. The control was not treated with the herbicides. The weed infestation level was determined by means of the quantitative-weighting method at two dates: the first one at the 6th week after herbicide application and the second one before harvest. The density of weed individuals was counted; the species composition and air- dry biomass of above-ground parts were estimated from the randomly selected areas of 1 m x 0.25 m at four sites of each plot. The density of weeds and weed air dry weight were statistically analysed by means of variance analysis, and the mean values were estimated with Tukey's confidence intervals (p=0.05. It was found that the number of weeds and air dry mass of weeds in the control were significantly higher in comparison with the herbicide treated objects. The application of different doses of herbicides did not differentiate significantly the weed infestation level in the winter triticale canopy. Viola arvensis, Matricaria maritima, Chenopodium album and Apera spicaventi were dominant species of weeds in the winter triticale canopy. The selection of cultivars did not influence the canopy weed infestation level.

  16. Unintended effects of the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba on lady beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freydier, Laurène; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2016-08-01

    Weed resistance to glyphosate and development of new GM crops tolerant to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and dicamba is expected to lead to increased use of these herbicides in cropland. The lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata is an important beneficial insect in cropland that is commonly used as an indicator species in safety evaluations of pesticides. Here, we examined the lethal and non-lethal effects of 2,4-D and dicamba active ingredients and commercial formulations to this lady beetle species, and tested for synergistic effects of the herbicides. Second instars of lady beetles were exposed to an experimental treatment, and their mortality, development, weight, sex ratio, fecundity, and mobility was evaluated. Using similar methods, a dose-response study was conducted on 2,4-D with and without dicamba. The commercial formulation of 2,4-D was highly lethal to lady beetle larvae; the LC90 of this herbicide was 13 % of the label rate. In this case, the "inactive" ingredients were a key driver of the toxicity. Dicamba active ingredient significantly increased lady beetle mortality and reduced their body weight. The commercial formulations of both herbicides reduced the proportion of males in the lady beetle population. The herbicides when used together did not act synergistically in their toxicity toward lady beetles versus when the chemistries were used independently. Our work shows that herbicide formulations can cause both lethal and sublethal effects on non-target, beneficial insects, and these effects are sometimes driven by the "inactive" ingredients. The field-level implications of shifts in weed management practices on insect management programs should receive further attention.

  17. Glyphosate, paraquat and ACCase multiple herbicide resistance evolved in a Lolium rigidum biotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Cairns, Andrew; Powles, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Glyphosate is the world's most widely used herbicide. A potential substitute for glyphosate in some use patterns is the herbicide paraquat. Following many years of successful use, neither glyphosate nor paraquat could control a biotype of the widespread annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum), and here the world's first case of multiple resistance to glyphosate and paraquat is confirmed. Dose-response experiments established that the glyphosate rate causing 50% mortality (LD(50)) for the resistant (R) biotype is 14 times greater than for the susceptible (S) biotype. Similarly, the paraquat LD(50 )for the R biotype is 32 times greater than for the S biotype. Thus, based on the LD(50 )R/S ratio, this R biotype of L. rigidum is 14-fold resistant to glyphosate and 32-fold resistant to paraquat. This R biotype also has evolved resistance to the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) inhibiting herbicides. The mechanism of paraquat resistance in this biotype was determined as restricted paraquat translocation. Resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides was determined as due to an insensitive ACCase. Two mechanisms endowing glyphosate resistance were established: firstly, a point mutation in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, resulting in an amino acid substitution of proline to alanine at position 106; secondly, reduced glyphosate translocation was found in this R biotype, indicating a co-occurrence of two distinct glyphosate resistance mechanisms within the R population. In total, this R biotype displays at least four co-existing resistance mechanisms, endowing multiple resistance to glyphosate, paraquat and ACCase herbicides. This alarming case in the history of herbicide resistance evolution represents a serious challenge for the sustainable use of the precious agrochemical resources such as glyphosate and paraquat.

  18. THE IMPACT OF WEED SUPRESSION BY HERBICIDES AND SOIL TILLAGE AT WINTER WHEAT YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branimir Mikić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research of impact of different herbicide dosages and soil tillage systems on weed population, weed control, winter wheat yield, its components and soil compaction has been conducted on luvisol soil type of Valpovo site during growing seasons 2008/09 and 2010/11. The trial has been set up as split-plot in four repetitions, with two soil tillage treatments (CT-conventional tillage, based on mouldboard ploughing, and CH-chiselling and diskharrowing, without ploughing and five herbicide sub-treatments (0-control, no herbicides; H10-recommended dose of Herbaflex (2 l ha-1; H05-half dose of Herbaflex; F10-recommended dose of Fox (1.5 l ha-1; and F05-half dose of Fox. CT treatment had significantly more weed than RT in over-wet season 2009/10., whereas RT had more weed than CT in drought seasons. The control 0 had the most weed occurrence, whereas H10 treatment had the best weed suppression at both soil tillage treatments. Higher yields were achieved by CT in comparison with RT. The highest winter wheat yield has been recorded at control treatment, whereas both full herbicide dosage treatments (F10 and H10 had lower yield, but significantly only within the RT treatment. Since half herbicide dosage treatments (F05 and H05 were not significantly different neither from higher winter wheat yield achieved at control 0 at both soil tillage treatments, nor from less weeded full herbicide dosage treatments (F10 and H10, they can be recommended for winter wheat production, especially in the conditions of more and more frequent occurrence of weather extremes over Northeastern Croatia.

  19. Herbicides Use by Smallholder Farmers in the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutambara Jackqeline

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the use of herbicides by smallholder farmers in crop production and determine the socio-economic factors that influence adoption of herbicides in the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 451 smallholder farmers randomly selected. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis and regression analysis were used in analyzing the data. Results showed that farmers used manual (50% and chemical (50% weed control options. Factor analysis revealed that 10 socio-economic factors related to weed control could represent the initial set of 20 factors without much compromise on quality of data. The extracted factors together with their communalities were; sex (0.69, household size (0.82, education (0.68, distance to extension ((0.86, distance to input supply (0.84, land (0.79, agricultural courses (0.75, farming objective (0.59, knowledge (0.8 and livestock units (0.69. Regressing these extracted factors with use of herbicides revealed that the coefficients of variables representing household size (-0.023, education (0.042, farming objective (-0.008, livestock (0.598 and knowledge (0.037 factors were significant determinants of herbicide use. The study concluded that to induce adoption of herbicides, policy efforts should be directed towards reducing family sizes, knowledge, education, livestock ownership, and commercialization of crop farming by farmers. However there is a need for further analysis to ascertain the social and economic worth of herbicides as an option in weed control.

  20. iMAR: An Interactive Web-Based Application for Mapping Herbicide Resistant Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Silvia; Colauzzi, Michele; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Rosan, Valentina; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are the major weed control tool in most cropping systems worldwide. However, the high reliance on herbicides has led to environmental issues as well as to the evolution of herbicide-resistant biotypes. Resistance is a major concern in modern agriculture and early detection of resistant biotypes is therefore crucial for its management and prevention. In this context, a timely update of resistance biotypes distribution is fundamental to devise and implement efficient resistance management strategies. Here we present an innovative web-based application called iMAR (interactive MApping of Resistance) for the mapping of herbicide resistant biotypes. It is based on open source software tools and translates into maps the data reported in the GIRE (Italian herbicide resistance working group) database of herbicide resistance at national level. iMAR allows an automatic, easy and cost-effective updating of the maps a nd provides two different systems, "static" and "dynamic". In the first one, the user choices are guided by a hierarchical tree menu, whereas the latter is more flexible and includes a multiple choice criteria (type of resistance, weed species, region, cropping systems) that permits customized maps to be created. The generated information can be useful to various stakeholders who are involved in weed resistance management: farmers, advisors, national and local decision makers as well as the agrochemical industry. iMAR is freely available, and the system has the potential to handle large datasets and to be used for other purposes with geographical implications, such as the mapping of invasive plants or pests.

  1. Bacterial degradation of phenoxy herbicide mixtures 2,4-D and MCPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyeheon Oh; Tuovinen, O.H. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (MCPP) have auxin-like growth regulating properties and are extensively used for the control of broad-leaf angiosperm weeds. The microbiological degradation of 2,4-D by pure and mixed cultures has been examined in a number of studies. The authors have previously evaluated the concurrent microbiological degradation of 2,4-D and MCPP in stirred tank reactors. For the present paper, they examined the utilization of the two substrates by three mixed cultures that had a previous history of growth with the respective single phenoxy herbicide.

  2. [Transformation of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with herbicide-resistant EPSPs gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L H; Wang, X W; Zhang, W J; Zhang, X D; Hu, D F; Liu, G T

    1999-01-01

    The herbicide-resistant EPSPs (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene was transformed into about 1,000 young spikes and 800 young embryos of wheat variety, Jinghua 1, with gene gun. Thirty-eight and four regenerated plants were obtained respectively screened with glyphosate. All regenerated plants were analysed by PCR and/or Southern blotting. The results indicated that EPSPs gene was integrated stably into the genome of Jinghua 1, and some of the transformants showed fertile. So herbicide-resistant EPSPs gene could be used as selective marker in the transformation of monocotyledon cereal crops, such as wheat.

  3. Prediction of Henry's law constants of triazine derived herbicides from quantum chemical continuum solvation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eduardo J; Alderete, Joel B

    2003-01-01

    The Henry's law constants (H) for triazine derived herbicides are calculated using quantum chemical solvation models, SM2, SM3, PCM-DFT, and CPCM-DFT, and their performances are discussed. The results show considerable differences in performance among the different levels of theory. The values of H calculated by the semiempirical methods agree much better with the experimental values than those obtained at the DFT level. The differences are discussed in terms of the different contributions, electrostatic and no-electrostatic, to Gibbs free energy of solvation. In addition, the Henry's law constants of some triazine derived herbicides whose values have not been reported earlier are predicted as well.

  4. Isolation and Structural Speculation of Herbicide-Active Compounds from the Metabolites of Pythium aphanidermatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-hui; ZHANG Jin-lin; LIU Ying-chao; CAO Zhi-yan; HAN Jian-min; YANG Juan; DONG Jin-gao

    2013-01-01

    Natural herbicides, or environment-friendly bioherbicides have been attracted more and more attentions. Isolation and structural identification of natural herbicide-active compounds from plant pathogens has been proved to be an effective approach for novel lead discovery of the pesticide development. In this study, the metabolites of the mutant strain PAM1, which obtained from PA1 of Pythium aphanidermatum (Eds.) Fitzp by ultraviolet radiation were separated and identified by HPLC, NMR, and IR. The results revealed that three active compounds including 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid and two indole derivatives, exhibited inhibition activity on the elongation of radical and coleoptile of Digtaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop.

  5. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Novel Sulfonylureas Containing 1,2,4-Triazolinone Moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhuo; PAN Li; LI Yong-hong; WANG Su-hua; LI Zheng-ming

    2013-01-01

    A series of new sulfonylureas incorporating 1,2,4-triazolinone moiety was synthesized,which were further bio-assayed for the herbicidal activity against four herbs,representative of monocotyledons and dicotyledons.Some of them exhibited high potency to inhibit the growth of dicotyledons(Bassica napus and Amaranthus retroflexus) in the pot experiment.Compounds 9a and 9b also displayed an excellent herbicidal activity against Bassica napus at a concentration of 15 g/hectare,which were comparable with commercial triasulfuron.

  6. Development of herbicide resistance in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides in Bavaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides is one of the most important grass weeds in Bavaria. Chemical weed control with high efficacy is very important in crops like winter cereals, oilseed rape and maize. Crop rotations with more winter cereals, reduced soil cultivation and e.g. contract harvesting enhanced distribution of blackgrass in arable farming regions. Effects of herbicide resistance were observed since the last 20 years. The blackgrass herbicide resistance is well observed by the official plant protection service of Bavaria. A wide experience of resistance tests shows the development of resistant black-grass and provides an opportunity for future prospects in resistance dynamics.

  7. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on mate location in a wolf spider that inhabits agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesinger, Laurie M; Evans, Samuel C; Rypstra, Ann L

    2011-09-01

    Chemical communication is important to many arthropod species but the potential exists for anthropogenic chemicals to disrupt information flow. Although glyphosate-based herbicides are not acutely toxic to arthropods, little is known regarding their effects on natural chemical communication pathways. The wolf spider, Pardosamilvina, is abundant in agroecosystems where herbicides are regularly applied and uses air- and substrate-borne chemical signals extensively during mating. The aim of this study was to examine effects of a commercial formulation of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the ability of males to find females. In the field, virgin females, when hidden inside pitfall traps with herbicide, attracted fewer males than females with water. Likewise females in traps with a ring of herbicide surrounding the opening were less likely to attract males than those in traps surrounded by water. We explored the reaction of males to any airborne component of the herbicide in a laboratory two-choice olfactometer experiment. When no female pheromones were present, males were equally likely to select herbicide or water treated corridors and they all moved through the apparatus at similar speeds. When female pheromones were present, the males that selected control corridors moved more slowly than those that selected herbicide and, if we control for the initial decision time, more males selected the control corridors over the herbicide. These data suggest that glyphosate-based herbicides are "info-disruptors" that alter the ability of males to detect and/or react fully to female signals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. α-(Substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonates: synthesis, herbicidal activity, inhibition on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), and application as postemergent herbicide against broadleaf weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Wu; Peng, Hao; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chubei; Yuan, Jun-Lin; Chen, Ting; He, Junbo; Tan, Xiaosong

    2013-03-13

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) is the site of action of a new class of herbicides. On the basis of the previous work for O,O'-dimethyl α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)alkylphosphonates (I), further synthetic modifications were made by introducing a fural and a thienyl group to structure I. A series of α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonate derivatives (II) were synthesized as potential inhibitors of PDHc. The postemergent activity of the title compounds II was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The in vitro efficacy of II against PDHc was also examined. Compounds II with fural as R(3) and 2,4-dichloro as X and Y showed significant herbicidal activity and effective inhibition against PDHc from plants. O,O'-Dimethyl α-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetoxy)-α-(furan-2-yl)methylphosphonate II-17 had higher inhibitory potency against PDHc from Pisum sativum than against PDHc from Oryza sativa in vitro and was most effective against broadleaf weeds at 50 and 300 ai g/ha. II-17 was safe for maize and rice even at the dose of 900-1200 ai g/ha. Field trials at different regions in China showed that II-17 (HWS) could control a broad spectrum of broad-leaved and sedge weeds at the rate of 225-375 ai g/ha for postemergent applications in maize fields. II-17 (HWS) displayed potential utility as a selective herbicide.

  9. Corn stover harvest increases herbicide movement to subsurface drains – Root Zone Water Quality Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Removal of crop residues for bioenergy production can alter soil hydrologic properties, but there is little information on its impact on transport of herbicides and their degradation products to subsurface drains. The Root Zone Water Quality Model, previously calibrated using measured fl...

  10. Simulatie van de uitspoeling van het Herbicide Atrazine uit een kolom gevuld met podzolgrond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiktak; A.*; Drecht; G.van

    1986-01-01

    Het gedrag van het herbicide Atrazine in de bodem is in het laboratorium onderzocht met behulp van grondkolommen. Over de proeven en de resultaten werd door Loch e.a. in 1985 gerapporteerd. Met behulp van model ONZAT werd de gemeten doorbraakkromme van Atrazine in een podzolgrond gesimuleerd. Da

  11. Effects of Chlorophenoxy Herbicides and Their Main Transformation Products on DNA Damage and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B.; Sottomayor, M. J.; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode. PMID:24795892

  12. Effects of Chlorophenoxy Herbicides and Their Main Transformation Products on DNA Damage and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Benfeito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode.

  13. 76 FR 4245 - Herbicide Exposure and Veterans With Covered Service in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... being left out in the cold.'' VVA stated the view that VA's proposal to limit the period covered by the... beginning presumption date should be September 1, 1967. Neither the statute nor the legislative history... prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents; wartime...

  14. Encapsulation of the herbicide picloram by using polyelectrolyte biopolymers as layer-by-layer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jing

    2013-04-24

    Microcapsules of the herbicide picloram (PLR) were formulated by a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method using the polyelectrolyte biopolymers of biocompatible chitosan (CS) and the UV-absorbent sodium lignosulfonate (SL) as shell materials. The herbicide PLR was recrystallized and characterized using XRD analysis. The obtained PLR-loaded microcapsules were characterized by using SEM, FTIR, CLSM, and ζ-potential measurements. The herbicide loading and encapsulation efficiency were also analyzed for the PLR-loaded microcapsules. The influence of LbL layer numbers on herbicide release and photodegradation rates was investigated in vitro. The results showed that the release rates and photodegradation rates of PLR in microcapsules decreased with increasing number of CS/SL self-assembly layers. The results demonstrated that polyelectrolyte biopolymer-based LbL multilayer microcapsules can be a promising approach for the controlled release of PLR as well as other pesticides with poor photostability or short half-release time.

  15. Herbicidal activity of formulated sorgoleone, a natural product of sorghum root exudate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The allelochemical, sorgoleone, a major component of the hydrophobic root exudates of Sorghum bicolor, was formulated as a wettable powder [WP] and evaluated as a natural herbicide on several weed and crop species under different growth conditions. Formulated sorgoleone suppressed germination and ...

  16. 75 FR 32540 - Health Effects Not Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... herbicide exposure for three conditions (Parkinson's disease, ischemic heart disease, and b-cell leukemias... Parkinson's disease, ischemic heart disease, and b-cell leukemias, and VA published a proposed rule in the... small intestine and anus); hepatobiliary cancers (liver, gallbladder and bile ducts); pancreatic cancer...

  17. Dicotyledon Weed Quantification Algorithm for Selective Herbicide Application in Maize Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Morten Stigaard; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Jensen, Kjeld; Christiansen, Martin Peter; Giselsson, Thomas Mosgaard; Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    2016-11-04

    The stricter legislation within the European Union for the regulation of herbicides that are prone to leaching causes a greater economic burden on the agricultural industry through taxation. Owing to the increased economic burden, research in reducing herbicide usage has been prompted. High-resolution images from digital cameras support the studying of plant characteristics. These images can also be utilized to analyze shape and texture characteristics for weed identification. Instead of detecting weed patches, weed density can be estimated at a sub-patch level, through which even the identification of a single plant is possible. The aim of this study is to adapt the monocot and dicot coverage ratio vision (MoDiCoVi) algorithm to estimate dicotyledon leaf cover, perform grid spraying in real time, and present initial results in terms of potential herbicide savings in maize. The authors designed and executed an automated, large-scale field trial supported by the Armadillo autonomous tool carrier robot. The field trial consisted of 299 maize plots. Half of the plots (parcels) were planned with additional seeded weeds; the other half were planned with naturally occurring weeds. The in-situ evaluation showed that, compared to conventional broadcast spraying, the proposed method can reduce herbicide usage by 65% without measurable loss in biological effect.

  18. Severe adverse effects related to dermal exposure to a glyphosate-surfactant herbicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, T P; Madsen, P V; Ebbehøj, N E

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of severe chemical burns following prolonged accidental exposure to a glyphosate-surfactant herbicide. The patient developed local swelling, bullae and exuding wounds. Neurological impairment followed affecting finger flexion and sensation with reduced nerve conduction. Imaging...... revealed oedema of the soft tissue and juxta-articular osteopenia, and a causal relationship to exposure is suggested....

  19. Assessing the extent and effects of herbicide drift into Danish hedgerows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, M.; Strandberg, M. T.; Andersen, H. V.

    Very low dosages of herbicides are known to cause effects on bird cherry (Prunus avium) and hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna). With the purpose of studying whether this is a general phenomenon two other common hedgerow species, Sambucus nigra (elder) and Sorbus intermedia (Swedish whitebeam), were...

  20. Weed control in distress – can all weeds still be controlled with herbicides in future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobny, Hans G.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction and availability of highly active and selective herbicides in all important field crops, in the last decades, enabled the simplification and money saving in crop rotations and agronomic measures. This resulted in respective specialized and adapted weed populations, and consequently an increasing selection of resistant populations. Since the introduction of the ALS-inhibitors (starting 1985 and the 4-HPPD-inhibitors (2001, no new MoA-Classes were registered, and there are none in the registration process. Several established herbicides were not registered or re-registered in the EU, or were severely restricted in their application. The cost and the risk to develop and register a new selective herbicide in the EU are hardly justified, in relation to their market potential. The only solution on problem fields, with resistant populations, is to change the agronomic practices, like crop rotation, soil tillage, seeding time, etc., as a precautionary principle also on still „normal“ fields. The different advising institutions have to integrate these aspects into their recommendations, besides the proper herbicide management.

  1. Responses by earthworms to reduced tillage in herbicide tolerant maize and Bt maize cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, P. H.; Griffiths, B.; Demsar, D.

    2007-01-01

    -toxin producing transgenic maize line MON810 was studied for 1 year. At a Danish study site, Foulum (Jutland), one year of Bt corn was followed by 2 years of herbicide tolerant corn. At the French study site the most prominent effects observed were due to the tillage method where RT significantly reduced...

  2. Coverage area and fading time of surfactant-amended herbicidal droplets on cucurbitaceous leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proper use of appropriate surfactants to control droplet behaviors on leaf surfaces is critical to improve herbicide application efficacy for controlling paddy melons. An esterified seed oil surfactant and a petroleum oil surfactant were investigated to modify spread areas and fading times of water ...

  3. Alternatives to herbicides in an apple orchard, effects on yield, earthworms and plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.; Kuehn, Birka Falk; Bertelsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    tIn a newly established apple orchard eight alternative methods to weed control in the tree row werecompared to a herbicide treatment with respect to effects on tree growth, first-quality fruit yield, earth-worms and flora. All treatments were tested at two irrigation schedules, with similar amount...

  4. Effects of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their main transformation products on DNA damage and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B; Sottomayor, M J; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode.

  5. Large-scale bioreactor production of the herbicide-degrading Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Knudsen, Berith Elkær; Frkova, Zuzana;

    2014-01-01

    The Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1 has potential for pesticide bioremediation because it degrades the herbicide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). Production of the BAM-degrading bacterium using aerobic bioreactor fermentation was investigated. A mineral salt medium limited for carbon...

  6. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTRA OF THE HERBICIDES PARAQUAT AND DIQUAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The positive ion electrospray mass spectra of the quaternary ammonium salt herbicides paraquat and diquat are examined by on-line separation with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and by direct infusion of the analytes. The analytes are separated by CE in 7-10 min at pH 3.9 in 50% m...

  7. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  8. Dicotyledon Weed Quantification Algorithm for Selective Herbicide Application in Maize Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Morten Stigaard; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Jensen, Kjeld; Christiansen, Martin Peter; Giselsson, Thomas Mosgaard; Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Jensen, Peter Kryger

    2016-01-01

    The stricter legislation within the European Union for the regulation of herbicides that are prone to leaching causes a greater economic burden on the agricultural industry through taxation. Owing to the increased economic burden, research in reducing herbicide usage has been prompted. High-resolution images from digital cameras support the studying of plant characteristics. These images can also be utilized to analyze shape and texture characteristics for weed identification. Instead of detecting weed patches, weed density can be estimated at a sub-patch level, through which even the identification of a single plant is possible. The aim of this study is to adapt the monocot and dicot coverage ratio vision (MoDiCoVi) algorithm to estimate dicotyledon leaf cover, perform grid spraying in real time, and present initial results in terms of potential herbicide savings in maize. The authors designed and executed an automated, large-scale field trial supported by the Armadillo autonomous tool carrier robot. The field trial consisted of 299 maize plots. Half of the plots (parcels) were planned with additional seeded weeds; the other half were planned with naturally occurring weeds. The in-situ evaluation showed that, compared to conventional broadcast spraying, the proposed method can reduce herbicide usage by 65% without measurable loss in biological effect. PMID:27827908

  9. Two-year results of herbicide released, naturally-regenerated bottomland cherrybark and shumard oak seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F., Jr. Thompson; Larry E. Nix

    1995-01-01

    After clearcuting in bottomlands, oak seedlings that naturally regenerate are often overtopped by woody pioneer species, sprouts and herbaceous material. To improve the competitive status of three- to four-year-old oak seedlings in two bottomland stands in South Carolina, several herbicides and methods of application were used to kill and/or stunt the overtopping...

  10. Agronomic evaluation of cowpea as a function of weed control with herbicides and different combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wando Wilson de Oliveira Souza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cultivation of the cowpea is important in various regions of Brazil, but competition from weeds is one of the factors which limit productivity. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the pre-plant selectivity and efficiency of different herbicides, and combinations of herbicides, in the cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.]. An experiment was carried out in a randomised block design, in lots split over time and with three replications, using a 4 x 7 factorial scheme, where the treatments consisted of: glyphosate, glyphosate + imazethapyr, glyphosate + flumioxazin, glyphosate + imazethapyr + flumioxazin, glyphosate + ready mix (imazethapyr & flumioxazin, and two control treatments (one with no weeding and one with manual weeding. The treatments were evaluated in combination with four different sowing times, i.e. immediately after application of the herbicides, and at five, ten and fifteen days after application (DAA. The combination of glyphosate + flumioxazin at 15 DAA, gave the highest mean productivity, 1,105.32 kg ha-1, followed by manual weeding with 1,027.37 kg ha-1. The herbicide mixtures of glyphosate + imazethapyr + flumioxazin caused phyto-toxicity in the cowpea crop, limiting the production components. The best strategies for weed control in this crop are manual weeding with seeding at 10 DAA, as well as the application of a glyphosate + flumioxazin mixture with seeding at 15 DAA.

  11. The herbicide flumioxazin stimulates pathogenesis-related gene expression and enzyme activities in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Antonio Jesús; Saladin, Gäelle; Bézier, Annie; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the capacity of the soil-applied herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) to trigger defence mechanisms was assessed using 6-week-old in vitro grown Vitis vinifera L. plantlets. Time-course studies demonstrated that the herbicide induced the expression of basic beta-1,3-glucanase (Vvglu), basic chitinase (Vvchit1b) and PR10 (VvPR10.3) genes encoding three pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins involved in grapevine defence against pathogens. Thus, all transcripts accumulated in grapevine tissues to reach maximum values after 24-72 h of herbicide exposure, except for VvPR10.3 gene expression, which was induced in roots and stems but not in leaves. Induction of PR genes was observed to a greater extent in roots and leaves, and its intensity diminished in the stems although still remained noteworthy. The activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase enzymes significantly increased in the whole plant after herbicide exposure and were still stimulated 21 days after the beginning of treatments. Similarly, the most remarkable effect occurred in roots. However, all enzyme activities tested were stimulated in the upper aerial tissues as well, indicating that fmx or a derived product acts systemically, likely via root uptake.

  12. Biochar soil additions impacts herbicide fate: Importance of application timing and feedstock species

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Biochar (BC), solid biomass subjected to pyrolysis, can alter the fate of pesticides in soil. We investigated the effect of soil amendment with several biochars on the sorption, persistence, leaching and bioefficacy of the herbicides clomazone (CMZ) and bispyribac sodium (BYP). RESULTS:...

  13. Corn gluten meal as an alternative organic preemergence herbicide for onions (Allium cepa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onions (Allium cepa L.) are a potential alternative crop for Oklahoma and northeast Texas and corn gluten meal (CGM) is an alternative organic preemergence herbicide. Successful onion production is dependent on reliable weed control because of the onion’s slow growth rate, short height, non-branchin...

  14. Ethylmethanesulfonate Saturation Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis to Determine Frequency of Herbicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant resistance to glyphosate has been reported far less frequently than resistance to sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. However, these studies tend to be anecdotal, without side by side comparisons for a single species or natural isolate. In this study, we tested the frequencies of resist...

  15. Evaluation of tribenuron-methyl on sulfonylurea herbicide tolerant lettuce germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene for sulfonylurea (SU) herbicide resistance discovered in a prickly lettuce population in Idaho was transferred to domestic lettuce by University of Idaho researchers. California researchers acquired the Idaho lettuce germplasm, “IDBR-1” and transferred the SU resistance gene to five common ...

  16. Kudzu (Pueraria montana) community responses to herbicides, burning, and high-density loblolly pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.B. Harrington; L.T. Rader-Dixon; J.W. Taylor, Jr.

    2003-11-01

    Kudzu is an aggressive, nonnative vine that currently dominates an estimated 810,000 ha of mesic forest communities in the eastern United States. To test an integrated method of weed control, abundances of kudzu and other plant species were compared during 4 yr after six herbicide treatments (clopyralid, triclopyr, metsulfuron, picloram 1 2,4-D, tebuthiuron, and a nonsprayed check), in which loblolly pines were planted at three densities (0, 1, and 4 seedlings m22) to induce competition and potentially delay kudzu recovery. This split-plot design was replicated on each of the four kudzu-dominated sites near Aiken, SC. Relative light intensity (RLI) and soil water content (SWC) were measured periodically to identify mechanisms of interference among plant species. Two years after treatment (1999), crown coverage of kudzu averaged , 2% in herbicide plots compared with 93% in the nonsprayed check, and these differences were maintained through 2001, except in clopyralid plots where kudzu cover increased to 15%. In 2001, pine interference was associated with 33, 56, and 67% reductions in biomass of kudzu, blackberry, and herbaceous vegetation, respectively. RLI in kudzu-dominated plots (4 to 15% of full sun) generally was less than half that of herbicide-treated plots. SWC was greatest in tebuthiuron plots, where total vegetation cover averaged 26% compared with 77 to 111% in other plots. None of the treatments eradicated kudzu, but combinations of herbicides and induced pine competition delayed its recovery.

  17. Effect of Starch Sources on the Release Rates of Herbicides Encapsulated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of starch sources on the behaviors of starch matrices and on the rates of herbicides released from the matrices were studied for slow release. The starches considered include native corn starch, wheat starch, potato starch and cassava starch. The matrices were prepared through encapsulating 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic or 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids as model herbicides with hot-gelatinized starch pastes. The encapsulation was evaluated in terms of herbicide content, swellability, encapsulation efficiency, and release rate. The results show that starch sources play an important role on the matrix behaviors and on release rates. The rate of 2,4-D released follows the order: wheat starch < potato starch < corn starch < cassava starch. And for the rate of 2,4,5-T, this order is nearly the same only with an exception that the late two kinds of starch are similar. It is also demonstrated that herbicides with different water solubility show different release rates, no matter what type of starch is used as the matrices.

  18. Isolation, Identiifcation, and Herbicidal Activity of Metabolites Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CB-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Juan; CAO Hong-zhe; WANG Wei; ZHANG Li-hui; DONG Jin-gao

    2014-01-01

    CB-4, a bacterial strain with highly effective herbicidal activity, was isolated from infected corn leaves. Through morphology, physiological and biochemical tests, and 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing methods, CB-4 was identiifed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We conducted activity-evaluation experiments in the laboratory to assess the herbicidal potential of metabolites produced by strain CB-4. Crude extracts of strain CB-4 have high inhibition activity on Digitaria sanguinalis. In general, the root and shoot growth parameters of D. sanguinalis were signiifcantly reduced by metabolites of strain CB-4. The IC50 of the culture ifltrate extracts for the radicula and coleoptile of D. sanguinalis were 0.299 and 0.210 mg mL-1, respectively. Component 2 of the herbicidal activity of the crude toxin from strain CB-4 was successfully puriifed for the ifrst time by using high-speed counter current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system composed of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (4:5:4:5, v/v) and high-performance liquid chromatography. We concluded that the metabolites of strain CB-4 have the potential to be developed as a microbe-based herbicide.

  19. The role of climate change and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide on weed management: Herbicide Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide [CO2] and a changing climate will almost certainly affect weed biology and demographics with consequences for crop productivity. The extent of such consequences could be minimal if weed management, particularly the widespread and effective use of herbicides, m...

  20. Effect of herbizid and touchdown herbicides on soil fungi and on production of some extracellular enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A H M; Abdel-Hafez, S I I; Saleem, A

    2005-01-01

    Glucophilic and cellulose-decomposing fungi were significantly reduced in soil samples treated with 0.019-0.152 mg a.i./kg soil of the herbicides Herbizid and Touchdown. The decrease was regularly correlated with the doses of the two herbicides and persisted till the end of the experiment (12 weeks). The isolated fungi were found to be able to produce hydrolytic extracellular enzymes in solid media but with variable capabilities. The ability to produce enzymes was adversily affected by the incorporation of herbicides in culture media. Lower doses of herbicides were occasionally promotive to enzyme production and mycelial growth of some fungi. Incorporation of 50 ppm of Herbizid and Touchdown significantly activated amylase production and mycelial dry weight in cultures of Fusarium oxysporum, Mucor hiemalis and Penicillium chrysogenum. There was a significant increase in C1-cellulase produced by F. oxysporum and P. aurantiogriseum when cultures were treated with 50, 100 and 200 ppm of Herbizid which induced also more Cx-cellulase production by P. chrysogenum. Lipase and protease production was always lower in treated than in control fungal cultures.