WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-progressing stage 4s

  1. Stage 4S Bilateral Adrenal Neuroblastoma in a Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stage 4S bilateral adrenal neuroblastoma presenting in the neonatal period is extremely rare. A 1-day-old male with 4S bilateral adrenal neuroblastoma complicated by marked hepatomegaly managed by chemotherapy is being reported. The provisional diagnosis of neuroblastoma was made in the fetal life during the last trimester of pregnancy. Cardiomyopathy due to doxorubicin cytotoxicity developed over ensuing years, which is being treated.

  2. BL4S, or how CERN sets the stage for teenage scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2014, the Beamline for Schools (BL4S) competition allows high-school students between 16 and 18 years old to run a real experiment at CERN’s PS accelerator (see here). For two years, students and schools worldwide have risen to the challenge and taken part enthusiastically in the competition. To ensure that it runs smoothly and enjoyably, over 100 CERN people work behind the scenes. The Bulletin lifts the curtain.   Student teams from Greece and the Netherlands – the winners of CERN’s first Beamline for schools competition – came to CERN to work on their experiments using a test beam. Turning young high-school students into real physicists who use a high-energy beam, set up an experiment and deal with data acquisition and analysis, is no game. For the people at CERN, the first step is to select the best proposals from those received from schools worldwide. “In 2015, over 40 scientists helped us select the best proposa...

  3. Atomic resolution structures of discrete stages on the reaction coordinate of the [Fe4S4] enzyme IspG (GcpE)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2015-04-11

    IspG is the penultimate enzyme in non-mevalonate biosynthesis of the universal terpene building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Its mechanism of action has been the subject of numerous studies but remained unresolved due to difficulties in identifying distinct reaction intermediates. Using a moderate reducing agent as well as an epoxide substrate analogue, we were now able to trap and crystallographically characterize various stages in the IspG catalyzed conversion of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MEcPP) to (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methylbut-2-enyl-4-diphosphate (HMBPP). In addition, the enzyme’s structure was determined in complex with several inhibitors. These results, combined with recent electron paramagnetic resonance data, allowed us to deduce a detailed and complete IspG catalytic mechanism which describes all stages from initial ring opening to formation of HMBPP via discrete radical and carbanion intermediates. The data presented in this article provide a guide for the design of selective drugs against many pro- and eukaryotic pathogens to which the non-mevalonate pathway is essential for survival and virulence.

  4. SCA13 causes dominantly inherited non-progressive myoclonus ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaut, Solveig; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Chanson, Jean-Baptiste; Ewenczyk, Claire; Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Muller, Jean; Legrand, André Pierre; Durr, Alexandra; Laugel, Vincent; Koenig, Michel; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2017-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 13 (SCA13) is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia. To our knowledge, its association to movement disorders has never been described. We aimed at reporting 8 new SCA13 cases with a focus on movement disorders especially myoclonus. We performed a detailed neurological examination and neurophysiological recording in 8 patients consecutively diagnosed with SCA13 between December 2013 and October 2015 and followed up in two French tertiary centers. We identified mild subcortical myoclonus in all patients, with a homogenous clinical and electrophysiological pattern. Myoclonus ataxia was very slowly progressive, like the other symptoms of the disease, whatever the age of onset. Patients with R423H mutation had an earlier age of onset than patients with R420H mutation. Myoclonus appears to be frequent in SCA13. SCA13 should be considered facing non-progressive autosomal dominant myoclonus ataxia, and polymyographic recording should be included in the diagnosis work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Monomelic amyotrophy: non progressive atrophy of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan; Lethlean; Blum

    1999-07-01

    Monomelic amyotrophy is a rare clinical entity, resulting in wasting and weakness localized to the hand and forearm unilaterally, in the absence of any sensory or long tract signs. The onset of the disease is insidious, occurring in males before the age of 30 years, with a clinical course marked by non-progression. The case of a 19-year-old Indonesian male patient is presented, with a one year history of right upper limb weakness. Nerve conduction studies were normal, without evidence of conduction block. Electromyography showed changes of chronic partial denervation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed an asymmetry of the spinal cord. Possible aetiological mechanisms for these changes are discussed. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  6. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  7. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  8. Maternal morbidity with caesarean section for non-progress of labour: an analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the maternal morbidity and mortality in caesarean section for non-progress of labour, a study was conducted over a period of 16 years at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram among 533 cases of non-progress of labour for which caesarean section was performed. A total of 34975 women delivered including 7309 cases by caesarean section. Sixteen years records divided into 4 blocks, one each of 4 years were analysed. There was no maternal mortality but 8.25% women had intra-operative complication and 42.21% had postoperative morbidity. Timely intervention can save complication of prolonged labour as well as complications for which caesarean section was done for non-progress of labour.

  9. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  10. Smart Chips for Smart Surroundings - 4S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuler, Eberhard; König, Ralf; Becker, Jürgen; Rauwerda, Gerard; Burgwal, van de Marcel; Smit, Gerard J.M.; Cardoso, João M.P.; Hübner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The overall mission of the 4S project (Smart Chips for Smart Surroundings) was to define and develop efficient flexible, reconfigurable core building blocks, including the supporting tools, for future Ambient System Devices. Reconfigurability offers the needed flexibility and adaptability, it provid

  11. Changes to articulation following LSVT(R) and traditional dysarthria therapy in non-progressive dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J; Cornwell, Petrea; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2010-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT(R)) on acoustic and perceptual measures of articulation in non-progressive dysarthria in comparison to traditional dysarthria therapy. The study involved 26 individuals with non-progressive dysarthria who were randomly allocated to receive either LSVT(R) or traditional dysarthria therapy (TRAD), both of which were administered for 16 hourly sessions over 4 weeks. Participants' speech samples were collected over a total of six testing sessions during three assessment phases: (1) prior to treatment, (2) immediately post-treatment, and (3) 6 months post-treatment (FU). Speech samples were analysed perceptually to determine articulatory precision and intelligibility as well as acoustically using vowel space (and vowel formant measures) and first moment differences. Results revealed short and long-term significant increases in vowel space area following LSVT(R). Significantly increased intelligibility was also found at FU in the LSVT(R) group. No significant differences between groups for any variables were found. The study reveals that LSVT(R) may be a suitable treatment option for improving vowel articulation and subsequent intelligibility in some individuals with non-progressive dysarthria.

  12. G4S fuajee ruumiinstallatsioon = G4S lobby spatial installation / Ville Lausmäe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lausmäe, Ville, 1981-

    2013-01-01

    Turvafirma G4S büroohoone (Paldiski mnt 80, Tallinn) fuajee sisekujundusest. Autorid: Ville Lausmäe, Kadi Karmann (sisearhitektuuribüroo VLS). Kultuuriministeeriumi kunstinõuniku Maria-Kristiina Soomre arvamus. Lühidalt sisearhitektuuribüroost VLS

  13. G4S fuajee ruumiinstallatsioon = G4S lobby spatial installation / Ville Lausmäe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lausmäe, Ville, 1981-

    2013-01-01

    Turvafirma G4S büroohoone (Paldiski mnt 80, Tallinn) fuajee sisekujundusest. Autorid: Ville Lausmäe, Kadi Karmann (sisearhitektuuribüroo VLS). Kultuuriministeeriumi kunstinõuniku Maria-Kristiina Soomre arvamus. Lühidalt sisearhitektuuribüroost VLS

  14. [Investigation of uterine scraping after non-progressive pregnancy due to HLA compatibility in married couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, A P; Poliakova, A A; Volkova, L V

    2011-01-01

    Non-progressive pregnancy in the first trimester is one of the common and little studied causes of early habitual miscarriage. Pathohistological and immunohistochemical investigations of uterine scrapings were first carried out during laboratorily verified observations of HLA compatibility of two (12 patients) or more (12 patients) similar alleles. Stepwise degradation of decidual cells in the uteroplacental area and parietal endometrium was revealed as their pathomorphological equivalents due to the activation of local large granular lymphocytes and macrophages. These cells are characterized by a strong release of proteolytic enzymes and by cytolysis of surrounding decidual cells. Moreover, there was superficial cytotrophoblastic invasion, atrophy, and numerous villous epithelial defects with villous cytotrophoblast reduction. These pathological markers in the uterine scrapings are proposed to use for a further goal-oriented study of a married couple-HLA system.

  15. [Two boys with non-progressive unilateral atrophy of the calf muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Oomi, Tsuyoshi; Segawa, Masami; Komaki, Hirofumi; Sugai, Kenji

    2006-11-01

    We report here two boys who presented with atrophy of the right calf muscle. The onset was insidious and the symptom was found in infancy in case 2. They were followed for more than 5 years and no progression was seen. No sensory disturbances or autonomic nervous system symptoms were observed. Although needle electric myograph and muscle biopsy findings showed a neurogenic pattern, no cause was confirmed. Recently, a new disease concept of "benign monomelic amyotrophy of lower limb" was established and this could be applied to these patients. This disorder is rare and it is seen in young adults. It is characterized by non-progressive unilateral calf muscle atrophy. There is almost no possibility that this disorder is a variant of spinal muscular atrophy. When a patient presents with unilateral calf muscle atrophy, the treatable causes of the atrophy, including spinal cord disorders or peripheral nerve disorders, should be excluded first. If a confirmed cause cannot be found, then there should be a careful follow-up of the patient, even if the symptoms are stable.

  16. Management of Non-Progressive Dysarthria: Practice Patterns of Speech and Language Therapists in the Republic of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Aifric; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a commonly acquired speech disorder. Rising numbers of people surviving stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) mean the numbers of people with non-progressive dysarthria are likely to increase, with increased challenges for speech and language therapists (SLTs), service providers and key stakeholders. The evidence base…

  17. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  18. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  19. Relationship between immune state and tumor growth rate in rats bearing progressive and non-progressive mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedi, M M; Hliba, E; Demarchi, M; Depiante-Depaoli, M

    1998-08-01

    Impaired immune responses occur frequently in cancer patients or in tumor-bearing animals, but the mechanisms of the tumor-induced immune defects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the relevance of the immune system in the control of tumor growth. We have developed a model of progressive and non-progressive mammary tumor, chemically induced in female Wistar rats. In this model we evaluated the development of an immune response after immunization of rats bearing progressive and non-progressive tumors with a non-related antigen, such as sheep red blood cells. We also studied the activation state of peritoneal macrophages from animals bearing tumors by evaluating the production of free radicals. Our findings indicated that the cell-mediated immunity in rats bearing progressive tumors fails to respond to heterologous antigen in vivo, as demonstrated by a negative delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, and is accompanied by minor nitric oxide production by peritoneal exudate cells as well as a lower capacity for macrophage activation. The study of non-progressive tumor-bearing rats indicated that the cell-mediated immune response was intact and an activated state of macrophages was found in vivo. The results described in this paper should be taken into account when therapies based on cancer vaccines are chosen for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Resonance structure for 4s subshell in photoionization of Mn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Peng-fei; YANG Xiang-dong; BAI Yu-lin; LIU Jin-chao; LIU Gang

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that the 3d5(4X)4s(5X) of 4s satellites, except to the coupling between 3d54s(7,5S) and 3p→3d transition, plays a key role on the magnitude of photoionization of 4s cross section. The coupled equation method is improved to calculate this resonance by including these channels. The results of calculations are comp ared with the experimental data from 46 eV to 56 eV photon energies, which are in good agreement with the experiment.

  1. Interventions for dysarthria due to stroke and other adult-acquired, non-progressive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Claire; Bowen, Audrey; Tyson, Sarah; Butterfint, Zoe; Conroy, Paul

    2017-01-25

    Dysarthria is an acquired speech disorder following neurological injury that reduces intelligibility of speech due to weak, imprecise, slow and/or unco-ordinated muscle control. The impact of dysarthria goes beyond communication and affects psychosocial functioning. This is an update of a review previously published in 2005. The scope has been broadened to include additional interventions, and the title amended accordingly. To assess the effects of interventions to improve dysarthric speech following stroke and other non-progressive adult-acquired brain injury such as trauma, infection, tumour and surgery. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2016), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL on 6 May 2016. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavioral Abstracts (LLBA) (1976 to November 2016) and PsycINFO (1800 to September 2016). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials, we searched major trials registers: WHO ICTRP, the ISRCTN registry, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted academic institutions and other researchers regarding other published, unpublished or ongoing trials. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysarthria interventions with 1) no intervention, 2) another intervention for dysarthria (this intervention may differ in methodology, timing of delivery, duration, frequency or theory), or 3) an attention control. Three review authors selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We attempted to contact study authors for clarification and missing data as required. We calculated standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI), using a random-effects model, and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the influence of methodological quality. We planned to conduct subgroup analyses for underlying clinical

  2. [Anthropometric evaluation of pediatric patients with non-progressive chronic encephalopathy according to different methods of classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Jéssica Socas; Gomes, Mirian Martins

    2014-09-01

    To perform anthropometric assessment of patients with quadriplegic, chronic non-progressive encephalopathy, comparing two distinct references of nutritional classification, and to compare the estimated height to the length measured by stadiometer. Cross-sectional study including 0-3-year children with quadriplegic, chronic non-progressive encephalopathy in secondary public hospital. Length, weight, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and knee height were measured. The arm muscle circumference and estimated height were calculated. The following relations were evaluated: weight-for-age, length-for-age and weight-for-length, using as reference the charts of the the World Health Organization (WHO) and those proposed by Krick et al. Fourteen children with a mean age of 21 months were evaluated. Assessment of anthropometric indicators showed significant difference between the two classification methods to assess nutritional indicators length/age (p=0.014), weight/age (p=0.014) and weight/length (p=0.001). There was significant correlation between measured length and estimated height (r=0.796, p=0.001). Evaluation of arm circumference and triceps skinfold showed that most patients presented some degree of malnutrition. According to arm muscle circumference, most were eutrophic. Specific curves for children with chronic non-progressive encephalopathy appear to underestimate malnutrition when one takes into account indicators involving weight. Curves developed for healthy children can be a good option for clinical practice and weight-for-length indicator and body composition measurements should be considered as complementary tools. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Father´s experience of non-progressive labour occurs and augmentation is established. A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    . Ten fathers were interviewed 4–15 weeks post partum. The interviews were semi-structured and were analyzed using Braun and Clarke’s thematic analysis. Results: The analysis revealed three themes and four sub-themes. The themes were: (1) A rational approach to own role, (2) Labour and birth...... as uncontrollable processes and (3) Relief about the decision of augmentation. The fathers had a rational approach and felt powerless when the process of labour was uncontrollable. They felt they were not able to help their partners in pain when non-progressive labour occurred. They experienced relief when...

  4. Fathers’ experience of childbirth when non-progressive labour occurs and augmentation is established. A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Kirsten; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2014-01-01

    design. Ten fathers were interviewed 4–15 weeks post partum. The interviews were semi-structured and were analyzed using Braun and Clarke’s thematic analysis. Results The analysis revealed three themes and four sub-themes. The themes were: (1) A rational approach to own role, (2) Labour and birth...... as uncontrollable processes and (3) Relief about the decision of augmentation. The fathers had a rational approach and felt powerless when the process of labour was uncontrollable. They felt they were not able to help their partners in pain when non-progressive labour occurred. They experienced relief when...

  5. Control and non-progression of HIV-1 infection in sub-Saharan Africa: A case and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Patel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Elite and viraemic controllers represent unique subsets of HIV-infected patients who may also be long-term non-progressors (LTNPs. LNTPs constitute an estimated 1 - 15% of the total HIV-positive population in the USA and Europe, but less is known about their epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. Though the exact mechanisms for long-term non-progression appear to be numerous and are still under investigation, research on elite controllers may hold the key to new therapeutics and vaccine development. The clinical management of such patients can be challenging, as there are no standard guidelines for treatment, particularly in resource-limited settings. We describe the case of an HIV-infected Botswanan man who is likely an elite or viraemic controller.

  6. Atrial fibrillation detection using an iPhone 4S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinseok; Reyes, Bersain A; McManus, David D; Maitas, Oscar; Mathias, Oscar; Chon, Ki H

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects three to five million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Existing methods to diagnose this paroxysmal arrhythmia are cumbersome and/or expensive. We hypothesized that an iPhone 4S can be used to detect AF based on its ability to record a pulsatile photoplethysmogram signal from a fingertip using the built-in camera lens. To investigate the capability of the iPhone 4S for AF detection, we first used two databases, the MIT-BIH AF and normal sinus rhythm (NSR) to derive discriminatory threshold values between two rhythms. Both databases include RR time series originating from 250 Hz sampled ECG recordings. We rescaled the RR time series to 30 Hz so that the RR time series resolution is 1/30 (s) which is equivalent to the resolution from an iPhone 4S. We investigated three statistical methods consisting of the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), the Shannon entropy (ShE) and the sample entropy (SampE), which have been proved to be useful tools for AF assessment. Using 64-beat segments from the MIT-BIH databases, we found the beat-to-beat accuracy value of 0.9405, 0.9300, and 0.9614 for RMSSD, ShE, and SampE, respectively. Using an iPhone 4S, we collected 2-min pulsatile time series from 25 prospectively recruited subjects with AF pre- and postelectrical cardioversion. Using derived threshold values of RMSSD, ShE and SampE from the MIT-BIH databases, we found the beat-to-beat accuracy of 0.9844, 0.8494, and 0.9522, respectively. It should be recognized that for clinical applications, the most relevant objective is to detect the presence of AF in the data. Using this criterion, we achieved an accuracy of 100% for both the MIT-BIH AF and iPhone 4S databases.

  7. Quantum entanglement at the psi(3770) and Upsilon(4S)

    CERN Document Server

    Yabsley, B D

    2008-01-01

    We review results which explicitly depend on the entanglement of neutral meson pairs produced at the psi(3770) and Upsilon(4S). Time-dependent CP-violation analyses at the B-factories use the flavour-singlet final state at the Upsilon(4S), but by assuming its quantum-mechanical evolution; Belle on the other hand has tested the time-dependent flavour correlation of the B-mesons, comparing predictions of quantum mechanics, spontaneous disentanglement, and Pompili-Selleri models. At the psi(3770), decay rates are modulated by various combinations of the charm mixing parameters: this has been exploited by CLEO-c to provide the first effective constraint on the strong-phase difference delta. Finally, the goal of a "model-independent" phi_3/Dalitz analysis is now within reach, using D-mesons from the psi(3770) to constrain the D0 -> K_S pi+ pi- decay amplitude. Manifestly entangled events psi(3770) -> (K_S pi+pi-)_D (K_S pi+ pi-)_D, rather than just "CP-tagged" decays, turn out to be crucial.

  8. Chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep in New Zealand - a review of the role of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M R; Ionas, G; Clarke, J K

    1999-10-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia (CNP) is a common disease which affects lambs in New Zealand during late summer and autumn. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can be recovered from a high proportion of lesions but it is also present in some normal lungs. Bacteria, especially Pasteurella haemolytica, can also be recovered from more than half the lungs of affected animals. Isolates of M. ovipneumoniae are genetically heterogeneous, as demonstrated by examination of their DNA or total cellular proteins, and are serologically heterogeneous as shown by metabolic inhibition tests. The number of strains present in New Zealand is large and several distinguishable strains can be recovered from each affected lung. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has pathogenic potential as indicated by its ability to produce hydrogen peroxide, cause ciliostasis and by its possession of a capsule. Chronic non-progressive pneumonia can be transmitted consistently to over 50% of lambs by inoculation of pooled pneumonic lung homogenate and transmission can be suppressed by broad spectrum antibiotics. In contrast, penicillin does not prevent the development of lesions but diminishes their severity. Pooled lung homogenate treated with digitonin, which inactivates mycoplasmas, has failed to transmit CNP. Pure cultures of M. ovipneumoniae produce only mild lesions in some animals, whereas inoculation with pooled lung homogenate (from which no viruses were isolated) containing mixed strains of M. ovipneumoniae and free from bacteria, is more effective in producing lesions. Research work to date suggests that CNP may be initiated by colonisation of the lung by M. ovipneumoniae which causes ciliostasis and elicits an exudate allowing colonisation of the lungs by bacteria especially M. haemolytica and by other strains of M. ovipneumoniae. The immune response to the initial strain of M. ovipneumoniae may inhibit its replication but would be less effective in inhibiting heterologous strains of the organism allowing

  9. OMAC4S- Open Modular Avionics for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpel, H.-J.; Willich, G.; Vogel, T.; Schuettauf, A.; Pletner, S.; Schoen, F.; Fidi, C.; Loetzke, M.; Dittrich, L.; Schuelke, P.; Wolf, T.

    2013-08-01

    Today's spacecraft avionics architecture is characterised by a broad variety of processing modules, operating systems and interfaces for exchanging data between different processing modules. The software that implements most of the satellite functionality has to deal with this fact and is one of the reasons why software has become one of the major cost drivers in satellite projects. Similar problems have triggered developments in other industrial domains like AUTOSAR in the automotive area or Integrated Modular Architecture (IMA) in the aerospace industry [8]. All these initiatives are based on the definition of standards for computing platforms and the interfaces between these platforms. The goals of the Open Modular Avionics Architecture for Space Applications (OMAC4S) initiative started by Astrium, Fraunhofer FOKUS, STI, SYSGO and TTTech are to outline a solution that helps to reduce complexity and costs for space avionics significantly. This initiative is partly funded by the German national space agency (DLR) through the project On-Board Computer System Architecture (OBC-SA). In this paper we describe how standardization and the usage of already proven technologies from other industrial domains will help to limit the effect of the software development on schedule and costs of satellite projects. In addition we will demonstrate a migration path to make these technologies available for space applications.

  10. Quasirelativistic calculation of 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4d and 4s4p$^6$ configuration spectroscopic parameters for the W$^{39+}$ ion

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovich, P; Kisielius, R

    2015-01-01

    The ab initio quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock method developed specifically for the calculation of spectral parameters of heavy atoms and highly charged ions is used to derive spectral data for the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4d and 4s4p$^6$ configurations of the multicharged tungsten ion W$^{39+}$. The relativistic effects are taken into account in the Breit-Pauli approximation for the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock radial orbitals. The configuration interaction method is applied to include the electron correlation effects. Produced data are compared with existing experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.

  11. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13)--Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages.

  12. The SAMP-/RAMP-hydrazone methodology in asymmetric synthesis of 4S-ferrugineone and 4S,5S-ferrugineol: The pheromones of palm weevils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Saeidian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 4S-ferrugineone and 4S,5S-ferrugineol as pheromones of palm weevils were synthesized in 3 and 4 steps, respectively, starting from nonane-5-one employing SAMP-/RAMP -hydrazone methodology. 5-Nonanone is transformed to its corresponding RAMP hydrazone by reaction with the enantiomerically pure hydrazine RAMP. Metalation with lithium diisopropylamide (LDA in ether to form azaenolate, followed by methylation with methyl iodide, furnishes the product hydrazone. Finally, cleavage of the hydrazone moiety to regenerate the carbonyl functionality is possible by ozonolysis, leads to the 4S-ferrugineone. The crucial step would be the final diastereoselective reduction to the 4S, 5S-ferrugineol.

  13. Chromosome jumping from D4S10 (G8) toward the Huntington disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, J.E.; Gilliam, T.C.; Cole, J.L.; Drumm, M.L.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Gusella, J.F.; Collins, F.S.

    1988-09-01

    The gene for Huntington disease (HD) has been localized to the distal portion of the short arm of human chromosome 4 by linkage analysis. Currently, the two closest DNA markers are D4S10 (G8), located /approx/3 centimorgans centromeric to HD, and D4S43 (C4H), positioned 0-1.5 centimorgans from HD. In an effort to move closer to the HD gene, with the eventual goal of identifying the gene itself, the authors have applied the technique of chromosome jumping to this region. A 200-kilobase jumping library has been constructed, and a jump from D4S10 has been obtained and its approximate distance verified by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Two restriction fragment length polymorphisms have been identified at the jump locus, which is denoted D4S81. Linkage analysis of previously identified recombinants between D4S10 and HD or D4S10 and D4S43 shows that in two of five events the jump has crossed the recombination points. This unequivocally orients D4S10 and D4S81 on the chromosome, provides additional markers for HD, and suggests that recombination frequency in this region of chromosome 4 may be increased, so that the physical distance from D4S10 to HD may not be as large as originally suspected.

  14. Electronic properties of GaV4S8: A percolation approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Naik; S Hansda; A K Rastogi

    2016-01-01

    Two polycrystalline V4-cluster compounds of GaV4S8 were prepared at different annealing temperatures (GaV4S8-1 sintered at 800°C and GaV4S8-2 sintered at 500°C). Their temperature-dependent resistivity and structural phase transformation temperature (45 K for GaV4S8-1 and 43K for GaV4S8-2) are found to be very sensitive to the annealing condition. Above 320 K, activation energy 3 is calculated to be ∼0.23 eV which decreases to ∼0.18 eV around 300 K in GaV4S8-1 and GaV4S8-2 on cooling. According to percolation theory, the gradual decrease in 3 below 300 K is expected due to the increase in separation between V4-clusters are significantly different in GaV4S8-1 and GaV4S8-2. This statement is strongly supported by the calculated bandwidth per cluster in GaV4S8 (∼0.342 eV in GaV4S8-1 and ∼0.374 eV in GaV4S8-2). A negative magnetoresistance (MR) is also found around 43 K in GaV4S8-2 at 6.0 T magnetic field associated with structural transition.

  15. Cancer Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor is to grow and spread The TNM Staging System The TNM system is the most widely used cancer staging system. Most hospitals and medical centers use the TNM system as their main method for cancer reporting. ...

  16. Well staged

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, Godfrey

    2011-06-15

    Packers Plus Energy Services Inc. has commercially launched QuickFRAC, a multi-stage completition system which can fracture four to five isolated stages in one treatment and set up a record of 23-stage slickwater frac in less than 10 hours. It could take up to 40 days to do 100 fracture treatments with other systems. This technology makes it possible to distribute fluid at each port thanks to the limited entry system. In order to make multiple isolated stages within one treatment zone, each zone includes multiple QuickPORT sleeves with packers on either side. The other technology which made this possible is the repeater port system, it allows them to perform more frac stages. This technology could be useful in the future since the need for stages will be doubling soon with microdarcy shale oil extraction which is more difficult than gas.

  17. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied ...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  18. Three-dimensional structure of the S4-S5 segment of the Shaker potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Hojo, Hironobu; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Görlach, Matthias; Haris, Parvez I

    2002-06-01

    The propagation of action potentials during neuronal signal transduction in phospholipid membranes is mediated by ion channels, a diverse group of membrane proteins. The S4-S5 linker peptide (S4-S5), that connects the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments of voltage-gated potassium channels is an important region of the Shaker ion-channel protein. Despite its importance, very little is known about its structure. Here we provide evidence for an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation of a synthetic S4-S5 peptide of the voltage-gated Drosophila melanogaster Shaker potassium channel in water/trifluoroethanol and in aqueous phospholipid micelles. The three-dimensional solution structures of the S4-S5 peptide were obtained by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance-geometry/simulated-annealing calculations. The detailed structural features are discussed with respect to model studies and available mutagenesis data on the mechanism and selectivity of the potassium channel.

  19. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments......In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed...... and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  20. Role of GalNAc4S-6ST in astrocytic tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available N-Acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase (GalNAc4S-6ST is the sulfotransferase responsible for biosynthesis of highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate CS-E. Although involvements of CS-E in neuronal cell functions have been extensively analyzed, the role of GalNAc4S-6ST in astrocytic tumor progression remains unknown. Here, we reveal that GalNAc4S-6ST transcripts were detected in astrocytic tumors derived from all 30 patients examined using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Patients with high GalNAc4S-6ST mRNA expression had significantly worse outcome compared with patients with low expression, and multivariate survival analysis disclosed that GalNAc4S-6ST is an independent poor prognostic factor for astrocytic tumors. We then tested whether CS-E enhanced haptotaxic migration of glioblastoma U251-MG cells that endogenously express both the CS-E's scaffold tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTPζ and GalNAc4S-6ST, in the presence of CS-E's preferred ligands, pleiotrophin (PTN or midkine (MK, using a modified Boyden chamber method. Haptotaxic stimulation of cell migration by PTN was most robust on control siRNA-transfected U251-MG cells, while that enhancing effect was cancelled following transduction of GalNAc4S-6ST siRNA. Similar results were obtained using MK, suggesting that both PTN and MK enhance migration of U251-MG cells by binding to CS-E. We also found that PTPζ as well as PTN and MK were frequently expressed in astrocytic tumor cells. Thus, our findings indicate that GalNAc4S-6ST mRNA expressed by astrocytic tumor cells is associated with poor patient prognosis likely by enhancing CS-E-mediated tumor cell motility in the presence of PTN and/or MK.

  1. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of Upsilon(4S) --> B0B0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De, N; De Groot, J G H; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the branching fraction f00 for Upsilon(4S) --> B0B0bar. The data sample consists of 81.7 fb^-1 collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e^+e^- storage ring. Using partial reconstruction of the decay B0bar --> D^{*+} \\ell^{-} \\bar{\

  2. Structural determinants for the action of grayanotoxin in D1 S4-S5 and D4 S4-S5 intracellular linkers of sodium channel alpha-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Eiji; Yuki, Tsunetsugu; Yakehiro, Masuhide; Seyama, Issei; Yamaoka, Kaoru

    2002-07-12

    We located a novel binding site for grayanotoxin on the cytoplasmic linkers of voltage-dependent cardiac (rH1) or skeletal-muscle (mu 1) Na(+) channel isoforms (segments S4-S5 in domains D1 and D4), using the alanine scanning substitution method. GTX-modification of Na(+) channels, transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, was evaluated under whole-cell voltage clamp, from the ratio of maximum chord conductance for modified and unmodified Na(+) channels. In mu 1, mutations K237A, L243A, S246A, K248A, K249A, L250A, S251A, or T1463A, caused a moderate, but statistically significant decrease in this ratio. On making corresponding mutations in rH1, only L244A dramatically reduced the ratio. Because in mu 1, the serine at position 251 is the only heterologous residue with respect to rH1 (Ala-252), we made a double mutant L243A&S251A to match the sequence of mu 1 and rH1 in S4-S5 linkers of both domains. This double mutation resulted in a significant decrease in the ratio, to the same extent as L244A substitution in rH1 did, indicating that the site at Leu-244 in rH1 or at Leu-243 in mu 1 is a novel one, exhibiting a synergistic effect of grayanotoxin.

  3. A new autosomal recessive non-progressive congenital cerebellar ataxia associated with mental retardation, optic atrophy, and skin abnormalities (CAMOS) maps to chromosome 15q24-q26 in a large consanguineous Lebanese Druze Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delague, Valérie; Bareil, Corinne; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Loiselet, Jacques; Mégarbané, André; Claustres, Mireille

    2002-03-01

    Congenital cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of non-progressive disorders characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay followed by the appearance of ataxia, and often associated with dysarthria, mental retardation, and atrophy of the cerebellum. We report the mapping of a disease gene in a large inbred Lebanese Druze family, with five cases of a new form of non-progressive autosomal recessive congenital ataxia associated with optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, and structural skin abnormalities, to a 3.6-cM interval on chromosome 15q24-15q26.

  4. As4S4 Induced Apoptosis in HeLa Cells and Its Molecular Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ling; PU De-min; CHENG Yan-xiang; LIU Rong; LI Tian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the As4S4 induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in HeLa cells and its possible relationship with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Methods: HeLa cells were treated with various concentrations (7.5, 15, 30, 60 mg/L) of As4S4 at different times (12, 24, 36, 48, 60 h). Cell growth was measured by MTT. Apoptosis was detected by double staining flow cytometry (FCM). Levels of PGE2 were measured by radioimmunoassay. The expression of COX-2 protein was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: After treated with different concentrations of As4S4, the growth of HeLa cells was suppressed significantly in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The IC50 of 24 h was 30 mg/L (P<0.01). As4S4 induced apoptosis with apoptosis rates at 8.13%-62.36% by flow cytometry (FCM) in a dose-dependent manners. The release of PGE2 was reduced in HeLa cells with the values being (70.56±2.03), (48.58±2.28), (29.25±1.57) and (18.02±1.04) respectively, significantly different compared with control group (3.15±0.01) (P<0.01). As4S4 also inhibited the activity and expression of COX-2 in a dose dependent manner and down-regulated the expression of COX-2 protein greatly. Conclusion: As4S4 could inhibit the proliferation and increase apoptosis in human HeLa cells. These effects may depend on the inhibition of the expression of COX-2 and PGE2 by As4S4.

  5. Characterization of the binding of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to a 4S cytosolic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, W.H.; Zielinski, R.; Bresnick, E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have recently reported on the partial purification of a 4S binding protein that interacts in a specific and saturable manner with (/sup 3/H)BP and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). They also reported that the 4S binding protein was able to interact in a specific and saturable manner with plasmids collectively containing the rat cytochrome P450c gene. The authors have examined further the (/sup 3/H)BP binding properties of the 4S protein. The specific (/sup 3/H)BP binding activity appears to be highest in 4 week old male rats and declines with age. In some animals the specific (/sup 3/H)BP binding activity is induced after pretreatment with either phenobarbital (BP) or isosafrole (IS) as evidenced by a 75% and 52% increase, respectively, over untreated controls. No apparent increase was observed after pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholanthracene (3MC). The addition of a 200 fold excess of tetra-chlordibenzofuran (TCDBF) to the incubations did not displace (/sup 3/H)BP from the 4S protein. The addition of molybdate (10 mM) to isolation buffers, known to stabilize certain hormone receptors, did not alter the sedimentation coefficient or the specific binding activity of the 4S protein. The authors conclude that: (1) in the rat, the 4S protein appears to be distinct from the 8S protein reported in the mouse and that: (2) the 4S species regulates the PAH induced expression of AHH activity in the rat.

  6. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  7. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle CompanyRanch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-04-10

    Hydrogeological assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conducted using a combination of field investigations and a survey of available literature from nearby agricultural water districts and other entities. The 4-S Ranch has been able to meet most of its own water needs providing irrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of shallow groundwater pumping in these miconfined aquifer above the Corcoran Clay. Comparison of groundwater pumping on the 4-S Ranch property with groundwater pumping in the adjacent Merquin and Stevinson Water Districts shows great similarity in the well screened depths and the quality of the groundwater produced by the well fields. The pump yield for the eight active production wells on the 4-S property are comparable to the production and drainage wells in the adjacent water districts. Like these Districts the 4-S Ranch lies close to the Valley trough in a historic discharge area. The 4-S Ranch is unique in that it is bounded and bisected by several major water conveyance facilities including Bear Creek. Although the large number of potential recharge structures would suggest significant groundwater conjunctive use potential the major well field development has occurred along the length of the Eastside Canal. The Eastside Canal is known to be leaky above the ''A'' Clay the Canal passes through sandy areas and experiences significant groundwater seepage. This seepage can be intercepted by adjacent groundwater wells. Pumping adjacent to, and along the alignment of the Canal, may induce higher rates of seepage from the Eastside Canal. Groundwater quality below and adjacent to the Eastside Canal is very good, reflecting the origin of this diverted water from the Merced River. Most of the pumpage occurs in a depth interval between 30 ft and 130 ft. Safe yield estimates made using the available data show that the 4-S Ranch has sufficient resources to meet its own needs. Further exploitation of

  8. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle CompanyRanch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-04-10

    Hydrogeological assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conducted using a combination of field investigations and a survey of available literature from nearby agricultural water districts and other entities. The 4-S Ranch has been able to meet most of its own water needs providing irrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of shallow groundwater pumping in these miconfined aquifer above the Corcoran Clay. Comparison of groundwater pumping on the 4-S Ranch property with groundwater pumping in the adjacent Merquin and Stevinson Water Districts shows great similarity in the well screened depths and the quality of the groundwater produced by the well fields. The pump yield for the eight active production wells on the 4-S property are comparable to the production and drainage wells in the adjacent water districts. Like these Districts the 4-S Ranch lies close to the Valley trough in a historic discharge area. The 4-S Ranch is unique in that it is bounded and bisected by several major water conveyance facilities including Bear Creek. Although the large number of potential recharge structures would suggest significant groundwater conjunctive use potential the major well field development has occurred along the length of the Eastside Canal. The Eastside Canal is known to be leaky above the ''A'' Clay the Canal passes through sandy areas and experiences significant groundwater seepage. This seepage can be intercepted by adjacent groundwater wells. Pumping adjacent to, and along the alignment of the Canal, may induce higher rates of seepage from the Eastside Canal. Groundwater quality below and adjacent to the Eastside Canal is very good, reflecting the origin of this diverted water from the Merced River. Most of the pumpage occurs in a depth interval between 30 ft and 130 ft. Safe yield estimates made using the available data show that the 4-S Ranch has sufficient resources to meet its own needs. Further exploitation of

  9. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  10. Growth of Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} films by controlled sulfurization of sputtered Pd on native oxide of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, R., E-mail: rbhatt@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India); Bhattacharya, S.; Basu, R.; Singh, A. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India); Deshpande, U. [UGC–DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore–452017 (India); Surger, C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Physikalisches Institut and DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures, P.O. Box 6980, D–76049 Karlsruhe (Germany); Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Aswal, D.K.; Gupta, S.K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India)

    2013-07-31

    Thin films of different Pd–S phase, namely Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2}, have been reproducibly grown by the sulfurization of Pd films deposited on native oxide of (111) Si substrates by radio frequency sputtering method. In order to achieve controlled sulfurization, a three-stage sulfurization setup consisting of evaporation chamber, activation chamber and sulfurization chamber has been developed. The sulfurization of Pd films (kept at a constant temperature of 500 °C) was carried out using sulfur vapors activated to different temperature between 550 and 700 °C. The results of X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that formation of Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} phases takes place for the activation temperatures of 550, 600 and 700 °C, respectively. The room temperature resistivity of Pd, Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} were found to be respectively 0.1, 15.9, 15,000 and 20,000 μΩ cm. The temperature-dependent electrical resistivity measurements showed metallic conduction for Pd and Pd{sub 4}S films. The Seebeck coefficient measured at 300 K for these Pd–S phases showed their n-type conducting behavior. - Highlights: • Multichamber sulfurization setup designed for preparing thin films of Pd–S. • S vapor activated at 550, 600 and 700 °C results in Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} phases. • The Seebeck coefficient of Pd–S phases shows their n-type conducting behavior. • Transport properties of Pd{sub 4}S phase show that it is a metallic phase. • High resistivity and thermopower of PdS and PdS{sub 2} show semiconducting nature.

  11. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Bernardino

    Full Text Available Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  12. Inferior Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation in Purebred Eurasier Dogs with Familial Non-Progressive Ataxia: A Retrospective and Prospective Clinical Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A.; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A.; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5 – 6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  13. Structural analysis of the S4-S5 linker of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2015-01-02

    KCNQ1 plays important roles in the cardiac action potential and consists of an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel and its channel activity is regulated by membrane potentials. The linker between transmembrane helices 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linker) is important for transferring the conformational changes from the voltage-sensor domain to the pore domain. In this study, the structure of the S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1 was investigated by solution NMR, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The S4-S5 linker adopted a helical structure in detergent micelles. The W248 may interact with the cell membrane.

  14. A Turkish family with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in six siblings; linkage analysis on 4p16 region (D4S3360-D4S2366).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağdaş, D N; Parlar, A I; Pac, A; Tutun, U; Balci, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a Turkish family and their 6 children, consecutively affected by Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) Syndrome. Four of the affected children died in the postnatal period, and 2 of them had been admitted to the pediatric cardiology department for their cardiologic evaluation. Since they had the features of the EVC Syndrome, linkage analysis was performed with the polymorphic markers, D4S3360-D4S2366, selected from 4p 16 locus. There was complete segregation between the disease and marker allels and the two affected siblings were homozygote for the polymorphic markers, as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. The diagnosis of EVC Syndrome was confirmed by this molecular analysis. Two cases with EVC were presented in this report. Case 1 had partial abnormal pulmonary venous return and pulmonary stenosis additional to ostium primum atrial septal defect and mitral cleft. Partial abnormal pulmonary venous return and pulmonary stenosis were previously not reported with EVC Syndrome. Postaxial polydactyly phenotype of the Case 2 differs from her brother's. There is bifid 5th metacarpal and unilateral (L) bifid middle and distal phalanges resembling syndactyly.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the S4-S5 segment of the Shaker potassium channel.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of action potentials during neuronal signal transduction in phospholipid membranes is mediated by ion channels, a diverse group of membrane proteins. The S4-S5 linker peptide (S4-S5), that connects the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments of voltage-gated potassium channels is an important region of the Shaker ion-channel protein. Despite its importance, very little is known about its structure. Here we provide evidence for an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation of a synthetic ...

  16. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed...... that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments......, the book asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities?...

  17. Sinnerite, Cu6As4S9, from the Lengenbach Quarry, Binn Valley, Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindi, Luca; Makovicky, Emil; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We have characterized the crystal structure of sinnerite, Cu6As4S9, a rare sulfosalt mineral from the ores of the Lengenbach quarry, Binn Valley, Canton Valais, Switzerland, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. We found sinnerite to be structurally identical to synthetic Cu6As...

  18. Classification of (D4,S1)-equivariant bifurcation problems up to topological codimension 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Shouping(高守平); LI; Yangcheng(李养成)

    2003-01-01

    The techniques from singularity theory are applied to the multiparameter bifurcation problem.The classification of (D4, S1)-equivariant bifurcation problems with topological codimension less than or equal to 2 is given. The corresponding recognition conditions are set up.

  19. Ab Initio Investigations of the C2F4S Isomers and of Their Interconversions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Vallano-Lorenzo, Sandra; Lisbona-Martin, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    The transition states and the activation energies for the unobserved isomerization reactions between the three possible C2F4S isomers with divalent sulfur, trifluorothioacetyl fluoride 1, tetrafluorothiirane 2, and trifluoroethenesulfenyl fluoride 3, have been determined by ab initio Hartree-Fock...

  20. Role of the S4-S5 linker in CNG channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Holschuh, Jascha; Biskup, Christoph; Schulz, Eckhard; Nache, Vasilica; Benndorf, Klaus

    2010-10-20

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate sensory signal transduction in retinal and olfactory cells. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the C-terminus that is located at the intracellular side. The molecular events translating the ligand binding to the pore opening are still unknown. We investigated the role of the S4-S5 linker in the activation process by quantifying its interaction with other intracellular regions. To this end, we constructed chimeric channels in which the N-terminus, the S4-S5 linker, the C-linker, and the CNBD of the retinal CNGA1 subunit were systematically replaced by the respective regions of the olfactory CNGA2 subunit. Macroscopic concentration-response relations were analyzed, yielding the apparent affinity to cGMP and the Hill coefficient. The degree of functional coupling of intracellular regions in the activation gating was determined by thermodynamic double-mutant cycle analysis. We observed that all four intracellular regions, including the relatively short S4-S5 linker, are involved in controlling the apparent affinity of the channel to cGMP and, moreover, in determining the degree of cooperativity between the subunits, as derived from the Hill coefficient. The interaction energies reveal an interaction of the S4-S5 linker with both the N-terminus and the C-linker, but no interaction with the CNBD.

  1. Heart rate at 4 s after the onset of exercise in endurance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniqueli, Divanei; Morra, Elis Aguiar; Dantas, Eduardo Miranda; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Carletti, Luciana; Perez, Anselmo José; Rodrigues, Sérgio Lamêgo; Mill, José Geraldo

    2014-06-01

    It has been suggested that the increase in heart rate (HR) at the onset of exercise is caused by vagal withdrawal. In fact, endurance runners show a lower HR in maximum aerobic tests. However, it is still unknown whether endurance runners have a lower HR at 4 s after the onset of exercise (4th-sec-HR). We sought to measure the HR at the onset of the 4 s exercise test (4-sET), clarifying its relationship to heart rate variability (HRV), spectral indices, and cardiac vagal index (CVI) in endurance runners (ER) and healthy untrained controls (CON). HR at 4th-sec-HR, CVI, and percent HR increase during exercise were analyzed in the 4-sET. High frequency spectrum (HF-nu), low frequency spectrum (LF-nu), and low frequency/high frequency band ratio (LF/HF) were analyzed from the HRV. ER showed a significantly higher HF, and both a lower LF and LF/HF ratio compared with the CON. ER presented a significantly lower 4th-sec-HR, although neither CVI nor HR increases during exercise were statistically different from the CON. In conclusion, ER presented a lower 4th-sec-HR secondary to increased vagal influence over the sinus node. CVI seems to be too weak to use for discriminating individuals with respect to the magnitude of HR vagal control.

  2. The S4-S5 loop contributes to the ion-selective pore of potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesinger, P A; Jan, Y N; Jan, L Y

    1993-10-01

    Mutagenesis experiments on voltage-gated K+ channels have suggested that the ion-selective pore is comprised mostly of H5 segments. To see whether regions outside of the H5 segment might also contribute to the pore structure, we have studied the effect of single amino acid substitutions in the segment that connects the S4 and S5 putative transmembrane segments (S4-S5 loop) on various permeation properties of Shaker K+ channels. Mutations in the S4-S5 loop alter the Rb+ selectivity, the single-channel K+ and Rb+ conductances, and the sensitivity to open channel block produced by intracellular tetraethylammonium ion, Ba2+, and Mg2+. The block of Shaker K+ channels by intracellular Mg2+ is surprising, but is reminiscent of the internal Mg2+ blockade of inward rectifier K+ channels. The results suggest that the S4-S5 loop constitutes part of the ion-selective pore. Thus, the S4-S5 loop and the H5 segment are likely to contribute to the long pore characteristic of voltage-gated K+ channels.

  3. The role of spin-flipping terms in hadronic transitions of $\\Upsilon(4S)$

    CERN Document Server

    Segovia, Jorge; Entem, David R

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to\\Upsilon(1S)\\eta$ and $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to h_{b}(1P)\\eta$ processes seem to contradict the naive expectation that hadronic transitions with spin-flipping terms should be suppressed with respect those without spin-flip. We analyze these transitions using the QCD Multipole Expansion (QCDME) approach and within a constituent quark model framework that has been applied successfully to the heavy-quark sectors during the last years. The QCDME formalism requires the computation of hybrid intermediate states which has been performed in a natural, parameter-free extension of our constituent quark model based on the Quark Confining String (QCS) scheme. We show that i) the M1-M1 contribution in the decay rate of the $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to\\Upsilon(1S)\\eta$ is important and its supression until now is not justified; ii) the role played by the $L=0$ hybrid states, which enter in the calculation of the M1-M1 contribution, explains the enhancement in the $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to\\Upsilon(1S)\\eta$...

  4. Measurement of the branching fraction of Gamma(4S) --> B0B0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We report the first measurement of the branching fraction f(00) for Gamma(4S) --> B(0)B(0). The data sample consists of 81.7 fb(-1) collected at the Gamma(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. Using partial reconstruction of the decay B(0) --> D(*+) l(-)nu(l) in which only the charged lepton and the soft pion from the decay D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) are reconstructed, we obtain f(00) = 0.487 +/- 0.010(stat) +/- 0.008(syst). Our result does not depend on the branching fractions of B(0) --> D(*+)l(-)nu(l) and D(*+) --> D(0)pi(+) decays, on the ratio of the charged and neutral B meson lifetimes, nor on the assumption of isospin symmetry.

  5. Stability studies of As4S4 nanosuspension prepared by wet milling in Poloxamer 407.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujňáková, Zdenka; Dutková, Erika; Baláž, Matej; Turianicová, Erika; Baláž, Peter

    2015-01-15

    In this paper the stability of the arsenic sulfide (As4S4) nanosuspension prepared by wet milling in a circulation mill in the environment of copolymer Poloxamer 407 was studied. The obtained As4S4 particles in nanosuspension were of ∼ 100 nm in size. The influence of temperature and UV irradiation on the changes in physical and/or chemical properties was followed. Long-term stability was observed via particle size distribution and zeta potential measurements. Influence of UV irradiation was studied via UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), photoluminicsence (PL) technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The best stability of the nanosuspension (24 weeks) was achieved when stored at 4°C and in the dark.

  6. Analysis and design of software ecosystem architectures – towards the 4S telemedicine ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    performed a descriptive, revelatory case study of the Danish telemedicine ecosystem and for ii), we experimentally designed, implemented, and evaluated the architecture of 4S. Results We contribute in three areas. First, we define the software ecosystem architecture concept that captures organization......, relations among them, and properties of both. Our objective is to show how this concept can be used i) in the analysis of existing software ecosystems and ii) in the design of new software ecosystems. Method We performed a mixed-method study that consisted of a case study and an experiment. For i), we...... experience in creating and evolving the 4S telemedicine ecosystem. Conclusion The concept of software ecosystem architecture can be used analytically and constructively in respectively the analysis and design of software ecosystems....

  7. Web-marketing mix 4S v malé organizaci

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlíř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to evaluate whether application of the model of marketing promotion in the Internet based on the concept of web-marketing mix 4S in a small organization, sales-oriented professional machines and equipment for carpentry, plumbing and metal fabrication shop can achieve synergy and formulated key performance indicators. To achieve this goal is necessary to identify and describe technologies, tools, procedures and processes based on literature and publications that are ...

  8. Web-marketing mix 4S v malé organizaci

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlíř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to evaluate whether application of the model of marketing promotion in the Internet based on the concept of web-marketing mix 4S in a small organization, sales-oriented professional machines and equipment for carpentry, plumbing and metal fabrication shop can achieve synergy and formulated key performance indicators. To achieve this goal is necessary to identify and describe technologies, tools, procedures and processes based on literature and publications that are ...

  9. 4s-reasoner: RDFS Backward Chained Reasoning Support in 4store

    OpenAIRE

    Salvadores, Manuel; Correndo, Gianluca; Omitola, Temitope; Gibbins, Nicholas; Harris, Steve; Shadbolt, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of backward chained clustered RDFS reasoning in 4store. The system presented, called “4s-reasoner”, adds no overhead to the import phase and yet performs reasonably well at the query phase. We also demonstrate that our solution scales over clusters of commodity servers providing an optimal solution that balances infrastructure cost and performance over tested data sets with up to 500M triples. In addition we have shared our implementation und...

  10. Preliminary Evaluation on In-vessel Source Term based on 4S Methodology in PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Won; Chang, Won-Pyo; Seong, Seung Hwan; Ahn, Sang June; Kang, Seok Hun; Choi, Chi-Woong; Lee, Jin Yoo; Lee, Kwi Lim; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Jeong, Taekyeong; Ha, Kwi-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This strategy requires nuclear plants to have features that prevent radionuclide release and multiple barriers to the escape from the plants of any radionuclides that are released despite preventive measures. Considerations of the ability to prevent and mitigate release of radionuclides arise at numerous places in the safety regulations of nuclear plants. The effectiveness of mitigative capabilities in nuclear plants is subject to quantitative analysis. The radionuclide input to these quantitative analyses of effectiveness is the Source Term (ST). All features of the composition, magnitude, timing, chemical form and physical form of accidental radionuclide release constitute the ST. Also, ST is defined as the release of radionuclides from the fuel and coolant into the containment, and subsequently to the environment. The many assumptions and equations evaluated in 4S are used. The in-vessel STs are calculated through several phases: The inventory of each radionuclide is calculated by ORIGEN-2 code using the peak burnup conditions. The nominal value of the radiological inventory is multiplied by a factor of 1.5 as an uncertainty margin to give the radiological inventory. ST in the release from the core to primary sodium is calculated by using the assumption of 4S methodology. Lastly, ST in the release from the primary sodium to cover gas space is calculated by using the assumption of 4S methodology.

  11. Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST receiving imatinib: an active agent only in non progressive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffaud Florence

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST receiving imatinib : an active agent only in non progressive patients. Background Imatinib is a standard treatment for advanced/metastatic GIST and in adjuvant setting. Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with advanced GIST, and is one of the most frequent side effects of imatinib with grade 3–4 anaemia in 10% of patients. Whether EPO treatment is useful in the management of GIST patients receiving imatinib treatment is unknown. Methods A retrospective study of EPO treatment in GIST patients receiving imatinib was undertaken in 4 centres. Thirty four patients received EPO treatment among the 319 GIST patients treated with imatinib in clinical trials or with compassionate use between 2001 and 2003. The efficacy of EPO on the anaemia of patients with GIST treated with imatinib was analyzed. Results There were 18 males and 16 females with a median age of 59 years. Median WHO-PS was 1. Primary tumour sites were mainly gastric (32% and small bowel (29%. Sites of metastases were mainly liver (82% and peritoneum (79%. The median delay between the initiation of imatinib treatment and EPO was 58 days (range 0–553. Median haemoglobin (Hb level prior to EPO was 9 g/dL (range 6,9-11,8 and 11,7 g/dL (range 6,8-14,4 after 2 months. An increase of more than 2 g/dL was observed in 18 (53% of patients. None of the 7 patients who progressed (PD under imatinib treatment (400 mg/day experienced HB response, as compared to 66% (18/27 of the remaining patients (PR + SD (p = 0,002. Primary tumour site, liver metastases, peritoneal metastases, age, gender did not correlate with HB response to EPO. Response to EPO was observed in 2/11 patients receiving high-dose imatinib (800 mg/day vs 16/23 of others. Using logistic regression, only PD before EPO treatment was retained as a predictive factor for EPO response. Conclusion EPO enables to

  12. Determination of nonligand amino acids critical to [4Fe-4S]2+/+ assembly in ferredoxin maquettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, S E; Gibney, B R; Rabanal, F; Dutton, P L

    1999-08-10

    The prototype ferredoxin maquette, FdM, is a 16-amino acid peptide which efficiently incorporates a single [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster with spectroscopic and electrochemical properties that are typical of natural bacterial ferredoxins. Using this synthetic protein scaffold, we have investigated the role of the nonliganding amino acids in the assembly of the iron-sulfur cluster. In a stepwise fashion, we truncated FdM to a seven-amino acid peptide, FdM-7, which incorporates a cluster spectroscopically identical to FdM but in lower yield, 29% relative to FdM. FdM-7 consists solely of the. CIACGAC. consensus ferredoxin core motif observed in natural protein sequences. Initially, all of the nonliganding amino acids were substituted for either glycine, FdM-7-PolyGly (.CGGCGGC.), or alanine, FdM-7-PolyAla (.CAACAAC.), on the basis of analysis of natural ferredoxin sequences. Both FdM-7-PolyGly and FdM-7-PolyAla incorporated little [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster, 6 and 7%, respectively. A systematic study of the incorporation of a single isoleucine into each of the four nonliganding positions indicated that placement either in the second or in the sixth core motif positions,.CIGCGGC. or.CGGCGIC., restored the iron-sulfur cluster binding capacity of the peptides to the level of FdM-7. Incorporation of an isoleucine into the fifth position,.CGGCIGC., which in natural ferredoxins is predominantly occupied by a glycine, resulted in a loss of [4Fe-4S] affinity. The substitution of leucine, tryptophan, and arginine into the second core motif position illustrated the stabilization of the [4Fe-4S] cluster by bulky hydrophobic amino acids. Furthermore, the incorporation of a single isoleucine into the second core motif position in a 16-amino acid ferredoxin maquette resulted in a 5-fold increase in the level of [4Fe-4S] cluster binding relative to that of the glycine variant. The protein design rules derived from this study are fully consistent with those derived from natural ferredoxin sequence

  13. Large structural changes upon protonation of Fe4S4 clusters: the consequences for reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Ian; Henderson, Richard A

    2014-11-21

    Density functional calculations reveal that protonation of a μ3-S in [Fe4S4X4](2-) clusters (X = halide, thiolate, phenoxide) results in the breaking of one S-Fe bond (to >3 Å, from 2.3 Å). This creates a doubly-bridging SH ligand (μ3-SH is not stable), and a unique three-coordinated planar Fe atom. The under-coordination of this unique Fe atom is the basis of revised mechanisms for the acid-catalysed ligand substitution reactions in which substitution of X by PhS occurs at the unique Fe site by an indirect pathway involving initial displacement of X by acetonitrile (solvent), followed by displacement of coordinated acetonitrile by PhSH. When X = Cl or Br the rate of attack by PhSH is slower than the dissociation of X(-), and is the rate-determining step; in contrast, when X = SEt, SBu(t) or OPh the rate of dissociation of XH is slower than attack by PhSH and is rate-determining for these clusters. A full and consistent interpretation of all kinetic data is presented including new explanations of many of the kinetic observations on the acid-catalysed substitution reactions of [Fe4S4X4](2-) clusters. The proposed mechanisms are supported by density functional calculations of the structures of intermediates, and simulations of some of the steps. These findings are expected to have widespread ramifications for the reaction chemistry of both natural and synthetic clusters with the {Fe4S4} core.

  14. The S4-S5 linker couples voltage sensing and activation of pacemaker channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mitcheson, J S; Tristani-Firouzi, M; Lin, M; Sanguinetti, M C

    2001-09-25

    Voltage-gated channels are normally opened by depolarization and closed by repolarization of the membrane. Despite sharing significant sequence homology with voltage-gated K(+) channels, the gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels has the opposite dependence on membrane potential: hyperpolarization opens, whereas depolarization closes, these channels. The mechanism and structural basis of the process that couples voltage sensor movement to HCN channel opening and closing is not understood. On the basis of our previous studies of a mutant HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel, we hypothesized that the intracellular linker that connects the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains (S4-S5 linker) of HCN channels might be important for channel gating. Here, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the HCN2 S4-S5 linker to identify three residues, E324, Y331, and R339, that when mutated disrupted normal channel closing. Mutation of a basic residue in the S4 domain (R318Q) prevented channel opening, presumably by disrupting S4 movement. However, channels with R318Q and Y331S mutations were constitutively open, suggesting that these channels can open without a functioning S4 domain. We conclude that the S4-S5 linker mediates coupling between voltage sensing and HCN channel activation. Our findings also suggest that opening of HCN and related channels corresponds to activation of a gate located near the inner pore, rather than recovery of channels from a C-type inactivated state.

  15. Argon 4s and 4p Excited States Atomic Data Applied in ARC-JET Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Katsonis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluated atomic data concerning the 4s and 4p configurations of Ar I are averaged in order to simplify their use in various cases of Ar plasma modeling and diagnostics. These data are used here to model a low-power arcjet, running with Argon at low pressure. In so doing, they are explicitly introduced in the chemical processes included in a fluid Navier-Stokes type code, allowing for evaluation of the spectroscopically measurable level populations and of the electronic temperatures. The characteristics of the model are described and the main processes are discussed in view of the results of the calculations.

  16. The Y(4140), X(4260), psi(2D), psi(4S) and tentative psi(3D)

    CERN Document Server

    van Beveren, Eef

    2009-01-01

    Data on B+ --> J/psi phi K+ and the Y(4140) enhancement recently reported by the CDF collaboration [arxiv:0903.2229] are analysed. The threshold behaviour, as well as traces of the X(4260) enhancement, the known c-cbar resonances psi(2D), psi(4S), and a tentative psi(3D) state, as observed in the mass distribution, suggest that the J/psi+phi system has quantum numbers JPC=1--. It is then argued that the Y(4140) enhancement does not represent any kind of resonance, but instead is a natural consequence of the opening of the J/psi+phi channel.

  17. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver cancer . The following stages are used for gastric cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In stage 0 , abnormal cells are ... check-ups. Treatment Options by Stage Stage 0 (Carcinoma in ... Stage I Gastric Cancer Treatment of stage I gastric cancer may ...

  18. Bottomonium physics at Υ(4S, 5S, 6S) energies with the Belle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamponi, Umberto

    2016-08-01

    The description of quarkonia as pure quark anti-quark bound states has been recently challenged by the observation of charged states in both the charmonium and bottomonium region and large violations of the heavy quark spin symmetry in hadronic transitions. All these effects can be ascribable to non-negligible contributions from the light quark degrees of freedom in the description of both charmonia and bottomonia. We will report the most recent experimental measurements performed by the Belle collaboration in the Y(4S), Y(5S) and Y(6S) regions, including the measurement of the ratio σ[e+e- → bb̅]/σ[e+e- → μ+ μ- ], the search for neutral states near the B0B̅0 threshold, the first observation of the transition ϒ(4S) → ηhb (lP) and the study of the η transitions at the ϒ(5S) energy. The contribution to the study of the structure of these states coming from the measurement of hadronic transitions will be discussed.

  19. Interaction between the sodium channel inactivation linker and domain III S4-S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M R; Goldin, A L

    1997-10-01

    The III-IV linker (L(III-IV)) of the rat brain sodium channel is critical for fast inactivation, possibly forming a fast inactivation particle. Inactivation can be disrupted by mutation of a conserved alanine at position 1329 in the S4-S5 loop of domain III. Combination of a charged mutation at 1329 with a compensatory (opposite) charge mutation at position 1489 in L(III-IV) partially restores inactivation of the channel. The compensatory charge mutant channel has a single-channel mean open time that is similar to that of the wild-type channel and is approximately 50 times shorter than that of the L(III-IV) mutant channel. The results of thermodynamic cycle analysis indicate that the mutations in domain III S4-S5 and L(III-IV) have a coupling energy of 2.8 kcal/mol, indicating that the two mutations act interdependently. These data suggest that L(III-IV) interacts directly with A1329, which may form part of the docking site if L(III-IV) is a fast inactivation particle.

  20. [15]aneN4S: Synthesis, Thermodynamic Studies and Potential Applications in Chelation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to synthesize and characterize the thiatetraaza macrocycle 1-thia-4,7,10,13-tetraazacyclopentadecane ([15]aneN4S. Its acid-base behaviour was studied by potentiometry at 25 °C and ionic strength 0.10 M in KNO3. The protonation sequence of this ligand was investigated by 1H-NMR titration that also allowed the determination of protonation constants in D2O. Binding studies of [15]aneN4S with Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ metal ions were further performed under the same experimental conditions. The results demonstrated that this compound has a higher selectivity and thermodynamic stability for Hg2+ and Cu2+, followed by Ni2+. The UV-visible-near IR spectroscopies and magnetic moment data for the Co(II and Ni(II complexes indicated a tetragonal distorted coordination geometry for both metal centres. The value of magnetic moment and the X-band EPR spectra of the Cu(II complex are consistent with a distorted square pyramidal geometry.

  1. [VALUE OF SMART PHONE Scoliometer SOFTWARE IN OBTAINING OPTIMAL LUMBAR LORDOSIS DURING L4-S1 FUSION SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weibo; Liang, De; Ye, Linqiang; Jiang, Xiaobing; Yao, Zhensong; Tang, Jingjing; Tang, Yongchao

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the value of smart phone Scoliometer software in obtaining optimal lumbar lordosis (LL) during L4-S1 fusion surgery. Between November 2014 and February 2015, 20 patients scheduled for L4-S1 fusion surgery were prospectively enrolled the study. There were 8 males and 12 females, aged 41-65 years (mean, 52.3 years). The disease duration ranged from 6 months to 6 years (mean, 3.4 years). Before operation, the pelvic incidence (PI) and Cobb angle of L4-S1 (CobbL4-S1) were measured on lateral X-ray film of lumbosacral spine by PACS system; and the ideal CobbL4-S1 was then calculated according to previously published methods [(PI+9 degrees) x 70%]. Subsequently, intraoperative CobbL4-S1 was monitored by the Scoliometer software and was defined as optimal while it was less than 5 degrees difference compared with ideal CobbL4-S1. Finally, the CobbL4-S1 was measured by the PACS system after operation and the consistency was compared between Scoliometer software and PACS system to evaluate the accuracy of this software. In addition, value of this method in obtaining optimal LL was validated by comparing the difference between ideal CobbL4-S1 and preoperative one with that between ideal CobbL4-S1 and postoperative one. The CobbL4-S1 was (36.17 ± 1.53)degrees for ideal one, (22.57 ± 5.50)degrees for preoperative one, (32.25 ± 1.46)degrees for intraoperative one measured by Scoliometer software, and (34.43 ± 1.72)degrees for postoperative one, respectively. The observed intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was excellent [ICC = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (0.93, 0.97)] and the mean absolute difference (MAD) was low (MAD = 1.23) between Scoliometer software and PACS system. The deviation between ideal CobbL4-S1 and postoperative CobbL4-S1 was (2.31 ± 0.23)degrees, which was significantly lower than the deviation between ideal CobbL4-S1 and preoperative CobbL4-S1 (13.60 ± 1.85)degrees (t = 6.065, P = 0.001). Scoliometer software can help surgeon obtain

  2. A 3:1 site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, Erwin P.L. van der; Brom, Coenraad R. van den; Arfaoui, Imad; Houssiau, Laurent; Rudolf, Petra; Koten, Gerard van; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J.M.; Hessen, Bart

    2008-01-01

    A 3:1 site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster is immobilized on a thiol-functionalized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on Au(111) by thiol-thiolate exchange chemistry. Fe 2p signals observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy support the presence of [4Fe-4S] clusters at the SAM surface; further evidenc

  3. Analysis and design of software ecosystem architectures – Towards the 4S telemedicine ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten

    2014-01-01

    , and application stove-pipes that inhibit the adoption of telemedical solutions. To which extent can a software ecosystem approach to telemedicine alleviate this? Objective In this article, we define the concept of software ecosystem architecture as the structure(s) of a software ecosystem comprising elements......, relations among them, and properties of both. Our objective is to show how this concept can be used i) in the analysis of existing software ecosystems and ii) in the design of new software ecosystems. Method We performed a mixed-method study that consisted of a case study and an experiment. For i), we...... performed a descriptive, revelatory case study of the Danish telemedicine ecosystem and for ii), we experimentally designed, implemented, and evaluated the architecture of 4S. Results We contribute in three areas. First, we define the software ecosystem architecture concept that captures organization...

  4. Chemical Bath Deposition of Nickel Sulphide (Ni4S3 Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren TEO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of nickel sulphide were deposited from aqueous baths on indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chemical bath contained nickel sulphate, sodium thiosulfate and triethanolamine solutions. The aim of the present study was to analyze the different experimental conditions to prepare Ni4S3 thin films using chemical bath deposition technique. The structural, morphological and optical properties of nickel sulphide thin films were obtained by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and UV-Vis Spectrophotometer will be presented. The properties of the films varied with the variation in the deposition parameters. The films deposited at longer deposition time using lower concentration in more acidic medium showed improved crystallinity, good uniformity and better adhesion to the substrate. Films showed band gap of 0.35 eV and exhibited p-type semiconductor behaviour.

  5. Exchange anisotropy in the skyrmion host GaV4S8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, D.; Stasinopoulos, I.; Kézsmárki, I.; Fehér, T.; Tsurkan, V.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Grundler, D.; Loidl, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy at 34 GHz we explored the magnetic anisotropy of single-crystalline GaV4S8 in the field-polarized magnetic state. We describe the data in terms of an easy-axis type uniaxial anisotropy with an anisotropy constant {{K}1}=1.6\\cdot {{10}5} erg cm‑3 at 2 K, corresponding to a relative exchange anisotropy Δ J/J≈ 5 %, and about 1.0\\cdot {{10}5}~ erg cm‑3 near 11 K, i.e. at temperatures where the skyrmion-lattice phase was recently discovered. The relatively large value of K 1 explains the confinement of the skyrmion tubes to the easy axes. A distinct set of resonances in the spectra is attributed to the co-existence of different rhombohedral domains. Complementary broadband spectroscopy demonstrates that non-collinear spin states may sensitively be detected by electron spin resonance techniques.

  6. Cyclic Parameter Refinement of 4S-10 Hybrid Flux-Switching Motor for Lightweight Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, J. Abd; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.

    2017-08-01

    A great deal of attention has been given to the reduction of lighting the vehicle because the lighter the vehicle the energy consumption is comparatively low. Hence, the lightweight electric vehicle was introduced for lower carbon footprint and the sizing of the vehicle itself. One of the components to reduce the weight of the vehicle is the propulsion system which comprised of electric motor functioning as the source of torque to drive the propulsion system of the machine. This paper presents the refinement methodology for the optimized design of the 4S-10P E-Core hybrid excitation flux switching motor. The purpose of the refinement methodology is to improve the torque production of the optimized motor. The result of the successful improvement of the torque production is justifiable for a lightweight electric vehicle to drive the propulsion system.

  7. Charge transfer in keV O+(4S,2D,2P)-He collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, B. G.; Stebbings, R. F.

    2003-02-01

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) are reported for charge-transfer scattering of (1 5)-keV O+(4S) ground-state and O+(2D,2P) metastable-state ions by helium atoms at angles between 0.2° and 6.3° in the laboratory frame. Estimated ground-state and metastable-state total cross sections are derived from these measurements. The present ground-state cross sections agree satisfactorily with previous measurements for energies above 2 keV and the metastable-state cross sections are consistent with the mixed-state data of Kusakabe et al. [J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59, 1987 (1990)]. The large differences between the ground- and metastable-state cross sections predicted by theory are not observed.

  8. Validation of a plant dynamics code for 4S - Test analysis of natural circulation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebe, F.; Horie, H.; Matsumiya, H. [Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Fanning, T. H. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A plant transient dynamics code for a sodium-cooled fast reactor was developed by Toshiba. The code is used to evaluate the safety performance of Super-Safe, Small, and Simple reactor (4S) for Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOOs), Design Basis Accident (DBA) and Beyond DBA (BDBA). The code is currently undergoing verification and validation (V and V). As one of the validation, test analysis of the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)-17 performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II was conducted. The SHRT-17 is protected loss of flow test. The purpose of this validation is to confirm capability of the code to simulate natural circulation behavior of the plant. As a result, good agreements are shown between the analytical results and the measured data which were available from instrumented subassembly. The detailed validation result of the natural circulation behavior is described in this paper. (authors)

  9. Solid-state and solution rearrangements of F3S[triple bond]NXeF+ leading to the F4S=NXe+ cation; syntheses, HF solvolyses, and structural characterizations of [F4S=NXe][AsF6] and[F4S=NH2][AsF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory L; Mercier, Hélène P A; Schrobilgen, Gary J

    2009-06-03

    The salt, [F(4)S=NXe][AsF(6)], has been synthesized by the solid-state rearrangement of [F(3)S[triple bond]NXeF][AsF(6)] and by HF-catalyzed rearrangement of [F(3)S[triple bond]NXeF][AsF(6)] in anhydrous HF (aHF) and HF/BrF(5) solvents. The F(4)S=NXe(+) cation undergoes HF solvolysis to form F(4)S=NH(2)(+), XeF(2), and the recently reported F(5)SN(H)Xe(+) cation. Both [F(4)S=NXe][AsF(6)] and [F(4)S=NH(2)][AsF(6)] have been characterized by (129)Xe and (19)F NMR spectroscopy in aHF and HF/BrF(5) solvents and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The [F(4)S=NXe][AsF(6)] salt was also characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The Xe-N bond of F(4)S=NXe(+) is among the shortest Xe-N bonds presently known (2.084(3) A), and the cation interacts with the AsF(6)(-) anion by means of a Xe---F-As bridge in which the Xe---F distance (2.618(2) A) is significantly less than the sum of the Xe and F van der Waals radii. Both F(4)S=NXe(+) and F(4)S=NH(2)(+) exhibit trigonal bipyramidal geometries about sulfur, with nitrogen in the equatorial plane and the nitrogen substituents coplanar with the axial fluorine ligands of sulfur. The F(4)S=NH(2)(+) cation is isoelectronic with F(4)S=CH(2) and, like F(4)S=CH(2), has a high barrier to rotation about the S=N double bond and to pseudorotation of the trigonal bipyramidal F(4)S=N- moiety. The solution and solid-state rearrangements of F(3)S[triple bond]NXeF(+) to F(4)S=NXe(+) are proposed to result from attack at sulfur by fluoride ion arising from HF in solution and from the AsF(6)(-) anion in the solid state. Quantum-chemical calculations were employed to calculate the gas-phase geometries, charges, bond orders, valencies, and vibrational frequencies of F(4)S=NXe(+) and F(4)S=NH(2)(+). The F(4)S=NXe(+) cation provides the first example of xenon bonded to an imido-nitrogen, and together with the F(4)S=NH(2)(+) cation are presently the only cations known to contain the F(4)S=N-group. Both cations are intermediates in the HF solvolysis pathways

  10. Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-06-16

    Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)C and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S)We present the first measurement of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) based on a sample of 230 x 106(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. We measure the product branching fractions Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S)) x BetaUpsilon(1S) --> mu(+)mu(-) = (2.23 +/- 0.25(stat) +/- 0.27(syst))x 10(-6) and Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S) x Beta(Upsilon(2S) --> mu(+)mu(-))=(1.69 +/-0.26(stat) +/- 0.20(syst)) x 10(-)6, from which we derive the partial widths Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S))=(1.8 +/-0.4) keV and Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S))=(2.7 +/- 0.8) keV.

  11. Search for missing $\\psi(4S)$ in the $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A detailed analysis to find a missing $\\psi(4S)$ is made by utilizing the recent precise mesurements of the cross section for the process $e^+e^-\\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+\\pi^-$ by Belle. Assuming three resonances $Y(4360)$, $Y(4660)$, and $\\psi(4S)$ to fit the data, we obtain the resonance parameters for $\\psi(4S)$ as $m=4243$ MeV and $\\Gamma=16 \\pm 31$ MeV showing a narrow state as predicted before. A combined fit to the data $e^+ e^- \\to \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-, \\ h_c \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, and $\\chi_{c0} \\omega$ is also performed to obtain the similar resonance parameters of $\\psi(4S)$. The upper limit of the branching ratio is fitted to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(4S)\\to\\psi(2S)\\pi^+\\pi^-) < 3\\times 10^{-3}$, which can be understood by hadronic loop contributions in reasonable parameters range. In addition, the ratios of the branching ratios of the $\\psi(4S)$ dipion transition to the one of $\\psi(4S)\\to\\chi_{c0}\\omega$ are fitted, which can be further measured by BESIII and forthcoming BelleII to confirm the existence of $\\psi(4...

  12. Comparison of maternal outcomes from primary cesarean section during the second compared with first stage of labor by indication for the operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Samuel; Raz, Nili; Boaz, Mona; Sadan, Oscar; Golan, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    To compare maternal outcomes when cesarean sections were performed in the second stage of labor to those performed in the first stage of labor by indication for the operation. This is a retrospective cohort (n=383) of term parturient women who underwent primary cesarean section during active labor. Cases were drawn from the Obstetrics Department, E. Wolfson Medical Center, a tertiary health care university facility, during a 24 month period. All cases were term singleton pregnancies in vertex presentation following unremarkable pregnancy. Maternal morbidity was assessed. A significantly higher rate of unintentional uterine incision extensions was observed in cesarean sections performed during second stage compared to first stage (17.1% vs. 4.6%, p=0.001). It was higher whenever (at first or second stage) the fetal head was pushed (20.0% vs. 5.4%, p=0.0024). Unintentional uterine incision extensions were significantly more frequent when the cesarean section was performed for non-progressive labor during the second stage compared to first stage (16.1% vs. 3.6%, p=0.0052). Uterine atonia was more frequent among parturient women who underwent cesarean section for non-progressive labor during the first stage compared to second stage (16.7% vs. 4.8%, p=0.0382). Uterine atony during first stage cesarean section and unintentional uterine incision extensions during second stage cesarean section were significantly more frequent when the operation was performed for non-progressive labor. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Structural, magnetic, electric, dielectric, and thermodynamic properties of multiferroic Ge V4S8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, S.; Günther, A.; Ruff, E.; Tsurkan, V.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2016-12-01

    The lacunar spinel Ge V4S8 undergoes orbital and ferroelectric ordering at the Jahn-Teller transition around 30 K and exhibits antiferromagnetic order below about 14 K. In addition to this orbitally driven ferroelectricity, lacunar spinels are an interesting material class, as the vanadium ions form V4 clusters representing stable molecular entities with a common electron distribution and a well-defined level scheme of molecular states resulting in a unique spin state per V4 molecule. Here we report detailed x-ray, magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion, and dielectric results to characterize the structural, electric, dielectric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of this interesting material, which also exhibits strong electronic correlations. From the magnetic susceptibility, we determine a negative Curie-Weiss temperature, indicative for antiferromagnetic exchange and a paramagnetic moment close to a spin S =1 of the V4 molecular clusters. The low-temperature heat capacity provides experimental evidence for gapped magnon excitations. From the entropy release, we conclude about strong correlations between magnetic order and lattice distortions. In addition, the observed anomalies at the phase transitions also indicate strong coupling between structural and electronic degrees of freedom. Utilizing dielectric spectroscopy, we find the onset of significant dispersion effects at the polar Jahn-Teller transition. The dispersion becomes fully suppressed again with the onset of spin order. In addition, the temperature dependencies of dielectric constant and specific heat possibly indicate a sequential appearance of orbital and polar order.

  14. Thermally assisted variable range hopping in Tl4S3Se crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdelhalim M Ziqan; A F Qasrawi; Abdulftah H Mohammad; N M Gasanly

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a modified model for the application of the thermionic and hopping current conduction mechanisms in the presence of continuous mixed conduction is investigated, discussed, experimented and simulated. It is observed that there exists a contribution from the hopping conductivity to the total conduction even at temperature ranges where the thermionic emission is mainly dominant. The contribution weight of a specific mechanism at particular temperature range is estimated. In addition, a modification to the Mott’s variable range hopping (VRH) transport parameters like density of localized state near the Fermi level, the average hopping range and the hopping energy in the presence of mixed conduction mechanism is also reported. This new approach corrects the evaluated electrical parameters that are necessary for the construction of electronic devices like absorption layers in solar cells. This proposed model is also used to explain the conduction mechanism and investigate the electrical conduction thermionic and Mott’s VRH parameters in Tl4S3Se crystals and in CuAlO2 thin films.

  15. Extending the Family of V(4+) S=(1/2) Kagome Antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lucy; Aidoudi, Farida H; Black, Cameron; Arachchige, Kasun S A; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Morris, Russell E; Lightfoot, Philip

    2015-12-14

    The ionothermal synthesis, structure, and magnetic susceptibility of a novel inorganic-organic hybrid material, imidazolium vanadium(III,IV) oxyfluoride [C3 H5 N2 ][V9 O6 F24 (H2 O)2 ] (ImVOF) are presented. The structure consists of inorganic vanadium oxyfluoride slabs with kagome layers of V(4+) S=${{ 1/2 }}$ ions separated by a mixed valence layer. These inorganic slabs are intercalated with imidazolium cations. Quinuclidinium (Q) and pyrazinium (Pyz) cations can also be incorporated into the hybrid structure type to give QVOF and PyzVOF analogues, respectively. The highly frustrated topology of the inorganic slabs, along with the quantum nature of the magnetism associated with V(4+) , means that these materials are excellent candidates to host exotic magnetic ground states, such as the highly sought quantum spin liquid. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of all samples suggest an absence of conventional long-range magnetic order down to 2 K despite considerable antiferromagnetic exchange.

  16. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H.; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will; Khare, Sagar D.; Noy, Dror

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. PMID:26449207

  17. On the Fermi-GBM Event 0.4 s after GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, J.; Burgess, J. M.; Savchenko, V.; Yu, H.-F.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent report by Connaughton et al., we analyze continuous time-tagged event (TTE) data of Fermi-gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) around the time of the gravitational-wave event GW 150914. We find that after proper accounting for low-count statistics, the GBM transient event at 0.4 s after GW 150914 is likely not due to an astrophysical source, but consistent with a background fluctuation, removing the tension between the INTEGRAL/ACS non-detection and GBM. Additionally, reanalysis of other short GRBs shows that without proper statistical modeling the fluence of faint events is over-predicted, as verified for some joint GBM-ACS detections of short GRBs. We detail the statistical procedure to correct these biases. As a result, faint short GRBs, verified by ACS detections, with significances in the broadband light curve even smaller than that of the GBM-GW150914 event are recovered as proper non-zero source, while the GBM-GW150914 event is consistent with zero fluence.

  18. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will A; Khare, Sagar D; Noy, Dror

    2016-05-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. This article is part of a Special issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L Ross Anderson.

  19. Observation of $\\Upsilon(4S) decays to $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(2S)

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present the first measurement of $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays to $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(2S)$ based on a sample of 230$\\times10^6$ $\\Upsilon(4S)$ mesons collected with the BABAR detector. We measure the product branching fractions ${\\cal B}(\\Upsilon(4S)\\to \\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S))\\times{\\cal B}(\\Upsilon(1S)\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-)=(2.23\\pm0.25_{stat} \\pm0.27_{sys})\\times 10^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}(\\Upsilon(4S)\\to \\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(2S))\\times{\\cal B}(\\Upsilon(2S)\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-)=(1.69\\pm0.26_{stat}\\pm0.20_{sys})\\times 10^{-6}$, from which we derive the partial widths $\\Gamma(\\Upsilon(4S)\\to \\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S))=(1.8\\pm0.4)$~keV and $\\Gamma(\\Upsilon(4S)\\to \\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(2S))=(2.7\\pm0.8)$~keV.

  20. Pb- and Sm-doping effects on the vortex dynamics in Bi4O4S3 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L.; Tie, X. Y.; Zhang, H. G.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of Bi4O4S3, Bi3.94Pb0.06O4S3, and Bi3.94Sm0.06O4S3 were synthesized using a conventional solid-state reaction method. The vortex dynamics of these samples are studied and compared through measuring the critical current density (Jc) and magnetic relaxation. The estimated Jc value of three samples at temperature 2 K decreases with doping Pb and Sm elements due to the depression of the superconductivity. The normalized pinning force response with reduced field follows the Kramer scaling law f (h )∝ hp(1-h ) q , and the maximum of the reduced field (hmax) is observed at 0.31, 0.24, and 0.18 for Bi4O4S3, Bi3.94Pb0.06O4S3, and Bi3.94Sm0.06O4S3, respectively, indicating the presence of both surface and point pinning centers in these samples. The barrier energy estimated by the magnetic relaxation data depends on the field as a negative power law U0∝Hn and the magnetic relaxation rate S exhibits a considerable monotonic increase with magnetic field, which corroborates a plastic nature of the creep vortex dynamics in these compounds.

  1. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide more detailed information about the cancer stage. TNM Staging System The most common system for staging ... in the form of solid tumor is the TNM system. Most providers and cancer centers use it ...

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 756x576 ... Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing and inset ...

  3. Impairment of slow inactivation as a common mechanism for periodic paralysis in DIIS4-S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendahhou, S; Cummins, T R; Kula, R W; Fu, Y-H; Ptácek, L J

    2002-04-23

    Mutations in the human skeletal muscle sodium channels are associated with hyperKPP, hypoKPP, paramyotonia congenita, and potassium-aggravated myotonia. This article describes the clinical manifestations of a patient with hyperKPP carrying a mutation (L689I) occurring in the linker DIIS4-S5 and its functional expression in a mammalian system. To correlate the clinical manifestations of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP) with the functional expression of a sodium channel mutation. The mutation was introduced into a mammalian expression vector and expressed in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The functional expression of the L689I and that of the wild-type channels was monitored using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. There was no change in the kinetics of fast inactivation, and inactivation curves were indistinguishable from that of wild-type channels. However, the L689I mutation caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation and the mutant channels showed an impaired slow inactivation process. In addition, the mutant channels have a larger persistent current at -40 mV where window current may occur. The L689I mutation has similar effects to the T704M mutation and causes hyperKPP in this family. Because both of these hyperKPP mutations cause episodic muscle weakness, and because patients harboring another mutation (I693T) also can have episodic weakness, it is hypothesized that mutations occurring in this region of the sodium channel may cause episodic weakness through an impaired slow inactivation process coupled with enhanced activation.

  4. Synthesis, Structure, and Characterization of Cu4S10(4-methylpyridine)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Richman, Robert M.; Duraj, Stan A.; Andras, Maria T.; Moore, Hall L.; Sabat, Michal; Eckles, William E.; Martuch, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The title compound, Cu4S10(4-methylpyridine)(sub 4) (dot) 4-methylpyridine was prepared by three different reactions: the oxidation of copper powder by sulfur and the reaction of copper (I) sulfide (or CuBr (dot) SMe2) with excess sulfur, both in the coordinating solvent, 4-methylpyridine. Red crystals of the compound obtained by layering with hexanes were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure was refined to R = 0.026 and R(sub w) = 0.036 in a space group P1bar (No. 2), with Z = 2, a = 13.983 (2) A, b = 15.384 (2) A, c = 9.660 (1) A, alpha = 93.87 (1)deg., beta = 93.38 (1)deg., gamma = 99.78 (1)deg., V = 2037.9 (9) A(exp 3). The compound has approximate S(sub 4) symmetry and consists of two pentasulfide chains linking four Cu(I) ions, each with a corrdinating 2-methylpyridine. The infrared spectrum was dominated by absorption due to coordinated 4-methylpyridine with several low-energy peaks attributable to S-S stretches, which were also observed by Raman spectroscopy. A featureless electronic absorption spectrum yielded a single peak in the near ultraviolet upon computer enhancement (lambda = 334 nm, epsilon = 10,000), most likely an intraligand transition. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the polysulfide complex undergoes irrversible oxidation and reduction at +0.04 and -0.34 V vs. SCE, respectively, at 298 K in 4-methylpyridine when swept at 20 mV/sec. The electrochemical behavior was unvaried even at sweep rates as high as 100 V/sec.

  5. [S4 S5 subsegmentectomy of the liver for gallbladder carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Michiaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Katayose, Yu; Takeuchi, Heigo; Rikiyama, Toshiki; Matsuno, Seiki

    2002-08-01

    Although innovations have occurred in imaging technology and surgical techniques, carcinoma of the gall-bladder still has a poor prognosis. Since the 1960s, we have performed extended cholecystectomy in patients with gallbladder cancer. Extended cholecystectomy is a safe and common treatment for advanced cancer, but the extent of necessary hepatic resection has not been established. In 2000, we reported that the gallbladder veins infused into the intrahepatic portal venous branch, mostly at P4 and P5(96.7%). Based on those results, we now perform resection of the lower part of segment 4(S4a) and segment 5 for advanced cancer with subserosal invasion and/or negligible direct invasion to the parenchyma of the liver. S4aS5 subsegmentectomy is thought to have a clear advantage over extended surgical margins. This procedure can remove almost all the area perfused by the gallbladder veins and as a results, it may also remove latent and occult metastatic foci. The steps in the procedure are as follows: 1) lymph nodes cleaning of the posterior of the pancreas head; 2) skeletonization of the hepatoduodenal ligament; 3) identification and ligation of the lower branch of P4; 4) identification of the boundary between the anterior and posterior segment; and 5) hepatic resection with the plate of the gallbladder. Since 1991, we have performed S4aS5 subsegmentectomy in 12 patients with gallbladder cancer. Although the follow-up period is short, it is thought that the outcome of this procedure is better than that of extended cholecystectomy because of the low mortality and morbidity rates.

  6. Regional flexibility in the S4-S5 linker regulates hERG channel closed-state stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Christina M; Sokolov, Stanislav; Van Slyke, Aaron C; Claydon, Tom W

    2014-10-01

    hERG K(+) channel function is vital for normal cardiac rhythm, yet the mechanisms underlying the unique biophysical characteristics of the channel, such as slow activation and deactivation gating, are incompletely understood. The S4-S5 linker is thought to transduce voltage sensor movement to opening of the pore gate, but may also integrate signals from cytoplasmic domains. Previously, we showed that substitutions of G546 within the S4-S5 linker destabilize the closed state of the channel. Here, we present results of a glycine-scan in the background of 546L. We demonstrate site-specific restoration of WT-like activation which suggests that flexibility in the N-terminal portion of the S4-S5 linker is critical for the voltage dependence of hERG channel activation. In addition, we show that the voltage dependence of deactivation, which was recently shown to be left-shifted from that of activation due to voltage sensor mode-shift, is also modulated by the S4-S5 linker. The G546L mutation greatly attenuated the coupling of voltage sensor mode-shift to the pore gate without altering the mode-shift itself. Indeed, all of the S4-S5 linker mutations tested similarly reduced coupling of the mode-shift to the pore gate. These data demonstrate a key role for S4-S5 linker in the unique activation and deactivation gating of hERG channels. Furthermore, uncoupling of the mode-shift to the pore by S4-S5 linker mutations parallels the effects of mutations in the N-terminus suggestive of functional interactions between the two regions.

  7. Study of hadronic transitions between Y states and observation of Y(4S)-> eta Y(1S) decay

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettonia, D; Bozzia, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppiab, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontesea, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzoa, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macria, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggioa, S; Patrignani, C; Robuttia, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firminoda Costa, J; Grosdidier, e G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D S; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardoa, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Listaa, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelliab, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandina, M; Posoccoa, M; Rotondoa, M; Simonettoab, F; Stroiliab, R; Vociab, C; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoniab, E; Angeliniab, C; Batignaniab, G; Bettariniab, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelliab, A; Fortiab, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusianiac, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsha, J J; Biesiada, J; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anullia, F; Baracchini, E; Cavotoa, G; del Reab, D; Di Marcoab, E; Facciniab, R; Ferrarottoa, F; Ferroniab, F; Gasperoab, M; Jacksona, P D; Li Gioia, L; Mazzonia, M A; Morgantia, S; Pireddaa, G; Polciab, F; Rengaab, F; Voenaa, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, o T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, e M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchiab, F; Gambaab, D; Pelliccioniab, M; Bombenab, M; Bosisioab, L; Cartaroab, C; Della Riccaab, G; Lanceriab, L; Vitaleab, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of hadronic transitions between Y(mS) (m=4,3,2) and Y(nS) (n=2,1) resonances based on 347.5\\invfb of data taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. We report the first observation of Y(4S)-> eta Y(1S) decay with a branching fraction BR((Y(4S)->eta Y(1S))=(1.96+-0.06_{stat} +-0.09_{syst}) x 10^{-4} and measure the ratio of partial widths Gamma(Y(4S)->etaY(1S))/Gamma(Y(4S)->pi+pi-Y(1S))=2.41+- 0.40_{stat}+- 0.12_{syst}. We set 90% CL upper limits on the ratios Gamma(Y(2S)->etaY(1S))/Gamma(Y(2S)->pi+pi-Y(1S))etaY(1S))/Gamma(Y(3S)->pi+pi-Y(1S))pi+pi-Y(2S))/Gamma(Y(4S)->pi+pi-Y(1S))=1.16+- 0.16_{stat}+- 0.14_{syst} and Gamma(Y(3S)->pi+pi-Y(2S))/Gamma(Y(3S)->pi+pi-Y(1S))=0.577+- 0.026_{stat}+- 0.060_{syst}.

  8. Porous SnIn4S8 microspheres in a new polymorph that promotes dyes degradation under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingjiang; Li, Liping; Li, Guangshe; Wang, Yunjian; Hu, Wanbiao; Guan, Xiangfeng

    2011-02-15

    Porous SnIn(4)S(8) microspheres were initially synthesized through a facile solvothermal approach and were investigated as visible-light driven photocatalysts for dyes degradation in polluted water. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance techniques. Results demonstrated that the as-synthesized SnIn(4)S(8) was of a new tetragonal polymorph, showing a band-gap of 2.5 eV, a specific surface area of 197 m(2) g(-1), and an accessible porous structure as well. The photocatalytic activity of the porous SnIn(4)S(8) was evaluated by decomposition of several typical organic dyes including methyl orange, rhodamine B, and methylene blue in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. It is demonstrated that porous SnIn(4)S(8) was highly photoactive and stable for dyes degradation, showing photocatalytic activity much higher than binary constituent sulfides like In(2)S(3), SnS(2), or even ternary chalcogenide ZnIn(2)S(4) photocatalyst. The excellent photocatalytic performance of porous SnIn(4)S(8) is the consequence of its high surface area, well-defined porous texture, and large amount of hydroxyl radicals.

  9. Mutations of the S4-S5 linker alter activation properties of HERG potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, M C; Xu, Q P

    1999-02-01

    1. The structural basis for the activation gate of voltage-dependent K+ channels is not known, but indirect evidence has implicated the S4-S5 linker, the cytoplasmic region between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains of the channel subunit. We have studied the effects of mutations in the S4-S5 linker of HERG (human ether-á-go-go-related gene), a human delayed rectifier K+ channel, in Xenopus oocytes. 2. Mutation of acidic residues (D540, E544) in the S4-S5 linker of HERG channels to neutral (Ala) or basic (Lys) residues accelerated the rate of channel deactivation. Most mutations greatly accelerated the rate of activation. However, E544K HERG channels activated more slowly than wild-type HERG channels. 3. Mutation of residues in the S4-S5 linker had little or no effect on fast inactivation, consistent with independence of HERG channel activation and inactivation 4. In response to large hyperpolarizations, D540K HERG channels can reopen into a state that is distinct from the normal depolarization-induced open state. It is proposed that substitution of a negatively charged Asp with the positively charged Lys disrupts a subunit interaction that normally stabilizes the channel in a closed state at negative transmembrane potentials. 5. The results indicate that the S4-S5 linker is a crucial component of the activation gate of HERG channels.

  10. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio produc

  11. Tyrosine Residues from the S4-S5 Linker of Kv11.1 Channels Are Critical for Slow Deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chai-Ann; Gravel, Andrée E; Perry, Matthew D; Arnold, Alexandre A; Marcotte, Isabelle; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-08-12

    Slow deactivation of Kv11.1 channels is critical for its function in the heart. The S4-S5 linker, which joins the voltage sensor and pore domains, plays a critical role in this slow deactivation gating. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to identify the membrane-bound surface of the S4S5 linker, and we show that two highly conserved tyrosine residues within the KCNH subfamily of channels are membrane-associated. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis indicates that Tyr-542 interacts with both the pore domain and voltage sensor residues to stabilize activated conformations of the channel, whereas Tyr-545 contributes to the slow kinetics of deactivation by primarily stabilizing the transition state between the activated and closed states. Thus, the two tyrosine residues in the Kv11.1 S4S5 linker play critical but distinct roles in the slow deactivation phenotype, which is a hallmark of Kv11.1 channels.

  12. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chai Ann; Perry, Matthew D; Tan, Peter S; Hill, Adam P; Kuchel, Philip W; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2012-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  13. Interaction of local anesthetics with a peptide encompassing the IV/S4-S5 linker of the Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraceto, Leonardo F; Oyama, Sérgio; Nakaie, Clóvis R; Spisni, Alberto; de Paula, Eneida; Pertinhez, Thelma A

    2006-08-20

    The peptide pIV/S4-S5 encompasses the cytoplasmic linker between helices S4-S5 in domain IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel, residues 1644-1664. The interaction of two local anesthetics (LA), lidocaine and benzocaine, with pIV/S4-S5 has been studied by DOSY, heteronuclear NMR 1H-15N-HSQC spectroscopy and computational methods. DOSY indicates that benzocaine, a neutral ester, exhibits stronger interaction with pIV/S4-S5 than lidocaine, a charged amine-amide. Weighted average chemical shifts, Deltadelta(1H-15N), show that benzocaine affects residues L1653, M1655 and S1656 while lidocaine slightly perturbs residues I1646, L1649 and A1659, L1660, near the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Computational methods confirmed the stability of the benzocaine binding and the existence of two binding sites for lidocaine. Even considering that the approach of studying the peptide in the presence of a co-solvent (TFE/H2O, 30%/70% v/v) has an inherently limited implication, our data strongly support the existence of multiple LA binding sites in the IV/S4-S5 linker, as suggested in the literature. In addition, we consider that LA can bind to the S4-S5 linker with diverse binding modes and strength since this linker is part of the receptor for the "inactivation gate particle". Conditions for devising new functional studies, aiming to better understand Na+ channel functionality as well as the various facets of LA pharmacological activity are proposed in this work.

  14. LOH analysis of genes around D4S2964 identifies ARD1B as a prognostic predictor of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate genes around the locus D4S2964 affected by loss of heterozygosity(LOH) and their clinical implications.METHODS:Four hundred and forty single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) located at 49 genes around D4S2964 were selected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information website for the SNPs microarray fabrication.LOH of SNPs markers in 112 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) tissues and paired adjacent liver tissues were investigated by the SNPs microarray.The correlation between ...

  15. Predicted Thermoelectric Properties of the Layered XBi4S7 (X = Mn, Fe) Based Materials: First Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Sikander; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Kanoun, Mohammed Benali

    2017-01-01

    We report a theoretical investigation of electronic structures, optical and thermoelectric properties of two ternary-layered chalcogenides, MnBi4S7 and FeBi4S7 , by combining the first principles density functional calculations and semi-local Boltzmann transport theory. The calculated electronic band structure have demonstrated that both compounds exhibit indirect band gaps. The optical transitions are explored via the dielectric function (real and imaginary parts) along with other related optical constants including refractive index, reflectivity, and energy loss spectrum. These chalcogenides have exhibited interesting thermoelectric properties such as Seebeck's coefficient, electrical and thermal conductivity, and power factor as function of temperatures.

  16. 40 CFR 122.30 - What are the objectives of the storm water regulations for small MS4s?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... water regulations for small MS4s? 122.30 Section 122.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT... solids, nutrients, heavy metals, pathogens, toxins, oxygen-demanding substances, and floatables. (d)...

  17. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of e^+e^- --> B0B0bar at the Upsilon(4S) Resonance

    CERN Document Server

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Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; 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Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q L; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction e^+e^- --> B0B0bar with a data sample of 81.7 fb^-1 collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e^+e^- storage ring. Using partial reconstruction of the decay B0bar --> D^{*+} \\ell^{-} \\bar{\

  18. Photoexcitation study of the 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} state of atomic sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, M; Kalyar, M A; Baig, M A [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)], E-mail: baig@qau.edu.pk, E-mail: baig77@gamil.com

    2008-06-14

    We report the first measurements of oscillator strengths for 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} {yields} np {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} (19 {<=} n {<=} 57) Rydberg transitions in atomic sodium using a thermionic diode ion detector in conjunction with an Nd:YAG pumped dye laser system. The f-values have been calibrated with the measured photoionization cross-section from the 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} excited state at the first ionization threshold as 0.65(0.10) Mb. The binding energy of the 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} level is determined as 15 709.444(8) cm{sup -1} by employing the Rydberg relation to the observed np {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} Rydberg series. Addition of the binding energy to the known energy of the 4s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} level yields the first ionization potential of sodium as 41 449.44(1) cm{sup -1}, which is in excellent agreement with the recognized value.

  19. Measurement of the Relative Branching Fraction of $\\Upsilon(4S)$ to Charged and Neutral B-Meson Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gwon, E Eckhart C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G

    2001-01-01

    We analyze 9.7 x 10^6 B\\bar{B}$ pairs recorded with the CLEO detector to determine the production ratio of charged to neutral B-meson pairs produced at the Y(4S) resonance. We measure the rates for B^0 -> J/psi K^{(*)0} and B^+ -> J/psi K^{(*)+} decays and use the world-average B-meson lifetime ratio to extract the relative widths f+-/f00 = Gamma(Y(4S) -> B+B-)/Gamma(Y(4S) -> B0\\bar{B0}) = = 1.04 +/- 0.07(stat) +/- 0.04(syst). With the assumption that f+- + f00 = 1, we obtain f00 = 0.49 +/- 0.02(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) and f+- = 0.51 +/- 0.02(stat) +/- 0.01(syst). This production ratio and its uncertainty apply to all exclusive B-mescon branching fractions measured at the Y(4S) resonance.

  20. Molecular Hybridization of Iodinated 4S, 5S, and 18S + 28S RNA to Salamander Chromosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro E. León

    1976-01-01

    4S, 5S, and 18S + 28S RNA from the newt Taricha granulosa granulosa were iodinated in vitro with carrier-free 125I and hybridized to the denatured chromosomes of Taricha granulosa and Batrachoseps wrighti. Iodinated 18S...

  1. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stage 0 , abnormal cells are found in the mucosa or submucosa layer of the esophagus wall. These ... found. Stage IA : Cancer has formed in the mucosa or submucosa layer of the esophagus wall. The ...

  2. Stages of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Stages of Adolescence Page Content Article Body Adolescence, these years from puberty to adulthood, may be roughly divided into three stages: early adolescence, generally ages eleven to fourteen; middle adolescence, ages ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  4. Dynamic Stage Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian von Hofen[GER

    2013-01-01

    Concepts and methods for dynamic stage designs were introduced ranging from different ifelds of TV live shows, exhibitions and theatre performances, and a special emphasis was put on solution to the theatre stage design.

  5. Ages and Stages: Teen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & ... Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen Teen Article Body Adolescence can be ...

  6. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical ...

  11. Beyond Erikson's Eight Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Erik Erikson has described eight stages of the healthy personality. This essay offers a revised version of the eight stages. Although most individuals develop through the eight stages, each is personally unique because patterns of fluctuation between safety and growth differ from one individual to another. (Author)

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  14. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  15. Use of combined Hartree–Fock–Roothaan theory in evaluation of lowest states of $K[Ar]4s^0 3d^1$ and $Cr^+ [Ar]4s^0 3d^5$ isoelectronic series over noninteger -Slater type orbitals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I I Guseinov; M Erturk; E Sahin

    2011-01-01

    By using noninteger n-Slater type orbitals in combined Hartree–Fock–Roothaan method, self-consistent field calculations of orbital and lowest states energies have been performed for the isoelectronic series of open shell systems $K[Ar]4s^0 3d^1 ({}^2D) (Z = 19–30)$ and $Cr^+[Ar]4s^0 3d^5 ({}^6 S) (Z = 24–30)$. The results of the calculations for the orbital and total energies obtained by using minimal basis-sets of noninteger -Slater type orbitals are given in the tables. The results are compared with the extended-basis Hartree–Fock computations. The orbital and total energies are in good agreement with those presented in the literature. The results can be useful in the study of various properties of heavy atomic systems when the combined Hartree–Fock–Roothaan approach is employed.

  16. Differential expression of melanopsin isoforms Opn4L and Opn4S during postnatal development of the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven; Welsh, Laura; Katti, Christiana; González-Menéndez, Irene; Turton, Michael; Halford, Stephanie; Sekaran, Sumathi; Peirson, Stuart N; Hankins, Mark W; Foster, Russell G

    2012-01-01

    Photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) respond to light from birth and represent the earliest known light detection system to develop in the mouse retina. A number of morphologically and functionally distinct subtypes of pRGCs have been described in the adult retina, and have been linked to different physiological roles. We have previously identified two distinct isoforms of mouse melanopsin, Opn4L and Opn4S, which are generated by alternate splicing of the Opn4 locus. These isoforms are differentially expressed in pRGC subtypes of the adult mouse retina, with both Opn4L and Opn4S detected in M1 type pRGCs, and only Opn4L detected in M2 type pRGCs. Here we investigate the developmental expression of Opn4L and Opn4S and show a differential profile of expression during postnatal development. Opn4S mRNA is detected at relatively constant levels throughout postnatal development, with levels of Opn4S protein showing a marked increase between P0 and P3, and then increasing progressively over time until adult levels are reached by P10. By contrast, levels of Opn4L mRNA and protein are low at birth and show a marked increase at P14 and P30 compared to earlier time points. We suggest that these differing profiles of expression are associated with the functional maturation of M1 and M2 subtypes of pRGCs. Based upon our data, Opn4S expressing M1 type pRGCs mature first and are the dominant pRGC subtype in the neonate retina, whereas increased expression of Opn4L and the maturation of M2 type pRGCs occurs later, between P10 and P14, at a similar time to the maturation of rod and cone photoreceptors. We suggest that the distinct functions associated with these cell types will develop at different times during postnatal development.

  17. Differential expression of melanopsin isoforms Opn4L and Opn4S during postnatal development of the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Hughes

    Full Text Available Photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs respond to light from birth and represent the earliest known light detection system to develop in the mouse retina. A number of morphologically and functionally distinct subtypes of pRGCs have been described in the adult retina, and have been linked to different physiological roles. We have previously identified two distinct isoforms of mouse melanopsin, Opn4L and Opn4S, which are generated by alternate splicing of the Opn4 locus. These isoforms are differentially expressed in pRGC subtypes of the adult mouse retina, with both Opn4L and Opn4S detected in M1 type pRGCs, and only Opn4L detected in M2 type pRGCs. Here we investigate the developmental expression of Opn4L and Opn4S and show a differential profile of expression during postnatal development. Opn4S mRNA is detected at relatively constant levels throughout postnatal development, with levels of Opn4S protein showing a marked increase between P0 and P3, and then increasing progressively over time until adult levels are reached by P10. By contrast, levels of Opn4L mRNA and protein are low at birth and show a marked increase at P14 and P30 compared to earlier time points. We suggest that these differing profiles of expression are associated with the functional maturation of M1 and M2 subtypes of pRGCs. Based upon our data, Opn4S expressing M1 type pRGCs mature first and are the dominant pRGC subtype in the neonate retina, whereas increased expression of Opn4L and the maturation of M2 type pRGCs occurs later, between P10 and P14, at a similar time to the maturation of rod and cone photoreceptors. We suggest that the distinct functions associated with these cell types will develop at different times during postnatal development.

  18. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. (e, 2e) triple-differential cross sections for Ag+(4p, 4s) in coplanar symmetric geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Li-Xia; Yan You-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The (e,2e) triple-differential cross sections of Ag+ (4p,4s) are calculated based on the three-body distorted-wave Born approximation considering post-collision interaction in coplanar symmetric geometry.The energy of the outgoing electron is set to be 50,70,100,200,300,500,700,and 1000 eV,and the intensity and splitting of forward and backward peaks are discussed in detail.Some new structures are observed around 15° and 85° for 4p and 4s orbitals.Structures in triple-differential cross sections at 15° are reported for the first time.A double-binary collision is proposed to explain the formation of such structures.The structures at 85° are also considered as the result of one kind of double-binary collision.

  20. The solution structure of the S4-S5 linker of the hERG potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2012-02-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) encodes a protein that forms a voltage-gated potassium channel and plays an important role in the heart by controlling the rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(Kr)). The S4-S5 linker was shown to be important for the gating of the hERG channel. Nuclear magnetic resonance study showed that a peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker had no well-ordered structure in aqueous solution and adopted a 3(10) -helix (E544-Y545-G546) structure in detergent micelles. The existence of an amphipathic helix was confirmed, which may be important for interaction with cell membrane. Close contact between side chains of residues R541 and E544 was observed, which may be important for its regulation of channel gating.

  1. Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and optical property of the pentanary chalcohalide Ba3KSb4S9Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua-Jun; Liu, Peng-Fei

    2015-12-01

    The pentanary chalcohalide Ba3KSb4S9Cl has been prepared from stoichiometric mixtures of KCl, Ba, Sb, and S in an evacuated silica tube, which is the first example of chalcohalides in the pentanary A/Ae/Sb/Q/X (A=alkali metal; Ae=alkaline-earth metal; Q=S, Se, Te; X=F, Cl, Br, I) system. This material crystallize in the Pnnm space group and its new structure type comprises one-dimensional (1D) [Sb3S7]5- chains running down the [001] direction separated by isolated dimeric Sb2S4 polyhedra, Ba2+, K+, and Cl-, respectively. The optical gap of 1.99 eV for Ba3KSb4S9Cl was deduced from the UV/vis reflectance spectroscopy and DFT study indicates a indirect band gap with an electronic transfer excitation of S 3p to Sb 5p orbital electrons.

  2. Staged electrostatic precipitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stanley J.; Almlie, Jay C.; Zhuang, Ye

    2016-03-01

    A device includes a chamber having an air inlet and an air outlet. The device includes a plurality of stages including at least a first stage adjacent a second stage. The plurality of stages are disposed in the chamber and each stage has a plurality of discharge electrodes disposed in an interior region and is bounded by an upstream baffle on an end proximate the air inlet and bounded by a downstream baffle on an end proximate the air outlet. Each stage has at least one sidewall between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The sidewall is configured as a collection electrode and has a plurality of apertures disposed along a length between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The upstream baffle of the first stage is positioned in staggered alignment relative to the upstream baffle of the second stage and the downstream baffle of the first stage are positioned in staggered alignment relative to the downstream baffle of the second stage.

  3. Characteristics of ferroelectric-ferroelastic domains in Néel-type skyrmion host GaV4S8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butykai, Ádám; Bordács, Sándor; Kézsmárki, István; Tsurkan, Vladimir; Loidl, Alois; Döring, Jonathan; Neuber, Erik; Milde, Peter; Kehr, Susanne C.; Eng, Lukas M.

    2017-01-01

    GaV4S8 is a multiferroic semiconductor hosting Néel-type magnetic skyrmions dressed with electric polarization. At Ts = 42 K, the compound undergoes a structural phase transition of weakly first-order, from a non-centrosymmetric cubic phase at high temperatures to a polar rhombohedral structure at low temperatures. Below Ts, ferroelectric domains are formed with the electric polarization pointing along any of the four 〈111〉 axes. Although in this material the size and the shape of the ferroelectric-ferroelastic domains may act as important limiting factors in the formation of the Néel-type skyrmion lattice emerging below TC = 13 K, the characteristics of polar domains in GaV4S8 have not been studied yet. Here, we report on the inspection of the local-scale ferroelectric domain distribution in rhombohedral GaV4S8 using low-temperature piezoresponse force microscopy. We observed mechanically and electrically compatible lamellar domain patterns, where the lamellae are aligned parallel to the (100)-type planes with a typical spacing between 100 nm–1.2 μm. Since the magnetic pattern, imaged by atomic force microscopy using a magnetically coated tip, abruptly changes at the domain boundaries, we expect that the control of ferroelectric domain size in polar skyrmion hosts can be exploited for the spatial confinement and manipulation of Néel-type skyrmions. PMID:28294193

  4. The upstream conserved regions (UCRs) mediate homo- and hetero-oligomerization of type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Moses; Blackman, Brigitte; Scheitrum, Colleen; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Lei, Tao; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2014-05-01

    PDE4s (type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases) are divided into long and short forms by the presence or absence of conserved N-terminal domains termed UCRs (upstream conserved regions). We have shown previously that PDE4D2, a short variant, is a monomer, whereas PDE4D3, a long variant, is a dimer. In the present study, we have determined the apparent molecular masses of various long and short PDE4 variants by size-exclusion chromatography and sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. Our results indicate that dimerization is a conserved property of all long PDE4 forms, whereas short forms are monomers. Dimerization is mediated by the UCR domains. Given their high sequence conservation, the UCR domains mediate not only homo-oligomerization, but also hetero-oligomerization of distinct PDE4 long forms as detected by co-immunoprecipitation assays and FRET microscopy. Endogenous PDE4 hetero-oligomers are, however, low in abundance compared with homo-dimers, revealing the presence of mechanisms that predispose PDE4s towards homo-oligomerization. Oligomerization is a prerequisite for the regulatory properties of the PDE4 long forms, such as their PKA (protein kinase A)-dependent activation, but is not necessary for PDE4 protein-protein interactions. As a result, individual PDE4 protomers may independently mediate protein-protein interactions, providing a mechanism whereby PDE4s contribute to the assembly of macromolecular signalling complexes.

  5. State-of-health monitoring of 18650 4S packs with a single-point impedance diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Corey T.; Virji, Maheboob B. V.; Rocheleau, Richard E.; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.

    2014-11-01

    The state-of-health (SOH) of Li-ion batteries and battery packs must be monitored effectively for abuse to prevent failure and accidents. In a previous publication, we described a single-point impedance diagnostic method for detecting damage in single prismatic lithium polymer rechargeable cells subjected to overcharge abuse. We now determine whether the single-point impedance diagnostic method is applicable to 4S battery packs. At 316 Hz, commercial 18650 LiCoO2 cells are determined to have the least change in impedance response when cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V, for states-of-charge (SOC) of 0-100%. The impedance response of single cells at 316 Hz changes dramatically during overcharge (SOC = 125%), presumably due to change in their solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layers at the electrodes. When a single cell is purposely subjected to such overcharge abuse and then integrated into a 4S pack with 3 other healthy cells, the impedance response of the 4S pack at 316 Hz also changes, despite variances in the impedance response of each of the 3 healthy cells. The results suggest that this single-point impedance method could serve as a diagnostic in an all-inclusive battery management system to identify overcharge abuse of single cells without individual cell monitoring.

  6. Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and evaluation of photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warjri, Wandibahun; Negi, Devendra P. S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared core-shell nanoparticles was evaluated by studying the degradation of methyl orange (MO) spectrophotometerically under visible light irradiation. Under optimum experimental conditions, 68.9% of the dye was degraded during 50 min of irradiation. Control experiments showed negligible degradation of MO in the absence of the photocatalyst under visible light irradiation. A good correlation was obtained between the concentration of the dye adsorbed on the surface of the Au@Co0.4S core-shell nanoparticles and its degradation efficiency. The as-prepared nanoparticles showed good recyclability for the degradation of MO. The mechanistic studies suggested that the valence band holes of the Co0.4S nanoparticles were scavenged by the MO molecules resulting in the degradation of the dye.

  7. Dissection of immune gene networks in primary melanoma tumors critical for antitumor surveillance of patients with stage II-III resectable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G; Harcharik, Sara T; Hall, Lawrence D; Bernardo, Sebastian G; Moskalenko, Marina M; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L; Friedlander, Philip A; Parides, Michael K; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G; Wolchok, Jedd D; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J; Oh, William K; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E; Saenger, Yvonne M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with resected stage II-III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II-III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Finally, the proposed 53-gene panel was confirmed in an independent test population of 48 patients (AUC=0.787). The gene signature was an independent predictor of non-progression (P<0.001), RFS (P<0.001), and DSS (P=0.024) in the test population. The identified driver genes are potential therapeutic targets, and the 53-gene panel should be tested for clinical application using a larger data set annotated on the basis of prospectively gathered data.

  8. Dissection of Immune Gene Networks in Primary Melanoma Tumors Critical for Antitumor Surveillance of Patients with Stage II–III Resectable Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Chang, Rui; Pham, Lisa; Phelps, Robert G.; Harcharik, Sara T.; Hall, Lawrence D.; Bernardo, Sebastian G.; Moskalenko, Marina M.; Sivendran, Meera; Fu, Yichun; de Moll, Ellen H.; Pan, Michael; Moon, Jee Young; Arora, Sonali; Cohain, Ariella; DiFeo, Analisa; Ferringer, Tammie C.; Tismenetsky, Mikhail; Tsui, Cindy L.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Parides, Michael K.; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Lebwohl, Mark G.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Burakoff, Steven J.; Oh, William K.; Palucka, Karolina; Merad, Miriam; Schadt, Eric E.; Saenger, Yvonne M.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with resected stage II–III cutaneous melanomas remain at high risk for metastasis and death. Biomarker development has been limited by the challenge of isolating high-quality RNA for transcriptome-wide profiling from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumor specimens. Using NanoString technology, RNA from 40 stage II–III FFPE primary melanomas was analyzed and a 53-immune-gene panel predictive of non-progression (area under the curve (AUC)=0.920) was defined. The signature predicted disease-specific survival (DSS P<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (RFS P<0.001). CD2, the most differentially expressed gene in the training set, also predicted non-progression (P<0.001). Using publicly available microarray data from 46 primary human melanomas (GSE15605), a coexpression module enriched for the 53-gene panel was then identified using unbiased methods. A Bayesian network of signaling pathways based on this data identified driver genes. Finally, the proposed 53-gene panel was confirmed in an independent test population of 48 patients (AUC=0.787). The gene signature was an independent predictor of non-progression (P<0.001), RFS (P<0.001), and DSS (P=0.024) in the test population. The identified driver genes are potential therapeutic targets, and the 53-gene panel should be tested for clinical application using a larger data set annotated on the basis of prospectively gathered data. PMID:24522433

  9. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, urban research has taken a ‘mobilities turn’. There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not ‘just happen.’ Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and lived...... as people are ‘staging themselves’ (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between ‘being staged’ (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the ‘mobile staging’ of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging mobilities is about the fact that mobility...... asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities? The theoretical framing in the Staging mobilities book is applied to four in-depth cases in the accompanying volume Designing mobilities.This book explore how places, sites...

  10. Calculation of the total electron excitation cross section in the Born approximation using Slater wave functions for the Li (2s yields 2p), Li (2s yields 3p), Na (3s yields 4p), Mg (3p yields 4s), Ca (4s yields 4p) and K (4s yields 4p) excitations. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsic, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Excitation of neutral atoms by inelastic scattering of incident electrons in gaseous nebulae were investigated using Slater Wave functions to describe the initial and final states of the atom. Total cross sections using the Born Approximation are calculated for: Li(2s yields 2p), Na(3s yields 4p), k(4s yields 4p). The intensity of emitted radiation from gaseous nebulae is also calculated, and Maxwell distribution is employed to average the kinetic energy of electrons.

  11. A T14C variant of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I undergoes facile [3Fe-4S]0 to [4Fe-4S]2+ conversion in vitro but not in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao-Sheridan, H S; Kemper, M A; Khayat, R; Tilley, G J; Armstrong, F A; Sridhar, V; Prasad, G S; Stout, C D; Burgess, B K

    1998-12-11

    [4Fe-4S]2+/+ clusters that are ligated by Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys sequence motifs share the general feature of being hard to convert to [3Fe-4S]+/0 clusters, whereas those that contain a Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motif undergo facile and reversible cluster interconversion. Little is known about the factors that control the in vivo assembly and conversion of these clusters. In this study we have designed and constructed a 3Fe to 4Fe cluster conversion variant of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I (FdI) in which the sequence that ligates the [3Fe-4S] cluster in native FdI was altered by converting a nearby residue, Thr-14, to Cys. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization shows that when purified in the presence of dithionite, T14C FdI is an O2-sensitive 8Fe protein. Both the new and the indigenous clusters have reduction potentials that are significantly shifted compared with those in native FdI, strongly suggesting a significantly altered environment around the clusters. Interestingly, whole cell EPR have revealed that T14C FdI exists as a 7Fe protein in vivo. This 7Fe form of T14C FdI is extremely similar to native FdI in its spectroscopic, electrochemical, and structural features. However, unlike native FdI which does not undergo facile cluster conversion, the 7Fe form T14C FdI quickly converts to the 8Fe form with a high efficiency under reducing conditions.

  12. Synthesis of(4S)-1-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-4-azido-L-proline%(4S)-1-芴甲氧羰基-4-叠氮基-L-脯氨酸的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚建忠; 张万年; 余建鑫; 杨松; 宋云龙; 盛春泉

    2004-01-01

    目的合成用于caspofungin类似物全合成的关键中间体--(4S)-1-芴甲氧羰基-4-叠氮基-L-脯氨酸.方法以(4R)-1-叔丁氧羰基-4-羟基-L-脯氨酸乙酯(2)为原料,经羟基甲磺酰化、叠氮基取代、酯水解、氨基脱叔丁氧羰基保护及9-芴甲氧羰基再保护合成了关键氨基酸中间体(4S)-1-芴甲氧羰基-4-叠氮基-L-脯氨酸,通过质谱(MS)和氢谱(1H-NMR)确证其结构.结果该工艺反应条件温和、操作简便、收率高,总收率达62.3%.

  13. Integrated 4S-MBR Process for Treatment and Reuse of Wastewater in Expressway Service Zone%一体化4S-MBR处理高速公路服务区污水并回用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶琨

    2011-01-01

    The integrated 4S-MBR process was used to treat wastewater in expressway service zone. The results show that the pollutant indexes in the effluent meet the requirements of Reuse of Urban Recycling Water-Water Quality Standard for Urban Miscellaneous Water Consumption ( GB/T 18920 -2002) , The process is characterized by simple installation, short construction period, low investment, wide adaptive range of wastewater quality and quantity, stable operation, less excess sludge and so forth, which is worth popularizing.%采用一体化4S - MBR工艺处理高速公路服务区污水并回用,结果表明出水各项指标均达到《城市污水再生利用城市杂用水水质》( GB/T 18920-2002)的要求.该工艺具有安装简单、建设周期短、投资省、水质水量适应范围广、运行稳定、剩余污泥量少等优点,具有很好的推广价值.

  14. Steady-state photoconductivity of amorphous (As4S3Se3)1-x:Snx films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaseniuc, O. V.; Iovu, M. S.; Cojocaru, I. A.; Prisacar, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) and arsenic triselenide (As2Se3) are among widely investigated amorphous materials due to its interesting electrical, optical and photoelectrical properties. In order to improve the physical properties and recording characteristics, and to extend the spectral range of photosensibility, a special interest represents the mixed amorphous materials, like (As2S3):(As2Se3). Chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVS) of the As-S-Se system exhibit photostructural transformations with reversible and irreversible properties, and are promising materials as registration media for holography and optical information, for fabrication of diffractive elements, and other optoelectronic applications. Because many optoelectronic devices on amorphous semiconductors are based on the photoconductivity effect, special interests represent investigation of the stationary and non-stationary characteristics of photoconductivity. In this paper the experimental results of steady-state photoconductivity and holographic characteristics of amorphous (As4S3Se3)1-x:Snx thin films are presented. It was shown that the photoconductivity spectra depend on the polarity on the top illuminated electrode and on the Sn concentration in the host glass. The photosensitivity of amorphous ((As4S3Se3)1-x:Snx thin films is almost constant for all Sn-containing glasses. The Moss rule was used for determination of the optical forbidden gap Eg from the photoconductivity spectra. It was demonstrated that the investigated amorphous films are sensitive to the light irradiation and can be used as effective registration media for holographic information. The relaxation of photodarkening in amorphous (As4S3Se3)1-x:Snx thin films was investigated and was shown that the relaxation curves of transmittance T/T0 = f(t) can be described the stretch exponential function T(t)/T(0) = A0+Aexp[-(t-t0)/τ] (1-β) . The kinetics of diffraction efficiency growth η(t) was measured by registration of

  15. Staging for vaginal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Maheshwari, Amita; Srivastava, Astha

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer comprising about 3% of all gynecologic cancers. Primary vaginal cancer should be carefully assigned as spread from cervix, vulva, and other metastatic tumors to vagina can occur. Although vaginal cancer traditionally occurs in older postmenopausal women, the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is increasing in younger women. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histopathologic type followed by adenocarcinoma. With decreasing use of diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy, non-diethylstilbestrol-associated cancers are described. The Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) staging of vaginal cancer (2009) follows the same rules as cervical cancer; it is clinically staged and allows the use of routine investigative modalities for staging. Although FIGO encourages the use of advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), to guide therapy, the imaging findings may not be used to change or reassign the stage. TNM staging is the pathologic staging system proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and information available from examination of the resected specimen, including pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, may be used for staging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional analysis of (4S)-limonene synthase mutants reveals determinants of catalytic outcome in a model monoterpene synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividya, Narayanan; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney B; Lange, B Markus

    2015-03-17

    Crystal structural data for (4S)-limonene synthase [(4S)-LS] of spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) were used to infer which amino acid residues are in close proximity to the substrate and carbocation intermediates of the enzymatic reaction. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of 48 amino acids combined with enzyme fidelity analysis [percentage of (-)-limonene produced] indicated which residues are most likely to constitute the active site. Mutation of residues W324 and H579 caused a significant drop in enzyme activity and formation of products (myrcene, linalool, and terpineol) characteristic of a premature termination of the reaction. A double mutant (W324A/H579A) had no detectable enzyme activity, indicating that either substrate binding or the terminating reaction was impaired. Exchanges to other aromatic residues (W324H, W324F, W324Y, H579F, H579Y, and H579W) resulted in enzyme catalysts with significantly reduced activity. Sequence comparisons across the angiosperm lineage provided evidence that W324 is a conserved residue, whereas the position equivalent to H579 is occupied by aromatic residues (H, F, or Y). These results are consistent with a critical role of W324 and H579 in the stabilization of carbocation intermediates. The potential of these residues to serve as the catalytic base facilitating the terminal deprotonation reaction is discussed.

  17. PIP2 controls voltage-sensor movement and pore opening of Kv channels through the S4-S5 linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Adney, Scott K; Tang, Qiong-Yao; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Cui, Meng; Logothetis, Diomedes E

    2012-09-04

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels couple the movement of a voltage sensor to the channel gate(s) via a helical intracellular region, the S4-S5 linker. A number of studies link voltage sensitivity to interactions of S4 charges with membrane phospholipids in the outer leaflet of the bilayer. Although the phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) in the inner membrane leaflet has emerged as a universal activator of ion channels, no such role has been established for mammalian Kv channels. Here we show that PIP(2) depletion induced two kinetically distinct effects on Kv channels: an increase in voltage sensitivity and a concomitant decrease in current amplitude. These effects are reversible, exhibiting distinct molecular determinants and sensitivities to PIP(2). Gating current measurements revealed that PIP(2) constrains the movement of the sensor through interactions with the S4-S5 linker. Thus, PIP(2) controls both the movement of the voltage sensor and the stability of the open pore through interactions with the linker that connects them.

  18. Mutations within the S4-S5 linker alter voltage sensor constraints in hERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Rezazadeh, Saman; Snopkowski, Mischa; Shi, Patrick; Allard, Charlene R; Claydon, Tom W

    2010-11-03

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel gating is associated with slow activation, yet the mechanistic basis for this is unclear. Here, we examine the effects of mutation of a unique glycine residue (G546) in the S4-S5 linker on voltage sensor movement and its coupling to pore gating. Substitution of G546 with residues possessing different physicochemical properties shifted activation gating by ∼-50 mV (with the exception of G546C). With the activation shift taken into account, the time constant of activation was also accelerated, suggesting a stabilization of the closed state by ∼1.6-4.3 kcal/mol (the energy equivalent of one to two hydrogen bonds). Predictions of the α-helical content of the S4-S5 linker suggest that the presence of G546 in wild-type hERG provides flexibility to the helix. Deactivation gating was affected differentially by the G546 substitutions. G546V induced a pronounced slow component of closing that was voltage-independent. Fluorescence measurements of voltage sensor movement in G546V revealed a slow component of voltage sensor return that was uncoupled from charge movement, suggesting a direct effect of the mutation on voltage sensor movement. These data suggest that G546 plays a critical role in channel gating and that hERG channel closing involves at least two independently modifiable reconfigurations of the voltage sensor.

  19. Molecular characterization of the genome segments S4, S6 and S7 of rice gall dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H M; Yang, J; Xin, X; Chen, J P; Adams, M J

    2007-01-01

    Rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus within the family Reovirdae. Its genome has 12 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), of which the nucleotide sequences of segments S4, S6, and S7 were determined, providing the first complete genome sequence of RGDV. Each of the segments S4, S6, and S7 contained conserved terminal sequences conforming to the RGDV consensus, 5'-GGXA ... UGAU-3' (X = U or C). Each segment had a single predicted open reading frame encoding proteins with calculated molecular weights of 79.8, 58.6, and 53.3 kDa. These proteins appeared to be homologous to those encoded by the corresponding segments of rice dwarf virus and wound tumor virus, the other known members of the same genus, having about 20-30% amino acid identity to them. It is therefore likely that RGDV S4 and S6 encode non-structural proteins and S7 an inner core protein. Probable homologies between the segments of all known phytoreoviruses are summarized. Beyond these similarities, the RGDV proteins displayed no significant similarity to any other reported viral proteins.

  20. Metal-Semiconductor Transition Concomitant with a Structural Transformation in Tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromi I.; Suekuni, Koichiro; Umeo, Kazunori; Nagasaki, Toshiki; Sato, Hitoshi; Kutluk, Galif; Nishibori, Eiji; Kasai, Hidetaka; Takabatake, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 undergoes a metal-semiconductor transition (MST) at TMST = 85 K, whose mechanism remains elusive. Our Cu 2p X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study revealed the monovalent state of Cu ions occupying the two sites in this compound. This fact excludes the possibilities of previously proposed antiferromagnetic order and Jahn-Teller instability inherent in a divalent Cu system. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study has revealed that the body-centered cubic cell of Cu12Sb4S13 transforms into a body-centered 2a × 2a × 2c tetragonal supercell below TMST, where the cell volume per formula unit expands by 0.25%. We have further studied pressure effects on the MST as well as the effects of the substitution of As for Sb. The application of pressure above 1 GPa completely inhibits the MST and leads to a metallic state, suggesting that the low-temperature structure with a larger volume becomes unstable under pressure. The As substitution also reduces the volume and suppresses the MST but the full substitution induces another transition at 124 K.

  1. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...

  2. Late-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources, care and ways to engage in meaningful connections. During the late stages, your role as a ... drinks. This will help you track the person's natural routine, and then you can plan a schedule. ...

  3. Multiple Stages 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations...

  4. Thyroid Cancer Staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The current prevalence of thyroid cancer in women is high. Likewise, other cancers and thyroid cancer have been based on the TNM classification system. Staging of thyroid cancer has an important role in determining the extent of surgical excision and lymph node dissection, planning the adjuvant therapy after surgery and predicting the recurrence rate and the prognosis of patients. Ultrasonography is the basic imaging modality to identify the tumor size and the extent of lymph node metastasis. More recently, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography provide additional help for the staging of thyroid cancer. So, this article describes the 7th edition of the TNM staging of thyroid cancer, as proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and the details of radiologic evaluation of the T, N and M stages

  5. Multiple Stages 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations...

  6. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010. Online Version Reviewed September 2013 ATS Patient Education Series © 2010 American Thoracic Society LIVER BONE www.thoracic.org ATS PATIENT INFORMATION SERIES How will my lung cancer be staged? ...

  7. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  8. Normalization: A Preprocessing Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Patro, S. Gopal Krishna; Sahu, Kishore Kumar

    2015-01-01

    As we know that the normalization is a pre-processing stage of any type problem statement. Especially normalization takes important role in the field of soft computing, cloud computing etc. for manipulation of data like scale down or scale up the range of data before it becomes used for further stage. There are so many normalization techniques are there namely Min-Max normalization, Z-score normalization and Decimal scaling normalization. So by referring these normalization techniques we are ...

  9. Multiple stage railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Scudder, Jonathan K.; Aaland, Kristian

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

  10. Stabilization of the Activated hERG Channel Voltage Sensor by Depolarization Involves the S4-S5 Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouta, Samrat; Hull, Christina M; Shi, Yu Patrick; Sergeev, Valentine; Young, James; Cheng, Yen M; Claydon, Thomas W

    2017-01-24

    Slow deactivation of hERG channels is critical for preventing cardiac arrhythmia yet the mechanistic basis for the slow gating transition is unclear. Here, we characterized the temporal sequence of events leading to voltage sensor stabilization upon membrane depolarization. Progressive increase in step depolarization duration slowed voltage-sensor return in a biphasic manner (τfast = 34 ms, τslow = 2.5 s). The faster phase of voltage-sensor return slowing correlated with the kinetics of pore opening. The slower component occurred over durations that exceeded channel activation and was consistent with voltage sensor relaxation. The S4-S5 linker mutation, G546L, impeded the faster phase of voltage sensor stabilization without attenuating the slower phase, suggesting that the S4-S5 linker is important for communications between the pore gate and the voltage sensor during deactivation. These data also demonstrate that the mechanisms of pore gate-opening-induced and relaxation-induced voltage-sensor stabilization are separable. Deletion of the distal N-terminus (Δ2-135) accelerated off-gating current, but did not influence the relative contribution of either mechanism of stabilization of the voltage sensor. Lastly, we characterized mode-shift behavior in hERG channels, which results from stabilization of activated channel states. The apparent mode-shift depended greatly on recording conditions. By measuring slow activation and deactivation at steady state we found the "true" mode-shift to be ∼15 mV. Interestingly, the "true" mode-shift of gating currents was ∼40 mV, much greater than that of the pore gate. This demonstrates that voltage sensor return is less energetically favorable upon repolarization than pore gate closure. We interpret this to indicate that stabilization of the activated voltage sensor limits the return of hERG channels to rest. The data suggest that this stabilization occurs as a result of reconfiguration of the pore gate upon opening by

  11. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  12. Study on the Stereoselective Synthesis of Carbapenem Sidechain (2S,4S)-4-Acetylsulphanyl-2-[(S)-1-phenylethylcarbamoyl]-pyrrolidine-1-carboxylic Acid 4-Nitrobenzyl Ester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian LIU; Gang FANG; Li Ping WU; Jian Mei CUI; Xiao Tian LIANG; Song WU

    2004-01-01

    A stereoselective and economic synthesis of the carbapenem sidechain (2S, 4S)-4-ace-tylsulphanyl-2-[ (S)1-phenylethyl-carbamoyl] pyrrolidine-l-carboxylic acid 4-nitrobenzyl ester was developed. Due to the effect of spatial hindrance, only the (2S,4S) diastereomer 3 was obtained by coupling 1 and the inexpensive racemic 2 catalyzed by EEDQ.

  13. N-Substituted indole-3-thiolate [4Fe-4S] clusters with a unique and tunable combination of spectral and redox properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, Erwin P. L.; Li, Qian; van Koten, Gerard; Gebbink, Robertus J. M. Klein; Hessen, Bart

    2008-01-01

    A series of N-substituted indole-3-thiols, synthesized by sequential alkylation, thiouronium salt formation, and hydrolysis, are used to generate a novel family of [4Fe-4S] clusters. The redox transitions of the clusters deviate from those of other [4Fe-4S] cluster families, with half-wave

  14. When one becomes two: Ba12In4Se20, not quite isostructural to Ba12In4S19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenlong; Iyer, Abishek K.; Li, Chao; Yao, Jiyong; Mar, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The ternary selenide Ba12In4Se20 was synthesized by reaction of BaSe, In2Se3, and Se at 1023 K. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed a trigonal structure (space group R 3 bar, Z = 6, a = 10.0360(6) Å, c = 78.286(4) Å at room temperature) consisting of one-dimensional stacks of InSe4 tetrahedra, In2Se7 double tetrahedra, selenide Se2- anions, and diselenide Se22- anions, with Ba2+ cations in the intervening spaces. The selenide Ba12In4Se20 can be derived from the corresponding sulfide Ba12In4S19 by replacing one monoatomic Ch2- anion with a diatomic Ch22- anion. An optical band gap of 1.70(2) eV, consistent with the dark red colour of the crystals, was deduced from the UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum.

  15. (1S,3S,4S-tert-Butyl N-[1-benzyl-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-4-(picolinamidopentyl]carbamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Feng Zheng

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C29H35N3O4, was obtained by the reaction of (2S,4S,5S-tert-butyl N-(4-amino-1-benzyl-3-hydroxy-5-phenylpentylcarbamate and picolinic acid using oxalyl chloride as a chlorinating reagent to activate the carboxyl group. In the crystal structure there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit, which are aligned edge-to-face. In one molecule, the pyridyl ring forms a dihedral angle of 22.0 (1° with the phenyl ring of the terminal benzyl group and 14.3 (1° with the other phenyl ring; in the other molecule, the corresponding angles are 12.1 (1 and 10.6 (1°, respectively. The packing is stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds and C—H...π interactions.

  16. Spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C(3P) and N(4S) atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, Sergey V; Gustafsson, Magnus; Nyman, Gunnar

    2011-11-14

    The role of spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C((3)P) and N((4)S) atoms is investigated. Couplings among doublet electronic states of the CN radical are considered, giving rise to a 6-state model of the process. The solution of the dynamical problem is based on the L(2) method, where a complex absorbing potential is added to the Hamiltonian operator in order to treat continuum and bound levels in the same manner. Comparison of the energy-dependent rate coefficients calculated with and without spin-orbit and rotational couplings shows that the couplings have a strong effect on the resonance structure and low-energy baseline of the rate coefficient.

  17. Composers on stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    A trend on the scene of contemporary music is composers going on stage, performing their pieces themselves. Within a discourse of popular music, this is more the rule than exception, but when it comes to the context of contemporary scored music, the historical and aesthetic context differs......, and something quite different is undergoing. This paper intends to discuss three examples of performances in which the composer’s appearance on stage was an important part of the piece, - both when it came to the role as a performer and as an individual person – as representer and presenter. The paper intends...... 2011 and Fischer-Lichte 2008) Hereby, the role of the composer appearing on stage is discussed from an aesthetic point of view; meanwhile social and political aspects of the phenomenon are also addressed. The three artistic works discussed are Simon Steen-Andersen’s Run Time Error (2009-), Niels...

  18. Staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  19. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...

  20. The concerted contribution of the S4-S5 linker and the S6 segment to the modulation of a Kv channel by 1-alkanols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharji, Aditya; Kaplan, Benjamin; Harris, Thanawath; Qu, Xiaoguang; Germann, Markus W; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-11-01

    Gating of voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v) channels) depends on the electromechanical coupling between the voltage sensor and activation gate. The main activation gate of K(v) channels involves the COOH-terminal section of the S6 segment (S6-b) and the S4-S5 linker at the intracellular mouth of the pore. In this study, we have expanded our earlier work to probe the concerted contribution of these regions to the putative amphipathic 1-alkanol site in the Shaw2 K(+) channel. In the S4-S5 linker, we found a direct energetic correlation between alpha-helical propensity and the inhibition of the Shaw2 channel by 1-butanol. Spectroscopic structural analyses of the S4-S5 linker supported this correlation. Furthermore, the analysis of chimeric Shaw2 and K(v)3.4 channels that exchanged their corresponding S4-S5 linkers showed that the potentiation induced by 1-butanol depends on the combination of a single mutation in the S6 PVPV motif (PVAV) and the presence of the Shaw2 S4-S5 linker. Then, using tandem-heterodimer subunits, we determined that this potentiation also depends on the number of S4-S5 linkers and PVAV mutations in the K(v) channel tetramer. Consistent with the critical contribution of the Shaw2 S4-S5 linker, the equivalent PVAV mutation in certain mammalian K(v) channels with divergent S4-S5 linkers conferred weak potentiation by 1-butanol. Overall, these results suggest that 1-alkanol action in Shaw2 channels depends on interactions involving the S4-S5 linker and the S6-b segment. Therefore, we propose that amphiphilic general anesthetic agents such as 1-alkanols may modulate gating of the Shaw2 K(+) channel by an interaction with its activation gate.

  1. How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged? Staging is the process of finding out ... Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  2. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the oropharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  3. Stages of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the hypopharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  4. World Stage Design

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    12-19. III Torontos rahvusvaheline lavakujunduse, kostüümi ning valgus- ja helikujunduse näitus, mis toimub samaaegselt OISTATi (International Organization of Scenographers, Theatre Architects and Technicians) maailmakongressiga ja USITT (United States Institute for Theatre Technology) üritustega (konverents, Stage Expo). Eestit esindab lavakujunduse kategoorias Lilja Blumenfeld-Luhse

  5. Composers on stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    A trend on the scene of contemporary music is composers going on stage, performing their pieces themselves. Within a discourse of popular music, this is more the rule than exception, but when it comes to the context of contemporary scored music, the historical and aesthetic context differs, and s...

  6. World Stage Design

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    12-19. III Torontos rahvusvaheline lavakujunduse, kostüümi ning valgus- ja helikujunduse näitus, mis toimub samaaegselt OISTATi (International Organization of Scenographers, Theatre Architects and Technicians) maailmakongressiga ja USITT (United States Institute for Theatre Technology) üritustega (konverents, Stage Expo). Eestit esindab lavakujunduse kategoorias Lilja Blumenfeld-Luhse

  7. Facile in situ solvothermal method to synthesize MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chaoying; Tian, Li [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); College of Hua Loogeng, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Liu, Bo; Liang, Qian [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Li, Zhongyu, E-mail: zhongyuli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); College of Hua Loogeng, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Key Laboratory of Regional Environment and Ecoremediation (Ministry of Education), Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044 (China); Xu, Song [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, School of Petrochemical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Liu, Qiaoli; Lu, Dayong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132022 (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites were facilely fabricated via in situ solvothermal method. • MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites exhibited significantly enhanced visible-light activity. • MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites showed remarkable visible light photocatalytic activity. • MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites exhibited excellent photo-stability. • Possible photocatalytic mechanism under visible-light irradiation was proposed. - Abstract: Superior photocatalytic activity could be achieved by multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) incorporated in the porous assembly of marigold-like SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} heterostructures synthesized by a flexible in-situ solvothermal method. The as-prepared MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites were well-characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared samples were tested by photo-degradation of aqueous malachite green (MG) under the irradiation of visible light. It was found that the MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites showed enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity for dye degradation, and an optimum photocatalytic activity was observed over 3.0 wt.% MWCNT incorporated SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites. The superior photocatalytic activity of MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites could be ascribed to the existence of MWCNT which could serve as a good electron acceptor, mediator as well as the co-catalyst for dye degradation. The synergistic effect between SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} and MWCNT in the composites facilitated the interfacial charge transfer driven by the excitation of SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} under visible-light irradiation. Furthermore, a possible mechanism for the photocatalytic degradation of MWCNT/SnIn{sub 4}S{sub 8} composites was also discussed.

  8. Multi-stage cleaning plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullendorff, A.; Wikner, J.

    1980-12-09

    A cleaning plant positioned within an annular fluidized bed combustion chamber is divided into a plurality of separate cleaning stages, wherein a first stage is located adjacent the fluidized bed and additional stages are arranged within the first stage. Each stage comprises a plurality of separate cleaning devices which act in parallel, while cleaning devices of different stages act in series to remove debris from the combustion gases that exit from the fluidized bed combustion chamber.

  9. Implicit stage topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lahousse

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Il a souvent été proposé que les éléments spatio-temporels en position initiale de phrase spécifient le cadre de l’événement dénoté par la proposition et ont une interprétation thématique ou topicale. Alors que les topiques spatio-temporels explicites ont souvent été étudiés, Erteschik-Schir (1997, 1999 propose l’idée que les topiques spatio-temporels, ou topiques scéniques (stage topics peuvent aussi être implicites.Dans cet article, nous offrons des arguments en faveur de la notion de topique scénique implicite. Nous montrons qu’un certain nombre de cas d’inversion nominale en français, une configuration syntaxique qui est favorisée par la présence d’un topique scénique explicite, s’expliquent par la présence d’un topique scénique implicite. Le fait que les topiques scéniques implicites interagissent avec la structure syntaxique de la même façon que les topiques scéniques explicites constitue un argument empirique en faveur de leur existence.It has often been proposed that sentence-initial spatio-temporal elements specify the frame in which the whole proposition takes place and are topical (i.e. thematic. Whereas considerable attention has been paid to explicit spatio-temporal topics, Erteschik-Shir (1997, 1999 argues that spatio-temporal topics, or stage topics, can also be implicit.In this article we provide evidence in favour of the notion of implicit stage topic. We show that a certain number of nominal inversion cases in French, a syntactic configuration which is triggered by the presence of an explicit stage topic, are explained by the presence of an implicit stage topic. The fact that implicit stage topics interact with syntactic structure the same way explicit stage topics do constitutes a strong empirical argument in favour of their existence.

  10. NuSTAR detection of 4s Hard X-ray Lags from the Accreting Pulsar GS 0834-430

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachetti Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope observed the transient Be/X-ray binary GS 0834–430 during its 2012 outburst. The source is detected between 3 – 79 keV with high statistical significance, and we were able to perform very accurate spectral and timing analysis. The phase-averaged spectrum is consistent with that observed in many other magnetized accreting pulsars. We fail to detect cyclotron resonance scattering features in either phase-averaged nor phase-resolved spectra that would allow us to constrain the pulsar’s magnetic field. We detect a pulse period of ~ 12:29 s in all energy bands. The pulse profile can be modeled with a double Gaussian and shows a strong and smooth hard lag of up to 0.3 cycles in phase, or about 4s between the pulse at ~ 3 and ≳ 30 keV. This is the first report of such a strong lag in high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB pulsars. Previously reported lags have been significantly smaller in phase and restricted to low-energies (E<10 keV. We investigate the possible mechanisms that might produce such lags. We find the most likely explanation for this effect to be a complex beam geometry.

  11. The ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S). I. The massive end of the z = 4 main sequence of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, C.; Pannella, M.; Leiton, R.; Elbaz, D.; Wang, T.; Okumura, K.; Labbé, I.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S), a systematic ALMA survey of all the known galaxies with stellar mass (M∗) larger than 5 × 1010M⊙ at 3.5 measurement errors and selection effects: we find a linear relation between SFR and M∗, with a median sSFR = 2.8 ± 0.8 Gyr and a dispersion around that relation of 0.28 ± 0.13 dex. This latter value is consistent with that measured at lower redshifts, which is proof that the main sequence of star-forming galaxies was already in place at z = 4, at least among massive galaxies. These new constraints on the properties of the main sequence are in good agreement with the latest predictions from numerical simulations, and suggest that the bulk of star formation in galaxies is driven by the same mechanism from z = 4 to the present day, that is, over at least 90% of the cosmic history. We also discuss the consequences of our results on the population of early quiescent galaxies. This paper is part of a series that will employ these new ALMA observations to explore the star formation and dust properties of the massive end of the z = 4 galaxy population.

  12. The ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S): I. The massive end of the z=4 main sequence of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, C; Leiton, R; Elbaz, D; Wang, T; Okumura, K; Labbé, I

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S), a systematic ALMA survey of all the known galaxies with stellar mass (M*) larger than 5e10 Msun at 3.5

  13. Insights on the origin of the unusually large specific rotation of (1S,4S)-norbornenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco; Vaccaro, Patrick H; Crawford, T Daniel; Wiberg, Kenneth B; Lahiri, Priyanka

    2014-07-03

    Measurements and calculations of specific rotation are indispensable for the characterization of chiral molecules and are now performed routinely. However, the factors that determine the magnitude of this property are still not well-understood. The anomalously large specific rotation of (1S,4S)-norbornenone, an outstanding puzzle for over three decades, offers the chance to examine these factors in detail. The present work provides an explanation for the unusual behavior of this molecule in terms of interactions between chemical groups and electronic excited-state transition properties by means of ab initio density functional theory and coupled cluster theory calculations. We show that one can focus on the first excited state and examine the relative orientation of its electric and magnetic transition dipole moments. The contribution of the two transition moments of this electronic state to the specific rotation in a sum-over-states formalism reveals a constructive interaction that is possible only when the two chromophores in norbornenone (C═O and C═C) are in-plane and pointing away from each other. This is due to a small but non-negligible charge transfer between the chromophores and is consistent with recent results from Autschbach's group [Moore et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 4336-4346]. The analysis in this work improves our understanding of this fundamental property of chiral molecules and may help in the design of other molecules with large specific rotation.

  14. Reactive collisions for NO((2)Π) + N((4)S) at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2017-01-18

    The NO(X(2)Π) + N((4)S) reaction which occurs entirely in the triplet manifold of N2O is investigated using quasiclassical trajectories and quantum simulations. Fully-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the (3)A' and (3)A'' states are computed at the MRCI+Q level of theory and are represented using a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The N-exchange and N2-formation channels are followed by using the multi-state adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics method. Up to 5000 K these reactions occur predominantly on the N2O (3)A'' surface. However, for higher temperatures the contributions of the (3)A' and (3)A'' states are comparable and the final state distributions are far from thermal equilibrium. From the trajectory simulations a new set of thermal rate coefficients of up to 20 000 K is determined. Comparison of the quasiclassical trajectory and quantum simulations shows that a classical description is a good approximation as determined from the final state analysis.

  15. Nonredox thiolation in tRNA occurring via sulfur activation by a [4Fe-4S] cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arragain, Simon; Bimai, Ornella; Legrand, Pierre; Caillat, Sylvain; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Touati, Nadia; Binet, Laurent; Atta, Mohamed; Fontecave, Marc; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2017-07-11

    Sulfur is present in several nucleosides within tRNAs. In particular, thiolation of the universally conserved methyl-uridine at position 54 stabilizes tRNAs from thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea and is required for growth at high temperature. The simple nonredox substitution of the C2-uridine carbonyl oxygen by sulfur is catalyzed by tRNA thiouridine synthetases called TtuA. Spectroscopic, enzymatic, and structural studies indicate that TtuA carries a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster and requires ATP for activity. A series of crystal structures shows that (i) the cluster is ligated by only three cysteines that are fully conserved, allowing the fourth unique iron to bind a small ligand, such as exogenous sulfide, and (ii) the ATP binding site, localized thanks to a protein-bound AMP molecule, a reaction product, is adjacent to the cluster. A mechanism for tRNA sulfuration is suggested, in which the unique iron of the catalytic cluster serves to bind exogenous sulfide, thus acting as a sulfur carrier.

  16. Reversal of HCN channel voltage dependence via bridging of the S4-S5 linker and Post-S6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prole, David L; Yellen, Gary

    2006-09-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels possess charged domains that move in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. How this movement is transduced into gating of the channel pore is largely unknown. Here we show directly that two functionally important regions of the spHCN1 pacemaker channel, the S4-S5 linker and the C-linker, come into close proximity during gating. Cross-linking these regions with high-affinity metal bridges or disulfide bridges dramatically alters channel gating in the absence of cAMP; after modification the polarity of voltage dependence is reversed. Instead of being closed at positive voltage and activating with hyperpolarization, modified channels are closed at negative voltage and activate with depolarization. Mechanistically, this reversal of voltage dependence occurs as a result of selectively eliminating channel deactivation, while retaining an existing inactivation process. Bridging also alters channel activation by cAMP, showing that interaction of these two regions can also affect the efficacy of physiological ligands.

  17. Ab initio studies of [Fe4S4] ^2+/3+ clusters in metalloprotein MutY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jong-Chin

    2005-03-01

    Iron sulfur clusters are present in the DNA repair protein MutY in a region highly homologous in species as diverse as E. Coli and Homo Sapiens, yet their function remains unknown. In MutY, this mixed valence cluster exists in two oxidation states, [Fe4S4]^2+/3+, with the stability depending upon the presence of DNA. We have studied the electronic structure and stability of these clusters using density functional theory, in particular the local orbital based SIESTA program. Our calculation shows that the energy difference between 2+ and 3+ forms is within the range of 0.1eV, which suggests that the redox process is reversible. We use this to propose a possible redox mechanism for modulating the rate for scanning for oxidized G-A mismatches in DNA by MutY ootnotetextM. Slutsky and L.A. Mirny, preprint q-bio.BM/0402005 at http://arxiv.org.. We note that this redox modulation mechanism for site recognition scanning may have broader generality.

  18. KCNQ1 channels voltage dependence through a voltage-dependent binding of the S4-S5 linker to the pore domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choveau, Frank S; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Abderemane Ali, Fayal; Labro, Alain J; Rose, Thierry; Dahimène, Shehrazade; Boudin, Hélène; Le Hénaff, Carole; Escande, Denis; Snyders, Dirk J; Charpentier, Flavien; Mérot, Jean; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2011-01-07

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers of six transmembrane domain (S1-S6) proteins. Crystallographic data demonstrate that the tetrameric pore (S5-S6) is surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4). One key question remains: how do voltage sensors (S4) regulate pore gating? Previous mutagenesis data obtained on the Kv channel KCNQ1 highlighted the critical role of specific residues in both the S4-S5 linker (S4S5(L)) and S6 C terminus (S6(T)). From these data, we hypothesized that S4S5(L) behaves like a ligand specifically interacting with S6(T) and stabilizing the closed state. To test this hypothesis, we designed plasmid-encoded peptides corresponding to portions of S4S5(L) and S6(T) of the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 and evaluated their effects on the channel activity in the presence and absence of the ancillary subunit KCNE1. We showed that S4S5(L) peptides inhibit KCNQ1, in a reversible and state-dependent manner. S4S5(L) peptides also inhibited a voltage-independent KCNQ1 mutant. This inhibition was competitively prevented by a peptide mimicking S6(T), consistent with S4S5(L) binding to S6(T). Val(254) in S4S5(L) is known to contact Leu(353) in S6(T) when the channel is closed, and mutations of these residues alter the coupling between the two regions. The same mutations introduced in peptides altered their effects, further confirming S4S5(L) binding to S6(T). Our results suggest a mechanistic model in which S4S5(L) acts as a voltage-dependent ligand bound to its receptor on S6 at rest. This interaction locks the channel in a closed state. Upon plasma membrane depolarization, S4 pulls S4S5(L) away from S6(T), allowing channel opening.

  19. Cross section of e(+)e(-) annihilation into hadrons of order alpha(4)(s)n(2)(f) in perturbative QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2002-01-07

    We present the first genuine QCD five-loop calculation of the vacuum polarization functions: analytical terms of order alpha(4)(s)n(2)(f) to the absorptive parts of vector and scalar correlators. These corrections form an important gauge-invariant subset of the full omicron(alpha(4)(s)) correction to e(+)e(-) annihilation into hadrons and the Higgs decay rate into hadrons, respectively. They discriminate between different widely used estimates of the full result.

  20. Staging Sociotechnical Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    The management of innovation and product development is increasingly facing complex challenges of staging design processes across heterogeneous organisational spaces, with multiple actor-concerns and sources of knowledge. This paper addresses how insights from the Actor-Network Theory and political...... process theory may contribute to a reflexive understanding of design as the staging of socio-technical relations and processes cutting across boundaries of diverse organisational, political and knowledge domains. This idea is pursued through the notion of ‘socio-technical spaces’. Socio-technical space...... of product development. The concept of socio-technical spaces is further illustrated through actual examples from industry dealing with early conceptualisation in product development and the role played by management concepts in the configuration of spaces....

  1. Staging interrail mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg; Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    This article applies the multiscalar ‘staging mobilities’ framework from the emergent subfield of mobilities design to analyse an enduring European rail travel phenomenon, interrail. This discussion extends and contributes to tourism mobilities research. Second, the article enriches previous...... and seat reservations. To reach these aims, the research design intertwines multi-sited ethnography, netnography, survey and interviews. The conclusion offers theoretical reflections pertaining to the role of mobilities designs and methodical hybrids in tourism mobilities research....

  2. Calibration of Nanopositioning Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy is one of the most important criteria for the performance evaluation of micro- and nanorobots or systems. Nanopositioning stages are used to achieve the high positioning resolution and accuracy for a wide and growing scope of applications. However, their positioning accuracy and repeatability are not well known and difficult to guarantee, which induces many drawbacks for many applications. For example, in the mechanical characterisation of biological samples, it is difficult to perform several cycles in a repeatable way so as not to induce negative influences on the study. It also prevents one from controlling accurately a tool with respect to a sample without adding additional sensors for closed loop control. This paper aims at quantifying the positioning repeatability and accuracy based on the ISO 9283:1998 standard, and analyzing factors influencing positioning accuracy onto a case study of 1-DoF (Degree-of-Freedom nanopositioning stage. The influence of thermal drift is notably quantified. Performances improvement of the nanopositioning stage are then investigated through robot calibration (i.e., open-loop approach. Two models (static and adaptive models are proposed to compensate for both geometric errors and thermal drift. Validation experiments are conducted over a long period (several days showing that the accuracy of the stage is improved from typical micrometer range to 400 nm using the static model and even down to 100 nm using the adaptive model. In addition, we extend the 1-DoF calibration to multi-DoF with a case study of a 2-DoF nanopositioning robot. Results demonstrate that the model efficiently improved the 2D accuracy from 1400 nm to 200 nm.

  3. hERG S4-S5 linker acts as a voltage-dependent ligand that binds to the activation gate and locks it in a closed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Olfat A; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2017-12-01

    Delayed-rectifier potassium channels (hERG and KCNQ1) play a major role in cardiac repolarization. These channels are formed by a tetrameric pore (S5-S6) surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4). Coupling between voltage sensor domains and the pore activation gate is critical for channel voltage-dependence. However, molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that covalently binding, through a disulfide bridge, a peptide mimicking the S4-S5 linker (S4-S5L) to the channel S6 C-terminus (S6T) completely inhibits hERG. This shows that channel S4-S5L is sufficient to stabilize the pore activation gate in its closed state. Conversely, covalently binding a peptide mimicking S6T to the channel S4-S5L prevents its inhibiting effect and renders the channel almost completely voltage-independent. This shows that the channel S4-S5L is necessary to stabilize the activation gate in its closed state. Altogether, our results provide chemical evidence that S4-S5L acts as a voltage-controlled ligand that binds S6T to lock the channel in a closed state, elucidating the coupling between voltage sensors and the gate in delayed rectifier potassium channels and potentially other voltage-gated channels.

  4. Dinuclear cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes with a Py2N4S2 macrocyclic ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Cristina; Bastida, Rufina; Lezama, Luis; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Valencia, Laura

    2011-06-20

    The interaction between Co(II) and Cu(II) ions with a Py(2)N(4)S(2)-coordinating octadentate macrocyclic ligand (L) to afford dinuclear compounds has been investigated. The complexes were characterized by microanalysis, conductivity measurements, IR spectroscopy and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry. The crystal structure of the compounds [H(4)L](NO(3))(4), [Cu(2)LCl(2)](NO(3))(2) (5), [Cu(2)L(NO(3))(2)](NO(3))(2) (6), and [Cu(2)L(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(3)·H(2)O (7) was also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The [H(4)L](4+) cation crystal structure presents two different conformations, planar and step, with intermolecular face-to-face π,π-stacking interactions between the pyridinic rings. Complexes 5 and 6 show the metal ions in a slightly distorted square-pyramidal coordination geometry. In the case of complex 7, the crystal structure presents the two metal ions joined by a μ-hydroxo bridge and the Cu(II) centers in a slightly distorted square plane or a tetragonally distorted octahedral geometry, taking into account weak interactions in axial positions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is in accordance with the dinuclear nature of the complexes, with an octahedral environment for the cobalt(II) compounds and square-pyramidal or tetragonally elongated octahedral geometries for the copper(II) compounds. The magnetic behavior is consistent with the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the ions for cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes, while for the Co(II) ones, this behavior could also be explained by spin-orbit coupling.

  5. The triple helical structure and stability of collagen model peptide with 4(S)-hydroxyprolyl-Pro-Gly units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motooka, Daisuke; Kawahara, Kazuki; Nakamura, Shota; Doi, Masamitsu; Nishi, Yoshinori; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kang, Young Kee; Nakazawa, Takashi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Extensive studies on the structure of collagen have revealed that the hydroxylation of Pro residues in a variety of model peptides with the typical (X-Y-Gly)(n) repeats (X and Y: Pro and its analogues) represents one of the major factors influencing the stability of triple helices. While(2S,4R)-hydroxyproline (Hyp) at the position Y stabilizes the triple helix, (2S,4S)-hydroxyproline (hyp) at the X-position destabilizes the helix as demonstrated that the triple helix of (hyp-Pro-Gly)(15) is less stable than that of (Pro-Pro-Gly)(15) and that a shorter peptide (hyp-Pro-Gly)(10) does not form the helix. To clarify the role of the hydroxyl group of Pro residues to play in the stabilization mechanism of the collagen triple helix, we synthesized and crystallized a model peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(4) -(hyp-Pro-Gly)(2) -(Pro-Hyp-Gly)(4) and analyzed its structure by X-ray crystallography and CD spectroscopy. In the crystal, the main-chain of this peptide forms a typical collagen like triple helix. The majority of hyp residues take down pucker with exceptionally shallow angles probably to relieve steric hindrance, but the remainders protrude the hydroxyl group toward solvent with the less favorable up pucker to fit in a triple helix. There is no indication of the existence of an intra-molecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl moiety and the carbonyl oxygen of hyp supposed to destabilize the triple helix. We also compared the conformational energies of up and down packers of the pyrrolidine ring in Ac-hyp-NMe(2) by quantum mechanical calculations.

  6. Interactions between S4-S5 linker and S6 transmembrane domain modulate gating of HERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2002-05-24

    Outward movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to activation in voltage-gated ion channels; however, the precise mechanism and structural basis of this gating event are poorly understood. Potential insight into the coupling mechanism was provided by our previous finding that mutation to Lys of a single residue (Asp(540)) located in the S4-S5 linker endowed HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) K(+) channels with the unusual ability to open in response to membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization in a voltage-dependent manner. We hypothesized that the unusual hyperpolarization-induced gating occurred through an interaction between Lys(540) and the C-terminal end of the S6 domain, the region proposed to form the activation gate. Therefore, we mutated six residues located in this region of S6 (Ile(662)-Tyr(667)) to Ala in D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665), but not the other five residues, prevented hyperpolarization-dependent reopening of D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665) to Gln or Asp also prevented reopening. In addition, D540R and D540K/R665K HERG reopened in response to hyperpolarization. Together these findings suggest that a single residue (Arg(665)) in the S6 domain interacts with Lys(540) by electrostatic repulsion to couple voltage sensing to hyperpolarization-dependent opening of D540K HERG K(+) channels. Moreover, our findings suggest that the C-terminal ends of S4 and S6 are in close proximity at hyperpolarized membrane potentials.

  7. Primary staging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, G.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentz, J.O. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ruijter, E.T.G. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)]|[Dept. of Pathology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oosterhof, G.O.N. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    Staging prostate cancer is a systematic classification of the extent of disease based on clinical and pathological criteria. Despite general acceptance of the TNM staging system, a lot of controversy and uncertainty with respect to staging still exists. This paper gives an overview of differnt staging modalities and emphasizes the need for incorporation of prognostic factors, such as tumour grade and volume, in the staging system. (orig.)

  8. High temperature neutron powder diffraction study of the Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu4Sn7S16 phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Pierric; Bourgès, Cédric; Barbier, Tristan; Nassif, Vivian; Cordier, Stéphane; Guilmeau, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    Ternary copper-containing sulfides Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu4Sn7S16 have attracted considerable interest since few years due to their high-efficiency conversion as absorbers for solar energy and promising thermoelectric materials. We report therein on the decomposition study of Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu4Sn7S16 phases using high temperature in situ neutron powder diffraction. Our results obtained at a heating rate of 2.5 K/min indicate that: (i) Cu12Sb4S13 decomposes above ≈792 K into Cu3SbS3, and (ii) Cu4Sn7S16 decomposes above ≈891 K into Sn2S3 and a copper-rich sulfide phase of sphalerite ZnS-type structure with an assumed Cu3SnS4 stoichiometry. Both phase decompositions are associated to a sulfur volatilization. While the results on Cu12Sb4S13 are in fair agreement with recent published data, the decomposition behavior of Cu4Sn7S16 differs from other studies in terms of decomposition temperature, thermal stability and products of reaction. Finally, the crystal structure refinements from neutron powder diffraction data are reported and discussed for the Cu4Sn7S16 and tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 phases at 300 K, and for the high temperature form of skinnerite Cu3SbS3 at 843 K.

  9. Polarity-dependent conformational switching of a peptide mimicking the S4-S5 linker of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluin, O; Breed, J; Duclohier, H

    1996-02-21

    The S4-S5 linker (or S45) in voltage-sensitive sodium channels was previously shown to be involved in the permeation pathway. The secondary structure, investigated by circular dichroism, of a S4-S45 peptide from domain IV and its fragments (including S45) is reported here and compared with that of the homologous peptide from domain II as a function of the solvent dielectric constant. The reduction in helicity seen for S4-S45 (II) in polar media is cancelled in membrane-like environment. The most striking result-- a sharp alpha-helix --> beta-sheet transition upon exposure of the S45 moiety to aqueous solvents-- is discussed as regards channel activation and selectivity.

  10. Search for the CP-violating decays Upsilon(4S)-->B0B0-->J/psiKS0+J/psi(etac)KS0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, O; Hazumi, M; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chang, P; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C-C; Chistov, R; Cho, I-S; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Joshi, N J; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kang, J H; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-11-23

    We report the first search for CP-violating decays of the Upsilon(4S) using a data sample that contains 535 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) mesons with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider. A partial reconstruction technique is employed to enhance the signal sensitivity. No significant signals were observed. We obtain an upper limit of 4 x 10(-7) at the 90% confidence level for the branching fractions of the CP violating modes, Upsilon(4S)-->B(0)B(0)-->J/psiK(S)(0)+J/psi(eta(c))K(S)(0). Extrapolating the result, we find that an observation with 5sigma significance is expected with a 30 ab(-1) data sample, which is within the reach of a future super B factory.

  11. CalCOFI Egg Stages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Egg morphological developmental stage for eggs of selected species captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets. Sequential developmental stages are described by Moser...

  12. The S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1 channels forms a structural scaffold with the S6 segment controlling gate closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, Alain J; Boulet, Inge R; Choveau, Frank S; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Loussouarn, Gildas; Raes, Adam L; Snyders, Dirk J

    2011-01-07

    In vivo, KCNQ1 α-subunits associate with the β-subunit KCNE1 to generate the slowly activating cardiac potassium current (I(Ks)). Structurally, they share their topology with other Kv channels and consist out of six transmembrane helices (S1-S6) with the S1-S4 segments forming the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The opening or closure of the intracellular channel gate, which localizes at the bottom of the S6 segment, is directly controlled by the movement of the VSD via an electromechanical coupling. In other Kv channels, this electromechanical coupling is realized by an interaction between the S4-S5 linker (S4S5(L)) and the C-terminal end of S6 (S6(T)). Previously we reported that substitutions for Leu(353) in S6(T) resulted in channels that failed to close completely. Closure could be incomplete because Leu(353) itself is the pore-occluding residue of the channel gate or because of a distorted electromechanical coupling. To resolve this and to address the role of S4S5(L) in KCNQ1 channel gating, we performed an alanine/tryptophan substitution scan of S4S5(L). The residues with a "high impact" on channel gating (when mutated) clustered on one side of the S4S5(L) α-helix. Hence, this side of S4S5(L) most likely contributes to the electromechanical coupling and finds its residue counterparts in S6(T). Accordingly, substitutions for Val(254) resulted in channels that were partially constitutively open and the ability to close completely was rescued by combination with substitutions for Leu(353) in S6(T). Double mutant cycle analysis supported this cross-talk indicating that both residues come in close contact and stabilize the closed state of the channel.

  13. Staged urethroplasty: indications and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secrest, Charles L

    2002-05-01

    There is still a place for staged urethroplasty. There are some indications for staged urethral reconstruction such as strictures associated with chronic inflammation, fistula, false passage, urethral stones, urethral diverticula, abscess, failed prior repair, complicated hypospadias, severe trauma, neurologic diseases, extensive BXO strictures and long strictures. Staging a urethroplasty should not be considered a step backwards rather instead we should learn from experience and realize there are some patients who are too complex to reconstruct in a single stage.

  14. KCNQ1 Channels Voltage Dependence through a Voltage-dependent Binding of the S4-S5 Linker to the Pore Domain*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers of six transmembrane domain (S1–S6) proteins. Crystallographic data demonstrate that the tetrameric pore (S5–S6) is surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1–S4). One key question remains: how do voltage sensors (S4) regulate pore gating? Previous mutagenesis data obtained on the Kv channel KCNQ1 highlighted the critical role of specific residues in both the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L) and S6 C terminus (S6T). From these data, we hypothesiz...

  15. Science on stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Piera

    2017-04-01

    Pictures and diaries of the legendary Antarctic Expedition of sir E. Shackleton and his crew aboard the Endurance (1914/16) have become the starting point to learn about Natural Science, Earth Science and Climate Change. Students, 12 years old, were involved in hands on activities, took part to a network project, used interactive virtual labs, talked to university researchers on Skype and became the writers of a play. The theater was the place to act the story of Shackleton's expedition, to "stage" some scientific experiments and to tell to the audience about ice cores, climate change, physical and geographical characteristic of polar regions, thermal phenomena related to adaptations of polar animals, solar radiation at different latitude, day/night duration. The project was carried out from teachers of science, letters, geography and English in collaboration with the "Piccolo Teatro di Milano", the association "Scienza Under 18", researchers of the "Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center of Ohio State University" and of "M. Zucchelli Station" based in Antarctica. In our opinion drama activities improve both verbal and non-verbal communication skills and soft skills such as teamwork, responsibility and commitment. To be able to write and to act, students need a deep understanding of contents. To have an audience different from their own teachers and classmates and to interact with university researchers offer real tasks. The project aims to develop a relevant skill for the students: to become awareness citizens in a changing word.

  16. Science on stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    During the opening ceremony, the audience was dazzled by a juggling show involving dramatic light effects. They also took away with them a teacher's sheet explaining some of the scientific concepts involved in juggling. Science teachers can sometimes be quite humorous when it comes to explaining serious matters, as those who took part in the 'Science on Stage' festival held at CERN from 21 to 25 November were able to see for themselves. The 500 or so participants from 27 different countries, mostly science teachers but also some university lecturers, science outreach specialists and students, had the opportunity to share their experience of the teaching of science. They also attended presentations and shows, took part in workshops and visited a fair with stands offering ideas on how to make school science lessons more appealing. The festival, organised by the EIROforum (a partnership between CERN, EFDA, ESA, ESO, EMBL, ESRF and ILL), marked the end of two years of projects for the promotion of science in vir...

  17. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  18. Role in fast inactivation of conserved amino acids in the IV/S4-S5 loop of the human muscle Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, N; Lerche, H; Heine, R; Fleischhauer, R; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Hartlaub, U; George, A L; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1996-08-16

    Since it has been shown that point mutations in the S4-S5 loop of the Shaker K+ channel may disrupt fast inactivation, we investigated the role of three conserved amino acids in IV/S4-S5 of the adult human muscle Na+ channel (L1471, S1478, L1482). In contrast to the K+ channel mutations, the analogous substitutions in the Na+ channel (S1478A/C, L1482A) did not substantially affect fast inactivation. Nevertheless, the mutations S1478A/C/Q shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation; L1471Q and S1478C slowed recovery from inactivation. In contrast, a novel non-conserved IV/S4-S5 mutation causing paramyotonia congenita (F1473S) slowed fast inactivation 2-fold and accelerated recovery from inactivation 5-fold. The results indicate involvement of the IV/ S4-S5 loop of the human muscle Na+ channel in fast inactivation, but different roles for conserved amino acids among Na+ and K+ channels.

  19. General anesthetic action at an internal protein site involving the S4-S5 cytoplasmic loop of a neuronal K(+) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T; Shahidullah, M; Ellingson, J S; Covarrubias, M

    2000-02-18

    The structural bases of general anesthetic action on a neuronal K(+) channel were investigated using the series of homologous 1-alkanols, electrophysiology, and mutational analysis. Domain swapping between dShaw2 (alkanol-sensitive) and hKv3.4 (alkanol-resistant) and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic loop (S4-S5) determines the selective inhibition of native dShaw2 channels by 1-alkanols. The S4-S5 loop may contribute to a receptor for both 1-alkanols and the inactivation particle, because the enhanced 1-alkanol sensitivity of hKv3.4 channels hosting S4-S5 mutations correlates directly with disrupted channel inactivation. Evidence of a discrete protein site was also obtained from the analysis of the relationship between potency and alkyl chain length, which begins to level off after 1-hexanol. Rapid application to the cytoplasmic side of inside-out membrane patches shows that the interaction between dShaw2 channels and 1-alkanols equilibrates in 1000-fold slower when the drug is applied externally to outside-out membrane patches. The data strongly favor a mechanism of inhibition involving a discrete internal site for 1-alkanols in dShaw2 K(+) channels. A new working hypothesis proposes that 1-alkanols lock dShaw2 channels in their closed conformation by a direct interaction at a crevice formed by the S4-S5 loop.

  20. Opposite Effects of the S4-S5 Linker and PIP(2) on Voltage-Gated Channel Function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and Other Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choveau, Frank S; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Coyan, Fabien C; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6), with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5(L)) and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6(T)) in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5(L) is acting like a ligand binding to S6(T) to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5(L), the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated) require PIP(2) to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel cofactor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP(2) leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP(2) and S4S5(L)), and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  1. Role of amino-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Oba, Toshiharu; Oyamada, Hideto; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Ogawa, Yasuo

    2011-10-14

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca(2+) release channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and plays a pivotal role in excitation-contraction coupling. The RyR1 channel is activated by a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor upon depolarization of the transverse tubule, or by Ca(2+) itself, i.e. Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). The molecular events transmitting such signals to the ion gate of the channel are unknown. The S4-S5 linker, a cytosolic loop connecting the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments in six-transmembrane type channels, forms an α-helical structure and mediates signal transmission in a wide variety of channels. To address the role of the S4-S5 linker in RyR1 channel gating, we performed alanine substitution scan of N-terminal half of the putative S4-S5 linker (Thr(4825)-Ser(4829)) that exhibits high helix probability. The mutant RyR1 was expressed in HEK cells, and CICR activity was investigated by caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, single-channel current recordings, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Four mutants (T4825A, I4826A, S4828A, and S4829A) had reduced CICR activity without changing Ca(2+) sensitivity, whereas the L4827A mutant formed a constitutive active channel. T4825I, a disease-associated mutation for malignant hyperthermia, exhibited enhanced CICR activity. An α-helical wheel representation of the N-terminal S4-S5 linker provides a rational explanation to the observed activities of the mutants. These results suggest that N-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker may form an α-helical structure and play an important role in RyR1 channel gating.

  2. Opposite effects of the S4-S5 linker and PIP2 on voltage-gated channel function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and other channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Choveau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6, with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6T in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5L is acting like a ligand binding to S6T to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5L, the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated require PIP2 to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel co-factor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP2 leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP2 and S4-S5L, and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  3. Preparation and Thermochemistrg of Crystalline Compound( n-C12 H25 NH3 ) 2 CdCl4 ( s)%晶体化合物( n-C12 H25 NH3 ) 2 CdCl4 ( s )的制备及热化学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓兰; 王建军; 范妮; 张静; 倪俊超; 陈经涛

    2015-01-01

    The crystal compounds synthesized by the hydrothermal synthesis of (n-C12H25NH3)2 CdCl4(s);compound were calculated based on the thermochemical principle ( n-C12 H25 NH3 ) 2 CdCl4 ( s) of the lattice energy of 889. 81 kJ·mol-1 . Using isothermal solution reaction calorimeter,the standard molar enthalpy of the compound was obtained:[n-C12H25NH3)2 CdCl4,S] = - (1 836. 23 + 7. 95) kJ David mol-1.%用水热合成法合成了晶体化合物 (n-C12H25NH3)2 CdCl4(s);根据热化学原理计算了化合物(n-C12H25 NH3)2 CdCl4(s)的晶格能为889. 81 kJ·mol-1. 利用等温溶解-反应热量计,得到了该化合物的标准的摩尔焓: [(n-C12H25NH3)2 CdCl4,s] = -(1836.23 ±7.95) kJ·mol-1.

  4. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  5. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T

    2003-10-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to

  6. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. Stage-specific psychological determinants of stage transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Tromp, D; Conijn, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. The stages of change construct refers to the different psychological states people move through when they change their behaviour. However, the prediction that people in different stages of change need different sorts of interventions to stimulate the change process has scarcely been test

  8. Comparing Enterovirus 71 with Coxsackievirus A16 by analyzing nucleotide sequences and antigenicity of recombinant proteins of VP1s and VP4s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 and Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16 are two major etiological agents of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD. EV71 is associated with severe cases but not CA16. The mechanisms contributed to the different pathogenesis of these two viruses are unknown. VP1 and VP4 are two major structural proteins of these viruses, and should be paid close attention to. Results The sequences of vp1s from 14 EV71 and 14 CA16, and vp4s from 10 EV71 and 1 CA16 isolated in this study during 2007 to 2009 HFMD seasons were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences available in GenBank using DNAStar and MEGA 4.0. Phylogenetic analysis of complete vp1s or vp4s showed that EV71 isolated in Beijing belonged to C4 and CA16 belonged to lineage B2 (lineage C. VP1s and VP4s from 4 strains of viruses expressed in E. coli BL21 cells were used to detect IgM and IgG in human sera by Western Blot. The detection of IgM against VP1s of EV71 and CA16 showed consistent results with current infection, while none of the sera were positive against VP4s of EV71 and CA16. There was significant difference in the positive rates between EV71 VP1 and CA16 VP1 (χ2 = 5.02, P 2 = 15.30, P 2 = 26.47, P 2 = 16.78, P Conclusions EV71 and CA16 were highly diverse in the nucleotide sequences of vp1s and vp4s. The sera positive rates of VP1 and VP4 of EV71 were lower than those of CA16 respectively, which suggested a less exposure rate to EV71 than CA16 in Beijing population. Human serum antibodies detected by Western blot using VP1s and VP4s as antigen indicated that the immunological reaction to VP1 and VP4 of both EV71 and CA16 was different.

  9. Construction, expression and characterization of human interferon α2b-(G4S)n-thymosin α1 fusion proteins in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Feng Yang; Han-Ying Yuan; Nan-Song Liu; Xiang-Ling Chen; Bu-Yu Gao; Hong Lu; Yu-Yang Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Interferon α2b (IFNα2b) and thymosin α1 (Tα1) exhibit synergic effects in the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis C when used together. For developing a fusion protein drug, fusion proteins of IFNα2b and Tα1 linked by different lengths of (G4S)n (n = 1-3) were constructed and expressed in Pichia pastoris.METHODS: Using PCR and molecular clone techniques, the fusion genes of IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were constructed and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9. After transformation of these plasmids into P. pastoris, the expressed fusion proteins IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were obtained. These proteins were purified through diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) affinity chromatography and SuperdexTM 75 gel filtration and analyzed by SDSPAGE and Western blot. Antiviral and E-rosette assays were used to investigate the bioactivities of these fusion proteins.RESULTS: DNA sequencing confirmed that the fusion genes of IFNα2b-(G4 S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were correctly cloned to the pPIC9 vector. The recombinant IFNα2b(G4 S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) fusion proteins expressed in P. pastoris were purified with DEAE and SuperdexTM 75 gel filtration chromatography. The fusion proteins could be observed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weight (MW) of 23.2, 22.9, and 22.6 ku, respectively, and reacted to the IFNα2b monoclonal antibody and Tα1 polyclonal antibody. The purified fusion proteins exhibit antiviral activity and can enhance the percentage of E-rosette-forming-cell in E-rosette assay.CONCLUSION: The recombinant IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) fusion proteins were successfully expressed in P. pastoris. Purified fusion proteins exhibit both antiviral activity of IFNα2b and immunomodulatory activity of Tα1 in vitro. These results will be the basis for further evaluation of the fusion proteins' function in vivo.

  10. Rapid preparation of (3R,4S,5R) polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine-based libraries to discover a pharmacological chaperone for treatment of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Yun, Wen-Yi; Li, Huang-Yi; Hu, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-27

    The rapid discovery of a pharmacological chaperone toward human α-Gal A for the treatment of Fabry disease is described. Two polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines with the (3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern underwent rapid substituent diversity by conjugating the primary aminomethyl moiety of each with a variety of carboxylic acids to generate two libraries (2 × 60 members). Our bioevaluation results showed one member with the (2R,3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern and bearing a 5-cyclohexylpentanoyl group as a substituent moiety possessed sufficient chaperoning capability to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphocyte of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line and other α-Gal A mutants in COS7 cells.

  11. Development Analysis of 4S Agricultural Business Model%4S农资连锁经营模式发展探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青; 方伟; 姜闯; 王霖野; 李文龙

    2013-01-01

    This article examined the development history of chain management at home and abroad, makes analysis on the basic charac-teristics and organization form of 4S agricultural chain business model, and the important roles of 4S chain operation in the agricultural industry and the development of modern agriculture in a bid to provide beneficial reference for promoting the development of modern a-griculture in China.%介绍国内外连锁经营的发展历史,分析4S农资连锁经营模式的基本特征及组织形式,探讨4S农资连锁经营在农资产业及现代农业发展中的重要作用,为促进我国现代农业的发展提供有益参考。

  12. Quasi-classical trajectory study of the reaction N(4S) + H2 and its reverse reaction: Role of initial vibrational and rotational excitations in chemical stereodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Juan Zhang; Shunle Dong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effects of reagent vibrational and rotational states on the stereodynamical properties of the N(4S) + H2(, )→NH + H reaction and its reverse reaction of H(2S) + NH(, )→N(4S) + H2, we reported a detailed quasiclassical trajectory study using the 4A" double many-body expansion potential energy surface and at the collision energy of 35 kcal/mol. The density distribution of (r) as a function of the angle between and ', and that of (r) as a function of the dihedral angle between the plane containing -' and the plane containing '- ', the normal differential cross-sections as well as the averaged product rotational alignment parameter 〈 2('.) 〉 are calculated and reported. Comparison between the two reactions has showed that the degrees of alignment and orientation of products related to reagent rovibrational state have marked differences for the two reactive systems.

  13. Isotope shifts of the (3s3p) 3P0,1,2-(3s4s) 3S1 Mg I transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Therkildsen, Kasper T.; Jensen, Brian B.;

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the isotope shifts of the (3s3p)P30,1,2-(3s4s)S31 Mg I transitions for the stable isotopes M24g (I=0) , M25g (I=5/2) , and M26g (I=0) . Furthermore, the M25g S31 hyperfine coefficient A(S31)=(-321.6±1.5)MHz is extracted and found to be in excellent agreement with state...

  14. Paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations within the D3/S4-S5 linker of Nav1.7 cause moderate destabilization of fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecki, Brian W; Sheets, Patrick L; Jackson, James O; Cummins, Theodore R

    2008-09-01

    Single-point missense mutations in the peripheral neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are implicated in the painful inherited neuropathy paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). The Nav1.7 PEPD mutations are located in regions of the channel suggested to play important roles in fast inactivation. PEPD mutations in the putative inactivation gate have been reported to significantly impair fast inactivation, resulting in pronounced persistent currents. However, PEPD mutations in the S4-S5 linker of domain 3 (D3/S4-S5) had not been characterized and the roles of specific residues in this linker in channel gating are unclear. We functionally characterized two of the D3/S4-S5 PEPD mutations (V1298F and V1299F) and compared their effects on gating to an adjacent non-PEPD mutation (V1300F) and the I1461T PEPD mutation, located in the putative inactivation gate. The primary effect of the V1298F and V1299F mutations is to shift the voltage dependence of fast inactivation by approximately 20 mV in the depolarizing direction. We observed a similar effect with the PEPD mutation I1461T. Interestingly, while all three PEPD mutations increased persistent currents, the relative amplitudes (approximately 6% of peak) were much smaller than previously reported for the I1461T mutation. In contrast, the main effect of the V1300F mutation was a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation. These data demonstrate that (1) mutations within D3/S4-S5 affect inactivation of Nav1.7 in a residue-specific manner and (2) disruption of the fast-inactivated state by PEPD mutations can be more moderate than previously indicated, which has important implications for the pathophysiology of PEPD.

  15. Side chain flexibility and coupling between the S4-S5 linker and the TRP domain in thermo-sensitive TRP channels: Insights from protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Gomez Lagunas, Froylan; Balleza, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily is subdivided into several subfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity, which is highly heterogeneous but shows a molecular architecture that resembles the one present in members of the Kv channel superfamily. Because of this diversity, they produce a large variety of channels with different gating and permeability properties. Elucidation of these particular features necessarily requires comparative studies based on structural and functional data. The present study aims to compilate, analyze, and determine, in a coherent way, the relationship between intrinsic side-chain flexibility and the allosteric coupling in members of the TRPV, TRPM, and TRPC families. Based on the recently determined structures of TRPV1 and TRPV2, we have generated protein models for single subunits of TRPV5, TRPM8, and TRPC5 channels. With these models, we focused our attention on the apparently crucial role of the GP dipeptide at the center of the S4-S5 linker and discussed its role in the interaction with the TRP domain, specifically with the highly-conserved Trp during this coupling. Our analysis suggests an important role of the S4-S5L flexibility in the thermosensitivity, where heat-activated channels possess rigid S4-S5 linkers, whereas cold-activated channels have flexible ones. Finally, we also present evidence of the key interaction between the conserved Trp residue of the TRP box and of several residues in the S4-S5L, importantly the central Pro. Proteins 2017; 85:630-646. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A [4Fe−4S] cluster dimer bridged by Bis(2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine-4′-thiolato)iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, E.P.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; Hessen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The use of 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine-4′-thiol (tpySH) was explored as a bridging ligand for the formation of stable assemblies containing both [4Fe−4S] clusters and single metal ions. Reaction of tpySH (2 equiv) with (NH4)2Fe(SO4)2·6H2O generated the homoleptic complex [Fe(tpySH)2]2+, which was

  17. A [4Fe-4S] cluster dimer bridged by bis(2,2 ' : 6 ',2 ''-terpyridine-4 '-thiolato)iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, Erwin P. L.; van Koten, Gerard; Gebbink, Robertus J. M. Klein; Hessen, Bart

    2008-01-01

    The use of 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine-4'-thiol (tpySH) was explored as a bridging ligand for the formation of stable. assemblies containing both [4Fe-4S] clusters and single metal ions. Reaction of tpySH (2 equiv) with (NH4)(2)Fe(SO4)(2)center dot 6H(2)O generated the homoleptic complex

  18. Performance of a UTC FW-4S solid propellant rocket motor under the command effects of simulated altitude and rotational spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merryman, H. L.; Smith, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    One United Technology Center FW-4S solid-propellant rocket motor was fired at an average simulated altitude of 103,000 ft while spinning about its axial centerline at 180 rpm. The objectives of the test program were to determine motor altitude ballistic performance including the measurement of the nonaxial thrust vector and to demonstrate structural integrity of the motor case and nozzle. These objectives are presented and discussed.

  19. Mn-doping induced ferromagnetism and enhanced superconductivity in Bi4 -xMnxO4S3 (0.075 ≤x ≤0.15 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenjie; Yin, Xunqing; Cao, Yiming; Peng, Xianglian; Gao, Tian; Yu, Chuan; Chen, Jingzhe; Kang, Baojuan; Lu, Bo; Guo, Juan; Li, Qing; Tseng, Wei-Shiuan; Ma, Zhongquan; Jing, Chao; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang; Yeh, N.-C.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that Mn doping in the layered sulfides Bi4O4S3 leads to stable Bi4-xMnxO4S3 compounds that exhibit both long-range ferromagnetism and enhanced superconductivity for 0.075 ≤x ≤0.15 , with a possible record superconducting transition temperature (Tc) ˜15 K among all BiS2-based superconductors. We conjecture that the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism may be attributed to Mn doping in the spacer Bi2O2 layers away from the superconducting BiS2 layers, whereas the enhancement of Tc may be due to excess electron transfer to BiS2 from the Mn4 +/Mn3 + substitutions in Bi2O2 . This notion is empirically corroborated by the increased electron-carrier densities upon Mn doping, and by further studies of the Bi4-xAxO4S3 compounds (A = Co, Ni; x =0.1 , 0.125), where the Tc values remain comparable to that of the undoped Bi4O4S3 system (˜4.5 K) due to lack of 4+ valences in either Co or Ni ions for excess electron transfer to the BiS2 layers. These findings therefore shed new light on feasible pathways to enhance the Tc values of BiS2-based superconductors, although complete elucidation of the interplay between superconductivity and ferromagnetism in these anisotropic layered compounds awaits the development of single crystalline materials for further investigation.

  20. Surgical staging in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MJ; Aalders, JG; Slager, E; Fauser, B; VanGeijn, H; Brolmann, H; Vervest, H

    2005-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most prevalent cancer of the female genital tract. No randomised study exists to prove that pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy increases survival, either by dissecting micrometastases or by altering the adjuvant treatment in all early stage (stage I grade I and 2) endom

  1. Writing Stages: A Developmental Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Joseph O.

    The developmental stages of writing can be related to Jean Piaget's final three stages of development (preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational) and to the narrative, descriptive, explanative, analytical, and artistic rhetorical modes. As the child enters kindergarten or the first grade, narrative blooms. By this age most young…

  2. Lernpunkt Deutsch--Stage 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elvira

    1997-01-01

    Evaluates the first stage of "Lernpunkt Deutsch," a new three-stage German course designed for upper elementary and early secondary school. Describes the publisher's package of materials and the appropriateness of the course, utility of the different package elements, format of the materials, and assesses whether the course provides pedagogically…

  3. Lernpunkt Deutsch--Stage 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elvira

    1997-01-01

    Evaluates the first stage of "Lernpunkt Deutsch," a new three-stage German course designed for upper elementary and early secondary school. Describes the publisher's package of materials and the appropriateness of the course, utility of the different package elements, format of the materials, and assesses whether the course provides pedagogically…

  4. Effects of $Z_b$ states and bottom meson loops on $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\Upsilon(1S,2S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yun-Hua; Daub, Johanna T; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G; Zou, Bing-Song

    2016-01-01

    We study the dipion transitions $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(nS) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ $(n=1,2)$. In particular, we consider the effects of the two intermediate bottomoniumlike exotic states $Z_b(10610)$ and $Z_b(10650)$ as well as bottom meson loops. The strong pion-pion final-state interactions, especially including channel coupling to $K\\bar{K}$ in the $S$-wave, are taken into account model-independently by using dispersion theory. Based on a nonrelativistic effective field theory we find that the contribution from the bottom meson loops is comparable to those from the chiral contact terms and the $Z_b$-exchange terms. For the $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay, the result shows that including the effects of the $Z_b$-exchange and the bottom meson loops can naturally reproduce the two-hump behavior of the $\\pi\\pi$ mass spectra. Future angular distribution data are decisive for the identification of different production mechanisms. For the $\\Upsilon(4S) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+\\pi^-$...

  5. 基于SERVQUAL的汽车4S店服务质量评价%Service Quality Evaluation of Auto 4S shop Based on SERVQUAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡斌祥; 严岿; 李江天

    2011-01-01

    汽车服务对于汽车厂商的市场竞争具有重要的意义,在深入分析汽车4S店服务特点的基础上,以SERVQUAL模型为基础,开发了衡量汽车4S店服务质量的量表,以实现对汽车4S店服务质量的科学评价,对于提高汽车4S店的服务质量具有一定的意义.%Car service is significant for car makers in the market competition. The characteristics of auto 4S shops' services were investigated. Based on the SERVQUAL model,service quality of automotive 4S shop was measured. Scientific evaluation on the service quality was then achieved. It is of great positive significance for the service quality improvement of the auto 4S Shops.

  6. Two mutations in the IV/S4-S5 segment of the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel disrupt fast and enhance slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekov, A K; Peter, W; Mitrovic, N; Lehmann-Horn, F; Lerche, H

    2001-06-29

    Fast and slow inactivation (FI, SI) of the voltage-gated Na+ channel are two kinetically distinct and structurally dissociated processes. The voltage sensor IV/S4 and the intracellular IV/S4-S5 loop have been shown to play an important role in FI mediating the coupling between activation and inactivation. Two mutations in IV/S4-S5 of the human muscle Na+ channel, L1482C/A, disrupt FI by inducing a persistent Na+ current, shifting steady-state inactivation in the depolarizing direction and accelerating its recovery. These effects were more pronounced for L1482A. In contrast, SI of L1482C/A channels was enhanced showing a more complete SI and a 3-fold slowing of its recovery. Effects on SI were more pronounced for L1482C. The results indicate an important role of the IV/S4-S5 loop not only in FI but also in SI of the Na+ channel.

  7. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  8. Resistive switching characteristics of Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices constructed on plastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2012-07-01

    In this study, Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6Al devices are fabricated on plastic substrates using the sputtering method at room temperature. The ratio of O/S in the zinc oxysulfide thin film is confirmed to be 0.4/0.6 from the Auger depth profiling. The Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices show unipolar resistive switching behaviors and the ratio of the measured resistance in the low-resistance state (LRS) to that in the high-resistance state (HRS) is above 10(4). The conduction mechanism of the LRS is governed by Ohm's law. On the other hand, in the HRS, the conduction mechanism at low voltages is controlled by Ohm's law, but that at high voltages results from the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism. The Ohmic and Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanisms observed in the LRS and HRS support the filament model of unipolar resistive switching. The memory characteristics of the Cu/ZnO0.4S0.6/Al devices are retained for 10(4) sec without any change.

  9. Multi-stage complex contagions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Sergey; Ward, Jonathan A.; Gleeson, James P.; Porter, Mason A.

    2013-03-01

    The spread of ideas across a social network can be studied using complex contagion models, in which agents are activated by contact with multiple activated neighbors. The investigation of complex contagions can provide crucial insights into social influence and behavior-adoption cascades on networks. In this paper, we introduce a model of a multi-stage complex contagion on networks. Agents at different stages—which could, for example, represent differing levels of support for a social movement or differing levels of commitment to a certain product or idea—exert different amounts of influence on their neighbors. We demonstrate that the presence of even one additional stage introduces novel dynamical behavior, including interplay between multiple cascades, which cannot occur in single-stage contagion models. We find that cascades—and hence collective action—can be driven not only by high-stage influencers but also by low-stage influencers.

  10. Photoelectric properties and charge dynamics in ZnO nanowires/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} and ZnO nanowires/In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiangyang, E-mail: lxy081276@126.com, E-mail: yzgu@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Shun; Gu, Yuzong, E-mail: lxy081276@126.com, E-mail: yzgu@henu.edu.cn [Institue of Microsystems Physics and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Jiwei [The Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of MOE, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-12-28

    ZnO nanowires arrays were preformed in a horizontal double-tube system. Two types of heterostructures (ZnO nanowires/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} and ZnO nanowires/In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9}) and three-dimensional solar cells were fabricated with ZnO nanowires arrays as working electrode, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} as buffer layer, and Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} as inorganic dye and hole collector. It is suggested that two types of heterostructures have the similar absorption properties with single Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9}. However, the results of steady state and electric field-induced surface photovoltage indicate that ZnO nanowires/In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} exhibits the higher photovoltaic response than ZnO nanowires/Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9}. Using the transient surface photovoltage spectroscopy, we further studied the separation and transport mechanism of photogenerated charges. Furthermore, Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9}/In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZnO cells presents the better performance than Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9}/ZnO cells and the highest efficiencies are about 6.4% and 5.2%, respectively. It is suggested that direct paths, interface barrier, built-in electric field, and double energy level matchings between conduction bands (Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO) have obvious effect on the separation of photogenerated charges. Then we discussed the synthetic action on the charge dynamics from these factors.

  11. Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and optical property of the pentanary chalcohalide Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hua-Jun, E-mail: cszzl772002@yeah.net [Laboratory of Applied Research on the Characteristic Resources in the North of Guizhou Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi, Guizhou 563002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Liu, Peng-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The pentanary chalcohalide Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl has been prepared from stoichiometric mixtures of KCl, Ba, Sb, and S in an evacuated silica tube, which is the first example of chalcohalides in the pentanary A/Ae/Sb/Q/X (A=alkali metal; Ae=alkaline-earth metal; Q=S, Se, Te; X=F, Cl, Br, I) system. This material crystallize in the Pnnm space group and its new structure type comprises one-dimensional (1D) [Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}]{sup 5−} chains running down the [001] direction separated by isolated dimeric Sb{sub 2}S{sub 4} polyhedra, Ba{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup −}, respectively. The optical gap of 1.99 eV for Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl was deduced from the UV/vis reflectance spectroscopy and DFT study indicates a indirect band gap with an electronic transfer excitation of S 3p to Sb 5p orbital electrons. - Graphical abstract: The pentanary chalcohalide Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl has been prepared, which contains one-dimensional (1D) [Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}]{sup 5−} chains running down the [001] direction separated by isolated dimeric Sb{sub 2}S{sub 4} polyhedra, Ba{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup −}, respectively. - Highlights: • Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl is the first example of chalcohalides in the pentanary A/Ae/Sb/Q/X (A=alkali metal; Ae= alkaline-earth metal; Q=S, Se, Te; X=F, Cl, Br, I) system. • This material crystallizes in a new structure type with one-dimensional (1D) [Sb{sub 3}S{sub 7}]{sup 5−} chains running down the [001] direction separated by isolated dimeric Sb{sub 2}S{sub 4} polyhedra, Ba{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup −}, respectively. • The optical gap of 1.99 eV for Ba{sub 3}KSb{sub 4}S{sub 9}Cl was deduced from UV/Vis reflectance spectroscopy.

  12. Staging of unipolar affective illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Ferensztajn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a concept of staging of unipolar affective illness (recurrent depression is presented. In respective subchapters, three most important aspects of this issue have been discussed: 1 staging of unipolar affective illness; 2 staging of treatment-resistant depression; and 3 conversion of unipolar into bipolar affective illness. The evidence for so called neuroprogression of the illness, accumulated in recent years, has allowed for a classification of staging based on a concept of allostasis and allostatic load. In the course of illness, changes in neuroendocrine system (mainly hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, immunological system, mechanisms of oxidative stress, neurotransmitters, neurotrophic factors as well as structural and functional changes of the brain occur. In their paper of 2007, Fava and Tossani elaborated a concept of staging of unipolar affective illness presenting a continuum model of five consecutive stages with specific clinical features. In the present paper, a concept of treatment-resistant depression and staging of treatment resistance is presented in the context of several models. An important determinant of treatment-resistant depression is so called subthreshold bipolarity which is connected with worse efficacy of antidepressant drugs. In the course of illness, there is a possibility of changing diagnosis from recurrent depression into bipolar affective illness. The studies on this issue show that frequency of such diagnostic conversion is 1,5% of depressed patients per year.

  13. Stages of Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following stages are used for major salivary gland cancers: Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  14. CalCOFI Larvae Stages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Developmental stages (yolk sac, preflexion, flexion, postflexion, or transformation) of selected fish larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets.

  15. Bipolar disorder: staging and neuroprogression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues, Aline André

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In bipolar disorder illness progression has been associated with a higher number of mood episodes and hospitalizations, poorer response to treatment, and more severe cognitive and functional impairment. This supports the notion of the use of staging models in this illness. The value of staging models has long been recognized in many medical and malignant conditions. Staging models rely on the fact that different interventions may suit different stages of the disorder, and that better outcomes can be obtained if interventions are implemented earlier in the course of illness. Thus, treatment planning would benefit from the assessment of cognition, functioning and comorbidities. Staging may offer a means to refine treatment options, and most importantly, to establish a more precise diagnosis. Moreover, staging could have utility as course specifier and may guide treatment planning and better information to patients and their family members of what could be expected in terms of prognosis. The present study reviews the clinical and biological basis of the concept of illness progression in bipolar disorder.

  16. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  17. Conserved residues within the putative S4-S5 region serve distinct functions among thermosensitive vanilloid transient receptor potential (TRPV) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukalova, Stepana; Marsakova, Lenka; Teisinger, Jan; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2010-12-31

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is a tetrameric six-transmembrane segment (S1-S6) channel that can be synergistically activated by various proalgesic agents such as capsaicin, protons, heat, or highly depolarizing voltages, and also by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common activator of the related thermally gated vanilloid TRP channels TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3. In these channels, the conserved charged residues in the intracellular S4-S5 region have been proposed to constitute part of a voltage sensor that acts in concert with other stimuli to regulate channel activation. The molecular basis of this gating event is poorly understood. We mutated charged residues all along the S4 and the S4-S5 linker of TRPV1 and identified four potential voltage-sensing residues (Arg(557), Glu(570), Asp(576), and Arg(579)) that, when specifically mutated, altered the functionality of the channel with respect to voltage, capsaicin, heat, 2-APB, and/or their interactions in different ways. The nonfunctional charge-reversing mutations R557E and R579E were partially rescued by the charge-swapping mutations R557E/E570R and D576R/R579E, indicating that electrostatic interactions contribute to allosteric coupling between the voltage-, temperature- and capsaicin-dependent activation mechanisms. The mutant K571E was normal in all aspects of TRPV1 activation except for 2-APB, revealing the specific role of Lys(571) in chemical sensitivity. Surprisingly, substitutions at homologous residues in TRPV2 or TRPV3 had no effect on temperature- and 2-APB-induced activity. Thus, the charged residues in S4 and the S4-S5 linker contribute to voltage sensing in TRPV1 and, despite their highly conserved nature, regulate the temperature and chemical gating in the various TRPV channels in different ways.

  18. Inclusive Lambda_c Production in e+e- Annihilations at sqrt{s}=10.54 GeV and in Upsilon(4S) Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07

    We present measurements of the total production rates and momentum distributions of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 10.54 GeV and in {Upsilon}(4S) decays. In hadronic events at 10.54 GeV, charmed hadrons are almost exclusively leading particles in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events, allowing direct studies of c-quark fragmentation. We measure a momentum distribution for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons that differs significantly from those measured previously for charmed mesons. Comparing with a number of models, we find none that can describe the distribution completely. We measure an average scaled momentum of (x{sub p}) = 0.574 {+-} 0.009 and a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup q{bar q}} = 0.057 {+-} 0.002(exp.) {+-} 0.015(BF) {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} per hadronic event, where the experimental error is much smaller than that due to the branching fraction into the reconstructed decay mode, pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. In {Upsilon}(4S) decays we measure a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup {Upsilon}} = 0.091 {+-} 0.006(exp.) {+-} 0.024(BF) per {Upsilon}(4S) decay, and find a much softer momentum distribution than expected from B decays into a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} plus an antinucleon and one to three pions.

  19. NifS-mediated assembly of [4Fe-4S] clusters in the N- and C-terminal domains of the NifU scaffold protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Archer D; Jameson, Guy N L; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Agar, Jeffrey N; Naik, Sunil; Krebs, Carsten; Frazzon, Jeverson; Dean, Dennis R; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2005-10-04

    NifU is a homodimeric modular protein comprising N- and C-terminal domains and a central domain with a redox-active [2Fe-2S](2+,+) cluster. It plays a crucial role as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the Fe-S clusters required for the maturation of nif-specific Fe-S proteins. In this work, the time course and products of in vitro NifS-mediated iron-sulfur cluster assembly on full-length NifU and truncated forms involving only the N-terminal domain or the central and C-terminal domains have been investigated using UV-vis absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopies, coupled with analytical studies. The results demonstrate sequential assembly of labile [2Fe-2S](2+) and [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters in the U-type N-terminal scaffolding domain and the assembly of [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters in the Nfu-type C-terminal scaffolding domain. Both scaffolding domains of NifU are shown to be competent for in vitro maturation of nitrogenase component proteins, as evidenced by rapid transfer of [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters preassembled on either the N- or C-terminal domains to the apo nitrogenase Fe protein. Mutagenesis studies indicate that a conserved aspartate (Asp37) plays a critical role in mediating cluster transfer. The assembly and transfer of clusters on NifU are compared with results reported for U- and Nfu-type scaffold proteins, and the need for two functional Fe-S cluster scaffolding domains on NifU is discussed.

  20. Cooperative effect of S4-S5 loops in domains D3 and D4 on fast inactivation of the Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, M Oana; Alekov, Alexi K; Bail, Sigrid; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Lerche, Holger

    2004-11-15

    Cytoplasmic S4-S5 loops have been shown to be involved in fast inactivation of voltage-gated ion channels. We studied mutations in these loops and their potential cooperative effects in domains D3 (N1151C, A1152C, I1160C/A) and D4 (F1473C, L1482C/A) of the human skeletal muscle Na(+) channel alpha-subunit (hNa(v)1.4) using expression in tsA201 cells and the whole cell patch-clamp technique. All cysteine mutations were accessible to intracellularly applied sulfhydryl reagents which considerably destabilized fast inactivation. For different combinations of corresponding D3/D4 double mutations, fast inactivation could be almost completely removed. Thermodynamic cycle analysis indicated an additive effect for N1151C/F1473C and a significant cooperative effect for I1160/L1482 double mutations. Application of oxidizing reagents such as Cu-phenanthroline to link two cysteines via a disulfide bridge did not reveal evidence for a direct physical interaction of cysteines in D3 and D4. In addition to the pronounced alterations of fast inactivation, mutations of I1160 shifted steady-state activation in the hyperpolarizing direction and slowed the kinetics of both activation and deactivation. Sulfhydryl reagents had charge-dependent effects on I1160C suggesting interaction with negative charges in another protein region. We conclude that fast inactivation of the Na(+) channel involves both S4-S5 loops in D3 and D4 in a cooperative manner. D3/S4-S5 also plays an important role in activation and deactivation.

  1. Voltage-dependent gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated pacemaker channels: molecular coupling between the S4-S5 and C-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decher, Niels; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2004-04-02

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels have a transmembrane topology that is highly similar to voltage-gated K(+) channels, yet HCN channels open in response to membrane hyperpolarization instead of depolarization. The structural basis for the "inverted" voltage dependence of HCN gating and how voltage sensing by the S1-S4 domains is coupled to the opening of the intracellular gate formed by the S6 domain are unknown. Coupling could arise from interaction between specific residues or entire transmembrane domains. We previously reported that the mutation of specific residues in the S4-S5 linker of HCN2 (i.e. Tyr-331 and Arg-339) prevented normal channel closure presumably by disruption of a crucial interaction with the activation gate. Here we hypothesized that the C-linker, a carboxyl terminus segment that connects S6 to the cyclic nucleotide binding domain, interacts with specific residues of the S4-S5 linker to mediate coupling. The recently solved structure of the C-linker of HCN2 indicates that an alpha-helix (the A'-helix) is located near the end of each S6 domain, the presumed location of the activation gate. Ala-scanning mutagenesis of the end of S6 and the A'-helix identified five residues that were important for normal gating as mutations disrupted channel closure. However, partial deletion of the C-linker indicated that the presence of only two of these residues was required for normal coupling. Further mutation analyses suggested that a specific electrostatic interaction between Arg-339 of the S4-S5 linker and Asp-443 of the C-linker stabilizes the closed state and thus participates in the coupling of voltage sensing and activation gating in HCN channels.

  2. (4S-4,8-dihydroxy-1-tetralone and other chemical constituents from Pestalotiopsis sp. EJC07, endophytic fromBauhinia guianensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleane M.C. de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the isolation of eight compounds fromPestalotiopsis sp. EJC07 isolated as endophytic fromBauhinia guianensis, a tipical plant of the Amazon. The compounds (4S-4,8-dihydroxy-1-tetralone (1, uracil (2, uridin (3, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (4, ergosterol (5, ergosterol peroxide (6, cerevisterol (7 and ducitol (8 were isolated by chromatographic procedures and identified by spectral methods of 1D and 2D NMR and MS. The compound 1 is being reported for the first time in the genusPestalotiopsis.

  3. Paperikoneen 4 sähkökunnossapidon ennakkohuolto-ohjelmien kartoitus ja luonti kunnossapitojärjestelmään

    OpenAIRE

    Lipsanen, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön toimeksiantaja ABB Oy, Service, Myllykoski toimii kunnossapitopalveluiden kokonaistoimittajana Myllykoski Paper Oy:lle. Palvelusopimukseen kuuluu paperitehtaan laitteiden kunnossapito ja sen kehittäminen. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli luoda paperikoneen 4 sähkölaitteille ennakkohuolto-ohjelmat Maximo 6-kunnossapitojärjestelmään. Työ rajattiin kriittisyysluokaltaan tärkeimpiin laitteisiin aiemmin käytössä olleiden Excel-huoltotaulukoiden ja dokumenttien pohjalta. Laitte...

  4. Branching Fraction for B+ -> pi0 l+ nu, Measured in Upsilon(4S) -> B Bbar Events Tagged by B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bomben, M; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cristinziani, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cunha, A; Curry, S; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Li, L; Li, X; Libby, J; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lü, C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Ryd, A; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schröder, H; Schröder, T; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Tan, P; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Vazquez, W P; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Viaud, B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de; Van Bakel, N; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H

    2005-01-01

    We report a preliminary branching fraction of (1.80 +/- 0.37(stat.) +/- 0.23(syst.)) x 10^-4 for the charmless exclusive semileptonic B+ -> pi0 l+ nu decay, where l can be either a muon or an electron. This result is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 81 fb^-1 collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses BBbar events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) decays, where X can be either a gamma or a pi0 from a D* decay.

  5. Adherence and persistence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus newly initiating canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, dpp-4s, or glp-1s in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jennifer; Divino, Victoria; Burudpakdee, Chakkarin

    2017-07-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors were first approved in the US in 2013; therefore, real-world (RW) studies describing outcomes are limited. This retrospective study evaluated adherence and persistence among patients initiating canagliflozin (CANA), dapagliflozin (DAPA), GLP-1 agonists (GLP-1s), and DPP-4 inhibitors (DPP-4s) over a 12-month follow-up from a US managed care perspective. Patients newly initiating CANA, DAPA, GLP-1s, or DPP-4s from February 1, 2014-June 30, 2014 were identified from the QuintilesIMS PharMetrics Plus Database. The first fill defined the index date/drug. Patients were required to have a T2DM diagnosis (ICD-9-CM 250.x[0,2]) and ≥12 months of continuous enrollment pre- and post-index (follow-up). Main outcome measures were adherence (proportion of days covered, PDC; medication possession ratio, MPR) and persistence on index therapy. PDC or MPR ≥0.80 was considered adherent. Patients were considered persistent until evidence of discontinuation (gap ≥90 days between two subsequent index therapy prescriptions). Kaplan-Meier (KM) analysis assessed time to discontinuation, while a Cox proportional hazards model (PHM) evaluated risk of discontinuation. Logistic regression models evaluated the likelihood of non-adherence. The final sample consisted of 23,702 patients (6,546 CANA, 3,087 DAPA, 6,273 GLP-1s, and 7,796 DPP-4s; 56% male, and mean [SD] age = 55 [9.1] years). Mean PDC ranged from 0.56 (GLP-1), to 0.71 (CANA), with 33-56% adherent, respectively; MPR results were similar. Fifty-two per cent (GLP-1) to 68% (CANA) were persistent over the follow-up. CANA patients had the longest time to discontinuation. In regression analyses, compared to CANA 100 mg, DAPA, DPP-4, and GLP-1 patients had a significantly higher likelihood of non-adherence and a significantly higher risk of discontinuation. CANA 300 mg patients had a significantly lower likelihood of non-adherence and a significantly lower risk of discontinuation

  6. Two-photon photo-ionization of the Ca 4s3d 1D2 level in an optical dipole trap

    OpenAIRE

    Daily, J. E.; Gommers, R.; Cummings, E. A.; Durfee, D. S.; S. D. Bergeson

    2004-01-01

    We report an optical dipole trap for calcium. The trap is created by focusing a 488 nm argon-ion laser beam into a calcium magneto-optical trap. The argon-ion laser photo-ionizes atoms in the trap because of a near-resonance with the 4s4f 1F3 level. By measuring the dipole trap decay rate as a function of argon-ion laser intensity, we determine the 1F3 photo-ionization cross section at our wavelength to be approximately 230 Mb.

  7. The conserved protein Dre2 uses essential [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters for its function in cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Daili J A; Genau, Heide M; Weiler, Benjamin D; Bill, Eckhard; Pierik, Antonio J; Lill, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery comprises 11 essential components and matures Fe-S proteins involved in translation and genome maintenance. Maturation is initiated by the electron transfer chain NADPH-diflavin reductase Tah18-Fe-S protein Dre2 that facilitates the de novo assembly of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the scaffold complex Cfd1-Nbp35. Tah18-Dre2 also play a critical role in the assembly of the diferric tyrosyl radical cofactor of ribonucleotide reductase. Dre2 contains eight conserved cysteine residues as potential co-ordinating ligands for Fe-S clusters but their functional importance and the type of bound clusters is unclear. In the present study, we use a combination of mutagenesis, cell biological and biochemical as well as UV-visible, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches to show that the yeast Dre2 cysteine residues Cys(252), Cys(263), Cys(266) and Cys(268) (motif I) bind a [2Fe-2S] cluster, whereas cysteine residues Cys(311), Cys(314), Cys(322) and Cys(325) (motif II) co-ordinate a [4Fe-4S] cluster. All of these residues with the exception of Cys(252) are essential for cell viability, cytosolic Fe-S protein activity and in vivo (55)Fe-S cluster incorporation. The N-terminal methyltransferase-like domain of Dre2 is important for proper Fe-S cluster assembly at motifs I and II, which occurs in an interdependent fashion. Our findings further resolve why recombinant Dre2 from Arabidopsis, Trypanosoma or humans has previously been isolated with a single [2Fe-2S] instead of native [2Fe-2S] plus [4Fe-4S] clusters. In the presence of oxygen, the motif I-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster is labile and the motif II-bound [4Fe-4S] cluster is readily converted into a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  8. Role in fast inactivation of the IV/S4-S5 loop of the human muscle Na+ channel probed by cysteine mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, H; Peter, W; Fleischhauer, R; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Malina, T; Mitrovic, N; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1997-12-01

    1. In order to investigate the role in fast inactivation of the cytoplasmic S4-S5 loop of the fourth domain (IV/S4-S5) within the alpha-subunit of the adult human muscle Na+ channel, every single amino acid from R1469 to G1486 was substituted by a cysteine and the mutants were studied by functional expression in human embryonic kidney cells (tsA201) using whole-cell patch clamping. Effects following intracellular application of the sulfhydryl reagents MTSET and MTSES on the mutants were investigated. 2. Sixteen of eighteen mutants resulted in the formation of functional channels. For P1480C and N1484C, no Na+ currents could be detected in transfected cells. In the absence of sulfhydryl reagents, F1473C and A1481C slowed fast Na+ channel inactivation by 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively, and L1482C induced a steady-state Na+ current (Iss) of 3% of peak current (Ipeak) (1% for wild-type). 3. Upon application of MTSET and MTSES, changes in fast inactivation gating occurred for most of the mutants. The most dramatic destabilizing effects on fast inactivation were observed for M1476C (9-fold slowing of inactivation; Iss/Ipeak, 3.6%; +15 mV shift in steady-state inactivation; 2- to 3-fold acceleration of recovery from inactivation), A1481C (3-fold; 14%; +20 mV; no change) and F1473C (2.5-fold; 2.4%; +8 mV; 1.5-fold). Less pronounced destabilizing effects were observed for M1477C and L1479C. Strongly stabilizing effects on the inactivated state, that is a 20-30 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve associated with a 3- to 4-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation, occurred for T1470C, L1471C and A1474C. Almost all effects were independent of the membrane potential; however, A1474C only reacted when cells were depolarized. Significant effects on activation were not observed. 4. We conclude that the IV/S4-S5 loop plays an important role in fast inactivation of the muscle Na+ channel and may contribute to the formation of a receptor for the putative

  9. Doping La into the depletion layer of the Cd(0.6)Zn(0.4)S photocatalyst for efficient H(2) evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao-Guang; Chen, Gang; Hao, Lin-Xing; Zhou, Yan-Song; Wang, Yu; Pei, Jian; Sun, Jing-Xue; Han, Zhong-Hui

    2013-10-01

    We report a novel strategy for the enhancement of photocatalytic H2 evolution by doping La into the depletion layer of Cd0.6Zn0.4S (CZS: x% La). The apparent quantum yield of the CZS: 2% La photocatalyst at 350 nm is up to 93.3%, which is extremely high for solar water splitting even compared with the noble metal cocatalyst systems. This work may contribute to the design and construction of materials with outstanding capability for charge separation and hence improve the properties of the materials for various applications.

  10. Mutations at opposite ends of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of sodium channel NaV1.7 produce distinct pain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrrell Lynda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two groups of gain-of-function mutations in sodium channel NaV1.7, which are expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, produce two clinically-distinct pain syndromes - inherited erythromelalgia (IEM and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD. IEM is characterized by intermittent burning pain and skin redness in the feet or hands, triggered by warmth or mild exercise, while PEPD is characterized by episodes of rectal, ocular and mandibular pain accompanied with skin flushing, triggered by bowel movement and perianal stimulation. Most of the IEM mutations are located within channel domains I and II, while most of the PEPD mutations are located within domains III and IV. The structural dichotomy parallels the biophysical effects of the two types of mutations, with IEM mutations shifting voltage-dependence of NaV1.7 activation in a hyperpolarized direction, and PEPD mutations shifting fast-inactivation of NaV1.7 in a depolarized direction. While four IEM and four PEPD mutations are located within cytoplasmic linkers joining segments 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linkers in the different domains (IEM: domains I and II; PEPD: domains III and IV, no S4-S5 linker has been reported to house both IEM and PEPD mutations thus far. Results We have identified a new IEM mutation P1308L within the C-terminus of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of NaV1.7, ten amino acids from a known PEPD mutation V1298F which is located within the N-terminus of this linker. We used voltage-clamp to compare the biophysical properties of the two mutant channels and current-clamp to study their effects on DRG neuron excitability. We confirm that P1308L and V1298F behave as prototypical IEM and PEPD mutations, respectively. We also show that DRG neurons expressing either P1308L or V1298F become hyperexcitable, compared to DRG neurons expressing wild-type channels. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for differential roles of the DIII/S4-S5 linker N- and C-termini in channel

  11. Study of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries and flavor oscillations in neutral B decays at the Υ(4S)

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This is the pre-print version of the Article. The official published version can be accessed from the links below. Copyright @ 2002 APS We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of 29.7 fb-1 recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance and 3.9 fb-1 off resonance. One of the neutral B mesons, which are prod...

  12. A New Diketopiperazine, Cyclo-(4-S-hydroxy-R-proline-R-isoleucine, from an Australian Specimen of the Sponge Stelletta sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne M. Tapiolas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available While investigating the cytotoxic activity of the methanol extract of an Australian marine sponge Stelletta sp. (Demospongiae, a new diketopiperazine, cyclo-(4-S-hydroxy-R-proline-R-isoleucine (1, was isolated together with the known bengamides; A (2, F (3, N (4, Y (5, and bengazoles; Z (6, C4 (7 and C6 (8. The isolation and structure elucidation of the diketopiperazine (1, together with the activity of 1–8 against a panel of human and mammalian cell lines are discussed.

  13. A new diketopiperazine, cyclo-(4-S-hydroxy-R-proline-R-isoleucine), from an Australian specimen of the sponge Stelletta sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovenden, Simon P B; Nielson, Jonathan L; Liptrot, Catherine H; Willis, Richard H; Tapiolas, Dianne M; Wright, Anthony D; Motti, Cherie A

    2011-01-01

    While investigating the cytotoxic activity of the methanol extract of an Australian marine sponge Stelletta sp. (Demospongiae), a new diketopiperazine, cyclo-(4-S-hydroxy-R-proline-R-isoleucine) (1), was isolated together with the known bengamides; A (2), F (3), N (4), Y (5), and bengazoles; Z (6), C(4) (7) and C(6) (8). The isolation and structure elucidation of the diketopiperazine (1), together with the activity of 1-8 against a panel of human and mammalian cell lines are discussed.

  14. DFT study on structure, electronic properties, and reactivity of cis-isomers of [(NC5H4-S)2Fe(CO)2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charles A Mebi

    2011-09-01

    Three cis-isomers of [(NC5H4-S)2Fe(CO)2], models for the active site of [Fe] hydrogenase, have been examined by computational method at DFT B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. The computed geometric parameters are remarkably close to experimental values. DFT global chemical reactivity descriptors (chemical hardness, total energy, electronic chemical potential, and electrophilicity) are calculated for the isomers and used to predict their relative stability and reactivity. The chemical reactivity indices are found to be related to the bond angle defined by the cis carbonyls and the iron center.

  15. Synthesis, anticancer activity and toxicity of a water-soluble 4S,5S-derivative of heptaplatin, cis-{Pt(II)[(4S,5S)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane]·(3-hydroxyl-cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylate)}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Jiang, Jing; Xie, Chengying; Hou, Shuqian; Quan, Haitian; Ye, Qingsong; Lou, Liguang

    2014-11-01

    A water-soluble 4S,5S-derivative of heptaplatin, cis-{Pt(II)[(4S,5S)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane]·(3-hydroxyl-cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylate)} was synthesized. The anticancer activity and toxicity were evaluated by comparing its interaction with DNA, cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines, antitumor efficiency in human gastric carcinoma NCI-N87 xenografts in nude mice, and preliminary side-effects in rats to those of its 4R,5R-optical isomer which is under preclinical development. Both isomers induce condensation of DNA to the same extent and have similar cytotoxicity, but show different antitumor activity and toxicity, probably owing to the difference in respective pharmacokinetic profiles. 4S,5S-Isomer seems to exhibit superior antitumor activity and less toxicity than 4R,5R-optical isomer as well as the parent heptaplatin. These results imply that 4S,5S-configuration as a new drug candidate may be better than 4R,5R-counterpart. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Control of stage by stage changing linear dynamic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barseghyan V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the control problems of linear dynamic systems stage by stage changing and the optimal control with the criteria of quality set for the whole range of time intervals are considered. The necessary and sufficient conditions of total controllability are also stated. The constructive solving method of a control problem is offered, as well as the definitions of conditions for the existence of programmed control and motions. The explicit form of control action for a control problem is constructed. The method for solving optimal control problem is offered, and the solution of optimal control of a specific target is brought.

  17. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Kang, CongBao, E-mail: cbkang@etc.a-star.edu.sg [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  18. UV radiation effects on a DNA repair enzyme: conversion of a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster into a [2Fe-2S] (2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgosa, Filipe; Camacho, Inês; Penas, Daniela; Guilherme, Márcia; Fróis, João; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-03-01

    Organisms are often exposed to different types of ionizing radiation that, directly or not, will promote damage to DNA molecules and/or other cellular structures. Because of that, organisms developed a wide range of response mechanisms to deal with these threats. Endonuclease III is one of the enzymes responsible to detect and repair oxidized pyrimidine base lesions. However, the effect of radiation on the structure/function of these enzymes is not clear yet. Here, we demonstrate the effect of UV-C radiation on E. coli endonuclease III through several techniques, namely UV-visible, fluorescence and Mössbauer spectroscopies, as well as SDS-PAGE and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We demonstrate that irradiation with a UV-C source has dramatic consequences on the absorption, fluorescence, structure and functionality of the protein, affecting its [4Fe-4S] cluster and its DNA-binding ability, which results in its inactivation. An UV-C radiation-induced conversion of the [4Fe-4S](2+) into a [2Fe-2S](2+) was observed for the first time and proven by Mössbauer and UV-visible analysis. This work also shows that the DNA-binding capability of endonuclease III is highly dependent of the nuclearity of the endogenous iron-sulfur cluster. Thus, from our point of view, in a cellular context, these results strengthen the argument that cellular sensitivity to radiation can also be due to loss of radiation-induced damage repair ability.

  19. Inclusive Lambda_c Production in e^+e^- Annihilations at sqrt{s}=10.54 GeV and in Upsilon(4S) Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the total production rates and momentum distributions of the charmed baryon $\\Lambda_c^+$ in $e^+e^- \\to$ hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 10.54 GeV and in $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays. In hadronic events at 10.54 GeV, charmed hadrons are almost exclusively leading particles in $e^+e^- \\to c\\bar{c}$ events, allowing direct studies of $c$-quark fragmentation. We measure a momentum distribution for $\\Lambda_c^+$ baryons that differs significantly from those measured previously for charmed mesons. Comparing with a number of models, we find none that can describe the distribution completely. We measure an average scaled momentum of $\\left = 0.574\\pm$0.009 and a total rate of $N_{\\Lambda c}^{q\\bar{q}} = 0.057\\pm$0.002(exp.)$\\pm$0.015(BF) $\\Lambda_c^+$ per hadronic event, where the experimental error is much smaller than that due to the branching fraction into the reconstructed decay mode, $pK^-\\pi^+$. In $\\Upsilon (4S)$ decays we measure a total rate of $N_{\\Lambda c}^{\\Upsilon} = 0.091\\pm...

  20. The identification of (3R,4S)-5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose-1-phosphate as an intermediate in fluorometabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Mayca; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Deng, Hai; Hamilton, John T G; O'Hagan, David

    2007-10-01

    (3R,4S)-5-Fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose-1-phosphate (5-FDRulP) has been identified as the third fluorinated intermediate on the biosynthetic pathway to fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine in Streptomyces cattleya. 5-FDRulP is generated after formation of 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-FDA) and then phosphorolysis of 5'-FDA to 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate (5-FDRP) by the action of a purine nucleoside phosphorylase. An isomerase mediates the conversion of 5-FDRP to 5-FDRulP. The identity of the (3R,4S) diastereoisomer of 5-FDRulP was established by comparative (19)F{(1)H} NMR studies whereby 5-FDRulP that accumulated in a cell free extract of S. cattleya, was treated with a phytase to generate the non-phosphorylated sugar, 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose (5-FDRul). This S. cattleya product was compared to the product of an in-vitro biotransformation where separately 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-xylose were converted to 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-xylulose respectively by the action of glucose isomerase. It was demonstrated that 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose gave the identical diastereoisomer to that observed from 5-FDRulP.

  1. “科学的社会研究学会(4S)”秘书长施勒姆教授访华

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐超

    1991-01-01

    应北京科技大学和中南工业大学的邀请,“科学的社会研究学会(4S)”秘书长,美国路易斯安娜州立大学社会学系施勒姆(Wesley Shrum)教授于5月4日~28日在华进行了访问和讲学。在华逗留期间,施靹姆教授应邀在北京、长沙、西安和昆明等地作了学术报告。 施勒姆教授向我们介绍了4S学会的情况。“科学的社会研究学会(Society for Social Studies of Science,简称4S)”是一个国际性的学

  2. Reaction between atomic N(4S) and molecular CO at very low temperature: possible formation of HNCO in the Oort cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourry, Sendres; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Krim, Lahouari

    2015-07-01

    Beyond the Kuiper belt, the Oort cloud is characterized by particularly cold temperatures and the absence of energetic particles. Specific chemical processes involving cold radicals may occur in this reservoir of comets. A microwave-driven atomic source can be used to generate cold atomic nitrogen (N (4S)) for reactivity study of ices relevant to the Oort cloud. Without any additional source of energy, atomic nitrogen does not react with CO molecules to form NCO. This is consistent with a previous theoretical investigation carried out by Yazidi et al., who have shown that the potential energy surface for the CO (X1Σ+) + N (4S) system is purely dissociative. On the other hand, a very small amount of water is sufficient to induce a reaction between these two species. This three-body reaction leads to the formation of the HNCO monomer, the (HNCO)(H2O) complex, and the hydroxyl radical. Such reactions, leading to prebiotic molecules, may take place in the Oort cloud and in the Kuiper belt, from which most of the comets come.

  3. The role of the S4-S5 linker and C-terminal tail in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Zachary T; Joseph, Suresh K

    2006-08-25

    In previous studies we have suggested that spatial proximity of the C- and N-terminal domains of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) may be critical for the channel gating mechanism. In the present study we have examined the sites of C-N interaction in more detail. We report that deletion mutations within the S4-S5 linker (amino acids 2418-2437) prevent co-immunoprecipitation of the C- and N-terminal domains, inhibit channel activity and enhance IP(3) binding. We also show that a region of the C-terminal tail (amino acids 2694-2721), predicted to be a coiled-coil, is also required for channel activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and gel filtration studies confirm that this region has a helical structure with the ability to form tetramers. We propose a model in which IP(3)-induced conformational changes in the N-terminal domain are mechanically transmitted to the opening of the pore through an attachment to the S4-S5 linker. The coiled-coil domain in the C-terminal tail may play a critical role in maintaining the structural integrity of the channel.

  4. Pressure-induced low-lying phonon modes softening and enhanced thermal resistance in β -M g2A l4S i5O18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiran; Tian, Zhilin; Luo, Yixiu; Wang, Jiemin; Sun, Luchao; Zheng, Liya; Wang, Jingyang

    2017-02-01

    Lattice thermal conductivities of β -M g2A l4S i5O18 were predicted at various hydrostatic pressures based on some theoretical models. An abnormal decrement on lattice thermal conductivity is observed for compressed crystal structure. A rigorous analysis of structural stability, bonding characteristics, vibration modes, group velocities, and mode Grüneisen parameters helps us to recognize the origin of this anomalous behavior. We attribute the negative dependent trend to the softening of low frequency phonons and strengthening of anharmonicity at elevated pressure, both of which arise from the specific corner-linked tetrahedral framework in the crystal structure. To validate theoretical calculations, we synthesized pure and dense β -M g2A l4S i5O18 ceramic by using a two-step processing method and determined its intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity by successfully eliminating the phonon scattering from defects and high-temperature thermal radiation. The experimental intrinsic values agreed quite well with the theoretical predictions. This paper reports an anomalous pressure-induced reduction of lattice thermal conductivity and also provides a key insight into the interesting phonon modification mechanism through tailoring the crystal structure of complex compounds.

  5. Solvothermal Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a Layered Thioantimonate(Ⅲ) [C4H9NH3]2Sb4S7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An inorganic-organic hybrid thioantimonate(Ⅲ) [CH3(CH2)3NH3]2Sb4S7 1 with layered structure was synthesized by solvothermal method.1 crystallizes in the triclinic system, space group P with a = 7.0124(11), b = 11.919(2), c = 14.879(3) (A), α = 108.791(3), β = 102.441(3), γ = 92.846(2)o, V = 1140.1(3) (A)3, Mr = 859.71, Z = 2, Dc = 2.504 g/cm3, μ= 5.324 mm-1, F(000) = 804, S = 1.013, the final R = 0.0297 and wR = 0.0618 for 3534 observed reflections with I>2σ(I). 1 consists of [C4H9NH3]+ cations and two-dimensional [Sb4S7]n2n-anion which is composed of three SbS3 trigonal pyramids and one SbS4 unit joined by sharing common corners. The anionic layers are stacked perpendicularly to the c axis of the unit cell forming two-dimensional channels between the layers. The [C4H9NH3]+ cations interdigitate in a bilayer and reside in the 2D channels leading to a sandwich-like arrangement of the anion and cations.

  6. A Study of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries and Flavor Oscillations in Neutral B Decays at the Upsilon(4S)

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of 29.7 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ recorded at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance and 3.9 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ off-resonance. One of the neutral B mesons, which are produced in pairs at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$, is fully reconstructed in the CP decay modes $J/\\psi K^0_S$, $\\psi(2S) K^0_S$, $\\chi_{c1} K^0_S$, $J/\\psi K^{*0}$ ($K^{*0}\\to K^0_S\\pi^0$) and $J/\\psi K^0_L$, or in flavor-eigenstate modes involving $D^{(*)}\\pi/\\rho/a_1$ and $J/\\psi K^{*0}$ ($K^{*0}\\to K^+\\pi^-$). The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly with the charge of identified leptons and kaons. The proper time elapsed between the decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. A maximum-likelihood fit to this flavor eigenstate sample finds $\\Delta m_d = 0.516\\pm 0.016 {...

  7. The U{sup 5+} compound Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24}: Synthesis, structure, and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesbah, Adel [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States); ICSM, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule – Bât. 426, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Stojko, Wojciech [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States); Lebègue, Sébastien [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, Résonance Magnétique, et Modélisations CRM2 (UMR UHP-CNRS 7036), Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Malliakas, Christos D. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States); Frazer, Laszlo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3112 (United States); Ibers, James A., E-mail: ibers@chem.northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Black crystals of Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24} have been made by direct combination of BaS, Ag, U, and S at 1273 K. This compound crystallizes in a new structure type in the space group C{sub 4v}{sup 10}−I4cm of the tetragonal system with four formula units in a cell with lattice constants a=13.9189(6) Å and c=23.7641(11) Å (V=4604(5) Å{sup 3}). Multiphoton Luminescence Spectroscopy measurements are consistent with the noncentrosymmetric nature of the structure. In the structure each U atom is octahedrally coordinated by six S atoms, whereas three of the five crystallographically independent Ag atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated to four S atoms, another has a seesaw coordination to four S atoms, and the last has a triangular coordination to three S atoms. The overall structure consists of the three-dimensional stacking of the US{sub 6}, AgS{sub 4}, and AgS{sub 3} polyhedra to leave channels in which Ba atoms reside. Based on the values of the U–S interatomic distances, the compound Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24} contains U{sup 5+} and charge balance is achieved with the formal oxidation states of 9 Ba{sup 2+}, 10 Ag{sup 1+}, 4 U{sup 5+} and 24 S{sup 2−}. DFT calculations predict an antiferromagnetic ground state and a band gap of 2.1 eV. Resistivity measurements indicate that the compound is a semiconductor with a complex activation mechanism and activation energies ranging from 0.03(1) eV to 0.08(1) eV. - Graphical abstract: General view of the Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24} structure. - Highlights: • Black crystals of Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24} have been made by direct combination of BaS, Ag, U, and S at 1273 K. • Ba{sub 9}Ag{sub 10}U{sub 4}S{sub 24} contains U{sup 5+} and charge balance is achieved with 9 Ba{sup 2+}, 10 Ag{sup 1+}, 4 U{sup 5+}, and 24 S{sup 2−}. • DFT calculations predict an antiferromagnetic ground state and a band gap of 2.1 eV. • The compound is a semiconductor with activation energies ranging

  8. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  9. A critical role for the S4-S5 intracellular loop in domain IV of the sodium channel alpha-subunit in fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, J C; Ragsdale, D S; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1998-01-09

    Na+ channel fast inactivation is thought to involve the closure of an intracellular inactivation gate over the channel pore. Previous studies have implicated the intracellular loop connecting domains III and IV and a critical IFM motif within it as the inactivation gate, but amino acid residues at the intracellular mouth of the pore required for gate closure and binding have not been positively identified. The short intracellular loops connecting the S4 and S5 segments in each domain of the Na+ channel alpha-subunit are good candidates for this role in the Na+ channel inactivation process. In this study, we used scanning mutagenesis to examine the role of the IVS4-S5 region in fast inactivation. Mutations F1651A, near the middle of the loop, and L1660A and N1662A, near the COOH-terminal end, substantially disrupted Na+ channel fast inactivation. The mutant F1651A conducted Na+ currents that decayed very slowly, while L1660A and N1662A had large sustained Na+ currents at the end of 30-ms depolarizing pulses. Inactivation of macroscopic Na+ currents was nearly abolished by the N1662A mutation and the combination of the F1651A/L1660A mutations. Single channel analysis revealed frequent reopenings for all three mutants during 40-ms depolarizing pulses, indicating a substantial impairment of the stability of the inactivated state compared with wild type (WT). The F1651A and N1662A mutants also had increased mean open times relative to WT, indicating a slowed rate of entry into the inactivated state. In addition to these effects on inactivation of open Na+ channels, mutants F1651A, L1660A, and N1662A also impaired fast inactivation of closed Na+ channels, as assessed from measurements of the maximum open probability of single channels. The peptide KIFMK mimics the IFM motif of the inactivation gate and provides a test of the effect of mutations on the hydrophobic interaction of this motif with the inactivation gate receptor. KIFMK restores fast inactivation of open

  10. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed? The TNM staging system A staging system is a standard ... cancer – the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging system. The TNM system describes 3 key ...

  11. The Staging of the Turk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bent

    2013-01-01

    An analytical and contextualized presentation of the figure of the Turk on the Danish stage in the 18. century with a specific focus on the interaction between the actual commercial and military circumstances on the one hand and the performative representations on the other hand. How far did the ...

  12. Drama for Classroom and Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Albert and Bertha

    This book with a three-part format contains information which the would-be thespian needs to know for maximum enjoyment and success in stage activities. The first part, "Heritage," traces the history and development of the theater from primitive ritual through the drama of classical Greece and Rome, the Renaissance, and modern Europe and America,…

  13. When science takes centre stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The teachers at 'Science on stage' are not emotionally attached to their chalk. Neither are they are weary old men who sport tweed jackets with elbow-patches and enter into conversation with their blackboards. Actually, 'Science on stage' teachers are far from the cliché of the boring physics teacher who can only inspire yawns from his pupils. Some present the basic principles of mechanics using a bicycle, others explain chemistry with examples from everyday life. The most audacious of them go so far as to explain the Doppler effect by means of a play in which Einstein dreams about jumping cows... These are but a few of the activities and plays that will be shown during the EIROforum1 Science on Stage Festival (organised by 7 European scientific organisations including CERN), to be held from 21 to 25 November at CERN, Geneva. This festival is dedicated to the teaching science in order to make it more attractive. After the first edition 'Physics on Stage' which was held in 2000 at CERN, the laboratory agai...

  14. [Intraoperative staging of colorectal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Iu B; Mel'nikov, O R; Egorenkov, V V; Moiseenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of intraoperative staging of tumor by sentinel node staining with lymphotropic dyes was evaluated in 60 patients with colorectal tumors (colon carcinoma -39, rectal cancer- 21). High sensitivity (84.6% and 87.5%, respectively) and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) for regional lymph node assessment were identified for both colonic and rectal cancer.

  15. Logarithmic temperature dependence of samarium ion valence in the heavy-fermion S mxL a1 -xO s4S b12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiya, Kengo; Miyazaki, Ryoichi; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Yamada, Akira; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Suemitsu, Bunya; Sato, Hideyuki; Aoki, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    We have measured x-ray absorption spectra at the Sm L3 edge to investigate the Sm-ion valence of (S mxL a1 -x) O s4S b12 , in which field-insensitive heavy-fermion behavior appears at low temperatures for x =1 . It has been found that the Sm-ion valance shifts to 2 + with La ion substitution; from v =+2.78 (x =1 ) to v =+2.73 (x =0.2 ) at 10 K. For all x investigated, its temperature dependence shows a logT behavior, indicating that the valence change is caused by "an unconventional Kondo effect" associated with Sm 4 f -electron charge degrees of freedom. Almost x independence of "the associated Kondo temperature" (T˜K=56 ±10 K ) indicates that the Kondo effect has a local nature, attributable to the cage structure of the filled skutterudite.

  16. Wavelengths of the 4s1/2 - 4p3/2 resonance lines in Cu- and Zn-like heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Trabert, E

    2004-03-01

    Using an electron beam ion trap and a high-resolution flat-field spectrometer, the EUV resonance lines 4s{sub 1/2} - 4p{sub 3/2} of the Cu- and Zn-like ions of Os, Bi, Th, and U (Z = 76-92) have been observed and their wavelengths measured. Our experiments remove systematic errors from line blends encountered in earlier work. Our results on Cu-like ions are in good agreement with recent ab initio calculations for all ions that include QED. Our results for Zn-like ions corroborate and extend our earlier findings, but consistently good theoretical values for comparison are lacking.

  17. Branching Fraction for B+ -> pi0 l+ nu, Measured in Upsilon (4S) -> BBbar Events Tagged by B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-06-29

    We report a preliminary branching fraction of (1.80 {+-} 0.37{sub stat.} {+-} 0.23{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} for the charmless exclusive semileptonic B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay, where {ell} can be either a muon or an electron. This result is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 81 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses B{bar B} events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}(X) decays, where X can be either a {gamma} or a {pi}{sup 0} from a D* decay.

  18. On the difficulty of N({sup 4}S) atom recombination to explain the appearance of the pink afterglow in a N{sub 2} flowing discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Sa, P A [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Guerra, V [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-01-07

    The possibility that the pink afterglow (PA) of a flowing nitrogen discharge occurs as a result of recombination of N({sup 4}S) atoms is evaluated and discussed, based on a detailed kinetic model for a microwave discharge and post-discharge. The present simulation shows that the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +},v) states responsible for the emission of the PA cannot be created via an indirect mechanism initiated with atomic recombination. Alternatively, it is indicated that the PA may have its origin in non-resonant vibration-vibration energy-exchange processes between N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v) molecules, which lead to an overpopulation of high levels of the vibrational manifold.

  19. Does Implementation Follow Design? A Case Study of a Workplace Health Promotion Program Using the 4-S Program Design and the PIPE Impact Metric Evaluation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äikäs, Antti Hermanni; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Hirvensalo, Mirja Hannele; Absetz, Pilvikki

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the content of a multiyear market-based workplace health promotion (WHP) program and to evaluate design and implementation processes in a real-world setting. Data was collected from the databases of the employer and the service provider. It was classified using the 4-S (Size, Scope, Scalability, and Sustainability) and PIPE Impact Metric (Penetration, Implementation) models. Data analysis utilized both qualitative and quantitative methods. Program design covered well the evidence-informed best practices except for clear path toward sustainability, cooperation with occupational health care, and support from middle-management supervisors. The penetration rate among participants was high (99%) and majority (81%) of services were implemented as designed. Study findings indicate that WHP market would benefit the use of evidence-based design principles and tendentious decisions to anticipate a long-term implementation process already during the planning phase.

  20. The microstructure and electrical conductivity of mixed-valence TlIn(4)S(5)Cl quaternary compound micro- and nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Deiseroth, Hans-Jörg; Gu, Changzhi; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Huang, Yang; Li, Junjie; Che, Renchao; Wang, Zongli

    2008-05-21

    Quaternary mixed-valence compound TlIn(4)S(5)Cl micro- and nanowires are prepared by partial substitution of chalcogen with halogen starting from a stoichiometric mixture of TlCl, In and S. Their electrical conductivity and gas sensitivity properties are investigated by using standard four-terminal systems. The specific nanowire resistivity is about 10(7) Ω cm and corresponds to the value of a typical undoped semiconductor in air. This resistivity is, however, extremely sensitive to NO(2) (sensitivity about 150) or NH(3), with a rapid response of about 2 s and recovery times. This phenomenon is supposed to be particularly important for future nanodevice applications.

  1. {μ-2-[4-(1,3-Benzothiazol-2-ylphenyl]-2-azapropane-1,3-dithiolato-κ4S,S′:S,S′}bis[tricarbonyliron(I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-yong Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Fe2(C15H12N2S3(CO6], was prepared as an azadithiolatodiiron model for the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The Fe2S2 core adopts a butterfly shape, with each metal having a pseudo square-pyramidal geometry. The N-substituted azadithiolate is μ2-κ4S,S′:S,S′-coordinated to the Fe(CO3 moieties to form two fused six-membered rings with different conformations. The sum of the C—N—C angles around the N atom [356.85 (15°] indicates a flattening of the trigonal–pyramidal geometry about the N atom and an increase in the degree of sp2-hybridization.

  2. Measurement of the B+ --> eta l+ nu and B+ --> eta' l+ nu Branching Fractions using Upsilon(4S)-->BBbar Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev,Y K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of the exclusive charmless semileptonic branching fractions of the B+ --> eta l+ nu and B+ --> eta' l+ nu decays. These measurements are based on 316 fb-1 of data collected at the Y(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector. In events in which the decay of one B meson to a hadronic final state is fully reconstructed, the semileptonic decay of the recoiling B meson is identified by the detection of a charged lepton and an eta or eta'. We measure the branching fraction BR(B+ --> eta l+ nu) = (0.84 +/- 0.27 +/- 0.21) x 10-4, where the first error is statistical and the second one systematic. We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction of BR(B+ --> eta l+ nu) eta' l+ nu) < 1.3 x 10^-4 at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Theoretical photoionization spectra for the Mg-like S4+ Ion in the energy range between the S5+ 4 s and 4 f thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Soung; Kwon, Duck-Hee

    2014-03-01

    The partial and the total photoionization cross sections of the Mg-like S4+ ion, leaving the residual S5+ 3 l and 4 l states from the ground 3 s 2 1 S e and the excited 3 s3 p 3,1 P o initial states, have been calculated for photon energies ranging from the S5+ 4 s to the S5+ 4 f threshold. The complex features appearing in the cross sections represent the tangled autoionizing Rydberg resonances converging to the different S5+ 4 l thresholds. The present results are compared with the available previous National Institute of Standards and Technology(NIST) and Opacity Project(OP) results.

  4. Conformational Chirality of the Biphenyl Groups Induced by the Aggregation of Poly{bis[4-(4'-(S)-2-methylbutoxy)- Biphenoxy] Phosphazene}

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xianhui; LI Baozong; LI Yi; YANG Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Poly{bis[4-(4'-(S)-2-methylbutoxy)biphenyloxy]phosphazene}(PP-C) was designed and successfully synthesized, and then characterized by means of FT-IR spectroscopy,1H- and31P-NMR, GPC spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicated that for PP-C, theMw is 2.18×105 and the PDI is 1.96. PP-C was a kind of crystallized polymer with a crystallizing point of -2.0℃ and a melting point of 28℃. The conformational chirality of the PP-C molecules was studied using circular dichroism spectrum. It was found that in dilute THF solution, the biphenyl groups in the PP-C molecules twisted randomly. However, when the PP-C formed aggregates, the biphenyl groups tended to twist single-handedly, which was controlled by the adjacent chiral alkoxy groups.

  5. Antioxidant effects of betulin on porcine chondrocyte behavior in gelatin/C6S/C4S/HA modified tricopolymer scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Lin, Feng-Huei [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sadhasivam, S., E-mail: rahulsbio@yahoo.co.in [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-10

    The antioxidant effects of betulin on porcine chondrocytes cultured in gelatin/C6S/C4S/HA modified tricopolymer scaffold for a period of 4 weeks was investigated. The porous structure of the scaffold and cell attachment was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Biochemical measures of necrosis, cell proliferation, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) content and extracellular matrix related gene expressions were quantitatively evaluated. The cell proliferation data showed good cellular viability in tricopolymer scaffold and increased optical density for total DNA demonstrated that the cells continued to proliferate inside the scaffold. The sGAG production indicated chondrogenic differentiation. Chondrocytes treated with betulin expressed transcripts encoding type II collagen, aggrecan, and decorin. To conclude, the substantiated results supported cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix proteins and down-regulation of matrix metalloproteases and cytokine, in betulin treated scaffolds.

  6. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder.

  7. L596-W733 bond between the start of the S4-S5 linker and the TRP box stabilizes the closed state of TRPV4 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jinfeng; Loukin, Stephen H; Anishkin, Andriy; Kung, Ching

    2015-03-17

    Unlike other cation channels, each subunit of most transient receptor potential (TRP) channels has an additional TRP-domain helix with an invariant tryptophan immediately trailing the gate-bearing S6. Recent cryo-electron microscopy of TRP vanilloid subfamily, member 1 structures revealed that this domain is a five-turn amphipathic helix, and the invariant tryptophan forms a bond with the beginning of the four-turn S4-S5 linker helix. By homology modeling, we identified the corresponding L596-W733 bond in TRP vanilloid subfamily, member 4 (TRPV4). The L596P mutation blocks bone development in Kozlowski-type spondylometaphyseal dysplasia in human. Our previous screen also isolated W733R as a strong gain-of-function (GOF) mutation that suppresses growth when the W733R channel is expressed in yeast. We show that, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, TRPV4 with the L596P or W733R mutation displays normal depolarization-induced activation and outward rectification. However, these mutant channels have higher basal open probabilities and limited responses to the agonist GSK1016790A, explaining their biological GOF phenotypes. In addition, W733R current fails to inactivate during depolarization. Systematic replacement of W733 with amino acids of different properties produced similar electrophysiological and yeast phenotypes. The results can be interpreted consistently in the context of the homology model of TRPV4 molecule we have developed and refined using simulations in explicit medium. We propose that this bond maintains the orientation of the S4-S5 linker to keep the S6 gate closed. Further, the two partner helices, both amphipathic and located at the polar-nonpolar interface of the inner lipid monolayer, may receive and integrate various physiological stimuli.

  8. A competing hydrophobic tug on L596 to the membrane core unlatches S4-S5 linker elbow from TRP helix and allows TRPV4 channel to open.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jinfeng; Loukin, Stephen H; Anishkin, Andriy; Kung, Ching

    2016-10-18

    We have some generalized physical understanding of how ion channels interact with surrounding lipids but few detailed descriptions on how interactions of particular amino acids with contacting lipids may regulate gating. Here we discovered a structure-specific interaction between an amino acid and inner-leaflet lipid that governs the gating transformations of TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4). Many cation channels use a S4-S5 linker to transmit stimuli to the gate. At the start of TRPV4's linker helix is leucine 596. A hydrogen bond between the indole of W733 of the TRP helix and the backbone oxygen of L596 secures the helix/linker contact, which acts as a latch maintaining channel closure. The modeled side chain of L596 interacts with the inner lipid leaflet near the polar-nonpolar interface in our model-an interaction that we explored by mutagenesis. We examined the outward currents of TRPV4-expressing Xenopus oocyte upon depolarizations as well as phenotypes of expressing yeast cells. Making this residue less hydrophobic (L596A/G/W/Q/K) reduces open probability [Po; loss-of-function (LOF)], likely due to altered interactions at the polar-nonpolar interface. L596I raises Po [gain-of-function (GOF)], apparently by placing its methyl group further inward and receiving stronger water repulsion. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the distance between the levels of α-carbons of H-bonded residues L596 and W733 is shortened in the LOFs and lengthened in the GOFs, strengthening or weakening the linker/TRP helix latch, respectively. These results highlight that L596 lipid attraction counteracts the latch bond in a tug-of-war to tune the Po of TRPV4.

  9. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbelin Julia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation.

  10. Role of an S4-S5 linker lysine in the trafficking of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels IK1 and SK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Heather M; Hamilton, Kirk L; Devor, Daniel C

    2005-11-04

    We have investigated the role of the S4-S5 linker in the trafficking of the intermediate (human (h) IK1) and small (rat SK3) conductance K(+) channels using a combination of patch-clamp, protein biochemical, and immunofluorescence-based techniques. We demonstrate that a lysine residue (Lys(197)) located on the intracellular loop between the S4 and S5 domains is necessary for the correct trafficking of hIK1 to the plasma membrane. Mutation of this residue to either alanine or methionine precluded trafficking of the channel to the membrane, whereas the charge-conserving arginine mutation had no effect on channel localization or function. Immunofluorescence localization demonstrated that the K197A mutation resulted in a channel that was primarily retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, and this could not be rescued by incubation at 27 degrees C. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis revealed that the K197A mutation was overexpressed compared with wild-type hIK1 and that this was due to a greatly diminished rate of channel degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the K197A mutation did not preclude multimer formation. Indeed, the K197A mutation dramatically suppressed expression of wild-type hIK1 at the cell surface. Finally, mutation of this conserved lysine in rat SK3 similarly resulted in a channel that failed to correctly traffic to the plasma membrane. These results are the first to demonstrate a critical role for the S4-S5 linker in the trafficking and/or function of IK and SK channels.

  11. A1152D mutation of the Na+ channel causes paramyotonia congenita and emphasizes the role of DIII/S4-S5 linker in fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Magali; Luce, Sandrine; Sternberg, Damien; Willer, Jean Claude; Fontaine, Bertrand; Tabti, Nacira

    2005-06-01

    Missense mutations in the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel alpha subunit (hSkM1) are responsible for a number of muscle excitability disorders. Among them, paramyotonia congenita (PC) is characterized by episodes of muscle stiffness induced by cold and aggravated by exercise. We have identified a new PC-associated mutation, which substitutes aspartic acid for a conserved alanine in the S4-S5 linker of domain III (A1152D). This residue is of particular interest since its homologue in the rat brain type II Na+ channel has been suggested as an essential receptor site for the fast inactivation particle. To identify the biophysical changes induced by the A1152D mutation, we stably expressed hSkM1 mutant or wild-type (WT) channels in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells, and recorded whole-cell Na+ currents with the patch-clamp technique. Experiments were performed both at 21 and 11 degrees C to better understand the sensitivity to cold of paramyotonia. The A1152D mutation disrupted channel fast inactivation. In comparison to the WT, mutant channels inactivated with slower kinetics and displayed a 5 mV depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of the steady-state. The other noticeable defect of A1152D mutant channels was an accelerated rate of deactivation from the inactivated state. Decreasing temperature by 10 degrees C amplified the differences in channel gating kinetics between mutant and WT, and unveiled differences in both the sustained current and channel deactivation from the open state. Overall, cold-exacerbated mutant defects may result in a sufficient excess of Na+ influx to produce repetitive firing and myotonia. In the light of previous reports, our data point to functional as well as phenotypic differences between mutations of conserved S4-S5 residues in domains II and III of the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel.

  12. Heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyan; Hu, Liejie; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Huili; Tao, Fei; Xie, Huijun; Wang, Shuning

    2016-05-01

    Ferredoxins are small, acidic proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters that are widespread in living organisms. They play key roles as electron carriers in various metabolic processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, fermentation, nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide fixation, and hydrogen production. However, only several kinds of ferredoxins are commercially available now, greatly limiting the investigation of ferredoxin-related enzymes and metabolic processes. Here we describe the heterologous overproduction of 2[4Fe4S]- and [2Fe2S]-type clostridial ferredoxins and [2Fe2S]-type agrobacterial ferredoxin. Adding extra iron and sulfur sources to the medium in combination with using Escherichia coli C41(DE3) harboring pCodonplus and pRKISC plasmids as host greatly enhanced iron-sulfur cluster synthesis in the three ferredoxins. After induction for 12 h in terrific broth and purification by affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, approximately 3.4 mg of streptavidin (Strep)-tagged and 3.7 mg of polyhistidine (His)-tagged clostridial 2[4Fe4S] ferredoxins were obtained from 1 l of culture. Excitingly, after induction for 24 h in terrific broth, around 40 mg of His-tagged clostridial [2Fe2S] and 23 mg of His-tagged agrobacterial [2Fe2S] ferredoxins were purified from 1 l of culture. The recombinant ferredoxins apparently exhibited identical properties and physiological function to native ferredoxins. No negative impact of two different affinity tags on ferredoxin activity was found. In conclusion, we successfully developed a convenient method for heterologous overproduction of the three kinds of ferredoxins with satisfactory yields and activities, which would be very helpful for the ferredoxin-related researches.

  13. Electron excitation cross sections for the 2s(2)2p(3)4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2D(O) (forbidden) and 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P (resonance) transitions in O II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I. D.; Tayal, S. S.; Mclaughlin, Brendan M.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition 4S(O) -- 2S(2)2p(3) 2D(O) (lambda-lambda 3726, 3729) and the first allowed (resonance) transition 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P(lambda-833) in O II. Use is made of electron energy loss and merged-beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 (threshold) to 15 eV for the S -- D transition, and 14.9 (threshold) to 40 eV for the S -- P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the O II beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically backscattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the 4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2P(O) (lambda-2470) transition.

  14. Radiative Transition Quantum Efficiency of 2H11/2, 4S3/2 States of Trivalent Erbium Ion in ZBLAN Glass%ZBLAN玻璃中三价铒离子 2H11/2,4S3/2辐射跃迁的量子效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨栈茨; 黄世华; 吕少哲; 陈宝玖

    2004-01-01

    为了探讨铒离子掺杂材料的激光制冷可能性, 依据测量样品的吸收光谱, 计算了Er3+掺杂的ZBLAN玻璃材料的Judd-Ofelt参数, 得到Ω2=3.01×10-20 cm2, Ω4=1.59×10-20 cm2, Ω6=1.03×10-20 cm2, 进而获得了2H11/2, 4S3/2及其以下各能级间跃迁的跃迁几率、分支比、寿命等数据. 测量了77 K到315 K温度范围内Er3+较强的两个绿色发射2H11/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2的发射谱及荧光寿命. 讨论了2H11/2, 4S3/2这样处于热平衡中的两个能级的量子效率的计算方法, 进而计算了它们的量子效率, 并与其它材料进行了比较.

  15. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, L

    1996-04-15

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does not produce memory deficits. Declarative memory, which is used for the recall of specific facts, is not similarly affected by REM-sleep loss. The learning of procedural motor tasks, including those required in many sports, is impaired by the loss of stage 2 sleep, which occurs primarily in the early hours of the morning. These findings have implications for the academic and athletic performance of students and for anyone whose work involves ongoing learning and demands high standards of performance.

  16. Upper-Stage Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. E.; Boxwell, R.; Crockett, D. V.; Ross, R.; Lewis, T.; McNeal, C.; Verdarame, K.

    1999-01-01

    For propulsion applications that require that the propellants are storable for long periods, have a high density impulse, and are environmentally clean and non-toxic, the best choice is a combination of high-concentration hydrogen peroxide (High Test Peroxide, or HTP) and a liquid hydrocarbon (LHC) fuel. The HTP/LHC combination is suitable for low-cost launch vehicles, space taxi and space maneuvering vehicles, and kick stages. Orbital Sciences Corporation is under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in cooperation with the Air Force Research Lab to design, develop and demonstrate a new low-cost liquid upper stage based on HTP and JP-8. The Upper Stage Flight Experiment (USFE) focuses on key technologies necessary to demonstrate the operation of an inherently simple propulsion system with an innovative, state-of-the-art structure. Two key low-cost vehicle elements will be demonstrated - a 10,000 lbf thrust engine and an integrated composite tank structure. The suborbital flight test of the USFE is scheduled for 2001. Preceding the flight tests are two major series of ground tests at NASA Stennis Space Center and a subscale tank development program to identify compatible composite materials and to verify their compatibility over long periods of time. The ground tests include a thrust chamber development test series and an integrated stage test. This paper summarizes the results from the first phase of the thrust chamber development tests and the results to date from the tank material compatibility tests. Engine and tank configurations that meet the goals of the program are described.

  17. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Dotto, L

    1996-01-01

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does n...

  18. Multi-stage flash degaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  19. Patch stage of mycosis fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavarkar Laxman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapsoriasis is aeon troversial topic. There are many studies regarding the relationship of parapsoriasis to lymphoma but no correlation between histology and clinical appearance. Parapsoriasis satisfies histologic criteria for mycosis fungoides and therefore it should be considered as patch stage of mycosis fungoides. A 30-year-old man presented with scaly skin lesions over the trunk since 4 years. Routine blood and urine investigations were normal. Skin biopsy from the lesion revealed atypical lymphocytes within the epidermis without spongiosis.

  20. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Mouteva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2 in pure oxygen (O2. On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5 samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C

  1. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  2. The Three Stages of Teaching Reading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝禹

    2005-01-01

    If we want to improve our way of teaching, one way is to teach reading in three stages: Pre- reading stage, while-reading stage, and post- reading stage. Each stage has a different goal and deals with different reading strategies. Prereading means before the text is read. In while reading stage, we have looked at the main reading skills: skimming, scanning , reading for detail , drawing inferences about the author's purpose and intention. Post - reading stage mainly focuses on the exploitation of the text. It aims to help the reader understand the content and structure of the text, as well as the author's purpose in writing it.

  3. Frontostriatal Cognitive Staging in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl de la Fuente-Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and behavioural disorders are often encountered in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD. A simple PD-related frontostriatal cognitive dysfunction (PDFCD staging is proposed. Executive dysfunction and mental fatigue (stage I, depression/anxiety (stage IIa, apathy/pain (stage IIb, and dementia (stage III reflect a sequential process of dopamine depletion occurring in different regions of the striatum (stages I and II and the frontal cortex (stage III. In addition to these nonmotor manifestations present in the unmedicated (OFF state, the PDFCD model also predicts a number of complications related to dopaminergic treatment (ON state, from impulse control disorders (stages I and IIa to hallucinations (stage IIb and psychosis (stage III. Although the model admittedly needs further refinements, it provides a framework for hypothesis testing and may help clinicians optimize therapeutic strategies.

  4. Using the World Health Organization's 4S-Framework to Strengthen National Strategies, Policies and Services to Address Mental Health Problems in Adolescents in Resource-Constrained Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral de Mello Meena

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most adolescents live in resource-constrained countries and their mental health has been less well recognised than other aspects of their health. The World Health Organization's 4-S Framework provides a structure for national initiatives to improve adolescent health through: gathering and using strategic information; developing evidence-informed policies; scaling up provision and use of health services; and strengthening linkages with other government sectors. The aim of this paper is to discuss how the findings of a recent systematic review of mental health problems in adolescents in resource-constrained settings might be applied using the 4-S Framework. Method Analysis of the implications of the findings of a systematic search of the English-language literature for national strategies, policies, services and cross-sectoral linkages to improve the mental health of adolescents in resource-constrained settings. Results Data are available for only 33/112 [29%] resource-constrained countries, but in all where data are available, non-psychotic mental health problems in adolescents are identifiable, prevalent and associated with reduced quality of life, impaired participation and compromised development. In the absence of evidence about effective interventions in these settings expert opinion is that a broad public policy response which addresses direct strategies for prevention, early intervention and treatment; health service and health workforce requirements; social inclusion of marginalised groups of adolescents; and specific education is required. Specific endorsed strategies include public education, parent education, training for teachers and primary healthcare workers, psycho-educational curricula, identification through periodic screening of the most vulnerable and referral for care, and the availability of counsellors or other identified trained staff members in schools from whom adolescents can seek assistance for

  5. Study of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries and flavor oscillations in neutral B decays at the Υ(4S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Clark, A. R.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Oddone, P. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Bloom, P.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Laplace, S.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Nief, J. Y.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Grauges, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Colecchia, F.; dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Le Diberder, F.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Lamanna, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Faccini, R.; Christ, S.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Aston, D.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Calderini, G.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Haas, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Quinn, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C. M.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Kordich, T. M.; Neal, H.

    2002-08-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of 29.7 fb-1 recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance and 3.9 fb-1 off resonance. One of the neutral B mesons, which are produced in pairs at the Υ(4S), is fully reconstructed in the CP decay modes J/ψK0S, ψ(2S)K0S, χc1K0S, J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K0Sπ0) and J/ψK0L, or in flavor-eigenstate modes involving D(*)π/ρ/a1 and J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K+π-). The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly with the charge of identified leptons and kaons. A neural network tagging algorithm is used to recover events without a clear lepton or kaon tag. The proper time elapsed between the decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. Wrong-tag probabilities, the time-difference resolution function, and the B0-B0 oscillation frequency Δmd are measured with a sample of about 6350 fully-reconstructed B0 decays in hadronic flavor-eigenstate modes. A maximum-likelihood fit to this flavor eigenstate sample finds Δmd=0.516+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst) ps-1. The value of the asymmetry amplitude sin 2β is determined from a simultaneous maximum-likelihood fit to the time-difference distribution of the flavor-eigenstate sample and about 642 tagged B0 decays in the CP-eigenstate modes. We find sin 2β=0.59+/-0.14(stat)+/-0.05(syst), demonstrating that CP violation exists in the neutral B meson system. We also determine the value of the CP violation parameter |λ|=0.93+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.03(syst), which is consistent with the expectation of |λ|=1 for no direct CP violation.

  6. The influence of the protector thiol L-cystein on the toxic and therapeutic responses of stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamide (4-(S-ethanol)-sulfido-cyclophosphamide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelcker, G; Laber, P; Rockinger, H; Wientzek, C; Hohorst, H J

    1984-01-01

    The influence of L-cystein on the toxic and therapeutic responses of 4-(S-ethanol)-sulfido-cyclophosphamide (P1), a stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamide, was investigated. Stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamides hydrolyze under physiological conditions to 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (4-OH-CP). The antitumor activity of P1 was investigated on a heterotransplanted human bladder sarcoma in nude mice and in perfusion experiments carried out on the isolated tumor bearing limb in rats. Due to its rapid hydrolysis to 4-OH-CP, P1 exhibits severe local toxicity which is decreased by the protector thiol L-cystein. Simultaneous application of double molar amounts of L-cystein reduces toxicity in nude mice to approximately one-third. Therapeutic activity is not affected by this ratio of L-cystein so that the protector thiol increases the therapeutic efficacy of P1. Higher amounts of L-cystein reduce both the acute toxicity in nude mice and the therapeutic efficacy against the human xenograft. The perfusion experiments demonstrate that a P1 concentration necessary to cure rats with tumor bearing limb is only tolerated in combination with L-cystein.

  7. A limited 4 Å radial displacement of the S4-S5 linker is sufficient for internal gate closing in Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Élise; Starek, Greg; McGuire, Hugo; Bernèche, Simon; Blunck, Rikard

    2012-11-16

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for the generation of action potentials in our nervous system. Conformational rearrangements in their voltage sensor domains in response to changes of the membrane potential control pore opening and thus ion conduction. Crystal structures of the open channel in combination with a wealth of biophysical data and molecular dynamics simulations led to a consensus on the voltage sensor movement. However, the coupling between voltage sensor movement and pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, occurs at the cytosolic face of the channel, from where no structural information is available yet. In particular, the question how far the cytosolic pore gate has to close to prevent ion conduction remains controversial. In cells, spectroscopic methods are hindered because labeling of internal sites remains difficult, whereas liposomes or detergent solutions containing purified ion channels lack voltage control. Here, to overcome these problems, we controlled the state of the channel by varying the lipid environment. This way, we directly measured the position of the S4-S5 linker in both the open and the closed state of a prokaryotic Kv channel (KvAP) in a lipid environment using Lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer. We were able to reconstruct the movement of the covalent link between the voltage sensor and the pore domain and used this information as restraints for molecular dynamics simulations of the closed state structure. We found that a small decrease of the pore radius of about 3-4 Å is sufficient to prevent ion permeation through the pore.

  8. PIP₂-dependent coupling is prominent in Kv7.1 due to weakened interactions between S4-S5 and S6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimova, Marina A; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin; Tarek, Mounir

    2015-01-06

    Among critical aspects of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels' functioning is the effective communication between their two composing domains, the voltage sensor (VSD) and the pore. This communication, called coupling, might be transmitted directly through interactions between these domains and, as recently proposed, indirectly through interactions with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP₂), a minor lipid of the inner plasma membrane leaflet. Here, we show how the two components of coupling, mediated by protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions, both contribute in the Kv7.1 functioning. On the one hand, using molecular dynamics simulations, we identified a Kv7.1 PIP₂ binding site that involves residues playing a key role in PIP₂-dependent coupling. On the other hand, combined theoretical and experimental approaches have shown that the direct interaction between the segments of the VSD (S4-S5) and the pore (S6) is weakened by electrostatic repulsion. Finally, we conclude that due to weakened protein-protein interactions, the PIP2-dependent coupling is especially prominent in Kv7.1.

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of the novel BK channel opener GoSlo: involvement of the S4/S5 linker and the S6 segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Timothy I; Kshatri, Aravind Singh; Large, Roddy J; Akande, Adebola Morayo; Roy, Subhrangsu; Sergeant, Gerard P; McHale, Noel G; Thornbury, Keith D; Hollywood, Mark A

    2015-02-17

    GoSlo-SR-5-6 is a novel large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel agonist that shifts the activation V1/2 of these channels in excess of -100 mV when applied at a concentration of 10 μM. Although the structure-activity relationship of this family of molecules has been established, little is known about how they open BK channels. To help address this, we used a combination of electrophysiology, mutagenesis, and mathematical modeling to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of GoSlo-SR-5-6. Our data demonstrate that the effects of this agonist are practically abolished when three point mutations are made: L227A in the S4/S5 linker in combination with S317R and I326A in the S6C region. Our data suggest that GoSlo-SR-5-6 interacts with the transmembrane domain of the channel to enhance pore opening. The Horrigan-Aldrich model suggests that GoSlo-SR-5-6 works by stabilizing the open conformation of the channel and the activated state of the voltage sensors, yet decouples the voltage sensors from the pore gate.

  10. Reinvestigation of the Direct Two-proton Decay of the Long-lived Isomer 94Agm [0.4 s, 6.7 MeV, (21+)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, J.; Moltz, D. M.; Lee, D. W.; Perajarvi, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Grossman, L. E.; Jeong, W.; Jewett, C.

    2009-03-05

    An attempt to confirm the reported direct one-proton and two-proton decays of the (21+) isomer at 6.7(5) MeV in 94Ag has been made. The 0.39(4) s half-life of the isomer permitted use of a helium-jet system to transport reaction products from the 40Ca + natNi reaction at 197 MeV to a low-background area; 24 gas Delta E-(Si) E detector telescopes were used to identify emitted protons down to 0.4 MeV. No evidence was obtained for two-proton radioactivity with a summed energy of 1.9(1) MeV and a branching ratio of 0.5(3)percent. Two groups of one-proton radioactivity from this isomer had also been reported; our data confirm the lower energy group at 0.79(3) MeV with its branching ratio of 1.9(5)percent.

  11. The 4S Law on the Public Opinion on Medicine in Micro-era%浅析微时代涉医舆情微公关4S法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕姗

    2015-01-01

    At present, the rapid development of real-time communication tools has changed the traditional mode of information dissemination, triggered the public relations reform for the network of public opinion crisis. New method for public relations in micro-era of public opinion on medicine can be dug out from aspects of 4S, which is Sociality, Speed, Agenda-Setting and Surround.%当前,即时通信工具的快速发展改变了传统信息传播模式,引发网络舆情危机公关新变革,把握微时代下舆情信息的社交(Sociality)、传播(Speed)、议程设置(Agenda-Setting)和关联(Surround)等突出特性,可以从上述4S方面寻找涉医舆情微公关的新方法。

  12. Progress in biodesulfurization microbes with the specific "4S" pathway%“4S”途径生物脱硫菌的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万涛; 辛星; 闻建平

    2012-01-01

    与传统的加氢脱硫方法相比,采用“4S”专一途径微生物脱除油品中的硫具有成本和操作费用低、反应条件温和、效率高、无需加氢、低碳排放等优势.文章综述了常见生物脱硫菌、近年来生物脱硫微生物的代谢工程研究情况,并对“4S”专一途径脱硫菌的研究方向,即系统生物学和合成生物学,进行了展望.%Compared with the traditional HDS (hydrodesulfurization) method,the specific "4S" sulfur-degradation pathway has great advantages, such as low operating cost, low carbon dioxide emission, mild reaction conditions, high efficiency and no hydrogenation. In this review, the biodesulfurization bacterium and the research progress in metabolic engineering of those microbes in recent years are summarized. The prospect related to systems biology and synthetic biology is put forward as well.

  13. A Process-Based Assessment of Decadal-Scale Surface Temperature Evolutions in the NCAR CCSM4's 25-Year Hindcast Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Chen, Junwen

    2017-04-01

    This study represents an initial effort in the context of the coupled atmosphere-surface climate feedback-response analysis method (CFRAM) to partition the temporal evolution of the global surface temperature from 1981 to 2005 into components associated with individual radiative and non-radiative (dynamical) processes in the NCAR CCSM4's decadal hindcasts. When compared with the observation (ERA-Interim), the CCSM4 is able to predict an overall warming trend as well as the transient cooling occurring during the period 1989-1994. However, while the model captures fairly well the positive contributions of the CO2 and surface albedo change to the temperature evolution, it has an overly strong water vapor effect that dictates the temperature evolution in the hindcast. This is in contrast with the observation where changes in surface dynamics (mainly ocean circulation and heat content change) dominates the actual temperature evolution. Atmospheric dynamics in both the observation and model works against the surface temperature tendency through turbulent and convective heat transport, leading to an overall negative contribution to the evolution of the surface temperature. Impacts of solar forcing and ozone change on the surface temperature change are relatively weak during this period. The magnitude of cloud effect is considerably smaller compared to that in the observation and the spatial distribution of the cloud effect is also significantly different between the two especially over the equatorial Pacific. The value and limitations of this process-based temperature decomposition are discussed.

  14. PIP2-dependent coupling is prominent in Kv7.1 due to weakened interactions between S4-S5 and S6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimova, Marina A.; Zaydman, Mark A.; Cui, Jianmin; Tarek, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    Among critical aspects of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels' functioning is the effective communication between their two composing domains, the voltage sensor (VSD) and the pore. This communication, called coupling, might be transmitted directly through interactions between these domains and, as recently proposed, indirectly through interactions with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a minor lipid of the inner plasma membrane leaflet. Here, we show how the two components of coupling, mediated by protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions, both contribute in the Kv7.1 functioning. On the one hand, using molecular dynamics simulations, we identified a Kv7.1 PIP2 binding site that involves residues playing a key role in PIP2-dependent coupling. On the other hand, combined theoretical and experimental approaches have shown that the direct interaction between the segments of the VSD (S4-S5) and the pore (S6) is weakened by electrostatic repulsion. Finally, we conclude that due to weakened protein-protein interactions, the PIP2-dependent coupling is especially prominent in Kv7.1.

  15. An intersubunit interaction between S4-S5 linker and S6 is responsible for the slow off-gating component in Shaker K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batulan, Zarah; Haddad, Georges A; Blunck, Rikard

    2010-04-30

    Voltage-gated ion channels are controlled by the membrane potential, which is sensed by peripheral, positively charged voltage sensors. The movement of the charged residues in the voltage sensor may be detected as gating currents. In Shaker K(+) channels, the gating currents are asymmetric; although the on-gating currents are fast, the off-gating currents contain a slow component. This slow component is caused by a stabilization of the activated state of the voltage sensor and has been suggested to be linked to ion permeation or C-type inactivation. The molecular determinants responsible for the stabilization, however, remain unknown. Here, we identified an interaction between Arg-394, Glu-395, and Leu-398 on the C termini of the S4-S5 linker and Tyr-485 on the S6 of the neighboring subunit, which is responsible for the development of the slow off-gating component. Mutation of residues involved in this intersubunit interaction modulated the strength of the associated interaction. Impairment of the interaction still led to pore opening but did not exhibit slow gating kinetics. Development of this interaction occurs under physiological ion conduction and is correlated with pore opening. We, thus, suggest that the above residues stabilize the channel in the open state.

  16. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, Congbao

    2010-12-03

    The human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  17. Kv channel gating requires a compatible S4-S5 linker and bottom part of S6, constrained by non-interacting residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, Alain J; Raes, Adam L; Grottesi, Alessandro; Van Hoorick, Diane; Sansom, Mark S P; Snyders, Dirk J

    2008-12-01

    Voltage-dependent K(+) channels transfer the voltage sensor movement into gate opening or closure through an electromechanical coupling. To test functionally whether an interaction between the S4-S5 linker (L45) and the cytoplasmic end of S6 (S6(T)) constitutes this coupling, the L45 in hKv1.5 was replaced by corresponding hKv2.1 sequence. This exchange was not tolerated but could be rescued by also swapping S6(T). Exchanging both L45 and S6(T) transferred hKv2.1 kinetics to an hKv1.5 background while preserving the voltage dependence. A one-by-one residue substitution scan of L45 and S6(T) in hKv1.5 further shows that S6(T) needs to be alpha-helical and forms a "crevice" in which residues I422 and T426 of L45 reside. These residues transfer the mechanical energy onto the S6(T) crevice, whereas other residues in S6(T) and L45 that are not involved in the interaction maintain the correct structure of the coupling.

  18. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabuig-Navarro, M. V.; Jackson, K. G.; Kemp, C. F.; Leake, D. S.; Walden, C. M.; Lovegrove, J. A.; Minihane, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4–6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482. PMID:28276521

  19. Nitrosylation of Nitric-Oxide-Sensing Regulatory Proteins Containing [4Fe-4S] Clusters Gives Rise to Multiple Iron-Nitrosyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Pauline N.; Wang, Hongxin; Crack, Jason; Prior, Christopher; Hutchings, Matthew; Thompson, Andrew; Kamali, Seed; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael; Alp, Ercan E.; Oganesyan, Vasily; Le Brun, Nick

    2016-11-14

    The reaction of protein-bound iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters with nitric oxide (NO) plays key roles in NO-mediated toxicity and signaling. Elucidation of the mechanism of the reaction of NO with DNA regulatory proteins that contain Fe-S clusters has been hampered by a lack of information about the nature of the iron-nitrosyl products formed. Herein, we report nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations that identify NO reaction products in WhiD and NsrR, regulatory proteins that use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense NO. This work reveals that nitrosylation yields multiple products structurally related to Roussin's Red Ester (RRE, [Fe2(NO)4(Cys)2]) and Roussin's Black Salt (RBS, [Fe4(NO)7S3]. In the latter case, the absence of 32S/34S shifts in the Fe−S region of the NRVS spectra suggest that a new species, Roussin's Black Ester (RBE), may be formed, in which one or more of the sulfide ligands is replaced by Cys thiolates.

  20. An Ac transposon system based on maize chromosome 4S for isolating long-distance-transposed Ac tags in the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Li, Zhaoying; Fan, Jun; Li, Pengfei; Hu, Wei; Wang, Gang; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2010-12-01

    Transposon tagging is an important tool for gene isolation and functional studies. In maize, several transposon-tagging systems have been developed, mostly using Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) and Mutator systems. Here, we establish another Ac-based transposon system with the donor Ac tightly linked with sugary1 (su1) on maize chromosome 4S. Newly transposed Ac (tr-Acs) were detected based on a negative dosage effect, and long-distance-transposed Ac events were identified and isolated from the donor Ac by a simple backcross scheme. In this study, we identified 208 independent long-distance-transposed Ac lines. Thirty-one flanking sequences of these tr-Acs were isolated and localized in the maize genome. As found in previous studies, the tr-Acs preferentially inserted into genic sequences. The distribution of tr-Acs is not random. In our study, the tr-Acs preferentially transposed into chromosomes 1, 2, 9 and 10. We discuss the preferential distribution of tr-Acs from Ac systems. Our system is complementary to two other Ac-based regional-mutagenesis systems in maize, and the combined use of these systems will achieve an even and high-density distribution of Ac elements throughout the maize genome for functional-genomics studies.

  1. Photoconductivity of amorphous GexAsxSe1-2x and (As4S3Se3)1-xSnx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaseniuc, O. V.; Iovu, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic selenide glasses are well known as high photosensitive materials with a wide range of application in optoelectronics and information storage systems. Besides, it was found that the impurities influence the electrical and photoelectrical characteristics of the amorphous material, due to the changes in the density of localized states. Introduction of the elements of IV group of periodic table in selenide and sulphide glasses, such as Sn and Ge, conduct to the appearance of tetrahedral structural units in the base glass, which change the coordination number. These particularities lead on non-monotonous dependence of physical properties on the glass composition. Besides that, recently it was established, that in the disordered network of glassy system GexAsxSe1-2x exists three distinct phases, floppy, intermediate and stressed rigid, and the dependence of physical properties of the average coordination number Z. In the present paper the experimental results on steady-state photoconductivity of amorphous GexAsxSe1-2x and (As4S3Se3)1-xSnx thin films are presented and discusses. It was shown, that the spectral distribution of the stationary photoconductivity for both glass systems depends on the composition and polarity on the illuminated electrode. The experimental results are discussed in terms of multiple trapping model for amorphous materials, with exponential distribution of localized states in the band gap.

  2. Single conversion stage amplifier - SICAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2005-12-15

    This Ph.D. thesis presents a thorough analysis of the so called SICAM - SIngle Converter stage AMplifier approach to building direct energy conversion audio power amplifiers. The mainstream approach for building isolated audio power amplifiers today consists of isolated DC power supply and Class D amplifier, which essentially represents a two stage solution, where each of the components can be viewed as separate and independent part. The proposed SICAM solution strives for direct energy conversion from the mains to the audio output, by dedicating the operation of the components one to another and integrating their functions, so that the final audio power amplifier represents a single-stage topology with higher efficiency, lower volume, less board space, lower component count and subsequently lower cost. The SICAM approach is both applicable to non-isolated and isolated audio power amplifiers, but the problems encountered in these two cases are different. Non-isolated SICAM solutions are intended for both AC mains-connected and battery-powered devices. In non-isolated mains-connected SICAMs the main idea is to simplify the power supply or even provide integrated power factor correction (PFC) functions, while still maintaining low component stress and good audio performance by generally decreasing the input voltage level to the Class D audio power amplifier. On the other hand, non-isolated battery-powered SICAMs have to cope with the ever changing battery voltage and provide output voltage levels which are both lower and higher than the battery voltage, while still being simple and single-stage energy conversion solutions. In isolated SICAMs the isolation transformer adjusts the voltage level on the secondary side to the desired level, so the main challenges here are decreasing the size of the magnetic core and reducing the number and size of bulky reactive components as much as possible. The main focus of this thesis is directed towards the isolated SICAMs and

  3. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  4. Small Stage,big Charm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a world where bigger is often seen as better, entertainment, especially the world of theater, has gone full circle and returned to smaller, more cozy productions that allow both the directors and the audience more freedom of interpretation and expression. Established in 1953, the Beijing People’s Art Theater on the northern end of Wangfujing Street, Beijing’s most popular pedestrian-only commercial street, has a colorful past, cataloguing a stream of trends, thoughts and ideas on stage for 55 years. In 1995, a new concept in theater was introduced in. The former canteen of the Beijing People’s Art Theater was changed into a smaller theater.

  5. Morphogenesis of early stage melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Clément; Amar, Martine Ben

    2015-08-01

    Melanoma early detection is possible by simple skin examination and can insure a high survival probability when successful. However it requires efficient methods for identifying malignant lesions from common moles. This paper provides an overview first of the biological and physical mechanisms controlling melanoma early evolution, and then of the clinical tools available today for detecting melanoma in vivo at an early stage. It highlights the lack of diagnosis methods rationally linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic properties of the tissue, which define the malignancy of the tumor. The possible inputs of multiscale models for improving these methods are shortly discussed.

  6. [Initial stages of steel biocorrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigletsova, S K; Rodin, V B; Kobelev, V S; Aleksandrova, N V; Rasulova, G E; Kholodenko, V P

    2000-01-01

    Initial stages of corrosion of mild steel induced by Klebsiela rhinoscleromatis BO2 were studied in various media. The effect of the microorganism was detected 8-10 h after inoculation. The number of viable cells were virtually unchanged within one month in all media, but the corrosive activity of the strain decreased. The corrosive activity of microorganisms can be determined by spectrophotometry even only after incubation for 24 h. At a low level of organic substrate, even strong colonization with microorganisms does not inevitably result in a significant damage to metals.

  7. Abstracts: Papers to be Presented at the Joint Conference for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents about 200 abstracts of papers presented at the joint conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988. (YP)

  8. Natural occurrence of tenuazonic acid and Phoma sorghina in Brazilian sorghum grains at different maturity stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo C; Goncalves, Sarah S; Oliveira, Mauricio S; Dilkin, Paulo; Mallmann, Carlos A; Freitas, Rogerio S; Bianchi, Priscilla; Correa, Benedito

    2017-09-01

    A survey of 100 samples of sorghum grains was carried out to determine Phoma spp. and tenuazonic acid (TA) contamination using molecular tools and LC-MS/MS. Sorghum samples were obtained at the following four grain maturity stages: milk (S1), soft dough (S2), hard dough (S3), and physiological maturity (S4). The results revealed a good correlation between Phoma and TA occurrence during grain development. The samples showed Phoma contamination with frequencies ranging from 2.4% (S1) to 87.4% (S4), and the molecular identification revealed P. sorghina as the only Phoma specie isolated. Tenuazonic acid was found in sorghum grains at all maturity stages. In S2, S3 and S4, 100% of the samples showed TA contamination with levels ranging from 20 to 1234µg/kg. Low levels of TA were detected in 36% of the samples collected at S1 stage. This is the first report of tenuazonic acid in Brazilian sorghum grains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthsis of(3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid%(3 S,4 S)-4-氨基-3-羟基-6-甲基庚酸的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金瑛; 张天一; 刘帆

    2015-01-01

    (3S,4S)-4-(Dibenzylamino)-3-hydroxy-6-methyl-heptanoic acid was synthesized from L-Leucine by protection of amino and carboxyl group to give( S)-2-( dibenzylamino)-4-methylbenzyl valerate,which was subjected to nucleophilic substitution with acetontrile and stereoselective reduction with NaBH4 to afford(3S,4S)-4-(dibenzylamino)-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanenitrile,fol-lowed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide to give(3S,4S)-4-(dibenzylamino)-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid. Finally,depro-tection of benzyl group in presence of Pd(OH)2/C-H2 to achieve(3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid in an overall yield of about 33. 6%.%价廉易得的L-亮氨酸先以苄基同时保护氨基及羧基得( S)-2-(二苄胺基)-4-甲基戊酸苄酯,进而在碱性条件下与乙腈发生亲核取代反应得( S)-4-(二苄胺基)-6-甲基-3-氧代庚腈,再经硼氢化钠选择性还原羰基得(3S,4S)-4-(二苄胺基)-3-羟基-6-甲基庚腈,用双氧水氧化得(3S,4S)-4-(二苄胺基)-3-羟基-6-甲基庚酸,最后在Pd(OH)2/C-H2作用下脱掉苄基得到(3S,4S)-4-氨基-3-羟基-6-甲基庚酸,即(3S,4S)-statine。整个合成路线总产率为33.6%。

  10. A simplified staging system based on the radiological findings in different stages of ochronotic spondyloarthropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Jebaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a group of 26 patients with ochronotic spondyloarthropathy who were on regular treatment and follow-up at a tertiary level hospital and proposes a simplified staging system for ochronotic spondyloarthropathy based on radiographic findings seen in the thoracolumbar spine. This proposed classification makes it easy to identify the stage of the disease and start the appropriate management at an early stage. Four progressive stages are described: an inflammatory stage (stage 1, the stage of early discal calcification (stage 2, the stage of fibrous ankylosis (stage 3, and the stage of bony ankylosis (stage 4. To our knowledge, this is the largest reported series of radiological description of spinal ochronosis, and emphasizes the contribution of the spine radiograph in the diagnosis and staging of the disease.

  11. Turbine Stages with Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. K. Ng

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the flow inside the multi-stage turbomachines will be very useful to both the designer and operator. The numerical calculation for single blade row has been well established with the time marching computation of the Navier-Stokes equations. But there will exist much more difficulties for the multi-blade rows due to the rotor-stator interaction. The major problems are related to the unsteady flow which will inevitably exist in the blade passages due to the different rotating speed and possible the different in blade number. A method is presented for simulating various turbine blade rows in single-stage environment. A solver has been developed for studying the complex flow analysis of ‘proposed high pressure turbine’ (HPT using quasi-3-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (Q3D RNS equations. The code achieves good quality solutions quickly even with relatively coarse mesh sizes. The work is first validated both with UTRC's and Zeschky and Gallus' subsonic turbine test cases covering inlet boundary conditions and Reynolds-averaged values. A H-type grid is adopted as it is easy to generate and can readily extend to 3D application. When rows are closely spaced, there can be a strong interaction which will impact the aerodynamic, thermal and structural performance of the blade.

  12. Composites for Exploration Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, J. C.; Jackson, J. R.; Richardson, S. W.; Thomas, A. D.; Mann, T. O.; Miller, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Composites for Exploration Upper Stage (CEUS) was a 3-year, level III project within the Technology Demonstration Missions program of the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate. Studies have shown that composites provide important programmatic enhancements, including reduced weight to increase capability and accelerated expansion of exploration and science mission objectives. The CEUS project was focused on technologies that best advanced innovation, infusion, and broad applications for the inclusion of composites on future large human-rated launch vehicles and spacecraft. The benefits included near- and far-term opportunities for infusion (NASA, industry/commercial, Department of Defense), demonstrated critical technologies and technically implementable evolvable innovations, and sustained Agency experience. The initial scope of the project was to advance technologies for large composite structures applicable to the Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) by focusing on the affordability and technical performance of the EUS forward and aft skirts. The project was tasked to develop and demonstrate critical composite technologies with a focus on full-scale materials, design, manufacturing, and test using NASA in-house capabilities. This would have demonstrated a major advancement in confidence and matured the large-scale composite technology to a Technology Readiness Level 6. This project would, therefore, have bridged the gap for providing composite application to SLS upgrades, enabling future exploration missions.

  13. Radiographic and functional results in the treatment of early stages of Charcot neuroarthropathy with a walker boot and immediate weight bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Candida Ribeiro Parisi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most common gold standards for the treatment of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN in the early Eichenholtz stages I and II is immobilization with the total contact casting and lower limb offloading. However, the total amount of offloading is still debatable. Objectives: This study evaluates the clinical and radiographic findings in the treatment of early stages of CN (Eichenholtz stages I and II with a walker boot and immediate total weight-bearing status. Methods: Twenty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and CN of Eichenholtz stages I and II were selected for non-operative treatment. All patients were educated about their condition, and full weight bearing was allowed as tolerated. Patients were monitored on a fortnightly basis in the earlier stages, with clinical examination, temperature measurement, and standardized weight-bearing radiographs. Their American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scores were determined before and after the treatment protocol. Results: No cutaneous ulcerations or infections were observed in the evaluated cases. The mean measured angles at the beginning and end of the study, although showing relative increase, did not present a statistically significant difference (p > 0.05. Mean AOFAS scores showed a statistically significant improvement by the end of the study (p < 0.005. Conclusion: The treatment of early stages of CN (Eichenholtz stages I and II with emphasis on walker boot and immediate weight bearing has shown a good functional outcome, non-progressive deformity on radiographic assessment, and promising results as a safe treatment option.

  14. An Analysis of Kohlberg's "Stage 4 1/2" within an Enhanced Framework of Moral Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnameier, Gerhard

    This paper discusses a well-known problem of stage categorization within Kohlberg's theory of moral stages (L. Kohlberg, 1973), that of "Stage 4 1/2." Some subjects previously scored at stage 4 in Kohlberg's framework took on some characteristics of stage 2 reasoning, which suggested the possibility of regression. To reconcile this…

  15. Spin Crossover in Dinuclear N4S2 Iron(II) Thioether-Triazole Complexes: Access to [HS-HS], [HS-LS], and [LS-LS] States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ross W; Feltham, Humphrey L C; Miller, Reece G; Brooker, Sally

    2016-05-01

    Access to a new family of thioether-linked PSRT ligands, 4-substituted-3,5-bis{[(2-pyridylmethyl)sulfanyl]methyl}-4H-1,2,4-triazoles (analogues of the previously studied amino-linked PMRT ligands), has been established. Four such ligands have been prepared, PSPhT, PS(i)BuT, PS(t-Bu)PhT, and PS(Me)PhT, with R = Ph, (i)Bu, (t-Bu)Ph, and (Me)Ph, respectively. Three dinuclear colorless to pale green iron(II) complexes, [Fe(II)2(PSRT)2](BF4)4·solvent, featuring N4S2 donor sets, were prepared. Single-crystal structure determinations on [Fe(II)2(PSPhT)2](BF4)4·2MeCN·H2O, [Fe(II)2(PSPhT)2](BF4)4·2(1)/2MeCN·(1)/2H2O·THF, [Fe(II)2(PS(Me)PhT)2](BF4)4·2MeCN, and [Fe(II)2(PS(i)BuT)2](BF4)4·4MeCN reveal that all four are stabilized in the [HS-HS] state to 100 K and that both possible binding modes of the bis-terdentate ligands, cis- and trans-axial, are observed. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies of air-dried crystals (solvatomorphs of the single crystal samples) reveal the first examples of spin crossover (SCO) for a dinuclear iron(II) complex with N4S2 coordination. Specifically, [Fe(II)2(PSPhT)2](BF4)4·2(1)/2H2O undergoes a multistep but complete SCO from [HS-HS] to [LS-LS], whereas [Fe(II)2(PS(Me)PhT)2](BF4)4·1(1)/2MeCN·2H2O exhibits a half-SCO from [HS-HS] to [HS-LS]. In contrast, [Fe(II)2(PS(i)BuT)2](BF4)4·MeCN·H2O remains [HS-HS] down to 50 K. The reflectance spectrum of pale green [Fe(II)2(PSPhT)2](BF4)4·(1)/2CHCl3·2(1)/2H2O (solvatomorph A) reveals a trace of LS character (572 nm band (1)A1g → (1)T1g). Evans' (1)H NMR method and UV-vis spectroscopy studies revealed that on cooling dark green acetonitrile solutions of these complexes from 313 to 233 K, all three undergo SCO centered at or near room temperature. The tendency of the complexes to go LS in solution reflects the electronic impact of R on the σ-donor strength of the PSRT ligand, whereas the opposite trend in stabilization of the LS state is seen in the solid state, where

  16. Global triplet potential energy surfaces for the N2(X(1)Σ) + O((3)P) → NO(X(2)Π) + N((4)S) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Varga, Zoltan; Song, Guoliang; Paukku, Yuliya; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-01-14

    This work presents two global triplet potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the high-energy reaction N2(X(1)Σ) + O((3)P) → NO(X(2)Π) + N((4)S)-in particular, for the lowest energy (3)A' and (3)A″ PESs. In order to obtain the energies needed for fitting analytic surfaces, we carried out multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations based on wave functions obtained from state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field calculations for 2280 geometries for the three lowest (3)A″ states and for 2298 geometries for the three lowest (3)A' states. The lowest-energy (3)A' and (3)A″ states at each of these geometries were then improved by applying the dynamically scaled external correlation (DSEC) method to all MRCI points, and the resulting DSEC energies were used for construction of the ground-state PES for each symmetry. The many-body component of the DSEC energies for the three-dimensional (3)A' and (3)A″ PESs was then least-squares fitted in terms of permutationally invariant polynomials in mixed exponential-Gaussian bond order variables. The global and local minima as well as the transition structures of both the (3)A' and the (3)A″ analytic PES were explored. In agreement with previous work, we find that the reverse reaction is barrierless on the (3)A″ surface along the minimum energy pathway. However, we have explored several new local minima and transition structures on the (3)A' PES. Furthermore, based on the newly found minima and transition structures, two independent reaction mechanisms have been illustrated for the reaction path on the (3)A' PES. The analytic surfaces may be used for dynamics calculations of electronically adiabatic reactive scattering and energy transfer.

  17. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S., E-mail: vlebedev@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular (l = vertical bar m vertical bar = n–1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ∼ n–1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau–Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li(nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n–1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l (l ≪ n)

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of amino-terminal and S4-S5 loop HERG channel mutants under steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Ron, Carlos; de la Peña, Pilar; Miranda, Pablo; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2008-05-15

    Gating kinetics and underlying thermodynamic properties of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were studied using protocols able to yield true steady-state kinetic parameters. Channel mutants lacking the initial 16 residues of the amino terminus before the conserved eag/PAS region showed significant positive shifts in activation voltage dependence associated with a reduction of z(g) values and a less negative DeltaG(o), indicating a deletion-induced displacement of the equilibrium toward the closed state. Conversely, a negative shift and an increased DeltaG(o), indicative of closed-state destabilization, were observed in channels lacking the amino-terminal proximal domain. Furthermore, accelerated activation and deactivation kinetics were observed in these constructs when differences in driving force were considered, suggesting that the presence of distal and proximal amino-terminal segments contributes in wild-type channels to specific chemical interactions that raise the energy barrier for activation. Steady-state characteristics of some single point mutants in the intracellular loop linking S4 and S5 helices revealed a striking parallelism between the effects of these mutations and those of the amino-terminal modifications. Our data indicate that in addition to the recognized influence of the initial amino-terminus region on HERG deactivation, this cytoplasmic region also affects activation behavior. The data also suggest that not only a slow movement of the voltage sensor itself but also delaying its functional coupling to the activation gate by some cytoplasmic structures possibly acting on the S4-S5 loop may contribute to the atypically slow gating of HERG.

  19. Hypokalemia-induced long QT syndrome with an underlying novel missense mutation in S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Shimizu, W; Kamakura, S; Horie, M

    2000-09-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is caused by mutations in at least five genes coding for cardiac potassium or sodium channels that regulate the duration of ventricular action potentials. Acquired LQTS often is associated with drugs or metabolic abnormalities. A 47-year-old woman who presented with marked QT prolongation (QTc = 620 msec(1/2)) and repeated episodes of torsades de pointes associated with hypokalemia (2.6 mEq/L) was screened for mutations in LQTS genes using polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP). We identified a novel missense mutation in the intracellular linker of S4-S5 domains of KCNQ1, resulting in an amino acid substitution of cysteine for arginine at position 259 (R259C). Whole cell, patch clamp experiments were conducted on COS7 cells transfected with wild-type and/or R259C KCNQ1 with or without KCNE1. Functional analyses of the mutant KCNQ1 subunit on COS7 cells revealed its functional channels in the homozygous state, producing a significantly smaller current than the KCNQ1 channels and a less severe dominant-negative effect on I(Ks). The novel KCNQ1 mutation R259C is the molecular basis for I(Ks) dysfunction underlying an apparently sporadic case of hypokalemia-induced LQTS, consistent with a mild mutation likely to disclose the clinical manifestation of LQTS in a context of severe hypokalemia. Our findings suggest that gene carriers with such mild mutations might not be so rare as commonly expected in patients with acquired LQTS, and stress the importance of mutational analysis for detecting either "silent" forms of congenital LQTS or de novo mutations.

  20. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4 s 2) and Sr(5 s 2) atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular ( l = | m| = n-1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ~ n-1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau-Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li( nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n-1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4 s 2) and Sr(5 s 2) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l ( l ≪ n).

  1. Rovibrational internal energy transfer and dissociation of N2(1Σg+)-N(4S(u)) system in hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesi, Marco; Jaffe, Richard L; Schwenke, David W; Magin, Thierry E

    2013-01-28

    A rovibrational collisional model is developed to study energy transfer and dissociation of N(2)((1)Σ(g)(+)) molecules interacting with N((4)S(u)) atoms in an ideal isochoric and isothermal chemical reactor. The system examined is a mixture of molecular nitrogen and a small amount of atomic nitrogen. This mixture, initially at room temperature, is heated by several thousands of degrees Kelvin, driving the system toward a strong non-equilibrium condition. The evolution of the population densities of each individual rovibrational level is explicitly determined via the numerical solution of the master equation for temperatures ranging from 5000 to 50,000 K. The reaction rate coefficients are taken from an ab initio database developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The macroscopic relaxation times, energy transfer rates, and dissociation rate coefficients are extracted from the solution of the master equation. The computed rotational-translational (RT) and vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation times are different at low heat bath temperatures (e.g., RT is about two orders of magnitude faster than VT at T = 5000 K), but they converge to a common limiting value at high temperature. This is contrary to the conventional interpretation of thermal relaxation in which translational and rotational relaxation timescales are assumed comparable with vibrational relaxation being considerable slower. Thus, this assumption is questionable under high temperature non-equilibrium conditions. The exchange reaction plays a very significant role in determining the dynamics of the population densities. The macroscopic energy transfer and dissociation rates are found to be slower when exchange processes are neglected. A macroscopic dissociation rate coefficient based on the quasi-stationary distribution, exhibits excellent agreement with experimental data of Appleton et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 48, 599-608 (1968)]. However, at higher temperatures, only about 50% of dissociation is found to

  2. Stages in the research process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelling, Leslie

    2015-03-01

    Research should be conducted in a systematic manner, allowing the researcher to progress from a general idea or clinical problem to scientifically rigorous research findings that enable new developments to improve clinical practice. Using a research process helps guide this process. This article is the first in a 26-part series on nursing research. It examines the process that is common to all research, and provides insights into ten different stages of this process: developing the research question, searching and evaluating the literature, selecting the research approach, selecting research methods, gaining access to the research site and data, pilot study, sampling and recruitment, data collection, data analysis, and dissemination of results and implementation of findings.

  3. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  4. Interconnected Levels of Multi-Stage Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette; Geersbro, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    different levels of multi-stage marketing and illustrates these stages with a case study. In addition, a triadic perspective is introduced as an analytical tool for multi-stage marketing research. The results from the case study indicate that multi-stage marketing exists on different levels. Thus, managers...... in a multi-stage marketing context. This understanding assists managers in assessing and balancing different aspects of multi- stage marketing. The triadic perspective also offers avenues for further research.......Multi-stage marketing gains increasing attention as knowledge of and influence on the customer's customer become more critical for the firm's success. Despite this increasing managerial relevance, systematic approaches for analyzing multi-stage marketing are still missing. This paper conceptualizes...

  5. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  6. Interconnected Levels of Multi-Stage Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette; Geersbro, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    must not only decide in general on the merits of multi-stage marketing for their firm, but must also decide on which level they will engage in multi-stage marketing. The triadic perspective enables a rich and multi-dimensional understanding of how different business relationships influence each other......Multi-stage marketing gains increasing attention as knowledge of and influence on the customer's customer become more critical for the firm's success. Despite this increasing managerial relevance, systematic approaches for analyzing multi-stage marketing are still missing. This paper conceptualizes...... different levels of multi-stage marketing and illustrates these stages with a case study. In addition, a triadic perspective is introduced as an analytical tool for multi-stage marketing research. The results from the case study indicate that multi-stage marketing exists on different levels. Thus, managers...

  7. The New Lung Cancer Staging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank C. Detterbeck,MD, FCCP; Daniel J. Boffa, MD; Lynn T, Tanoue, MD, FCCP

    2009-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) has conducted an extensive initiative to inform the revision of the lung cancer staging system. This involved development of an international database along with extensive analysis of a large population of patients and their prognoses. This article reviews the recommendations of the IASLC International Staging Committee for the definitions for the TNM descriptors and the stage grouping in the new non-small cell lung cancer staging system.

  8. Two Stage Gear Tooth Dynamics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    cordi - tions and associated iteration prooedure become more complex. This is due to both the increased number of components and to the time for a...solved for each stage in the two stage solution . There are (3 + ntrrber of planets) degrees of freedom fcr eacb stage plus two degrees of freedom...should be devised. It should be noted that this is not minor task. In general, each stage plus an input or output shaft will have 2 times (4 + number

  9. [Develpment of sleep stages in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Lorena Teresinha Consalter

    2007-01-01

    With the perspective of describing some aspects of the ontogenesis and organization of the sleep stages during the first year of life, a literature review was carried out to assess the physiological and behavioral alterations controlled by changes occurring during sleep at this developmental stage. In addition, based on the sleep preceding theory the stages of differentiation, classification and time organization of sleep stages are presented, aiming at the favorable management of environmental events that affect the organization of infant sleep.

  10. Between Stage and Screen : Ingmar Bergman Directs

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Törnqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio productions. In the prologue Bergman's spiritual and aesthetic heritage and his position in the twentieth century media landscape is outlined. In the epilogue the question is answered to what extent one ...

  11. TNM Staging of Colorectal Cancer Should be Reconsidered According to Weighting of the T Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yi, Cheng-Hao; Hu, Ye-Ting; Li, Jin-Song; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Zheng, Shu; Ding, Ke-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The gradient monotonicity of existing tumor, node, metastases staging systems for colorectal cancer is unsatisfactory. Our proposed T-plus staging system strengthens weighting of the T stage. In this study, applicability of the T-plus staging system was verified with data of a Chinese colorectal cancer center. Records of 2080 nonmetastatic, advanced cancer patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery from 1985 to 2011 were reviewed for T, N stage pathology and follow-up information. Using overall and disease-specific survival data, the 7th edition tumor, node, metastases staging system and the T-plus staging system were compared for stage homogeneity and discrimination and gradient monotonicity. For gradient monotonicity, the T-plus staging system was superior for both colon and rectal cancer. With Kaplan–Meier survival curves, the T-plus staging system discriminated among different stages, and the corresponding survival was inversely associated with the stage. However, for the 7th edition tumor, node, metastases staging system, stage IIIa had a better prognosis than stage II for rectal cancer and stage I for colon cancer. For homogeneity within the same stage and discrimination between different stages, the 2 staging systems were similar for colorectal cancer, but the T-plus system was clearly better for colon cancer. The T-plus staging system provides good gradient monotonicity. For future colorectal cancer staging systems, we propose replacement of lymph node status as the criterion to discriminate colorectal cancer stage II and stage III with greater weighting of the T stage. PMID:26871810

  12. Structure of C42D Azotobacter vinelandii FdI. A Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motif ligates an air-stable [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y S; Bonagura, C A; Tilley, G J; Gao-Sheridan, H S; Armstrong, F A; Stout, C D; Burgess, B K

    2000-11-24

    All naturally occurring ferredoxins that have Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motifs contain [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that can be easily and reversibly converted to [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In contrast, ferredoxins with unmodified Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motifs assemble [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that cannot be easily interconverted with [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In this study we changed the central cysteine of the Cys(39)-X-X-Cys(42)-X-X-Cys(45) of Azotobacter vinelandii FdI, which coordinates its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster, into an aspartate. UV-visible, EPR, and CD spectroscopies, metal analysis, and x-ray crystallography show that, like native FdI, aerobically purified C42D FdI is a seven-iron protein retaining its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster with monodentate aspartate ligation to one iron. Unlike known clusters of this type the reduced [4Fe-4S](+) cluster of C42D FdI exhibits only an S = 1/2 EPR with no higher spin signals detected. The cluster shows only a minor change in reduction potential relative to the native protein. All attempts to convert the cluster to a 3Fe cluster using conventional methods of oxygen or ferricyanide oxidation or thiol exchange were not successful. The cluster conversion was ultimately accomplished using a new electrochemical method. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction and the lack of Gly residues adjacent to the Asp ligand explain the remarkable stability of this cluster.

  13. Association study between STR marker D4S413 polymorphism on 4q31 and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate in Han Chinese%4q31区域STR位点D4S413多态性与中国汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂的关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴镝; 王新刚; 王玫; 宋涛; 尹宁北; 赵振民

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨4q31区域STR位点的基因多态性与中国汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂发生的相关性.方法 收集中国医学科学院整形外科医院214个非综合征型唇腭裂核心家系(患者及其父母)样本.在4号染色体4q31-q32分布10个短串联重复序列位点.采用ABI 3730DNA分型仪进行短串联重复序列位点的基因分型.分别采用Mendel和FBAT两种软件进行传递不平衡检验分析.结果 采用Mendel软件进行传递不平衡检验分析,短串联重复序列位点D4S413与中国汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂有相关性(P=0.0372),采用FBAT软件进行传递不平衡检验分析发现,短串联重复序列位点D4S413的与中国汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂有相关性(P=0.01974),等位基因297过传递.但经过多重检验校正后,P>0.05.结论 4q31区域短串联重复序列位点D4S413可能与中国汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂关联,但需要大样本量进行验证.

  14. Synthesis and ligand non-innocence of thiolate-ligated (N4S) Iron(II) and nickel(II) bis(imino)pyridine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Leland R; Jiang, Yunbo; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; Latifi, Reza; de Visser, Sam P; Jameson, Guy N L; Goldberg, David P

    2013-09-16

    The known iron(II) complex [Fe(II)(LN3S)(OTf)] (1) was used as starting material to prepare the new biomimetic (N4S(thiolate)) iron(II) complexes [Fe(II)(LN3S)(py)](OTf) (2) and [Fe(II)(LN3S)(DMAP)](OTf) (3), where LN3S is a tetradentate bis(imino)pyridine (BIP) derivative with a covalently tethered phenylthiolate donor. These complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic analysis, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as electrochemistry. A nickel(II) analogue, [Ni(II)(LN3S)](BF4) (5), was also synthesized and characterized by structural and spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetric studies showed 1-3 and 5 undergo a single reduction process with E(1/2) between -0.9 V to -1.2 V versus Fc(+)/Fc. Treatment of 3 with 0.5% Na/Hg amalgam gave the monoreduced complex [Fe(LN3S)(DMAP)](0) (4), which was characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-vis spectroscopic analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (g = [2.155, 2.057, 2.038]), and Mössbauer (δ = 0.33 mm s(-1); ΔE(Q) = 2.04 mm s(-1)) spectroscopy. Computational methods (DFT) were employed to model complexes 3-5. The combined experimental and computational studies show that 1-3 are 5-coordinate, high-spin (S = 2) Fe(II) complexes, whereas 4 is best described as a 5-coordinate, intermediate-spin (S = 1) Fe(II) complex antiferromagnetically coupled to a ligand radical. This unique electronic configuration leads to an overall doublet spin (S(total) = 1/2) ground state. Complexes 2 and 3 are shown to react with O2 to give S-oxygenated products, as previously reported for 1. In contrast, the monoreduced 4 appears to react with O2 to give a mixture of sulfur oxygenates and iron oxygenates. The nickel(II) complex 5 does not react with O2, and even when the monoreduced nickel complex is produced, it appears to undergo only outer-sphere oxidation with O2.

  15. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Belvin, Anthony D.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) development efforts in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability and performance potential of NTP systems. For example, Project Rover (1955 - 1973) completed 22 high power rocket reactor tests. Peak performances included operating at an average hydrogen exhaust temperature of 2550 K and a peak fuel power density of 5200 MW/m3 (Pewee test), operating at a thrust of 930 kN (Phoebus-2A test), and operating for 62.7 minutes in a single burn (NRX-A6 test). Results from Project Rover indicated that an NTP system with a high thrust-to-weight ratio and a specific impulse greater than 900 s would be feasible. Excellent results were also obtained by the former Soviet Union. Although historical programs had promising results, many factors would affect the development of a 21st century nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Test facilities built in the US during Project Rover no longer exist. However, advances in analytical techniques, the ability to utilize or adapt existing facilities and infrastructure, and the ability to develop a limited number of new test facilities may enable affordable development, qualification, and utilization of a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS). Bead-loaded graphite fuel was utilized throughout the Rover/NERVA program, and coated graphite composite fuel (tested in the Nuclear Furnace) and cermet fuel both show potential for even higher performance than that demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA engine tests.. NASA's NCPS project was initiated in October, 2011, with the goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS. FY 2014 activities are focused on fabrication and test (non-nuclear) of both coated graphite composite fuel elements and cermet fuel elements. Additional activities include developing a pre-conceptual design of the NCPS stage and evaluating affordable strategies for NCPS development, qualification, and utilization. NCPS stage designs are focused on supporting human Mars

  16. Three stage semelparous Leslie models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, J M

    2009-07-01

    oscillations (not necessarily periodic) with separated life-cycle stages, while weak interactions promote stable equilibration with overlapping life-cycle stages. Methods used include the theory of planar monotone maps, average Lyapunov functions, and bifurcation theory techniques.

  17. Optimum Staging with Varying Thrust Attitude Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1966-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimum staging programme for step rockets of arbitrary number of stages having different specific impulses and mass fractions with stages is derived, the optimization criterion being minimum take-off weight for a desired burntout velocity at an assigned altitude. Variation of thrust attitude angle from stage to stage and effects of gravity factor are taken into account. Analysis is performed for a degenerate problem obtained by relaxing the altitude constraint and it has been shown that problems of Weisbord, Subotowicz, Hall & Zambelli and Malina & Summerfield are the particular cases of the degenerate problem.

  18. TNM staging of colorectal cancer should be reconsidered by T stage weighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Bao-Cai; Sun, Li-Rong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Fu, Xian-Hua; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Poston, Graeme; Ding, Ke-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To verify that the T stage has greater weight than the N stage in the staging of colorectal cancer. METHODS: Open data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program were reviewed and analyzed according to the T stage, N stage, and patients’ observed survival (OS). The relative weights of the T and N stages were calculated by multiple linear regressions based on their impact on survival. Risk scores for 25 TN categories were then calculated from the T and N stage relative weights, and a rearranged tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system was proposed via a cluster analysis of the TN scores. RESULTS: Both T and N stages significantly affect the OS of patients with colorectal cancer. Moreover, the T stage has greater weight than the N stage in the TNM staging system of colorectal cancer. For colon cancer, the relative T and N stage weights were 0.58 and 0.42, respectively, and for rectal cancer, the relative T and N stage weights were 0.61 and 0.39, respectively. On the basis of cluster analysis of the TN scores, T1N1a was classified to stage I, and T2N1a-1b and T1N1b-2a were classified to stage II in our revised TNM staging system for both colon and rectal cancer. For colon cancer, T4bN0 was classified to stage IIIa, but for rectal cancer, it was classified to stage IIIb. CONCLUSION: As the T stage affects colorectal cancer survival more significantly than the N stage, the TNM staging should be revised by relative T stage weight. PMID:24803826

  19. TNM staging of colorectal cancer should be reconsidered by T stage weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Bao-Cai; Sun, Li-Rong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Fu, Xian-Hua; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Poston, Graeme; Ding, Ke-Feng

    2014-05-07

    To verify that the T stage has greater weight than the N stage in the staging of colorectal cancer. Open data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program were reviewed and analyzed according to the T stage, N stage, and patients' observed survival (OS). The relative weights of the T and N stages were calculated by multiple linear regressions based on their impact on survival. Risk scores for 25 TN categories were then calculated from the T and N stage relative weights, and a rearranged tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system was proposed via a cluster analysis of the TN scores. Both T and N stages significantly affect the OS of patients with colorectal cancer. Moreover, the T stage has greater weight than the N stage in the TNM staging system of colorectal cancer. For colon cancer, the relative T and N stage weights were 0.58 and 0.42, respectively, and for rectal cancer, the relative T and N stage weights were 0.61 and 0.39, respectively. On the basis of cluster analysis of the TN scores, T1N1a was classified to stage I, and T2N1a-1b and T1N1b-2a were classified to stage II in our revised TNM staging system for both colon and rectal cancer. For colon cancer, T4bN0 was classified to stage IIIa, but for rectal cancer, it was classified to stage IIIb. As the T stage affects colorectal cancer survival more significantly than the N stage, the TNM staging should be revised by relative T stage weight.

  20. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  1. Freedom and the Ibsen Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbjφrn Aarseth

    2005-01-01

    To some extent Ibsen's career as a dramatist was conditioned by the physical limitations of the theatre buildings. He succeeded in turning these limitations to his advantage. Through dialogue and scenography he tried to achieve a longing in the audience to see the characters succeed in getting out of oppressive, prisonlike conditions. Gradually concentrating the action in the narrow room, he succeeded in achieving the effect of claustrophobia particularly in his work in the years 1877-86. After that he experimented in bringing the basic narrowness out in the open air scenography in 1888 with The Lady from the Sea. In Hedda Gabler and partly in John Gabriel Borkman he returned to the interior stage, but in the rest of the 1890s he preferred to situate some or most of the action in the open air. This selfimposed constriction is capable of producing an intense experience exactly because the urge to be free is amplified by the physical narrowness. Consequently it has proved difficult to make a successful movie on the basis of a modern prose play by Ibsen. The moving camera tends to dissolve the spatial limitations.

  2. Staging of moyamoya disease by perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital; Matsushima, Toshio; Fukui, Masashi

    2001-04-01

    Staging of moyamoya disease, based on angiography and PET have already been established. The authors have established staging of moyamoya disease based on perfusion SPECT, that can be summarized as follows: Stage I, no abnormality is seen at rest or after acetazolamide loading; Stage II, no abnormality is seen at rest, however, a decreased response (blood flow increase rate: <15%) is seen to acetazolamide loading (a, a decreased response is seen only in the frontal lobe; b, a decreased response is seen in regions other than the frontal lobe; and c, a decreased response is seen throughout the cerebrum); Stage III, localized decrease in blood flow (blood flow decrease compared with peripheral tissue: {>=}15%) and marked decrease in response to acetazolamide (blood flow increase rate: <5%) are seen at rest. In Stage III, CT and MRI show no abnormal findings or only mild lesions of the white matter; and Stage IV, multiple decreases in blood flow are seen at rest, and CT and MRI reveal infarctions and severe atrophy at the same sites. The above staging does not require determination of cerebral blood flow, and thus it can be used in children, in whom cerebral blood flow determination is difficult. The authors performed 99m-Tc ECD perfusion SPECT in 25 patients with moyamoya disease for the staging, and compared staging based on angiography with staging based on perfusion SPECT. The results did not show a correlation between the 2 staging methods. A problem inherent in the staging of moyamoya disease based on perfusion SPECT is that the relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral radioactivity concentrations may differ depending on the drug used to determine cerebral blood flow. Thus, although the present staging system does not depend on any specific radioactive drug to determine cerebral blood flow, further investigation is necessary to identify a more appropriate drug than those in current use. (K.H.)

  3. Precision control system of two-DOF stage with linear ultrasonic motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanlei ZHANG; Yunlai SHI; Chunsheng ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    Using an appropriate control method, linear ultrasonic motors can be used in applications requiring high position accuracy. In this paper, a closed loop PI control system is designed to achieve high position accu-racy during the control of a two-DOF stage driven by linear ultrasonic motors, Two ultrasonic motors are mounted on the stage to generate motion in two ortho-gonal directions. The PI control algorithm is used to increase the stability and accuracy of position control. The x-axis mover covers 30 mm forward and backward in less than 0.3 s settling time and the y-axis mover in less than 0.4 s. Experimental results denote that the control strategy proposed in this paper appears to have high effi-ciency, quick response, and high accuracy.

  4. Effect of two-stage aging on superplasticity of Al-Li alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhi-hui; ZHANG Xin-ming; DU Yu-xuan; YE Ling-ying

    2006-01-01

    The effect of two-stage aging on the microstructures and superplasticity of 01420 Al-Li alloy was investigated by means of OM, TEM analysis and stretching experiment. The results demonstrate that the second phase particles distributed more uniformly with a larger volume fraction can be observed after the two-stage aging (120 ℃, 12 h+300 ℃, 36 h) compared with the single-aging(300 ℃, 48 h). After rolling and recrystallization annealing, fine grains with size of 8-10 μm are obtained, and the superplastic elongation of the specimens reaches 560% at strain rate of 8×10-4 s-1 and 480 ℃. Uniformly distributed fine particles precipitate both on grain boundaries and in grains at lower temperature. When the sheet is aged at high temperature, the particles become coarser with a large volume fraction.

  5. Search for the CP-violating decays $\\Upsilon(4S) B0\\bar{B}0 J/K0_S + J/\\psi(\\eta_c)K0_S$

    CERN Document Server

    Tajima, O; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Joshi, N J; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kang, J H; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Lin, S W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-01-01

    We report the first search for CP violating decays of the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ using a data sample that contains 535 million $\\Upsilon(4S)$ mesons with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. A partial reconstruction technique is employed to enhance the signal sensitivity. No significant signals were observed. We obtain an upper limit of $4 \\times 10^{-7}$ at the 90 % confidence level for the branching fractions of the $CP$ violating modes, $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to B^0\\bar{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0_S + J/\\psi(\\eta_c) K^0_S$. Extrapolating the result, we find that an observation with 5$\\sigma$ significance is expected with a 30 ab^{-1} data sample, which is within the reach of a future super B factory.

  6. Acting Antarctica: science on stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Piera; Tizzoni, Paola; Pierro, Luigia

    2016-04-01

    Key-words: Polar science, Earth science, Theatre, Hands on activities The legendary Antarctic Expedition of sir E. Shackleton and his crew of 27 aboard the Endurance (1914/16) trapped in the Antarctic ice has become the starting point to learn about Polar Science and Climate Change. While the students were involved into this incredible adventure by the astonishing images of the Australian photographer Frank Hurley (who joined the crew), they discovered the world in which this story happened. Students were then involved in hands-on activities and role plays and have become the writers of the play "Uomini a scienza ai confini del mondo". They act the story of Shackelton's expedition and they tell at the same time to the audience about ice pack, ice cores and their role in understanding the past of the climate, physical and geographical characteristic of polar regions, thermal phenomena related to adaptations of polar animals, solar radiation at different latitude, day/night duration. The theater was the place to "stage" some scientific experiments and to explain the current research carried out in polar regions and their importance in climate change studies and to stress some similarities between Antarctica and space. The project was carried out from teachers of science, letters and geography and was born in collaboration with the "Piccolo Teatro di Milano" and the association "Science Under 18" with the support of a professional actor and director and was played for other schools at "EXPO 2015" in Milano (Italy). In our opinion drama activities improve reading comprehension, and both verbal and non-verbal communication skills. To be able to write and to act, students need a deep understanding of contents. Arts, including theatre, are a good key to involve emotionally students. To have an audience different from their own teachers and classmates offers a real task and the opportunity to play and let grow real skills.

  7. Final Stages of Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, Peter; Lithwick, Yoram; Sari, Re'em

    2004-10-01

    We address three questions regarding solar system planets: What determined their number? Why are their orbits nearly circular and coplanar? How long did they take to form? Runaway accretion in a disk of small bodies resulted in a tiny fraction of the bodies growing much larger than all the others. These big bodies dominated the viscous stirring of all bodies. Dynamical friction by small bodies cooled the random velocities of the big ones. Random velocities of small bodies were cooled by mutual collisions and/or gas drag. Runaway accretion terminated when the orbital separations of the big bodies became as wide as their feeding zones. This was followed by oligarchic growth during which the big bodies maintained similar masses and uniformly spaced semimajor axes. As the oligarchs grew, their number density decreased, but their surface mass density increased. We depart from standard treatments of planet formation by assuming that as the big bodies got bigger, the small ones got smaller as the result of undergoing a collisional fragmentation cascade. It follows that oligarchy was a brief stage in solar system evolution. When the oligarchs' surface mass density matched that of the small bodies, dynamical friction was no longer able to balance viscous stirring, so their velocity dispersion increased to the extent that their orbits crossed. This marked the end of oligarchy. What happened next differed in the inner and outer parts of the planetary system. In the inner part, where the ratios of the escape velocities from the surfaces of the planets to the escape velocities from their orbits are smaller than unity, big bodies collided and coalesced after their random velocities became comparable to their escape velocities. In the outer part, where these ratios are larger than unity, the random velocities of some of the big bodies continued to rise until they were ejected. In both parts, the number density of the big bodies eventually decreased to the extent that

  8. Crystal structures, lattice potential energies, and thermochemical properties of crystalline compounds (1-C(n)H(2n+1)NH3)2ZnCl4(s) (n = 8, 10, 12, and 13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupu; Di, Youying; He, Donghua; Zhou, Qian; Dou, Jianmin

    2011-11-01

    As part of our ongoing project involving the study of (1-C(n)H(2n+1)NH(3))(2)MCl(4)(s) (where M is a divalent metal ion and n = 8-18), we have synthesized the compounds (1-C(n)H(2n+1)NH(3))(2)ZnCl(4)(s) (n = 8, 10, 12, and 13), and the details of the structures are reported herein. All of the compounds were crystallized in the monoclinic form with the space group P2(1)/n for (1-C(8)H(17)NH(3))(2)ZnCl(4)(s), P21/c for (1-C(10)H(21)NH(3))(2)ZnCl(4)(s), P2(1)/c for (1-C(12)H(25)NH(3))(2)ZnCl(4)(s), and P2(1)/m for (1-C(13)H(27)NH(3))(2)ZnCl(4)(s). The lattice potential energies and ionic volumes of the cations and the common anion of the title compounds were obtained from crystallographic data. Molar enthalpies of dissolution of the four compounds at various molalities were measured at 298.15 K in the double-distilled water. According to Pitzer's theory, molar enthalpies of dissolution of the title compounds at infinite dilution were obtained. Finally, using the values of molar enthalpies of dissolution at infinite dilution (Δ(s)H(m)(∞)) and other auxiliary thermodynamic data, the enthalpy change of the dissociation of [ZnCl(4)](2-)(g) for the reaction [ZnCl(4)](2-)(g)→ Zn(2+)(g) + 4Cl(-)(g) was obtained, and then the hydration enthalpies of cations were calculated by designing a thermochemical cycle.

  9. The S4-S5 linker directly couples voltage sensor movement to the activation gate in the human ether-a'-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Tania; Rupp, Jason; Piper, David R; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin

    2006-05-05

    A key unresolved question regarding the basic function of voltage-gated ion channels is how movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to channel opening. We previously proposed that the S4-S5 linker couples voltage sensor movement to the S6 domain in the human ether-a'-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channel. The recently solved crystal structure of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel reveals that the S4-S5 linker is the structural link between the voltage sensing and pore domains. In this study, we used chimeras constructed from hERG and ether-a'-go-go (EAG) channels to identify interactions between residues in the S4-S5 linker and S6 domain that were critical for stabilizing the channel in a closed state. To verify the spatial proximity of these regions, we introduced cysteines in the S4-S5 linker and at the C-terminal end of the S6 domain and then probed for the effect of oxidation. The D540C-L666C channel current decreased in an oxidizing environment in a state-dependent manner consistent with formation of a disulfide bond that locked the channel in a closed state. Disulfide bond formation also restricted movement of the voltage sensor, as measured by gating currents. Taken together, these data confirm that the S4-S5 linker directly couples voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. Moreover, rather than functioning simply as a mechanical lever, these findings imply that specific interactions between the S4-S5 linker and the activation gate stabilize the closed channel conformation.

  10. C-stage in colon cancer: implications of carcinoembryonic antigen biomarker in staging, prognosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sukumar, Shyamsunder; Sathaiah, Magesh; Mahan, Meredith; Pragatheeshwar, Kothai Divya; Pingpank, James F; Zeh, Herbert; Bartels, Christopher J; Lee, Kenneth K W; Bartlett, David L

    2011-04-20

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has proposed the inclusion of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (C-stage) into the conventional TNM staging system of colon cancer. We assessed the prognosis of various stages of colon cancer after such an inclusion. Data for all patients (N = 17 910) diagnosed with colonic adenocarcinoma (AJCC stages I, IIA, IIB, IIC, IIIA, IIIB, IIIC, and IV, based on TNM staging system) between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2004, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range 0-35 months), were collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. C-stage (C0-stage = normal CEA level; C1-stage = elevated CEA level) was assigned to all patients with available CEA information (n = 9083). Multivariable analyses using Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent factors associated with prognosis. Prognosis of overall stages (AJCC stages I-IV and C0 or C1) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. All statistical tests were two-sided. C1-stage was independently associated with a 60% increased risk of overall mortality (hazard ratio of death = 1.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.46 to 1.76, P cancer compared with C0-stage cancer of the respective overall stages (P cancer compared with stage IIA C0 or stage IIIA C0 cancer (P cancer compared with stage IIIA C0 (P cancer compared with stage IIIB C0 cancer (P colon cancer. The results support routine preoperative CEA testing and C-staging upon diagnosis of colon cancer and the inclusion of C-stage in the conventional TNM staging of colon cancer.

  11. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinke, S., E-mail: ssteinke@lbl.gov; Tilborg, J. van; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daniels, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Swanson, K. K.; Shaw, B. H.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  12. Pantex staging study near-term alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, M.S.; Adickes, M.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Nealey, S.M.; Smith, B.W.

    1992-12-01

    As the result of bilateral treaties to reduce the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile, the US Department of Energy must now address the requirements for additional storage of the plutonium components (pits) from the retired weapons at Pantex until the components` final disposition. Because of the critical need to take action, Pantex has initiated two related efforts: Project Stage Right and this Staging Study. While support of Project Stage Right is a key objective of this study, the scope covers a broader range of activities and aspects of the pit staging problem. This study provides estimates of worker radiation exposures under the current scenario as well as estimated radiation exposure for workers under four alternative staging scenarios. An important objective of this study also identifies and recommends for future study other activities related to staging where radiation safety and overall efficiency can be improved.

  13. Pantex staging study near-term alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, M.S.; Adickes, M.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Nealey, S.M.; Smith, B.W.

    1992-12-01

    As the result of bilateral treaties to reduce the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile, the US Department of Energy must now address the requirements for additional storage of the plutonium components (pits) from the retired weapons at Pantex until the components' final disposition. Because of the critical need to take action, Pantex has initiated two related efforts: Project Stage Right and this Staging Study. While support of Project Stage Right is a key objective of this study, the scope covers a broader range of activities and aspects of the pit staging problem. This study provides estimates of worker radiation exposures under the current scenario as well as estimated radiation exposure for workers under four alternative staging scenarios. An important objective of this study also identifies and recommends for future study other activities related to staging where radiation safety and overall efficiency can be improved.

  14. Compact 6-DOF Stage for Optical Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaat, Syed; Chang, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) stage for mechanical adjustment of an optical component. The six degrees of freedom are translations along the Cartesian axes (x, y, and z) and rotations about these axes (theta x, theta y, and theta z, respectively). Relative to prior such stages, this stage offers advantages of compactness, stability, and robustness, plus other advantages as described below. The stage was designed specifically as part of a laser velocimeter and altimeter in which light reflected by a distant object is collected by a Cassegrainian telescope and focused into a single-mode, polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The stage is used to position and orient the input end of the optical fiber with respect to the focal point of the telescope. Stages like this one can also be adapted for use in positioning and orienting other optical components, including lenses, prisms, apertures, and photodetectors.

  15. Experiments for Multi-Stage Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyssedal, John; Kulahci, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Multi-stage processes are very common in both process and manufacturing industries. In this article we present a methodology for designing experiments for multi-stage processes. Typically in these situations the design is expected to involve many factors from different stages. To minimize...... the required number of experimental runs, we suggest using mirror image pairs of experiments at each stage following the first. As the design criterion, we consider their projectivity and mainly focus on projectivity 3 designs. We provide the methodology for generating these designs for processes with any...

  16. Susceptibility to AcMNPV and Expression of Recombinant Proteins by a Novel Cell Clone Derived from a Trichoplusia ni QAU-BTI-Tn9-4s Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Shan; Shi-ying Zhang; Lei Jiang; Ming Ma; Guo-xun Li

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that Tn5B1-4(commercially known as the High Five)cell line is highly susceptible to baculovirus and provides superior production of recombinant proteins when compared to other insect cell lines.But the characteristics of the cell line do not always remain stable and may change upon continuous passage.Recently an alphanodavirus,named Tn5 Cell Line Virus(or TNCL Virus),was identified in High Five cells in particular. Therefore,we established a new cell line,QB-Tn9-4s,from Trichoplusia ni,which was determined to be free of TNCL virus by RT-PCR analysis. In this paper,we describe the development of a novel cell clone,QB-CL-B,from a low passage QB-Tn9-4s cell line and report its susceptibility to ACMNPV,and the level of recombinant protein production. This cell clone was similar to its parental cells QB-Tn9-4s and Tn5B 1-4 cells in morphology and growth rate;although it also showed approximately the same responses to AcMNPV infection and production of occlusion bodies,there were higher levels of recombinant protein production in comparison to QB-Tn9-4s(parental cells)and High5 cells.

  17. 汽车品牌4S店的现状分析与前景展望%Status Quo Analysis and Prospects of the Automotive 4S Stores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴江

    2009-01-01

    文中首先对汽车品牌4S店的现状进行分析,指出4S店在建设实施过程中的优、劣势.针对克服劣势的对策,从战略和战术的角度提出了解决思路.再对汽车品牌4S店的发展前景进行了展望,在明确4S店发展呈现集团化趋势的基础上,提出了"服务是核心,品牌是目标;关注售后环节,体现增值服务"的观点,并以实例进行了论证.%Status quo of the automotive 4S stores is ana-lyzed, and the advantage and disadvantage in the construction process of 4S stores is pointed out. The solution idea to overcome the disadvantage from the point view of strategic and tactical is put forward. Then, the future development of the automotive 4S stores is prospected. It is clearly indicated that the development of 4S stores is in the trend of grouping, based on which the point of view of " Service is the core, branding is the goal; Concern about the after -sales to reflect the value - added services " is pointed out, and example is given to validate it.

  18. One-stage and two-stage penile buccal mucosa urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Barbagli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides the reader with the detailed description of current techniques of one-stage and two-stage penile buccal mucosa urethroplasty. The paper provides the reader with the preoperative patient evaluation paying attention to the use of diagnostic tools. The one-stage penile urethroplasty using buccal mucosa graft with the application of glue is preliminary showed and discussed. Two-stage penile urethroplasty is then reported. A detailed description of first-stage urethroplasty according Johanson technique is reported. A second-stage urethroplasty using buccal mucosa graft and glue is presented. Finally postoperative course and follow-up are addressed.

  19. Serumfree culture of the suspension cell line QB-Tn9-4s of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, is highly productive for virus replication and recombinant protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gui-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Xu; Li, Chang-You

    2014-02-12

    Serumfree cultures of insect cells play an important role in the fields of protein engineering, medicine, and biology. In this paper, the suspension cell line QB-Tn9-4s of Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was successfully adapted to serumfree Sf-900 III medium and passaged for 52 generations. The adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells grew faster. Their population doubling time shortened from 27.4 hr in serum-containing medium to 24.1 hr, and their maximal density increased by 1.83-fold, reaching 3.50 ×10(6) cells/mL in serumfree culture in T-flasks. The cells readily adapted to spinner culture, with maximum cell density of 4.40 × 10(6) cells/mL in a spinner flask. Although the infection rate of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus and production of occlusion bodies (OBs) of the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells were 91.0% and 85.4 OBs/cell, respectively, similar to those of QB-Tn9-4s cells cultured in serum-containing medium and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cells, their budded virus titer was 4.97 ×10(7) TCID50/mL, significantly higher than those of the latter two. In addition, the expression levels of β-galactosidase at six days postinfection and secreted alkaline phosphatase at seven days postinfection in the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells reached 2.98 ± 0.15×10(4) IU/mL and 3.34 ± 0.13 IU/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of QB-Tn9-4s and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cultured in serum-containing media. The above findings establish a foundation for industrial production of virus and recombinant proteins in QB-Tn9-4s serumfree culture.

  20. Serum-Free Culture of the Suspension Cell Line QB-Tn9-4s of the Cabbage Looper, Trichoplusia ni, is Highly Productive for Virus Replication and Recombinant Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gui-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Xu; Li, Chang-You

    2014-01-01

    Serum-free cultures of insect cells play an important role in the fields of protein engineering, medicine, and biology. In this paper, the suspension cell line QB-Tn9-4s of Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was successfully adapted to serum-free Sf-900 III medium and passaged for 52 generations. The adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells grew faster. Their population doubling time shortened from 27.4 hr in serum-containing medium to 24.1 hr, and their maximal density increased by 1.83-fold, reaching 3.50 × 106 cells/mL in serum-free culture in T-flasks. The cells readily adapted to spinner culture, with maximum cell density of 4.40 × 106 cells/mL in a spinner flask. Although the infection rate of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus and production of occlusion bodies (OBs) of the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells were 91.0% and 85.4 OBs/cell, respectively, similar to those of QB-Tn9-4s cells cultured in serum-containing medium and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cells, their budded virus titer was 4.97 × 107 TCID50/mL, significantly higher than those of the latter two. In addition, the expression levels of β-galactosidase at six days post-infection and secreted alkaline phosphatase at seven days postinfection in the adapted QB-Tn9-4s cells reached 2.98 ± 0.15×104 IU/mL and 3.34 ± 0.13 IU/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of QB-Tn9-4s and control BTI-Tn5B1-4 cultured in serum-containing media. The above findings establish a foundation for industrial production of virus and recombinant proteins in QB-Tn9-4s serum-free culture. PMID:25373171

  1. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C ferredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational and resonance Raman spectroscopies, force field simulations, and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P

    2011-06-14

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal-mode assignments, we conducted NRVS with D14C ferredoxin samples with (36)S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains, (Ph(4)P)(2)[Fe(4)S(4)Cl(4)]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from "protein" and torsional modes below 100 cm(-1), through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm(-1), to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 and ∼400 cm(-1). The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low-frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe(4)S(4)](2+/+) redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  2. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C Ferredoxin via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational and Resonance Raman Spectroscopies, Force Field Simulations, and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A.; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal mode assignments, we recorded the NRVS of D14C ferredoxin samples with 36S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains: (Ph4P)2[Fe4S4Cl4]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from `protein' and torsional modes below 100 cm−1, through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm−1, to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 cm−1 and ~400 cm−1. The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe4S4]2+/1+ redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins. PMID:21500788

  3. Solution structures of the cytoplasmic linkers between segments S4 and S5 (S4-S5) in domains III and IV of human brain sodium channels in SDS micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Nakagawa, T; Kuroda, Y

    2001-09-01

    The two cytoplasmic linkers connecting segment S4 and segment S5 (S4-S5 linker) of both domain III (III/S4-S5) and IV (IV/S4-S5) of the sodium channel alpha-subunit are considered to work as a hydrophobic receptor for the inactivation particle because of the three hydrophobic amino acids of Ile-Phe-Met (IFM motif) in the III-IV linker of the sodium channel alpha-subunit. To date, the solution structures of the peptides related to III/S4-S5 (MP-D3: A1325-M1338) and IV/S4-S5 (MP-D4: T1648-L1666) of human brain sodium channels have been investigated using CD and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. SDS micelles were employed as a solvent. The micelles mimic either biological membranes or the interior of a protein and can be a relevant environment at the inactivated state of the channels. It was found that the secondary structures of both MP-D3 and MP-D4 assume alpha-helical conformations around the N-terminal half-side of the sequences, i.e. the residues between V1326 and L1331 in MP-D3 and between L1650 and S1656 in MP-D4. Residue A1329 in MP-D3, which is considered to interact with F1489 of the IFM motif, was found to be located within the alpha-helix. Residues F1651, M1654, M1655, L1657 and A1669 in MP-D4, which also play an important role in inactivation, formed a hydrophobic cluster on one side of the helix. This cluster was concluded to interact with the hydrophobic cluster due to the III-IV linker before the inactivation gate closes.

  4. Stages of Small-Group Development Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Jensen, Mary Ann C.

    1977-01-01

    This review examines published research on small-group development done in the last ten years that would constitute an empirical test of Tuckman's hypothesis that groups go through the stages of "forming,""storming,""norming," and "performing." A fifth stage, "adjourning," was added to the…

  5. The Stages of Mailed Questionnaire Returning Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Daniel C.

    1984-01-01

    Six stages are hypothesized that define the behavior of returning mailed questionnaires: receiving the questionnaire, opening the mail, forming an overall impression, answering the questions, returning the questionnaire, and dealing with nonrespondents. The researcher must provide incentives at each stage if potential respondents are to complete a…

  6. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  7. [Klatskin tumors: rational diagnostics and staging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzer, U W; Rösch, T

    2012-03-01

    Klatskin tumors continue to be a challenge for diagnostic assessment and staging due to their longitudinal tumor growth along the perihilar bile ducts. Therefore the rate of non-resectable tumors remains relatively stable despite modern imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article reviews the current diagnostic methods for preoperative staging and the significance for predicting resectability.

  8. Developmental Stages in the Conceptualization of Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    1978-01-01

    "Marriage" is treated as a mental concept that evolves in a developmental sequence of four qualitatively distinct stages: Magical, Idealized Conventional, Individualistic, and Affirmational. Each stage is illustrated with excerpts from Ingmar Bergman's Scenes From a Marriage. Some applications for marriage counselors are suggested. (Author)

  9. The construction of two-stage tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Jos J.

    1988-01-01

    Although two-stage testing is not the most efficient form of adaptive testing, it has some advantages. In this paper, linear programming models are given for the construction of two-stage tests. In these models, practical constraints with respect to, among other things, test composition, administrat

  10. The Sixth Stage of Moral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    This assessment of L. Kohlberg's theory of moral development is a dialectical critique focusing on his claim that the sixth stage of moral development is morally adequate, specifically, that it is both comprehensive and fully equilibrated. Includes a brief account of B. J. Lonergan's dialectical method and an analysis of the sixth stage of…

  11. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  12. Second-Stage Music Teachers' Professional Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draves, Tami J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study research was to explore the professional identities of second-stage music teachers, or those in years 4-10 of teaching, focusing primarily on how their identities were sustained or neglected. Participants were two second stage music educators teaching in middle school (grades 6-8) music classrooms and taught…

  13. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  14. Dislocation generation during early stage sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, J. E.; Lenel, F. V.; Ansell, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of capillarity-induced stresses on dislocations during early stage sintering. A special version of Hirth's (1963) theoretical calculation procedures modified to describe dislocation nucleation on planes meeting the sintering body's neck surface obliquely is shown to predict plastic flow at stress levels know to exist between micron size metal particles in the early stages of sintering.

  15. Management of Low-Stage Testicular Seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Shane M; Liauw, Stanley L; Eggener, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Management of testicular seminoma has benefited from numerous advances in imaging, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy over the last 50 years leading to nearly 100% disease-specific survival for low-stage seminoma. This article examines the evaluation and management of low-stage testicular seminoma, which includes clinical stage I and IIA disease. Excellent outcomes for stage I seminoma are achieved with active surveillance, adjuvant radiotherapy, and adjuvant single-agent carboplatin. Current areas of research focus on optimizing surveillance regimens and minimizing the morbidity and long-term complications of adjuvant treatment. Radiotherapy continues to be the primary treatment option for patients with clinical stage IIa disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MCSCF potential energy surface for the high barrier adiabatic 1 /sup 4/. sigma. /sup -/ pathway of the O/sup +/(/sup 4/S)+N/sub 2/(X /sup 1/. sigma. /sub g//sup +/). -->. NO/sup +/(X /sup 1/. sigma. /sup +/) +N(/sup 4/S) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, D.G.

    1980-03-15

    The collinear /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/ pathway for the state-specific O/sup +/(/sup 4/S)+N/sub 2/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/) ..-->..NO/sup +/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sup +/)+N(/sup 4/S) reaction has been surveyed with ab initio calculations. A ninety-nine configuration, fifteen orbital multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) wave function, involving the use of a double-zeta plus polarization one-electron basis, was developed for the long range /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/ state. This long range /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/ state has the character of O/sup +/+N/sub 2/ for long R/sub NO/, or of N+NO/sup +/ for long R/sub NN/, and is for most geometries, the lowest, or 1 /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/, state. The ab initio exothermicity computed with the present wave function is 0.93 eV, compared to an accurate experimental value of 1.10 eV. The saddle-point in the energy surface is 8.0 eV above O/sup +/+N/sub 2/, with critical values of R*/sub NN/=1.48 +- 0.02 A and R*/sub NO/ =1.38 +- 0.02 A. These values are 0.38 and 0.32 A greater than the equilibrium bond lengths of N/sub 2/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sub g//sup +/) and NO/sup +/(X /sup 1/..sigma../sup +/). The present wave function reproduces the experimental bond lengths of these two diatomics to within 0.01 A when the third atom is removed to 500 a.u. (264.6 A). Preceding the barrier on the O/sup +/+N/sub 2/ side is an appreciable polarization well. With the present wave function the attributes of this well are D/sup 0/ (N/sub 2/--O/sup +/) =0.38 eV, R/sub NN//sup E/=1.108 A, R/sub NO//sup e/ =2.350 A, theta/sup e//sub NNO/=180/sup 0/, k/sup e//sub NN/=24.679 md/A, k/sup e//sub NO/=0.295 md/A, k/sub theta/=0.0366 md/A. There is also a smaller polarization well on the N+NO/sup +/ side. Although the ion--atom interaction is more stable at C/sub s/ the latter well is bound by 0.02 eV at 180/sup 0/ with R/sup e//sub NN/=3.34 A, and R/sup e//sub NO/=1.07 A.

  17. Tools for Reactive Distillation Column Design: Graphical and Stage-to-Stage Computation Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Daza, O.; Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Hostrup, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Based on the element mass balance concept, a graphical design method and a stage-to-stage multicomponent design method for reactive distillation columns have been developed. For distillation columns comprising reactive and non-reactive stages, a simple design strategy based on reactive and non......-reactive bubble point calculations is proposed. This strategy tracks the conversion and temperature between the feed and the end stages of the column. An illustrative example highlights the verification of the design strategy through rigorous simulation....

  18. Multi-Stage Programs are Generalized Arrows

    CERN Document Server

    Megacz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The lambda calculus, subject to typing restrictions, provides a syn- tax for the internal language of cartesian closed categories. This paper establishes a parallel result: staging annotations, subject to named level restrictions, provide a syntax for the internal language of Freyd categories, which are known to be in one-to-one correspondence with Arrows. The connection is made by interpreting multi-stage type systems as indexed functors from polynomial categories to their reindexings (Definitions 15 and 16). This result applies only to multi-stage languages which are (1) homogeneous, (2) allow cross-stage persistence and (3) place no restrictions on the use of structural rules in typing derivations. Removing these restrictions and repeating the construction yields generalized arrows, of which Arrows are a particular case. A translation from well-typed multi-stage programs to single-stage GArrow terms is provided. The translation is defined by induction on the structure of the proof that the multi-stage prog...

  19. Dynamics of an [Fe4S4(SPh)4]2- cluster explored via IR, Raman, and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)-analysis using 36S substitution, DFT calculations, and empirical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuming; Koutmos, Markos; Case, David A; Coucouvanis, Dimitri; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P

    2006-05-14

    We have used four vibrational spectroscopies--FT-IR, FT-Raman, resonance Raman, and 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)--to study the normal modes of the Fe-S cluster in [(n-Bu)4N]2[Fe4S4(SPh)4]. This [Fe4S4(SR)4]2- complex serves as a model for the clusters in 4Fe ferredoxins and high-potential iron proteins (HiPIPs). The IR spectra exhibited differences above and below the 243 K phase transition. Significant shifts with 36S substitution into the bridging S positions were also observed. The NRVS results were in good agreement with the low temperature data from the conventional spectroscopies. The NRVS spectra were interpreted by normal mode analysis using optimized Urey-Bradley force fields (UBFF) as well as from DFT theory. For the UBFF calculations, the parameters were refined by comparing calculated and observed NRVS frequencies and intensities. The frequency shifts after 36S substitution were used as an additional constraint. A D 2d symmetry Fe4S4S'4 model could explain most of the observed frequencies, but a better match to the observed intensities was obtained when the ligand aromatic rings were included for a D 2d Fe4S4(SPh)4 model. The best results were obtained using the low temperature structure without symmetry constraints. In addition to stretching and bending vibrations, low frequency modes between approximately 50 and 100 cm(-1) were observed. These modes, which have not been seen before, are interpreted as twisting motions with opposing sides of the cube rotating in opposite directions. In contrast with a recent paper on a related Fe4S4 cluster, we find no need to assign a large fraction of the low frequency NRVS intensity to 'rotational lattice modes'. We also reassign the 430 cm(-1) band as primarily an elongation of the thiophenolate ring, with approximately 10% terminal Fe-S stretch character. This study illustrates the benefits of combining NRVS with conventional Raman and IR analysis for characterization of Fe-S centers. DFT

  20. Observing river stages using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Witek, Matylda; Spallek, Waldemar

    2016-08-01

    We elaborated a new method for observing water surface areas and river stages using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). It is based on processing multitemporal five orthophotomaps produced from the UAV-taken visible light images of nine sites of the river, acquired with a sufficient overlap in each part. Water surface areas are calculated in the first place, and subsequently expressed as fractions of total areas of water-covered terrain at a given site of the river recorded on five dates. The logarithms of the fractions are later calculated, producing five samples, each consisted of nine elements. In order to detect statistically significant increments of water surface areas between two orthophotomaps, we apply the asymptotic and bootstrapped versions of the Student's t test, preceded by other tests that aim to check model assumptions. The procedure is applied to five orthophotomaps covering nine sites of the Ścinawka river (south-western (SW) Poland). The data have been acquired during the experimental campaign, at which flight settings were kept unchanged over nearly 3 years (2012-2014). We have found that it is possible to detect transitions between water surface areas associated with all characteristic water levels (low, mean, intermediate and high stages). In addition, we infer that the identified transitions hold for characteristic river stages as well. In the experiment we detected all increments of water level: (1) from low stages to mean, intermediate and high stages; (2) from mean stages to intermediate and high stages; and (3) from intermediate stages to high stages. Potential applications of the elaborated method include verification of hydrodynamic models and the associated predictions of high flows as well as monitoring water levels of rivers in ungauged basins.

  1. Black Brant X third stage dispersion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Maksimovic, V. M.; Lindahl, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The successful development of the Black Brant X (BBX) launch vehicle resulted from the application of a gyroscopically stabilized, unguided third stage motor configuration. Design analyses indicated sufficient gyroscopic stability and acceptable impact dispersion could be realized by optimizing second/third stage separation time. By flying an unguided third stage motor, significant program cost savings were realized. One flight test and two operational missions demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing gyroscopic stability to achieve satisfactory trajectory dispersion on a high performance rocket. A detailed assessment of the major dispersion contributors identified for the first three BBX missions is presented, offering important insight into the dispersion sensitivity of unguided, spin-stabilized flight.

  2. Assessment of Stage 35 With APNASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Mulac, Richard

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of APNASA was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program to determine their predictive capabilities. The geometry selected for this study was Stage 35 which is a single stage transonic compressor. A speedline at 100% speed was generated and compared to experimental data at 100% speed for two turbulence models. Performance of the stage at 100% speed and profiles of several key aerodynamic parameters are compared to the survey data downstream of the stator in this report. In addition, hub leakage was modeled and compared to solutions without leakage and the available experimental data.

  3. Lymph node staging in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Brown, Anna M; Fascelli, Michele; Law, Yan Mee; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-05-01

    Nodal staging is important in prostate cancer treatment. While surgical lymph node dissection is the classic method of determining whether lymph nodes harbor malignancy, this is a very invasive technique. Current noninvasive approaches to identifying malignant lymph nodes are limited. Conventional imaging methods rely on size and morphology of lymph nodes and have notoriously low sensitivity for detecting malignant nodes. New imaging techniques such as targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) with iron oxide particles are promising for nodal staging of prostate cancer. In this review, the strengths and limitations of imaging techniques for lymph node staging of prostate cancer are discussed.

  4. Comparing Stage Presence and Virtual Reality Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Xavier Samur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on the impending release of new Head Mounted Display virtual reality (VR technologies, the article examines definitions and techniques for digital presence, and compares them with research into stage presence. It opens with an outline of definitions of digital presence, comparing them with Cormac Power’s fictional, auratic, and literal modes of presence in performance. The article then looks at techniques used in VR and on stage to achieve presence. Finally, performance examples that use virtual reality technologies are presented. The article concludes that even if the technology falls short, discourse on digital presence is useful in providing insights into presence on stage.

  5. Staging mammography nonadherent women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPelle, Nancy; Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger; Rosal, Milagros C; White, Mary Jo; Stark, Jennifer Rider

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have related stages of mammography screening nonadherence with the rationale used by overdue women. We used a grounded theory approach to obtain and analyze data from focus groups, telephone interviews, and surveys. Emergent specific themes were compared with emerging decision levels of nonadherence. Each decision level was then compared with the Precaution Adoption Process Model and the Transtheoretical Model. A total of 6 key themes influencing mammogram nonadherence emerged as did 6 decision levels. Variability within themes was associated with specific decision levels. The decision levels were not adequately classified by either stage model. Stage-based educational strategies may benefit by tailoring interventions to these 6 decision levels.

  6. Isotope shift of $^{40,42,44,48}$Ca in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ transition

    CERN Document Server

    Gorges, C; Frömmgen, N; Geppert, Ch; Hammen, M; Kaufmann, S; Krämer, J; Krieger, A; Neugart, R; Sanchez, R; Nörtershäuser, W

    2015-01-01

    We report on improved isotope shift measurements of the isotopes $^{40,42,44,48}$Ca in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{3}{2}}$ (D2) transition using collinear laser spectroscopy. Accurately known isotope shifts in the $4s\\,^2 \\rm{S}_{\\frac{1}{2}} \\rightarrow 4p\\,^2\\rm{P}_{\\frac{1}{2}}$ (D1) transition were used to calibrate the ion beam energy with an uncertainty of $\\Delta U \\approx \\pm 0.25$ V. The accuracy in the D2 transition was improved by a factor of $5 - 10$. A King-plot analysis of the two transitions revealed that the field shift factor in the D2 line is about 1.8(13) % larger than in the D1 transition which is ascribed to relativistic contributions of the $4p_{1/2}$ wave function.

  7. Characterization of collagen model peptides containing 4-fluoroproline; (4(S)-fluoroproline-pro-gly)10 forms a triple helix, but (4(R)-fluoroproline-pro-gly)10 does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Masamitsu; Nishi, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2003-08-20

    Collagen model peptide (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 has a triple helical structure and undergoes a thermal transition to a single random coil structure. The transition temperature of the analogous model peptides depends largely on amino acid substitution. Substitution of Pro by 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) or 4-fluoroproline (fPro) has especially attracted attention because the position of substitution and chirality of the hydroxyl group or fluorine atom affect the transition temperatures. Here, we demonstrated that (4(S)-fPro-Pro-Gly)10 takes a triple helical structure, but (4(R)-fPro-Pro-Gly)10 exists in a single chain structure. This is not consistent with the case of Hyp substitution in our previous report where both (4(S)-Hyp-Pro-Gly)10 and (4(R)-Hyp-Pro-Gly)10 are in a single random coil state.

  8. PET for Staging of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.H.Hoelscher

    2004-01-01

    FDG-PET is of clinical value especially for detection of distant metastases or recurrent esophageal cancer. For the staging of primary tumor or locoregional lymph node metastasis PET is currently not suitable.

  9. Classification in two-stage screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longford, Nicholas T

    2015-11-10

    Decision theory is applied to the problem of setting thresholds in medical screening when it is organised in two stages. In the first stage that involves a less expensive procedure that can be applied on a mass scale, an individual is classified as a negative or a likely positive. In the second stage, the likely positives are subjected to another test that classifies them as (definite) positives or negatives. The second-stage test is more accurate, but also more expensive and more involved, and so there are incentives to restrict its application. Robustness of the method with respect to the parameters, some of which have to be set by elicitation, is assessed by sensitivity analysis.

  10. Low-level waste feed staging plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Certa, P.J.; Grams, W.H.; McConville, C.M.; L. W. Shelton, L.W.; Slaathaug, E.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The `Preliminary Low-Level Waste Feed Staging Plan` was updated to reflect the latest requirement in the Tank Waste Remediation Privatization Request for Proposals (RFP) and amendments. The updated plan develops the sequence and transfer schedule for retrieval of DST supernate by the management and integration contractor and delivery of the staged supernate to the private low-activity waste contractors for treatment. Two DSTs are allocated as intermediate staging tanks. A transfer system conflict analysis provides part of the basis for determining transfer system upgrade requirements to support both low-activity and high-level waste feed delivery. The intermediate staging tank architecture and retrieval system equipment are provided as a planning basis until design requirements documents are prepared. The actions needed to successfully implement the plan are identified. These include resolution of safety issues and changes to the feed envelope limits, minimum order quantities, and desired batch sizes.

  11. Spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge staff conducted a survey of spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River in the Bristol Bay drainage, Alaska...

  12. Two stage gear tooth dynamics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    The epicyclic gear dynamics program was expanded to add the option of evaluating the tooth pair dynamics for two epicyclic gear stages with peripheral components. This was a practical extension to the program as multiple gear stages are often used for speed reduction, space, weight, and/or auxiliary units. The option was developed for either stage to be a basic planetary, star, single external-external mesh, or single external-internal mesh. The two stage system allows for modeling of the peripherals with an input mass and shaft, an output mass and shaft, and a connecting shaft. Execution of the initial test case indicated an instability in the solution with the tooth paid loads growing to excessive magnitudes. A procedure to trace the instability is recommended as well as a method of reducing the program's computation time by reducing the number of boundary condition iterations.

  13. Konkurss "Sony Jazz Stage" otsib uusi talente

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    The Contemporary Music Centre'i korraldatavast konkursist "Sony Jazz Stage 2006". Võistlus toimub vokaali ja bassi (basskitarri või kontrabassi) kategoorias (The Contemporary Music Centre'i posti-või meiliaadress - vt. www.jazzkaar.ee)

  14. Modeling the three stages in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A; Middleton, Richard H

    2013-03-07

    A typical HIV infection response consists of three stages: an initial acute infection, a long asymptomatic period and a final increase in viral load with simultaneous collapse in healthy CD4+T cell counts. The majority of existing mathematical models give a good representation of either the first two stages or the last stage of the infection. Using macrophages as a long-term active reservoir, a deterministic model is proposed to explain the three stages of the infection including the progression to AIDS. Simulation results illustrate how chronic infected macrophages can explain the progression to AIDS provoking viral explosion. Further simulation studies suggest that the proposed model retains its key properties even under moderately large parameter variations. This model provides important insights on how macrophages might play a crucial role in the long term behavior of HIV infection. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Konkurss "Sony Jazz Stage" otsib uusi talente

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    The Contemporary Music Centre'i korraldatavast konkursist "Sony Jazz Stage 2006". Võistlus toimub vokaali ja bassi (basskitarri või kontrabassi) kategoorias (The Contemporary Music Centre'i posti-või meiliaadress - vt. www.jazzkaar.ee)

  16. (Kangaroo grass) at various growth stages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... Key words: Kangaroo grass, biomass, dry matter, rangeland, growth stages. INTRODUCTION ... Soil organic matter, soil porosity and nutrient ... as soil moisture approaches field capacity (Nolan, 1994). Because Kangaroo ...

  17. Shielded multi-stage EMI noise filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Fugate, David Lee

    2016-11-08

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise filter embodiments and methods for filtering are provided herein. EMI noise filters include multiple signal exclusion enclosures. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures contain filter circuit stages. The signal exclusion enclosures can attenuate noise generated external to the enclosures and/or isolate noise currents generated by the corresponding filter circuits within the enclosures. In certain embodiments, an output of one filter circuit stage is connected to an input of the next filter circuit stage. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures can be chambers formed using conductive partitions to divide an outer signal exclusion enclosure. EMI noise filters can also include mechanisms to maintain the components of the filter circuit stages at a consistent temperature. For example, a metal base plate can distribute heat among filter components, and an insulating material can be positioned inside signal exclusion enclosures.

  18. Shielded multi-stage EMI noise filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Fugate, David Lee

    2016-11-08

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise filter embodiments and methods for filtering are provided herein. EMI noise filters include multiple signal exclusion enclosures. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures contain filter circuit stages. The signal exclusion enclosures can attenuate noise generated external to the enclosures and/or isolate noise currents generated by the corresponding filter circuits within the enclosures. In certain embodiments, an output of one filter circuit stage is connected to an input of the next filter circuit stage. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures can be chambers formed using conductive partitions to divide an outer signal exclusion enclosure. EMI noise filters can also include mechanisms to maintain the components of the filter circuit stages at a consistent temperature. For example, a metal base plate can distribute heat among filter components, and an insulating material can be positioned inside signal exclusion enclosures.

  19. Phase-matching properties of BaGa{sub 4}S{sub 7} and BaGa{sub 4}Se{sub 7}: Wide-bandgap nonlinear crystals for the mid-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badikov, Valeriy; Badikov, Dmitrii; Shevyrdyaeva, Galina [High Technologies Laboratory, Kuban State University, 149 Stavropolskaya Str., 350040 Krasnodar (Russian Federation); Tyazhev, Aleksey; Marchev, Georgi; Panyutin, Vladimir; Petrov, Valentin [Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Str. 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kwasniewski, Albert [Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Biaxial BaGa{sub 4}S{sub 7} and BaGa{sub 4}Se{sub 7} crystals transparent in the mid-IR have been grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique in sufficiently large sizes and with good optical quality to measure the refractive indices and analyze phase-matching properties. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. The "missing" typical Rhizobium leguminosarum O antigen is attached to a fatty acylated glycerol in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii 4S, a strain that also lacks the usual tetrasaccharide "core" component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R A; Wang, Y; Hollingsworth, R I

    1996-09-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii 4S has a lipopolysaccharide O antigen that lacks galactose and many of the typical glycosyl components found in related strains. Here, we show that it also lacks the typical core tetrasaccharide but synthesizes an alternative glycolipid that contains galactose and the typical O-antigen glycosyl components, suggesting that in this strain, the O antigen is transferred to an alternative lipid acceptor.

  1. Inertial Upper Stage Thermal Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-12

    REPORT SD-TR-89-26 Inertial Upper Stage Thermal Test Program D. J. SPENCER and H. A. BIXLER Aerophysics Laboratory Laboratory Operations The...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Inertial Upper Stage Thermal Test Program 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Spencer, Donald J., and Bixler, Henry A. 13a...by the laboratory thermal test program under consideration here. Details of the IUS launch vehicle characteristics and corrective action taken in

  2. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  3. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  4. INNOVATION DIFFUSION THEORY MAIN DEVELOPMENT STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Lisafiev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Main innovation diffusion development theory stages are: Rogers model of moving new products to the market including characteristics of its segments; mathematic substantiation of this model by Bass; Moor model taking into account gaps between adjacent market segments; Goldenberg model making it possible to predict sales drops at new product life cycle initial stages. It is reasonable to use this theory while moving innovative products to the market.

  5. 4-Demethylwyosine Synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi Is a Radical-S-adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with an Additional [4Fe-4S]+2 Cluster That Interacts with the Pyruvate Co-substrate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called “Radical-SAM.” These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX3CX2C motif, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:23043105

  6. First observation of the hadronic transition $ \\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_{b}(1P)$ and new measurement of the $h_b(1P)$ and $\\eta_b(1S)$ parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Tamponi, U; Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hedges, M T; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petriřc, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Starič, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, M -Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of $771.6 \\times 10^{6}$ $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB $e^+e^-$ collider, we observe for the first time the transition $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)$ with the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)]= (2.18 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.18) \\times 10^{-3}$ and we measure the $h_b(1P)$ mass $M_{h_{b}(1P)} = (9899.3 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to the hyperfine splitting $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1P) = (0.6 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$. Using the transition $h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)$, we measure the $\\eta_b(1S)$ mass $M_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (9400.7 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1S) = (59.6 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, the $\\eta_b(1S)$ width $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (8 ^{+6}_{-5} \\pm 5)$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)]= (56 \\pm 8 \\pm 4) \\%$.

  7. 汽车4S店顾客满意度评价研究——以宁波某汽车4S店为例%Customer Satisfaction Evaluation in Automobile 4S Shops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建茵

    2012-01-01

    With the increasingly fierce market competition, the customer satisfaction strategy is the important developmental strategy for the automobile 4S shops. Therefore, this paper constructs the auto 4S shop customer satisfaction evaluation system and based on the questionnaire, sample - surveys the customer satisfaction with the 4S shops in Ningbo and analyzes the importance degree and the satisfaction degree of the factors that affect the customer purchase of automotive products and the quality of the service.%面对日趋激烈的市场竞争,顾客满意度战略是汽车4S店维系老顾客争取新顾客的必备条件。因此,本文构建了汽车4S店顾客满意度评价体系,通过问卷调查的形式,对宁波汽车4S店得顾客满意度进行抽样调查,对影响顾客选购汽车产品和服务的各因素的重要程度和满意程度进行分析。

  8. 关于汽车销售4S店财务核算与管理分析%Financial Accounting and Management of Automotive Sales 4S Shops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德荣

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous maturation of current automotive market, customers have increasing and strict demands in the automobile consumption process. In today's rapid economic development, the car has become a necessity of life, the centralized management demands of cars in the brand also urgent need to produce automotive 4S shops. Therefore, automotive 4S shop is an inevitable trend. his article will focus on analyzing the financial accounting and management of automotive sales 4S shop and provide a reference for the efficient operation of automotive sales.%伴随当前汽车市场的不断成熟,客户在对汽车的消费过程中产生越来越高的要求,同时也越来越严格。在经济飞速发展的今天,汽车已经成为人们生活中的必需品,同时汽车在品牌方面的归口管理需求也迫切需要汽车4S店的产生。因此,汽车4S店是一种必然的发展趋势。本文将重点对汽车销售4S店的财务核算和管理进行分析,从而为汽车4S店的高效运营提供决策参考。

  9. Optimisation of the CT h4S bioassay for detection of human interleukin-4 secreted by mononuclear cells stimulated by phytohaemaglutinin or by human leukocyte antigen mismatched mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Lykke; Russell, Charlotte Astrid; Bendtzen, Klaus;

    2002-01-01

    bioassay with regards to specificity, sensitivity, detection limit, and reproducibility. We have found the optimal assay conditions to be 1 x 10 (4) CT.h4S cells/well deprived of IL-4 for 24 h and preincubated for 7 h followed by 18 h of incubation with tritiated methyl-thymidine. In this setting the CT.h4......S bioassay detects 5 pg/ml of human recombinant IL-4 with no detection of IL-2 in concentrations below 500 pg/ml. We have found 72 h of culture optimal for detection of IL-2 and IL-4 produced by human mononuclear cells (MNC) in response to stimulation with phytohaemaglutinin and for detection of IL...... of IL-4 detection was not due to high amounts of soluble IL-4 receptor. With the use of 1x10(6) responder cells/well in HLA-mismatched MLC, we found limited IL-4 accumulation still increasing at day 12. We conclude that the CT.h4S bioassay is a reliable and specific method for quantification of IL-4...

  10. 新形势下汽车4S店财务管理的重点%The Focus of Financial Management of Auto 4S Shop under the New Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖书梅

    2014-01-01

    汽车4S店是一种集销售、售后、零配件及信息反馈为一体的汽车销售模式,是当前各大汽车生产厂家占领市场与促进销售的重要手段。对于汽车4S店而言,财务管理是企业管理中的重要内容,是保证企业发展的重要管理手段。本文通过简单分析加强汽车4S店财务管理的重要性,并对其财务管理的重点进行探讨。%Auto 4S shop is a automotive sales model combined with the sales, after-sales, spare parts and feedback, and is an important means for major automobile manufacturers dominating the market and promoting sales currently. For auto 4S shop, the financial management is an important part of business management and an important management means to ensure the development of enterprise. In this paper, the importance of strengthening the financial management of auto 4S shop is analyzed and the focus of financial management is explored.

  11. Evaluation of stage acoustics in Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall by measuring stage support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Barron, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stage acoustics is an important characteristic for concert halls, both for the acoustic quality on stage and for the audience. However, relatively little research has been conducted into the question. This study was based on the investigation of an actual concert hall stage, that of the Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall in Korea. The stage acoustics was evaluated in the actual hall, and with two models: a 1:25 scale model and a computer model. The study was based on the stage support parameter ST1 proposed by Gade as a measure of support for individual performers [Acustica 65, 193-203 (1989)]. The variation of support was measured on the empty stage of the actual hall and in the two models. The effect of musicians on stage, the effect of moving the orchestra, the effect of ceiling height and of stage-wall profile were also investigated. Conclusions are drawn both relating to the Seoul Concert Hall stage and stages in general.

  12. Extraoral implants for orbit rehabilitation: a comparison between one-stage and two-stage surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, M C L M P; Guedes, R; de Oliveira, J A P; Pecorari, V A; Abrahão, M; Dib, L L

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the osseointegration success rate and time for delivery of the prosthesis among cases treated by two-stage or one-stage surgery for orbit rehabilitation between 2003 and 2011. Forty-five patients were included, 31 males and 14 females; 22 patients had two-stage surgery and 23 patients had one-stage surgery. A total 138 implants were installed, 42 (30.4%) on previously irradiated bone. The implant survival rate was 96.4%, with a success rate of 99.0% among non-irradiated patients and 90.5% among irradiated patients. Two-stage patients received 74 implants with a survival rate of 94.6% (four implants lost); one-stage surgery patients received 64 implants with a survival rate of 98.4% (one implant lost). The median time interval between implant fixation and delivery of the prosthesis for the two-stage group was 9.6 months and for the one-stage group was 4.0 months (P < 0.001). The one-stage technique proved to be reliable and was associated with few risks and complications; the rate of successful osseointegration was similar to those reported in the literature. The one-stage technique should be considered a viable procedure that shortens the time to final rehabilitation and facilitates appropriate patient follow-up treatment.

  13. Design and Experiment of Vertical Motion Dual-stage with Piezo-actuated Nanopositioning Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Jiaqi; Zhu Xiaobo; Chen Guozhen; Liu Pinkuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanopositioning stage based on piezoelectric (PZT ) actuators and flexure mechanisms has been widely used in dual-stage .Its favorable positioning accuracy and dynamic response can guarantee the high performance of the dual-stage .Here the vertical axis motion dual-stage is designed with piezoelectric actuator for the fine-stage and ball-screw drive integrated with wedge sliding mechanisms for the coarse-stage .The aim of the dual-stage is to meet the stringent requirement of scanning over a relative large range with high accuracy .The design results of the piezo-actuated nanopositioning stage show good static and dynamic performance ,validated by the simulation of fi-nite element analysis (FEA) .Hysteresis nonlinearity due to the use of piezoelectric stacks for actuation is studied and compensated by a proportional-integral (PI) feedback controller .To qualify the design of the motion ranges and resolutions ,an experiment platform is established .The experimental results show that the proposed dual-stage has a full range of 12 mm with the resolution of 40 nm .Guideline is provided for the design methodology of the vertical motion dual-range stages .

  14. NMR analysis of interaction of LqhalphaIT scorpion toxin with a peptide corresponding to the D4/S3-S4 loop of insect para voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Einat; Turkov, Michael; Kahn, Roy; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Anglister, Jacob

    2008-01-22

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) are large transmembrane proteins that initiate action potential in electrically excitable cells. This central role in the nervous system has made them a primary target for a large number of neurotoxins. Scorpion alpha-neurotoxins bind to Navs with high affinity and slow their inactivation, causing a prolonged action potential. Despite the similarity in their mode of action and three-dimensional structure, alpha-toxins exhibit great variations in selectivity toward insect and mammalian Navs, suggesting differences in the binding surfaces of the toxins and the channels. The scorpion alpha-toxin binding site, termed neurotoxin receptor site 3, has been shown to involve the extracellular S3-S4 loop in domain 4 of the alpha-subunit of voltage-gated sodium channels (D4/S3-S4). In this study, the binding site for peptides corresponding to the D4/S3-S4 loop of the para insect Nav was mapped on the highly insecticidal alpha-neurotoxin, LqhalphaIT, from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus, by following changes in the toxin amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts upon binding. This analysis suggests that the five-residue turn (residues LqK8-LqC12) of LqhalphaIT and those residues in its vicinity interact with the D4/S3-S4 loop of Nav. Residues LqR18, LqW38, and LqA39 could also form a patch contributing to the interaction with D4/S3-S4. Moreover, a new bioactive residue, LqV13, was identified as being important for Nav binding and specifically for the interaction with the D4/S3-S4 loop. The contribution of LqV13 to NaV binding was further verified by mutagenesis. Future studies involving other extracellular regions of Navs are required for further characterization of the structure of the LqhalphaIT-Navs binding site.

  15. Nonenzymatic Synthesis of the P-Cluster in the Nitrogenase MoFe Protein: Evidence of the Involvement of All-Ferrous [Fe4S4]0 Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The P-cluster in the nitrogenase MoFe protein is a [Fe8S7] cluster and represents the most complex FeS cluster found in Nature. To date, the exact mechanism of the in vivo synthesis of the P-cluster remains unclear. What is known is that the precursor to the P-cluster is a pair of neighboring [Fe4S4]-like clusters found on the ΔnifH MoFe protein, a protein expressed in the absence of the nitrogenase Fe protein (NifH). Moreover, incubation of the ΔnifH MoFe protein with NifH and MgATP results in the synthesis of the MoFe protein P-clusters. To improve our understanding of the mechanism of this reaction, we conducted a magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic study of the [Fe4S4]-like clusters on the ΔnifH MoFe protein. Reducing the ΔnifH MoFe protein with Ti(III) citrate results in the quenching of the S = 1/2 electron paramagnetic resonance signal associated with the [Fe4S4]+ state of the clusters. MCD spectroscopy reveals this reduction results in all four 4Fe clusters being converted into the unusual, all-ferrous [Fe4S4]0 state. Subsequent increases of the redox potential generate new clusters. Most significantly, one of these newly formed clusters is the P-cluster, which represents approximately 20–25% of the converted Fe concentration. The other two clusters are an X cluster, of unknown structure, and a classic [Fe4S4] cluster, which represents approximately 30–35% of the Fe concentration. Diamagnetic FeS clusters may also have been generated but, because of their low spectral intensity, would not have been identified. These results demonstrate that the nitrogenase P-cluster can be generated in the absence of NifH and MgATP. PMID:24520862

  16. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  18. Hybrid staging of geothermal energy conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steidel, R.F.

    1978-09-01

    A hybrid system consists of two or more energy conversion processes. This study examines the use of three energy conversion machines in hybrid systems: the conventional single-phase turbine, and the two-phase expanders known as the Lysholm engine and the radial outflow reaction turbine. Two hybrid systems are presented. The first is a two-stage, single-flash system with the Lysholm engine as the first stage, and a separator and conventional turbine as the second stage. The second system adds a radial outflow reaction turbine to recover a part of the energy rejected in the second stage. A theoretical specific power of 41.3 kW.s/lb is predicted for the two-stage, single-flash hybrid system. The addition of the radial outflow rotary turbine increases performance to 44.8 kW.s/lb. Both are superior to the double-flash system, with a specific power of 37.8 kW.s/lb. In addition, the hybrid system offers operating flexibility.

  19. Controversies in Surgical Staging of Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seracchioli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. In 1998, international federation of gynaecologists and obstetricians (FIGO required a change from clinical to surgical staging in endometrial cancer, introducing pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. This staging requirement raised controversies around the importance of determining nodal status and impact of lymphadenectomy on outcomes. There is agreement about the prognostic value of lymphadenectomy, but its extent, therapeutic value, and benefits in terms of survival are still matter of debate, especially in early stages. Accurate preoperative risk stratification can guide to the appropriate type of surgery by selecting patients who benefit of lymphadenectomy. However, available preoperative and intraoperative investigations are not highly accurate methods to detect lymph nodes and a complete surgical staging remains the most precise method to evaluate extrauterine spread of the disease. Laparotomy has always been considered the standard approach for endometrial cancer surgical staging. Traditional and robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques seem to provide equivalent results in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival compared to laparotomy. These minimally invasive approaches demonstrated additional benefits as shorter hospital stay, less use of pain killers, lower rate of complications and improved quality of life.

  20. A CENTRAL-STAGE BUFFERED THREE-STAGE CLOS SWITCHING FABRIC AND THE SCHEDULING ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuxiang; Ma Xiangjie; Lan Julong; Wang Haoxue

    2009-01-01

    Current MSM switching fabric has poor performance under unbalanced traffic. This paper presents an alternative, novel Central-stage Buffered Three-stage Clos switching (CB-3Clos) fabric and proves that this fabric can emulate output queuing switch without any speedup. By analyzing the condition to satisfy the central-stage load-balance, this paper also proposes a Central-stage Load-balanced-based Distributed Scheduling algorithm (CLDS) for CB-3Clos. The results show that, compared with Concurrent Round-Robin based Dispatching (CRRD) algorithm based on MSM, CLDS algorithm has high throughput irrespective with the traffic model and better performance in mean packet delay.

  1. Nucleic acids in the last stages of maturation of two varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Górecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the MAK column chromatography method the process of wheat grain maturation was found to be closely correlated with nucleic acid metabolism. The amount of nucleic acids in the embryos increased until the end of the maturation of the grain. This increase was the result of an intensive synthesis mainly of rRNA fractions and to some extent also of sRNA. The quantitative proportion of various fractions of nucleic acids also changed in the last stages of grain maturation. In the period of wax maturity in wheat embryos a higher content of 4S and 5S RNA was found which partly explains a higher viability of these seeds.

  2. Stagering: Een ontwikkelingspuzzel [The challenge of staging developmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, R.J. van der; Wijngaarden-Cremers, P.J. van; Staal, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the basis of our current knowledge, developmental disorders can be divided into the following stages: stage 0: normal variation, stage 1: simple disorder of moderate severity, stage 2: complicating co-morbidity and/or harmful background circumstances, and stage 3: serious disorder wit

  3. Time-Limited Psychotherapy: An Interactional Stage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Terence J.

    One model of successful time-limited psychotherapy characterizes the therapy as a movement through three interactional stages: the early rapport attainment stage, the middle conflict stage, and the final resolution stage. According to this model, these stages are indicated by the relative presence of communicational harmony. To examine the…

  4. Life stages: interactions and spatial patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Suzanne L; Cushing, J M; Costantino, R F

    2012-02-01

    In many stage-structured species, different life stages often occupy separate spatial niches in a heterogeneous environment. Life stages of the giant flour beetle Tribolium brevicornis (Leconte), in particular adults and pupae, occupy different locations in a homogeneous habitat. This unique spatial pattern does not occur in the well-studied stored grain pests T. castaneum (Herbst) and T. confusum (Duval). We propose density dependent dispersal as a causal mechanism for this spatial pattern. We model and explore the spatial dynamics of T. brevicornis with a set of four density dependent integrodifference and difference equations. The spatial model exhibits multiple attractors: a spatially uniform attractor and a patchy attractor with pupae and adults spatially separated. The model attractors are consistent with experimental observations.

  5. STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

    2002-08-29

    TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

  6. The three stages of magma ocean cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1992-12-01

    Models of magma ocean (MO) cooling and crystallization can provide important constraints on MO plausibility for a given planet, on the origin of long term, stable crusts, and even on the origin of the solar system. Assuming the MO is initially extensive enough to have a mostly molten surface, its first stage of cooling is an era of radiative heat loss from the surface, with extremely rapid convection below, and no conductive layer in between. The development of the chill crust starts the second stage of MO cooling. Heat loss is now limited by conduction through the crust. The third stage of cooling starts when the near surface MO evolves compositionally to the point of saturation with feldspar. At this point, the cooling rate again precipitously diminishes, the rate of crustal thickness growth as a function of temperature suddenly increases. More work on incorporating chemical constraints into the evolving physical models of MO solidification would be worthwhile.

  7. Imaging the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, William; Small, Scott A

    2006-12-01

    Historical progress in medicine can be charted along the lines of technical innovations that have visualized the invisible. One hundred years ago, Alois Alzheimer exploited newly developed histological stains to visualize his eponymonous disease in dead tissue under the microscope. Now, as we are entering the second century of Alzheimer's disease research, technical innovation has endowed us with a range of in vivo imaging techniques that promise to visualize Alzheimer' disease in living people. The earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease is characterized by cell-sickness, not cell-death, and can occur before the deposition of amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. In principle, 'functional' imaging techniques might be able to detect this early stage of the disease, a stage that was invisible to Alzheimer himself. Here, we will first define the neurobiological meaning of 'function' and then review the different approaches that measure brain dysfunction in Alzheimer' disease.

  8. Radiation therapy for stage IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the outcome and discover predictive factors for patients with stage IVA cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with stage IVA cervical cancer who received definitive radiation therapy between 1992 and 2009. On univariate analysis, statistically significant prognostic factors for improved local control rate (LCR) were absence of pyometra (p=0.037) and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Prognostic factors for improved progression-free survival (PFS) were absence of pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial presentation (p=0.014), and EQD2 at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Patients with stage IVA disease had poor median survival. However adequate radiation dose to point A produced favorable LCR and PFS, therefore efforts should be made to increase the point A dose.

  9. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  10. Stage fright in singers: three reaction types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghs, Geert

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on both my own personal experience and that of many colleagues and pupils, I shall describe three kinds of reactions to stage fright. The first is the primarily mental reaction of derealization, which involves feeling cut off from fear and decreasing body awareness. The second and third reactions to stage fright involve (a) increased and (b) decreased muscle tonus and their associated breathing patterns. Furthermore, I shall indicate how singers manage to pull themselves together through the very act of producing their first tones. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Stage- vs. Channel-strip Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Korsgaard, Dannie Michael; Büchert, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the stage metaphor and the channel strip metaphor in terms of performance. Traditionally, music mixing consoles employ a channels strip control metaphor for adjusting parameters such as volume and panning of each track. An alternative control metaphor, the so-called stage...... metaphor lets the user adjust volume and panning by positioning tracks relative to a virtual listening position. In this study test participants are given the task to adjust volume and panning of one channel (in mixes consisting of three channels) in order to replicate a series of simple pre-rendered mixes...

  12. iPhone 4S For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Baig, Edward C

    2011-01-01

    The full-color guide to getting the most out of your iPhone Completely updated and revised to include iOS 5, iCloud, and other new Apple features, this full-color book is your guide to all things iPhone. Bestselling veteran authors Edward Baig and Bob "Dr. Mac" LeVitus introduce you to the capabilities of the iPhone for making phone calls, browsing the Internet, sending and receiving e-mails, working with the calendar, watching videos, taking great photos, and much more. You'll discover how to set up iTunes, buy music and videos, protect your information, troubleshoot, multitask, and download

  13. 4S Store to Face Watershed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mr. Xue Xu, a famous professor from the School of Economics of Beijing University and a well-known corporate strategy and marketing expert, recently commented that the strengthening of brands under the wing of international automakers are destined to weaken the sales of their joint ventures.

  14. Staging in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; PET-CT versus Standard Staging Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Yalçın

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important factor for accurate treatment of patients with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is accuracy of the initial staging. The aim of this study was to determine how often patients, staged as local or local-advanced disease by standard staging procedures (SSPs, would be staged to have a metastatic disease based on the findings of the positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT scan. Methods: Patients with SCLC who were staged as I, II, or III disease by SSPs (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging, 7th edition formed the study population. SSPs included computed tomography of chest, abdomen, brain (or magnetic resonance imaging of brain, and bone scintigraphy. These patients were re-staged with 18F-FDG PET-CT scan. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, 27 patients were prospectively studied. Of these patients, 92.5% were male and the median age was 61. Among 27 patients, distant metastasis was detected by PET-CT in 7 (25.9% patients. Two of 7 patients were determined as stage IIIA by SSPs and 5 of 17 patients that were determined as stage IIIB by SSPs were upstaged to metastatic disease by PET-CT. All of the 7 patients had bone metastasis by PET-CT. But bone metastasis could not be detected with bone scintigraphy. Conclusion: PET-CT detected distant metastasis in one quarter of SCLC stage III patients by SSPs. Patients who staged local-advanced SCLC with CT of the chest have to be assessed by PET-CT for extracranial distant metastasis.

  15. 低水平病毒载量长期不进展人类免疫缺陷病毒-1感染者的人类免疫缺陷病毒-1的遗传分析%Genetic analysis of human immunodeficieney virus-1 in long-term non-progress human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected individuals with low viral load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟烈; 唐小平; 唐漾波; 魏绍静

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析低水平病毒载量长期不进展(LTNP)HIV-1感染者HIV-1的遗传特征.方法 采用有限稀释套式PCR、终点PCR和序列确证分析等技术对5例低病毒载量LTNP HIV-1感染者不同随访时间点HIV-1前病毒enw基因c2-v3-c3区域和gag基因p17区域进行扩增和序列分析.分别计算不同时间点内以及不同时间点与用于分析的最早时间点之间上述两个基因区域的基因多样性和基因离散率,依据基因离散率计算基因的进化率,统计学分析用GraphPad Prism 5软件.结果 5例患者在21个随访时间点共获得115条c2-v3-c3序列和173条p17序列.进化树分析表明,不同患者的序列分开,同一患者的序列特异地聚集,序列质量可靠.5例患者env基因c2-v3-c3区域不同时间点基因多样性为0~6.38%,平均为2.1%,病例1、3和5基因多样性随感染时间的增加逐渐升高(r=0.7257、0.4954、0.3288),病例2和4基因多样性随感染时间的增加逐渐下降(r=-0.3759、-0.5028);基因离散率为0.1%~6.5%,平均为2.9%,除病例1外,基因离散率均随感染时间间隔的增加逐渐升高,进化率分别为每年每位点-0.13%、0.81%、0.09%、0.14%和0.16%,平均为0.21%.gag基因p17区域基因多样性为0~2.5%,平均为1.2%,基因离散率为0.2%~2.7%,平均为1.4%,除病例3基因多样性和基因离散率随感染时间或时间间隔的增加下降外,其余病例均随感染时间或时间间隔的增加而逐渐升高,进化率分别为每年每位点0.087%、0.064%、-0.014%、0.081%和0.087%,平均为0.061%.结论 低水平病毒载量LTNP HIV-1感染者HIV-1有复制能力,病毒基因维持较低水平的进化;HIV-1 env基因变化的程度大于gag基因.%Objective To analyze the genetic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 in long-term non-progress (LTNP) HIV-1 infected individuals with low viral load. Methods Limiting dilution nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and end-point PCR were used to

  16. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted.

  17. Demonstration of physical proximity between the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Pilar; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Machín, Angeles; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Carretero, Luis; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2011-05-27

    Potassium channels encoded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) contribute to cardiac repolarization as a result of their characteristic gating properties. The hERG channel N terminus acts as a crucial determinant in gating. It is also known that the S4-S5 linker couples the voltage-sensing machinery to the channel gate. Moreover, this linker has been repeatedly proposed as an interaction site for the distal portion of the N terminus controlling channel gating, but direct evidence for such an interaction is still lacking. In this study, we used disulfide bond formation between pairs of engineered cysteines to demonstrate the close proximity between the beginning of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker. Currents from channels with introduced cysteines were rapidly and strongly attenuated by an oxidizing agent, this effect being maximal for cysteine pairs located around amino acids 3 and 542 of the hERG sequence. The state-dependent modification of the double-mutant channels, but not the single-cysteine mutants, and the ability to readily reverse modification with the reducing agent dithiothreitol indicate that a disulfide bond is formed under oxidizing conditions, locking the channels in a non-conducting state. We conclude that physical interactions between the N-terminal-most segment of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker constitute an essential component of the hERG gating machinery, thus providing a molecular basis for previous data and indicating an important contribution of these cytoplasmic domains in controlling its unusual gating and hence determining its physiological role in setting the electrical behavior of cardiac and other cell types.

  18. First observation of the hadronic transition Υ(4S)→ηhb(1P) and new measurement of the hb(1P) and ηb(1S) parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponi, Umberto; Mussa, Roberto; Abdesselam, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Atmacan, H.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hedges, Michael T.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, Kay; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, Anatoly; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-09-29

    Using a sample of 771.6 × 106 Υ(4S) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e +e - collider, we observe for the first time the transition Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P) with the branching fraction B[Υ(4S) → ηhb(1P)] = (2.18 ± 0.11 ± 0.18) × 10-3 and we measure the hb(1P) mass Mhb(1P ) = (9899.3 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to the hyperfine splitting ΔMHF (1P) = (0.6 ± 0.4 ± 1.0) MeV/c 2 . Using the transition hb(1P) → γηb(1S), we measure the ηb(1S) mass Mηb(1S) = (9400.7 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , corresponding to ΔMHF (1S) = (59.6 ± 1.7 ± 1.6) MeV/c 2 , the ηb(1S) width Γηb(1S) = (8+6 -5 ± 5) MeV/c 2 and the branching fraction B[hb(1P) → γηb(1S)] = (56 ± 8 ± 4)%.

  19. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-...... in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies....

  20. Influence of charged microenvironment on redox potential and diffusion coefficient of [Fe4S4(SPh)4](NBu4)2 in DMF and inside CTAB film on electrode surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raben Ch Roy; Diganta Kumar Das

    2005-11-01

    Redox potential of [Fe4S4(SPh)4]2-/3-, a model of the active centre of ferredoxin, in DMF solution shows a 90-mV positive shift, when the charged microenvironment provided by the surfactant is changed from negative to positive. Inside the positive surfactant film on GC electrode there is a 235-mV positive shift in redox potential compared to that in neutral DMF solution. Diffusion coefficient of the reduced cluster onto the electrode surface is also found to be 102 times greater in the presence of negative surfactant compared to that in positive surfactant.

  1. The soluble extracellular domain of EphB4 (sEphB4) antagonizes EphB4-EphrinB2 interaction, modulates angiogenesis, and inhibits tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kertesz, Nathalie; Krasnoperov, Valery; Reddy, Ramachandra; Leshanski, Lucy; Kumar, S. Ram; Zozulya, Sergey; Gill, Parkash S.

    2006-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4 and its ligand EphrinB2 play a crucial role in vascular development during embryogenesis. The soluble monomeric derivative of the extracellular domain of EphB4 (sEphB4) was designed as an antagonist of EphB4/EphrinB2 signaling. sEphB4 blocks activation of EphB4 and EphrinB2; suppresses endothelial cell migration, adhesion, and tube formation in vitro; and inhibits the angiogenic effects of various growth factors (VEGF and bFGF) in vivo. sEphB4 also inhibits ...

  2. Glutamine substitution at alanine1649 in the S4-S5 cytoplasmic loop of domain 4 removes the voltage sensitivity of fast inactivation in the human heart sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Chehab, N; Wieland, S J; Kallen, R G

    1998-05-01

    Normal activation-inactivation coupling in sodium channels insures that inactivation is slow at small but rapid at large depolarizations. M1651Q/M1652Q substitutions in the cytoplasmic loop connecting the fourth and fifth transmembrane segments of Domain 4 (S4-S5/D4) of the human heart sodium channel subtype 1 (hH1) affect the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation (Tang, L., R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1996. J. Gen. Physiol. 108:89-104.). We now show that glutamine substitutions NH2-terminal to the methionines (L1646, L1647, F1648, A1649, L1650) also influence the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation compared with the wild-type channel. In contrast, mutations at the COOH-terminal end of the S4-S5/D4 segment (L1654, P1655, A1656) are without significant effect. Strikingly, the A1649Q mutation renders the current decay time constants virtually voltage independent and decreases the voltage dependences of steady state inactivation and the time constants for the recovery from inactivation. Single-channel measurements show that at negative voltages latency times to first opening are shorter and less voltage dependent in A1649Q than in wild-type channels; peak open probabilities are significantly smaller and the mean open times are shorter. This indicates that the rate constants for inactivation and, probably, activation are increased at negative voltages by the A1649Q mutation reminiscent of Y1494Q/ Y1495Q mutations in the cytoplasmic loop between the third and fourth domains (O'Leary, M.E., L.Q. Chen, R.G. Kallen, and R. Horn. 1995. J. Gen. Physiol. 106:641-658.). Other substitutions, A1649S and A1649V, decrease but fail to eliminate the voltage dependence of time constants for inactivation, suggesting that the decreased hydrophobicity of glutamine at either residues A1649 or Y1494Y1495 may disrupt a linkage between S4-S5/D4 and the interdomain 3-4 loop interfering with normal activation-inactivation coupling.

  3. Structural and spectroscopic ellipsometry studies on vacuum-evaporated Sn{sub 2m−4}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 2m+2} (m = 2.5, 3 and 4) thin films deposited on glass and Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelkader, D., E-mail: dhaferabdelkader@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque et Matériaux Semi-conducteurs-ENIT, Université Tunis ElManar, BP37, Lebelvédère, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Akkari, F. Chaffar; Khemiri, N. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque et Matériaux Semi-conducteurs-ENIT, Université Tunis ElManar, BP37, Lebelvédère, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Gallas, B. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris-CNRS-Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Antoni, F. [ICube-Laboratoire des sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l' Informatique et de l’Imagerie, Université de Strasbourg-CNRS, 23, rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Kanzari, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque et Matériaux Semi-conducteurs-ENIT, Université Tunis ElManar, BP37, Lebelvédère, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingénieurs de Tunis-IPEIT, Université de Tunis, 2, Rue Jawaher Lel Nehru, 1089 Montfleury (Tunisia)

    2015-10-15

    Sn{sub 2m−4}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 2m+2} (m = 2.5, 3 and 4) thin films were deposited on glass and Si substrates using vacuum evaporation technique. The structural properties have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The XRD patterns revealed the polycrystalline nature of the films on substrates even when they are not heated during evaporation process. Raman spectra revealed four main peaks. The main structural units of Sn–Sb–S thin films are tetrahedral [SnS{sub 4}] and pyramidal [SbS{sub 3}]. The cross-section morphology was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements (ψ and Δ) were carried out to study the optical properties of the films. SE measured data were analyzed by considering double layer optical model for all the samples, with the two oscillators Tauc-Lorentz and Gaussian dispersion relations. Surface roughness was taken into consideration as shown in SEM micrographs. From the ellipsometric study, we determined the thicknesses of the modeled layers and their optical parameters (refractive index, absorption coefficient …). All the films exhibit high absorption coefficient α in the visible range (>10{sup 5} cm{sup −1}). The values of the band gap energy E{sub g} of Sn{sub 2m−4}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 2m+2} thin films deposited on glass were 1.52, 1.29 and 1.28 eV, respectively for m = 2.5, 3 and 4. For the samples deposited on silicon, E{sub g}(SnSb{sub 4}S{sub 7}) = 1.29 eV, E{sub g}(SnSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) = 1.13 eV and E{sub g}(Sn{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}S{sub 5}) = 1.48 eV. - Highlights: • Sn{sub 2m−4}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 2m+2} films were thermally evaporated on glass and Si substrates. • The films have polycrystalline nature without any heat treatment. • [SnS{sub 4}] tetrahedral and [SbS{sub 3}] pyramidal are the main structural units. • Thicknesses and optical parameters were determined by ellipsometric study. • The films exhibit high absorption coefficient α in the visible

  4. The IASLC Mesothelioma Staging Project: Improving Staging of a Rare Disease Through International Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Harvey; Giroux, Dorothy; Kennedy, Catherine; Ruffini, Enrico; Cangir, Ayten K; Rice, David; Asamura, Hisao; Waller, David; Edwards, John; Weder, Walter; Hoffmann, Hans; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Nowak, Anna; Rusch, Valerie W

    2016-12-01

    For nearly 40 years, there was no generally accepted staging system for malignant pleural mesothelioma. In 1994, members of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, in collaboration with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, proposed a TNM staging system based on analyses of outcomes in retrospective surgical series and small clinical trials. Subsequently accepted by the American Joint Commission on Cancer and the Union for International Cancer Control for the sixth editions of their staging manuals, this system has since been the international staging standard. However, it has significant limitations, particularly with respect to clinical staging and to the categories for lymph node staging. Here we provide an overview of the development of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer malignant pleural mesothelioma staging database, which was designed to address these limitations through the development of a large international data set. Analyses of this database, described in papers linked to this overview, are being used to inform revisions in the eighth editions of the American Joint Commission on Cancer and Union for International Cancer Control staging systems.

  5. The microorganisms in chronically infected end-stage and non-end-stage cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Alhede, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infections because of highly viscous mucus, where bacteria can form biofilms. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in the lungs of end-stage and non-end-stage patients using standard culturing techniques and mo...

  6. Treatment results in women with clinical stage I and pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobsen, J J; Schutter, E M; Meerwaldt, J H; Van Der Palen, J; Van Der Sijde, R; Ten Cate, L N

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report survival and results of therapy and possible prognostic factors in women with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma. Forty-two patients with pathologic stage II endometrial carcinoma were treated at the department of Radiation Oncology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente between 1987 and 1998. All patients received external radiotherapy following standard surgical procedures and no adjuvant systemic therapy was given. From the 42 patients 21 had a pathologic stage IIA and 21 stage IIB. The median follow-up was 62 months. The overall recurrence rate was 21.5% (9/42). Seven patients had distant metastasis, of which three also had locoregional recurrence, vaginal vault and/or pelvic. The presence of myometrial invasion (> (1/2)) and/or lymph-angioinvasion showed a significant relation with distant metastasis (P = 0.017). Stage IIB showed more recurrences, 33% (7/21). There was a significant different 5-year disease specific survival for stage IIA and IIB, respectively, 95% and 74% (P = 0.0311). Patients with a differentiation grade 3 and stage IIB showed a significantly poorer (P = 0.003) 5-year survival of 48.6% (P = 0.003). Results obtained in the present series of patients are in accordance with the literature. The present treatment policy seems justified, except for patients with pathologic stage IIB and grade 3, in which a more aggressive treatment should be considered.

  7. How orchestra members influence stage acoustic parameters on five different concert hall stages and orchestra pits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2016-12-01

    Stage acoustic parameters aim to quantify the amount of sound energy reflected by the stage and hall boundaries and the energy decay over time. In this research, the effect of orchestra presence on parameter values is investigated. The orchestra is simulated by dressed mannequins, which have been compared with humans with respect to acoustic properties. Impulse response measurements were performed in a concert hall, a theatre, a rehearsal room, and in two orchestra pits. Conditions were empty stage floors, stage floors with music stands and chairs only, and floors occupied by the mannequin orchestra. Results show that the direct and reflected sound levels and the energy decay are significantly affected by the orchestra compared to an empty stage or a stage with chairs and stands only. Both the direct sound and early reflected sound levels are reduced by the orchestra with the distance. The late reflected sound level is reduced considerably more than can be expected based on Barron's revised theory. It can be concluded that measurements on a stage without the orchestra being present results in significant differences. A practical method is presented to perform a "musician friendly" stage acoustic measurement with a real orchestra.

  8. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Jamshidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods. A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results. The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion. The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique.

  9. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  10. Staging Events of Collaborative Design and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva; Horgen, Turid

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on events where collaborating parties get together to further the design work, and on how these events get staged in time and space. Our consern is the micro-organisation of time and space, which we find is poorly explored in the literature on product development. We...

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Hypopharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the hypopharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  12. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the oropharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  13. China's Macroeconomic Development: Stages and Nonlinear Convergence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pingyao Lai

    2006-01-01

    The central theme of this paper is that China's macroeconomic development can be divided into three distinct stages with significant trend changes. Market-oriented reform and opening to the outside world provide main driving forces for the convergence. However, the gradual reform and some inappropriate policies have caused serious ups and downs in China's macroeconomic performance.

  14. Initial stages of Bose-Einstein condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    1997-01-01

    We present the quantum theory for the nucleation of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic Bose gas. This quantum theory has the important advantage that both the kinetic and coherent stages of the nucleation process can be described in a unified way by a single Fokker-Planck equation.

  15. Initial stages of Bose-Einstein condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    We present the quantum theory for the nucleation of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic Bose gas. This quantum theory confirms the results of the semiclassical treatment, but has the important advantage that both the kinetic and coherent stages of the nucleation process can now be describe

  16. Educational Gymnastics--Stages of Content Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilges, Lynda M.

    1997-01-01

    Educational gymnastics uses a problem-solving approach to accommodate multiple correct solutions to open-ended movement problems in gymnastics. A four-stage framework is outlined to help teachers systematically increase and decrease task difficulty in educational gymnastics. Answers to common questions about educational gymnastics are provided.…

  17. [Treatment of early stage Hodgkin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1993-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment is still an unresolved issue. Twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out world-wide. The preliminary results of a global meta-analysis of these trials...

  18. Clinical TNM staging of gastrointestinal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrup, W.

    1987-08-01

    Computed tomography has decisively improved determination of clinical stage of esophagus- and rectumtumors. This method enables to diagnose and localize tumorextension to adjacent organs and metastatic lymphnode involvement in most cases without additional invasive imaging procedure. In tumors of the stomach, small bowel and colon CT is rarely used.

  19. Development Stages and Curriculum: A Japanese Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Tadahiko

    2002-01-01

    Discusses contemporary psychologists' criticism of Jean Piaget's developmental theory; reviews research in brain science, psychology, history, and the experiences of teachers; proposes a new theory of developmental stages based on children's shifting interests; discuses implications of "shifting interest center theory" for school…

  20. Capacitor blocks for linear transformer driver stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Kumpyak, E V; Smorudov, G V; Zherlitsyn, A A

    2014-01-01

    In the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology, the low inductance energy storage components and switches are directly incorporated into the individual cavities (named stages) to generate a fast output voltage pulse, which is added along a vacuum coaxial line like in an inductive voltage adder. LTD stages with air insulation were recently developed, where air is used both as insulation in a primary side of the stages and as working gas in the LTD spark gap switches. A custom designed unit, referred to as a capacitor block, was developed for use as a main structural element of the transformer stages. The capacitor block incorporates two capacitors GA 35426 (40 nF, 100 kV) and multichannel multigap gas switch. Several modifications of the capacitor blocks were developed and tested on the life time and self breakdown probability. Blocks were tested both as separate units and in an assembly of capacitive module, consisting of five capacitor blocks. This paper presents detailed design of capacitor blocks, description of operation regimes, numerical simulation of electric field in the switches, and test results.