WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-radioactive field-based assay

  1. A fluorescence based non-radioactive electrophoretic mobility shift assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, K; Reuter, M; Kupper, D; Trendelenburg, G; Dirnagl, U; Meisel, A

    2000-03-10

    Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or gel shift assay is one of the most powerful methods for studying protein-DNA interactions. Typically, 32P-labeled DNA probes containing the sequence bound by the protein of interest are used in EMSA (rEMSA). Although rEMSA is sensitive and practicable, it relies on the handling of hazardous radioisotopes, and does not easily allow quantification. We developed a non-radioactive procedure using fluorescence (Cyano dye Cy5) labeled oligodeoxynucleotide duplexes as specific probes (fEMSA) and an automatic DNA sequencer for analysis. Testing different DNA-binding proteins (restriction endonuclease EcoRII, transcription factor NFkappaB and it's subunit p50) the results in fEMSA and rEMSA are similar in regard to quality, reproducibility, and sensitivity. fEMSA allows a semiquantitative screening of large amounts of samples for specific DNA binding activities and is, therefore, a high throughput technology for semiquantitative analysis of DNA-protein interaction.

  2. A new non-radioactive deoxyhypusine synthase assay adaptable to high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Hee; Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Wolff, Edith C

    2017-08-17

    Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) catalyzes the post-translational modification of eukaryotic translation factor 5A (eIF5A) by the polyamine, spermidine, that converts one specific lysine residue to deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)], which is subsequently hydroxylated to hypusine [N (ε) -4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl(lysine)]. Hypusine synthesis represents the most critical function of polyamine. As eIF5A has been implicated in various human diseases, identification of specific inhibitors of hypusine modification is of vital importance. DHS catalyzes a complex reaction that occurs in two stages, first, the NAD-dependent cleavage of spermidine to form an enzyme-butylimine intermediate and enzyme-bound NADH, and second, the transfer of the butylimine moiety from the enzyme intermediate to the eIF5A precursor and subsequent reduction of the eIF5A-butylimine intermediate by enzyme-bound NADH to form deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)]. Our data demonstrate that there is a measurable release of enzyme-bound NADH in the absence of eIF5A precursor and that the DHS activity can be determined by coupling the first phase reaction with the NADH-Glo assay in which the generation of luminescence is dependent on NADH derived from the DHS partial reaction. The conventional DHS assay that measures the incorporation of radioactivity from [1,8-(3)H]spermidine into the eIF5A precursor in the complete reaction cannot be readily adapted for high throughput screening (HTS). In contrast, the non-radioactive DHS/NADH-Glo coupled assay is highly specific, sensitive and reproducible and could be configured for HTS of small molecule libraries for the identification of new inhibitors of DHS. Furthermore, the coupled assay provides new insights into the dynamics of the DHS reaction especially regarding the fate of NADH.

  3. A non-radioactive DAPI-based high-throughput in vitro assay to assess Plasmodium falciparum responsiveness to antimalarials--increased sensitivity of P. falciparum to chloroquine in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Patel, Vishal; Demas, Allison; LeRoux, Michele; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Clardy, Jon; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Daily, Johanna P; Wirth, Dyann F

    2010-02-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is outpacing new antimalarial development and compromising effective malaria treatment. Combination therapy is widely implemented to prolong the effectiveness of currently approved antimalarials. To maximize utility of available drugs, periodic monitoring of drug efficacy and gathering of accurate information regarding parasite-sensitivity changes are essential. We describe a high-throughput, non-radioactive, field-based assay to evaluate in vitro antimalarial drug sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates from 40 Senegalese patients. Compared with earlier years, we found a significant decrease in chloroquine in vitro and in genotypic resistances (> 50% and > 65%, respectively, in previous studies) with only 23% of isolates showing resistance. This is possibly caused by a withdrawal of chloroquine from Senegal in 2002. We also found a range of artemisinin responses. Prevalence of drug resistance is dynamic and varies by region. Therefore, the implementation of non-radioactive, robust, high-throughput antimalarial sensitivity assays is critical for defining region-specific prophylaxis and treatment guidelines.

  4. A Non-Radioactive DAPI-based High-Throughput In Vitro Assay to Assess Plasmodium falciparum Responsiveness to Antimalarials—Increased Sensitivity of P. falciparum to Chloroquine in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Patel, Vishal; Demas, Allison; LeRoux, Michele; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Clardy, Jon; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Daily, Johanna P.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2010-01-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is outpacing new antimalarial development and compromising effective malaria treatment. Combination therapy is widely implemented to prolong the effectiveness of currently approved antimalarials. To maximize utility of available drugs, periodic monitoring of drug efficacy and gathering of accurate information regarding parasite-sensitivity changes are essential. We describe a high-throughput, non-radioactive, field-based assay to evaluate in vitro antimalarial drug sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates from 40 Senegalese patients. Compared with earlier years, we found a significant decrease in chloroquine in vitro and in genotypic resistances (> 50% and > 65%, respectively, in previous studies) with only 23% of isolates showing resistance. This is possibly caused by a withdrawal of chloroquine from Senegal in 2002. We also found a range of artemisinin responses. Prevalence of drug resistance is dynamic and varies by region. Therefore, the implementation of non-radioactive, robust, high-throughput antimalarial sensitivity assays is critical for defining region-specific prophylaxis and treatment guidelines. PMID:20133997

  5. Establishment and Validation of a Non-Radioactive Method for In Vitro Transcription Assay Using Primer Extension and Quantitative Real Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Shasha; Zhou, Ying; Wei, Yun; Deng, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Primer extension-dependent in vitro transcription assay is one of the most important approaches in the research field of gene transcription. However, conventional in vitro transcription assays incorporates radioactive isotopes that cause environmental and health concerns and restricts its scope of application. Here we report a novel non-radioactive method for in vitro transcription analysis by combining primer extension with quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We show that the DNA template within the transcription system can be effectively eliminated to a very low level by our specially designed approach, and that the primers uniquely designed for primer extension and qPCR can specifically recognize the RNA transcripts. Quantitative PCR data demonstrate that the novel method has successfully been applied to in vitro transcription analyses using the adenovirus E4 and major late promoters. Furthermore, we show that the TFIIB recognition element inhibits transcription of TATA-less promoters using both conventional and nonradioactive in vitro transcription assays. Our method will benefit the laboratories that need to perform in vitro transcription but either lack of or choose to avoid radioactive facilities.

  6. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase based on in silico high-throughput screening and a non-radioactive enzymatic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenzeng; Wang, Yanlin; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Lidan; Liu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Natural polyamines are small polycationic molecules essential for cell growth and development, and elevated level of polyamines is positively correlated with various cancers. As a rate-limiting enzyme of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) has been an attractive drug target. In this report, we present the discovery of novel human AdoMetDC (hAdoMetDC) inhibitors by coupling computational and experimental tools. We constructed a reasonable computational structure model of hAdoMetDC that is compatible with general protocols for high-throughput drug screening, and used this model in in silico screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors against a large compound library using a battery of computational tools. We also established and validated a simple, economic, and non-radioactive enzymatic assay, which can be adapted for experimental high-throughput screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors. Finally, we obtained an hAdoMetDC inhibitor lead with a novel scaffold. This study provides both new tools and a new lead for the developing of novel hAdoMetDC inhibitors.

  7. Use of a non-radioactive hybridisation assay for direct detection of gram-negative bacteria carrying TEM beta-lactamase genes in infected urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, G I; Towner, K J; Pearson, N J; Slack, R C

    1989-02-01

    DNA in infected urines from 81 patients with urinary tract infection was hybridised directly with a non-radioactive DNA probe specific for bacterial genes coding for TEM-type beta-lactamase. The results were assessed by means of a computerised image analysis system and compared with those obtained following isolation of the infecting organism, conventional sensitivity testing and isoelectric focusing (IEF) procedures for the detection of TEM-type beta-lactamase. Of the 27 ampicillin-resistant gram-negative organisms isolated in pure culture from the urines, 14 were shown by both hybridisation and IEF to carry a gene for TEM beta-lactamase production. Only four discordant results were obtained: three "false positive" direct hybridisation results, one due to urine pigmentation, and one, possibly, to a TEM beta-lactamase gene which was not being expressed, and one "false negative" result due to insufficient cell numbers in the urine. The system is capable of screening large numbers of samples and is applicable to any gene for which a suitable DNA probe is available.

  8. Development of a multiplex non-radioactive receptor assay : the benzodiazepine receptor, the serotonin transporter and the beta-adrenergic receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Lutea A. A.; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C. Margot; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2007-01-01

    Binding assays still form a fundamental part of modem drug development. Receptor binding assays are mostly based on radioactivity because of their speed, ease of use and reproducibility. Disadvantages, such as health hazards and production of radioactive waste, have prompted the development of non-r

  9. Sensitive non-radioactive detection of HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the non-radioactive detection of HIV-1 proviral genomic sequences in HIV-1 infected cells. We have developed a sensitive assay, using three different sets of nested primers and our results show that this method is superior t...... genomic copies often are present at such low numbers that they are otherwise undetectable....

  10. Can field-based mosquito feeding assays be used for evaluating transmission-blocking interventions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, Jan Teun; Churcher, T.S.; Morlais, I.; Dinglasan, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of mosquito feeding assays to determine the Plasmodium falciparum transmission potential of naturally infected gametocyte carriers highlighted considerable variation in transmission efficiency between assay methodologies and between laboratories. This begs the question as to

  11. Comparisons between radioactive and non-radioactive gas lantern mantles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, E; Yoshizawa, Y; Aburai, T

    2000-12-01

    Gas lantern mantles containing radioactive thorium have been used for more than 100 years. Although thorium was once believed to be indispensable for giving a bright light, non-radioactive mantles are now available. From the radioactivities of the daughter nuclides, we estimated the levels of radioactivity of 232Th and 228Th in 11 mantles. The mantles contained various levels of radioactivity from background levels to 1410 +/- 140 Bq. Our finding that radioactive and non-radioactive mantles are equally bright suggests that there is no advantage in using radioactive mantles. A remaining problem is that gas lantern mantles are sold without any information about radioactivity.

  12. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  13. Polarographic immunoassay coupled with catalysis of non-radioactive multiple iodine label

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋俊峰; 白亚丽; 过玮; 贾晓琳

    1997-01-01

    A now polarographic immunoassay was developed In this assay,human serum albumin (HSA) as the model antigen was covalently labeled with organic compound erythrosin B(EB) containing four non-radioactive iodides through Ⅰ step chemical reaction The labeling procedure is simple and the conditions needed are moderate.The molar labeling ratio of KB HSA was 12 Ⅰ The content of iodine in the conjugate obtained by the proposed procedure is ninth higher than that by the other existing methods.A heterogeneous competitive immunoassay was established by compling the catalysis of the conjugate to substrate As(Ⅲ)-Ce(Ⅳ) reaction with the linear-sweep polarographic detec-tion of As(Ⅲ) amount HSA can be determined in the HSA concentration range from 1 to 200μg/mL,with the de-tection hum of 0 66μg/ml.

  14. Development of field-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for detection of Chikungunya and O'nyong-nyong viruses in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darci R; Lee, John S; Jahrling, Jordan; Kulesh, David A; Turell, Michael J; Groebner, Jennifer L; O'Guinn, Monica L

    2009-10-01

    Chikungunya (CHIK) and O'nyong-nyong (ONN) are important emerging arthropod-borne diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these two viruses in mosquitoes has not been evaluated, and the effects of extraneous mosquito tissue on assay performance have not been tested. Additionally, no real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay exists for detecting ONN virus (ONNV) RNA. We describe the development of sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assays for detecting CHIK and ONN viral RNA in mosquitoes, which have application for field use. In addition, we compared three methods for primer/probe design for assay development by evaluating their sensitivity and specificity. This comparison resulted in development of virus-specific assays that could detect less than one plaque-forming unit equivalent of each of the viruses in mosquitoes. The use of these assays will aid in arthropod-borne disease surveillance and in the control of the associated diseases.

  15. Use of sampling based correction for non-radioactivity X-ray energy calibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Cheng; WEI Yong-Bo; JIANG Da-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    As the requirement of non-radioactivity measurement has increased in recent years, various energy calibration methods applied in portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers have been developed. In this paper, a sampling based correction energy calibration has been discussed. In this method both history information and current state of the instrument are considered and relative high precision and reliability can be obtained.

  16. A new, peroral non-radioactive vitamin B{sub 12} absorption test compared with the Schilling test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnus, E.; Mueller, C. [Ullevaal Hospital, Dept. of Haematology and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    1995-02-01

    The results of a non-radioactive, peroral absorption test have been compared with the results of the traditional Schilling test in 31 cobalamin-deficient patients. The non-radioactive test is simple to perform, is less costly than the Schilling test and seems to give reliable results. The non-radioactive test should be performed after cobalamin treatment, but not until the plasma cobalamin value has declined to below 450 pmol/l. Normal Schilling test was noted in one-third of the patients, while normal non-radioactive test was noted in only one-fifth of the patients. The results reveal some discrepancies between the two tests regarding the response to intrinsic factor. In the non-radioactive test without intrinsic factor, the great variation in values may reflect varying secretion of intrinsic factor, possibly secondary to infestation with Helicobacter pylori. `False normal` Schilling test seems to be more common than previously believed. (au) (12 refs.).

  17. USE OF NUCLEOTIDES AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO FORMAMIDE IN NON-RADIOACTIVE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Koji, Takehiko; Nakane, Paul K.

    1990-01-01

    To analyze the expression of specific mRNA at the level of individual cells, non-radioactive in situ hybridization has been a most powerful technique. In the process of in situ hybridization, the use of formamide is usually required in order to reduce the melting temperature (Tm) of nucleic acids. However, formamide is an expensive and unstable reagent, and more importantly, formamide in itself has some deteriorative effects such as nonspecific staining and morphological damage on the results...

  18. Non-radioactive waste management in a Nuclear Energy Research Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Helio A.; Martins, Elaine A.J.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria A. F., E-mail: helioaf@ipen.br, E-mail: elaine@ipen.br, E-mail: mecotrim@ipen.br, E-mail: mapires@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEM-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2013-07-01

    For more than 50 years, non-radioactive materials have been used in processes at IPEN to support the nuclear fuel development and all related activities. Reagents, raw materials, products and by-products have been stored. Many of these are hazardous highly toxic or reactants materials. Some years ago actions sent part of these non-radioactive waste materials to proper disposal (technical incineration) resulting in an Institutional Non-Radioactive Waste Management Program. In 2005, an internal set of procedures and information entitled - Guia de Procedimentos para Armazenamento, Tratamento e Descarte de Residuos de Laboratorio Quimico - (Guide of Procedures for Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Chemistry Laboratory Wastes) - was published to be used at the IPEN's facilities. A data base managed by software was created in order to allow the Units to input data and information about the routinely generated wastes and those already existing. Even after disposing so huge amount of wastes, a latent demand still exists. Several goals were achieved notably a well-organized and roomy space; safer storage places; local, state, and nationwide laws enforcement (for radioactive and non-radioactive materials); and improvement in chemicals control as hazardous and aged materials are more frequently disposed. A special stress was conducted to know and follow laws, regulations, and technical norms as the entire process is very detailed and this is not a day-by-day routine for the IPEN's technical personnel. The immediate consequence is that the safer the workplace the safer the nuclear related activities are done. (author)

  19. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  20. Sensitive non-radioactive determination of aminotransferase stereospecificity for C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomrit, Juntratip [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Agricultural Biotechnology: (AG-BIO/PERDO-CHE), Bangkok (Thailand); Summpunn, Pijug [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Meevootisom, Vithaya [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Agricultural Biotechnology: (AG-BIO/PERDO-CHE), Bangkok (Thailand); Wiyakrutta, Suthep, E-mail: scsvy@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Agricultural Biotechnology: (AG-BIO/PERDO-CHE), Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Stereochemical mechanism of PLP enzymes is important but difficult to determine. {yields} This new method is significantly less complicated than the previous ones. {yields} This assay is as sensitive as the radioactive based method. {yields} LC-MS/MS positively identify the analyte coenzyme. {yields} The method can be used with enzyme whose apo form is unstable. -- Abstract: A sensitive non-radioactive method for determination of the stereospecificity of the C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzymes (pyridoxal phosphate, PLP; and pyridoxamine phosphate, PMP) of aminotransferases has been developed. Aminotransferase of unknown stereospecificity in its PLP form was incubated in {sup 2}H{sub 2}O with a substrate amino acid resulted in PMP labeled with deuterium at C-4' in the pro-S or pro-R configuration according to the stereospecificity of the aminotransferase tested. The [4'-{sup 2}H]PMP was isolated from the enzyme protein and divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated in aqueous buffer with apo-aspartate aminotransferase (a reference si-face specific enzyme), and the other was incubated with apo-branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (a reference re-face specific enzyme) in the presence of a substrate 2-oxo acid. The {sup 2}H at C-4' is retained with the PLP if the aminotransferase in question transfers C-4' hydrogen on the opposite face of the coenzyme compared with the reference aminotransferase, but the {sup 2}H is removed if the test and reference aminotransferases catalyze hydrogen transfer on the same face. PLP formed in the final reactions was analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the presence or absence of {sup 2}H. The method was highly sensitive that for the aminotransferase with ca. 50 kDa subunit molecular weight, only 2 mg of the enzyme was sufficient for the whole test. With this method, the use of radioactive substances could be avoided without compromising the sensitivity of the assay.

  1. Identification of five novel FBN1 mutations by non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.; Qian, C.; Comeau, K.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), one of the most common genetic disorders of connective tissue, is characterized by variable manifestations in skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular systems. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) have been shown to cause MFS. To examine the relationship between FBN1 gene mutations, fibrillin protein function and MFS phenotypes, we screened for alternations in the fibrillin coding sequence in fibroblast derived cDNA from MFS patients. To date, abnormally migrating bands in more than 20 unrelated MFS patients have been identified by using non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis and silver staining. Five altered bands have been directly sequenced. Two missense mutations and three splice site mutations have been identified. Both missense mutations substitute another amino acid for a cysteine residue (C1402W and C1672R) in EGF-like motifs of the fibrillin polypeptide chain. The two splice site mutations are at nucleotide positions 6994+1 (G{yields}A), and 7205-2 (A{yields}G) and result in in-frame skipping of exon 56 and 58, respectively. Skipping of exon 56 occurs in 50% of mutant transcripts. Use of a cryptic splice site 51 bp upstream of the normal donor site results in half of the mutant transcripts containing part of exon 56. Both products contain in-frame deletions. Another splice site mutation, identified by exon screening from patient genomic DNA using intron primers, is at nucleotide position 2293+2 (T{yields}A), but the predicted exon skipping has not been detected at the RT-PCR level. This may be due to instability of the mutant transcript. Including the mutations reported here, a total of 8 out of 36 published FBN1 gene mutations involve exon skipping. It may be inferred that FBN1 exon skipping plays an important pathogenic role in MFS.

  2. Detection of Sleeping Beauty transposition in the genome of host cells by non-radioactive Southern blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Park, Chang W; Steer, Clifford J

    2016-08-26

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) system is being used widely as a DNA vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes, as well as a tool for the insertional mutagenesis in animal models. In order to accurately assess the insertional potential and properties related to the integration of SB it is essential to determine the copy number of SB-Tn in the host genome. Recently developed SB100X transposase has demonstrated an integration rate that was much higher than the original SB10 and that of other versions of hyperactive SB transposases, such as HSB3 or HSB17. In this study, we have constructed a series of SB vectors carrying either a DsRed or a human β-globin transgene that was encompassed by cHS4 insulator elements, and containing the SB100X transposase gene outside the SB-Tn unit within the same vector in cis configuration. These SB-Tn constructs were introduced into the K-562 erythroid cell line, and their presence in the genomes of host cells was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using non-radioactive probes. Many copies of SB-Tn insertions were detected in host cells regardless of transgene sequences or the presence of cHS4 insulator elements. Interestingly, the size difference of 2.4 kb between insulated SB and non-insulated controls did not reflect the proportional difference in copy numbers of inserted SB-Tns. We then attempted methylation-sensitive Southern blots to assess the potential influence of cHS4 insulator elements on the epigenetic modification of SB-Tn. Our results indicated that SB100X was able to integrate at multiple sites with the number of SB-Tn copies larger than 6 kb in size. In addition, the non-radioactive Southern blot protocols developed here will be useful to detect integrated SB-Tn copies in any mammalian cell type.

  3. Detection of Sleeping Beauty transposition in the genome of host cells by non-radioactive Southern blot analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N., E-mail: aravalli@umn.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, MMC 292, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Park, Chang W. [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MMC 36, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Steer, Clifford J., E-mail: steer001@umn.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MMC 36, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2016-08-26

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) system is being used widely as a DNA vector for the delivery of therapeutic transgenes, as well as a tool for the insertional mutagenesis in animal models. In order to accurately assess the insertional potential and properties related to the integration of SB it is essential to determine the copy number of SB-Tn in the host genome. Recently developed SB100X transposase has demonstrated an integration rate that was much higher than the original SB10 and that of other versions of hyperactive SB transposases, such as HSB3 or HSB17. In this study, we have constructed a series of SB vectors carrying either a DsRed or a human β-globin transgene that was encompassed by cHS4 insulator elements, and containing the SB100X transposase gene outside the SB-Tn unit within the same vector in cis configuration. These SB-Tn constructs were introduced into the K-562 erythroid cell line, and their presence in the genomes of host cells was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using non-radioactive probes. Many copies of SB-Tn insertions were detected in host cells regardless of transgene sequences or the presence of cHS4 insulator elements. Interestingly, the size difference of 2.4 kb between insulated SB and non-insulated controls did not reflect the proportional difference in copy numbers of inserted SB-Tns. We then attempted methylation-sensitive Southern blots to assess the potential influence of cHS4 insulator elements on the epigenetic modification of SB-Tn. Our results indicated that SB100X was able to integrate at multiple sites with the number of SB-Tn copies larger than 6 kb in size. In addition, the non-radioactive Southern blot protocols developed here will be useful to detect integrated SB-Tn copies in any mammalian cell type.

  4. Ultrastructural localisation of intramuscular expression of BDNF mRNA by silver-gold intensified non-radioactive in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, RSB; Brouwer, N; Copray, JCVM

    2001-01-01

    A non-radioactive in situ hybridisation method is described for the detection of low intramuscular levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA at the electron microscope level. Application of high-grade silver-gold intensification of the diaminobenzidine end product of in situ hybridisat

  5. Field-based transformation optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Instead of common definition of the transformation-optics devices via the coordinate transformation we offer the approach founded on boundary conditions for the fields. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by two examples: two-shell cloak and concentrator of electric field. We believe...... that the field-based approach is quite important for effective field control....

  6. Development of rapid, sensitive and non-radioactive tissue-blot diagnostic method for the detection of citrus greening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Miyata, Shin-Ichi; Ghosh, Dilip; Irey, Mike; Garnsey, Stephen M; Gowda, Siddarame

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening) is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by Gram-negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', vectored by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Citrus plants infected by the HLB bacterium may not show visible symptoms sometimes for years following infection and non-uniform distribution within the tree makes the detection of the pathogen very difficult. Efficient management of HLB disease requires rapid and sensitive detection early in the infection followed by eradication of the source of pathogen and the vector. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method is most commonly employed for screening the infected/suspected HLB plants and psyllids. This is time consuming, cumbersome and not practical for screening large number of samples in the field. To overcome this, we developed a simple, sensitive, non-radioactive, tissue-blot diagnostic method for early detection and screening of HLB disease. Digoxigenin labeled molecular probes specific to 'Ca. L. asiaticus' nucleotide sequences have been developed and used for the detection of the pathogen of the HLB disease. The copy number of the target genes was also assessed using real-time PCR experiments and the optimized real-time PCR protocol allowed positive 'Ca. L. asiaticus' detection in citrus samples infected with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterium.

  7. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  8. A single-dose toxicity study on non-radioactive iodinated hypericin for a targeted anticancer therapy in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-jie LI; Yi-cheng NI; Marlein Miranda CONA; Yuan-bo FENG; Feng CHEN; Guo-zhi ZHANG; Xue-bin FU; Uwe HIMMELREICH; Raymond OYEN; Alfons VERBRUGGEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Hypericin (Hyp) and its radio-derivatives have been investigated in animal models with ischemic heart diseases and malignancies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.Before radioiodinated Hyp (123I-Hyp or 131I-Hyp) can be considered as a clinically useful drug,vigorous evaluations on its chemotoxicity are necessary.In the present study,we examined the toxicity of a single dose of non-radioactive 127I-Hyp in normal mice for 24 h and 14 d.Methods: Studies were performed on 132 normal mice.127I-Hyp at a clinically relevant dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight and a 100-times higher dose of 10 mg/kg was intravenously injected into 40 mice.The safety aspects of clinical manifestations,serological biochemistry,and histopathology were assessed.In another 72 mice,127I-Hyp was administered intravenously at assumed values to bracket the value of LD50.The rest 20 mice were used in the control groups.Results: At 24 h and 14 d following the injection of 127I-Hyp at either 0.1 or 10 mg/kg,all mice tolerated well without mortality or any observable treatment-related symptoms.No significant differences were found in blood biochemical parameters between the test and control groups.All organs presented normal appearances upon histopathological inspection.The value of LD50 of 127I-Hyp in mice through intravenous injection was 20.26 mg/kg,with the 95% confidence interval between 18.90 and 21.55 mg/kg.Conclusion: The current study reveals a broad safety range of 127I-Hyp,which not only supports the use of 123I-Hyp or 131I-Hyp in the necrosis targeting theragnostic strategy,but also serves as a valuable reference for exploring other possible applications for iodinated Hyp.

  9. Letter report: Pre-conceptual design study for a pilot-scale Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.A.; Morrissey, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a pre-conceptual design study for a Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste, Pilot-Scale Vitrification System. This pilot plant would support the development of a full-scale LLW Vitrification Facility and would ensure that the full-scale facility can meet its programmatic objectives. Use of the pilot facility will allow verification of process flowsheets, provide data for ensuring product quality, assist in scaling to full scale, and support full-scale start-up. The facility will vitrify simulated non-radioactive LLW in a manner functionally prototypic to the full-scale facility. This pre-conceptual design study does not fully define the LLW Pilot-Scale Vitrification System; rather, it estimates the funding required to build such a facility. This study includes identifying all equipment necessary. to prepare feed, deliver it into the melter, convert the feed to glass, prepare emissions for atmospheric release, and discharge and handle the glass. The conceived pilot facility includes support services and a structure to contain process equipment.

  10. Rapid detection of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene mutations by non-radioactive, single strand conformation polymorphism minigels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, A; Parrella, T; Perrotta, S; Guardamagna, O; Coates, P M; Sartore, M; Surrey, S; Fortina, P

    1994-07-01

    Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a common inherited metabolic disorder affecting fatty acid beta oxidation. Identification of carriers is important since the disease can be fatal and is readily treatable once diagnosed. Twelve molecular defects have been identified in the MCAD gene; however, a single highly prevalent mutation, A985G, accounts for > 90% of mutant alleles in the white population. In order to facilitate the molecular diagnosis of MCAD deficiency, oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify the exon regions encompassing the 12 mutations enzymatically, and PCR products were then screened with a single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) based method. Minigels were used allowing much faster run times, and silver staining was used after gel electrophoresis to eliminate the need for radioisotopic labelling strategies. Our non-radioactive, minigel SSCP approach showed that normals can be readily distinguished from heterozygotes and homozygotes for all three of the 12 known MCAD mutations which were detected in our sampling of 48 persons. In addition, each band pattern is characteristic for a specific mutation, including those mapping in the same PCR product like A985G and T1124C. When necessary, the molecular defect was confirmed using either restriction enzyme digestion of PCR products or by direct DNA sequence analysis or both. This rapid, non-radioactive approach can become routine for molecular diagnosis of MCAD deficiency and other genetic disorders.

  11. A non-isotopic assay for histone deacetylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, K; Brosch, G; Loidl, P; Jung, M

    1999-05-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HD) bear great potential as new drugs due to their ability to modulate transcription and to induce apoptosis or differentiation in cancer cells. To study the activity of HD and the effect of potential inhibitors in vitro so far only radio-active assays have existed. For the search of new inhibitors and for the use in HD identification and purification we established a simple, non-radioactive assay that allows screening of large numbers of compounds. The assay is based on an aminocoumarin derivative of an Omega-acetylated lysine as enzyme substrate.

  12. Novel, Non-Radioactive, Simple and Multiplex PCR-cRFLP Methods for Genotyping Human SP-A and SP-D Marker Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan DiAngelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified an allele of the human SP-A2 gene that occurs with greater frequency in an RDS population [12]. Because of the importance of SP-A in normal lung function and its newly emerging role in innate host defense and regu-lation of inflammatory processes, we wish to better characterize genotypes of both SP-A1 and SP-A2 genes. It has been determined that SP-D shares similar roles in immune response. Therefore, in this report we 1 describe a novel, non radioactive PCR based-cRFLP method for genotyping both SP-A and SP-D; 2 describe two previously unpublished biallelic polymorphisms within the SP-D gene; 3 present the partial sequence of one new SP-A1 allele (6A14 and describe other new SP-A1 and SP-A2 alleles; and 4 describe additional methodologies for SP-A genotype assessment. The ability to more accurately and efficiently genotype samples from individuals with various pulmonary diseases will facilitate population and family based association studies. Genetic poly-morphisms may be identified that partially explain individual disease susceptibility and/or treatment effectiveness.

  13. Brain uptake of a non-radioactive pseudo-carrier and its effect on the biodistribution of [(18)F]AV-133 in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianying; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Shuxian; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Aifang; Han, Jie; Zhu, Lin; Kung, Hank F; Qiao, Jinping

    2015-07-01

    9-[(18)F]Fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine ([(18)F]AV-133) is a new PET imaging agent targeting vesicular monoamine transporter type II (VMAT2). To shorten the preparation of [(18)F]AV-133 and to make it more widely available, a simple and rapid purification method using solid-phase extraction (SPE) instead of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. The SPE method produced doses containing the non-radioactive pseudo-carrier 9-hydroxypropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (AV-149). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the brain uptake of AV-149 by UPLC-MS/MS and its effect on the biodistribution of [(18)F]AV-133 in the brains of mice. The mice were injected with a bolus including [(18)F]AV-133 and different doses of AV-149. Brain tissue and blood samples were harvested. The effect of different amounts of AV-149 on [(18)F]AV-133 was evaluated by quantifying the brain distribution of radiolabelled tracer [(18)F]AV-133. The concentrations of AV-149 in the brain and plasma were analyzed using a UPLC-MS/MS method. The concentrations of AV-149 in the brain and plasma exhibited a good linear relationship with the doses. The receptor occupancy curve was fit, and the calculated ED50 value was 8.165mg/kg. The brain biodistribution and regional selectivity of [(18)F]AV-133 had no obvious differences at AV-149 doses lower than 0.1mg/kg. With increasing doses of AV-149, the brain biodistribution of [(18)F]AV-133 changed significantly. The results are important to further support that the improved radiolabelling procedure of [(18)F]AV-133 using an SPE method may be suitable for routine clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitive non-isotopic DNA hybridisation assay or immediate-early antigen detection for rapid identification of human cytomegalovirus in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, C P; Morris, D J; Corbitt, G

    1991-04-01

    A sensitive non-radioactive DNA hybridisation assay employing digoxigenin-labelled probes was compared with immediate-early antigen detection and conventional virus isolation for the identification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in 249 urine samples. Of 44 specimens yielding HCMV by virus isolation, more were positive by DNA hybridisation (32; 73%) than by immediate-early antigen detection (25; 52%) (P = 0.05). The specificity of the hybridisation assay in 45 apparently falsely positive specimens was supported by detection of HCMV DNA in 40 of these specimens using the polymerase chain reaction. Many urine specimens may thus contain large amounts of non-viable virus or free viral DNA. Evaluation of various protocols for the extraction and denaturation of virus DNA prior to hybridisation showed that proteinase K digestion with phenol/chloroform extraction was the most sensitive and reliable procedure. We conclude that the non-radioactive DNA hybridisation assay described is a potentially valuable routine diagnostic test.

  15. Dye Labelled Monoclonal Antibody Assay for Detection of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin -1 from Staphylococcus Aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Javid Khojasteh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of study was to develop a rapid assay, dye labelled monoclonal antibody assay (DLMAA, using non-radioactive organic synthetic dyes for identification of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1 producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus.Materials and Methods: The assay protocol required only two simple steps; addition of TSST-1 antigen to a nitrocellulose membrane and then adding a colloidal dye labelled antibody (D/A suspension detection reagent.Results: The sensitivity and specificity of the assay was determined relative to positive and negative strains compared to an ELISA assay. Overall 100% agreement was found between both assays. The sensitivity for detection of TSST-1 was 30 ng.Conclusion: The DLMAA did not require handling and disposal of radioactive materials. It is a rapid qualitative technique for detection of TSST-1 toxin at room temperature within a short time.

  16. A rapid non-radioactive technique for measurement of repair synthesis in primary human fibroblasts by incorporation of ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Niimi, Atsuko; Fawcett, Heather; Lehmann, Alan; Yamashita, Shunichi; Ogi, Tomoo

    2009-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Afflicted patients show extreme sun-sensitivity and skin cancer predisposition. XP is in most cases associated with deficient nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is the process responsible for removing photolesions from DNA. Measuring NER activity by nucleotide incorporation into repair patches, termed 'unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS)', is one of the most commonly used assays for XP-diagnosis and NER research. We have established a rapid and accurate procedure for measuring UDS by replacement of thymidine with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). EdU incorporated into repair patches can be directly conjugated to fluorescent azide derivatives, thereby obviating the need for either radiolabeled thymidine or denaturation and antibody detection of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We demonstrate that the EdU incorporation assay is compatible with conventional techniques such as immunofluorescent staining and labeling of cells with micro-latex beads. Importantly, we can complete the entire UDS assay within half a day from preparation of the assay coverslips; this technique may prove useful as a method for XP diagnosis.

  17. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  18. A Collaborative Field-Based Urban Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a 12-month, field-based, alternative teacher preparation program for individuals holding baccalaureate degrees in areas outside education who want master's degrees in early childhood education. The program involves collaboration between the State Department of Education, the Early Childhood Department of an urban university, and four…

  19. Field-Based Concerns about Fourth-Generation Evaluation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Morris K.

    Some aspects of fourth generation evaluation procedures that have been advocated by E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln were examined empirically, with emphasis on areas where there have been discrepancies between theory and field-based experience. In fourth generation evaluation, the product of an evaluation is not a set of conclusions, recommendations,…

  20. Field-based validation of a tactile navigation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elliott, L.R.; Erp, J. van; Redden, E.S.; Duistermaat, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present three field-based evaluations of a tactile land navigation system. In Experiment 1, we transition from a laboratory setting to rugged terrain used to train US Army soldier land navigation. Navigation in this challenging terrain requires careful attention to one's surroundin

  1. A Collaborative Field-Based Urban Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a 12-month, field-based, alternative teacher preparation program for individuals holding baccalaureate degrees in areas outside education who want master's degrees in early childhood education. The program involves collaboration between the State Department of Education, the Early Childhood Department of an urban university, and four…

  2. Participative Critical Enquiry in Graduate Field-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kathy; Clavin, Alma; Morrissey, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines a critical pedagogic approach to field-based learning (FBL) at graduate level. Drawing on student experience stemming from a FBL module and as part of an MA programme in Environment, Society and Development, the paper addresses the complexities associated with student-led, participative critical enquiry during fieldwork in…

  3. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  4. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis.

  5. Ultraviolet refractometry using field-based light scattering spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Accurate refractive index measurement in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range is important for the separate quantification of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA in biology. This task is demanding and has not been fully exploited so far. Here we report a new method of measuring refractive index using field-based light scattering spectroscopy, which is applicable to any wavelength range and suitable for both solutions and homogenous objects with well-defined shape such as microspheres. The angula...

  6. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    of peptide-binding assay were developed including a homogeneous, non-radioactive, high-throughput (HTS) binding assay. Binding isotherms were generated allowing the affinities of interaction to be determined. The affinities of the best binders were found to be in the low nanomolar range. Recombinant MHC...... in the generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. RESULTS: We generated....... CONCLUSION: We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools....

  7. Detecção de um begomovírus em amostras foliares de tomateiro com sondas não-radioativas Detection of a begomovirus in tomato leaf samples using non-radioactive probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Martins Santana

    2007-02-01

    , the risk for the user’s health and a regular radiochemical element supply. This study is aimed at demonstrating the usefulness of the hybridization method with non-radioactive probes for detection of a tomato begomoviruses in Brazil. The sensitivity of this method was high enabling the detection of 0.1fg of homologous DNA and in crude sap extract diluted up to 100-fold.

  8. Evaluation of DNA Recombinant Methodologies for the Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum and their Comparison with the Microscopy Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Urdaneta

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1984, DNA tests based on the highly repeated subtelomeric sequences of Plasmodium falciparum (rep 20 have been frequently used in malaria diagnosis. Rep 20 is very specific for this parasite, and is made of 21 bp units, organized in repeated blocks with direct and inverted orientation. Based in this particular organization, we selected a unique consensus oligonucleotide (pf-21 to drive a PCR reaction coupled to hybridization to non-radioactive labeled probes. The pf-21 unique oligo PCR (pf-21-I assay produced DNA amplification fingerprints when was applied on purified P. falciparum DNA samples (Brazil and Colombia, as well as in patient's blood samples from a large area of Venezuela. The performance of the Pf-21-I assay was compared against Giemsa stained thick blood smears from samples collected at a malaria endemic area of the Bolívar State, Venezuela, at the field station of Malariología in Tumeremo. Coupled to non-radioactive hybridization the pf-21-I performed better than the traditional microscopic method with a r=1.7:1. In the case of mixed infections the r value of P. falciparum detection increased to 2.5:1. The increased diagnostic sensitivity of the test produced with this homologous oligonucleotide could provide an alternative to the epidemiological diagnosis of P. falciparum being currently used in Venezuela endemic areas, where low parasitemia levels and asymptomatic malaria are frequent. In addition, the DNA fingerprint could be tested in molecular population studies

  9. Affinity-tagged phosphorylation assay by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATPA-MALDI): application to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinumi, Tomoya; Niki, Etsuo; Shigeri, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based kinase assay using a peptide substrate tagged with a biotinyl group has been developed. The peptide moiety was designed to serve as an efficient substrate for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, based on the in vivo phosphorylation site of phosrestin I, a Drosophila homolog of arrestin. In the assay, the quantitative relationship was determined from the ratio of the peak areas between the two peaks respectively representing the unphosphorylated and the phosphorylated substrate. Attempts to assay phosphorylated peptides directly from the reaction mixture, gave inaccurate results because of the high noise level caused by the presence of salts and detergents. In contrast, after purifying the substrate peptides with the biotin affinity tag using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, peak areas accurately represented the ratio between the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptide. By changing the substrate peptide to a peptide sequence that serves as a kinase substrate, it is expected that an efficient non-radioactive protein kinase assay using MALDI-TOF MS can be developed for any type of protein kinase. We call this technique "Affinity-Tagged Phosphorylation Assay by MALDI-TOF MS (ATPA-MALDI)." ATPA-MALDI should serve as a quick and efficient non-radioactive protein kinase assay by MALDI-TOF MS.

  10. Problem-based, interdisciplinary field-based courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Trevor; Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Traynor, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Student field courses at Universities are increasingly incorporating problem-based interdisciplinary approaches to enhance learning opportunities. This paper reports upon seven field-based, problem-oriented, interdisciplinary courses held within southern Africa concerning natural resource managem...... in a positive manner and a strong respectful working relationship from the staff. We advocate this process as worthwhile as classroom theory becomes real in all applied and complex environment....... management and sustainable land use. The SLUSE (Sustainable Land Use and Natural Resource Management) project, under which these courses were devised, is introduced and the process of field-course implementation is described. The SLUSE approach is discussed in terms of management issues, levels...... of responsibility, staff and student development and the benefits to rural host communities. The courses are very intense experiences and Students encounter difficulties working across traditional academic disciplines and in cross-cultural groups. Through critical thinking and self-reflection students understand...

  11. Measuring cytotoxicity by bioluminescence imaging outperforms the standard chromium-51 release assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin A Karimi

    Full Text Available The chromium-release assay developed in 1968 is still the most commonly used method to measure cytotoxicity by T cells and by natural killer cells. Target cells are loaded in vitro with radioactive chromium and lysis is determined by measuring chromium in the supernatant released by dying cells. Since then, alternative methods have been developed using different markers of target cell viability that do not involve radioactivity. Here, we compared and contrasted a bioluminescence (BLI-based cytotoxicity assay to the standard radioactive chromium-release assay using an identical set of effector cells and tumor target cells. For this, we stably transduced several human and murine tumor cell lines to express luciferase. When co-cultured with cytotoxic effector cells, highly reproducible decreases in BLI were seen in an effector to target cell dose-dependent manner. When compared to results obtained from the chromium release assay, the performance of the BLI-based assay was superior, because of its robustness, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and faster kinetics. The reduced/delayed detection of cytotoxicity by the chromium release method was attributable to the association of chromium with structural components of the cell, which are released quickly by detergent solubilization but not by hypotonic lysis. We conclude that the (BLI-based measurement of cytotoxicity offers a superior non-radioactive alternative to the chromium-release assay that is more robust and quicker to perform.

  12. Ultraviolet refractometry using field-based light scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Oh, Seungeun; Yaqoob, Zahid; Park, YongKeun; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate refractive index measurement in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range is important for the separate quantification of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA in biology. This task is demanding and has not been fully exploited so far. Here we report a new method of measuring refractive index using field-based light scattering spectroscopy, which is applicable to any wavelength range and suitable for both solutions and homogenous objects with well-defined shape such as microspheres. The angular scattering distribution of single microspheres immersed in homogeneous media is measured over the wavelength range 260 to 315 nm using quantitative phase microscopy. By least square fitting the observed scattering distribution with Mie scattering theory, the refractive index of either the sphere or the immersion medium can be determined provided that one is known a priori. Using this method, we have measured the refractive index dispersion of SiO2 spheres and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions in the deep UV region. Specific refractive index increments of BSA are also extracted. Typical accuracy of the present refractive index technique is ≤0.003. The precision of refractive index measurements is ≤0.002 and that of specific refractive index increment determination is ≤0.01 mL/g. PMID:20372622

  13. Field-Based Experiential Learning Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Technologies such as GPS and cellular triangulation allow location-specific content to be delivered by mobile devices, but no mechanism currently exists to associate content shared between locations in a way that guarantees the delivery of coherent and non-redundant information at every location. Thus, experiential learning via mobile devices must currently take place along a predefined path, as in the case of a self-guided tour. I developed a mobile-device-based system that allows a person to move through a space along a path of their choosing, while receiving information in a way that guarantees delivery of appropriate background and location-specific information without producing redundancy of content between locations. This is accomplished by coupling content to knowledge-concept tags that are noted as fulfilled when users take prescribed actions. Similarly, the presentation of the content is related to the fulfillment of these knowledge-concept tags through logic statements that control the presentation. Content delivery is triggered by mobile-device geolocation including GPS/cellular navigation, and sensing of low-power Bluetooth proximity beacons. Together, these features implement a process that guarantees a coherent, non-redundant educational experience throughout a space, regardless of a learner's chosen path. The app that runs on the mobile device works in tandem with a server-side database and file-serving system that can be configured through a web-based GUI, and so content creators can easily populate and configure content with the system. Once the database has been updated, the new content is immediately available to the mobile devices when they arrive at the location at which content is required. Such a system serves as a platform for the development of field-based geoscience educational experiences, in which students can organically learn about core concepts at particular locations while individually exploring a space.

  14. Field-based study of connectivity in an agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexartza-Artza, I.; Wainwright, J.

    2009-12-01

    Field-based studies of hydrological connectivity can provide context-specific knowledge that might both help understand dynamic complex systems and contribute to other synthetic or modelling approaches. The importance of such an understanding of catchment processes and also of the knowledge of catchment connections with water bodies and the changes of concentration with scale for Integrated Catchment Management has been increasingly emphasized. To provide a holistic understanding, approaches to the study of connectivity need to include both structural and functional aspects of the system and must consider the processes taking place within and across different temporal and spatial scales. A semi-quantitative nested approach has been used to investigate connectivity and study the interactions and feedbacks between the factors influencing transfer processes in the Ingbirchworth Catchment, in the uplands of the River Don, England. A series of reconnaissance techniques have been combined with monitoring of aspects such as rainfall, runoff, sediment transfer and soil-moisture distribution from plot to catchment scale and with consideration of linkages between land and water bodies. The temporal aspect has also been considered, with a special focus on the temporal distribution of events and the influence of longer term catchment changes such as those in land use and management practices. A variability of responses has been observed in relation to the characteristics of events, land use and scale of observation, with elements traditionally considered as limiting or enhancing connectivity responding differently under changing conditions. Sediment redistribution, reshaping of structure and consequent reinforcing loops can be observed across all land uses and landscape units, but the relevance it terms of effective connectivity of highly connected patches varies as the scale is increased. The knowledge acquired can contribute to recognise emerging processes significant for

  15. Field-based detection and monitoring of uranium in contaminated groundwater using two immunosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, S.J.; Yu, H.; Williams, K.H.; Morris, S.A.; Long, P.E.; Blake, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Field-based monitoring of environmental contaminants has long been a need for environmental scientists. Described herein are two kinetic exclusion-based immunosensors, a field portable sensor (FPS) and an inline senor, that were deployed at the Integrated Field Research Challenge Site of the U.S. Department of Energy in Rifle, CO. Both sensors utilized a monoclonal antibody that binds to a U(VI)-dicarboxyphenanthroline complex (DCP) in a kinetic exclusion immunoassay format. These sensors were able to monitor changes of uranium in groundwater samples from {approx} 1 {micro}M to below the regulated drinking water limit of 126 nM (30 ppb). The FPS is a battery-operated sensor platform that can determine the uranium level in a single sample in 5-10 min, if the instrument has been previously calibrated with standards. The average minimum detection level (MDL) in this assay was 0.33 nM (79 ppt), and the MDL in the sample (based on a 1:200?1:400 dilution) was 66?132 nM (15.7?31.4 ppb). The inline sensor, while requiring a grounded power source, has the ability to autonomously analyze multiple samples in a single experiment. The average MDL in this assay was 0.12 nM (29 ppt), and the MDL in the samples (based on 1:200 or 1:400 dilutions) was 24?48 nM (5.7?11.4 ppb). Both sensor platforms showed an acceptable level of agreement (r{sup 2} = 0.94 and 0.76, for the inline and FPS, respectively) with conventional methods for uranium quantification.

  16. Comparison of In Vitro Assays in Selecting Radiotracers for In Vivo P-Glycoprotein PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renske M. Raaphorst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in the blood-brain barrier can be important in neurological diseases where P-gp is affected, such as Alzheimer´s disease. Radiotracers used in the imaging studies are present at very small, nanomolar, concentration, whereas in vitro assays where these tracers are characterized, are usually performed at micromolar concentration, causing often discrepant in vivo and in vitro data. We had in vivo rodent PET data of [11C]verapamil, (R-N-[18F]fluoroethylverapamil, (R-O-[18F]fluoroethyl-norverapamil, [18F]MC225 and [18F]MC224 and we included also two new molecules [18F]MC198 and [18F]KE64 in this study. To improve the predictive value of in vitro assays, we labeled all the tracers with tritium and performed bidirectional substrate transport assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells at three different concentrations (0.01, 1 and 50 µM and also inhibition assay with P-gp inhibitors. As a comparison, we used non-radioactive molecules in transport assay in Caco-2 cells at a concentration of 10 µM and in calcein-AM inhibition assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells. All the P-gp substrates were transported dose-dependently. At the highest concentration (50 µM, P-gp was saturated in a similar way as after treatment with P-gp inhibitors. Best in vivo correlation was obtained with the bidirectional transport assay at a concentration of 0.01 µM. One micromolar concentration in a transport assay or calcein-AM assay alone is not sufficient for correct in vivo prediction of substrate P-gp PET ligands.

  17. Effectiveness of Mobile Apps in Teaching Field-Based Identification Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rebecca L.; Fellowes, Mark D. E.

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that few students graduate with the skills required for many ecological careers, as field-based learning is said to be in decline in academic institutions. Here, we asked if mobile technology could improve field-based learning, using ability to identify birds as the study metric. We divided a class of ninety-one undergraduate…

  18. A Field-Based Learning Experience for Introductory Level GIS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pedagogic foundation for introducing a field-based geographic information systems (GIS) experience to the GIS curriculum at the university level and uses a dual evaluation methodology to monitor student learning and satisfaction. Students learned the basics of field-based global position systems (GPS) and GIS data…

  19. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  20. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. A novel mass spectrometry-based assay for GSK-3β activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Bing Siang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a component of the progression from genomic to proteomic analysis, there is a need for accurate assessment of protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Traditional kinase assays rely heavily on the incorporation of γ-P32 radiolabeled isotopes, monoclonal anti-phospho-protein antibodies, or gel shift analysis of substrate proteins. In addition to the expensive and time consuming nature of these methods, the use of radio-ligands imposes restrictions based on the half-life of the radionucleotides and pose potential health risks to researchers. With the shortcomings of traditional assays in mind, the aim of this study was to develop a high throughput, non-radioactive kinase assay for screening Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3beta (GSK-3β activity. Results Synthetic peptide substrates designed with a GSK-3β phosphorylation site were assayed with both recombinant enzyme and GSK-3β immunoprecipitated from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. A molecular weight shift equal to that of a single phosphate group (80 Da. was detected by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS in a GSK-3β target peptide (2B-Sp. Not only was there a dose-dependent response in molecular weight shift to the amount of recombinant GSK-3β used in this assay, this shift was also inhibited by lithium chloride (LiCl, in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion We present here a novel method to sensitively measure peptide phosphorylation by GSK-3β that, due to the incorporation of substrate controls, is applicable to either purified enzyme or cell extracts. Future studies using this method have the potential to elucidate the activity of GSK-3β in vivo, and to screen enzyme activity in relation to a variety of GSK-3β related disorders.

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by the hybrid capture assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Maria Odete O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is the main cause of cervical cancers and cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN worldwide. Consequently, it would be useful to evaluate HPV testing to screen for cervical cancer. Recently developed, the second-generation Hybrid Capture (HCA II test is a non-radioactive, relatively rapid, liquid hybridization assay designed to detect 18 HPV types, divided into high and low-risk groups. We evaluated 1055 women for HPV infection with the HCA II test. Five hundred and ten (48.3% of these women had HPV infection; 60 (11.8% had low cancer-risk HPV DNA; 269 (52.7% had high-risk HPV types and 181 (35.5% had both groups. Hence, 450 women (88.2% in this HPV-infected group had at least one high risk HPV type, and were therefore considered to be at high risk for cancer. Among the group with Papanicolaou (Pap test results, the overall prevalence of HPV DNA was 58.4%. Significant differences in HPV infection of the cervix were detected between Pap I (normal smears and Pap IV (carcinomas (p<0.0001. Values of HPV viral load obtained for Pap I and SILs were significantly different, with an upward trend (p<0.0001, suggesting a positive correlation between high viral load values and risk of SIL. Because of the high costs of the HCA II test, its use for routine cervical mass screening cannot be recommended in poor countries. Nevertheless, it is a useful tool when combined with cytology, diagnosing high-risk infections in apparently normal tissues. Use of this technique could help reduce the risk of cancer.

  4. A novel quantitative kinase assay using bacterial surface display and flow cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Troeira Henriques

    Full Text Available The inhibition of tyrosine kinases is a successful approach for the treatment of cancers and the discovery of kinase inhibitor drugs is the focus of numerous academic and pharmaceutical laboratories. With this goal in mind, several strategies have been developed to measure kinase activity and to screen novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nevertheless, a general non-radioactive and inexpensive approach, easy to implement and adapt to a range of applications, is still missing. Herein, using Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, an oncogenic target and a model protein for cancer studies, we describe a novel cost-effective high-throughput screening kinase assay. In this approach, named the BacKin assay, substrates displayed on a Bacterial cell surface are incubated with Kinase and their phosphorylation is examined and quantified by flow cytometry. This approach has several advantages over existing approaches, as using bacteria (i.e. Escherichia coli to display peptide substrates provides a self renewing solid support that does not require laborious chemical strategies. Here we show that the BacKin approach can be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies, as well as a platform to characterize and identify small-molecule or peptide-based kinase inhibitors with potential applications in drug development.

  5. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  6. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  7. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  8. Assays for thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    In summary, thrombopoietin levels have been determined indirectly by measuring thrombocytopoiesis in assay animals (platelet counting, measurement of isotope incorporation into newly formed platelets, changes in platelet sizes, or alterations in number and size of megakaryocytes) and by use of an immunoassay. Although much work remains, it seems clear at the present time that isotopic uptake into platelets of specially prepared assay mice (rebound-thrombocytosis) is superior to the other techniques now available for the measurement of thrombopoietin. However, the ideal assay for TSF which is specific, rapid, and inexpensive is yet to be developed. An immunoassay is in the development stage, but will require additional work before it can be utilized for the routine assay of TSF.

  9. New Rapid Spore Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  10. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  11. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  12. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Quantitative Assessment of a Field-Based Course on Integrative Geology, Ecology and Cultural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Donaldson, Brad A.; Huckleberry, Gary

    2010-01-01

    A field-based course at the University of Arizona called Sense of Place (SOP) covers the geology, ecology and cultural history of the Tucson area. SOP was quantitatively assessed for pedagogical effectiveness. Students of the Spring 2008 course were given pre- and post-course word association surveys in order to assess awareness and comprehension…

  14. A Field-Based Introductory Physical and Historical Geology Course Taught in the Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, George Christopher; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a six-week, six-credit, field-based physical and historical geology course offered by Lehigh University (Pennsylvania) in conjunction with its standard summer field studies program. Stresses the advantages of integrating physical and historical geology concepts in a field setting. (TW)

  15. Developing Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy through Field-Based Science Teaching Practice with Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Ingrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirty preservice teachers enrolled in a field-based science methods course were placed at a public elementary school for coursework and for teaching practice with elementary students. Candidates focused on building conceptual understanding of science content and pedagogical methods through innovative curriculum development and other course…

  16. Quantitative Assessment of a Field-Based Course on Integrative Geology, Ecology and Cultural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Donaldson, Brad A.; Huckleberry, Gary

    2010-01-01

    A field-based course at the University of Arizona called Sense of Place (SOP) covers the geology, ecology and cultural history of the Tucson area. SOP was quantitatively assessed for pedagogical effectiveness. Students of the Spring 2008 course were given pre- and post-course word association surveys in order to assess awareness and comprehension…

  17. The Ins & Outs of Developing a Field-Based Science Project: Learning by Lassoing Lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Catherine E.; Huffling, Lacey D.; Benavides, Aerin

    2014-01-01

    We describe a field-based lizard project we did with high school students as a part of our summer Herpetological Research Experiences. We describe data collection on lizards captured, identified, and marked as a part of our mark-recapture study. We also describe other lizard projects that are ongoing in the United States and provide resources for…

  18. To Be Transformed: Emotions in Cross-Cultural, Field-Based Learning in Northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah; Hodge, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Students undertaking field-based learning, in which they work with Indigenous people in Northern Australia, describe a profound learning experience redolent with emotion. Inspired, challenged and transformed, the students are compelled in ways that require them to interrogate their own selves and taken-for-granted beliefs. In this paper, we draw…

  19. CTL ELISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Elena; Popescu, Iulia; Gigante, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (Elispot) is a quantitative method for measuring relevant parameters of T cell activation. The sensitivity of Elispot allows the detection of low-frequency antigen-specific T cells that secrete cytokines and effector molecules, such as granzyme B and perforin. Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) studies have taken advantage with this high-throughput technology by providing insights into quantity and immune kinetics. Accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and robustness of Elispot resulted in a wide range of applications in research as well as in diagnostic field. Actually, CTL monitoring by Elispot is a gold standard for the evaluation of antigen-specific T cell immunity in clinical trials and vaccine candidates where the ability to detect rare antigen-specific T cells is of relevance for immune diagnostic. The most utilized Elispot assay is the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) test, a marker for CD8(+) CTL activation, but Elispot can also be used to distinguish different subsets of activated T cells by using other cytokines such as T-helper (Th) 1-type cells (characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-21, and TNF-α), Th2 (producing cytokines like IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) cells. The reliability of Elispot-generated data, by the evaluation of T cell frequency recognizing individual antigen/peptide, is the core of this method currently applied widely to investigate specific immune responses in cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. The Elispot assay is competing with other methods measuring single-cell cytokine production, e.g., intracellular cytokine by FACS or Miltenyi cytokine secretion assay. Other types of lymphocyte frequency and function assays include limiting dilution assay (LDA), cytotoxic T cell assay (CTL), and tetramer staining. Compared with respect to sensitivity the Elispot assay is outranking other methods to define frequency of antigen-specific lymphocytes. The method

  20. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  1. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  3. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  4. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weatherford Wendy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small synthetic peptides as substrates. However, the use of natural protein substrates has the advantage that potential inhibitors can be detected that affect enzyme activity by binding to a site other than the catalytic site. We have previously reported a non-radioactive and non-antibody-based fluorescence quench assay for detection of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation using synthetic peptide substrates. The aim of this work is to develop an assay for detection of phosphorylation of chemically unmodified proteins based on this polymer superquenching platform. Results Using a modified QTL Lightspeed™ assay, phosphorylation of native protein was quantified by the interaction of the phosphorylated proteins with metal-ion coordinating groups co-located with fluorescent polymer deposited onto microspheres. The binding of phospho-protein inhibits a dye-labeled "tracer" peptide from associating to the phosphate-binding sites present on the fluorescent microspheres. The resulting inhibition of quench generates a "turn on" assay, in which the signal correlates with the phosphorylation of the substrate. The assay was tested on three different proteins: Myelin Basic Protein (MBP, Histone H1 and Phosphorylated heat- and acid-stable protein (PHAS-1. Phosphorylation of the proteins was detected by Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα and by the Interleukin -1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 (IRAK4. Enzyme inhibition yielded IC50 values that were comparable to those obtained using

  5. A rapid and robust assay for detection of S-phase cell cycle progression in plant cells and tissues by using ethynyl deoxyuridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Gábor V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in plant cell cycle research is highly dependent on reliable methods for detection of cells replicating DNA. Frequency of S-phase cells (cells in DNA synthesis phase is a basic parameter in studies on the control of cell division cycle and the developmental events of plant cells. Here we extend the microscopy and flow cytometry applications of the recently developed EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-based S-phase assay to various plant species and tissues. We demonstrate that the presented protocols insure the improved preservation of cell and tissue structure and allow significant reduction in assay duration. In comparison with the frequently used detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and tritiated-thymidine incorporation, this new methodology offers several advantages as we discuss here. Results Applications of EdU-based S-phase assay in microscopy and flow cytometry are presented by using cultured cells of alfalfa, Arabidopsis, grape, maize, rice and tobacco. We present the advantages of EdU assay as compared to BrdU-based replication assay and demonstrate that EdU assay -which does not require plant cell wall digestion or DNA denaturation steps, offers reduced assay duration and better preservation of cellular, nuclear and chromosomal morphologies. We have also shown that fast and efficient EdU assay can also be an efficient tool for dual parameter flow cytometry analysis and for quantitative assessment of replication in thick root samples of rice. Conclusions In plant cell cycle studies, EdU-based S-phase detection offers a superior alternative to the existing S-phase assays. EdU method is reliable, versatile, fast, simple and non-radioactive and it can be readily applied to many different plant systems.

  6. The corneal pocket assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  7. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  8. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  9. Post-crackdown effectiveness of field-based forest law enforcement in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Jan; Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Hargrave, Jorge; König, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory enforcement of forest conservation laws is often dismissed as an ineffective approach to reducing tropical forest loss. Yet, effective enforcement is often a precondition for alternative conservation measures, such as payments for environmental services, to achieve desired outcomes. Fair and efficient policies to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) will thus crucially depend on understanding the determinants and requirements of enforcement effectiveness. Among potential REDD candidate countries, Brazil is considered to possess the most advanced deforestation monitoring and enforcement infrastructure. This study explores a unique dataset of over 15 thousand point coordinates of enforcement missions in the Brazilian Amazon during 2009 and 2010, after major reductions of deforestation in the region. We study whether local deforestation patterns have been affected by field-based enforcement and to what extent these effects vary across administrative boundaries. Spatial matching and regression techniques are applied at different spatial resolutions. We find that field-based enforcement operations have not been universally effective in deterring deforestation during our observation period. Inspections have been most effective in reducing large-scale deforestation in the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, where average conservation effects were 4.0 and 9.9 hectares per inspection, respectively. Despite regional and actor-specific heterogeneity in inspection effectiveness, field-based law enforcement is highly cost-effective on average and might be enhanced by closer collaboration between national and state-level authorities.

  10. Post-crackdown effectiveness of field-based forest law enforcement in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Börner

    Full Text Available Regulatory enforcement of forest conservation laws is often dismissed as an ineffective approach to reducing tropical forest loss. Yet, effective enforcement is often a precondition for alternative conservation measures, such as payments for environmental services, to achieve desired outcomes. Fair and efficient policies to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD will thus crucially depend on understanding the determinants and requirements of enforcement effectiveness. Among potential REDD candidate countries, Brazil is considered to possess the most advanced deforestation monitoring and enforcement infrastructure. This study explores a unique dataset of over 15 thousand point coordinates of enforcement missions in the Brazilian Amazon during 2009 and 2010, after major reductions of deforestation in the region. We study whether local deforestation patterns have been affected by field-based enforcement and to what extent these effects vary across administrative boundaries. Spatial matching and regression techniques are applied at different spatial resolutions. We find that field-based enforcement operations have not been universally effective in deterring deforestation during our observation period. Inspections have been most effective in reducing large-scale deforestation in the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, where average conservation effects were 4.0 and 9.9 hectares per inspection, respectively. Despite regional and actor-specific heterogeneity in inspection effectiveness, field-based law enforcement is highly cost-effective on average and might be enhanced by closer collaboration between national and state-level authorities.

  11. Aporrectodea caliginosa, a suitable earthworm species for field based genotoxicity assessment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobucar, Goeran I.V., E-mail: gklobuca@zg.biol.pmf.hr [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Stambuk, Anamaria; Srut, Maja [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Husnjak, Ivana [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction, Ulica Republike Austrije 14, Zagreb (Croatia); Merkas, Martina [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Salata 12, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Traven, Luka [Department of Environmental Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Brace Branchetta 20a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Teaching Institute of Public Health of the Primorsko-goranska County, Kresimirova 52a, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Cvetkovic, Zelimira [Department of Ecology, Institute of Public Health, Mirogojska c. 16, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-04-15

    There is a growing interest for the application of biomakers to field-collected earthworms. Therefore we have evaluated the usability of native populations of endogeic, widely distributed earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa in the assessment of soil genotoxicity using the Comet assay. Validation of the Comet assay on earthworm coelomocytes has been established using commercially available Eisenia fetida exposed to copper, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol, along with A. caliginosa exposed to copper in a filter paper contact test. Neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay was conducted on copper exposed and field-collected earthworms. Significant DNA and lysosomal damage was measured using Comet and NRRT assays in native populations of A. caliginosa sampled from the polluted soils in the urban area in comparison to the earthworms from the reference site. The results of this study confirm the employment of A. caliginosa as a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Research highlights: > Native A. caliginosa has shown significant biological effect measured by the Comet and NRRT assays. > The Comet assay on A. caliginosa and E. fetida has shown to be of similar sensitivity as the NRRT assay. > A. caliginosa is a suitable species for the in situ soil toxicity and genotoxicity field surveys. - Native populations of endogeic earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa can be successfully applied in the genotoxicity field surveys using Comet assay.

  12. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  13. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  14. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  15. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  16. Field-based Information Technology in Geology Education: GeoPads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, P. A.; van der Pluijm, B.

    2004-12-01

    During the past two summers, we have successfully incorporated a field-based information technology component into our senior-level, field geology course (GS-440) at the University of Michigan's Camp Davis Geology Field Station, near Jackson, WY. Using GeoPads -- rugged TabletPCs equipped with electronic notebook software, GIS, GPS, and wireless networking -- we have significantly enhanced our field mapping exercises and field trips. While fully retaining the traditional approaches and advantages of field instruction, GeoPads offer important benefits in the development of students' spatial reasoning skills. GeoPads enable students to record observations and directly create geologic maps in the field, using a combination of an electronic field notebook (Microsoft OneNote) tightly integrated with pen-enabled GIS software (ArcGIS-ArcMap). Specifically, this arrangement permits students to analyze and manipulate their data in multiple contexts and representations -- while still in the field -- using both traditional 2-D map views, as well as richer 3-D contexts. Such enhancements provide students with powerful exploratory tools that aid the development of spatial reasoning skills, allowing more intuitive interactions with 2-D representations of our 3-D world. Additionally, field-based GIS mapping enables better error-detection, through immediate interaction with current observations in the context of both supporting data (e.g., topographic maps, aerial photos, magnetic surveys) and students' ongoing observations. The overall field-based IT approach also provides students with experience using tools that are increasingly relevant to their future academic or professional careers.

  17. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  18. Nonradioactive heteroduplex tracking assay for the detection of minority-variant chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwapasa Victor

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strains of Plasmodium falciparum genetically resistant to chloroquine (CQ due to the presence of pfcrt 76T appear to have been recently introduced to the island of Madagascar. The prevalence of such resistant genotypes is reported to be low (P. falciparum isolates on the island. Previously, minority variant chloroquine resistant parasites were described in Malawian patients using an isotopic heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA, which can detect pfcrt 76T-bearing P. falciparum minority variants in individual patients that were undetectable by conventional PCR. However, as this assay required a radiolabeled probe, it could not be used in many resource-limited settings. Methods This study describes a digoxigenin (DIG-labeled chemiluminescent heteroduplex tracking assay (DIG-HTA to detect pfcrt 76T-bearing minority variant P. falciparum. This assay was compared to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis and to the isotopic HTA for detection of genetically CQ-resistant parasites in clinical samples. Results Thirty one clinical P. falciparum isolates (15 primary isolates and 16 recurrent isolates from 17 Malagasy children treated with CQ for uncomplicated malaria were genotyped for the pfcrt K76T mutation. Two (11.7% of 17 patients harboured genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains after therapy as detected by HTA. RFLP analysis failed to detect any pfcrt K76T-bearing isolates. Conclusion These findings indicate that genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum are more common than previously thought in Madagascar even though the fitness of the minority variant pfcrt 76T parasites remains unclear. In addition, HTAs for malaria drug resistance alleles are promising tools for the surveillance of anti-malarial resistance. The use of a non-radioactive label allows for the use of HTAs in malaria endemic countries.

  19. Field-based and laboratory stable isotope probing surveys of the identities of both aerobic and anaerobic benzene-metabolizing microorganisms in freshwater sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J S-C; Derito, C M; Madsen, E L

    2008-08-01

    Laboratory incubations of coal-tar waste-contaminated sediment microbial communities under relatively controlled physiological conditions were used to interpret results of a field-based stable isotope probing (SIP) assay. Biodegradation activity of 13C-benzene was examined by GC/MS determination of net 13CO2 production and by GC headspace analysis of benzene loss. Key experimental variables were: the site of the assays (laboratory serum-bottle incubations and in situ field sediments), benzene concentration (10, 36 or 200 p.p.m. in laboratory assays), and physiological conditions (anaerobic with or without sulfate or nitrate additions versus aerobic headspace or the uncontrolled field). In anaerobic laboratory incubations of benzene at 10 p.p.m., greater than 60% of the substrate was eliminated within 15 days. During anaerobic incubations of 200 p.p.m. benzene (70 days), 0.9% benzene mineralization occurred. When benzene (36 p.p.m.) was added to sediment with air in the serum-bottle headspace, 14% of the initial 13C was mineralized to 13CO2 in 2.5 days. In the field experiment (178 microg 13C-benzene dosed to undisturbed sediments), net 13CO2 production reached 0.3% within 8.5 h. After isopycnic separation of 13C (heavy)-labelled DNA from the above biodegradation assays, sequencing of 13C-DNA clone libraries revealed a broad diversity of taxa involved in benzene metabolism and distinctive libraries for each biodegradation treatment. Perhaps most importantly, in the field SIP experiment the clone libraries produced were dominated by Pelomonas (betaproteobacteria) sequences similar to those found in the anaerobic 10 p.p.m. benzene laboratory experiment. These data indicate that the physiological conditions that prevail and govern in situ biodegradation of pollutants in the field may be interpreted by knowing the physiological preferences of potentially active populations.

  20. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Foong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs. Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  1. Accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit system for field-based occupational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Oyama, Sakiko; Douphrate, David I

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring trunk angular displacement and upper arm elevation were evaluated over eight hours (i) in comparison to a gold standard, optical motion capture (OMC) system in a laboratory setting, and (ii) during a field-based assessment of dairy parlour work. Sample-to-sample root mean square differences between the IMU and OMC system ranged from 4.1° to 6.6° for the trunk and 7.2°-12.1° for the upper arm depending on the processing method. Estimates of mean angular displacement and angular displacement variation (difference between the 90th and 10th percentiles of angular displacement) were observed to change IMU system may serve as an acceptable instrument for directly measuring trunk and upper arm postures in field-based occupational exposure assessment studies with long sampling durations. Practitioner Summary: Few studies have evaluated inertial measurement unit (IMU) systems in the field or over long sampling durations. Results of this study indicate that the IMU system evaluated has reasonably good accuracy and repeatability for use in a field setting over a long sampling duration.

  2. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  3. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  4. Field Based Learning About Butterfly Diversity in School Garden-A Case Study From Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalsomy Poyyamoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies are essential components for well functioning of ecosystems due to their key roles as pollinators and as indicators of ecosystem health. Butterflies are also beloved by public as well as young students and children, who are largely unaware that many species are threatened or endangered. The main objectives of field based education for butterfly conservation were to create knowledge, interest and necessary skills to investigate and, identify the butterfly species and conserve its diversity in school gardens. For butterfly survey the census technique method was taught to the students to investigate the diversity of butterflies during the field trips. During the field trip a total of 34 butterfly species, belonging to 4 families, were recorded with standard literature and colour photographs. The Nymphalidae family was the dominant species found in school gardens. The study concluded that the young students must be given the chance to investigate, engage with and experience nature in order to appreciate and be motivated to conserve and protect these fascinating insects at local level. The conservation of our natural biological resources will be dependent upon future generations. This field based learning program inspired to identify and conserve the butterfly diversity within the school gardens.

  5. Considerations when using the activPAL monitor in field-based research with adult populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charlotte L. Edwardson; Elisabeth A.H. Winkler; Danielle H. Bodicoat; Tom Yates; Melanie J. Davies; David W. Dunstan; Genevieve N. Healy

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates that high levels of sedentary behavior (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) are adversely associated with health. A key factor in improving our understanding of the impact of sedentary behavior (and patterns of sedentary time accumulation) on health is the use of objective measurement tools that collect date and time-stamped activity information. One such tool is the activPAL monitor. This thigh-worn device uses accelerometer-derived information about thigh position to determine the start and end of each period spent sitting/lying, standing, and stepping, as well as stepping speed, step counts, and postural transitions. The activPAL is increasingly being used within field-based research for its ability to measure sitting/lying via posture. We summarise key issues to consider when using the activPAL in physical activity and sedentary behavior field-based research with adult populations. It is intended that the findings and discussion points be informative for researchers who are currently using activPAL monitors or are intending to use them. Pre-data collection decisions, monitor preparation and distribution, data collection considerations, and manual and automated data processing possibilities are presented using examples from current literature and experiences from 2 research groups from the UK and Australia.

  6. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force, good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design.

  7. Design Methodology for Magnetic Field-Based Soft Tri-Axis Tactile Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; de Boer, Greg; Kow, Junwai; Alazmani, Ali; Ghajari, Mazdak; Hewson, Robert; Culmer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tactile sensors are essential if robots are to safely interact with the external world and to dexterously manipulate objects. Current tactile sensors have limitations restricting their use, notably being too fragile or having limited performance. Magnetic field-based soft tactile sensors offer a potential improvement, being durable, low cost, accurate and high bandwidth, but they are relatively undeveloped because of the complexities involved in design and calibration. This paper presents a general design methodology for magnetic field-based three-axis soft tactile sensors, enabling researchers to easily develop specific tactile sensors for a variety of applications. All aspects (design, fabrication, calibration and evaluation) of the development of tri-axis soft tactile sensors are presented and discussed. A moving least square approach is used to decouple and convert the magnetic field signal to force output to eliminate non-linearity and cross-talk effects. A case study of a tactile sensor prototype, MagOne, was developed. This achieved a resolution of 1.42 mN in normal force measurement (0.71 mN in shear force), good output repeatability and has a maximum hysteresis error of 3.4%. These results outperform comparable sensors reported previously, highlighting the efficacy of our methodology for sensor design. PMID:27563908

  8. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  9. Field-based, research-focused experiential learning in undergraduate geoscience and physical geography classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A. J.; Ackerman, A.; Flynn, M.; Mclain, J.; Moller, C.; Clements, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Field-based experiential learning in undergraduate courses in geosciences or physical geography is essential for cementing theoretical understanding through observation, illustrating the complexity of natural systems, understanding uncertainty in observational records and providing students with tools to teach themselves beyond the instructor and the classroom. In addition, it helps stimulate interest in pursuing graduate studies and associated research in many important bio-geophysical topics. There is a real challenge to provide this type of learning opportunity to large numbers of students and to students currently under-represented in the geosciences. The learning experience in this case was focused around experimental deployment of a sophisticated atmospheric profiling system over a weekend field trip involving 50 students from three classes in two campuses; San Francisco State University and San Jose State University. Students were involved in experimental design, instrument calibration and field deployment, manual measurements and data analysis phases of field-based experimental research. The results of student work is presented as well as specific student responses to the field experience that highlight the pedagogical values provided as well as challenges to improve the learning opportunity.

  10. A Multiagent Potential Field-Based Bot for Real-Time Strategy Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hagelbäck

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bots for real-time strategy (RTS games may be very challenging to implement. A bot controls a number of units that will have to navigate in a partially unknown environment, while at the same time avoid each other, search for enemies, and coordinate attacks to fight them down. Potential fields are a technique originating from the area of robotics where it is used in controlling the navigation of robots in dynamic environments. Although attempts have been made to transfer the technology to the gaming sector, assumed problems with efficiency and high costs for implementation have made the industry reluctant to adopt it. We present a multiagent potential field-based bot architecture that is evaluated in two different real-time strategy game settings and compare them, both in terms of performance, and in terms of softer attributes such as configurability with other state-of-the-art solutions. We show that the solution is a highly configurable bot that can match the performance standards of traditional RTS bots. Furthermore, we show that our approach deals with Fog of War (imperfect information about the opponent units surprisingly well. We also show that a multiagent potential field-based bot is highly competitive in a resource gathering scenario.

  11. Herbicide resistance screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Herbicide resistance screening is a method that can be used not only to determine presence of the enzyme, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase, encoded by either the Bar or the Pat gene in transgenic maize, but also to assess the inheritance ratio of those genes in a segregating population. Herbicide screening can also be used to study linkage of a transgene of interest that was cotransformed with the herbicide resistance marker gene. By combining the herbicide screen assay with a PCR-based screen of leaf tissue DNA for the presence of both the Bar or the Pat gene marker and a cotransformed transgene of interest from the same seedling tissue and maintaining that seedling identity, the researcher can identify linkage or the possible breakdown in linkage of the marker gene and the transgene of interest. Further, the occurrence of "DNA silencing" can be evaluated if an individual seedling that was susceptible to the applied herbicide nonetheless gave PCR data that indicated presence of the gene responsible for herbicide resistance. Similarly, "DNA silencing" of the gene of interest may be investigated if the seeds can be screened and scored for that phenotypic trait in a nondestructive manner prior to planting.

  12. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41......We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four......% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥ 30 years (30%, vs. 49% at samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30...

  13. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xi-Yong; Zhu, Jing

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  14. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  15. Successes and challenges in a field-based, multi-method study of home telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, M A; Jansen, J J; Brant, R; Hailey, D; van der Pol, M

    2004-01-01

    We are conducting a three-year study of telehealth in 11 home care offices that serve rural clients in Alberta. Three hundred and twenty palliative home care clients are being recruited to participate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to answer three questions about the use of video-phones and their effect on symptom management, quality of life and cost, as well as readiness to use the technology. Both successes and challenges have been identified in three main areas: technology, people/organizational issues and study design. Maintaining study integrity has been the key factor in decision making, as adjustments from the original proposal are made. It is already clear that field-based RCTs are feasible, but require commitment and flexibility on the part of researchers and community partners to work through the study implementation.

  16. Determining Loading Field based on Required Deformation for Isotropic Hardening Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Eringen's and Trusedell's polar decomposition are formulated by explicit formulation of displacement field, based on Chen's additive decomposition of deformation gradient. Then the strain introduced by the multiplicative decomposition and the strain introduced by the additive decomposition are formulated explicitly with displacement gradient. This formulation clears the intrinsic contents of strains defined by taking the Eringen's and Trusedell's polar decomposition. After that, Chen's strain definition was introduced to show that the plastic deformation can be understood as the irreversible local average rotation. For initial isotropic simple elastic material, the research shows that path-dependent feature of classical plasticity theory is naturally expressed in Chen's strain definition. For rate-independent plasticity, the related deformation stress was discussed. The research shows that for isotropic hardening material the relation equation between the required geometric configuration and the corresponding loading field is explicitly formulated. Hence, for metal forming, this paper explicitly formulates the related fields by displacement field and invariant elastic constants.

  17. NEAR-FIELD ACOUSTIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR SEMI-FREE ACOUSTIC FIELD BASED ON WAVE SUPERPOSITION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weibing; CHEN Jian; YU Fei; CHEN Xinzhao

    2006-01-01

    In the semi-free acoustic field, the actual acoustic pressure at any point is composed of two parts: The direct acoustic pressure and the reflected acoustic pressure. The general acoustic holographic theories and algorithms request that there is only the direct acoustic pressure contained in the pressure at any point on the hologram surface, consequently, they cannot be used to reconstruct acoustic source and predict acoustic field directly. To take the reflected pressure into consideration, near-field acoustic holography for semi-free acoustic field based on wave superposition approach is proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field, and the wave superposition approach is adopted as a holographic transform algorithm. The proposed theory and algorithm are realized and verified with a numerical example,and the drawbacks of the general theories and algorithms in the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field are also demonstrated by this numerical example.

  18. A comparison of instrumentation methods to estimate thoracolumbar motion in field-based occupational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Gerr, Fred

    2015-05-01

    The performance of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring thoracolumbar trunk motion was compared to that of the Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM). Thirty-six male participants completed a simulated material handling task with both systems deployed simultaneously. Estimates of thoracolumbar trunk motion obtained with the IMU system were processed using five common methods for estimating trunk motion characteristics. Results of measurements obtained from IMUs secured to the sternum and pelvis had smaller root-mean-square differences and mean bias estimates in comparison to results obtained with the LMM than results of measurements obtained solely from a sternum mounted IMU. Fusion of IMU accelerometer measurements with IMU gyroscope and/or magnetometer measurements was observed to increase comparability to the LMM. Results suggest investigators should consider computing thoracolumbar trunk motion as a function of estimates from multiple IMUs using fusion algorithms rather than using a single accelerometer secured to the sternum in field-based studies.

  19. A comparison of field-based similarity searching methods: CatShape, FBSS, and ROCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Kirstin; Gillet, Valerie J; Whittle, Martin; Bravi, Gianpaolo; Leach, Andrew R

    2008-04-01

    Three field-based similarity methods are compared in retrospective virtual screening experiments. The methods are the CatShape module of CATALYST, ROCS, and an in-house program developed at the University of Sheffield called FBSS. The programs are used in both rigid and flexible searches carried out in the MDL Drug Data Report. UNITY 2D fingerprints are also used to provide a comparison with a more traditional approach to similarity searching, and similarity based on simple whole-molecule properties is used to provide a baseline for the more sophisticated searches. Overall, UNITY 2D fingerprints and ROCS with the chemical force field option gave comparable performance and were superior to the shape-only 3D methods. When the flexible methods were compared with the rigid methods, it was generally found that the flexible methods gave slightly better results than their respective rigid methods; however, the increased performance did not justify the additional computational cost required.

  20. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹细勇; 诸静

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  1. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹细勇; 诸静

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation.Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  2. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P; Lovell, John T; Moyers, Brook T; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B; McNally, Kenneth L; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E; McKay, John K

    2017-02-21

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution.

  3. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  4. A High-Throughput, Field-Based Phenotyping Technology for Tall Biomass Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Fernandez, Maria G; Bao, Yin; Tang, Lie; Schnable, Patrick S

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in omics technologies have not been accompanied by equally efficient, cost-effective, and accurate phenotyping methods required to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits. Even though high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed for controlled environments, field-based aerial and ground technologies have only been designed and deployed for short-stature crops. Therefore, we developed and tested Phenobot 1.0, an auto-steered and self-propelled field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform for tall dense canopy crops, such as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Phenobot 1.0 was equipped with laterally positioned and vertically stacked stereo RGB cameras. Images collected from 307 diverse sorghum lines were reconstructed in 3D for feature extraction. User interfaces were developed, and multiple algorithms were evaluated for their accuracy in estimating plant height and stem diameter. Tested feature extraction methods included the following: (1) User-interactive Individual Plant Height Extraction (UsIn-PHe) based on dense stereo three-dimensional reconstruction; (2) Automatic Hedge-based Plant Height Extraction (Auto-PHe) based on dense stereo 3D reconstruction; (3) User-interactive Dense Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction; and (4) User-interactive Image Patch Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction (IPaS-Di). Comparative genome-wide association analysis and ground-truth validation demonstrated that both UsIn-PHe and Auto-PHe were accurate methods to estimate plant height, while Auto-PHe had the additional advantage of being a completely automated process. For stem diameter, IPaS-Di generated the most accurate estimates of this biomass-related architectural trait. In summary, our technology was proven robust to obtain ground-based high-throughput plant architecture parameters of sorghum, a tall and densely planted crop species. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. A High-Throughput, Field-Based Phenotyping Technology for Tall Biomass Crops1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in omics technologies have not been accompanied by equally efficient, cost-effective, and accurate phenotyping methods required to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits. Even though high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed for controlled environments, field-based aerial and ground technologies have only been designed and deployed for short-stature crops. Therefore, we developed and tested Phenobot 1.0, an auto-steered and self-propelled field-based high-throughput phenotyping platform for tall dense canopy crops, such as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Phenobot 1.0 was equipped with laterally positioned and vertically stacked stereo RGB cameras. Images collected from 307 diverse sorghum lines were reconstructed in 3D for feature extraction. User interfaces were developed, and multiple algorithms were evaluated for their accuracy in estimating plant height and stem diameter. Tested feature extraction methods included the following: (1) User-interactive Individual Plant Height Extraction (UsIn-PHe) based on dense stereo three-dimensional reconstruction; (2) Automatic Hedge-based Plant Height Extraction (Auto-PHe) based on dense stereo 3D reconstruction; (3) User-interactive Dense Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction; and (4) User-interactive Image Patch Stereo Matching Stem Diameter Extraction (IPaS-Di). Comparative genome-wide association analysis and ground-truth validation demonstrated that both UsIn-PHe and Auto-PHe were accurate methods to estimate plant height, while Auto-PHe had the additional advantage of being a completely automated process. For stem diameter, IPaS-Di generated the most accurate estimates of this biomass-related architectural trait. In summary, our technology was proven robust to obtain ground-based high-throughput plant architecture parameters of sorghum, a tall and densely planted crop species. PMID:28620124

  6. Practical assay issues with the PERT/PBRT assay: a highly sensitive reverse transcriptase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A; Dusing, S

    2006-01-01

    Product safety testing for retroviruses can be achieved by a panel of screening assays, including electron microscopy, viral gene specific PCRs, virus propagation, and detection of reverse transciptase activity. The application of PCR-based reverse transcriptase assays (PERT) that are approximately a million-fold more sensitive than conventional nucleotide incorporation assays in the testing of biologicals is described. Use of PERT assays can be applied to three areas: (i) screening for adventitious retrovirus contamination; (ii) detecting and quantifying endogenous viral particle load and (iii) monitoring levels of infectious retrovirus generation in cell lines that contain endogenous retroviruses.

  7. From Antenna to Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  8. Bottom-up communication. Identifying opportunities and limitations through an exploratory field-based evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.; Irvine, K.N. [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Communication to promote behaviours like energy saving can use significant resources. What is less clear is the comparative value of different approaches available to communicators. While it is generally agreed that 'bottom-up' approaches, where individuals are actively involved rather than passive, are preferable to 'top-down' authority-led projects, there is a dearth of evidence that verifies why this should be. Additionally, while the literature has examined the mechanics of the different approaches, there has been less attention paid to the associated psychological implications. This paper reports on an exploratory comparative study that examined the effects of six distinct communication activities. The activities used different communication approaches, some participative and others more top-down informational. Two theories, from behavioural studies and communication, were used to identify key variables for consideration in this field-based evaluation. The evaluation aimed to assess not just which activity might be most successful, as this has limited generalisability, but to also gain insight into what psychological impacts might contribute to success. Analysis found support for the general hypothesis that bottom-up approaches have more impact on behaviour change than top-down. The study also identified that, in this instance, the difference in reported behaviour across the activities related partly to the extent to which intentions to change behaviour were implemented. One possible explanation for the difference in reported behaviour change across the activities is that a bottom-up approach may offer a supportive environment where participants can discuss progress with like-minded individuals. A further possible explanation is that despite controlling for intention at an individual level, the pre-existence of strong intentions may have an effect on group success. These suggestive findings point toward the critical need for additional and larger-scale studies

  9. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays.

  10. Proximal Remote Sensing Buggies and Potential Applications for Field-Based Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Deery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The achievements made in genomic technology in recent decades are yet to be matched by fast and accurate crop phenotyping methods. Such crop phenotyping methods are required for crop improvement efforts to meet expected demand for food and fibre in the future. This review evaluates the role of proximal remote sensing buggies for field-based phenotyping with a particular focus on the application of currently available sensor technology for large-scale field phenotyping. To illustrate the potential for the development of high throughput phenotyping techniques, a case study is presented with sample data sets obtained from a ground-based proximal remote sensing buggy mounted with the following sensors: LiDAR, RGB camera, thermal infra-red camera and imaging spectroradiometer. The development of such techniques for routine deployment in commercial-scale breeding and pre-breeding operations will require a multidisciplinary approach to leverage the recent technological advances realised in computer science, image analysis, proximal remote sensing and robotics.

  11. A field based, self-excited compulsator power supply for a 9 MJ railgun demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, W.A.; Pratap, S.B.; Brinkman, W.G.; Cook, K.G.; Herbst, J.D.; Manifold, S.M.; Reah, B.M.; Thelen, R.F.; Thompson, R.C. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    Fabrication efforts have begun on a field-based compulsator for firing 9 MJ projectiles from a railgun launcher. The machine is designed to store 200 MJ kinetic energy and fire a salvo of nine rounds in three minutes at velocities between 2.5 and 4.0 km/s. Prime power required to meet this firing schedule is 1,865 kW and will be supplied by a gas turbine engine. It is also possible to fire a burst of two shots in rapid succession, if desired. Operating speed of the machine is 8,250 rpm and it has design ratings of 3.2 MA peak current and 20 GW peak power into a 9 MJ railgun load. A detailed description of the machine as designed, and its auxiliary and control systems, is provided in this paper. Fabrication and assembly methods are reviewed and the current status of the project is discussed. In conjunction with this project, a lightweight railgun is being developed and is discussed in a companion paper presented at the 5th EML conference.

  12. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions.

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSAY FOR VITAMIN B

    OpenAIRE

    Bishnoi Kapil*, , ,; Kataria Mahesh; Singhal Vipin; Gupta Deepika

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrients added to foods are analyzed using various procedures depending on their nature and properties. The microbiological assays are better than chemical method because any suitable change in vitamin molecule which may not be detected by chemical method will be revealed by change in microbial activity. The microbiological assay of vitamins is based upon the comparison of the stimulation of growth of bacteria by measured concentration of vitamin with that produced by known concentratio...

  14. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI, chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  15. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping.

  16. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Remote Sensing for Field-Based Crop Phenotyping: Current Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guijun; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Zhenhong; Huang, Yanbo; Yu, Haiyang; Xu, Bo; Yang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ruyang; Feng, Haikuan; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhenhai; Li, Heli; Yang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Phenotyping plays an important role in crop science research; the accurate and rapid acquisition of phenotypic information of plants or cells in different environments is helpful for exploring the inheritance and expression patterns of the genome to determine the association of genomic and phenotypic information to increase the crop yield. Traditional methods for acquiring crop traits, such as plant height, leaf color, leaf area index (LAI), chlorophyll content, biomass and yield, rely on manual sampling, which is time-consuming and laborious. Unmanned aerial vehicle remote sensing platforms (UAV-RSPs) equipped with different sensors have recently become an important approach for fast and non-destructive high throughput phenotyping and have the advantage of flexible and convenient operation, on-demand access to data and high spatial resolution. UAV-RSPs are a powerful tool for studying phenomics and genomics. As the methods and applications for field phenotyping using UAVs to users who willing to derive phenotypic parameters from large fields and tests with the minimum effort on field work and getting highly reliable results are necessary, the current status and perspectives on the topic of UAV-RSPs for field-based phenotyping were reviewed based on the literature survey of crop phenotyping using UAV-RSPs in the Web of Science™ Core Collection database and cases study by NERCITA. The reference for the selection of UAV platforms and remote sensing sensors, the commonly adopted methods and typical applications for analyzing phenotypic traits by UAV-RSPs, and the challenge for crop phenotyping by UAV-RSPs were considered. The review can provide theoretical and technical support to promote the applications of UAV-RSPs for crop phenotyping. PMID:28713402

  17. Inverse field-based approach for simultaneous B₁ mapping at high fields - a phantom based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Liu, Feng; Zuo, Zhentao; Xue, Rong; Li, Mingyan; Li, Yu; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Based on computational electromagnetics and multi-level optimization, an inverse approach of attaining accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity of radiofrequency coils is presented. This paper extends our previous study of inverse methods of receptivity mapping at low fields, to allow accurate mapping of RF magnetic fields (B(1)) for high-field applications. Accurate receive sensitivity mapping is essential to image domain parallel imaging methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE), to reconstruct high quality images. Accurate transmit sensitivity mapping will facilitate RF-shimming and parallel transmission techniques that directly address the RF inhomogeneity issue, arguably the most challenging issue of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The inverse field-based approach proposed herein is based on computational electromagnetics and iterative optimization. It fits an experimental image to the numerically calculated signal intensity by iteratively optimizing the coil-subject geometry to better resemble the experiments. Accurate transmit and receive sensitivities are derived as intermediate results of the optimization process. The method is validated by imaging studies using homogeneous saline phantom at 7T. A simulation study at 300MHz demonstrates that the proposed method is able to obtain receptivity mapping with errors an order of magnitude less than that of the conventional method. The more accurate receptivity mapping and simultaneously obtained transmit sensitivity mapping could enable artefact-reduced and intensity-corrected image reconstructions. It is hoped that by providing an approach to the accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity, the proposed method will facilitate a range of applications in high-field MRI and parallel imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Field-based and laboratory stable isotope probing surveys of the identities of both aerobic and anaerobic benzene-metabolizing microorganisms in freshwater sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, J.S.C.; DeRito, C.M.; Madsen, E.L. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2008-08-15

    Laboratory incubations of coal-tar waste-contaminated sediment microbial communities under relatively controlled physiological conditions were used to interpret results of a field-based stable isotope probing (SIP) assay. Biodegradation activity of {sub 13}C-benzene was examined by GC/MS determination of net (CO{sub 2})-{sub 13}C production and by GC headspace analysis of benzene loss. In anaerobic laboratory incubations of benzene at 10 p.p.m., greater than 60% of the substrate was eliminated within 15 days. During anaerobic incubations of 200 p.p.m. benzene (70 days), 0.9% benzene mineralization occurred. When benzene (36 p.p.m.) was added to sediment with air in the serum-bottle headspace, 14% of the initial C-13 was mineralized to (CO{sub 2})-{sub 13}C in 2.5 days. In the field experiment (178 {mu} g {sub 13}C-benzene dosed to undisturbed sediments), net (CO{sub 2})-{sub 13}C production reached 0.3% within 8.5 h. After isopycnic separation of {sub 13}C (heavy)-labelled DNA from the above biodegradation assays, sequencing of {sub 13}C-DNA clone libraries revealed a broad diversity of taxa involved in benzene metabolism and distinctive libraries for each biodegradation treatment. Perhaps most importantly, in the field SIP experiment the clone libraries produced were dominated by Pelomonas (betaproteobacteria) sequences similar to those found in the anaerobic 10 p.p.m. benzene laboratory experiment. These data indicate that the physiological conditions that prevail and govern in situ biodegradation of pollutants in the field may be interpreted by knowing the physiological preferences of potentially active populations.

  19. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  20. Robotic weeding of a maize field based on navigation data of the tractor that performed the seeding (Preprint)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Henten, van E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This research presents robotic weeding of a maize field based on navigation data of the tractor that performed the seeding. The availability of tractors equipped with RTK-DGPS based automatic guidance potentially enables robots to perform subsequent tasks in the same field. In an experiment a tracto

  1. Emphasizing Collaborative Practices in Learning to Teach: Coteaching and Cogenerative Dialogue in a Field-Based Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siry, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    This article details a field-based methods course for preservice teachers that has been designed to integrate shared teaching experiences in elementary classrooms with ongoing critical dialogues with a focus on highlighting the complexities of teaching. I describe the structure of the course and explore the use of coteaching and cogenerative…

  2. Noticing and Naming as Social Practice: Examining the Relevance of a Contextualized Field-Based Early Childhood Literacy Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Tasha Tropp; Miller, Erin T.; Lopez-Robertson, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines what early childhood preservice teachers enrolled in a field-based literacy methods course deemed relevant regarding teaching, literacy, and learning. This study is based on postcourse interviews with 7 early childhood preservice teachers. Findings suggest that "contextualized field experiences" facilitate…

  3. Influence of an Intensive, Field-Based Life Science Course on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Environmental Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth-Nare, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Personal and professional experiences influence teachers' perceptions of their ability to implement environmental science curricula and to positively impact students' learning. The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine what influence, if any, an intensive field-based life science course and service learning had on preservice teachers'…

  4. Influence of an Intensive, Field-Based Life Science Course on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Environmental Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth-Nare, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Personal and professional experiences influence teachers' perceptions of their ability to implement environmental science curricula and to positively impact students' learning. The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine what influence, if any, an intensive field-based life science course and service learning had on preservice teachers'…

  5. Potentials, Dissonances and Reform Initiatives in Field-Based Learning and Mentoring Practices in the Early Childhood Sector in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flämig, Katja; König, Anke; Spiekermann, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In Germany, the field-based element in the education/training of early childhood educators is given high priority in the development of professional competencies. Nevertheless, Germany lacks a firmly anchored regulatory and curricular framework for early childhood education and care settings as "workplace learning sites" ("Lernort…

  6. Interdisciplinary Graduate Training in Polar Environmental Change: Field-based learning in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, R. A.; Holm, K.; Whitecloud, S.; Levy, L.; Kelly, M. A.; Feng, X.; Grenoble, L.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the NSF-funded Integrative Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT) program at Dartmouth College is to develop a new cohort of environmental scientists and engineers with an interdisciplinary understanding of polar regions and their importance to global environmental change. The Dartmouth IGERT challenges Ph.D. students to consider the broader dimensions of their research and to collaborate with scientists from other disciplines, educators, and policy makers. IGERT students will focus on research questions that are relevant to the needs of local people experiencing climate change and on understanding the ethical responsibilities and benefits of conducting research in partnership with northern residents and institutions. Seven Ph.D. students from the departments of Earth Sciences, Engineering, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Dartmouth College make up the first IGERT cohort for the five-year program. The Dartmouth IGERT curriculum will focus on three main components of polar systems responding to recent climate change: the cryosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and biogeochemical cycles. The integrating experience of the core curriculum is the Greenland Field Seminar that will take place in Kangerlussuaq (terrestrial and aquatic systems), Summit Camp (snow and ice) and Nuuk, Greenland (human dimensions of change). In Nuuk, IGERT students will share their science and develop partnerships with students, educators, and policy makers at the University of Greenland, the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), and other Greenlandic institutions. In summer 2009 the authors conducted preliminary fieldwork near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland to develop aspects of the science curriculum for the 2010 Greenland Field Seminar and to explore research topics for IGERT Fellows (Levy and Whitecloud). Examples of results presented here are designed to develop field-based learning activities. These include soil and vegetation relationships as a function of aspect

  7. Field-based crowd simulation%基于场的人群运动仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣欣; 张勇; 孔德慧; 尹宝才

    2013-01-01

    Crowd simulation has been widely used in industry, architecture, transportation, and many other fields. To implement real-time crowd simulation in complex environments, efficiency is a pivotal problem to resolve. We meet a lot of challenges, such as rendering of large crowds, the update of crowd's locations and states, as well as collision avoidance. We propose a field-based approach to implement real-time crowd simulation. This approach guides the crowd movements by constructing a navigation field and a density field. The navigation field can make the crowd choose the optimal path to reach the desired destinations. The density field can affect the velocity of the crowd to help avoid collisions, combined with a GPU-based collision avoidance method. Using our approach, we have constructed a real-time crowd simulation system and tested the performance in a large venue with thousands of agents. We succeed in simulating the evacuation of crowds with excellent rendering and high efficiency.%人群仿真目前在工业、建筑、交通等多种领域中应用广泛.实现复杂场景中的人群运动实时仿真,效率是亟待解决的关键性问题,而提高仿真效率所必须面临的挑战主要有人群的渲染、位置及状态的实时更新和碰撞检测.提出一种基于场的方法来实现人群运动的实时仿真,通过构建导航场和密度场引导人群运动.导航场能够引导人群按最优可行路径到达其目标位置;而密度场通过对人群运动速度的影响,再与基于GPU的碰撞检测方法结合,有效地避免了人群碰撞.应用基于场的方法,搭建了人群运动实时仿真系统,在复杂的场馆中对几千人规模的人群进行了实验,成功地对人群进行疏散.实验结果表明,本文方法能够获得良好的渲染效果和仿真效率.

  8. Barcoded microchips for biomolecular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jiashu; Zou, Yu; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-20

    Multiplexed assay of analytes is of great importance for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Barcode-based bioassays with the ability to encode and decode may realize this goal in a straightforward and consistent manner. We present here a microfluidic barcoded chip containing several sets of microchannels with different widths, imitating the commonly used barcode. A single barcoded microchip can carry out tens of individual protein/nucleic acid assays (encode) and immediately yield all assay results by a portable barcode reader or a smartphone (decode). The applicability of a barcoded microchip is demonstrated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoassays for simultaneous detection of three targets (anti-gp41 antibody, anti-gp120 antibody, and anti-gp36 antibody) from six human serum samples. We can also determine seven pathogen-specific oligonucleotides by a single chip containing both positive and negative controls.

  9. Radioreceptor assay method for insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, K.F.; Wood, R.J. (Bureau of Drug Research, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Health Protection Branch)

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive practical radioreceptor assay method for pharmaceutical insulin products has been developed with partially purified rat liver plasma membranes and the optimal conditions under which the best overall assay performance is obtainable have been defined. Intra- and inter-assay variations of the method averaged 7.3 and 12.2% of the man, respectively, when expressed as the coefficient of variation. Potency estimates of an insulin product obtained with the proposed method correlated well with those determined by the mouse convulsion bioassay method. Liver membranes prepared according to the method could be stored for up to ten weeks at 4/sup 0/C and for 6 months or more at -18/sup 0/C without losing insulin-binding ability.

  10. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  11. Avicequinone C Isolated from Avicennia marina Exhibits 5α-Reductase-Type 1 Inhibitory Activity Using an Androgenic Alopecia Relevant Cell-Based Assay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchy Jain

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Avicennia marina (AM exhibits various biological activities and has been traditionally used in Egypt to cure skin diseases. In this study, the methanolic heartwood extract of AM was evaluated for inhibitory activity against 5α-reductase (5α-R [E.C.1.3.99.5], the enzyme responsible for the over-production of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT causing androgenic alopecia (AGA. An AGA-relevant cell-based assay was developed using human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs, the main regulator of hair growth and the only cells within the hair follicle that are the direct site of 5α-DHT action, combined with a non-radioactive thin layer chromatography (TLC detection technique. The results revealed that AM is a potent 5α-R type 1 (5α-R1 inhibitor, reducing the 5α-DHT production by 52% at the final concentration of 10 µg/mL. Activity-guided fractionation has led to the identification of avicequinone C, a furanonaphthaquinone, as a 5α-R1 inhibitor with an IC50 of 9.94 ± 0.33 µg/mL or 38.8 ± 1.29 µM. This paper is the first to report anti-androgenic activity through 5α-R1 inhibition of AM and avicequinone C.

  12. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  13. Influence of an Intensive, Field-Based Life Science Course on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Environmental Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth-Nare, Amy

    2015-08-01

    Personal and professional experiences influence teachers' perceptions of their ability to implement environmental science curricula and to positively impact students' learning. The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine what influence, if any, an intensive field-based life science course and service learning had on preservice teachers' self-efficacy for teaching about the environment and to determine which aspects of the combined field-based course/service learning preservice teachers perceived as effective for enhancing their self-efficacy. Data were collected from class documents and written teaching reflections of 38 middle-level preservice teachers. Some participants ( n = 18) also completed the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument at the beginning and end of the semester. Both qualitative and quantitative data analyses indicated a significant increase in PSTs' personal efficacies for environmental teaching, t(17) = 4.50, p = .000, d = 1.30, 95 % CI (.33, .90), but not outcome expectancy, t(17) = 1.15, p = .268, d = .220, 95 % CI (-.06, .20). Preservice teachers reported three aspects of the course as important for enhancing their self-efficacies: learning about ecological concepts through place-based issues, service learning with K-5 students and EE curriculum development. Data from this study extend prior work by indicating that practical experiences with students were not the sole factor in shaping PSTs' self-efficacy; learning ecological concepts and theories in field-based activities grounded in the local landscape also influenced PSTs' self-efficacy.

  14. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  15. The skin-blanching assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P; Neumann, H A M; Thio, H B

    2012-10-01

    The skin-blanching assay is used for the determination and bioequivalence of dermatologic glucocorticoids (GCs). The exact mechanism of the production of blanching is not fully understood, but it is considered that local vasoconstriction of the skin microvasculature and the consequent blood-flow reduction cause this phenomenon. Several factors influence skin blanching, including drug concentration, duration of application, nature of vehicle, occlusion, posture and location. The intensity of vasoconstriction can be measured in several ways: visual or quantitative methods, such as reflectance spectroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler velocimetry and chromametry. In literature, contradicting results in the correlation of the skin-blanching assay with different tests to determine GC sensitivity have been reported, limiting its clinical usefulness.

  16. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  17. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  18. The effect of physical contact on changes in fatigue markers following rugby union field-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Gregory; Darrall-Jones, Joshua; Till, Kevin; Phibbs, Padraic; Read, Dale; Weakley, Jonathon; Rock, Andrew; Jones, Ben

    2017-02-26

    Repeated physical contact in rugby union is thought to contribute to post-match fatigue; however, no evidence exists on the effect of contact activity during field-based training on fatigue responses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of contact during training on fatigue markers in rugby union players. Twenty academy rugby union players participated in the cross-over study. The magnitude of change in upper- and lower-body neuromuscular function (NMF), whole blood creatine kinase concentration [CK] and perception of well-being was assessed pre-training (baseline), immediately and 24 h post-training following contact and non-contact, field-based training. Training load was measured using mean heart rate, session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) and microtechnology (Catapult Optimeye S5). The inclusion of contact during field-based training almost certainly increased mean heart rate (9.7; ±3.9%) and sRPE (42; ±29.2%) and resulted in likely and very likely greater decreases in upper-body NMF (-7.3; ±4.7% versus 2.7; ±5.9%) and perception of well-being (-8.0; ±4.8% versus  -3.4; ±2.2%) 24 h post-training, respectively, and almost certainly greater elevations in [CK] (88.2; ±40.7% versus 3.7; ±8%). The exclusion of contact from field-based training almost certainly increased running intensity (19.8; ±5%) and distance (27.5; ±5.3%), resulting in possibly greater decreases in lower-body NMF (-5.6; ±5.2% versus 2.3; ±2.4%). Practitioners should be aware of the different demands and fatigue responses of contact and non-contact, field-based training and can use this information to appropriately schedule such training in the weekly microcycle.

  19. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field-based settings. The development of the Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large…

  20. Screening of herpes simplex virus type 1 isolates for acyclovir resistance using DiviTum® assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbrei, Andreas; Vödisch, Susanne; Bohn, Kathrin; Schacke, Michael; Gronowitz, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Rapid alternative methods are required to evaluate easily acyclovir (ACV) sensitivity of clinical herpes simplex virus (HSV) isolates. The objective of this study was to screen 54 ACV-sensitive and 41 ACV-resistant clinical HSV-1 isolates, well characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods, for the phosphorylation activity of the viral thymidine kinase (TK) using a commercially available and modified non-radioactive DiviTum® test on the basis of an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The ACV-sensitive HSV-1 isolates had high TK activity values between 31.5±6.4 DiviTum® Units per liter (DU/L) and 487.4±60.1 DU/L. The mean activity of all ACV-sensitive isolates was calculated as 212.3±15.7 DU/L. By contrast, the mean activity of all ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates was significantly lower at 5.5±1.3 DU/L. Out of the 41 ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates, 38 had no or very low phosphorylation activities of the viral TK between 0 DU/L and 9.3±3.2 DU/L. The remaining three ACV-resistant viral isolates had TK activities between 44.6±5.1 DU/L and 80.9±13.3D U/L. In conclusion, the modified DiviTum® test can be used to screen HSV-1 isolates for their sensitivity to ACV. Acyclovir-sensitive HSV-1 isolates show TK activities >30 DU/L and ACV-resistant isolates have activity values ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates can have TK activity values >30 DU/L. These strains are most likely ACV-resistant TK-altered mutants, but no evidence was provided for an alteration of the TK.

  1. A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

    2002-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

  2. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Susana Viegas; Manuel C. Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN) assay is a comprehensive system for measuring DNA damage; cytostasis and cytotoxicity-DNA damage events are scored specifically in once-divided binucleated cells. The endpoints possible to be measured are micronuclei (MN), a biomarker of chromosome breakage and/or whole chromosome loss, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB), a biomarker of DNA misrepair and/or telomere end-fusions, and nuclear buds (NBUD), a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA and/...

  3. Field-based fitness assessment in young people: the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Castro-Piñero, José; España-Romero, Vanesa; Artero, Enrique G; Ortega, Francisco B; Cuenca, Magdalena M; Jimenez-Pavón, David; Chillón, Palma; Girela-Rejón, María J; Mora, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Angel; Suni, Jaana; Sjöström, Michael; Castillo, Manuel J

    2011-05-01

    The present study summarises the work developed by the ALPHA (Assessing Levels of Physical Activity) study and describes the procedures followed to select the tests included in the ALPHA health-related fitness test battery for children and adolescents. The authors reviewed physical fitness and health in youth findings from cross-sectional studies. The authors also performed three systematic reviews dealing with (1) the predictive validity of health-related fitness, (2) the criterion validity of field-based fitness tests and (3) the reliability of field-based fitness tests in youth. The authors also carried out 11-methodological studies to determine the criterion validity and the reliability of several field-based fitness tests for youth. Finally, the authors performed a study in the school setting to examine the reliability, feasibility and safety of the selected tests. The selected fitness tests were (1) the 20 m shuttle run test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness; (2) the handgrip strength and (3) standing broad jump to assess musculoskeletal fitness, and (4) body mass index, (5) skinfold thickness and (5) waist circumference to assess body composition. When there are time limits, the authors propose the high-priority ALPHA health-related fitness test battery, which comprises all the evidence-based fitness tests except the measurement of the skinfold thickness. The time required to administer this battery to a group of 20 youth by one physical education teacher is less than 2 h. In conclusion, the ALPHA fitness tests battery is valid, reliable, feasible and safe for the assessment of health-related physical fitness in children and adolescents to be used for health monitoring purposes at population level.

  4. The forward and inverse problem of cardiac magnetic fields based on concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Lu, Hong; Ma, Ping; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper constructs a concentric ellipsoid torso-heart model by boundary element method and investigates the impacts of model structures on the cardiac magnetic fields generated by both equivalent primary source-a current dipole and volume currents. Then by using the simulated magnetic fields based on the torso-heart model as input, the cardiac current sources-an array of current dipoles by optimal constrained linear inverse method are constructed. Next, the current dipole array reconstruction considering boundaries are compared with that in an unbounded homogeneous medium. Furthermore, the influence of random noise on reconstruction is also considered and the reconstructing effect is judged by several reconstructing parameters.

  5. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Tommy; Vescovi, Jason D; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Gilenstam, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15–25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm), with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex). The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables. Results Regression models (adj R2) for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing long jump alone explained 57.1%, 38.1%, and 29.1% of the variance in skating time during transition agility skate, agility cornering s-turn, and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque in the quadriceps at 90° explained 42.0% and 32.2% of the variance in skating time during agility cornering s-turn and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Conclusion Field-based assessments, particularly single-leg tests, are an adequate

  6. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in the genital tract determined by hybrid capture assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda N. Carestiato

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most prevalent sexually-transmitted virus worldwide. It is known to be the etiological agent of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. Consequently, there is strong motivation to evaluate HPV testing in cervical cancer screening. Recently developed, the second generation of the hybrid capture test (HCA II is a non-radioactive, relatively rapid, hybridization assay, designed to detect 18 HPV types divided into high and low-risk groups. We evaluated 7,314 patients (5,833 women and 1,481 men for HPV infection by HCA II. Among them, 3,008 (41.1% presented HPV infection: 430 (14.2% had HPV DNA of low risk for cancer, 1,631 (54.2% had high risk HPV types and 947 (31.5% had both types. The prevalence in females was 44.9%. The prevalence of HPV DNA in the group for which cytological results were available was slightly higher: 55.3% (1007/1824. Significant differences were detected in the frequency of HPV infection of the cervix between normal cases and those with high-grade squamous-intraepithelial lesions (HSIL(P<0.0001. Among males, the prevalence was 26.2%, composed of 9.1% in Group A, 9.7% in Group B and 7.4% with multiple infections. We observed that male prevalence was lower and that low-risk types were more frequent than in females. HPV viral load was significantly greater in SILs than in normal or inflammatory cases (P<0.0001, suggesting an association between high viral load values and risk of SIL. Because of high costs, the HCA II test cannot be recommended for routine mass screening for cervical infection in poor countries. Nevertheless, it was found to be a useful tool, when combined with cytology, discovering high-risk infections in apparently normal tissues and revealing silent infections that may be responsible for the maintenance of HPV in the general population. These findings point to the need for close and careful management of patients, thereby reducing overtreatment

  7. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification. A heparin assay is a device used to determine the level of the anticoagulant heparin in the...

  8. A colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libreros-Minotta, C A; Tipton, P A

    1995-11-01

    A simple and rapid colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase is described. The assay is based on the formation of a Schiff base between the enzymatic reaction product 3-methyl-2-butenal and p-aminophenol. The assay is effective in the submicromolar concentration range and can be used in crude plant extracts as well as in more highly purified preparations.

  9. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert;

    2016-01-01

    ) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a) Identification. An endotoxin assay is a device that uses serological techniques in whole blood. The device...

  11. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida;

    2014-01-01

    of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...

  12. Steroid assays in paediatric endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, John W

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation.

  13. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  14. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  15. A Comparison of Field-Based and Lab-Based Experiments to Evaluate User Experience of Personalised Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing debate in the literature regarding the tradeoffs between lab and field evaluation of mobile devices. This paper presents a comparison of field-based and lab-based experiments to evaluate user experience of personalised mobile devices at large sports events. A lab experiment is recommended when the testing focus is on the user interface and application-oriented usability related issues. However, the results suggest that a field experiment is more suitable for investigating a wider range of factors affecting the overall acceptability of the designed mobile service. Such factors include the system function and effects of actual usage contexts aspects. Where open and relaxed communication is important (e.g., where participant groups are naturally reticent to communicate, this is more readily promoted by the use of a field study.

  16. Systematic review and proposal of a field-based physical fitness-test battery in preschool children: the PREFIT battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco B; Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Sánchez-Delgado, Guillermo; Mora-González, José; Martínez-Téllez, Borja; Artero, Enrique G; Castro-Piñero, Jose; Labayen, Idoia; Chillón, Palma; Löf, Marie; Ruiz, Jonatan R

    2015-04-01

    Physical fitness is a powerful health marker in childhood and adolescence, and it is reasonable to think that it might be just as important in younger children, i.e. preschoolers. At the moment, researchers, clinicians and sport practitioners do not have enough information about which fitness tests are more reliable, valid and informative from the health point of view to be implemented in preschool children. Our aim was to systematically review the studies conducted in preschool children using field-based fitness tests, and examine their (1) reliability, (2) validity, and (3) relationship with health outcomes. Our ultimate goal was to propose a field-based physical fitness-test battery to be used in preschool children. PubMed and Web of Science. Studies conducted in healthy preschool children that included field-based fitness tests. When using PubMed, we included Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms to enhance the power of the search. A set of fitness-related terms were combined with 'child, preschool' [MeSH]. The same strategy and terms were used for Web of Science (except for the MeSH option). Since no previous reviews with a similar aim were identified, we searched for all articles published up to 1 April 2014 (no starting date). A total of 2,109 articles were identified, of which 22 articles were finally selected for this review. Most studies focused on reliability of the fitness tests (n = 21, 96%), while very few focused on validity (0 criterion-related validity and 4 (18%) convergent validity) or relationship with health outcomes (0 longitudinal and 1 (5%) cross-sectional study). Motor fitness, particularly balance, was the most studied fitness component, while cardiorespiratory fitness was the least studied. After analyzing the information retrieved in the current systematic review about fitness testing in preschool children, we propose the PREFIT battery, field-based FITness testing in PREschool children. The PREFIT battery is composed of the following

  17. Electromagnetic field-based navigation for percutaneous punctures on C-arm CT: experimental evaluation and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bernhard C; Peter, Olaf; Nagel, Markus; Hoheisel, Martin; Frericks, Bernd B; Wolf, Karl-Jürgen; Wacker, Frank K

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the needle visualization and placement error and use of an electromagnetic field-based tracking navigation device for puncture procedures based on C-arm CT (CACT) images. A commercially available navigation device was mounted on an angiographic X-ray system setup for CACT. After the target was defined, needle placement was performed under real-time visualization of the virtual needle in CACT images. The final, real needle position was assessed by CACT. Punctures were performed in phantoms (n = 76) and in twelve patients (eight biopsies, three drainages, one injection). Procedure times, system error, user error and total error were assessed. In phantoms, mean total error was 2.3 +/- 0.9 mm, user error was 1.4 +/- 0.8 mm and system error was 1.7 +/- 0.8 mm. In the patient study, the targeted puncture was successful in all twelve cases. The mean total error was 5.4 mm +/- 1.9 mm (maximum 8.1 mm), user error was 3.7 +/- 1.7 mm, system error was 3.2 +/- 1.4 mm and mean skin-to-target time was less than 1 min. The navigation device relying on CACT was accurate in terms of needle visualization and useful for needle placement under both experimental and clinical conditions. For more complex procedures, electromagnetic field-based tracking guidance might be of help in facilitating the puncture and reducing both the puncture risk and procedure time.

  18. A non-stationary stochastic ensemble generator for radar rainfall fields based on the short-space Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerini, Daniele; Besic, Nikola; Sideris, Ioannis; Germann, Urs; Foresti, Loris

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we present a non-stationary stochastic generator for radar rainfall fields based on the short-space Fourier transform (SSFT). The statistical properties of rainfall fields often exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity due to variability in the involved physical processes and influence of orographic forcing. The traditional approach to simulate stochastic rainfall fields based on the Fourier filtering of white noise is only able to reproduce the global power spectrum and spatial autocorrelation of the precipitation fields. Conceptually similar to wavelet analysis, the SSFT is a simple and effective extension of the Fourier transform developed for space-frequency localisation, which allows for using windows to better capture the local statistical structure of rainfall. The SSFT is used to generate stochastic noise and precipitation fields that replicate the local spatial correlation structure, i.e. anisotropy and correlation range, of the observed radar rainfall fields. The potential of the stochastic generator is demonstrated using four precipitation cases observed by the fourth generation of Swiss weather radars that display significant non-stationarity due to the coexistence of stratiform and convective precipitation, differential rotation of the weather system and locally varying anisotropy. The generator is verified in its ability to reproduce both the global and the local Fourier power spectra of the precipitation field. The SSFT-based stochastic generator can be applied and extended to improve the probabilistic nowcasting of precipitation, design storm simulation, stochastic numerical weather prediction (NWP) downscaling, and also for other geophysical applications involving the simulation of complex non-stationary fields.

  19. Gully recharge rates and debris flows: A combined numerical modeling and field-based investigation, Haida Gwaii, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Yvonne E.; Johnson, E. A.; Chaikina, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall, snowmelt and/or other mass movements are possible triggers to initiate debris flows. In supply-limited landscapes, clastic and organic materials (together termed debris) accumulate in the gully via various geomorphic processes that occur on gully sidewalls. The conceptualization of this phenomenon has been termed the gully recharge rate, with several recent field studies measuring such rates in coastal British Columbia. In the present study, a simple numerical model is introduced to estimate debris flow volumes in Haida Gwaii, British Columbia based on debris flow recurrence intervals, gully recharge rates and factors affecting deposition of debris flow material. Debris flow volumes obtained in model runs are somewhat lower than field-based values by about half, which is a reasonable result for this exploratory study. The annual erosion rate (clastic material) for debris flows in the model run is 0.031 mm yr- 1. This value is about 0.57 × of the field-based value and is lower than the erosion rate for debris slides in Haida Gwaii of 0.1 mm yr- 1. Deposition of debris flows in the model occurs in 60% of cases due to a decrease in channel gradient, with deposition resulting from high stream junction angles being less common. Locations for initiation of debris flow deposition were situated in stream orders 3 and 4 in 60% of cases. Sensitivity analysis shows that in comparison to other model variables, recharge rate has the greatest effect on the statistics and frequency distributions of debris flow volumes and total debris flow volume (summation of all debris activity in a basin) over the study time period.

  20. Electromagnetic field-based navigation for percutaneous punctures on C-arm CT: experimental evaluation and clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Bernhard C.; Peter, Olaf; Frericks, Bernd B.; Wolf, Karl-Juergen [Charite - University Hospital, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Nagel, Markus [CAS innovations AG, Erlangen (Germany); Hoheisel, Martin [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Wacker, Frank K. [Charite - University Hospital, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Radiology Department, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the needle visualization and placement error and use of an electromagnetic field-based tracking navigation device for puncture procedures based on C-arm CT (CACT) images. A commercially available navigation device was mounted on an angiographic X-ray system setup for CACT. After the target was defined, needle placement was performed under real-time visualization of the virtual needle in CACT images. The final, real needle position was assessed by CACT. Punctures were performed in phantoms (n = 76) and in twelve patients (eight biopsies, three drainages, one injection). Procedure times, system error, user error and total error were assessed. In phantoms, mean total error was 2.3 {+-} 0.9 mm, user error was 1.4 {+-} 0.8 mm and system error was 1.7 {+-} 0.8 mm. In the patient study, the targeted puncture was successful in all twelve cases. The mean total error was 5.4 mm {+-} 1.9 mm (maximum 8.1 mm), user error was 3.7 {+-} 1.7 mm, system error was 3.2 {+-} 1.4 mm and mean skin-to-target time was less than 1 min. The navigation device relying on CACT was accurate in terms of needle visualization and useful for needle placement under both experimental and clinical conditions. For more complex procedures, electromagnetic field-based tracking guidance might be of help in facilitating the puncture and reducing both the puncture risk and procedure time. (orig.)

  1. Laboratory and Field-Based Evaluation of Short-Term Effort with Maximal Intensity in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lencse-Mucha Judit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of previous studies have not indicated clearly which tests should be used to assess short-term efforts of people with intellectual disabilities. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate laboratory and field-based tests of short-term effort with maximal intensity of subjects with intellectual disabilities. Twenty four people with intellectual disability, who trained soccer, participated in this study. The 30 s Wingate test and additionally an 8 s test with maximum intensity were performed on a bicycle ergometer. The fatigue index, maximal and mean power, relative maximal and relative mean power were measured. Overall, nine field-based tests were conducted: 5, 10 and 20 m sprints, a 20 m shuttle run, a seated medicine ball throw, a bent arm hang test, a standing broad jump, sit-ups and a hand grip test. The reliability of the 30 s and 8 s Wingate tests for subjects with intellectual disability was confirmed. Significant correlation was observed for mean power between the 30 s and 8 s tests on the bicycle ergometer at a moderate level (r >0.4. Moreover, significant correlations were indicated between the results of laboratory tests and field tests, such as the 20 m sprint, the 20 m shuttle run, the standing long jump and the medicine ball throw. The strongest correlation was in the medicine ball throw. The 30 s Wingate test is a reliable test assessing maximal effort in subjects with intellectual disability. The results of this research confirmed that the 8 s test on a bicycle ergometer had a moderate correlation with the 30 s Wingate test in this population, thus, this comparison needs further investigation to examine alternativeness of the 8 s to 30 s Wingate tests. The non-laboratory tests could be used to indirectly assess performance in short-term efforts with maximal intensity.

  2. Development and application of assays for serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, two assays for serotonin were developed, validated, and used to investigate the relationship between platelet aggregation, serotonin levels and sodium status and serotonin levels and platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) using an (/sup 125/I)-labelled tracer was developed and validated for the measurement of serotonin in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and rat serum. Antisera were raised against N-succinamylserotonin conjugated to bovine albumin and, to improve assay sensitivity, the analyte was made chemically similar to the immunogen by conversion to N-acetylserotonin prior to assay, using the specific amino reagent N-acetoxysuccinimide. An assay for serotonin using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) was developed, and used to validate the RIA. The RIA can be used to assay up to 100 samples/day compared with 10-20/day by the HPLC-ECD assay.

  3. Direct Spectrophotometric Assay for Benzaldehyde Lyase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzaldehyde lyase from Pseudomonas fluorescens Biovar I. (BAL, EC 4.1.2.38 is a versatile catalyst for the organic synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy ketones. To allow fast assessment of enzyme activity, a direct spectrophotometric assay is desirable. Here, a new robust and easy-to-handle assay based on UV absorption is presented. The assay developed is based on the ligation of the α-hydroxy ketone (R-2,2′-furoin from 2-furaldehyde. A robust assay with direct monitoring of the product is facilitated with a convenient concentration working range minimising experimental associated with low concentrations.

  4. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays to Detect Tembusu Virus in Culex tarsalis Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    appropri- ate preventive measures can be taken to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with infection with these pathogens. Development of...field-based real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for rapid detection of virus-infected mos- quitoes would be a great assistance to preventive ...specimens were propagated in primary duck embryo, C6/36 ( Aedes albopictus), or Vero (African green monkey kidney) cells to produce stock viruses for

  5. Assay-dependent variability of serum insulin concentrations: a comparison of eight assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Maryam; Arbab, Parvaneh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-04-01

    Although insulin measurement is essential for both clinical and research purposes, there is currently no reference method for insulin assays. The aim of this study was to compare results of serum insulin determined by a number of commercially available assays. We compared eight insulin assays by analyzing 165 serum samples. Assays included two chemiluminescence (Roche and DiaSorin), four ELISA (Tosoh, Mercodia, Monobind, and Diametra), and two IRMA (Izotop and BioSource) methods. Each assay was compared with the mean of all assay methods and Bland-Altman difference plots were used to measure agreement between each assay and overall mean. Least squared perpendicular distance regression analysis (Deming's method) was used to calculate slope and intercept for bias and also for each assay vs. mean of eight assays. Findings showed that the lowest and highest median insulin concentrations varied by a factor of 1.8. Maximum and minimum correlations with mean of assays were observed for Roche (0.992) and BioSource (0.844), respectively. Significant bias was observed in six assays. In pairwise comparisons of different assays, the highest and least mean differences were 7.78 μU/mL and -0.14 μU/mL, respectively. In conclusion, serum insulin measurement with different assays showed a maximum of 1.8-fold difference, a point that should be taken into consideration in the interpretation of circulating insulin levels in both clinical and research fields.

  6. Increasing student engagement in science through field-based research: University of Idaho's WoW STEMcore Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, A. L.; Boylan, R. D.; Rittenburg, R.; Boll, J.; Allan, P.

    2013-12-01

    A recent statewide survey assessing STEM perceptions in Idaho showed that high school student interest in science and preparation for college are declining. To address this decline we are piloting an interdisciplinary, community and field-based water science education approach for 10th - 12th grade science courses during the 2013-14 school year called WoW STEMcore. The program is led by graduate students in the University of Idaho (UI) Waters of the West (WoW) program. Our methods are based on proven best practices from eight years of NSF GK-12 experience at UI and over a decade of GK-12 experience at more than 300 programs in the U.S. WoW STEMcore works to strengthen partnerships between WoW graduate students, high school teachers, and regional organizations that work on natural resource management or place-based science education with the intent of sustaining and merging efforts to increase scientific literacy among high school students and to better prepare them for higher education. In addition, graduate students gain outreach, education and communication experience and teachers are exposed to new and relevant research content and methods. WoW STEMcore is fostering these partnerships through water themed projects at three northern Idaho high schools. The pilot program will culminate in Spring 2014 with a regional Water Summit in which all participating students and partners will converge at a two-day youth scientific conference and competition where they can showcase their research and the skills they gained over the course of the year. We hypothesize that through a graduate student-led, field-based program that gets students out of the classroom and thinking about water resource issues in their communities, we will 1) fuel high school students' interest in science through hands on and inquiry-based pedagogy and 2) improve preparation for higher education by providing graduate student mentors to discuss the pathway from high school to college to a career. In

  7. Consistency of Field-Based Measures of Neuromuscular Control Using Force-Plate Diagnostics in Elite Male Youth Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Paul J; Oliver, Jon L; Croix, Mark Ba De Ste; Myer, Gregory D; Lloyd, Rhodri S

    2016-12-01

    Read, P, Oliver, JL, Croix, MD, Myer, GD, and Lloyd, RS. Consistency of field-based measures of neuromuscular control using force-plate diagnostics in elite male youth soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3304-3311, 2016-Deficits in neuromuscular control during movement patterns such as landing are suggested pathomechanics that underlie sport-related injury. A common mode of assessment is measurement of landing forces during jumping tasks; however, these measures have been used less frequently in male youth soccer players, and reliability data are sparse. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of a field-based neuromuscular control screening battery using force-plate diagnostics in this cohort. Twenty-six pre-peak height velocity (PHV) and 25 post-PHV elite male youth soccer players completed a drop vertical jump (DVJ), single-leg 75% horizontal hop and stick (75%HOP), and single-leg countermovement jump (SLCMJ). Measures of peak landing vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF), time to stabilization, time to pVGRF, and pVGRF asymmetry were recorded. A test-retest design was used, and reliability statistics included change in mean, intraclass correlation coefficient, and coefficient of variation (CV). No significant differences in mean score were reported for any of the assessed variables between test sessions. In both groups, pVGRF and asymmetry during the 75%HOP and SLCMJ demonstrated largely acceptable reliability (CV ≤ 10%). Greater variability was evident in DVJ pVGRF and all other assessed variables, across the 3 protocols (CV range = 13.8-49.7%). Intraclass correlation coefficient values ranged from small to large and were generally higher in the post-PHV players. The results of this study suggest that pVGRF and asymmetry can be reliably assessed using a 75%HOP and SLCMJ in this cohort. These measures could be used to support a screening battery for elite male youth soccer players and for test-retest comparison.

  8. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    1994-01-01

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  9. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  10. Radioreceptor assay: theory and applications to pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G. (U.E.R. de Medecine, Sante et Biologie Humaine, 93 - Bobigny (France)); Simon, P. (Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France))

    The aim of the first part of this work is to present the theory of the radioreceptor assay and to compare it to the other techniques of radioanalysis (radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding assays). The technology of the radioreceptor assay is then presented and its components (preparation of the receptors, radioligand, incubation medium) are described. The analytical characteristics of the radioreceptor assay (specificity, sensitivity, reproductibility, accuracy) and the pharmacological significance of the results are discussed. The second part is devoted to the description of the radioreceptor assays of some pharmacological classes (neuroleptics, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, ..beta..-blockers, anticholinergic drugs) and to their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. In conclusion, by their nature, radioreceptor assays are highly sensitive, reliable, precise, accurate and simple to perform. Their chief disadvantage relates to specificity, since any substance having an appreciable affinity to the receptor site will displace the specifically bound radioligand. Paradoxically in some cases, this lack of specificity may be advantageous in that it allows for the detection of not only the apparent compound but of active metabolites and endogenous receptor agonists as well and in that radioreceptors assays can be devised for a whole pharmacological class and not only for one drug as it is the case for classical physico-chemical techniques. For all these reasons future of radioreceptor assay in pharmacology appears promising.

  11. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  12. Acellular comet assay: a tool for assessing variables influencing the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Erin K; McNamee, James P; Prud'homme Lalonde, Louise; Jones, Trevor; Wilkinson, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an acellular modification to the alkaline comet assay to further evaluate key variables within the assay that may influence the outcome of genotoxicity studies is described. This acellular comet assay can detect differences of 0.2 Gy of (60)Co gamma-ray radiation between 0 and 1 Gy and differences of 1 Gy between 0 and 8 Gy; thus, this assay is applicable for a wide range of DNA damage levels. It is also shown that DNA damage from different radiation energies was not significantly different from (60)Co gamma-ray. This assay displayed a statistical increase in DNA damage due to uncontrolled exposure to natural light; however, the slope of the dose-response curve for light-exposed samples was similar to that for samples protected from light. A comparison of the alkaline comet assay with the acellular comet assay allowed for the intrinsic repair capacity of the alkaline comet assay to be quantified.

  13. Assays for Determination of Protein Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical analysis of proteins relies on accurate quantification of protein concentration. Detailed in this appendix are some commonly used methods for protein analysis, e.g., Lowry, Bradford, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), UV spectroscopic, and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) assays. The primary focus of this report is assay selection, emphasizing sample and buffer compatibility. The fundamentals of generating protein assay standard curves and of data processing are considered, as are high-throughput adaptations of the more commonly used protein assays. Also included is a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable BCA assay of total protein in SDS-PAGE sample buffer that is used for equal loading of SDS-PAGE gels. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper contamination on China’s arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg-1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  15. The development and reliability of a simple field based screening tool to assess core stability in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S; McCaffrey, N; Whyte, E; Moran, K

    2016-07-01

    To adapt the trunk stability test to facilitate further sub-classification of higher levels of core stability in athletes for use as a screening tool. To establish the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of this adapted core stability test. Reliability study. Collegiate athletic therapy facilities. Fifteen physically active male subjects (19.46 ± 0.63) free from any orthopaedic or neurological disorders were recruited from a convenience sample of collegiate students. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were computed to establish inter-tester and intra-tester reliability. Excellent ICC values were observed in the adapted core stability test for inter-tester reliability (0.97) and good to excellent intra-tester reliability (0.73-0.90). While the 95% CI were narrow for inter-tester reliability, Tester A and C 95% CI's were widely distributed compared to Tester B. The adapted core stability test developed in this study is a quick and simple field based test to administer that can further subdivide athletes with high levels of core stability. The test demonstrated high inter-tester and intra-tester reliability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-core magnetic markers in rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassays and the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckhoff, Jan, E-mail: j.dieckhoff@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Schrittwieser, Stefan; Schotter, Joerg [Molecular Diagnostics, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Remmer, Hilke; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we report on the effect of the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) concentration on the quantitative detection of proteins in solution with a rotating magnetic field (RMF) based homogeneous bioassay. Here, the phase lag between 30 nm iron oxide single-core particles and the RMF is analyzed with a fluxgate-based measurement system. As a test analyte anti-human IgG is applied which binds to the protein G functionalized MNP shell and causes a change of the phase lag. The measured phase lag changes for a fixed MNP and a varying analyte concentration are modeled with logistic functions. A change of the MNP concentration results in a nonlinear shift of the logistic function with the analyte concentration. This effect results from the law of mass action. Furthermore, the bioassay results are used to determine the association constant of the binding reaction. - Highlights: • A rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassay concept was presented. • Here, single-core iron oxide nanoparticles are applied as markers. • The impact of the particle concentration on the bioassay results is investigated. • The relation between particle concentration and bioassay sensitivity is nonlinear. • This finding can be reasonably explained by the law of mass action.

  17. Peak flow regression equations For small, ungaged streams in Maine: Comparing map-based to field-based variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Hodgkins, Glenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Regression equations to estimate peak streamflows with 1- to 500-year recurrence intervals (annual exceedance probabilities from 99 to 0.2 percent, respectively) were developed for small, ungaged streams in Maine. Equations presented here are the best available equations for estimating peak flows at ungaged basins in Maine with drainage areas from 0.3 to 12 square miles (mi2). Previously developed equations continue to be the best available equations for estimating peak flows for basin areas greater than 12 mi2. New equations presented here are based on streamflow records at 40 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages with a minimum of 10 years of recorded peak flows between 1963 and 2012. Ordinary least-squares regression techniques were used to determine the best explanatory variables for the regression equations. Traditional map-based explanatory variables were compared to variables requiring field measurements. Two field-based variables—culvert rust lines and bankfull channel widths—either were not commonly found or did not explain enough of the variability in the peak flows to warrant inclusion in the equations. The best explanatory variables were drainage area and percent basin wetlands; values for these variables were determined with a geographic information system. Generalized least-squares regression was used with these two variables to determine the equation coefficients and estimates of accuracy for the final equations.

  18. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Yi-Bing; Hu, Hang-Wei; Wang, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Rong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Copper contamination on China's arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg(-1) in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values) characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM) analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  19. Improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay using the MultiScreen (R) Assay System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    1999-01-01

    In this article, an improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay is described, which allows substantial reduction in assay time, The filtration in this method was performed by using the MultiScreen(R) Assay System. The latter consists of a 96-well plate with glass fibre filters sealed at the bottom,

  20. Nano-immunosafety: issues in assay validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, Diana; Italiani, Paola [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Oostingh, Gertie J; Duschl, Albert [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Campus de la UAB - Facultat de Ciencies, Edifici CM7, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Nelissen, Inge, E-mail: diana.boraschi@itb.cnr.it [VITO NV, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-07-06

    Assessing the safety of engineered nanomaterials for human health must include a thorough evaluation of their effects on the immune system, which is responsible for defending the integrity of our body from damage and disease. An array of robust and representative assays should be set up and validated, which could be predictive of the effects of nanomaterials on immune responses. In a trans-European collaborative work, in vitro assays have been developed to this end. In vitro tests have been preferred for their suitability to standardisation and easier applicability. Adapting classical assays to testing the immunotoxicological effects of nanoparticulate materials has raised a series of issues that needed to be appropriately addressed in order to ensure reliability of results. Besides the exquisitely immunological problem of selecting representative endpoints predictive of the risk of developing disease, assay results turned out to be significantly biased by artefactual interference of the nanomaterials or contaminating agents with the assay protocol. Having addressed such problems, a series of robust and representative assays have been developed that describe the effects of engineered nanoparticles on professional and non-professional human defence cells. Two of such assays are described here, one based on primary human monocytes and the other employing human lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene.

  1. Mobile non-destructive assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarusso, A.P.; Audas, J.H.; Bieri, J.M.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Horton, W.S.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Kunz, W.E.; Medvick, P.A.; Vogel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    A mobile system for non-destructive assay (NDA), developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides accurate and sensitive measurements for transuranic (TRU) isotopes contained in 208-iota drums of miscellaneous nuclear wastes. The NDA unit consists of four major subsystems: an assay chamber, counting and digital electronics, data acquisition, and a neutron generator. It performs both active and passive neutron waste measurements. The former determines the amount of fissile isotopes at a sensitivity level of 1 mg plutonium. The latter determines spontaneous fission and ..cap alpha..,n) isotopes at a comparable level. A complete assay consists of sequential active and passive measurements. The assay measurement and other supporting data are incorporated in a commercial spreadsheet program (Lotus 1,2,3) for further analysis, which includes various matrix corrections and a determination of whether or not the drum exceeds the 100-nCi/g threshold for TRU wastes. Field tests have been performed on three separate occasions, accomplishing more than 1800 waste drum assays. These waste drum assays are discussed, especially those comparing passive and active neutron measurements with independent segmented gamma scan assays. Results obtained with a set of 15 drums containing plutonium prepared from standards and actual hot waste matrices are also reviewed.

  2. Analytical characterization of the APTIMA HPV Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockter, Janel; Schroder, Astrid; Eaton, Barbara; Wang, Ann; Sikhamsay, Nathan; Morales, Liezel; Giachetti, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has improved the sensitivity for the detection of cervical pre-cancer and cancer as compared to Pap testing. Several HPV tests are commercially available and most target the DNA from 13 or 14 high-risk HPV types. The APTIMA HPV Assay however, detects HPV E6/E7 mRNA from 14 high-risk types of HPV: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68. To determine the analytical performance characteristics of the APTIMA HPV Assay. Analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, reproducibility, and the effect of potentially interfering substances was determined for the APTIMA HPV Assay on both the DTS (semi-automated) and TIGRIS DTS (fully automated) systems. The 95% detection limit for both systems was between 17 and 488 copies/reaction, depending on the HPV type. The assay did not cross-react with normal flora and opportunistic organisms that may be found in cervical samples, or low-risk HPV types. Spermicides, anti-fungal and anti-itch medications, whole blood, glacial acetic acid, and most lubricants did not interfere with assay performance. Those lubricants containing polyquaternium 15 did interfere with assay performance. Inter-instrument, inter-operator, inter-lot, and inter-run signal variability were 99% of the data. Intra-run variability was HPV Assay showed excellent performance and robustness.

  3. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Phalen, D.N.; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By us...

  4. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buch Karl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98 were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability.

  5. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for carbon cycle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujie; Zhuang, Qianlai; McGuire, David; Liu, Yaling; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations in modeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the implications of those options. We calibrated the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model on a hierarchy of three vegetation classification levels for the Alaskan boreal forest: species level, plant-functional-type level (PFT level), and biome level, and we examined the differences in simulated carbon dynamics. Species-specific field-based estimates were directly used to parameterize the model for species-level simulations, while weighted averages based on species percent cover were used to generate estimates for PFT- and biome-level model parameterization. We found that calibrated key ecosystem process parameters differed substantially among species and overlapped for species that are categorized into different PFTs. Our analysis of parameter sets suggests that the PFT-level parameterizations primarily reflected the dominant species and that functional information of some species were lost from the PFT-level parameterizations. The biome-level parameterization was primarily representative of the needleleaf PFT and lost information on broadleaf species or PFT function. Our results indicate that PFT-level simulations may be potentially representative of the performance of species-level simulations while biome-level simulations may result in biased estimates. Improved theoretical and empirical justifications for grouping species into PFTs or biomes are needed to adequately represent the dynamics of ecosystem functioning and structure.

  6. The Effect of "Pumping" and "Nonpumping" Techniques on Velocity Production and Muscle Activity During Field-Based BMX Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, Lee P; Hurst, Howard T; Roberts, Simon J; Graydon, Robert W

    2017-02-01

    Rylands, LP, Hurst, HT, Roberts, SJ, and Graydon, RW. The effect of "pumping" and "nonpumping" techniques on velocity production and muscle activity during field-based BMX cycling. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 445-450, 2017-The aim of the current study was to determine if a technique called "pumping" had a significant effect on velocity production in Bicycle Motocross (BMX) cycling. Ten National standard male BMX riders fitted with surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors completed a timed lap of an indoor BMX track using the technique of pumping, and a lap without pumping. The lap times were recorded for both trials and their surface sEMG was recorded to ascertain any variation in muscle activation of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, vastus lateralis, and medial gastrocnemius. The findings revealed no significant differences between any of muscle groups (p > 0.05). However, significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed between the pumping and nonpumping trials for both mean lap velocity (42 ± 1.8 km·h, 33 ± 2.9 km·h, respectively) and lap times (43.3 ± 3.1 seconds, 34.7 ± 1.49 seconds, respectively). The lap times recorded for the pumping trials were 19.50 ± 4.25% lower than the nonpumping, whereas velocity production was 21.81 ± 5.31% greater in the pumping trial compared with the nonpumping trial. The technique of pumping contributed significantly to velocity production, although not at the cost of additional muscle activity. From a physiological and technical perspective, coaches and riders should prioritize this technique when devising training regimes.

  7. Isolation, production, purification, assay and characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, production, purification, assay and characterization of fibrinolytic ... are isolated from Bacillus subtilis, β-haemolytic Streptococci and urine sample. ... recombinant E.coli containing short fragment genomic DNA of Pseudomonas sp.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... erythropoietin (an enzyme that regulates the production of red blood cells) in serum or urine. This assay provides diagnostic information for the evaluation of erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  9. Evaluation of Genetic Variations in Maize Seedlings Exposed to Electric Field Based on Protein and DNA Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma A. AL-Huqail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzed proteins and nuclear DNA of electric fields (ELF exposed and nonexposed maize seedlings for different exposure periods using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and comet assay, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed total of 46 polypeptides bands with different molecular weights ranging from 186.20 to 36.00 KDa. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 84.62%. Leucine-aminopeptidase, peroxidase, and catalase isozymes showed the highest values of polymorphism (100% based on zymograms number, relative front (Rf, and optical intensity while esterase isozyme generated polymorphism value of 83.33%. Amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presence of 17 amino acids of variable contents ranging from 22.65% to 28.09%. RAPD revealed that 78 amplified DNA products had highly polymorphism value (95.08% based on band numbers, with variable sizes ranging from 120 to 992 base pairs and band intensity. Comet assay recorded the highest extent of nuclear DNA damage as percentage of tailed DNA (2.38% and tail moment unit (5.36 at ELF exposure of maize nuclei for 5 days. The current study concluded that the longer ELF exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of maize cells and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of economic plants to ELF stressors.

  10. The comet assay: a heavenly method!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    The contributions to this special issue of Mutagenesis have been selected to cover the main research areas served by the comet assay, namely genotoxicology, environmental toxicology, human biomonitoring and fundamental investigations into mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. Innovative methods are described, technical issues are explored, and guidelines are given for venturing into relatively new or unexploited areas of research. The popularity of the comet assay in a historical context is illustrated by a bibliometric survey.

  11. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  12. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methan...

  13. A sensitive non-radioactive northern blot method to detect small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woo; Li, Zhihua; Moore, Patrick S; Monaghan, A Paula; Chang, Yuan; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2010-04-01

    The continuing discoveries of potentially active small RNAs at an unprecedented rate using high-throughput sequencing have raised the need for methods that can reliably detect and quantitate the expression levels of small RNAs. Currently, northern blot is the most widely used method for validating small RNAs that are identified by methods such as high-throughput sequencing. We describe a new northern blot-based protocol (LED) for small RNA (approximately 15-40 bases) detection using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide for cross-linking the RNA to the membrane. LED generates clearly visible signals for RNA amounts as low as 0.05 fmol. This method requires as little as a few seconds of membrane exposure to outperform the signal intensity using overnight exposure of isotope-based methods, corresponding to approximately 1000-fold improvement in exposure-time. In contrast to commonly used radioisotope-based methods, which require freshly prepared and hazardous probes, LED probes can be stored for at least 6 months, facilitate faster and more cost-effective experiments, and are more environmentally friendly. A detailed protocol of LED is provided in the Supplementary Data.

  14. Unit of Analysis: Impact of Silverman and Solmon's Article on Field-Based Intervention Research in Physical Education in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Chen, Yung-Ju; Xiang, Ping; Xie, Xiuge; Li, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the impact of the Silverman and Solmon article (1998) on how researchers handle the unit of analysis issue in their field-based intervention research in physical education in the United States and summarize statistical approaches that have been used to analyze the data, and (b) provide…

  15. Most Important Competencies of Cooperating Teachers during the Field-Based Experience: Perceptions of Participants in Two Preschool Teacher Preparation Programs in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ibtesam Abdul-Qadir Yassin

    2013-01-01

    Cooperating teachers (CTs) are considered one of the most important groups who play a role in the success of student teachers (STs) during their field-based experience (FBE). The literature in the Arabic world about how CTs should fulfill their role has been limited with most of what is available has been conducted in the United States and other…

  16. Field-based high-throughput plant phenotyping reveals the temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci associated with stress-responsive traits in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    To dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits under relevant growing conditions, we employed a field-based, high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) system that deployed four sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsut...

  17. One Foot on the Dock and One Foot on the Boat: Differences among Preservice Science Teachers' Interpretations of Field-Based Science Methods in Culturally Diverse Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerrick, Randy K.; Hoving, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    Investigates preservice science teachers' beliefs about science teaching and learning through reflections on teaching lower track science students. Studies preservice teachers enrolled in a field-based secondary science methods course working with rural Black children. Discusses implications for teacher education and research. (Author/KHR)

  18. Evaluation of red blood cell Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats using chlorambucil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akihisa; Takahashi, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Hiromi; Oshida, Keiyu

    2016-11-15

    The Pig-a assay is a novel method to assess the in vivo mutagenicity of compounds, and it is expected to be useful for the detection of genotoxicity. In this study, to assess the performance of the Pig-a assay targeting red blood cells (RBCs; RBC Pig-a assay) and reticulocytes (RETs; PIGRET assay), chlorambucil, which is a genotoxicant, was orally administered to male rats once at 10, 20 and 40mg/kg on Day 1, and the mutant frequencies (MFs) of RBCs and RETs were examined periodically. In the RBC Pig-a assay, significant increases in MFs were observed at 40mg/kg on Day 15 and at 20mg/kg or higher on Day 29. In the PIGRET assay, MFs increased significantly at all dose levels on Day 8 and only at 20mg/kg on Day 15, but there was no increase in MFs in the treatment groups on Day 29. In conclusion, the RBC Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats have sufficient sensitivity to detect the mutagenicity of chlorambucil, and the PIGRET assay could detect its mutagenicity earlier and at a lower dose than the RBC Pig-a assay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Communicating Science: The Role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Field-Based Epidemic Intelligence Service Officers, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Fátima; Chen, Guan M; Smith, C Kay; Glynn, M Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    A highly skilled public health workforce is needed for responding to health threats, and that workforce must be able to communicate its scientific findings effectively. We evaluated the scientific communication effectiveness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) field-based Epidemic Intelligence Service officers (EISOs). A descriptive analysis of all scientific information products produced and submitted for institutional clearance by CDC's field-based EISOs during 2009-2014. The number of abstracts, journal manuscripts, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWRs), and other information products approved by CDC during 2009-2014; the number of those products published; and of those published, the number cited in the scientific literature. During 2009-2014, a total of 152 field-based EISOs produced 835 scientific information products, including 437 abstracts, 261 manuscripts, and 103 MMWRs. The majority of scientific information products submitted for clearance were abstracts (52.3%), and infectious diseases (75.3%) constituted the majority of topics. Among the 103 MMWRs and 261 manuscripts cleared, 88 (85%) and 199 (76%) were published, respectively, with the majority also infectious disease-related. The 199 published manuscripts were cited in the scientific literature 2415 times, and the 88 published MMWRs were cited 1249 times. Field-based EISOs published their work in 74 different peer-reviewed medical and public health journals, with 54% published in journals with impact factors of 1 to 5. Field-based EISOs' publications are a measurable marker that reflects proficiency in epidemiology, written communication, and professionalism, and those publications are a direct reflection of EISOs' contribution to local and state health departments. Our study establishes a baseline for future evaluations of publication outcome of scientific information products by EISOs. Information released by EISOs provides health professionals with the scientific

  20. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Richard Collins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardising the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature and voltage gradient are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e. cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay, or photosensitiser plus light to oxidise guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites. Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period - for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial - to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation.

  1. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  2. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  3. Random assay in radioimmunoassay: Feasibility and application compared with batch assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hwan Hee; Park, Sohyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineNational Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The batch assay has been conventionally used for radioimmunoassay (RIA) because of its technical robustness and practical convenience. However, it has limitations in terms of the relative lag of report time due to the necessity of multiple assays in a small number of samples compared with the random assay technique. In this study, we aimed to verify whether the random assay technique can be applied in RIA and is feasible in daily practice. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of eight standard curves within a single kit were calculated in a CA-125 immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the reference of the practically ideal CV of the CA-125 kit. Ten standard curves of 10 kits from 2 prospectively collected lots (pLot) and 85 standard curves of 85 kits from 3 retrospectively collected lots (Lot) were obtained. Additionally, the raw measurement data of both 170 control references and 1123 patients' sera were collected retrospectively between December 2015 and January 2016. A standard curve of the first kit of each lot was used as a master standard curve for a random assay. The CVs of inter-kits were analyzed in each lot, respectively. All raw measurements were normalized by decay and radioactivity. The CA-125 values from control samples and patients' sera were compared using the original batch assay and random assay. In standard curve analysis, the CVs of inter-kits in pLots and Lots were comparable to those within a single kit. The CVs from the random assay with normalization were similar to those from the batch assay in the control samples (CVs % of low/high concentration; Lot1 2.71/1.91, Lot2 2.35/1.83, Lot3 2.83/2.08 vs. Lot1 2.05/1.21, Lot2 1.66/1.48, Lot3 2.41/2.14). The ICCs between the batch assay and random assay using patients' sera were satisfactory (Lot1 1.00, Lot2 0.999, Lot3 1.00). The random assay technique could be successfully applied to the conventional CA-125 IRMA kits. The random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay. The

  4. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John A; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Abbatiello, Susan E; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri R; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Fenyö, David; Hiltke, Tara; Ketchum, Karen A.; Kinsinger, Chris; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel C.; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J; Qian, Wei-Jun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly V; Scott, Mitchell G; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani; Townsend, R. Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories. PMID:26867747

  5. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  6. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  7. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  8. Development of a multiplex PCR-ligase detection reaction assay for diagnosis of infection by the four parasite species causing malaria in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David T; Thomson, Jodi M; Kasehagen, Laurin J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2004-06-01

    The diagnosis of infections caused by Plasmodium species is critical for understanding the nature of malarial disease, treatment efficacy, malaria control, and public health. The demands of field-based epidemiological studies of malaria will require faster and more sensitive diagnostic methods as new antimalarial drugs and vaccines are explored. We have developed a multiplex PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) assay that allows the simultaneous diagnosis of infection by all four parasite species causing malaria in humans. This assay exhibits sensitivity and specificity equal to those of other PCR-based assays, identifying all four human malaria parasite species at levels of parasitemias equal to 1 parasitized erythrocyte/microl of blood. The multiplex PCR-LDR assay goes beyond other PCR-based assays by reducing technical procedures and by detecting intraindividual differences in species-specific levels of parasitemia. Application of the multiplex PCR-LDR assay will provide the sensitivity and specificity expected of PCR-based diagnostic assays and will contribute new insight regarding relationships between the human malaria parasite species and the human host in future epidemiological studies.

  9. Lessons from Astrobiological Planetary Analogue Exploration in Iceland: Biomarker Assay Performance and Downselection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, D. M.; Amador, E. S.; Cable, M. L.; Cantrell, T.; Chaudry, N.; Cullen, T.; Duca, Z.; Kirby, J.; Jacobsen, M.; McCaig, H.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of biomarker assays to the local physicochemical environment, and the underlying spatial distribution of the target biomarkers in 'homogeneous' environments, can increase mission science return. We have conducted four expeditions to Icelandic Mars analogue sites in which an increasingly refined battery of physicochemical measurements and biomarker assays were performed, staggered with scouting of further sites. Completed expeditions took place in 2012 (location scouting and field assay use testing), 2013 (sampling of two major sites with three assays and observational physicochemical measurements), 2015 (repeat sampling of prior sites and one new site, scouting of new sites, three assays and three instruments), and 2016 (preliminary sampling of new sites with analysis of returned samples). Target sites were geologically recent basaltic lava flows, and sample loci were arranged in hierarchically nested grids at 10 cm, 1 m, 10 m, 100 m, and >1 km order scales, subject to field constraints. Assays were intended to represent a diversity of potential biomarker types (cell counting via nucleic acid staining and fluorescence microscopy, ATP quantification via luciferase luminescence, and relative DNA quantification with simple domain-level primers) rather a specific mission science target, and were selected to reduce laboratory overhead, require limited consumables, and allow rapid turnaround. All analytical work was performed in situ or in a field laboratory within a day's travel of the field sites unless otherwise noted. We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing ATP quantification and qPCR analysis in a field-based laboratory with single-day turnaround. The ATP assay was generally robust and reliable and required minimal field equipment and training to produce a large amount of useful data. DNA was successfully extracted from all samples, but the serial-batch nature of qPCR significantly limited the number of primers (hence

  10. EDTA interference in electrochemiluminescence ACTH assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Burak; Yalcin, Hulya; Arı, Elif; Colak, Ayfer

    2016-11-01

    Background As plasma is the recommended sample type for Roche adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) assay, we evaluated the effect of EDTA concentration on Cobas ACTH assay. Methods Samples containing twofold and fourfold higher concentrations of EDTA were prepared by adding plasma to empty K2EDTA tubes and by making under-filled EDTA tubes. All measurements were performed with four replicates. Results Increased EDTA concentration resulted in a significant decrease in ACTH concentration. Fifty-per cent-filled EDTA tube showed 19% decrease in ACTH concentration and 25% filled EDTA tube showed 50% decrease in ACTH concentration. Conclusion We recommend that inadequately filled EDTA specimens should be rejected when using Cobas ACTH assay.

  11. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  12. Fungicide resistance assays for fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera, Viviana V

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide resistance assays are useful to determine if a fungal pathogen has developed resistance to a fungicide used to manage the disease it causes. Laboratory assays are used to determine loss of sensitivity, or resistance, to a fungicide and can explain fungicide failures and for developing successful fungicide recommendations in the field. Laboratory assays for fungicide resistance are conducted by measuring reductions in growth or spore germination of fungi in the presence of fungicide, or by molecular procedures. This chapter describes two techniques for measuring fungicide resistance, using the sugarbeet leaf spot fungus Cercospora beticola as a model for the protocol. Two procedures are described for fungicides from two different classes; growth reduction for triazole (sterol demethylation inhibitor; DMI) fungicides, and inhibition of spore germination for quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides.

  13. Detection of Eperythrozoon wenyoni by PCR assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Yutao ZHU; Jianhua QIN; Fumei ZHANG; Yuelan ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a detection method for Eperythrozoon wenyoni infection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay technique. A pair of primers was designed and synthesized according to the conservative sequence 16S rRNA. The PCR assay was performed with the primers. A 985-bp fragment was amplified by using PCR. The amplified fragments with the expected size were identified by EcoR I restriction digestion. The crossing-reaction, specific-reaction and duplicate-reaction indicated that the PCR method is a specific, sensitive, fast and effective method for diagnosing E. Wenyoni infection at group level.

  14. Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal - Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides instructions for configuring and uploading data files to the CPTAC Assay Portal. It is divided into sections, with an overview checklist provided at the end. If help is needed at any stage of the process, please use the support page: https://assays.cancer.gov/support/

  15. Wireless mobile field-based GIS science and technology for crisis management process: A case study of a fire event, Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.H. EL-Gamily

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless GIS services have been evolving from scientific and technological perspectives through the last two decades. These services include both the location-based services (LBS and the mobile field-based GIS. Whereas the former provides the user with the capability to access and query the already established enterprise geo-database, the latter enables the end user not only to access and query but also to update the geo-database by a near real-time spatial and non-spatial data. However, to establish a mobile field-based GIS facility, a concise system architecture should be designed. This architecture includes client-side components, wireless communication facility, and server components. The integration and automation of these components can provide the capability to collect, update, validate, and query the enterprise geo-database remotely in a near real-time mode. One of the potential fields of applications for the mobile field-based GIS is the crisis management process. A prescribed system has been previously defined as emergency response cycle for managing both the natural and the man-made crises. Three phases of the emergency response cycle are outlined which are the response and rescue phase, the recovery and reconstruction phase, and mitigation and preparedness phase. In each phase, various tasks are undertaken based on the type of the event. Selective tasks of the response and the rescue phase of the fire event occurred in the Sheraton Exchange Center have been chosen to check the validity of using the mobile field-based GIS for enhancing the performance of these tasks. These tasks are path selection and quick damage estimates.

  16. Drugs and brain death: drug assay perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R G

    1996-08-01

    The ability to make any meaningful interpretation of a drug assay result is very dependent upon a knowledge of the limitations of the method(s) used (sensitivity, specificity etc.), and the concentration that may be measured in plasma and its relationship to CNS effects. We need more information about 'critical' concentrations for each drug and sedation in the setting of the brain-injured patient before meaningful interpretation can be applied to such data. While the above discussion is critical of screen-type assays, the alternative specific assays are not easily provided for, as obviously the resourcing of laboratories to be able to deliver such specialized services for a range of therapeutic drugs, in addition to 'social' drugs or other toxins (e.g. glues, pesticides, solvents, environmental substances etc), becomes an increasingly complex issue in the current economic climate. Hence, the analytical laboratory can offer valuable support to the clinical team however, the interpretation of such results must be assessed in the light of many limitations of such assay methods and not seen as the 'gold standard' for assessment of brain function.

  17. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors.

  18. Endoproteolytic activity assay in malting barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Gómez Guerrero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of barley proteins into peptides and amino acids is one of the most important processes during barley germination.The degradation of the endosperm stored proteins facilitates water and enzyme movements, enhances modification, liberates starch granules and increases soluble amino nitrogen. Protease activity is the result of the activities of a mixture of exo- and endo-proteases. The barley proteins are initially solubilized by endo-proteases and the further by exo-proteases. Four classes of endo-proteases have been described: serine-proteases, cysteine-proteases, aspartic-proteases and metallo-proteases. The objective of this work was to develop a rapid and colorimetric enzymatic assay to determine the endo-proteolytic activity of the four endo-protease classes using two different substrates: azo-gelatin and azo-casein. Optimum conditions for the assays such as: pH,reaction time and temperature and absorbance scale were determined. Azo-gelatin presented several difficulties in standardizing an “in solution” assay. On the other hand, azo-casein allowed standardization of the assay for the four enzyme classes to produce consistent results. The endo-proteoteolytic method developed was applied to determine the endo-protease activity in barley, malt and wort.

  19. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...

  20. In vitro solubility assays in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Edward H; Di, Li; Carter, Guy T

    2008-11-01

    The solubility of a compound depends on its structure and solution conditions. Structure determines the lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, molecular volume, crystal energy and ionizability, which determine solubility. Solution conditions are affected by pH, co-solvents, additives, ionic strength, time and temperature. Many drug discovery experiments are conducted under "kinetic" solubility conditions. In drug discovery, solubility has a major impact on bioassays, formulation for in vivo dosing, and intestinal absorption. A good goal for the solubility of drug discovery compounds is >60 ug/mL. Equilibrium solubility assays can be conducted in moderate throughput, by incubating excess solid with buffer and agitating for several days, prior to filtration and HPLC quantitation. Kinetic solubility assays are performed in high throughput with shorter incubation times and high throughput analyses using plate readers. The most frequently used of these are the nephelometric assay and direct UV assay, which begin by adding a small volume of DMSO stock solution of each test compound to buffer. In nephelometry, this solution is serially diluted across a microtitre plate and undissolved particles are detected via light scattering. In direct UV, undissolved particles are separated by filtration, after which the dissolved material is quantitated using UV absorption. Equilibrium solubility is useful for preformulation. Kinetic solubility is useful for rapid compound assessment, guiding optimization via structure modification, and diagnosing bioassays. It is often useful to customize solubility experiments using conditions that answer specific research questions of drug discovery teams, such as compound selection and vehicle development for pharmacology and PK studies.

  1. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  2. Production and assay of forskolin antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, L.T.; Ho, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Forskolin (Fo), a cardiovascular active diterpene of plant origin, has been widely used as a research tool in regulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase (AC). A linear relationship of Fo binding to plasma membrane with activation of AC has been reported. The present abstract describes the production and assay of Fo antibodies (AB). 7-0-Hemisuccinyl-7-deacetyl Fo, coupled to either human serum albumin or goat IgG, was injected into goats to elicit AB to Fo haptan. AB to Fo in antiserum or an isolated IgG fraction was tested by two assay methods, a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-Fo as a tracer and a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horse radish peroxidase-rabbit anti goat IgG as indicator. The titers for Fo antiserum were 4000-10,000. In the defined assay condition, approximately 20-25% of the added /sup 3/H-Fo was found to bind to AB. The bound radioactivity was displaced by Fo-HSA or Fo-goat IgG or free unlabelled Fo ranging from 0.5-50 pmol/tube, or 5-500 nM. The IC/sub 50/ was approximately 8-10 pmol/tube or 80-100 nM. The binding of HRP-rabbit anti goat IgG in the ELISA was inhibited by proper Fo conjugate. The development of methods for production and assay for Fo AB may be useful in the study of mechanism of activation of AC by Fo and Fo-like compound.

  3. Evaluating the effect of human activity patterns on air pollution exposure using an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Beelen, Rob M. J.; de Bakker, Merijn P.; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Constructing spatio-temporal numerical models to support risk assessment, such as assessing the exposure of humans to air pollution, often requires the integration of field-based and agent-based modelling approaches. Continuous environmental variables such as air pollution are best represented using the field-based approach which considers phenomena as continuous fields having attribute values at all locations. When calculating human exposure to such pollutants it is, however, preferable to consider the population as a set of individuals each with a particular activity pattern. This would allow to account for the spatio-temporal variation in a pollutant along the space-time paths travelled by individuals, determined, for example, by home and work locations, road network, and travel times. Modelling this activity pattern requires an agent-based or individual based modelling approach. In general, field- and agent-based models are constructed with the help of separate software tools, while both approaches should play together in an interacting way and preferably should be combined into one modelling framework, which would allow for efficient and effective implementation of models by domain specialists. To overcome this lack in integrated modelling frameworks, we aim at the development of concepts and software for an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework. Concepts merging field- and agent-based modelling were implemented by extending PCRaster (http://www.pcraster.eu), a field-based modelling library implemented in C++, with components for 1) representation of discrete, mobile, agents, 2) spatial networks and algorithms by integrating the NetworkX library (http://networkx.github.io), allowing therefore to calculate e.g. shortest routes or total transport costs between locations, and 3) functions for field-network interactions, allowing to assign field-based attribute values to networks (i.e. as edge weights), such as aggregated or averaged

  4. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  5. Lump corrections for radioactive waste assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T J

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that automated radioactive waste assay techniques, such as segmented gamma scanner (SGS) and automated qualitative and quantitative (AQ2), have severely underestimated fissile material due to either the malfunction or absence of appropriate lump correction routines. This paper examines the application of manual techniques, such as Monte Carlo N particle (MCNP) and spectral non-destructive assay platform (SNAP) software, to lump corrections in plutonium (Pu), enriched uranium (EU) and depleted uranium (DU) waste streams. Excellent results have been obtained when comparing MCNP with SNAP and applying the SNAP lump correction routine to a range of simulated and typical wastes containing various Pu and EU lump sizes. It has been concluded that the need for lump corrections was relatively rare and usually apparent from abnormal gamma ray peak area ratios, since most AWE waste streams are only lightly shielded.

  6. Transient expression assays in tobacco protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bossche, Robin; Demedts, Brecht; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Goossens, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The sequence information generated through genome and transcriptome analysis from plant tissues has reached unprecedented sizes. Sequence homology-based annotations may provide hints for the possible function and roles of particular plant genes, but the functional annotation remains nonexistent or incomplete for many of them. To discover gene functions, transient expression assays are a valuable tool because they can be done more rapidly and at a higher scale than generating stably transformed tissues. Here, we describe a transient expression assay in protoplasts derived from suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the study of the transactivation capacities of transcription factors. To enhance throughput and reproducibility, this method can be automated, allowing medium-throughput screening of interactions between large compendia of potential transcription factors and gene promoters.

  7. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  8. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  9. Comparative assay of Vipera ammodytes antivenom potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanescu, Cristian; Macovei Oprescu, Anca Monica; Supeanu, Alexandru; Coculescu, Bogdan Ioan; Strambu, Victor; Macovei, Radu Alexandru; Manole, Gheorghe

    2016-12-01

    The finding of the most appropriate way to assess precisely the antivenom efficacy represents one of the major issues for antivenom standardization and success increasing of antivenom therapy. The efficacy of experimental Vipera ammodytes antivenom raised in sheep was determined using in vivo mouse lethality test, respectively, L-aminoacid oxidase, total proteinase and phospholipase A2 antienzymatic effectiveness. The values gained for the antivenom potency depend on the method of measure. So, some of the most toxic venom proteins own phospholipase A2 activity and provide the highest antivenom potency (lowest effective dose) values by antienzymatic assay method. This value is similar with total antiproteolytic antivenom potency value, but almost three times higher than value obtained by L-aminoacid oxidase (low toxic viper venom protein) antienzymatic assay method.

  10. Kinetic viability assays using DRAQ7 probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Akagi, Jin; Dobrucki, Jurek; Errington, Rachel; Smith, Paul J; Takeda, Kazuo; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-07-01

    Cell death within cell populations is a stochastic process where cell-to-cell variation in temporal progression through the various stages of cell death arises from asynchrony of subtle fluctuations in the signaling pathways. Most cell death assays rely on detection of the specific marker of cell demise at the end-point of cell culturing. Such an approach cannot account for the asynchrony and the stochastic nature of cell response to the death-inducing signal. There is a need therefore for rapid and high-throughput bioassays capable of continuously tracking viability of individual cells from the time of encountering a stress signal up to final stages of their demise. In this context, a new anthracycline derivative, DRAQ7, is gaining increasing interest as an easy-to-use marker capable of long-term monitoring of cell death in real-time. This novel probe neither penetrates the plasma membrane of living cells nor does it affect the cells' susceptibility to the death-inducing agents. However, when the membrane integrity is compromised, DRAQ7 enters cells undergoing demise and binds readily to nuclear DNA to report cell death. Here, we provide three sets of protocols for viability assays using DRAQ7 probe. The first protocol describes the innovative use of single-color DRAQ7 real-time assay to dynamically track cell viability. The second protocol outlines a simplified end-point DRAQ7 staining approach. The final protocol highlights the real-time and multiparametric apoptosis assay utilizing DRAQ7 dye concurrently with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), the mitochondrial trans-membrane electrochemical potential (ΔΨm) sensing probe.

  11. A new fluorescent assay for sialyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Y; Kamitani, T; Sakakibara, T

    2001-04-23

    A new fluorescent assay for the sialyltransferase reaction was established. After incubation of the sialyltransferase reaction, the sialyloligosaccharide obtained was treated by acid hydrolysis, and then the NeuAc that was released was labeled with 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenedioxibenzene. The fluorescent-labeled NeuAc could be estimated by HPLC (excitation: 373 nm; emission: 448 nm) and a Lineweaver-Burk plot could be plotted with the data from this analysis.

  12. Delivery of High-Quality Biomarker Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian N. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker measurements now support key decisions throughout the drug development process, from lead optimization to regulatory approvals. They are essential for documenting exposure-response relationships, specificity and potency toward the molecular target, untoward effects, and therapeutic applications. In a broader sense, biomarkers constitute the basis of clinical pathology and laboratory medicine. The utility of biomarkers is limited by their specificity and sensitivity toward the drug or disease process and by their overall variability. Understanding and controlling sources of variability is not only imperative for delivering high-quality assay results, but ultimately for controlling the size and expense of research studies. Variability in biomarker measurements is affected by: biological and environmental factors (e.g., gender, age, posture, diet and biorhythms, sample collection factors (e.g., preservatives, transport and storage conditions, and collection technique, and analytical factors (e.g., purity of reference material, pipetting precision, and antibody specificity. The quality standards for biomarker assays used in support of nonclinical safety studies fall under GLP (FDA regulations, whereas, those assays used to support human diagnostics and healthcare are established by CLIA (CMS regulations and accrediting organizations such as the College of American Pathologists. While most research applications of biomarkers are not regulated, biomarker laboratories in all settings are adopting similar laboratory practices in order to deliver high-quality data. Because of the escalation in demand for biomarker measurements, the highly-parallel (multi-plexed assay platforms that have fueled the rise of genomics will likely evolve into the analytical engines that drive the biomarker laboratories of tomorrow.

  13. Methods and devices for protein assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Swapnil; Cintron, Jose M.; Shediac, Renee

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  14. Immunoreagents and competitive assays to fludioxonil

    OpenAIRE

    Abad Fuentes, Antonio; Agulló, Consuelo; Esteve Turrillas, Francesc Albert; Abad Somovilla, Antonio; Mercader Badia, Josep Vicent

    2014-01-01

    Fludioxonil is a new-generation fungicide widely used for postharvest fruit protection. The aim of this study was to produce hitherto unreported immunoreagents for Fludioxonil analysis by immunoassay. Derivatives of this agrochemical were synthesized with different linker tethering sites. Those functionalized haptens were activated, and the purified active esters were efficiently conjugated to different carrier proteins for immunogen and assay antigen preparation. Antibodies to Fludioxonil we...

  15. Cell based assay for hypoglycemic drugs screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZHANG; Juan-juanHU; Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a cell based assay for hypoglyc emicdrugs. METHODS: The five cell lines, BALB/c3T3, HepG2, NIH3T3, Be17402, and L929 were incubated with insulin (0-125n mol/L) for 48 h. Their sensitivities to insulin were studied by detecting glucose consumption. The dose-response and time-response relationship between the sensitive cell line (BALB/c 3T3)

  16. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  17. Diagnostic Certified Assay: Neuromuscular and Cardiac Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Valaperta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of the specific trinucleotide sequence, [CTG], is the molecular pathological mechanism responsible for the clinical manifestations of DM1. Many studies have described different molecular genetic techniques to detect DM1, but as yet there is no data on the analytical performances of techniques used so far in this disease. We therefore developed and validated a molecular method, “Myotonic Dystrophy SB kit,” to better characterize our DM1 population. 113 patients were examined: 20 DM1-positive, 11 DM1/DM2-negative, and13 DM1-negative/DM2-positive, who had a previous molecular diagnosis, while 69 were new cases. This assay correctly identified 113/113 patients, and all were confirmed by different homemade assays. Comparative analysis revealed that the sensitivity and the specificity of the new kit were very high (>99%. Same results were obtained using several extraction procedures and different concentrations of DNA. The distribution of pathologic alleles showed a prevalence of the “classical” form, while of the 96 nonexpanded alleles 19 different allelic types were observed. Cardiac and neuromuscular parameters were used to clinically characterize our patients and support the new genetic analysis. Our findings suggest that this assay appears to be a very robust and reliable molecular test, showing high reproducibility and giving an unambiguous interpretation of results.

  18. Assessment of plaque assay methods for alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Diana; Long, Kanya C; Aguilar, Patricia; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses from the Alphavirus genus are responsible for numerous arboviral diseases impacting human health throughout the world. Confirmation of acute alphavirus infection is based on viral isolation, identification of viral RNA, or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titers between acute and convalescent samples. In convalescence, the specificity of antibodies to an alphavirus may be confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test. To identify the best method for alphavirus and neutralizing antibody recognition, the standard solid method using a cell monolayer overlay with 0.4% agarose and the semisolid method using a cell suspension overlay with 0.6% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) overlay were evaluated. Mayaro virus, Una virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) were selected to be tested by both methods. The results indicate that the solid method showed consistently greater sensitivity than the semisolid method. Also, a "semisolid-variant method" using a 0.6% CMC overlay on a cell monolayer was assayed for virus titration. This method provided the same sensitivity as the solid method for VEEV and also had greater sensitivity for WEEV titration. Modifications in plaque assay conditions affect significantly results and therefore evaluation of the performance of each new assay is needed.

  19. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  20. A single step protein assay that is both detergent and reducer compatible: The cydex blue assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabilloud, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    Determination of protein concentration is often an absolute prerequisite in preparing samples for biochemical and proteomic analyses. However, current protein assay methods are not compatible with both reducers and detergents, which are however present simultaneously in most denaturing extraction buffers used in proteomics and electrophoresis, and in particular in SDS electrophoresis. It was found that inclusion of cyclodextrins in a Coomassie blue-based assay made it compatible with detergents, as cyclodextrins complex detergents in a 1:1 molecular ratio. As this type of assay is intrinsically resistant to reducers, a single-step assay that is both detergent and reducer compatible was developed. Depending on the type and concentration of detergents present in the sample buffer, either beta-cyclodextrin or alpha-cyclodextrin can be used, the former being able to complex a wider range of detergents and the latter being able to complex higher amounts of detergents due to its greater solubility in water. Cyclodextrins are used at final concentrations of 2-10 mg/mL in the assay mix. This typically allows to measure samples containing as little as 0.1 mg/mL protein, in the presence of up to 2% detergent and reducers such as 5% mercaptoethanol or 50 mM DTT in a single step with a simple spectrophotometric assay.

  1. A novel assay detecting recall response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Comparison with existing assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; Zaunders, John J; Plit, Marshall; Leeman, Craig; Ip, Susanna; Iampornsin, Thatri; Pett, Sarah L; Bailey, Michelle; Amin, Janaki; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2012-07-01

    A strategy to reduce the burden of active TB is isoniazid preventive therapy for latent TB infection (LTBI). However, current assays used to diagnose LTBI all have limitations. In these proof of concept studies, we compared the agreement of a novel flow cytometry assay detecting CD25/CD134 co-expression with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN-GIT) and Tuberculin skin test (TST) in the detection of recall immune response to TB. The CD25/CD134 assay, QFN-GIT and TST were performed on 74 participants referred for TB screening in Sydney and on 50 participants with advanced HIV infection (CD4 ≤ 350 × 10(6) cells/L) in Bangkok. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and QFN-GIT was 93.2% (Kappa 0.631 95% CI 0.336-0.926) in Sydney and 90% (Kappa 0.747 95% CI 0.541-0.954) in Bangkok. Discordant results occurred around the cut off of both tests. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and TST was 73.6% (Kappa 0.206 95% CI 0.004-0.409) in Sydney and 84% (Kappa 0.551 95% CI 0.296-0.806) in Bangkok. The CD25/CD134 assay showed good agreement with QFN-GIT in detecting recall response to TB both in well and less resourced setting as well as in persons with advanced HIV infection. Further study into the performance of this assay is thus warranted.

  2. Bacterial assay of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D E; Hosmer, M; Georgescu, M; Farris, R L

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the quantity of bacteria on the contact lens and adjacent areas of the eye. This paper is a quantitative study of the contact lens and ocular aerobic microbiota in a mixed group of daily and extended wear disposable contact lens users. The contact lens, the lower fornix, tears collecting at the lower fornix, and edge of the lower lid at the Meibomian gland margin were assayed for the quantity of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). Eighteen patients wearing 49 disposable high water content hydrogel contact lenses were assayed and the mean lens age was 8.8 +/- 4.6 days. Three patients wore their lenses on a daily wear basis and 15 on an extended wear schedule. Tear samples were obtained with sterile microbial loops and the lens was macerated into small particles with a tissue grinder. The samples were poured onto the surface of chocolate agar plates and incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h in 5% Co2. The lid margin revealed the greatest bacterial presence (mean = 9.7 CFU; median = 2 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The lens showed the next greatest presence of CFU (mean = 4.5 CFU; median = 1 CFU; mode = 0). The fornix and tears revealed the least bacterial presence (fornix: mean = 2.6 CFU; median = 0 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The bacterial assay of disposable lens wearing contact lens subjects indicates that the lid margins are the greatest source of bacteria with the tears being the lowest. These studies support the concept that in the eye, the lens typically does not possess a large number of bacteria under normal conditions.

  3. Nondestructive boxed transuranic (TRU) waste assay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, John T.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Lucero, Randy F.

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of boxed waste assay systems (primarily those developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) is presented. The characteristics and design process involved with current generation systems--as practiced by BII--are also discussed in some detail. Finally, a specific boxed waste assay system and acceptance test results are presented. This system was developed by BII and installed at the Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility in Hanford, Washington in early 1997. The WRAP system combines imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) techniques with gamma- ray energy analysis (GEA) to assay crates up to 2.5 m X 2.5 m X 6.5 m in size. (Systems that incorporate both these methodologies are usually denoted IPAN/GEA types.) Two separate gamma-ray measurements are accomplished utilizing 16 arrayed NaI detectors and a moveable HPGe detector, while 3He detectors acquire both active and passive neutron data. These neutron measurements use BII's proprietary imaging methodology. Acceptance testing of the system was conducted at Hanford in January 1998. The system's operating performance was evaluated based on accuracy and sensitivity requirements for three different matrix types. Test results indicate an average 13% active mode accuracy for 10 nCi/g loadings of Pu waste and 5% passive mode accuracy for 10 g loadings of Pu waste. Sensitivity testing demonstrated an active mode lower limit of detection of less than 5 nCi/g of 239Pu for the medium matrix and less than 20 pCi/g of fission and activation products at 3(sigma) above background.

  4. Antibacterial effect of protamine assayed by impedimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Gill, T.; Gram, Lone

    1995-01-01

    Impedimetric measurements were used to assay the antibacterial effect of protamine. A good linear correlation between the impedance detection time and the initial cell counts was obtained (r = 0 . 99, n = 2). As basic peptides may cause clumping of cells, this correlation curve was used when esti...... A suspended in buffer was not lethal as was the effect on growing cells; however, protamine (50-500 mu g ml(-1)) killed the Gram-negative fish spoilage bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens when the live cells were suspended in buffer....

  5. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-07

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  6. Purification and kinase assay of PKN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hideyuki; Ono, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    PKN is a serine/threonine protein kinase, which has a catalytic domain highly homologous to that of protein kinase C (PKC) in the carboxyl-terminal region and three repeats of the antiparallel coiled coil (ACC) domain in the amino-terminal region. Mammalian PKN has three isoforms each derived from different genes, PKN1 (PKNalpha/PRK1/PAK1), PKN2 (PRK2/PAK2/PKNgamma), and PKN3 (PKNbeta). PKN isoforms show different enzymatic properties and tissue distributions and have been implicated in various distinct cellular processes (reviewed in Mukai [2003]). This chapter discusses methods to prepare purified enzymes and to assay substrate phosphorylation activities.

  7. Bicarbonate alters cellular responses in respiration assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James R; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Muoio, Deborah M; James, David E

    2017-08-05

    Metabolic assay buffers often omit bicarbonate, which is susceptible to alkalinisation in an open environment. Here, we assessed the effect of including bicarbonate in respirometry experiments. By supplementing HEPES-buffered media with low concentrations of bicarbonate, we found increased respiration in adipocytes and hepatocytes, but not myotubes. This was observed across multiple respirometry platforms and was independent of effects on enhanced insulin sensitivity, pH drift, or mitochondrial function. Permeabilised cell experiments suggest that bicarbonate increases substrate availability, likely by acting as a cofactor for carboxylase enzymes. This emphasises the importance of buffer choice in experimental biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mass-based readout for agglutination assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunara, Rumi; Godin, Michel; Knudsen, Scott M.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a mass-based readout for agglutination assays. The suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) is used to classify monomers and dimers that are formed during early stage aggregation, and to relate the total count to the analyte concentration. Using a model system of streptavidin functionalized microspheres and biotinylated antibody as the analyte, we obtain a dose-response curve over a concentration range of 0.63-630nM and show that the results are comparable to what has been previously achieved by image analysis and conventional flow cytometry.

  9. [Human angiogenin: expression, purification, biological assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Zhang, Y Q; Yan, Z; Han, W; Yao, L B; Su, C Z

    2001-01-01

    Angiogenin cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR, and cloned into the fusion expression vector pRSETB. The recombinant Angiogenin protein was fused with His6 at its N-terminal and expressed as inclusion body. The expression level was about 10% of the total bacteria protein. After dissolved in 8 mol/L urea, the recombinant protein was purified by Ni2(+)-NTA chelating resin, according to the high affinity of His6 with Ni2+. The biological assay indicated that purified rhANG could induced the new blood vessel formation of CAM and degraded tRNA in vitro.

  10. Standardization of cytokine flow cytometry assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Josephine

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine flow cytometry (CFC or intracellular cytokine staining (ICS can quantitate antigen-specific T cell responses in settings such as experimental vaccination. Standardization of ICS among laboratories performing vaccine studies would provide a common platform by which to compare the immunogenicity of different vaccine candidates across multiple international organizations conducting clinical trials. As such, a study was carried out among several laboratories involved in HIV clinical trials, to define the inter-lab precision of ICS using various sample types, and using a common protocol for each experiment (see additional files online. Results Three sample types (activated, fixed, and frozen whole blood; fresh whole blood; and cryopreserved PBMC were shipped to various sites, where ICS assays using cytomegalovirus (CMV pp65 peptide mix or control antigens were performed in parallel in 96-well plates. For one experiment, antigens and antibody cocktails were lyophilised into 96-well plates to simplify and standardize the assay setup. Results (CD4+cytokine+ cells and CD8+cytokine+ cells were determined by each site. Raw data were also sent to a central site for batch analysis with a dynamic gating template. Mean inter-laboratory coefficient of variation (C.V. ranged from 17–44% depending upon the sample type and analysis method. Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC yielded lower inter-lab C.V.'s than whole blood. Centralized analysis (using a dynamic gating template reduced the inter-lab C.V. by 5–20%, depending upon the experiment. The inter-lab C.V. was lowest (18–24% for samples with a mean of >0.5% IFNγ + T cells, and highest (57–82% for samples with a mean of Conclusion ICS assays can be performed by multiple laboratories using a common protocol with good inter-laboratory precision, which improves as the frequency of responding cells increases. Cryopreserved PBMC may yield slightly more

  11. A field-based method to derive macroinvertebrate benchmark for specific conductivity adapted for small data sets and demonstrated in the Hun-Tai River Basin, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Jia, Xiaobo; Xia, Rui; Lin, Jianing; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Ionic mixtures, measured as specific conductivity, have been increasingly concerned because of their toxicities to aquatic organisms. However, identifying protective values of specific conductivity for aquatic organisms is challenging given that laboratory test systems cannot examine more salt-intolerant species nor effects occurring in streams. Large data sets used for deriving field-based benchmarks are rarely available. In this study, a field-based method for small data sets was used to derive specific conductivity benchmark, which is expected to prevent the extirpation of 95% of local taxa from circum-neutral to alkaline waters dominated by a mixture of SO4(2-) and HCO3(-) anions and other dissolved ions. To compensate for the smaller sample size, species level analyses were combined with genus level analyses. The benchmark is based on extirpation concentration (XC95) values of specific conductivity for 60 macroinvertebrate genera estimated from 296 sampling sites in the Hun-Tai River Basin. We derived the specific conductivity benchmark by using a 2-point interpolation method, which yielded the benchmark of 249 μS/cm. Our study tailored the method that was developed by USEPA to derive aquatic life benchmark for specific conductivity for basin scale application, and may provide useful information for water pollution control and management.

  12. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D; Huffnagle, Ian M; Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  13. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  14. Response definition criteria for ELISPOT assays revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, Z; Price, L; Gouttefangeas, C; Mander, A; Janetzki, S; Löwer, M; Welters, M J P; Ottensmeier, C; van der Burg, S H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2010-10-01

    No consensus has been reached on how to determine if an immune response has been detected based on raw data from an ELISPOT assay. The goal of this paper is to enable investigators to understand and readily implement currently available methods for response determination. We describe empirical and statistical approaches, identifying the strengths and limitations of each approach to allow readers to rationally select and apply a scientifically sound method appropriate to their specific laboratory setting. Five representative approaches were applied to data sets from the CIMT Immunoguiding Program and the response detection and false positive rates were compared. Simulation studies were also performed to compare empirical and statistical approaches. Based on these, we recommend the use of a non-parametric statistical test. Further, we recommend that six medium control wells or four wells each for both medium control and experimental conditions be performed to increase the sensitivity in detecting a response, that replicates with large variation in spot counts be filtered out, and that positive responses arising from experimental spot counts below the estimated limit of detection be interpreted with caution. Moreover, a web-based user interface was developed to allow easy access to the recommended statistical methods. This interface allows the user to upload data from an ELISPOT assay and obtain an output file of the binary responses.

  15. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  16. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  17. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  18. Characterization of substrate preference for Slc1p and Cst26p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using lipidomic approaches and an LPAAT activity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghou Shui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphatidic acid (PA is a key regulated intermediate and precursor for de novo biosynthesis of all glycerophospholipids. PA can be synthesized through the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA by 1-acyl-3-phosphate acyltransferase (also called lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, LPAAT. Recent findings have substantiated the essential roles of acyltransferases in various biological functions. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a flow-injection-based lipidomic approach with approximately 200 multiple reaction monitoring (MRM transitions to pre-screen fatty acyl composition of phospholipids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants. Dramatic changes were observed in fatty acyl composition in some yeast mutants including Slc1p, a well-characterized LPAAT, and Cst26p, a recently characterized phosphatidylinositol stearoyl incorporating 1 protein and putative LPAAT in S. cerevisiae. A comprehensive high-performance liquid chromatography-based multi-stage MRM approach (more than 500 MRM transitions was developed and further applied to quantify individual phospholipids in both strains to confirm these changes. Our data suggest potential fatty acyl substrates as well as fatty acyls that compensate for defects in both Cst26p and Slc1p mutants. These results were consistent with those from a non-radioactive LPAAT enzymatic assay using C17-LPA and acyl-CoA donors as substrates. CONCLUSIONS: We found that Slc1p utilized fatty acid (FA 18:1 and FA 14:0 as substrates to synthesize corresponding PAs; moreover, it was probably the only acyltransferase responsible for acylation of saturated short-chain fatty acyls (12:0 and 10:0 in S. cerevisiae. We also identified FA 18:0, FA 16:0, FA 14:0 and exogenous FA 17:0 as preferred substrates for Cst26p because transformation with a GFP-tagged CST26 restored the phospholipid profile of a CST26 mutant. Our current findings expand the enzymes and existing scope of acyl-CoA donors for

  19. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  20. Assay Method for 235U in Low-Density Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>235U assay method will provide a semi-quantitative assay for any uranium lumps that might exist in low-density, low-Z material waste boxes within a short count time. These materials will consist of

  1. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  2. Assay optimization: a statistical design of experiments approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altekar, Maneesha; Homon, Carol A; Kashem, Mohammed A; Mason, Steven W; Nelson, Richard M; Patnaude, Lori A; Yingling, Jeffrey; Taylor, Paul B

    2007-03-01

    With the transition from manual to robotic HTS in the last several years, assay optimization has become a significant bottleneck. Recent advances in robotic liquid handling have made it feasible to reduce assay optimization timelines with the application of statistically designed experiments. When implemented, they can efficiently optimize assays by rapidly identifying significant factors, complex interactions, and nonlinear responses. This article focuses on the use of statistically designed experiments in assay optimization.

  3. Performance Characteristics of Xpert Flu/RSV XC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B

    2015-08-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay was compared to laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) (n = 207) and the Xpert Flu assay (n = 147) using archived nasopharyngeal swabs. The percentages of positive agreements with LDTs were 97.8% for influenza A, 97.2% for influenza B, and 89.3% for RSV. The sensitivity of influenza detection was improved with the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay compared to the Xpert Flu assay.

  4. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  5. Systems, devices, and methods for agglutination assays using sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-26

    Embodiments of the present invention include methods for conducting agglutination assays using sedimentation. Aggregates may be exposed to sedimentation forces and travel through a density medium to a detection area. Microfluidic devices, such as microfluidic disks, are described for conducting the agglutination assays, as are systems for conducting the assays.

  6. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from either...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to measure the glycosylated hemoglobins (A1a, A1b, and A1c) in a patient's blood by a column...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7400 Hemoglobin A2 assay. (a) Identification. A hemoglobin A2 assay is a device used to determine the hemoglobin A2...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  11. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866... Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. (a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay... malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium...

  12. 40 CFR 79.64 - In vivo micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... micronucleus assay. (a) Purpose. The micronucleus assay is an in vivo cytogenetic test which uses erythrocytes...) Test evaluation. (i) Positive results in the micronucleus test provide information on the ability of a..., Mammalian Bone Marrow Cytogenetics Tests: Micronucleus Assay. (2) Cihak, R. “Evaluation of Benzidine by...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  15. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  16. Assays for investigating deSUMOylation enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Chen, Yuan

    2012-07-01

    Post-translational modifications by the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) family of proteins are recently discovered essential regulatory mechanisms. All SUMO proteins are synthesized as larger precursors that are matured by SUMO-specific proteases, known as SENPs, which remove several C-terminal amino acids of SUMO to expose the Gly-Gly motif. SENPs also remove SUMO modifications from target proteins, making this modification highly dynamic. At least six deSUMOylation enzymes, all of which are encoded by essential genes, have been identified in mammals. SENP1 has been shown to play an important role in the development of prostate cancer and in angiogenesis. This unit describes and discusses methods for characterizing the deSUMOylation enzymes. These assays enable the identification of inhibitors of these enzymes and investigation of their mechanism of inhibition in order to develop research tools and future therapeutics.

  17. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jansson, Peter [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  18. Assay of Endocannabinoid Oxidation by Cyclooxygenase-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonylethanolamide (AEA) are endogenous ligands for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and are implicated in a wide array of physiological processes. These neutral arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives have been identified as efficient substrates for the second isoform of the cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2). A diverse family of prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) and prostaglandin ethanolamides (PG-EAs) is generated by the action of COX-2 (and downstream prostaglandin synthases) on 2-AG and AEA. As the biological importance of the endocannabinoid system becomes more apparent, there is a tremendous need for robust, sensitive and efficient analytical methodology for the endocannabinoids and their metabolites. In this chapter we describe methodology suitable for carrying out oxygenation of endocannabinoids by COX-2, and analysis of products of endocannabinoid oxygenation by COX-2 and of endocannabinoids themselves from in-vitro and cell assays. PMID:27245906

  19. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan [Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelchemie der Technischen, Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis. (orig.)

  20. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  1. Development of a Radioactive Waste Assay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae; Shin, Sang Woon; Sung, Kee Bang; Ko, Dae Hach [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Jeong; Park, Jong Mook; Jee, Kwang Yoong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear Act of Korea requires the manifest of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated at nuclear power plants prior to disposal sites.Individual history records of the radioactive waste should be contained the information about the activity of nuclides in the drum, total activity, weight, the type of waste. A fully automated nuclide analysis assay system, non-destructive analysis and evaluation system of the radioactive waste, was developed through this research project. For the nuclides that could not be analysis directly by MCA, the activities of the representative {gamma}-emitters(Cs-137, Co-60) contained in the drum were measured by using that system. Then scaling factors were used to calculate the activities of {alpha}, {beta}-emitters. Furthermore, this system can automatically mark the analysis results onto the drum surface. An automated drum handling system developed through this research project can reduce the radiation exposure to workers. (author). 41 refs., figs.

  2. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  3. Universal fieldable assay with unassisted visual detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelyapov, Nicolas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A universal detection system based on allosteric aptamers, signal amplification cascade, and eye-detectable phrase transition. A broadly applicable homogeneous detection system is provided. It utilizes components of the blood coagulation cascade in the presence of polystyrene microspheres (MS) as a signal amplifier. Russell's viper venom factor X activator (RVV-X) triggers the cascade, which results in an eye-visible phase transition--precipitation of MS bound to clotted fibrin. An allosteric RNA aptamer, RNA132, with affinity for RVV-X and human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.sub.165) was created. RNA132 inhibits enzymatic activity of RVV-X. The effector molecule, VEGF.sub.165, reverses the inhibitory activity of RNA132 on RVV-X and restores its enzymatic activity, thus triggering the cascade and enabling the phase transition. Similar results were obtained for another allosteric aptamer modulated by a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The assay is instrumentation-free for both processing and readout.

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MILK CASEIN ASSAY METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIłĂ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Casein, the main milk protein was determined by different assay methods: the gravimetric method, the method based on the neutralization of the NaOH excess used for the casein precipitate solving and the method based on the titration of the acetic acid used for the casein precipitation. The last method is the simplest one, with the fewer steps, and also with the lowest error degree. The results of the experiment revealed that the percentage of casein from the whole milk protein represents between 72.6–81.3% in experiment 1, between 73.6–81.3% in experiment 2 and between 74.3–81% in experiment 3.

  5. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...... limit was 3 nmol/l. Within run and between-run precision was 7.4% and 13.5% for control 10 nmol/l and 1.2% and 3.2% for control 50 nmol/l. Recovery was 85-115% of MTX added to haemolysed erythrocytes. We found the method useful for pharmacokinetic studies of MTX in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients...

  6. Advancement in biochemical assays in andrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; RaftHenkel

    1999-01-01

    Determination of maikers of sperm function, accessory sex gland secretion and silent male genital tract inflammation is of considerable diagnostic value in the evaluation of male infertility. The introduction of biochemical tests into the analysis of male factor has the advantage that standardized assays with a coefficient of variafion characteristic of clinical chemistry are performed, in contrast to biological test systems with a large variability .Biochemical parameters may be used in clinical practice to evaluate the sperm fertitizing capacity (acrosin, aniline blue,ROS), to characterize male accessory sex gland secretinns (fructose, a-glucosidase, PSA), and to identify men with silent genital tract inflammation (elastase, C'3 complement component, coeruloplasmin, IgA, IgG, ROS). (As/an J Androl 1999 Jun; 1: 45-51)

  7. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  8. Improved internal control for molecular diagnosis assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayagamoorthy, T; Maryanski, Danielle; Vinayagamoorthy, Dilanthi; Hay, Katie S L; Yo, Jacob; Carter, Mark; Wiegel, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The two principal determining steps in molecular diagnosis are the amplification and the identification steps. Accuracy of DNA amplification is primarily determined by the annealing sequence of the PCR primer to the analyte DNA. Accuracy for identification is determined either by the annealing region of a labelled probe for the real time PCR analysis, or the annealing of a sequencing primer for DNA sequencing analysis, that binds to the respective analyte (amplicon). Presently, housekeeping genes (Beta globin, GAPDH) are used in molecular diagnosis to verify that the PCR conditions are optimum, and are thus known as amplification controls [1-4]. Although these genes have been useful as amplification controls, they lack the true definition of an internal control because the primers and annealing conditions are not identical to the analyte being assayed. This may result in a false negative report [5]. The IC-Code platform technology described here provides a true internal control where the internal control and analyte share identical PCR primers annealing sequences for the amplification step and identical sequencing primer annealing sequence for the identification step. •The analyte and internal control have the same PCR and sequencing annealing sequences.•This method assures for little or no false negatives and false positives due to the method's design of using identical annealing conditions for the internal control and analyte, and by using DNA sequencing analysis for the identification step of the analyte, respectively.•This method also allows for a set lower limit of detection to be used by varying the amount of internal control used in the assay.

  9. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  10. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  11. Dark-field-based observation of single-nanoparticle dynamics on a supported lipid bilayer for in situ analysis of interacting molecules and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kwang; Kim, Sungi; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2015-01-12

    Observation of single plasmonic nanoparticles in reconstituted biological systems allows us to obtain snapshots of dynamic processes between molecules and nanoparticles with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution and single-molecule/single-particle-level data acquisition. This Concept is intended to introduce nanoparticle-tethered supported lipid bilayer platforms that allow for the dynamic confinement of nanoparticles on a two-dimensional fluidic surface. The dark-field-based long-term, stable, real-time observation of freely diffusing plasmonic nanoparticles on a lipid bilayer enables one to extract a broad range of information about interparticle and molecular interactions throughout the entire reaction period. Herein, we highlight important developments in this context to provide ideas on how molecular interactions can be interpreted by monitoring dynamic behaviors and optical signals of laterally mobile nanoparticles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Performance of MycAssay Aspergillus DNA real-time PCR assay compared with the galactomannan detection assay for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis from serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylo, Alexis; Courtemanche, Chantal; Pelletier, René; Boudreault, Alexandre A

    2014-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a major problem in the immunocompromised population, and its diagnosis is difficult due to the low sensitivity of available tests. Detection of Aspergillus nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples is a promising diagnostic tool; however, use of multiple "in-house" methods precludes standardization. The first commercial PCR assay, MycAssay Aspergillus (Myconostica, Ltd), became available recently, and its performance in the diagnosis of IA was evaluated and compared with the galactomannan (GM) assay. Serum samples obtained from patients with hematological cancer were tested retrospectively with MycAssay Aspergillus PCR. Per-episode and per-test analyses were undertaken with 146 sera from 35 hematological patients. Sixteen patients had proven or probable IA and 19 had possible or no IA. In per-episode analysis, MycAssay Aspergillus had a sensitivity of 43.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.8%-70.1%) and a specificity of 63.2% (95% CI, 38.4%-83.7%) for IA diagnosis. In per-test analyses, MycAssay Aspergillus had a lower specificity than the GM assay (83.3% vs. 93.1%, P = 0.04). The addition of PCR to routine clinical practice would have permitted the diagnosis of one additional probable IA in our cohort. Use of PCR instead of GM assay would have delayed the diagnosis in two cases. Aspergillus DNA detection by PCR with serum specimens using MycAssay showed a lower specificity than the GM assay and was associated with a low sensitivity for IA diagnosis. More studies are needed to determine the exact role of MycAssay in IA diagnosis in patients with hematological malignancy.

  13. Field-Based High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping Reveals the Temporal Patterns of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Stress-Responsive Traits in Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Duke; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Gazave, Elodie; French, Andrew N; Heun, John; Hunsaker, Douglas J; Lipka, Alexander E; Setter, Tim L; Strand, Robert J; Thorp, Kelly R; Wang, Sam; White, Jeffrey W; Gore, Michael A

    2016-04-07

    The application of high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) to continuously study plant populations under relevant growing conditions creates the possibility to more efficiently dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits. Toward this end, we employed a field-based HTPP system that deployed sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) recombinant inbred line mapping population. The evaluation trials were conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in a replicated field experiment at a hot, arid location in central Arizona, with trait measurements taken at different times on multiple days across 2010-2012. Canopy temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), height, and leaf area index (LAI) displayed moderate-to-high broad-sense heritabilities, as well as varied interactions among genotypes with water regime and time of day. Distinct temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL) expression were mostly observed for canopy temperature and NDVI, and varied across plant developmental stages. In addition, the strength of correlation between HTPP canopy traits and agronomic traits, such as lint yield, displayed a time-dependent relationship. We also found that the genomic position of some QTL controlling HTPP canopy traits were shared with those of QTL identified for agronomic and physiological traits. This work demonstrates the novel use of a field-based HTPP system to study the genetic basis of stress-adaptive traits in cotton, and these results have the potential to facilitate the development of stress-resilient cotton cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Pauli et al.

  14. Field-Based High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping Reveals the Temporal Patterns of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Stress-Responsive Traits in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Pauli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP to continuously study plant populations under relevant growing conditions creates the possibility to more efficiently dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits. Toward this end, we employed a field-based HTPP system that deployed sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. recombinant inbred line mapping population. The evaluation trials were conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in a replicated field experiment at a hot, arid location in central Arizona, with trait measurements taken at different times on multiple days across 2010–2012. Canopy temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, height, and leaf area index (LAI displayed moderate-to-high broad-sense heritabilities, as well as varied interactions among genotypes with water regime and time of day. Distinct temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL expression were mostly observed for canopy temperature and NDVI, and varied across plant developmental stages. In addition, the strength of correlation between HTPP canopy traits and agronomic traits, such as lint yield, displayed a time-dependent relationship. We also found that the genomic position of some QTL controlling HTPP canopy traits were shared with those of QTL identified for agronomic and physiological traits. This work demonstrates the novel use of a field-based HTPP system to study the genetic basis of stress-adaptive traits in cotton, and these results have the potential to facilitate the development of stress-resilient cotton cultivars.

  15. Technical note: comparison of the PrestoBlue and LDH release assays with the MTT assay for skin viability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Sonia; Jarraya, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    MTT assay is the gold standard for assessing skin sample viability but it is time-consuming. Here we compared the MTT test with two other assays for the assessment of skin viability. The MTT, PrestoBlue (colorimetric method) and LDH release assays were applied to fresh and cryopreserved skin. Skin viability was considered proportional to the optical density values of the relevant analytes. PrestoBlue did not reliably distinguish between fresh and cryopreserved skin. The LDH release assay did not allow us to establish a viability index. We recommend the MTT assay for assessing skin viability.

  16. Field based plastic contamination sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States has a long-held reputation of being a dependable source of high quality, contaminant-free cotton. Recently, increased incidence of plastic contamination from sources such as shopping bags, vegetable mulch, surface irrigation tubing, and module covers has threatened the reputation o...

  17. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results.

  18. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  19. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  20. Comparison of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Kimberle C; Dickenson, Roberta A; Wu, Fongman; Andrea, Sarah B

    2011-07-01

    Performance characteristics of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin were compared using fresh stool samples from patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Assays were performed simultaneously and according to the manufacturers' instructions. Patients were included in the study if they exhibited clinical symptoms consistent with CDI. Nonmolecular assays included glutamate dehydrogenase antigen tests, with positive findings followed by the Premier Toxin A and B Enzyme Immunoassay (GDH/EIA), and the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test. Molecular assays (PCR) included the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, and the ProGastro Cd assay. Specimens were considered true positive if results were positive in two or more assays. For each method, the Youden index was calculated and cost-effectiveness was analyzed. Of 81 patients evaluated, 26 (32.1%) were positive for CDI. Sensitivity of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, the ProGastro Cd assay, C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test, and two-step GDH/EIA was 96.2%, 96.2%, 88.5%, 61.5%, and 42.3%, respectively. Specificity of the Xpert C. difficile test was 96.4%, and for the other four assays was 100%. Compared with nonmolecular methods, molecular methods detected 34.7% more positive specimens. Assessment of performance characteristics and cost-effectiveness demonstrated that the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay yielded the best results. While costly, the Xpert C. difficile test required limited processing and yielded rapid results. Because of discordant results, specimen processing, and extraction equipment requirements, the ProGastro Cd assay was the least favored molecular assay. The GDH/EIA method lacked sufficient sensitivity to be recommended. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  2. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  3. Prandiology of Drosophila and the CAFE assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja, William W.; Carvalho, Gil B.; Mak, Elizabeth M.; de la Rosa, Noelle N.; Fang, Annie Y.; Liong, Jonathan C.; Brummel, Ted; Benzer, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Studies of feeding behavior in genetically tractable invertebrate model systems have been limited by the lack of proper methodology. We introduce the Capillary Feeder (CAFE), a method allowing precise, real-time measurement of ingestion by individual or grouped fruit flies on the scale of minutes to days. Using this technique, we conducted the first quantitative analysis of prandial behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results allow the dissection of feeding into discrete bouts of ingestion, defining two separate parameters, meal volume and frequency, that can be uncoupled and thus are likely to be independently regulated. In addition, our long-term measurements show that flies can ingest as much as 1.7× their body mass over 24 h. Besides the study of appetite, the CAFE can be used to monitor oral drug delivery. As an illustration, we used the CAFE to test the effects of dietary supplementation with two compounds, paraquat and ethanol, on food ingestion and preference. Paraquat, a prooxidant widely used in stress tests, had a strong anorexigenic effect. In contrast, in a feeding preference assay, ethanol-laced food, but not ethanol by itself, acted as an attractant. PMID:17494737

  4. Assaying Visual Memory in the Desert Locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senne Dillen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of associative learning cues has been demonstrated in several stages of feeding and food selection. Short neuropeptide F (sNPF, an insect neuropeptide whose effects on feeding behavior have previously been well established, may be one of the factors bridging feeding and learning behavior. Recently, it was shown in Drosophila melanogaster that the targeted reduction of Drome-sNPF transcript levels significantly reduced sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. While Drosophila mainly relies on olfactory perception in its food searching behavior, locust foraging behavior is likely to be more visually orientated. Furthermore, a feeding-dependent regulation of Schgr-sNPF transcript levels has previously been observed in the optic lobes of the locust brain, suggesting a possible involvement in visual perception of food and visual associative memory in this insect species. In this study, we describe the development of a robust and reproducible assay allowing visual associative memory to be studied in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Furthermore, we performed an exploratory series of experiments, studying the role of Schgr-sNPF in this complex process.

  5. Liquid chromatographic assay for dicloxacillin in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Oscar; González-Esquivel, Dinora F; Del Rivero, L Misael; Castro Torres, Nelly

    2004-06-15

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of dicloxacillin in plasma has been developed. The method only requires 0.5 ml of plasma, phosphate buffer solution (pH = 4.7), acidification with 0.5N hydrochloride acid and liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Posterior evaporation of organic under nitrogen steam and redissolution in mobile phase is carried out. The analysis was performed on a Spherisorb C18 (5 microm) column, using methanol -0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH = 4.7 (75:25; v/v) as mobile phase, with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. Results showed that the assay is sensitive: 0.5 microg/ml. The response is linear in the range of 0.5 - 10 microg/ml. Maximum inter-day coefficient of variation was 12.4%. Mean extraction recovery obtained was 96.95%. Stability studies showed that the loss was not higher than 10%, samples are stable at room temperature for 6 h, at -20 Celsius for 2 months, processed samples were stable at least for 24 h and also after two freeze-thaw cycles. The method has been used to perform pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in humans.

  6. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of L-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415 nm under excitation at 360 nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100 nM to 6 μМ with a limit of detection of 34 nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples.

  7. PARALLEL ASSAY OF OXYGEN EQUILIBRIA OF HEMOGLOBIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Laura E.; Blinebry, Sara K.; Viscardi, Chelsea M.; Perez, Luis; Bonaventura, Joe; McMahon, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    Methods to systematically analyze in parallel the function of multiple protein or cell samples in vivo or ex vivo (i.e. functional proteomics) in a controlled gaseous environment have thus far been limited. Here we describe an apparatus and procedure that enables, for the first time, parallel assay of oxygen equilibria in multiple samples. Using this apparatus, numerous simultaneous oxygen equilibrium curves (OECs) can be obtained under truly identical conditions from blood cell samples or purified hemoglobins (Hbs). We suggest that the ability to obtain these parallel datasets under identical conditions can be of immense value, both to biomedical researchers and clinicians who wish to monitor blood health, and to physiologists studying non-human organisms and the effects of climate change on these organisms. Parallel monitoring techniques are essential in order to better understand the functions of critical cellular proteins. The procedure can be applied to human studies, wherein an OEC can be analyzed in light of an individual’s entire genome. Here, we analyzed intraerythrocytic Hb, a protein that operates at the organism’s environmental interface and then comes into close contact with virtually all of the organism’s cells. The apparatus is theoretically scalable, and establishes a functional proteomic screen that can be correlated with genomic information on the same individuals. This new method is expected to accelerate our general understanding of protein function, an increasingly challenging objective as advances in proteomic and genomic throughput outpace the ability to study proteins’ functional properties. PMID:23827235

  8. Microrheological Coagulation Assay Exploiting Micromechanical Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Francesco; Duffy, James; Hegner, Martin

    2017-01-03

    Rheological measurements in biological liquids yield insights into homeostasis and provide information on important molecular processes that affect fluidity. We present a fully automated cantilever-based method for highly precise and sensitive measurements of microliter sample volumes of human blood plasma coagulation (0.009 cP for viscosity range 0.5-3 cP and 0.0012 g/cm(3) for density range 0.9-1.1 g/cm(3)). Microcantilever arrays are driven by a piezoelectric element, and resonance frequencies and quality factors of sensors that change over time are evaluated. A highly accurate approximation of the hydrodynamic function is introduced that correlates resonance frequency and quality factor of cantilever beams immersed in a fluid to the viscosity and density of that fluid. The theoretical model was validated using glycerol reference solutions. We present a surface functionalization protocol that allows minimization of unspecific protein adsorption onto cantilevers. Adsorption leads to measurement distortions and incorrect estimation of the fluid parameters (viscosity and density). Two hydrophilic terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) sensor surfaces are compared to a hydrophobic terminated SAM coating. As expected, the hydrophobic modified surfaces induced the highest mass adsorption and could promote conformational changes of the proteins and subsequent abnormal biological activity. Finally, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assay was performed, and the viscosity, density, and coagulation rate of human blood plasma were measured along with the standard coagulation time. The method could extend and improve current coagulation testing.

  9. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  10. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  11. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H. (Department of Microbiology, Alexander Stone Building, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland)

    1982-03-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 ..mu..Ci (37 K Bq) of (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation.

  12. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  13. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  14. An assay for ribonuclease activity, based on ultraviolet absorption of RNA hydrolysate, using phosphotungstic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, K; Uchiyama, S

    1986-06-01

    In the method for the determination of ribonuclease activity that depends on the ultraviolet absorption of the RNA hydrolysate, the uranium reagent (25% perchloric acid solution containing 0.75% uranyl acetate) is commonly used for the efficient precipitation of the unhydrolyzed RNA. However, this reagent is always contaminated by the presence of radioactive isotopes. Radioactive uranium is one of the substances used for atomic nuclear fuel and therefore, at least in Japan, the use of uranium compounds requires permission from the government. We tried to find another efficient and non-radioactive precipitant of RNA to replace the uranium reagent, and have developed a phosphotungsten reagent (25% perchloric acid solution containing 0.75% phosphotungstic acid plus 0.6% bovine serum albumin solution) which functions as efficiently as the uranium reagent in the precipitation of RNA. A cell-free crude extract of Dictyostelium discoideum was used as the source of ribonuclease.

  15. A comprehensive company database analysis of biological assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christian; Dahl, Göran; Tyrchan, Christian; Ulander, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of data from various compounds measured in diverse biological assays is a central part of drug discovery research projects. However, no systematic overview of the variability in biological assays has been published and judgments on assay quality and robustness of data are often based on personal belief and experience within the drug discovery community. To address this we performed a reproducibility analysis of all biological assays at AstraZeneca between 2005 and 2014. We found an average experimental uncertainty of less than a twofold difference and no technologies or assay types had higher variability than others. This work suggests that robust data can be obtained from the most commonly applied biological assays.

  16. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  17. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  18. Establishment of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Neonatal Thyrotropin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and specific ELISA for neonatal thyrotropin(Neonatal TSH) is established with using twoanti-TSH monoclonal antibody. One of them is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is conjugate ofbiotin. The label is horseradish peroxidase(HRP) conjugate of streptavidin. TMB-H2O2 solution is used asthe substrate of HRP.The sensitivity of the assay is 0.5 mIU/L, the intra-assay CVs and the intre-assay

  19. Validation of Laboratory-Developed Molecular Assays for Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Molecular technology has changed the way that clinical laboratories diagnose and manage many infectious diseases. Excellent sensitivity, specificity, and speed have made molecular assays an attractive alternative to culture or enzyme immunoassay methods. Many molecular assays are commercially available and FDA approved. Others, especially those that test for less common analytes, are often laboratory developed. Laboratories also often modify FDA-approved assays to include different e...

  20. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  1. The Spheroplast Lysis Assay for Yeast in Microtiter Plate Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Rafael; Spencer, Moyah; Thiwanont, Monthiwa; Lipke, Peter N.

    1999-01-01

    A yeast lysis assay in the microtiter plate format improved precision and throughput and led to an improved algorithm for estimating lag time. The assay reproducibly revealed differences of 10% or greater in the maximal lysis rate and 50% or greater in the lag time. Clonal differences were determined to be the major source of variation. Microtiter-based assays should be useful for screening for drug susceptibility and for analyzing mutant phenotypes. PMID:10427014

  2. BROMATOMATRIC ASSAY OF GATIFLOXACIN IN PHARMACEUTICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KALSANG THARPA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Three new, simple, and cost-effective visible spectrophotometric methods are proposed for determination of gatifloxacin (GTF using bromate-bromide mixture, and three dyes, methyl orange, indigocarmine and thymol blue, as reagents.The methods engross the addition of a known excess of bromate-bromide mixture to GTF in hydrochloric acid medium followed by determination of residual bromine by reacting with a fixed amount of either methyl orange andmeasuring the absorbance at 520 nm (method A or indigo carmine and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm (method B or thymol blue and measuring the absorbance at 550 nm (method C. In all the methods, the amount of brominereacted corresponds to the amount of GTF, and the absorbance is found to increase linearly with the concentration of GTF. Under the optimum conditions, GTF could be assayed in the concentration range 0.25-1.5, 0.5-6.0, and 0.5-10μg/mL by method A, method B and method C, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivities are calculated to be 1.6x105, 4.0x104 and 3.2x104 L mol-1 cm-1 for the method A, method B and method C, respectively, and the corresponding Sandell sensitivity values are 0.0025, 0.010 and 0.012 μg/cm2. The intra-day and inter-day precision, and the accuracy of the methods were evaluated as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of GTF in pharmaceutical preparations without the interference from any of the pharmaceutical adjuvants.

  3. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  4. Comparative investigation of various cellulase assay procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canevascini, G.; Gattlen, C.

    1981-07-01

    The cellulolytic activity of crude enzyme preparations from different cellulolytic fungi (namely Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma koningii, Fusarium solani, Sporotrichum pulverulentum, Sporotrichum thermophile) was assayed comparatively with several common analytical procedures described in the literature. The investigation was carried out with the objective of evaluating, with raw culture filtrates, the different cellulase tests in relation to their specificity for endo- and exo-cellulase action as well as to allow comparisons to be made between results from different research groups using different methods. 1) Cellulase activity was tested viscometrically as well as chemically (determination of reducing end groups) with different carboxymethylcelluloses as substrates. Essentially constant ratios between both kinds of activities were obtained, indicating that they are directly related. By estimating cellulase activity with insoluble cellulosic substrates no direct relationship could be established with the above-described activities except in the case where the cellulose was amorphous. The ratio profile between activities thus obtained and endo-cellulase activities determined viscometrically shows that some enzyme preparations (such as those from both Trichoderma sp.) are clearly more active than others against crystalline cellulose reflecting quantitative differences in enzyme composition. Nevertheless, for a biological understanding of cellulolysis, analytical procedures using crystalline celluloses are not adequate for specifically monitoring exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions for essentially two reasons: a) they are not sufficiently sensitive to detect small changes in enzyme activity during the early phase of growth, and b) exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions also depends on the endo-cellulase activity present. (Refs. 39).

  5. Robust versatile tyrosine kinase assay for HTS in drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudhir S.; Mineyev, I.; Owicki, John C.

    1999-04-01

    A fluorescence polarization assay was developed as an alternative to the radiolabeled SPA assays currently used to monitor the activity of tyrosine kinases in drug discovery. The assay can be used with enzymes having substrate specificity similar to that of the insulin receptor, the EGF receptor and the Src kinase receptor enzymes. The assay is easy to configure in 96, 384 and 1536-well microplates in assay volumes ranging from (mu) L with minimal efforts. The reconstituted reagents are stable for up to 24 hr at ambient temperatures, thereby minimizing the need for replenishing the stock solutions during the course of a high-throughput screen. Because of the stability and equilibrium kinetics, the assay allows the user the luxury of scheduling the reading of plates any time up to 24 hr after the completion of the assay without substantial deterioration in the assay signal. The antibody and the tracer solutions can also be premixed and added as a preformed complex in a single step. The performance of the assay with the insulin receptor kinase is described. In addition, given the diversity of the substrates used in measuring the activity of different tyrosine kinases, LJL's on-going efforts to provide different antibodies of wide ranging specificity and sensitivity are described.

  6. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation...

  7. A Multi-detection Assay for Malaria Transmitting Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoosook; Weakley, Allison M.; Nieman, Catelyn C.; Malvick, Julia; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The Anopheles gambiae species complex includes the major malaria transmitting mosquitoes in Africa. Because these species are of such medical importance, several traits are typically characterized using molecular assays to aid in epidemiological studies. These traits include species identification, insecticide resistance, parasite infection status, and host preference. Since populations of the Anopheles gambiae complex are morphologically indistinguishable, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is traditionally used to identify species. Once the species is known, several downstream assays are routinely performed to elucidate further characteristics. For instance, mutations known as KDR in a para gene confer resistance against DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. Additionally, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Plasmodium parasite DNA detection PCR assays are used to detect parasites present in mosquito tissues. Lastly, a combination of PCR and restriction enzyme digests can be used to elucidate host preference (e.g., human vs. animal blood) by screening the mosquito bloodmeal for host-specific DNA. We have developed a multi-detection assay (MDA) that combines all of the aforementioned assays into a single multiplex reaction genotyping 33SNPs for 96 or 384 samples at a time. Because the MDA includes multiple markers for species, Plasmodium detection, and host blood identification, the likelihood of generating false positives or negatives is greatly reduced from previous assays that include only one marker per trait. This robust and simple assay can detect these key mosquito traits cost-effectively and in a fraction of the time of existing assays. PMID:25867057

  8. Modeling error in experimental assays using the bootstrap principle: understanding discrepancies between assays using different dispensing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sonya M.; Ekins, Sean; Chodera, John D.

    2015-12-01

    All experimental assay data contains error, but the magnitude, type, and primary origin of this error is often not obvious. Here, we describe a simple set of assay modeling techniques based on the bootstrap principle that allow sources of error and bias to be simulated and propagated into assay results. We demonstrate how deceptively simple operations—such as the creation of a dilution series with a robotic liquid handler—can significantly amplify imprecision and even contribute substantially to bias. To illustrate these techniques, we review an example of how the choice of dispensing technology can impact assay measurements, and show how large contributions to discrepancies between assays can be easily understood and potentially corrected for. These simple modeling techniques—illustrated with an accompanying IPython notebook—can allow modelers to understand the expected error and bias in experimental datasets, and even help experimentalists design assays to more effectively reach accuracy and imprecision goals.

  9. Modeling error in experimental assays using the bootstrap principle: understanding discrepancies between assays using different dispensing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sonya M; Ekins, Sean; Chodera, John D

    2015-12-01

    All experimental assay data contains error, but the magnitude, type, and primary origin of this error is often not obvious. Here, we describe a simple set of assay modeling techniques based on the bootstrap principle that allow sources of error and bias to be simulated and propagated into assay results. We demonstrate how deceptively simple operations--such as the creation of a dilution series with a robotic liquid handler--can significantly amplify imprecision and even contribute substantially to bias. To illustrate these techniques, we review an example of how the choice of dispensing technology can impact assay measurements, and show how large contributions to discrepancies between assays can be easily understood and potentially corrected for. These simple modeling techniques--illustrated with an accompanying IPython notebook--can allow modelers to understand the expected error and bias in experimental datasets, and even help experimentalists design assays to more effectively reach accuracy and imprecision goals.

  10. The chemical hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids within charge equilibration formalisms. Toward force field-based simulations of redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müser, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    This work finds that different charge equilibration methods lead to qualitatively different responses of molecules and solids to an excess charge. The investigated approaches are the regular charge equilibration (QE), the atom-atom-charge transfer (AACT), and the split-charge equilibration (SQE) method. In QE, the hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids approaches zero at large particle numbers, affirming the claim that QE induces metallic behavior. AACT suffers from producing negative values of the hardness; moreover valence and conduction bands of solids cross. In contrast to these methods, SQE can reproduce the generic behavior of dielectric molecules or solids. Moreover, first quantitative results for the NaCl molecule are promising. The results derived in this work may have beneficial implications for the modeling of redox reactions. They reveal that by introducing formal oxidation states into force field-based simulations it will become possible to simulate redox reactions including non-equilibrium contact electrification, voltage-driven charging of galvanic cells, and the formation of zwitterionic molecules.

  11. GIS- and field based mapping of geomorphological changes in a glacier retreat area: A case study from the Kromer valley, Silvretta Alps (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, Markus; Pöppl, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Global warming results in an ongoing retreat of Alpine glaciers, leaving behind large amounts of easily erodible sediments. As a consequence processes like rockfalls, landslides and debris flows as well as fluvial processes occur more frequently in pro- and paraglacial areas, often involving catastrophic consequences for humans and infrastructure in the affected valleys. The main objective of the presented work was to map and spatially quantify glacier retreat and geomorphological changes in the Kromer valley, Silvretta Alps (Austria) by applying GIS- and field-based geomorphological mapping. In total six geomorphological maps (1950s, 1970s, 2001, 2006, 2012, and 2016) were produced and analyzed in the light of the study aim. First results have shown a significant decrease of total glaciated area from 96 ha to 53 ha which was accompanied by increased proglacial geomorphic activity (i.e. fluvial processes, rockfalls, debris flows, shallow landslides) in the last 15 years. More detailed results will be presented at the EGU General Assembly 2017.

  12. Detection of antibodies to egg drop syndrome virus in chicken serum using a field-based immunofiltration (flow-through) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Thiagarajan, V; Nachimuthu, K

    2007-09-01

    A simple, user-friendly, and rapid method to detect the presence of antibodies to egg drop syndrome 76 (EDS) virus in chicken sera based on an immunofiltration (flow-through) test was developed. Purified EDS virus antigen was coated onto nitrocellulose membranes housed in a plastic module with layers of absorbent filter pads underneath. Following addition of serum to be tested and washing, monoclonal antibodies or polyclonal serum to chicken immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a bridge antibody to mediate binding between EDS virus-specific IgG and protein A gold conjugate. The appearance of a pink dot indicated the presence of antibodies to EDS virus in the sample tested. The results could be obtained within 5-10 min. The developed immunofiltration test could detect antibodies in the sera of experimentally vaccinated chickens from 2 wk postvaccination. With field sera samples, this test was positive in samples having hemagglutination inhibition titers of 8 and above. This test has the potential to be used as a field-based kit to assess seroconversion in EDS-vaccinated flocks.

  13. COMPARISON OF EIGENMODE-BASED AND RANDOM FIELD-BASED IMPERFECTION MODELING FOR THE STOCHASTIC BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF I-SECTION BEAM–COLUMNS

    KAUST Repository

    STAVREV, A.

    2013-03-01

    The uncertainty of geometric imperfections in a series of nominally equal I-beams leads to a variability of corresponding buckling loads. Its analysis requires a stochastic imperfection model, which can be derived either by the simple variation of the critical eigenmode with a scalar random variable, or with the help of the more advanced theory of random fields. The present paper first provides a concise review of the two different modeling approaches, covering theoretical background, assumptions and calibration, and illustrates their integration into commercial finite element software to conduct stochastic buckling analyses with the Monte-Carlo method. The stochastic buckling behavior of an example beam is then simulated with both stochastic models, calibrated from corresponding imperfection measurements. The simulation results show that for different load cases, the response statistics of the buckling load obtained with the eigenmode-based and the random field-based models agree very well. A comparison of our simulation results with corresponding Eurocode 3 limit loads indicates that the design standard is very conservative for compression dominated load cases. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  14. Strongyloides stercoralis: a field-based survey of mothers and their preschool children using ELISA, Baermann and Koga plate methods reveals low endemicity in western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothard, J R; Pleasant, J; Oguttu, D; Adriko, M; Galimaka, R; Ruggiana, A; Kazibwe, F; Kabatereine, N B

    2008-09-01

    To ascertain the current status of strongyloidiasis in mothers and their preschool children, a field-based survey was conducted in western Uganda using a combination of diagnostic methods: ELISA, Baermann concentration and Koga agar plate. The prevalence of other soil-transmitted helminthiasis and intestinal schistosomiasis were also determined. In total, 158 mothers and 143 children were examined from five villages within Kabale, Hoima and Masindi districts. In mothers and children, the general prevalence of strongyloidiasis inferred by ELISA was approximately 4% and approximately 2%, respectively. Using the Baermann concentration method, two parasitologically proven cases were encountered in an unrelated mother and child, both of whom were sero-negative for strongyloidiasis. No infections were detected by Koga agar plate method. The general level of awareness of strongyloidiasis was very poor ( < 5%) in comparison to schistosomiasis (51%) and ascariasis (36%). Strongyloidiasis is presently at insufficient levels to justify inclusion within a community treatment programme targeting maternal and child health. Better epidemiological screening is needed, however, especially identifying infections in HIV-positive women of childbearing age. In the rural clinic setting, further use of the Baermann concentration method would appear to be the most immediate and pragmatic option for disease diagnosis.

  15. Predicting electroporation of cells in an inhomogeneous electric field based on mathematical modeling and experimental CHO-cell permeabilization to propidium iodide determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermol, Janja; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    High voltage electric pulses cause electroporation of the cell membrane. Consequently, flow of the molecules across the membrane increases. In our study we investigated possibility to predict the percentage of the electroporated cells in an inhomogeneous electric field on the basis of the experimental results obtained when cells were exposed to a homogeneous electric field. We compared and evaluated different mathematical models previously suggested by other authors for interpolation of the results (symmetric sigmoid, asymmetric sigmoid, hyperbolic tangent and Gompertz curve). We investigated the density of the cells and observed that it has the most significant effect on the electroporation of the cells while all four of the mathematical models yielded similar results. We were able to predict electroporation of cells exposed to an inhomogeneous electric field based on mathematical modeling and using mathematical formulations of electroporation probability obtained experimentally using exposure to the homogeneous field of the same density of cells. Models describing cell electroporation probability can be useful for development and presentation of treatment planning for electrochemotherapy and non-thermal irreversible electroporation.

  16. Simple field-based automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace level phthalate esters in natural waters with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Geng; Chen, Wenjin; Wang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    A small, simple, and field-based automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis was developed for trace level phthalate esters analysis in natural waters. With a single syringe pump that is coupled with a multiposition valve, the whole extraction procedure including cleaning, sampling, mixing of extractant and disperser solvents, extraction, phase separation, and analytes collection was carried out in a totally automated way with a sample throughput of 21 h(-1) . Key factors, such as type and ratio of the extractant and disperser solvent, aspiration flow rate, extraction time, and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linearity was found in the range from 0.03 to 60 μg/L. Limits of detection ranged from 0.0015 to 0.003 μg/L. Enrichment factors were in a range of 106-141. Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by testing a series of three natural water samples that were spiked with different concentration levels. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in analysis of real surface waters. The developed system is inexpensive, light (2.6 kg), simple to use, applicable in the field, with high sample throughput, and sensitive enough for trace level phthalate esters analysis in natural waters.

  17. Force field based molecular dynamics simulations in highly conducting compounds of poly(aniline). A comparison with quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniechowski, M. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, UMR5588 (CNRS-UJF), Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble I, Domaine Universitaire, B.P. 87, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres, Cedex (France); Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Djurado, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Metaux Synthetiques, CEA Grenoble, DRFMC/SI3M/SPrAM, UMR 5819 (CEA/CNRS/UJF), 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: djurado@drfmc.ceng.cea.fr; Bee, M. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, UMR5588 (CNRS-UJF), Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble I, Domaine Universitaire, B.P. 87, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres, Cedex (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horovitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Gonzalez, M.A. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horovitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horovitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Rannou, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Metaux Synthetiques, CEA Grenoble, DRFMC/SI3M/SPrAM, UMR 5819 (CEA/CNRS/UJF), 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Dufour, B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Metaux Synthetiques, CEA Grenoble, DRFMC/SI3M/SPrAM, UMR 5819 (CEA/CNRS/UJF), 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Luzny, W. [Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-10-31

    Dynamics of counter-ions in poly(aniline) doped with di-(2-butoxyethoxyethyl)ester of 4-sulfophthalic acid have been simulated using force field based molecular dynamics involving a semi-empirical charge equilibration procedure and charge rescaling based on DFT calculations. Due to particular relaxational and structural characteristics of such 'plastdoped' poly(anilines), these simulations have proved to be a very effective tool for reproducing the main structural and dynamic features of the material. The experiment/simulation comparison for dynamics is very good in the 10{sup -10}-10{sup -13} s time range. In particular, mean square displacements extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations for atoms in the counter-ions are in good agreement with the analytical model used to analyse the quasi-elastic neutron scattering data. The use of a larger simulation box and longer simulation time give good agreement in the extended time domain and reveal a dynamical heterogeneity between the counter-ions that was not foreseen in the analytical model.

  18. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor M; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal BEM; Pas, Suzan D; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Koopmans, Marion P; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. Methods We compared seven published real-time RT–PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we constructed a synthetic universal control ribonucleic acid (uncRNA) containing all of the assays’ target regions on one RNA strand and spiked human blood or urine with known quantities of African or Asian Zika virus strains. Viral loads in 33 samples from Zika virus-infected patients were determined by using one of the new assays. Findings Oligonucleotides of the published real-time RT–PCR assays, showed up to 10 potential mismatches with the Asian lineage causing the current outbreak, compared with 0 to 4 mismatches for the new assays. The 95% lower detection limit of the seven most sensitive assays ranged from 2.1 to 12.1 uncRNA copies/reaction. Two assays had lower sensitivities of 17.0 and 1373.3 uncRNA copies/reaction and showed a similar sensitivity when using spiked samples. The mean viral loads in samples from Zika virus-infected patients were 5 × 104 RNA copies/mL of blood and 2 × 104 RNA copies/mL of urine. Conclusion We provide reagents and updated protocols for Zika virus detection suitable for the current outbreak strains. Some published assays might be unsuitable for Zika virus detection, due to the limited sensitivity and potential incompatibility with some strains. Viral concentrations in the clinical samples were close to the technical detection limit, suggesting that the use of insensitive assays will cause false-negative results. PMID:27994281

  19. ToxCast HTS Assay Development and Retrofitting: Strategies ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A presentation to EC JRC partners on new ToxCast HTS assay methods and strategies to address current limitations to HTS methods Slide presentation to EC JRC partners on new ToxCast HTS assay methods and strategies to address current limitations to HTS methods.

  20. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein-particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  1. Engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates for novel assay capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Keith V.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of HTS as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescent reporter molecules have generally been adopted as the favored signal transducer. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain methodologies, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a broader range of applications due to their sensitivity, extensive linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by development several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450's, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for drug discovery, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates. In reporter gene applications, modified luciferases have provided greatly improved expression efficiency in mammalian cells, improved responsiveness to changes of transcriptional rate, and increased the magnitude of the reporter response. Highly stabilized luciferase mutants have enabled new assays strategies for high-throughput screening based on detection of ATP and luciferin. Assays based on ATP support rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Although luciferin is found natively only in luminous beetles, coupled assays have been designed using modified forms of luciferin requiring the action of second enzyme to yield luminescence. Due to the very low inherent background and protection of the photon-emitter afforded by the enzyme, bioluminescent assays often outperform the analogous fluorescent assays for analyses performed in multiwell plates.

  2. Colorimetric micro-assay for accelerated screening of mould inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2013-01-01

    Since current standard laboratory methods are time-consuming macro-assays that rely on subjective visual ratings of mould growth, rapid and quantitative laboratory methods are needed to screen potential mould inhibitors for use in and on cellulose-based products. A colorimetric micro-assay has been developed that uses XTT tetrazolium salt to enzymatically assess...

  3. Radioimmunoprecipitation polyethylene glycol assay for circulating Entamoeba histolytica antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, S.; Mohimen, A.; Mehra, S. (Calcutta Medical Research Inst., Calcutta (India). Kothari Centre of Gastroenterology)

    1982-12-17

    An assay capable of detecting circulating Entamoeba histolytica antigens in amoebiasis is described. This assay utilised a radiolabelled affinity purified rabbit anti-E. histolytica antibody that had been depleted of antibodies that cross-react with human serum proteins, and a polyethylene glycol precipitation step.

  4. Microfluidic assay without blocking for rapid HIV screening and confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lusheng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Liying; Liu, Yong; Hao, Yanlin; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-08-01

    The essential step for HIV spreading limitation is the screening tests. However, there are multiple disadvantages in current screening assays which need further confirmation test. Herein we developed a rapid HIV assay combining screening and confirmation test by using the microfluidic network assay. Meanwhile, the assay is accelerated by bypassing the step of blocking. We call this method as microfluidic assay without blocking (MAWB). Both the limit of detection and reagent incubation time of MAWB are determined by screening of one model protein pair: ovalbumin and its antibody. The assay time is accelerated about 25% while the limit of detection (LOD) is well kept. Formatting the method in for both HIV screening (testing 8 HIV-related samples) and confirmation (assaying 6 kinds of HIV antibodies of each sample) within 30 min was successful. Fast HIV screening and confirmation of 20 plasma samples were also demonstrated by this method. MAWB improved the assay speed while keeping the LOD of conventional ELISA. Meanwhile, both the accuracy and throughput of MAWB were well improved, which made it an excellent candidate for a quick HIV test for both screening and confirmation. Methods like this one will find wide applications in clinical diagnosis and biochemical analysis based on the interactions between pairs of molecules.

  5. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  6. A Simple Endpoint Assay for Starch-Degrading Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroen, William K.

    1998-01-01

    Since many of the important energy-transferring pathways involve synthesis or degradation of biological macromolecules, observations of the enzymes responsible for starch breakdown provide a useful case study. Provides a short, one-step assay for the enzymes amylase and amyloglucosidase. Topics covered include goals, preparation, assay procedure,…

  7. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hemoglobin present. The assay may be used to detect fetal red cells in the maternal circulation or to detect... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal...

  8. Exposure-based validation list for developmental toxicity screening assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daston, George P.; Beyer, Bruce K.; Carney, Edward W.; Chapin, Robert E.; Friedman, Jan M.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Rogers, John M.; Scialli, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Validation of alternative assays requires comparison of the responses to toxicants in the alternative assay with in vivo responses. Chemicals have been classified as "positive" or "negative" in vivo, despite the fact that developmental toxicity is conditional on magnitude of exposure. We developed a

  9. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  10. Bioluminescence-Sensing Assay for Microbial Growth Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ramadan Eed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional methods for microbial viability quantification require cultivation and are laborious. There is consequently a widespread need for cultivation-free methods. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay is considered an extremely effective biosensor; hence ATP is the energy currency of all living microbes and can be used as a rapid indicator of microbial viability. We developed an ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay to detect microbial viability. A bioluminescent recombinant E. coli strain was used with luciferase extracted from transformed bacteria. Results showed that there is a direct correlation between the bioluminescence intensity of the ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay and the microbial viability. Bacterial counts from food samples were detected using the developed sensing assay and validated by the traditional plate-counting method. Compared with the plate-counting method, ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay is a more rapid and efficient approach for detecting microbial viability.

  11. Comparison of immunoturbidimetric and immunonephelometric assays for specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Bahera; Armbruster, David; Serediak, Ernie; Ottenbreit, Tammy

    2009-10-01

    Immunoturbidimetric assays for specific proteins are available on "open system" clinical chemistry analyzers. The analytical performance of nine immunoturbidimetric specific protein assays (C3, C4, CRP, Haptoglobin, IgA, IgG, IgM, RF, and Transferrin) was compared to immunonephelometry. Testing was performed on the Abbott ARCHITECT ci8200 and the Dade Behring BNII nephelometer and evaluated for precision, linearity, limit of detection, prozone phenomenon, method comparison, workflow, and proficiency testing survey comparison. Immunoturbidimetric assays performance was satisfactory for total precision, linearity, limit of detection and the prozone effect was not observed. Method comparison was acceptable for the immunoglobulins, CRP and transferrin but less favorable for the other assays, likely due to methodology and antibody specificity differences. Immunourbidimetric specific protein assays allow for efficient test consolidation on a general purpose clinical chemistry analyzer.

  12. Development and Validation of a HPV-32 Specific PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Janet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus-32 (HPV-32 has traditionally been associated with focal-epithelial-hyperplasia (FEH. It is also present in 58% of oral warts of HIV-positive individuals whose prevalence is increasing. Current methods for the detection of HPV-32 are labor-intensive and insensitive so the goal of this work was to develop a highly sensitive and easy to use specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Materials and methods An HPV-32 L1 specific PCR assay was developed and optimized. The sensitivity and specificity was compared to previous assays utilized for detection (PGMY and MY09/11 PCR with dot blot hybridization using cloned HPV-32 L1, the closely related HPV-42 L1 as well as clinical samples (oral swabs and fluids from 89 HIV-positive subjects. Results The HPV-32 specific PCR assay showed improved sensitivity to 5 copies of HPV-32 as compared to the PGMY PCR, MY09/11 PCR and dot blot which had a limit of detection of approximately 3,000 copies. Using the HPV-32 dot blot hybridization assay as the gold standard, the HPV-32 specific PCR assay has a sensitivity of 95.8% and 88.9% by sample and subject, respectively, and specificity was 87.8% and 58.8% by sample and subject, respectively. The low sensitivity is due to the HPV-32 specific PCR assays ability to detect more HPV-32 positive samples and may be the new gold standard. Conclusion Due to the ease, sensitivity, and specificity the HPV-32 specific PCR assay is superior to previous assays and is ideal for detection of HPV-32 in large cohorts. This assay provides an excellent tool to study the natural history of HPV-32 infection and the development of oral warts.

  13. The effects of repeated-sprint training on field-based fitness measures: a meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan; Macpherson, Tom; Spears, Iain; Weston, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Repeated-sprint training appears to be an efficient and practical means for the simultaneous development of different components of fitness relevant to team sports. Our objective was to systematically review the literature and meta-analyse the effect of repeated-sprint training on a selection of field-based measures of athletic performance, i.e. counter-movement jump, 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, 30 m sprint, repeated-sprint ability and high-intensity intermittent running performance. The SPORTDiscus, PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched for original research articles. Search terms included 'repeated-sprint training', 'sprint training', 'aerobic endurance', 'repeated-sprint ability', 'counter-movement jump' and 'sprint performance'. Inclusion criteria included intervention consisting of a series of ≤10 s sprints with ≤60 s recovery; trained participants; intervention duration of 2-12 weeks; field-based fitness measures; running- or cycling-based intervention; published up to, and including, February 2014. Our final dataset included six trials for counter-movement jump (two controlled trials), eight trials for 10 m sprint, four trials for 20 m sprint (three controlled trials), two trials for 30 m sprint, eight trials for repeated-sprint ability and three trials for high-intensity intermittent running performance. Analyses were conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Uncertainty in the meta-analysed effect of repeated-sprint training was expressed as 95% confidence limits (CL), along with the probability that the true value of the effect was trivial, beneficial or harmful. Magnitude-based inferences were based on standardised thresholds for small, moderate and large changes of 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 standard deviations, respectively. Repeated-sprint training had a likely small beneficial effect in non-controlled counter-movement jump trials (effect size 0.33; 95% CL ±0.30), with a possibly moderate beneficial effect in controlled

  14. Making the Most of a Limited Opportunity: Empowering our Future Earth Science Educators by Engaging Them in Field-Based Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.; David, H.; Carlson, D.; Kunz, G.

    2004-12-01

    Geoscience courses that engage students in our K-12 learning environments represent a fundamental method to increase public awareness and understanding of Earth systems science. K-12 teachers are ultimately responsible for developing and teaching these courses. We recognize that it is our role as university instructors to ensure that our future K-12 teachers receive a high-quality and practical Earth science education; unfortunately many education majors at our institution receive no formal exposure to geoscience. Furthermore, for those students who choose to take a geoscience course, the experience is typically limited to a large introductory lecture-lab. While these courses are rich in content they neither provide opportunities for students to experience `real' Earth science nor address the skills required to teach Earth science to others. In 2002 we began to develop a field-based introductory geoscience course designed specifically for education students. Our major goal was to attract education majors and provide a field-based geoscience learning experience that was challenging, exciting, and directly applicable to their chosen career. Specific objectives of our project were to: (1) teach geoscience concepts and skills that K-12 teachers are expected to understand and teach to their students (outlined in national standards); (2) provide students with an opportunity to learn through scientific inquiry; (3) enhance student confidence in their ability to teach geoscience in the K-12 classroom. We piloted a two-week field course during summer 2004. The field excursion followed a route through Nebraska and Wyoming. Instructors focused on exposing students to the Earth systems concepts and content outlined in national education standards. The primary instructional approach was to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Students were provided many opportunities to utilize science process skills including: observation, documentation, classification, questioning

  15. Challenges and approaches to conducting and interpreting the amphibian metamorphosis assay and the fish short-term reproduction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine Kemler; Lehman, Christine Marie; Currie, Rebecca J; Marino, Troy Alan

    2014-02-01

    The amphibian metamorphosis assay (AMA) and the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) are screening assays designed to detect potential endocrine activity of a test substance. These assays are included in a battery of assays in Tier 1 of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Based on our laboratory's experience with these two assays, we have noted several challenges in the conduct and interpretation of the AMA and FSTRA, including, but not limited to, diseased/parasitized test organisms, failure to meet some guideline performance criteria, and issues selecting and maintaining test concentrations. Various approaches are described for addressing the challenges associated with both the conduct and interpretation of these assays. Historical control data for both the AMA and FSTRA are presented to further understand background occurrences of histopathological phenomena and variability associated with the measured endpoints in these assays. In the historical control database for the AMA, wet weight on day 7 was the most variable endpoint (coefficient of variation = 26%), while developmental stage on day 21 was least variable (coefficient of variation = 0.47%). In the FSTRA, vitellogenin concentrations were the most variable endpoint (coefficient of variation = 47-84%), while fertility was the least variable endpoint (coefficient of variation = 1.5%) among historical controls.

  16. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data ...

  17. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  18. Field-based stable isotope analysis of carbon dioxide by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for carbon capture and storage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin E; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A C; Jost, Hans-Jürg

    2014-12-16

    A newly developed isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a tracer experiment at the Ketzin pilot site (northern Germany) for CO2 storage. For the experiment, 500 tons of CO2 from a natural CO2 reservoir was injected in supercritical state into the reservoir. The carbon stable isotope value (δ(13)C) of injected CO2 was significantly different from background values. In order to observe the breakthrough of the isotope tracer continuously, the new instruments were connected to a stainless steel riser tube that was installed in an observation well. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10 day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 min resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within analytical precision. This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time stable isotope data directly in the field. The laser spectroscopy data revealed for the first time a prior to this experiment unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ(13)C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The short-term variances as observed in this study might have been missed during previous works that applied laboratory-based IRMS analysis. The new technique could contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long

  19. Inquiry-Driven Field-Based (IDFB) Ocean Science Classes: an Important Role in College Students' Development as Scientists, and Student Retention in the Geo-science Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, N. L.

    2004-12-01

    Experiential learning, engaging students in the process of science, can not only teach students important skills and knowledge, it can also help them become connected with the process on a personal level. This study investigates the role that Inquiry-Driven Field-Based (IDFB) experiences (primarily field classes) in ocean science have on undergraduate science students' development as ocean scientists. Both cognitive (knowledge-based) and affective (motivation and attitude) measures most important to students were used as indicators of development. Major themes will be presented to illustrate how IDFB science experiences can enhance the academic and personal development of students of science. Through their active engagement in the process of science, students gain important skills and knowledge as well as increased confidence, motivation, and ability to plan for their future (in particular their career and educational pathways). This growth is an important part of their development as scientists; the IDFB experience provides them a way to build a relationship with the world of science, and to better understand what science is, what scientists do, and their own future role as scientists. IDFB experiences have a particularly important role in affective measures of development: students develop an important personal connection to science. By doing science, students learn to be scientists and to understand science and science concepts in context. Many underrepresented students do not have the opportunity to take IDFB classes, and addressing this access issue could be an important step towards engaging more underrepresented students in the field. The nature of IDFB experiences and their impact on students makes them a potentially important mechanism for retaining students in the geo-science `pipeline'.

  20. A Location Method by Position Information Field Based on TOA%一种基于TOA测量的位置信息场定位算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张奎; 罗景青; 孟祥豪

    2014-01-01

    As the traditional location method based on TOA can’t adapt to complex radar signals,a new location method by position information field based on TOA is proposed in this paper. Firstly,the pulse pattern is self-extracted from the pulse train received by the master station,which is used by slave station to sort the emitter’s pulse data,and the TOA of the slave station’pulse data is transformed back to the master station. Then the master station constructs position information field function and obtains the emitter position estimate through grid searching method. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the algorithm.%针对传统的仅测脉冲到达时间(TOA)定位方法不能适应复杂体制雷达信号的问题,提出了一种新的基于TOA测量的位置信息场定位算法。首先由主站自提取辐射源的脉冲样本图,副站利用主站自提取的脉冲样本图匹配分选出该站接收的辐射源脉冲列,并将其对应的TOA数据传回主站,而后由主站基于各站的TOA测量构造目标位置信息场函数,通过网格搜索法实现对辐射源位置的估计。仿真结果验证了该方法的有效性。

  1. Rapid pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies using cholorotoxin-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles: a novel non-radioactive method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Jeung-Eun Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of biocompatible nanoparticles for in vivo molecular imaging and targeted therapy. Many nanoparticles have undesirable tissue distribution or unacceptably low serum half-lives. Pharmacokinetic (PK and biodistribution studies can help inform decisions determining particle size, coatings, or other features early in nanoparticle development. Unfortunately, these studies are rarely done in a timely fashion because many nanotechnology labs lack the resources and expertise to synthesize radioactive nanoparticles and evaluate them in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this problem, we developed an economical, radioactivity-free method for assessing serum half-life and tissue distribution of nanoparticles in mice. Iron oxide nanoparticles coated with chitosan and polyethylene glycol that utilize chlorotoxin as a targeting molecule have a serum half-life of 7-8 hours and the particles remain stable for extended periods of time in physiologic fluids and in vivo. Nanoparticles preferentially distribute to spleen and liver, presumably due to reticuloendothelial uptake. Other organs have very low levels of nanoparticles, which is ideal for imaging most cancers in the future. No acute toxicity was attributed to the nanoparticles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report here a simple near-infrared fluorescence based methodology to assess PK properties of nanoparticles in order to integrate pharmacokinetic data into early nanoparticle design and synthesis. The nanoparticles tested demonstrate properties that are excellent for future clinical imaging strategies and potentially suitable for targeted therapy.

  2. Development of materials for the removal of metal ions from radioactive and non-radioactive waste streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Shameem

    Nuclear wastes that were generated during cold-war era from various nuclear weapon programs are presently stored in hundreds of tanks across the United States. The composition of these wastes is rather complex containing both radionuclides and heavy metals, such as 137Cs, 90Sr, Al, Pb, Cr, and Cd. In this study, chitosan based biosorbents were prepared to adsorb some of these metal ions. Chitosan is a partially acetylated glucosamine biopolymer encountered in the cell walls of fungi. In its natural form this material is soft and has a tendency to agglomerate or form gels. Various methods were used to modify chitosan to avoid these problems. Chitosan is generally available commercially in the form of flakes. For use in an adsorption system, chitosan was made in the form of beads to reduce the pressure drop in an adsorption column. In this research, spherical beads were prepared by mixing chitosan with perlite and then by dropwise addition of the slurry mixture into a NaOH precipitation bath. Beads were characterized using Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Tunneling Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The SEM, EDS, and TEM data indicated that the beads were porous in nature. The TGA data showed that bead contained about 32% chitosan. The surface area, pore volume, and porosity of the beads were determined from the BET surface area that was measured using N2 as adsorbate at 77K. Adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI), Cr(III), Cd(II), U(VI), Cu(II), from aqueous solutions of these metal ions were studied to evaluate the adsorption capacities of the beads for these metals ions. Equilibrium adsorption data of these metals on the beads were found to correlate well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. Chitosan coated perlite beads had negligible adsorption capacity for Sr(II) and Cs(I). It was found that Fullers earth had very good capacity for these two metals. However, the mechanical strength of Fullers earth granules available commercially was not sufficient for use in a column. In this study chitosan was used as a binder to make Fullers earth beads and were used for adsorption of Cs(I) and Sr(II). (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Management of Conventional Wastes (Non Radioactive) in Spanish Landfills; Gestion de Residuos Convencionales (No Radiactivos) en Vertederos de Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, N.; Pena, J. M.; Ramos, J. L.; Millan, R.

    2011-07-15

    This report is the result of a collaboration agreement between CIEMAT and ENRESA. The goal of the report is to analyze the existing legislation on solid conventional waste, according to the European Community, the Spanish State and its Autonomous Communities, focusing on the latest regulation applicable to the final management in controlled landfills. In addition, information about the legal frame, production, composition and characteristics of conventional waste (i.e. urban, inert, dangerous industrial and non dangerous industrial) is given. Also, the final management that is carried out nowadays in Spain for each of the waste is analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the fulfilment of the in force regulation by the different types of Spanish controlled landfills is evaluated. (Author) 52 refs.

  4. The line blot assay: problems with titrating first and second antibodies for Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Silva-Miranda, M; Wek-Rodriguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe a technique designed to assess the optimal dilution of primary and secondary antibodies, to be used in Western blot, dot blot, the multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) and immunohistochemistry assays. The method that we call "line blot" is not an alternative but a practical, complementary tool for the above techniques that assures definitive results are obtained from single assays, so there is no need to repeat the assay. As with most immunoenzymatic assays, the line blot assay is very sensitive, allowing the detection of absolute amounts of antigen as low as 2.5 ng in the 0.5 cm-long segment line (see Results), depending on the strength of the secondary, enzyme-labelled antibody.

  5. [Role of ultrasensitive TSH assay and ultrarapid total thyroxine assay in the thyroid studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragu, P; Comoy, E; Noël, M; Lounis, M; Patois, E; Parmentier, C

    1987-11-07

    The diagnostic value of high sensitivity thyrotrophin assay (HS-TSH) and that of ultra-short determination of total thyroxine (T4) by fluorescence polarization (T4-TDX) were evaluated in 284 patients (29 hyperthyroid, 137 euthyroid without treatment and 118 under substitutive therapy). After comparing the clinician's first impression with the results of these laboratory tests the proportion of correctly classified untreated euthyroid patients was the same with T4-TDX as with HS-TSH (90%). In contrast, this proportion in hyperthyroid patients was about twice as low with HS-TSH (23%) as with T4-TDX (42%). While HS-TSH gives a better diagnostic evaluation, T4-TDX is an excellent indicator of the degree of hyperthyroidism. In patients under suppressive therapy HS-TSH and T4-TDX provide a better evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  6. Immunoradiometric assay for quantification of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Miriam [Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology, Havana (Cuba). Dept.of Radiochemistry]. E-mail: mirian@fctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2002-07-01

    To develop an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for quantification of total PSA in serum, we carried out the evaluation of a panel of 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The mAbs (CB-PSA 1 to CB-PSA 10) were developed in the Center of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB) Havana, Cuba and mAbs (CMC-H9, CMC-A5) in the Center of Immunology and Biologics (CENIB), Camaguey, Cuba. The inhibition assays were carried out using as reference a commercial equimolar assay for total PSA. For the evaluation, the mAbs were labeled with {sup 125} I by the method of Chloramine T and the capture mAbs were used conjugated with biotin. For separation, it was used the avidin coupled to magnetic particles. To validate the assay we evaluated the sensibility, inter and intraassay precision and the correlation with reference assay in 65 samples of patient under suspicion of prostate cancer. The partner CB-PSA 4 / CB-PSA 9 (capture / tracer) showed the best results in the IRMA. The developed assay presented a detection limit of 0.025 mg/L, a good intra and interassay precision and a high correlation with the reference assay. (author)

  7. Quantitative Fissile Assay In Used Fuel Using LSDS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YongDeok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative assay of isotopic fissile materials (U235, Pu239, Pu241 was done at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, using lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS. The optimum design of LSDS was performed based on economics, easy maintenance and assay effectiveness. LSDS system consists of spectrometer, neutron source, detection and control. LSDS system induces fissile fission and fast neutrons are collected at fission chamber. The detected signal has a direct relation to the mass of existing fissile isotopes. Many current commercial assay technologies have a limitation in direct application on isotopic fissile assay of spent fuel, except chemical analysis. In the designed system, the fissile assay model was setup and the correction factor for self-shield was obtained. The isotopic fissile content assay was performed by changing the content of Pu239. Based on the fuel rod, the isotopic content was consistent with ~2% uncertainty for Pu239. By applying the covering (neutron absorber, the effective shielding was obtained and the activation was calculated on the target. From the assay evaluation, LSDS technique is very powerful and direct to analyze the isotopic fissile content. LSDS is applicable for nuclear fuel cycle and spent fuel management for safety and economics. Additionally, an accurate fissile content will contribute to the international transparency and credibility on spent fuel.

  8. Traditional and Model Based Assay of Irregular Geometry Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MOORE, FRANK S.; SALAYMEH, SALEEM

    2005-06-15

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) of SRNL was requested to perform a waste disposal assay of two heater boxes which had been used in the HB Line dissolvers. They had been sent to SRNL for study to make recommendations on how to prevent future failure of the units when they were replaced. The study having been completed, the units needed to be characterized prior to sending to Solid Waste for disposal. An assay station consisting of a turntable, HPGe detector, CANBERRA Inspector, transmission source and a portable computer was set up to do the required assays. The assays indicate the presence of U-235, Pu-239 and Cs-137. No measurable amounts of U-235 or Pu-239 were found. Therefore the Minimum Detectable Activities for U-235 and Pu-239 were calculated. For Heater Box 1, 0.23 grams of U-235 and 0.24 grams of Pu-239. For Heater Box 2, the results were 0.21 grams of U-235 and 0.21 grams of Pu-239. This paper describes and documents the assays employed to determine the amount of U, Pu and Cs contents of the heater boxes. The paper provides results of SNM assays using traditional calibration of the system and on one based on modeling. It also provides the scientific community with data that will assist the user in determining the method of choice for assaying items with irregular geometries.

  9. Quantitative Fissile Assay In Used Fuel Using LSDS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YongDeok; Jeon, Ju Young; Park, Chang-Je

    2017-09-01

    A quantitative assay of isotopic fissile materials (U235, Pu239, Pu241) was done at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), using lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS). The optimum design of LSDS was performed based on economics, easy maintenance and assay effectiveness. LSDS system consists of spectrometer, neutron source, detection and control. LSDS system induces fissile fission and fast neutrons are collected at fission chamber. The detected signal has a direct relation to the mass of existing fissile isotopes. Many current commercial assay technologies have a limitation in direct application on isotopic fissile assay of spent fuel, except chemical analysis. In the designed system, the fissile assay model was setup and the correction factor for self-shield was obtained. The isotopic fissile content assay was performed by changing the content of Pu239. Based on the fuel rod, the isotopic content was consistent with 2% uncertainty for Pu239. By applying the covering (neutron absorber), the effective shielding was obtained and the activation was calculated on the target. From the assay evaluation, LSDS technique is very powerful and direct to analyze the isotopic fissile content. LSDS is applicable for nuclear fuel cycle and spent fuel management for safety and economics. Additionally, an accurate fissile content will contribute to the international transparency and credibility on spent fuel.

  10. New low-viscosity overlay medium for viral plaque assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garten Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plaque assays in cell culture monolayers under solid or semisolid overlay media are commonly used for quantification of viruses and antiviral substances. To overcome the pitfalls of known overlays, we tested suspensions of microcrystalline cellulose Avicel RC/CL™ as overlay media in the plaque and plaque-inhibition assay of influenza viruses. Results Significantly larger plaques were formed under Avicel-containing media, as compared to agar and methylcellulose (MC overlay media. The plaque size increased with decreasing Avicel concentration, but even very diluted Avicel overlays (0.3% ensured formation of localized plaques. Due to their low viscosity, Avicel overlays were easier to use than methylcellulose overlays, especially in the 96-well culture plates. Furthermore, Avicel overlay could be applied without prior removal of the virus inoculum thus facilitating the assay and reducing chances of cross-contamination. Using neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate, we demonstrated applicability of the Avicel-based plaque reduction assay for testing of antiviral substances. Conclusion Plaque assay under Avicel-containing overlay media is easier, faster and more sensitive than assays under agar- and methylcellulose overlays. The assay can be readily performed in a 96-well plate format and seems particularly suitable for high-throughput virus titrations, serological studies and experiments on viral drug sensitivity. It may also facilitate work with highly pathogenic agents performed under hampered conditions of bio-safety labs.

  11. The application of protein microarray assays in psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, K; Bowden, T; Tighe, P; Todd, I; Dilnot, E M; Negm, O H; Fairclough, L; Vedhara, K

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays are miniaturized multiplex assays that exhibit many advantages over the commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This article aims to introduce protein microarrays to readers of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity and demonstrate its utility and validity for use in psychoneuroimmunological research. As part of an ongoing investigation of psychological and behavioral influences on influenza vaccination responses, we optimized a novel protein microarray to quantify influenza-specific antibody levels in human sera. Reproducibility was assessed by calculating intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variance on serially diluted human IgG concentrations. A random selection of samples was analyzed by microarray and ELISA to establish validity of the assay. For IgG concentrations, intra-assay and inter-assay precision profiles demonstrated a mean coefficient of variance of 6.7% and 11.5% respectively. Significant correlations were observed between microarray and ELISA for all antigens, demonstrating the microarray is a valid alternative to ELISA. Protein microarrays are a highly robust, novel assay method that could be of significant benefit for researchers working in psychoneuroimmunology. They offer high throughput, fewer resources per analyte and can examine concurrent neuro-immune-endocrine mechanisms.

  12. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  13. Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mira T; Rotem, Assaf; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2012-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. Droplets allow sample volumes to be significantly reduced, leading to concomitant reductions in cost. Manipulation and measurement at kilohertz speeds enable up to 10(8) samples to be screened in one day. Compartmentalization in droplets increases assay sensitivity by increasing the effective concentration of rare species and decreasing the time required to reach detection thresholds. Droplet microfluidics combines these powerful features to enable currently inaccessible high-throughput screening applications, including single-cell and single-molecule assays.

  14. A rapid and efficient assay for extracting DNA from fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Peak, K.K.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A method for the rapid extraction of fungal DNA from small quantities of tissue in a batch-processing format was investigated. Methods and Results: Tissue (DNA for PCR/ sequencing applications. Conclusions: The method allowed batch DNA extraction from multiple fungal isolates using a simple yet rapid and reliable assay. Significance and Impact of the Study: Use of this assay will allow researchers to obtain DNA from fungi quickly for use in molecular assays that previously required specialized instrumentation, was time-consuming or was not conducive to batch processing.

  15. A Sensitive Chemotaxis Assay Using a Novel Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing chemotaxis assays do not generate stable chemotactic gradients and thus—over time—functionally measure only nonspecific random motion (chemokinesis. In comparison, microfluidic technology has the capacity to generate a tightly controlled microenvironment that can be stably maintained for extended periods of time and is, therefore, amenable to adaptation for assaying chemotaxis. We describe here a novel microfluidic device for sensitive assay of cellular migration and show its application for evaluating the chemotaxis of smooth muscle cells in a chemokine gradient.

  16. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  17. Ethanal assay, using an enzymo-conductimetric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, I.; Wallach, J.M. (I.C.B.M.C., Villeurbanne (France))

    1992-01-01

    An enzymo-conductimetric method for the assay of ethanol is described. It is based on ethanol oxidation is presence of yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase. Experimental conditions compatible with conductimetry were optimized and kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction determined. Due to the low K{sub M} value of ethanol for the enzyme, an end-point assay was proposed. A linear relationship was demonstrated between experimental conductance changes and ethanol concentration up to 25 {mu}M. Validation of the assay was made on wines by comparison with a spectrophotometric method. Both methods gave similar results, but conductimetry avoids sample treatment if solutions are colored or turbid.

  18. Application of radioreceptor assay of benzodiazepines for toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, L.; Scheinin, M. (Department of Pharmacology and the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Turku, Finland)

    1982-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay (RRA) for determining benzodiazepines (BZ) has been developed and applied to toxicological analysis of serum samples from 21 patients with acute BZ overdosage. The method was sensitive (e.g., lorazepam 17 nM, diazepam 41 nM), and specific for pharmacologically active BZ derivatives. The reproducibility of the results was good (intra-assay variation < 8%, inter-assay variation < 10%). Concentrations measured by the RRA showed a good correlation with those obtained by gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the same samples. The quantitative results represent the sum of one or several parent substances and all biologically active metabolites, in proportion to their receptor binding affinities.

  19. The Influence of Prior Knowledge, University Coursework, and Field Experience on Primary Preservice Teachers' Use of Reading Comprehension Strategies in a Year-Long, Field-Based Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Mary Beth; Linek, Wayne M.; Raine, I. Laverne; Szabo, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study employed mixed methods to explore preservice teachers' initial knowledge and subsequent use of explicitly taught reading comprehension strategies in primary grade classrooms during a year-long, field-based teacher preparation program. Self-Knowledge Rating Surveys, Strategy Multiple-Choice Tests, strategy logs, lesson plans,…

  20. Comparative evaluation under routine conditions of the nitrate reduction assay, the proportion assay and the MGIT 960 assay for drug susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila de Souza Fonseca

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the nitrate reductase assay (NRA was compared with the proportion method (PM on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and the BACTEC MGIT960 assay under routine conditions using 160 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a high proportion of resistant strains. The mean time to obtain results was 8.8 days and the overall agreements between NRA and PM and NRA and M960 were 95% and 94%, respectively. NRA was easy to perform and represents a useful tool for the rapid screening of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains in low-resource countries.

  1. Microfluidic Assay to Quantify the Adhesion of Marine Bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arpa-Sancet, M P; Christophis, C; Rosenhahn, A

    2012-01-01

    .... To determine the attachment strength of bacteria to coatings, a microfluidic adhesion assay has been developed which allows probing at which critical wall shear stress bacteria are removed from the surface...

  2. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  3. Radiometric microbiologic assay for the biologically active forms of niacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertcher, J.A.; Guilarte, T.R.; Chen, M.F.; Rider, A.A.; McIntyre, P.A.

    1979-05-01

    A radiometric microbiologic assay has been developed for the determination of niacin in biologic fluids. Lactobacillus plantarum produced /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(U-/sup 14/C) malic acid in quantities proportional to the amount of niacin present. The assay is specific for the biologically active forms of niacin in humans. Thirty normal hemolysates were analyzed and the values ranged from 13.0 to 17.8 ..mu..g niacin/ml RBC (mean = 15.27 +- 1.33 s.d.). Good recovery and reproducibility studies were obtained with this assay. On thirty blood samples, correlation was excellent between the radiometric and the conventional turbidimetric assays.

  4. Effect of Spacer and the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sathe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of spacers and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA formats on the functional parameters of assays such as lower detection limit, inhibitory concentration at 50 per cent (IC50, and specificity were studied. Enzyme conjugates having hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacers were prepared using O-isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA and horseradish peroxidase (HRP as an enzyme label. Comparison was made with reference to enzyme conjugate without any spacer. The present investigation revealed that the presence of a hydrophilic spacer in the enzyme conjugate significantly improves the sensitivity of assays. An enhanced IC50 value achieved was 0.01 μg mL−1 for free antigen detection by direct immunoassay using hydrophilic spacers and precoating of ELISA plates by secondary antibody. The use of a hydrophilic spacer might have helped in projecting the hapten in the aqueous phase, leading to enhanced antibody binding signal and improved sensitivity of the assay.

  5. Sperm penetration assay and its correlation with semen analysis parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Kant Pandey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of current study was to determine whether the Sperm Penetration Assay (SPA can be used as a test to discriminate the infertile male from fertile one. We have also correlated the SPA with semen analysis. Methods: Sperm characteristics namely Semen analysis and the sperm penetration assay were tested in 44 infertile and 10 fertile men. Sperm penetration assay was determined by using zona free hamster eggs. Results: With decreasing spermatozoa concentration in the semen there was significant decrease in percentage penetration of zona free Hamster eggs (p0.05. Conclusions: The Sperm penetration assay could discriminate the infertile group from fertile group significantly (p<0.001. The test appeared to be highly reproducible and probably identifies a truly infertile male. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3197-3201

  6. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  7. Transient expression assays in grapevine: a step towards genetic improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jelly, Noémie S; Valat, Laure; Walter, Bernard; Maillot, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the usefulness of transient expression assays has continuously increased for the characterization of unknown gene function and metabolic pathways. In grapevine ( Vitis vinifera L...

  8. Optimising automation of a manual enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corena de Beer; Monika Esser; Wolfgang Preiser

    2011-01-01

    .... Compared to conventional manual assays, automated ELISA systems offer more accurate and reproducible results, faster turnaround times and cost effectiveness due to the use of multianalyte reagents.Design: The VaccZyme...

  9. PubChem BioAssay: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.; Cheng, Tiejun; Wang, Jiyao; Gindulyte, Asta; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Thiessen, Paul A.; He, Siqian; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    PubChem's BioAssay database (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) has served as a public repository for small-molecule and RNAi screening data since 2004 providing open access of its data content to the community. PubChem accepts data submission from worldwide researchers at academia, industry and government agencies. PubChem also collaborates with other chemical biology database stakeholders with data exchange. With over a decade's development effort, it becomes an important information resource supporting drug discovery and chemical biology research. To facilitate data discovery, PubChem is integrated with all other databases at NCBI. In this work, we provide an update for the PubChem BioAssay database describing several recent development including added sources of research data, redesigned BioAssay record page, new BioAssay classification browser and new features in the Upload system facilitating data sharing. PMID:27899599

  10. Usefulness of human coagulation and fibrinolysis assays in domestic pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Anna-Marie Bloch; Olsen, Aage Kristian; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Pigs are often used as animal models in research on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. The usefulness of the assays applied within this field, and the knowledge of reference intervals are therefore essential and of utmost importance. In the study reported here, we investigated the applicability...... time, tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, factor VII, protein C, protein S, prothrombin fragment 1+2, antithrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, soluble fibrin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasmin inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and D-dimer. We found...... that 11 of 12 functional assays, but only 3 of 10 immunoassays, were applicable to porcine plasma, and we determined the normal range of these variables. We conclude that human functional assays are useful in porcine plasma, whereas only a few immunologic assays can be used. However, precautions must...

  11. Development of fluorescent methods for DNA methyltransferase assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueying; Zou, Xiaoran; Ma, Fei; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation modified by DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays an important role in regulating gene transcription, cell growth and proliferation. The aberrant DNA MTase activity may lead to a variety of human diseases including cancers. Therefore, accurate and sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is crucial to biomedical research, clinical diagnostics and therapy. However, conventional DNA MTase assays often suffer from labor-intensive operations and time-consuming procedures. Alternatively, fluorescent methods have significant advantages of simplicity and high sensitivity, and have been widely applied for DNA MTase assay. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of fluorescent methods for DNA MTase assay. These emerging methods include amplification-free and the amplification-assisted assays. Moreover, we discuss the challenges and future directions of this area.

  12. Awareness of antimullerian hormone assay and its relevance in in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness of antimullerian hormone assay and its relevance in in-vitro fertilization ... especially in areas of current methods for successful IVF treatment. Key words: Antimullerian hormone, In Vitro Fertilization, Infertility, Laboratory scientist ...

  13. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  14. Piceance Basin Oil Shale Data: Assays, Boreholes and Formation Tops

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This database contains Oil Shale Assays, Borehole Locations and Formation Tops that were used in support of the 2009 Oil Shale Assessment (Survey Fact Sheet...

  15. Mouse Assay for Determination of Arsenic Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Accurate assessment of human exposure estimates from arsenic-contaminated soils depends upon estimating arsenic (As) soil bioavailability. Development of bioavailability assays provides data needed for human health risk assessments and supports development and valida...

  16. Cell-based Assays to Identify Inhibitors of Viral Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Neil; Ott, Robert D.; Isaacs, Richard J.; Fang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Antagonizing the production of infectious virus inside cells requires drugs that can cross the cell membrane without harming host cells. Objective It is therefore advantageous to establish intracellular potency of anti-viral drug candidates early in the drug-discovery pipeline. Methods To this end, cell-based assays are being developed and employed in high-throughput drug screening, ranging from assays that monitor replication of intact viruses to those that monitor activity of specific viral proteins. While numerous cell-based assays have been developed and investigated, rapid counter screens are also needed to define the specific viral targets of identified inhibitors and to eliminate nonspecific screening hits. Results/Conclusions Here, we describe the types of cell-based assays being used in antiviral drug screens and evaluate the equally important counter screens that are being employed to reach the full potential of cell-based high-throughput screening. PMID:19750206

  17. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  18. Influences of acidic conditions on formazan assay: a cautionary note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johno, Hisashi; Takahashi, Shuhei; Kitamura, Masanori

    2010-11-01

    Formazan assay has been used for several decades to evaluate metabolic activity of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In particular, it has been often applied for quantitative assessment of viable cells under acidic circumstances caused by, e.g., ischemia and hypoxia. However, little attention has been paid to the influence of acidic pH on formazan assays. We found that acidic culture conditions significantly affect outcomes of the assays. Absorbance of tetrazolium-formazan decreased in a pH-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. This nonspecific effect was ascribed to influences of acidic pH on the production of formazan. Replacement of culture media to fresh medium at physiologic pH partially overcame this problem. The influence of acidic culture conditions should be carefully considered when formazan assays are used for the assessment of viable cells under various experimental situations.

  19. A novel behavioral assay for measuring cold sensation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Brenner

    Full Text Available Behavioral models of cold responses are important tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of cold sensation. To complement the currently cold behavioral assays and allow further studies of these mechanisms, we have developed a new technique to measure the cold response threshold, the cold plantar assay. In this assay, animals are acclimated on a glass plate and a cold stimulus is applied to the hindpaw through the glass using a pellet of compressed dry ice. The latency to withdrawal from the cooled glass is used as a measure of the cold response threshold of the rodents, and the dry ice pellet provides a ramping cold stimulus on the glass that allows the correlation of withdrawal latency values to rough estimates of the cold response threshold temperature. The assay is highly sensitive to manipulations including morphine-induced analgesia, Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced inflammatory allodynia, and Spinal Nerve Ligation-induced neuropathic allodynia.

  20. Lipid-binding analysis using a fat blot assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, T.; Wierzchowiecka, M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-lipid interactions play an important role in lipid metabolism, membrane trafficking and cell -signaling by regulating protein localization, activation, and function. The Fat Blot assay is a relatively simple and inexpensive method to examine these interactions using nitrocellulose

  1. Multiplexed Dosing Assays by Digitally Definable Hydrogel Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack

    2016-01-01

    Stable and low-cost multiplexed drug sensitivity assays using small volumes of cells or tissue are in demand for personalized medicine, including patientspecific combination chemotherapy. Spatially defined projected light photopolymerization of hydrogels with embedded active compounds is introduc...

  2. A Cell-Based Assay to Assess Hemichannel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Srinivasan; Fiori, Mariana C.; Cuello, Luis G.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of connexin hemichannels is involved in the pathophysiology of disorders that include deafness, stroke, and cardiac infarct. This aspect makes hemichannels an attractive therapeutic target. Unfortunately, most available inhibitors are not selective or isoform specific, which hampers their translational application. The absence of a battery of useful inhibitors is due in part to the absence of simple screening assays for the discovery of hemichannel-active drugs. Here, we present an assay that we have recently developed to assess hemichannel function. The assay is based on the expression of functional human connexins in a genetically modified bacterial strain deficient in K+ uptake. These modified cells do not grow in low-K+ medium, but functional expression of connexin hemichannels allows K+ uptake and growth. This cell-growth-based assay is simple, robust, and easily scalable to high-throughput multi-well platforms.

  3. Application of neutron multiplicity counting to waste assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Ensslin, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sharpe, T.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the use of a new figure of merit code that calculates both bias and precision for coincidence and multiplicity counting, and determines the optimum regions for each in waste assay applications. A {open_quotes}tunable multiplicity{close_quotes} approach is developed that uses a combination of coincidence and multiplicity counting to minimize the total assay error. An example is shown where multiplicity analysis is used to solve for mass, alpha, and multiplication and tunable multiplicity is shown to work well. The approach provides a method for selecting coincidence, multiplicity, or tunable multiplicity counting to give the best assay with the lowest total error over a broad spectrum of assay conditions. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Mouse Assay for Determination of Arsenic Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Accurate assessment of human exposure estimates from arsenic-contaminated soils depends upon estimating arsenic (As) soil bioavailability. Development of bioavailability assays provides data needed for human health risk assessments and supports development and valida...

  5. Field-Based Teacher Research: How Teachers and Scientists Working Together Answers Questions about Turtle Nesting Ecology while Enhancing Teachers' Inquiry Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, J. M.; Jungblut, D.; Catena, A. N.; Rubenstein, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    the research was 'an invaluable experience.' Conceptual models of QUEST's philosophy will be distributed at our presentation to encourage audience members interested in starting their own field-based educator professional development project. Through our presentation of this unique program, we will share how we have successfully incorporated real scientific research into classrooms through teachers' experiences, and discuss the lessons learned regarding replication and sustainability of educator-scientist collaborations.

  6. Using remote sensing techniques and field-based structural analysis to explore new gold and associated mineral sites around Al-Hajar mine, Asir terrane, Arabian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonbul, Abdullah R.; El-Shafei, Mohamed K.; Bishta, Adel Z.

    2016-05-01

    Modern earth resource satellites provide huge amounts of digital imagery at different resolutions. These satellite imageries are considered one of the most significant sources of data for mineral exploration. Image processing techniques were applied to the exposed rocks around the Al-Aqiq area of the Asir terrane in the southern part of the Arabian Shield. The area under study has two sub-parallel N-S trending metamorphic belts of green-schist facies. The first belt is located southeast of Al-Aqiq, where the Al-Hajar Gold Mine is situated. It is essentially composed of metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks, and it is intruded by different plutonic rocks of primarily diorite, syenite and porphyritic granite. The second belt is located northwest of Al-Aqiq, and it is composed of metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks and is intruded by granite bodies. The current study aimed to distinguish the lithological units, detect and map the alteration zones, and extract the major fault lineaments around the Al-Hajar gold prospect. Digital satellite imageries, including Landsat 7 ETM + multispectral and panchromatic and SPOT-5 were used in addition to field verification. Areas with similar spectral signatures to the prospect were identified in the nearby metamorphic belt; it was considered as a target area and was inspected in the field. The relationships between the alteration zones, the mineral deposits and the structural elements were used to locate the ore-bearing zones in the subsurface. The metasedimentary units of the target area showed a dextral-ductile shearing top-to-the-north and the presence of dominant mineralized quartz vein-system. The area to the north of the Al-Hajar prospect showed also sub-parallel shear zones along which different types of alterations were detected. Field-based criteria such as hydrothermal breccia, jasper, iron gossans and porphyritic granite strongly indicate the presence of porphyry-type ore deposits in Al-Hajar metamorphic belt that

  7. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A

    2015-05-14

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  8. Timing of Landform Displacements along the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault: A Comparison of Field-based and Remote Reconstructions at Two Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, M. A.; Cowgill, E.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the Holocene slip rate of the Mojave section of the San Andreas Fault (MSAF) is key for assessing the earthquake hazard that this ~150-km-long section of fault poses to the Los Angeles metropolitan area, which is located ~45 km to the southwest. Possible temporal variations in slip rate along the MSAF are suggested by an apparent discrepancy between geologically and geodetically determined slip rates, with rates from geologic observations reported to be up to twice as fast as those reported from geodetic data. This apparent variability could be the result of changes in slip rate over time, which is known as secular variation in slip. To test the hypothesis that the MSAF exhibits variability in slip rate over time requires establishing not just a Holocene-average slip rate, but a Holocene slip history. Previous work along the MSAF using remote, virtual-reality based analysis of B4 LiDAR topographic data and pilot field observations identified ~60 potential slip-rate sites with landform offsets between 30 and 300 m, 10 of which are particularly promising. We are currently conducting detailed, field-based studies at two of these 10 sites (Oakdale and Shoemaker Canyon), with an emphasis on collecting age and offset data to determine both Holocene-average slip rates and constrain slip-history analysis. Initial offset estimates were made by remote analysis using 3D visualization software with 1-meter resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. We plan to excavate exploratory, fault-parallel trenches both northwest and southeast of the fault to constrain the ages of offset landforms, correlate depositional events across the fault, and test the offset estimates that were determined remotely. Upon establishing the stratigraphic relationships of lithologic units within the trenches and correlating this stratigraphy across the fault, we plan to employ geochronologic techniques to quantify the age of depositional events. The nature of the deposits will

  9. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2015-05-01

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  10. Timber production assessment of a plantation forest: An integrated framework with field-based inventory, multi-source remote sensing data and forest management history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian; Zhu, Jiaojun; Deng, Songqiu; Zheng, Xiao; Zhang, Jinxin; Shang, Guiduo; Huang, Liyan

    2016-10-01

    Timber production is the purpose for managing plantation forests, and its spatial and quantitative information is critical for advising management strategies. Previous studies have focused on growing stock volume (GSV), which represents the current potential of timber production, yet few studies have investigated historical process-harvested timber. This resulted in a gap in a synthetical ecosystem service assessment of timber production. In this paper, we established a Management Process-based Timber production (MPT) framework to integrate the current GSV and the harvested timber derived from historical logging regimes, trying to synthetically assess timber production for a historical period. In the MPT framework, age-class and current GSV determine the times of historical thinning and the corresponding harvested timber, by using a "space-for-time" substitution. The total timber production can be estimated by the historical harvested timber in each thinning and the current GSV. To test this MPT framework, an empirical study on a larch plantation (LP) with area of 43,946 ha was conducted in North China for a period from 1962 to 2010. Field-based inventory data was integrated with ALOS PALSAR (Advanced Land-Observing Satellite Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) and Landsat-8 OLI (Operational Land Imager) data for estimating the age-class and current GSV of LP. The random forest model with PALSAR backscatter intensity channels and OLI bands as input predictive variables yielded an accuracy of 67.9% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.59 for age-class classification. The regression model using PALSAR data produced a root mean square error (RMSE) of 36.5 m3 ha-1. The total timber production of LP was estimated to be 7.27 × 106 m3, with 4.87 × 106 m3 in current GSV and 2.40 × 106 m3 in harvested timber through historical thinning. The historical process-harvested timber accounts to 33.0% of the total timber production, which component has been neglected in the

  11. Comparing field-based and numerically modelled reconstructions of the last Cordilleran Ice Sheet deglaciation over the Thompson Plateau, southern interior British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, Jonathan; Brennand, Tracy; Seguinot, Julien; Perkins, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoglaciological and palaeoclimate reconstructions of the deglaciation of the last Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) over British Columbia (BC), Canada, are limited by the relative lack of understanding of the late-glacial ice sheet margins and dynamics. Deglaciation of the last CIS over the southern Interior Plateau of BC has been characterised as proceeding via stagnation and downwasting into dead ice lobes in valleys where ice was thickest. This conceptual model explains the apparent lack of moraines, which may otherwise imply active recession, and known palaeo-glacial lakes are explained as being dammed by these dead ice lobes. However, downwasting alone is at odds with coeval ice sheets which receded systematically towards their interiors. Presented here is a comparison between a new field-based reconstruction of the deglaciation of the northern Thompson Plateau, and ice sheet model results of the same area. Glacioisostatic tilts, reconstructed using mapped shoreline elevations, rise to the north-northwest at around 1.8 m/km, implying an ice surface slope, and likely active recession, towards the Coast Mountains. New reconstructions of the stages of glacial Lake Nicola (gLN), utilising field and aerial photographic mapping of shorelines, and sedimentology and geophysical surveys on ice-marginal and glaciolacustrine landforms, largely support this interpretation; the lake expanded and lowered to the north-northwest as progressively lower outlets were opened during ice retreat in this direction. Fields of newly discovered glaciotectonised moraines, grounding-line deposits and overridden glacial lake sediments record ice margin oscillations and minor readvances within gLN; the general alignment of these features further supports recession to the north-northwest. Numerical simulations of deglaciation of the area results in ice retreat to the north-northeast, which is inconsistent with the north-north-westward evolution of gLN. Excess precipitation over the eastern

  12. The comet assay – from toy to tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenter Speit

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is nowadays the most common method for measuring DNA damage and repair in single cells. It is based on the microelectrophoretic study published by Ostling and Johanson (1984 and was developed by Singh and coworkers (1988 to a versatile technique for quantitation of low levels of DNA damage in individual cells. This alkaline version still is the basis for the triumphant success of the comet assay in basic research into mechanisms of DNA damage and DNA repair, genotoxicity testing, ecotoxicology and human biomonitoring. Important technical improvements (e.g., the use of precoated slides, introduction of image analysis, high throughput methods, automated scoring systems made the assay more robust and more efficient. Modifications of the standard protocol provide more specific information on the type and biological significance of the damage studied. The introduction of lesion-specific endonucleases allowed the characterization of oxidative base damage, alkylation damage and UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. The combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH made it possible to identify DNA of particular chromosome regions and measure effects of damage and repair in particular genes. The comet assay is being increasingly used in genotoxicity testing. In particular, the in vivo comet assay has become a component of some genotoxicity test strategies and generally accepted test protocols have evolved over the years. A large international collaborative trial sponsored by the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM was recently completed and an OECD test guideline was approved. The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents or to investigate genoprotective effects. However, there are still problems in comparing results from different laboratories and there is need for reducing inter-laboratory variation and identification of standard

  13. Spectrophotometric Assays of Major Compounds Extracted from Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Solène

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes spectrophotometric assays of major compounds extracted from microalgae and macroalgae, i.e., proteins, carbohydrates, pigments (chlorophylls, carotenoids, and phycobiliproteins) and phenolic compounds. In contrast to other specific analytical techniques, such as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrometry (MS), commonly applied to purified extracts to reveal more detailed composition and structure of algal compound families, these assays serve as a first assessment of the global contents of extracts.

  14. Bioluminescence-Sensing Assay for Microbial Growth Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Heba Ramadan Eed; Nora S. Abdel-Kader; Mahmoud Helmy El Tahan; Tianhong Dai; Rehab Amin

    2016-01-01

    The conventional methods for microbial viability quantification require cultivation and are laborious. There is consequently a widespread need for cultivation-free methods. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence-sensing assay is considered an extremely effective biosensor; hence ATP is the energy currency of all living microbes and can be used as a rapid indicator of microbial viability. We developed an ATP bioluminescence-sensing assay to detect microbial viability. A biolumine...

  15. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes sensitive to changes in intracellular calcium have become increasingly popular in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug discovery for several reasons. First of all, the assays using the dyes are easy to perform and are of low cost compared to other assays. Second, most non-Galph...... making them obtainable even for academic groups. Here, we present a protocol for measuring changes in intracellular calcium levels in living mammalian cells based on the fluorescent calcium binding dye, fluo-4....

  16. Monkey Feeding Assay for Testing Emetic Activity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are unique bacterial toxins that cause gastrointestinal toxicity as well as superantigenic activity. Since systemic administration of SEs induces superantigenic activity leading to toxic shock syndrome that may mimic enterotoxic activity of SEs such as vomiting and diarrhea, oral administration of SEs in the monkey feeding assay is considered as a standard method to evaluate emetic activity of SEs. This chapter summarizes and discusses practical considerations of the monkey feeding assay used in studies characterizing classical and newly identified SEs.

  17. Analytical applications of MIPs in diagnostic assays: future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Thomas S; Whitcombe, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Many efforts have been made to produce artificial materials with biomimetic properties for applications in binding assays. Among these efforts, the technique of molecular imprinting has received much attention because of the high selectivity obtainable for molecules of interest, robustness of the produced polymers, simple and short synthesis, and excellent cost efficiency. In this review, progress in the field of molecularly imprinted sorbent assays is discussed-with a focus on work conducted from 2005 to date.

  18. Fluorescence Assay for Evaluating Microbicidal Activity of Hand Antiseptics

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M.; Mariscal, Alberto; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and ...

  19. Antibiotic microbial assay using kinetic-reading microplate system

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Rebello Lourenço; Terezinha de Jesus Andreoli Pinto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal experimental conditions to develop a methodology for microbiological assay of apramycin employing microplate and kinetic reading mode, and to validate the developed method, through evaluation of parameters of selectivity, linearity, linear range, limits of detection and quantification, accuracy and precision. The turbidimetric assay principle is simple: the test solution is added to a suspension of test microorganism in culture media, the mix...

  20. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Isabel CHINEN; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  1. Optimising automation of a manual enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    OpenAIRE

    Corena de Beer; Monika Esser; Wolfgang Preiser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are widely used to quantify immunoglobulin levels induced by infection or vaccination. Compared to conventional manual assays, automated ELISA systems offer more accurate and reproducible results, faster turnaround times and cost effectiveness due to the use of multianalyte reagents.Design: The VaccZyme™ Human Anti-Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) kit (MK016) from The Binding Site Company was optimised to be used on an automated BioRad...

  2. Diced electrophoresis gel assay for screening enzymes with specified activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Toru; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Adibekian, Alexander; Yoshioka, Kentaro; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2013-04-24

    We have established the diced electrophoresis gel (DEG) assay as a proteome-wide screening tool to identify enzymes with activities of interest using turnover-based fluorescent substrates. The method utilizes the combination of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) with a multiwell-plate-based fluorometric assay to find protein spots with the specified activity. By developing fluorescent substrates that mimic the structure of neutrophil chemoattractants, we could identify enzymes involved in metabolic inactivation of the chemoattractants.

  3. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  4. Protein-protein interaction assays: eliminating false positive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tuan N.; Goodrich, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Many methods commonly used to identify and characterize interactions between two or more proteins are variations of the immobilized protein-protein interaction assay (for example, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation). A potential, and often overlooked, problem with these assays is the possibility that an observed interaction is mediated not by direct contact between proteins, but instead by nucleic acid contaminating the protein preparations. As a negatively cha...

  5. Micronuclei assay: A potential biomonitoring protocol in occupational exposure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanikumar, L; Panneerselvam, N

    2011-09-01

    As micronuclei (MN) derive from chromosomal fragments and whole chromosomes lagging behind in anaphase, the MN assay can be used to show both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. This particularly concerns the use of MN as a biomarker ofgenotoxic exposure and effects, where differences in MN frequencies between exposed subjects and referents are expected to be small. The present paper reviews the use of the MN assay in biomonitoring of occupational exposure studies.

  6. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mummolo Stefano; Tecco Simona; Gallusi Gianni; Farini Donatella; Klinger Francesca G; Marzo Giuseppe; Libonati Antonio; De Felici Massimo; Campanella Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mo...

  7. Detection of Streptococcus pyogenes using rapid visual molecular assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangna; He, Xiaoming; Li, Huan; Zhao, Jiangtao; Huang, Simo; Liu, Wei; Wei, Xiao; Ding, Yiwei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zou, Dayang; Wang, Xuesong; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Yan, Xiabei; Huang, Liuyu; Du, Shuangkui; Yuan, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an increasingly important pathogen in many parts of the world. Rapid and accurate detection of S. pyogenes aids in the control of the infection. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and validated for the specific detection of S. pyogenes. The assay incorporates two methods: a chromogenic analysis using a calcein/Mn(2+) complex and real-time turbidity monitoring to assess the reaction. Both methods detected the target DNA within 60 min under 64°C isothermal conditions. The assay used specifically designed primers to target spy1258, and correctly identified 111 strains of S. pyogenes and 32 non-S. pyogenes strains, including other species of the genus Streptococcus. Tests using reference strains showed that the LAMP assay was highly specific. The sensitivity of the assay, with a detection limit of 1.49 pg DNA, was 10-fold greater than that of PCR. The LAMP assay established in this study is simple, fast and sensitive, and does not rely upon any special equipment; thus, it could be employed in clinical diagnosis.

  8. First 25-hydroxyvitamin D assay for general chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saida, Fakhri B; Chen, Xiaoru; Tran, Kiet; Dou, Chao; Yuan, Chong

    2015-03-01

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the predominant circulating form of vitamin D, is an accurate indicator of the general vitamin D status of an individual. Because vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to several pathologies (including osteoporosis and rickets), accurate monitoring of 25(OH)D levels is becoming increasingly important in clinical settings. Current 25(OH)D assays are either chromatographic or immunoassay-based assays. These assays include HPLC, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), enzyme-immunosorbent, immunochemiluminescence, immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay. All these assays use heterogeneous formats that require phase separation and special instrumentations. In this article, we present an overview of these assays and introduce the first homogeneous assay of 25(OH)D for use on general chemistry analyzers. A special emphasis is put on the unique challenges posed by the 25(OH)D analyte. These challenges include a low detection limit, the dissociation of the analyte from its serum transporter and the inactivation of various binding proteins without phase separation steps.

  9. Troponin assays in the assessment of the equine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, T M; Pyle, W G; Maxie, M G; Pearl, D L; Physick-Sheard, P W

    2014-05-01

    In 2000, troponin assays were adopted as the test of choice for detection of myocardial injury in man. This decision was made after extensive testing and followed a 60 year search for a biomarker of myocardial damage with sufficient analytical sensitivity and specificity. This has led to proliferation of assays for use in human medicine, each requiring extensive testing and validation before it could be made available on the open market for human use. The search for ever-more analytically sensitive assays and for a standard reference material continues. The adoption of troponin testing in veterinary medicine followed shortly after its development for use in man, providing a much-needed means of detecting and monitoring myocardial damage in horses. However, application of these tests in veterinary medicine has exclusively involved use of assays designed for and clinically validated in human patients. There is no mandated requirement for test validation in veterinary medicine and, while many of these assays have been shown to be capable of detecting equine troponin, the wide diversity of available tests, lack of validation, absence of protocols for their use and lack of standardisation make their application problematic. The objective of this review article is to address this issue, offering guidance where data are available and encouraging caution where there are none. Ultimately, the overall goal of this review is to examine critically the use of troponin assays in the horse and to promote the accurate and appropriate interpretation of valid results.

  10. Hemizona Assay and Sperm Penetration Assay in the Prediction of IVF Outcome: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Vogiatzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The limited predictive value of semen analysis in achieving natural conception or in IVF outcome confirms the need for sperm function tests to determine optimal management. We reviewed HZA and SPA predictive power in IVF outcome, with statistical significance of diagnostic power of the assays. HZA was readily efficient in predicting IVF outcome, while evident inconsistency among the studies analysed framed the SPA’s role in male fertility evaluation. Considerable variation was noted in the diagnostic accuracy values of SPA with wide sensitivity (52–100%, specificity (0–100%, and PPV (18–100% and NPV (0–100% together with fluctuation and notable differentiation in methodology and cutoff values employed by each group. HZA methodology was overall consistent with minor variation in cutoff values and oocyte source, while data analysis reported strong correlation between HZA results with IVF outcome, high sensitivity (75–100%, good specificity (57–100%, and high PPV (79–100% and NPV (68–100%. HZA correlated well with IVF outcome and demonstrated better sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive power. Males with normal or slightly abnormal semen profiles could benefit by this intervention and could be evaluated prior to referral to assisted reproduction. HZA should be used in a sequential fashion with semen analysis and potentially other bioassays in an IVF setting.

  11. Use of an aqueous soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for cell growth assays in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, A H; Owen, T C; Barltrop, J A; Cory, J G

    1991-07-01

    A new tetrazolium analog of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was evaluated as a substitute for MTT in the microculture screening assay for in vitro cell growth. This new tetrazolium compound, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2- (4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS), in the presence of phenazine methosulfate (PMS), gave a water-soluble formazan product that had an absorbance maximum at 490-500 nm in phosphate-buffered saline. The amount of colored product formed was proportional to the number of cells and the time of incubation of the cells with MTS/PMS. MTS/PMS was reactive in all the cell lines tested which included mouse leukemia L1210 cells, mouse Ehrlich tumor cells, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, and human colon tumor cells (HT-29). HT-29 and 3T3 fibroblasts reduced MTS/PMS more efficiently than they reduced MTT. Comparable to the amount of product formed from MTT, MTS/PMS gave excellent product formation. The IC50 value for pyrazoloimidazole obtained using MTS/PMS was 200 microM; for 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, the IC50 value was 0.9 nM. These values compared very favorably with the IC50 values obtained by direct cell counts. Further, the same IC50 values were obtained when the absorbances of the formazan product in the 96-well plates were determined after different times of incubation.

  12. A colorimetric sandwich-type assay for sensitive thrombin detection based on enzyme-linked aptamer assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hee; Cho, Yea Seul; Kang, Sungmuk; Lee, Eun Jeong; Lee, Gwan-Ho; Hah, Sang Soo

    2014-10-01

    A colorimetric sandwich-type assay based on enzyme-linked aptamer assay has been developed for the fast and sensitive detection of as low as 25 fM of thrombin with high linearity. Aptamer-immobilized glass was used to capture the target analyte, whereas a second aptamer, functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was employed for the conventional 3,5,3',5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-based colorimetric detection. Without the troublesome antibody requirement of the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as low as 25 fM of thrombin could be rapidly and reproducibly detected. This assay has superior, or at least equal, recovery and accuracy to that of conventional antibody-based ELISA.

  13. The Granzyme B ELISPOT assay: an alternative to the 51Cr-release assay for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baseler Michael

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interferon-γ (IFN-γ ELISPOT assay is one of the most useful techniques for immunological monitoring of cancer vaccine trials and has gained increased application as a measure of specific T cell activation. However, it does not assess cell-mediated cytotoxicity directly as IFN-γ secretion is not limited to only cytolytic cells. Granzyme B (GrB is a key mediator of target cell death via the granule-mediated pathway. Therefore, the release of GrB by cytolytic lymphocytes upon effector-target interaction may be a more specific indicator of CTL and NK cytotoxic ability than IFN-γ secretion. Methods We assessed whether the GrB ELISPOT assay is a viable alternative to the 51Cr-release and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays for measuring antigen-specific CTL cytotoxicity. Direct comparisons between the three assays were made using human CTL cell lines (αEN-EBV and αJY and an in vitro stimulated anti-Flu matrix peptide (FMP-specific CTL. Results When the GrB ELISPOT was directly compared to the IFN-γ ELISPOT and 51Cr-release assays, excellent cross-correlation between all three assays was shown. However, measurable IFN-γ secretion in the ELISPOT assay was observed only after 1 hour of incubation and cytotoxicity assessed via the 51Cr-release assay after 4 hours, whereas GrB secretion was detectable within 10 min of effector-target contact with significant secretion observed after 1 h. Titration studies demonstrated a strong correlation between the number of effector cells and GrB spots per well. Irrelevant targets or antigens did not induce significant GrB secretion. Additionally, GrB secretion was abrogated when CTL cultures were depleted of CD8+ cells. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that the GrB ELISPOT assay is a superior alternative to the 51Cr-release assay since it is significantly more sensitive and provides an estimation of cytotoxic effector cell frequency. Additionally, unlike the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, the GrB ELISPOT

  14. Evaluation of Presto(plus) assay and LightMix kit Trichomonas vaginalis assay for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in dry vaginal swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waaij, Dewi J; Ouburg, Sander; Dubbink, Jan Henk; Peters, Remco P H; Morré, Servaas A

    2016-08-01

    This is an evaluation study of the Presto(plus) Assay for T. vaginalis by comparing to the TIB MOLBIOL LightMix Kit Trichomonas vaginalis Assay using 615 dry collected vaginal and rectal swabs. Discordant samples were analyzed by the Qiagen® Microbial DNA qPCR for TV Assay. Both assays showed comparable performances (McNemar p>0.05).

  15. Suitability of a liquid chromatography assay of neomycin sulfate to replace the microbiological assay for neomycin in USP Monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanko, Valoran P; Rohrer, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    The current USP National Formulary contains 65 Monographs for drug formulations containing neomycin. All 65 Monographs prescribe a bioassay for neomycin assay. This bioassay, based on cell culture, is labor intensive, has poor precision, and cannot be adapted for purity or identification. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-IPAD), a liquid chromatography technique, has been shown to be suitable for neomycin purity analysis and neomycin assay of an over-the-counter first aid cream (Hanko and Rohrer [17]). Here we propose that an HPAE-IPAD assay can replace the bioassay in the 65 neomycin-containing Monographs. We applied the HPAE-IPAD assay to four neomycin-containing drug products representing the four classes of formulations found in the 65 Monographs, liquid, solid, suspension, and cream. Each drug was analyzed with two chromatography systems, and on 3 separate days. For all products, HPAE-IPAD measurements were precise and accurate with respect to the label concentrations. There was also high accuracy for spike recovery of neomycin from the four drug products throughout 70-150% of the labeled concentration. These results suggest that an HPAE-IPAD assay would be an accurate assay for neomycin, and would be faster and more precise than the current bioassay.

  16. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  17. Sperm DNA assays and their relationship to sperm motility and morphology in bulls (Bos Taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Rosanna; Romano, Juan E; Varner, Dickson D; Di Palo, Rossella; Love, Charles C

    2015-08-01

    The relationship among sperm DNA assays in bulls with different sperm motility and morphology measures has not been reported. The objectives of the present study were to (1) describe Comet assay measures and examine their repeatability (inter- and intra-assay); (2) compare sperm DNA quality assays (i.e., Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay-SCSA; alkaline and neutral Comet assays and Sperm Bos Halomax assay-SBH) in two groups of bulls selected on either greater and lesser sperm motility and morphology (greater compared with lesser); (3) determine the relationship among DNA assays and sperm motility and morphology values. Inter-assay repeatability was greater for the neutral Comet assay as compared to the alkaline Comet assay. Intra-assay repeatability was greater than inter-assay repeatability for both Comet assays. Comet assay dimension measures and percentage tail DNA were the most repeatable for both Comet assays. Among sperm DNA quality assays, only SCSA measures and neutral Comet assay Ghosts (% Ghosts), head diameter and area, and comet area were different between greater and lesser sperm quality groups (P<0.05). The SCSA measures were inversely correlated with neutral Comet head measures (diameter, area, and intensity) and positively with percentage Ghosts (P<0.05). The % Ghosts and COMP-αt were correlated with some measures of sperm morphology and sperm motility. The neutral Comet assay was more appropriate for sperm evaluation than the alkaline Comet assay for distinguishing among groups with different sperm quality.

  18. A versatile polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis based sulfotransferase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prather Brittany

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfotransferases are a large group of enzymes that regulate the biological activity or availability of a wide spectrum of substrates through sulfation with the sulfur donor 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS. These enzymes are known to be difficult to assay. A convenient assay is needed in order to better understand these enzymes. Results A universal sulfotransferase assay method based on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE is described. This assay has been successfully applied to substrates as small as α-naphthol and as big as proteoglycans. As examples, we present the assays for recombinant human CHST4, TPST1, CHST3 and HS6ST1. In order to assess whether a small molecule can be applicable to this type of assay, a method to estimate the relative mobility of a molecule to PAPS is also presented. The estimated relative mobilities of various sulfated small molecules generated by SULT1A1, SULT1E1, SULT2A1 and CHST4 are in the range of ± 0.2 of the actual relative mobilities. Conclusion The versatility of the current method comes from the ability that SDS-PAGE can separate proteins and small molecules according to different parameters. While mobilities of proteins during SDS-PAGE are inversely related to their sizes, mobilities of small molecules are positively related to their charge/mass ratios. The predicted relative mobility of a product to PAPS is a good indicator of whether a sulfotransferase can be assayed with SDS-PAGE. Because phosphorylation is most similar to sulfation in chemistry, the method is likely to be applicable to kinases as well.

  19. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data.

  20. Worldwide interest in the comet assay: a bibliometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Monica; Milazzo, Daniele; Ugolini, Donatella; Milic, Mirta; Campolongo, Alessandra; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Bonassi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The comet assay is a rapid, sensitive and relatively simple method for measuring DNA damage. A bibliometric study was performed to evaluate temporal and geographical trends, research quality and main areas of interest in scientific production in this field. A PubMed search strategy was developed and 7674 citations were retrieved in the period 1990-2013. Notably, the MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) term 'comet assay', officially introduced in 2000, is used by indexers only in two thirds of papers retrieved. Articles on the comet assay were published in 78 countries, spread over the 5 continents. The EU contributed the greatest output, producing >2900 articles with IF (42.0%) and totalling almost 10000 IF points, and was followed by USA. In the new millennium, research with this assay reached a plateau or slow decline in the most industrialised areas (USA, Germany, UK, Italy), while its use has boomed in emerging countries, with increases of 5- to 7-fold in the last 10 years in China, India and Brazil, for instance. This transition resulted in a slow decrease of scientific production quality, as the countries that increased their relative weight typically had lower mIFs. The most common MeSH terms used in papers using the comet assay referred to wide areas of interest, such as DNA damage and repair, cell survival and apoptosis, cancer and oxidative stress, occupational and environmental health. Keywords related to humans, rodents and cell culture were also frequently used. The top journal for the comet assay articles was found to be Mutation Research, followed by Mutagenesis. Most papers using the comet assay as a biomarker were published in genetic and toxicology journals, with a stress on environmental and occupational disciplines.

  1. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyruwan, Saminda; Vempati, Uma D; Küçük-McGinty, Hande; Visser, Ubbo; Koleti, Amar; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Chung, Caty; Bittker, Joshua A; Clemons, Paul A; Brudz, Steve; Siripala, Anosha; Morales, Arturo J; Romacker, Martin; Twomey, David; Bureeva, Svetlana; Lemmon, Vance; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  2. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eRojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes.Over a thirty year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been litlle employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  3. Multiplexed Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay To Detect Intestinal Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crannell, Zachary; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Nair, Gayatri; Mejia, Rojelio; White, A Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a proof-of-concept multiplex recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay with lateral flow readout that is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating DNA from any of the diarrhea-causing protozoa Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. Together, these parasites contribute significantly to the global burden of diarrheal illness. Differential diagnosis of these parasites is traditionally accomplished via stool microscopy. However, microscopy is insensitive and can miss up to half of all cases. DNA-based diagnostics such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are far more sensitive; however, they rely on expensive thermal cycling equipment, limiting their availability to centralized reference laboratories. Isothermal DNA amplification platforms, such as the RPA platform used in this study, alleviate the need for thermal cycling equipment and have the potential to broaden access to more sensitive diagnostics. Until now, multiplex RPA assays have not been developed that are capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating infections caused by different pathogens. We developed a multiplex RPA assay to detect the presence of DNA from Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. The multiplex assay was characterized using synthetic DNA, where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 403, 425, and 368 gene copies per reaction of the synthetic Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba targets, respectively (roughly 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than for the same targets in a singleplex RPA assay). The multiplex assay was also characterized using DNA extracted from live parasites spiked into stool samples where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 444, 6, and 9 parasites per reaction for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba parasites, respectively. This proof-of-concept assay may be reconfigured to detect a wide variety of targets by re-designing the primer and probe sequences.

  4. Comparison of clonogenic assay with premature chromosome condensation assay in prediction of human cell radiosensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuan-Zi Wang; Wen-Jian Li; Hong Zhang; Jian-She Yang; Rong Qiu; Xiao Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the number of non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks can predict the radiosensitivity of human cell lines.METHODS: Cell lines of human ovary carcinoma cells (HO8910), human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and liver cells (L02) were irradiated with a range of doses and assessed both of cell survival and non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks at 24 h after irradiation. Cell survival was documented by a colony assay. Non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining G2 chromatid breaks at 24 h after irradiation, detected by the prematurely chromosome condensed (PCC) technique.RESULTS: A linear-quadratic survival curve was observed in three cell lines, and HepG2 was the most sensitive to y-radiation. A dose-dependent linear increase was observed in radiation-induced non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks measured at 24 h after irradiation in all cell lines, and HepG2 was the most susceptible to induction of non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks. A close correlation was found between the clonogenic radiosensitivity and the radiation-induced non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks (r= 0.923). Furthermore, survival-aberration correlations for two or more than two doses lever were also significant.CONCLUSION: The number of non-rejoining G2 PCC breaks holds considerable promise for predicting the radiosensitivity of normal and tumor cells when two or more than two doses lever is tested.

  5. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades the production and use of nanomaterials (NMs has impressively increased. Their small size, given a mass equal to that of the corresponding bulk material, implies an increase in the surface area and consequently in the number of atoms that can be reactive. They possess different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to bulk materials of the same composition, which makes them very interesting and valuable for many different applications in technology, energy, construction, electronics, agriculture, optics, paints, textiles, food, cosmetics, medicine... Toxicological assessment of NMs is crucial; the same properties that make them interesting also make them potentially harmful for health and the environment. However, the term NM covers many different kinds of particle , and so there is no simple, standard approach to assessing their toxicity. NMs can enter the cell, interact with cell components and even penetrate the nucleus and interfere with the genetic material. Among the different branches of toxicology, genotoxicity is a main area of concern since it is closely related with the carcinogenic potential of compounds. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD has published internationally agreed in vitro and in vivo validated test methods to evaluate different genotoxic endpoints of chemicals, including chromosome and gene mutations, and DNA breaks. However not all the assays are suitable to study the genotoxic potential of NMs as has been shown by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN. Moreover, alterations to DNA bases, which are precursors to mutations and of great importance in elucidating the mechanism of action of NMs, are not covered by the OECD guidelines. The in vivo standard comet assay (which measures DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites was included in the OECD assays battery in September 2014 while the in vitro standard comet assay is currently under

  6. Field-based evaluation of a reagent strip test for diagnosis of Schistosomiasis mansoni by detecting circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in urine in low endemic area in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legesse M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of a reagent strip test for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni by detecting circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in urine were evaluated using 184 stool and urine samples collected from schoolchildren living in relatively low endemic area of schistosomiasis mansoni in Ethiopia. A combined result of stool samples processed by Kato and formol-ether concentration methods was used as gold standard. The results showed that detection of CCA in urine using reagent strip test was slightly higher than the combined results of the stool techniques (65.2% vs 42.4%, p > 0.05 in suggesting the prevalence of the disease. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the reagent strip test were 76.9%, 43.4%, 50% and 71.9%, respectively. The result of egg counts using Kato method suggested that detection of urine CCA could be used to indicate the intensity of infection. Nevertheless, like that of stool examination, the reagent strip test was found to be less sensitive in case of light to moderate infections. About 23.1% of the study children who were excreting the eggs of the parasite were found negative by the reagent strip test. The relative insensitivity of a reagent strip test in low intensity of infection necessitates for the development of more sensitive assay that can truly discriminate schistosome-infected from non-infected individuals.

  7. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, crAssphage, was discovered by metagenomic data mining and reported to be abundant in and closely associated with human fecal waste. To confirm bioinformatic predictions, 384 primer sets were designed along the length of the crAssphage genome. Based upon initial screening, two novel crAssphage qPCR assays (CPQ_056 and CPQ_064) were designed and evaluated in reference fecal samples and water matrices. The assays exhibited high specificities (98.6%) when tested against a large animal fecal reference library and were highly abundant in raw sewage and sewage impacted water samples. In addition, CPQ_056 and CPQ_064 assay performance was compared to HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 methods in paired experiments. Findings confirm viral crAssphage qPCR assays perform at a similar level to well established bacterial human-associated fecal source identification technologies. These new viral based assays could become important water quality management and research tools. To inform the public.

  8. A radioactive assay for the degradation of neuropeptide Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, R.; Lucius, R.; Mentlein, R. [Kiel Univ. (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian central nervous system. Like other neuropeptides, NPY is inactivated by specialized neuro-peptidases. To trace the degradation of NPY, an assay was established using biotinylated NPY. Biotinyl-NPY was radiolabeled with Na{sup 125}I by the chloramine-T method and bound to a streptavidin-agarose matrix. The amount of radiolabeling was analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. The assay was carried out with five peptidases and inhibitors to demonstrate different specific activity. Measurable amounts of radioactivity were released by treatment with endopeptidase-24.18, plasmin, and trypsin, whereas dipetidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) showed no activity in this assay. In the case of DPPIV this is due to a resistance of the assay to aminopeptidase attack. The assay is useful to study the specific degradation of NPY particularly by endopeptidases in all kinds of biological samples. (authors). 31 refs., 6 figs.

  9. The use of comet assay in plant toxicology: recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição LV Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The systematic study of genotoxicity in plants induced by contaminants and other stress agents has been hindered to date by the lack of reliable and robust biomarkers. The comet assay is a versatile and sensitive method for the evaluation of DNA damages and DNA repair capacity at single-cell level. Due to its simplicity and sensitivity, and the small number of cells required to obtain robust results, the use of plant comet assay has drastically increased in the last decade. For years its use was restricted to a few model species, e.g. Allium cepa, Nicotiana tabacum, Vicia faba, or Arabidopsis thaliana but this number largely increased in the last years. Plant comet assay has been used to study the genotoxic impact of radiation, chemicals including pesticides, phytocompounds, heavy metals, nanoparticles or contaminated complex matrices. Here we will review the most recent data on the use of this technique as a standard approach for studying the genotoxic effects of different stress conditions on plants. Also, we will discuss the integration of information provided by the comet assay with other DNA-damage indicators, and with cellular responses including oxidative stress, cell division or cell death. Finally, we will focus on putative relations between transcripts related with DNA damage pathways, DNA replication and repair, oxidative stress and cell cycle progression that have been identified in plant cells with comet assays demonstrating DNA damage.

  10. Non-Destructive Assay of Curium Contaminated Transuranic Waste Drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L.A.

    1998-11-01

    At the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a series of non-destructive assays were performed on five transuranic waste (TRU) drums containing non-plutonium scrap metal that was potentially contaminated with weapons grade plutonium and trace quantities of curium. Typically, waste drums containing metal matrices are assayed for plutonium content using passive neutron coincidence counting techniques. The presence of trace quantities of Cm-244 prevents this type of analysis because of the strong coincidence signal created by spontaneous fission of Cm-244. To discriminate between the plutonium and curium materials present, an active neutron measurement technique was used. A Cf shuffler designed for measurement of uranium bearing materials was calibrated for plutonium in the active mode. The waste drums were then assayed for plutonium content in the shuffler using the active-mode calibration. The curium contamination levels were estimated from the difference between the active-mode measurement in the shuffler and a passive assay in a neutron coincidence counter. Far field gamma-ray measurements were made to identify additional radioactive contaminants and to corroborate the plutonium measurement results obtained from the active-mode assay. This report describes in detail the measurement process used for characterization of these waste drums. The measurement results and the estimated uncertainty will be presented.

  11. Capture-stabilize approach for membrane protein SPR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ruiyin; Reczek, David; Brondyk, William

    2014-12-08

    Measuring the binding kinetics of antibodies to intact membrane proteins by surface plasmon resonance has been challenging largely because of the inherent difficulties in capturing membrane proteins on chip surfaces while retaining their native conformation. Here we describe a method in which His-tagged CXCR5, a GPCR, was purified and captured on a Biacore chip surface via the affinity tag. The captured receptor protein was then stabilized on the chip surface by limited cross-linking. The resulting chip surface retained ligand binding activity and was used for monoclonal antibody kinetics assays by a standard Biacore kinetics assay method with a simple low pH regeneration step. We demonstrate the advantages of this whole receptor assay when compared to available peptide-based binding assays. We further extended the application of the capture-stabilize approach to virus-like particles and demonstrated its utility analyzing antibodies against CD52, a GPI-anchored protein, in its native membrane environment. The results are the first demonstration of chemically stabilized chip surfaces for membrane protein SPR assays.

  12. A highly scalable peptide-based assay system for proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Kozlov

    Full Text Available We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays.

  13. Evaluation of a radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rootwelt, K.

    1988-02-01

    A commercial radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb), based on solubilized porcine receptor and purified radio-iodinated bovine TSH, was tested in 264 subjects with a variety of thyroid disorders. The sensitivity of the assay for the detection of hyperthyroid Graves' disease was 91%. The assay specificity for Graves' disease was 95%. With the exception of one patient with Hashimoto's disease and one patient with de Quervain's subacute thyroiditis no subjects other than Graves' patients had detectable TRAb. Thus purely blocking TSII receptor autoantibodies were not detected with the assay. One female with thyroxine-treated idiopathic primary hypothyroidism who had given birth to two children with transiently elevated TSH, was found to have a circulating TSH-binding substance that resulted in an abnormally negative TRAb value, and highly discrepant results when TSH was measured with a double antibody TSH radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The TSH-binding substance was precipitated like a protein, but was not IgG. Similar findings have not previously been reported.

  14. Formalization, annotation and analysis of diverse drug and probe screening assay datasets using the BioAssay Ontology (BAO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma D Vempati

    Full Text Available Huge amounts of high-throughput screening (HTS data for probe and drug development projects are being generated in the pharmaceutical industry and more recently in the public sector. The resulting experimental datasets are increasingly being disseminated via publically accessible repositories. However, existing repositories lack sufficient metadata to describe the experiments and are often difficult to navigate by non-experts. The lack of standardized descriptions and semantics of biological assays and screening results hinder targeted data retrieval, integration, aggregation, and analyses across different HTS datasets, for example to infer mechanisms of action of small molecule perturbagens. To address these limitations, we created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO. BAO has been developed with a focus on data integration and analysis enabling the classification of assays and screening results by concepts that relate to format, assay design, technology, target, and endpoint. Previously, we reported on the higher-level design of BAO and on the semantic querying capabilities offered by the ontology-indexed triple store of HTS data. Here, we report on our detailed design, annotation pipeline, substantially enlarged annotation knowledgebase, and analysis results. We used BAO to annotate assays from the largest public HTS data repository, PubChem, and demonstrate its utility to categorize and analyze diverse HTS results from numerous experiments. BAO is publically available from the NCBO BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/1533. BAO provides controlled terminology and uniform scope to report probe and drug discovery screening assays and results. BAO leverages description logic to formalize the domain knowledge and facilitate the semantic integration with diverse other resources. As a consequence, BAO offers the potential to infer new knowledge from a corpus of assay results, for example molecular mechanisms of action of perturbagens.

  15. A simple high-content cell cycle assay reveals frequent discrepancies between cell number and ATP and MTS proliferation assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Ka Yan Chan

    Full Text Available In order to efficiently characterize both antiproliferative potency and mechanism of action of small molecules targeting the cell cycle, we developed a high-throughput image-based assay to determine cell number and cell cycle phase distribution. Using this we profiled the effects of experimental and approved anti-cancer agents with a range mechanisms of action on a set of cell lines, comparing direct cell counting versus two metabolism-based cell viability/proliferation assay formats, ATP-dependent bioluminescence, MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium reduction, and a whole-well DNA-binding dye fluorescence assay. We show that, depending on compound mechanisms of action, the metabolism-based proxy assays are frequently prone to 1 significant underestimation of compound potency and efficacy, and 2 non-monotonic dose-response curves due to concentration-dependent phenotypic 'switching'. In particular, potency and efficacy of DNA synthesis-targeting agents such as gemcitabine and etoposide could be profoundly underestimated by ATP and MTS-reduction assays. In the same image-based assay we showed that drug-induced increases in ATP content were associated with increased cell size and proportionate increases in mitochondrial content and respiratory flux concomitant with cell cycle arrest. Therefore, differences in compound mechanism of action and cell line-specific responses can yield significantly misleading results when using ATP or tetrazolium-reduction assays as a proxy for cell number when screening compounds for antiproliferative activity or profiling panels of cell lines for drug sensitivity.

  16. Cytogenetic status of healthy children assessed with the alkaline comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Oreščanin, Višnja; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2013-01-20

    In the present study the alkaline comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN Cyt) assay were used to evaluate the baseline frequency of cytogenetic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 50 healthy children from the general population in Croatia (age, 11.62±1.81 years). Mean values of tail length, tail intensity and tail moment, as comet assay parameters, were 12.92±0.10, 0.73±0.06 and 0.08±0.01, respectively. The mean frequency of micronuclei (MN) for all subjects was 2.32±0.28 per 1000 bi-nucleated cells, while the mean frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) was 1.72±0.24 and of nuclear buds (NBUDs) 1.44±0.19. The mean nuclear division index (NDI) was 1.70±0.05. When comet-assay parameters were considered, higher mean values for all three were found for the female population. According to the Mann-Whitney U test applied on the results of the comet assay, the only statistically significant difference between the male and female populations was found for tail length. Similar to the results obtained by the comet assay, girls showed higher mean values of all three measured parameters of the CBMN Cyt assay. This difference was statistically significant for total number of NPBs only. In the case of the NDI, a higher mean value was also obtained in girls, but this difference was not statistically significant. The results obtained present background data that could be considered as normal values for healthy children living in urban areas, and can later on serve as baseline values for further toxicological monitoring. Additionally, the usefulness of both techniques in measuring cytogenetic damage during bio-monitoring of children is confirmed.

  17. Formalization, annotation and analysis of diverse drug and probe screening assay datasets using the BioAssay Ontology (BAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vempati, Uma D; Przydzial, Magdalena J; Chung, Caty; Abeyruwan, Saminda; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Visser, Ubbo; Lemmon, Vance P; Schürer, Stephan C

    2012-01-01

    Huge amounts of high-throughput screening (HTS) data for probe and drug development projects are being generated in the pharmaceutical industry and more recently in the public sector. The resulting experimental datasets are increasingly being disseminated via publically accessible repositories. However, existing repositories lack sufficient metadata to describe the experiments and are often difficult to navigate by non-experts. The lack of standardized descriptions and semantics of biological assays and screening results hinder targeted data retrieval, integration, aggregation, and analyses across different HTS datasets, for example to infer mechanisms of action of small molecule perturbagens. To address these limitations, we created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO). BAO has been developed with a focus on data integration and analysis enabling the classification of assays and screening results by concepts that relate to format, assay design, technology, target, and endpoint. Previously, we reported on the higher-level design of BAO and on the semantic querying capabilities offered by the ontology-indexed triple store of HTS data. Here, we report on our detailed design, annotation pipeline, substantially enlarged annotation knowledgebase, and analysis results. We used BAO to annotate assays from the largest public HTS data repository, PubChem, and demonstrate its utility to categorize and analyze diverse HTS results from numerous experiments. BAO is publically available from the NCBO BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/1533. BAO provides controlled terminology and uniform scope to report probe and drug discovery screening assays and results. BAO leverages description logic to formalize the domain knowledge and facilitate the semantic integration with diverse other resources. As a consequence, BAO offers the potential to infer new knowledge from a corpus of assay results, for example molecular mechanisms of action of perturbagens.

  18. Qualification of standard membrane-feeding assay with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and potential improvements for future assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoyo Miura

    Full Text Available Vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission are of increasing interest and a robust functional assay to measure this activity would promote their development by providing a biologically relevant means of evaluating potential vaccine candidates. Therefore, we aimed to qualify the standard membrane-feeding assay (SMFA. The assay measures the transmission-blocking activity of antibodies by feeding cultured P. falciparum gametocytes to Anopheles mosquitoes in the presence of the test antibodies and measuring subsequent mosquito infection. The International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH Harmonised Tripartite Guideline Q2(R1 details characteristics considered in assay validation. Of these characteristics, we decided to qualify the SMFA for Precision, Linearity, Range and Specificity. The transmission-blocking 4B7 monoclonal antibody was tested over 6 feeding experiments at several concentrations to determine four suitable concentrations that were tested in triplicate in the qualification experiments (3 additional feeds to evaluate Precision, Linearity and Range. For Specificity, 4B7 was tested in the presence of normal mouse IgG. We determined intra- and inter-assay variability of % inhibition of mean oocyst intensity at each concentration of 4B7 (lower concentrations showed higher variability. We also showed that % inhibition was dependent on 4B7 concentration and the activity is specific to 4B7. Since obtaining empirical data is time-consuming, we generated a model using data from all 9 feeds and simulated the effects of different parameters on final readouts to improve the assay procedure and analytical methods for future studies. For example, we estimated the effect of number of mosquitoes dissected on variability of % inhibition, and simulated the relationship between % inhibition in oocyst intensity and % inhibition of prevalence of infected mosquitos at different mean oocysts in the control. SMFA is one of the few biological assays used in

  19. Dose estimation using dicentric chromosome assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay: comparison between manual and automated scoring in triage mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; De Sanctis, Stefania; Di Cristofaro, Sara; Franchini, Valeria; Regalbuto, Elisa; Mammana, Giacomo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-06-01

    In cases of an accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation, it is essential to estimate the individual absorbed dose of a potentially radiation-exposed person. For this purpose, biological dosimetry can be performed to confirm, complement or even replace physical dosimetry when this proves to be unavailable. The most validated biodosimetry techniques for dose estimation are the dicentric chromosome assay, the "gold standard" for individual dose assessment, and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. However, both assays are time consuming and require skilled scorers. In case of large-scale accidents, different strategies have been developed to increase the throughput of cytogenetic service laboratories. These are the decrease of cell numbers to be scored for triage dosimetry; the automation of procedures including the scoring of, for example, aberrant chromosomes and micronuclei; and the establishment of laboratory networks in order to enable mutual assistance if necessary. In this study, the authors compared the accuracy of triage mode biodosimetry by dicentric chromosome analysis and the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay performing both the manual and the automated scoring mode. For dose estimation using dicentric chromosome assay of 10 blind samples irradiated up to 6.4 Gy of x-rays, a number of metaphase spreads were analyzed ranging from 20 up to 50 cells for the manual and from 20 up to 500 cells for the automatic scoring mode. For dose estimation based on the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay, the micronucleus frequency in both 100 and 200 binucleated cells was determined by manual and automatic scoring. The results of both assays and scoring modes were compared and analyzed considering the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of dose estimation with regard to the discrimination power of clinically relevant binary categories of exposure doses.

  20. Application of statistical process control to qualitative molecular diagnostic assays

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Cathal P.

    2014-11-01

    Modern pathology laboratories and in particular high throughput laboratories such as clinical chemistry have developed a reliable system for statistical process control (SPC). Such a system is absent from the majority of molecular laboratories and where present is confined to quantitative assays. As the inability to apply SPC to an assay is an obvious disadvantage this study aimed to solve this problem by using a frequency estimate coupled with a confidence interval calculation to detect deviations from an expected mutation frequency. The results of this study demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and highlight minimum sample number requirements. Notably, assays with low mutation frequencies and detection of small deviations from an expected value require greater sample numbers to mitigate a protracted time to detection. Modeled laboratory data was also used to highlight how this approach might be applied in a routine molecular laboratory. This article is the first to describe the application of SPC to qualitative laboratory data.

  1. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  2. MAPK Assays in Arabidopsis MAMP-PRR Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoo Sun; Sheen, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Activation of MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) cascades after MAMP (Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern) perception through PRR (Pattern Recognition Receptor) is one of the first conserved responses when plants encounter microbial organisms. Phosphorylation of various cellular factors in the MAMP-PRR pathway by MAPK cascades is critical for broad-spectrum plant innate immunity. Measurement of MAPK activation and identification of MAPK phosphorylation targets in the MAMP-PRR signal transduction pathway are essential to understand how plants reprogram their cellular processes to cope with unfavorable microbial attack. Here, we describe detailed protocols of three assays measuring MAPK activity after MAMP perception: (1) immune-blotting analysis with anti-phospho ERK1/2 antibody; (2) in-gel kinase assay using a general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP); (3) an in vitro kinase assay to evaluate phosphorylation of MAPK substrate candidates during MAMP-PRR signaling based on a protoplast expression system.

  3. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  4. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.; Shea, C.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; Schlyer, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-01

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [{sup 11}C]Benztropine, [{sup 11}C]cocaine, [{sup 11}C]clorgyline, [{sup 11}C]deprenyl, [{sup 11}C]methadone, [{sup 11}C]methylphenidate, [{sup 11}C]raclorpride, and [{sup 11}C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers.

  5. Evaluation of a visualization assay for blood on forensic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lepez, Trees; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2015-05-01

    In forensics, bloodstains on dark fabrics might be invisible for the naked eye. Although several visualization, presumptive, and confirmatory blood tests have been developed, all have one or more disadvantages, especially on DNA analysis. We report here the use of a visualization assay that can visually detect blood drops up to 1/20 dilution. In this assay, the fabric is placed between two wet filter papers and covered by glass surfaces on both sides. Pressure is applied on the glass surfaces in which bloodstains transfer onto the filter papers through capillary forces. Detected stains can be tested with other more sensitive presumptive blood tests performed on the filter paper. Even more, DNA analysis can be performed on the transferred bloodstains. The presented visualization assay is easy to perform, extremely cheap, requires little hands on time, and does not affect bloodstain pattern analysis.

  6. Proofreading genotyping assays mediated by high fidelity exo+ DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai; Pardinas, Jose R; Sommer, Steve S; Yao, Kai-Tai

    2005-02-01

    DNA polymerases with 3'-5' proofreading function mediate high fidelity DNA replication but their application for mutation detection was almost completely neglected before 1998. The obstacle facing the use of exo(+) polymerases for mutation detection could be overcome by primer-3'-termini modification, which has been tested using allele-specific primers with 3' labeling, 3' exonuclease-resistance and 3' dehydroxylation modifications. Accordingly, three new types of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays have been developed to carry out genome-wide genotyping making use of the fidelity advantage of exo(+) polymerases. Such SNP assays might also provide a novel approach for re-sequencing and de novo sequencing. These new mutation detection assays are widely adaptable to a variety of platforms, including real-time PCR, multi-well plate and microarray technologies. Application of exo(+) polymerases to genetic analysis could accelerate the pace of personalized medicine.

  7. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-03-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources.

  8. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  9. Assay and analytical practice in the South African mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenahan, W.C.; Murray-Smith, R. de L.

    1986-01-01

    Contains chapters with the following titles: laboratory design; the preparation of mine samples; the furnace room; balances and mass measurement; the fire assay; sampling and the preparation of samples from metallurgical plants; the determination of gold in cyanide solutions; particle size analysis; the analysis of uranium prospecting, mining and extraction plant samples; the assay of gold bullion and some associated methods of analysis, special methods for the assay of complex materials and geological prospecting samples; the analysis of mine air; pH and electrometric measurement; the treatment and analysis of water and effluents; the sample preparation; analysis and testing of coal (and coke); the analysis of miscellaneous mine materials; the determination of base metals in ores and related materials; the determination of platinum group metals; the analysis of cyanide solutions; the determination of sulphur in ores and related materials; statistical control of analytical practice.

  10. Lipase assay in duodenal juice using a conductimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballot, C; Favre-Bonvin, G; Wallach, J M

    1984-11-15

    Lipase activity in duodenal juice is known to undergo important variations in pathologic states, especially in cases of chronic pancreatitis. Almost all of the current assay methods are based on the measurement of hydrolysis of olive oil or triolein, mainly by potentiometry. As we have developed a conductimetric method for enzyme activity measurements, we have applied it to lipase assay. A higher experimental conductimetric sensitivity is obtained when liberated acids have a short chain (higher limiting equivalent conductivity). We have therefore used triacetin as a substrate and compared out method with potentiometry (pH-stat) and spectrophotometry. The correlation coefficients of both methods with conductimetry were 0.94 and 0.97, respectively, indicating that the conductimetric method may be used for lipase assay in duodenal juice, using triacetin as a substrate.

  11. Automated assay optimization with integrated statistics and smart robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P B; Stewart, F P; Dunnington, D J; Quinn, S T; Schulz, C K; Vaidya, K S; Kurali, E; Lane, T R; Xiong, W C; Sherrill, T P; Snider, J S; Terpstra, N D; Hertzberg, R P

    2000-08-01

    The transition from manual to robotic high throughput screening (HTS) in the last few years has made it feasible to screen hundreds of thousands of chemical entities against a biological target in less than a month. This rate of HTS has increased the visibility of bottlenecks, one of which is assay optimization. In many organizations, experimental methods are generated by therapeutic teams associated with specific targets and passed on to the HTS group. The resulting assays frequently need to be further optimized to withstand the rigors and time frames inherent in robotic handling. Issues such as protein aggregation, ligand instability, and cellular viability are common variables in the optimization process. The availability of robotics capable of performing rapid random access tasks has made it possible to design optimization experiments that would be either very difficult or impossible for a person to carry out. Our approach to reducing the assay optimization bottleneck has been to unify the highly specific fields of statistics, biochemistry, and robotics. The product of these endeavors is a process we have named automated assay optimization (AAO). This has enabled us to determine final optimized assay conditions, which are often a composite of variables that we would not have arrived at by examining each variable independently. We have applied this approach to both radioligand binding and enzymatic assays and have realized benefits in both time and performance that we would not have predicted a priori. The fully developed AAO process encompasses the ability to download information to a robot and have liquid handling methods automatically created. This evolution in smart robotics has proven to be an invaluable tool for maintaining high-quality data in the context of increasing HTS demands.

  12. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abd El Wahed

    Full Text Available Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF. Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV. Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA assays were developed to detect DENV1-4.Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4 to 241 (DENV1-3 RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal and in Bangkok (Thailand. In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38 °C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31 and 100% (n=23, respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90 and 100%(n=41, respectively.During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations.

  13. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebel Urban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148.

  14. Radioreceptor assay analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsunari; Schäfers, Rafael F; Michel, Martin C

    1998-01-01

    Aims A radioreceptor assay has been developed for α1-adrenoceptor subtypes and applied to a pharmacokinetic analysis of tamsulosin and terazosin. Methods Young, male, healthy volunteers received 0.4 mg tamsulosin (as Omnic® modified release capsules) or 5 mg terazosin (as Flotrin® tablets) in a randomized, cross-over design. Before and after 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 23.5 h plasma was analyzed by radioreceptor assay using cloned human α1A-, α1B- and α1D-adrenoceptors and specific h.p.l.c. analysis. Results Following ingestion of tamsulosin median peak plasma levels of 16 ng ml−1 were reached after 5 h and declined to 2 ng ml−1 at 23.5 h. The time course in the radioreceptor assay was similar, and at most time points binding to α1A-adrenoceptors was significantly greater than to α1B- and α1D-adrenoceptors. Following ingestion of terazosin median peak plasma levels of 91 ng ml−1 were reached after 1 h and declined to 11 ng ml−1 at 23.5 h. In the radioreceptor assay binding also peaked at 1 h and declined thereafter, but even after 23.5 h considerable binding activity remained detectable at all three subtypes. At most time points binding to the α1A- and α1D-adrenoceptor was significantly greater than to the α1B-adrenoceptor. Conclusions We conclude that α1-adrenoceptor antagonist pharmacokinetics can be monitored by radioreceptor assays in a subtype-selective manner. Tamsulosin and terazosin exhibit subtype selective receptor binding ex vivo. The discordance between terazosin blood levels as determined by h.p.l.c. and radioreceptor assay at late time points indicates the possible involvement of metabolites in in vivo terazosin effects. PMID:9489594

  15. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the comet assay, single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose and they are inexpensive.

  16. Development of a new in vitro skin sensitization assay (Epidermal Sensitization Assay; EpiSensA) using reconstructed human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazutoshi; Nukada, Yuko; Takenouchi, Osamu; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2013-12-01

    Recent changes in regulatory requirements and social views on animal testing have accelerated the development of reliable alternative tests for predicting skin sensitizing potential of chemicals. In this study, we aimed to develop a new in vitro skin sensitization assay using reconstructed human epidermis, RhE model, which is expected to have broader applicability domain rather than existing in vitro assays. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of five genes (ATF3, DNAJB4, GCLM, HSPA6 and HSPH1) related to cellular stress response were significantly up-regulated in RhE model after 6h treatment with representative skin sensitizers, 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and oxazolone, but not a non-sensitizer, benzalkonium chloride. The predictive performance of five genes was examined with eight skin sensitizers (e.g., cinnamic aldehyde), four non-sensitizers (e.g., sodium lauryl sulfate) and four pre-/pro-haptens (e.g., p-phenylenediamine, isoeugenol). When the positive criteria were set to obtain the highest accuracy with the animal testing (LLNA), ATF3, DNAJB4 and GCLM exhibited a high predictive accuracy (100%, 93.8% and 87.5%, respectively). All tested pre-/pro-haptens were correctly predicted by both ATF3 and DNAJB4. These results suggested that the RhE-based assay, termed epidermal sensitization assay (EpiSensA), could be an useful skin sensitization assay with a broad applicability domain including pre-/pro-haptens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  18. Liposomes and MTT cell viability assay: an incompatible affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angius, Fabrizio; Floris, Alice

    2015-03-01

    The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay is commonly used to evaluate the cytotoxicity potential of drugs vehicled by liposomes. However, liposome delivering drugs could produce inconsistent values of MTT absorbance. On the basis of previous experiments demonstrating the MTT affinity for lipid droplets, this paper aims to show that empty-liposomes interfere, per se, on MTT assay due to its lipidic nature. This brings into question the use of MTT testing cytotoxicity when liposomes are involved in delivering drugs.

  19. Assessing equivalence of two assays using sensitivity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Jorge; Burdick, Richard K

    2007-01-01

    The equivalence of two assays is determined using the sensitivity and specificity relative to a gold standard. The equivalence-testing criterion is based on a misclassification rate proposed by Burdick et al. (2005) and the intersection-union test (IUT) method proposed by Berger (1982). Using a variance components model and IUT methods, we construct bounds for the sensitivity and specificity relative to the gold standard assay based on generalized confidence intervals. We conduct a simulation study to assess whether the bounds maintain the stated test size. We present a computational example to demonstrate the method described in the paper.

  20. Use of laminar flow patterning for miniaturised biochemical assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Krühne, Ulrich; Beyer, M.

    2004-01-01

    Laminar flow in microfluidic chambers was used to construct low (one dimensional) density arrays suitable for miniaturized biochemical assays. By varying the ratio of flows of two guiding streams flanking a sample stream, precise focusing and positioning of the latter was achieved, and reactive...... species carried in the sample stream were deposited on functionalized chip surfaces as discrete 50 mm wide lanes. Using different model systems we have confirmed the method's suitability for qualitative screening and quantification tasks in receptor-ligand assays, recording biotin......-streptavidin interactions, DNA-hybridization and DNA-triplex formation. The system is simple, fast, reproducible, flexible, and has small sample requirements....