WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-polar liquid contaminants

  1. Harvesting contaminants from liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T.; Hunter, Scott R.

    2016-05-31

    Disclosed are examples of apparatuses for evaporative purification of a contaminated liquid. In each example, there is a vessel for storing the contaminated fluid. The vessel includes a surface coated with a layer of superhydrophobic material and the surface is at least partially in contact with the contaminated liquid. The contaminants do not adhere to the surface as the purified liquid evaporates, thus allowing the contaminants to be harvested.

  2. Non-polar contaminants in estuarine waters: new extraction methods and passive sampling choices

    OpenAIRE

    Posada Ureta, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    248 p. The huge amounts of anthropogenic organic micro-pollutants released to environmental waters due to human daily activities have bequeathed many countries the legacy of organic pollution in water. Their persistence in the aquatic environments disrupsts the natural processes and thus, the need of a continous monitoring of these contaminants is endlessly revealed in several international environmental legislations. Therefore, the principal aim of this work is the development of analytic...

  3. Relaxation phenomena of polar non-polar liquid mixtures under low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    der high-frequency electric field have gained much importance to study the structure as ... Purohit et al [1,2] and Srivastava and Srivastava [3] had measured the real ε¼ ... The cell containing the experimental liquid in a given solvent .... due to inductive, mesomeric and electromeric effects of the substituent polar groups at-.

  4. Liquid crystalline phases in suspensions of pigments in non-polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susanne; Richardson, Robert M.; Eremin, Alexey

    We will discuss colloid suspensions of pigments and compare their electro-optic properties with those of traditional dyed low molecular weight liquid crystal systems. There are several potential advantages of colloidal suspensions over low molecular weight liquid crystal systems: a very high contrast because of the high orientational order parameter of suspensions of rod shaped nano-particles, the excellent light fastness of pigments as compared to dyes and high colour saturations resulting from the high loading of the colour stuff. Although a weak `single-particle' electro-optic response can be observed in dilute suspensions, the response is very much enhanced when the concentration of the particles is sufficient to lead to a nematic phase. Excellent stability of suspensions is beneficial for experimental observation and reproducibility, but it is a fundamental necessity for display applications. We therefore discuss a method to achieve long term stability of dispersed pigments and the reasons for its success. Small angle X-ray scattering was used to determine the orientational order parameter of the suspensions as a function of concentration and the dynamic response to an applied electric field. Optical properties were investigated for a wide range of pigment concentrations. Electro-optical phenomena, such as field-induced birefringence and switching, were characterised. In addition, mixtures of pigment suspensions with small amounts of ferrofluids show promise as future magneto-optical materials.

  5. On flotation separation of oxo-anions of transition metals by the use of fine-emulsified solutions of cationic collector in non-polar liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Experimentally shown is a principle possibility of flotation separation of oxo-anions of transition metals by the use of fine-emulsified solutions of cationic collector in non-polar liquids. Ammonium vanadate and sodium tuno.state solutions have been the objects of study. Hexadezilamine has been used as collector. The collector has been introduced in the form of hexadecylamine emulsions in n-decane, in tetrachloromethane or alcohol. Optimum pH value ranges are determined for separation processes

  6. Study of the motion of electrons in non polar classical liquids. Measurement of Hall effect and f.i.r. search for low energy traps. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported on experiments aimed at the measurement of the Hall mobility of injected electrons in classical non polar insulating liquids and the optical absorption associated with electrons captured by shallow traps in the liquefied rare gases. Theoretical work aimed at a better understanding of the trapping kinetics of electrons by SF 6 and O 2 dissolved in rare gas liquids was also carried out. Its conclusion is that the electric field dependence of the trapping probability can be explained, basically without adjustable parameters, by considering the Poole-Frenkel-Schotky ionization of the excited state of the traps. From the analysis of published data on the motion of electrons in liquid ethane it is tentatively concluded that at low temperatures the trapping of electrons in the liquid involves a Jahn-Teller like distortion of a single ethane molecule while at higher temperatures it is necessary to consider a small molecular cluster, possibly made up of 2 molecules

  7. Impact of water dilution and cation tail length on ionic liquid characteristics: Interplay between polar and non-polar interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Govind A.; Bharadwaj, Vivek S.; Kinsinger, Corey L.; Schutt, Timothy C.; Pisierra, Nichole R.; Maupin, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass poses a major challenge that hinders the economical utilization of biomass for the production of biofuel, plastics, and chemicals. Ionic liquids have become a promising solvent that addresses many issues in both the pretreatment process and the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond for the deconstruction of cellulosic materials. However, to make the use of ionic liquids economically viable, either the cost of ionic liquids must be reduced, or a less expensive solvent (e.g., water) may be added to reduce the overall amount of ionic liquid used in addition to reducing the viscosity of the binary liquid mixture. In this work, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the impact of water dilution on the overall liquid structure and properties of three imidazolium based ionic liquids. It is found that ionic liquid-water mixtures exhibit characteristics that can be grouped into two distinct regions, which are a function of the ionic liquid concentration. The trends observed in each region are found to correlate with the ordering in the local structure of the ionic liquid that arises from the dynamic interactions between the ion pairs. Simulation results suggest that there is a high level of local ordering in the molecular structure at high concentrations of ionic liquids that is driven by the aggregation of the cationic tails and the anion-water interactions. It is found that as the concentration of ionic liquids in the binary mixture is decreased, there is a point at which the competing self and cross interaction energies between the ionic liquid and water shifts away from a cation-anion dominated regime, which results in a significant change in the mixture properties. This break point, which occurs around 75% w/w ionic liquids, corresponds to the point at which water molecules percolate into the ionic liquid network disrupting the ionic liquids’ nanostructure. It is observed that as the cationic alkyl

  8. Studying the response of CR-39 to radon in non-polar liquids above water by Monte Carlo simulation and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaie, Mohammad Reza; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Negarestani, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The application of CR-39 has been extensive for measurement of radon and progeny in air of dwellings, but limited as regards to measurements of radon in water. In this paper, a new method is introduced for efficient measurement of radon in water by registering alpha particle tracks in a CR-39 detector placed in a non-polar medium such as cyclohexane, hexane and olive oil when each mixed with water, then separated and fixed above water, as a two-phase media. The method introduced here is however different from the widely used liquid - liquid extraction technique by liquid scintillation spectrometry since it is a passive detection method (CR-39) in a non-polar liquid with enhanced absorption of radon in the liquid, it has a capability for long sample counting to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL), it does not require sophisticated low light counting systems, and it has the potential for simultaneous measurements of large number of samples for large-scale applications. It also has a low cost and is readily available. A new Monte Carlo calculation of energy-distance travelled by alphas from radon and progeny in a medium was also investigated. The sensitivity of CR-39 detector to radon and progeny in water was determined under two conditions; in a single-phase and two-phase media. In a single-phase medium, CR-39 is directly placed either in air, water, cyclohexane, hexane or olive oil. When CR-39 is placed directly in water, its sensitivity is (2.4 ± 0.1) × 10 −4 (track/cm 2 )/(Bq.d/m 3 ). In the two-phase media, CR-39 is placed either in cyclohexane, hexane or olive oil when each is fixed above water. The sensitivities in the two-phase media are significantly enhanced and are respectively (1.98 ± 0.10) × 10 −2 , (2.8 ± 0.15) × 10 −2 and (2.86 ± 0.15) × 10 −2 (track/cm 2 )/(Bq.d/m 3 ). The sensitivies are about 76, 82 and 110 times more than that of when CR-39 is directly placed in water. The new method is a novel alternative for radon

  9. Stir bar sorptive extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of polar and non-polar emerging and priority pollutants in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Irene; Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Malvar, José Luis; Alonso, Esteban

    2017-06-02

    An analytical method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) was developed and validated for the determination of environmental concern pollutants in environmental waters by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Target compounds include six water and oil repellents (perfluorinated compounds), four preservatives (butylated hydroxytoluene and three parabens), two plasticizers (bisphenol A and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate), seven surfactants (four linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, nonylphenol and two nonylphenol ethoxylates), a flame retardant (hexabromocyclododecane), four hormones, fourteen pharmaceutical compounds, an UV-filter (2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate) and nine pesticides. To achieve the simultaneous extraction of polar and non-polar pollutants two stir bar coatings were tested, the classic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating and the novel ethylene glycol modified silicone (EG-silicone). The best extraction recoveries were obtained using EG-silicone coating. The effects of sample pH, volume and ionic strength and extraction time on extraction recoveries were evaluated. The analytical method was validated for surface water and tap water samples. The method quantification limits ranged from 7.0ngL -1 to 177ngL -1 . The inter-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was lower than 20%. Accuracy, expressed as relative recovery values, was in the range from 61 to 130%. The method was applied for the determination of the 48 target compounds in surface and tap water samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An on-line normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography method for the rapid detection of radical scavengers in non-polar food matrixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Klift, van der E.J.C.; Janssen, H.G.; Beek, van T.A.

    2009-01-01

    An on-line method for the rapid pinpointing of radical scavengers in non-polar mixtures like vegetable oils was developed. To avoid problems with dissolving the sample, normal-phase chromatography on bare silica gel was used with mixtures of hexane and methyl tert-butyl ether as the eluent. The high

  11. Comparison of the sampling rates and partitioning behaviour of polar and non-polar contaminants in the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and a monophasic mixed polymer sampler for application as an equilibrium passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2018-06-15

    In this work, Oasis HLB® beads were embedded in a silicone matrix to make a single phase passive sampler with a higher affinity for polar and ionisable compounds than silicone alone. The applicability of this mixed polymer sampler (MPS) was investigated for 34 aquatic contaminants (log K OW -0.03 to 6.26) in batch experiments. The influence of flow was investigated by comparing uptake under static and stirred conditions. The sampler characteristics of the MPS was assessed in terms of sampling rates (R S ) and sampler-water partition coefficients (K SW ), and these were compared to those of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) as a reference kinetic passive sampler. The MPS was characterized as an equilibrium sampler for both polar and non-polar compounds, with faster uptake rates and a shorter time to reach equilibrium than the POCIS. Water flow rate impacted sampling rates by up to a factor of 12 when comparing static and stirred conditions. In addition, the relative accumulation of compounds in the polyethersulfone (PES) membranes versus the inner Oasis HLB sorbent was compared for the POCIS, and ranged from <1% to 83% depending on the analyte properties. This is indicative of a potentially significant lag-phase for less polar compounds within POCIS. The findings of this study can be used to quantitatively describe the partitioning and kinetic behaviour of MPS and POCIS for a range of aquatic organic contaminants for application in field sampling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A way for evaluating parameters of electron transport in non-polar molecular liquids derived from analysis of the trapped electron recombination kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukin, L.V.

    2012-01-01

    The geminate recombination kinetics of electron-ion pairs produced by high energy radiation in liquid hydrocarbons is considered in the two state model of electron transport. The purpose of the study is to relate the trapped electron transient optical absorption, observed in the pulse radiolysis experiments, to fundamental parameters of electron transport in liquid. It is shown that measurements of the half-life time and amplitude of the trapped electron decay curve allow one to find the electron life time in a localized state. - Highlights: ► A two state electron model is applied to geminate charge recombination. ► Time dependence of trapped electrons is computed for liquid isooctane and squalane. ► Electron decay kinetics depends on electron life time in a localized state. ► Key parameters of electron transport are found from the pulse radiolysis studies.

  13. Microbial contamination of traditional liquid herbal medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data were analyzed using STATA software version 11. Results: The median age (interquartile range) of participants was 35 (27-43) years, with males accounting for 36 (61%). Of 109 liquid THMPs collected, 89 (81.7%) were found to be contaminated; with predominant fecal coliforms being Klebsiella spp and ...

  14. Alpha contaminated liquid effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, M.; Mattia, B.; Bianchini, E.; Frazzoli, F.V.

    1987-01-01

    The present report takes into consideration the possibility to carry out an in-line control of activity in liquid streams of fuel cycle nuclear plants, epecially for waste streams. The instrument developed for this purpose, has been characterized by means of static and dinamic measurements with Pu and Am bearing solutions. The results so far obtained show that the minimum detectable Pu amount is about .01mg/l and that it is possible to apply such a technique as alarm system able to detect the overcoming of a present threshold of actinides concentrations. The report also presents an approach to the spectra deconvolution in order to determine the amount of single isotopes

  15. Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles

  16. Modeling diffusion coefficients in binary mixtures of polar and non-polar compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Oleg; Shapiro, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The theory of transport coefficients in liquids, developed previously, is tested on a description of the diffusion coefficients in binary polar/non-polar mixtures, by applying advanced thermodynamic models. Comparison to a large set of experimental data shows good performance of the model. Only f...

  17. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Yimin [Urbana, IL; Kahn, Zakia [Palatine, IL; Man, Malcolm [Vancouver, CA

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  18. Determination of activity coefficients at infinite dilution of water and organic solutes (polar and non-polar) in the Ammoeng 100 ionic liquid at T = (308.15, 313.5, 323.15, and 333.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Prashant; Chiyen, Kaleng J.; Deenadayalu, Nirmala; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Activity coefficients at infinite dilution in the ionic liquid Ammoeng 100. → Twenty-seven solutes investigated at T = (308.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. → Ammoeng 100 not suited to aromatic/aliphatic and alkane/alcohol separations. - Abstract: Activity coefficients at infinite dilution (γ 13 ∞ ) have been determined for 27 solutes, viz. water and organic compounds (n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, 1-alkenes, 1-alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, and ketones) in the ionic liquid Ammoeng 100, by gas-liquid chromatography at four different temperatures, T = (308.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. Columns with different phase loadings (20 to 24)% of the ionic liquid in the stationary phase were employed to obtain γ 13 ∞ values at each temperature investigated. Partial molar excess enthalpies at infinite dilution (ΔH 1 E,∞ ) were calculated for the solutes from the temperature dependency relationship of the ln(γ 13 ∞ ) values for the temperature range in this study. The uncertainties in the determinations of the γ 13 ∞ and ΔH 1 E,∞ values are 6% and 10%, respectively. Selectivity values at infinite dilution (S ij ∞ ), have been computed from the γ 13 ∞ values to assess the potential candidacy of the Ammoeng 100 ionic liquid for the separation of alkane/alcohol mixtures. The results from this study have been compared to those available for several ionic liquids from previous investigations.

  19. [Identification of bacterial contamination in liquid soap for hospital use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Joselany Afio; Lima, Maria Alzete; Di Ciero Miranda, Maira; Serufo, José Carlos; Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins

    2011-03-01

    This study performed a bacteriological analysis of the liquid soap in dispensers that health professionals use for hand washing. This exploratory, cross-sectional study was developed at the hospitalization units of a medium-sized hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected between May and July 2007. Fifty-nine liquid soap dispensers were analyzed, of which 33 contained the following microorganisms: Burkholderia cepacia (14), Pseudomonas putidas (9), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3), Klebsiella pneumoniae (3), Enterobacter clocae (2), and Pseudomonas luteola (2). The units with the largest number of contaminated samples were the surgical (n=7) and the dermatological clinics (n=4). Contamination was also found in an original flask of the same lot of liquid soap used to fill up the dispensers. In conclusion, there is a need to regulate and control the quality of these products in the production lines as well as during use in hospital services, mainly because they are used to prevent hospital infection.

  20. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  1. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people

  2. Method and apparatus for treating liquid contaminated with radioactive particulate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirs, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus reduces the amount of radioactive solids resulting from the filtration of particulate contaminants from liquid in a nuclear reactor plant. A filtration system includes a pre-filter comprising a sheet filter medium through which the reactor liquid passes to remove relatively large particulate contaminants for storage or disposal. The reactor liquid is then passed through a bed of granular filter medium to accumulate substantially all the previously non-filtered contaminants and thereby provide a clarified liquid suitable for reuse in the reactor. Backwash liquid is flowed through the granular filter bed to remove and entrain the accumulated contaminants into a slurry which is received by a reservoir where the slurry is maintained quiescently to settle the contaminants. Removal of liquid from the reservoir concentrates the contaminants for storage or further processing, without the necessity of large quantities of filter aids that would increase the quantity of storage-requiring contaminated solids

  3. Contamination of liquid soap for hospital use with Raoultella planticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-San Miguel, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A; Medina, M J; López Hernández, S; Sánchez-Romero, I; Ganga, B; Asensio, Á

    2014-03-01

    This article reports the contamination of a batch of liquid soap for hospital use with Raoultella planticola. The micro-organism was first identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae due to the inability of automated systems to characterize this species. There is a need to strengthen the inspection of cosmetic products to be used in the hospital setting. It is recommended that hospitalized patients at the highest risk of infection should use antimicrobial soaps for personal hygiene. The incidence of infections due to R. planticola is unknown as it is usually misclassified as Klebsiella spp. by automated systems. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulsed high voltage electric discharge disinfection of microbially contaminated liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anpilov, A M; Barkhudarov, E M; Christofi, N; Kop'ev, V A; Kossyi, I A; Taktakishvili, M I; Zadiraka, Y

    2002-01-01

    To examine the use of a novel multielectrode slipping surface discharge (SSD) treatment system, capable of pulsed plasma discharge directly in water, in killing micro-organisms. Potable water containing Escherichia coli and somatic coliphages was treated with pulsed electric discharges generated by the SSD. The SSD system was highly efficient in the microbial disinfection of water with a low energy utilization (eta approximately 10-4 kW h l-1). The SSD treatment was effective in the destruction of E. coli and its coliphages through the generation of u.v. radiation, ozone and free radicals. The non-thermal treatment method can be used for the eradication of micro-organisms in a range of contaminated liquids, including milk, negating the use of pasteurization. The method utilizes multipoint electric discharges capable of treating large volumes of liquid under static and flowing regimes.

  5. Liquid scintillation cocktails comparison for tritium contamination measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzarri, S.; Belloni, P.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting is one of the most used techniques for the measurements of tritium contamination. Until few years ago a problem related to this kind of measurement was the potential toxicity of the liquid cocktails used to produce the required scintillation. Some new products that guarantee an almost negligible impact on the environment and that are no longer toxic for the operators are now available. Some of this new scintillation cocktail are suitable to be used for tritium measurement. Due to the great benefit from the health point of view of these new materials a test of their scintillation performance has been done at the ENEA centers to select the product having the best characteristics for tritium measurement. (author)

  6. Contaminants in Liquid Organic Fertilizers Used for Agriculture in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Dao M; Qiu, Xuchun; Xu, Hai; Honda, Masato; Yabe, Mitsuyasu; Kadokami, Kiwao; Shimasaki, Yohei; Oshima, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    To provide an overview of anthropogenic contaminants in liquid organic fertilizers (LOFs), products from four biogas plants in Kyushu, Japan, were analyzed for a wide range of contaminants, including copper, cadmium, tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT), perfluorooctane sulfonate, 952 semi-volatile organic compounds, and 89 antibiotics. The highest concentrations of copper (31.1 mg/L) and cadmium (0.08 mg/L) were found in LOFs from the Hita biogas plant. Only ofloxacin and sulfapyridine were detected in total 89 antibiotics screened. TBT, DBT, and perfluorooctane sulfonate were present at low concentrations in the LOFs from all four locations. Among the 952 semi-volatile organic compounds, 78 compounds were detected in at least one sample and were present at concentrations between 1.2 and 139.6 mg/L. On the basis of comparisons with previous studies and quality standards for the use of organic fertilizers, the concentrations of contaminants in the studied LOFs indicate that they might be safe for agricultural purposes.

  7. Dry washing: the solution for contaminated liquid effluent releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'homme, D.; Trambouze, P.

    1998-01-01

    The release of wash water used for contaminated garments poses an ever-increasing problem on nuclear sites. Even though the radioactivity is low, it mixes with organic compounds, thus polluting a large quantity of liquid effluents. In many cases, several thousands of m 3 /year per nuclear site are produced, which at times represents more than 30% of the volume of total releases. The conventional dry cleaning process is not a viable option, given that repeated washing cause clothes to fade and the odors are rot removed completely. In order to eliminate releases, STMI has developed, after several years of research with the Technological University of Compiegne, France, a solvent dry washing process for garments used in the nuclear industry. (author)

  8. Contamination of liquid oxygen by pressurized gaseous nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; King, Tracy K.; Ngo, Kim Chi

    1989-01-01

    The penetration of pressurized gaseous nitrogen (GN2) into liquid oxygen (LOX) was investigated experimentally in the 7-inch High Temperature Tunnel, the pilot tunnel for the 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT) at Langley Research Center. A preliminary test using a nuclear monitor revealed the extent of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) build-up at the LOX interface as a function of GN2 pressure. Then an adaptation of the differential flash vaporization technique was used to determine the binary diffusivity of the LOX-LN2 system at a temperature of 90.2 K. The measured value D equals 0.000086 sq cm/s + or - 25 percent together with two prior measurements at lower temperatures revealed an excellent fit to the Arrhenius equation, yielding a pre-exponential factor D sub 0 equals 0.0452 sq cm/s and an activation enthalpy H equals 1.08 kcal/mol. At a pressure of 1700 psi and holding time of 15 min, the penetration of LN2 into LOX (to a 1 percent contamination level) was found to be 0.9 cm, indicating but minimal impact upon 8'HTT operations.

  9. Photonic Crystal Polarizing and Non-Polarizing Beam Splitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Ying, Guan; Jin-Hui, Shi; Li-Boo, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and a non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) based on a photonic crystal (PC) directional coupler are demonstrated. The photonic crystal directional coupler consists of a hexagonal lattice of dielectric pillars in air and has a complete photonic band gap. The photonic band structure and the band gap map are calculated using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The splitting properties of the splitter are investigated numerically using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella oxytoca Isolates Originating from a Highly Contaminated Liquid Hand Soap Product

    OpenAIRE

    Hammerl, J. A.; Lasch, P.; Nitsche, A.; Dabrowski, P. W.; Hahmann, H.; Wicke, A.; Kleta, S.; Dahouk, S. Al; Dieckmann, R.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, contaminated liquid soap was detected by routine microbiological monitoring of consumer products through state health authorities. Because of its high load of Klebsiella oxytoca, the liquid soap was notified via the European Union Rapid Alert System for Dangerous Non-Food Products (EU-RAPEX) and recalled. Here, we present two draft genome sequences and a summary of their general features.

  11. Selective extraction of emerging contaminants from water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using functionalized ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cong; Li, Tianhao; Twu, Pamela; Pitner, William R; Anderson, Jared L

    2011-03-25

    Functionalized ionic liquids containing the tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (FAP) anion were used as extraction solvents in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for the extraction of 14 emerging contaminants from water samples. The extraction efficiencies and selectivities were compared to those of an in situ IL DLLME method which uses an in situ metathesis reaction to exchange 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM-Cl) to 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (BMIM-NTf(2)). Compounds containing tertiary amine functionality were extracted with high selectivity and sensitivity by the 1-(6-amino-hexyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (HNH(2)MPL-FAP) IL compared to other FAP-based ILs and the BMIM-NTf(2) IL. On the other hand, polar or acidic compounds without amine groups exhibited higher enrichment factors using the BMIM-NTf(2) IL. The detection limits for the studied analytes varied from 0.1 to 55.1 μg/L using the traditional IL DLLME method with the HNH(2)MPL-FAP IL as extraction solvent, and from 0.1 to 55.8 μg/L using in situ IL DLLME method with BMIM-Cl+LiNTf(2) as extraction solvent. A 93-fold decrease in the detection limit of caffeine was observed when using the HNH(2)MPL-FAP IL compared to that obtained using in situ IL DLLME method. Real water samples including tap water and creek water were analyzed with both IL DLLME methods and yielded recoveries ranging from 91% to 110%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in nitrogen contaminated liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.; Bradley, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    Liquid lithium penetration of 304L stainless steel and Armco iron grain boundaries has been studied. The penetration kinetics for the 304L stainless steel was found to be diffusion controlled. The measured temperature dependent delay time has been associated with the initial formation of the corrosion product at the grain boundary. Nitrogen in the stainless steel or the liquid lithium has been found to accelerate the rate of attack without changing the apparent activation energy. Grain boundary grooving of Armco iron in liquid lithium indicates that the controlling mass transport is also through a corrosion product present as a surface film. Stresses as small as 12 MPa have been found to give rise to a fifty-fold increase in the rate of penetration of Armco iron by liquid lithium

  13. Analysis of contamination in liquids hydrocarbons transport for pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Ricardo Zárate Neira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipeline contamination is usually understood to mean both the mixing effect produced when two different products transported by the same pipeline come into contact qith each other and often product of such mixing as well. This product os often referred to as "contamination" or as "interface" Cleary such intermixing is generally less serious in crude carrying, pipelines where each batch can become somewhat polluted by the batches inmediately preceding and immediately following without significant damage. However, the situation is different in a finished products pipeline, which may carry products as different as aircraft gasoline and light fuel oils. This article presents a brief description of the main factors influencing contamination with the objective of optimize conditions operating and to drive the more important respects about them.

  14. Subsurface contaminant transport from the liquid disposal area, CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killey, R.W.D.; Munch, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes geologic, hydrogeologic and geochemical information obtained from a detailed study of the aquifer receiving contaminated waste-waters from the Chemical Pit. Geologically, the study area features wind-deposited sand overlying a continuous lacustrine clayey silt and a bouldery basal till. Medium to coarse sands locally found at the base of the sand sequence appear to represent stream channel deposits following a buried drainage course towards Perch Lake. These channel sands significantly influence groundwater flow; 3-dimensional models will be required to mathematically simulate the system. Based on the subsurface data, calculated groundwater residence times between the infiltration pit and points of discharge to surface into the East Swamp range from 4 to 22 months. The shortest observed residence time for a non-reactive radio-nuclide is 5 months. Tritium data confirm that contamination is confined to the sands, but show that within the sand aquifer there is considerable heterogeneity in the distribution and rates of groundwater flow. Samples of contaminated groundwaters collected during this study featured increased redox potentials, increased acidity, and minor increases in some major ions relative to local uncontaminated groundwater. Extensive oxidation of the sands in contaminated portions of the aquifer may reflect much greater chemical differences in plume groundwaters in the past

  15. Method and apparatus for the purification of a liquid contaminated with radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for the purification of a liquid contaminated with radioactive substances is described, wherein the liquid is infed to an evaporator in or with which there is connected a column having a multiplicity of superposed plates or floors. The vapor generated in the evaporator is guided through a washing or scrubbing liquid uniformly distributed at the floors and flowing in crosswise counterflow with regard to the vapor. The washing liquid at the floors is deflected a number of times in such a manner that the washing liquid itself together with the droplets entrained by the vapor are uniformly admixed and the washing liquid subjected to a constant intake of the radioactive substance

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella oxytoca Isolates Originating from a Highly Contaminated Liquid Hand Soap Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, J A; Lasch, P; Nitsche, A; Dabrowski, P W; Hahmann, H; Wicke, A; Kleta, S; Al Dahouk, S; Dieckmann, R

    2015-07-23

    In 2013, contaminated liquid soap was detected by routine microbiological monitoring of consumer products through state health authorities. Because of its high load of Klebsiella oxytoca, the liquid soap was notified via the European Union Rapid Alert System for Dangerous Non-Food Products (EU-RAPEX) and recalled. Here, we present two draft genome sequences and a summary of their general features. Copyright © 2015 Hammerl et al.

  17. studies dielectric behaviour of some long chain alcohols and their mixtures with a non-polar solvent at various concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqub, M.; Ahmed, S.S.; Hussain, A.

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric constant, refractive index and the Kirkwood linear correlation factor of 1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol in mixtures with carbon tetrachloride at various concentration have been measured at fixed frequency (100 KHz) at 303.15 K. For the study of dielectric properties of polar molecules in a non-polar solvent at different concentrations, polarization per unit volume and excess free-energy of mixing were evaluated at this temperature. In order to study the association of polar molecules in such a non-polar solvent, the Kirkwood correlation factor (g) between molecular pairs, which exists due to the hydrogen bond association suggesting the presence of some dimension in the liquid phase with a number of dimmers, was determined. The refractive index and dielectric constant measurements are expected to shed some light on the configuration of molecules in various mixtures, and give some idea about the specific interactions between components, which decrese with the increase in the concentration of alcohol. All the three mixtures showed different behaviour for the value of correlation factor (g) as a function of concentration. The response of 1-pentanol was broadly identical to that of small chain alcohols. The different behaviour of the correlation factor (g) was interpreted in terms of the Kirkwood-Frohlich theory, as it takes into account, explicitly, such type of short and long range interactions of a mixture of polar molecules with non-polar solvents. (author)

  18. Determination of the plutonium contamination level in biological samples by liquid scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemot, J.M.; Verry, M.; Lataillade, G.

    1989-01-01

    Usual radiochemical processes are unable to carry out without delay the very large number of analyses as required in plutonium toxicology studies. Liquid scintillation is the best method to quickly determine plutonium contamination levels in most various samples (bone, organs,...) [fr

  19. THERMAL EVALUATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID ONTO CELL FLOORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    For the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP), postulated events in the new Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) can result in spilling liquids that contain Cs-137 and organics onto cell floors. The parameters of concern are the maximum temperature of the fluid following a spill and the time required for the maximum fluid temperature to be reached. Control volume models of the various process cells have been developed using standard conduction and natural convection relationships. The calculations are performed using the Mathcad modeling software. The results are being used in Consolidated Hazards Analysis Planning (CHAP) to determine the controls that may be needed to mitigate the potential impact of liquids containing Cs-137 and flammable organics that spill onto cell floors. Model development techniques and the ease of making model changes within the Mathcad environment are discussed. The results indicate that certain fluid spills result in overheating of the fluid, but the times to reach steady-state are several hundred hours. The long times allow time for spill clean up without the use of expensive mitigation controls

  20. Microbial contamination of embryos and semen during long term banking in liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielanski, A; Bergeron, H; Lau, P C K; Devenish, J

    2003-04-01

    We report on microbial contamination of embryos and semen cryopreserved in sealed plastic straws and stored for 6-35 years in liquid nitrogen. There were 32 bacterial and 1 fungal species identified from randomly drawn liquid nitrogen, frozen semen, and embryos samples stored in 8 commercial and 8 research facility liquid nitrogen (LN) tanks. The identified bacteria represented commensal or environmental microorganisms and some, such as Escherichia coli, were potential or opportunistic pathogens for humans and animals. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was the most common contaminant identified from the samples and was further shown to significantly suppress fertilization and embryonic development in vitro. Analysis of the strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed restriction patterns with no relatedness indicating that there was no apparent cross-contamination of S. maltophilia strains between the germplasm and liquid nitrogen samples. In addition, no transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) from infected semen and embryos straws to clean germplasm stored in the same LN tanks or LN was detected.

  1. Demonstration test on decontamination of contaminated pool water using liquid-solid settling technology with flocculants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Adachi, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Tagawa, Akihiro; Hosobuchi, Shigeki; Takanashi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of supplying agricultural water, a stationary purification system for contaminated water had been developed on the basis of the liquid-solid settling technology using flocculants. Two kinds of flocculants had been developed on the basis of preliminary tests: one that compounds iron ferrocyanide and the other that does not. With the use of this system and flocculants, a demonstration test was conducted to apply the decontamination technology on contaminated water in two swimming pools in an elementary school located at Motomiya City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. It is proved from the results that both the developed purification system and the flocculants can be established as a practicable decontamination technology for contaminated water: the treatment rate was 10 m 3 /hour and the elimination factor of radioactive materials was higher than 99%. (author)

  2. Comparison of solid and liquid-phase bioassays using ecoscores to assess contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, Christine [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France); Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, 930 Boulevard Lahure, BP 537, 59505 Douai Cedex (France); Ponge, Jean-Francois, E-mail: ponge@mnhn.fr [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Departement Ecologie et Gestion de la Biodiversite, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Martinez Aldaya, Maite [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, Departement Ecologie et Gestion de la Biodiversite, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Damidot, Denis [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France)

    2011-10-15

    Bioassays on aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils were compared, belonging to a wide array of trophic and response levels and using ecoscores for evaluating ecotoxicological and genotoxicological endpoints. The method was applied to four coke factory soils contaminated mainly with PAHs, but also to a lesser extent by heavy metals and cyanides. Aquatic bioassays do not differ from terrestrial bioassays when scaling soils according to toxicity but they are complementary from the viewpoint of ecological relevance. Both aquatic and terrestrial endpoints are strongly correlated with concentrations of 3-ring PAHs. This evaluation procedure allows us to propose a cost-effective battery which embraces a wide array of test organisms and response levels: it includes two rapid bioassays (Microtox) and springtail avoidance), a micronucleus test and three bioassays of a longer duration (algal growth, lettuce germination and springtail reproduction). This battery can be recommended for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Highlights: > Comparison of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays on contaminated soils, using ecoscores. > Complementarity of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays for the evaluation of environmental hazards. > Proposal for a restricted battery of 5 most sensitive tests. > Use of this restricted battery for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils give similar results in terms of toxicity but are complementary for the evaluation of environmental hazards by ecoscores.

  3. Comparison of solid and liquid-phase bioassays using ecoscores to assess contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-Francois; Martinez Aldaya, Maite; Damidot, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Bioassays on aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils were compared, belonging to a wide array of trophic and response levels and using ecoscores for evaluating ecotoxicological and genotoxicological endpoints. The method was applied to four coke factory soils contaminated mainly with PAHs, but also to a lesser extent by heavy metals and cyanides. Aquatic bioassays do not differ from terrestrial bioassays when scaling soils according to toxicity but they are complementary from the viewpoint of ecological relevance. Both aquatic and terrestrial endpoints are strongly correlated with concentrations of 3-ring PAHs. This evaluation procedure allows us to propose a cost-effective battery which embraces a wide array of test organisms and response levels: it includes two rapid bioassays (Microtox) and springtail avoidance), a micronucleus test and three bioassays of a longer duration (algal growth, lettuce germination and springtail reproduction). This battery can be recommended for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Highlights: → Comparison of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays on contaminated soils, using ecoscores. → Complementarity of liquid- and solid-phase bioassays for the evaluation of environmental hazards. → Proposal for a restricted battery of 5 most sensitive tests. → Use of this restricted battery for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. - Aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils give similar results in terms of toxicity but are complementary for the evaluation of environmental hazards by ecoscores.

  4. The main rules regarding the management of solid waste and liquid effluent contaminated during use at nuclear medicine departments; Les principales regles de gestion des dechets solides et des effluents liquides contamines dans les services de medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudouin, E. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Direction des rayonnements ionisants et de la sante, 75 - Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    This article describes the key requirements applicable to the management of contaminated medical waste and effluent from hospitals and health care centres, and more especially from nuclear medicine departments that use radionuclides for the purposes of diagnosis (in vivo or in vitro) or in patient treatment. It also presents the key management regulations, making a distinction between contaminated solid waste and contaminated liquid waste from such nuclear medicine departments. (author)

  5. Solutal Marangoni flows of miscible liquids drive transport without surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Muller, Koen; Shardt, Orest; Afkhami, Shahriar; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-11-01

    Mixing and spreading of different liquids are omnipresent in nature, life and technology, such as oil pollution on the sea, estuaries, food processing, cosmetic and beverage industries, lab-on-a-chip devices, and polymer processing. However, the mixing and spreading mechanisms for miscible liquids remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that a fully soluble liquid drop deposited on a liquid surface remains as a static lens without immediately spreading and mixing, and simultaneously a Marangoni-driven convective flow is generated, which are counterintuitive results when two liquids have different surface tensions. To understand the dynamics, we develop a theoretical model to predict the finite spreading time and length scales, the Marangoni-driven convection flow speed, and the finite timescale to establish the quasi-steady state for the Marangoni flow. The fundamental understanding of this solutal Marangoni flow may enable driving bulk flows and constructing an effective drug delivery and surface cleaning approach without causing surface contamination by immiscible chemical species.

  6. The main rules regarding the management of solid waste and liquid effluent contaminated during use at nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudouin, E.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the key requirements applicable to the management of contaminated medical waste and effluent from hospitals and health care centres, and more especially from nuclear medicine departments that use radionuclides for the purposes of diagnosis (in vivo or in vitro) or in patient treatment. It also presents the key management regulations, making a distinction between contaminated solid waste and contaminated liquid waste from such nuclear medicine departments. (author)

  7. Design technique for all-dielectric non-polarizing beam splitter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizea, A.

    2012-03-01

    There are many situations when, for the proper working, an opto-electronic device requiring optical components does not change the polarization state of light after a reflection, splitting or filtering. In this paper, a design for a non-polarizing beam splitter plate is proposed. Based on certain optical properties of homogeneous dielectric materials we will establish a reliable thin film package formula, excellent for the start of optimization to obtain a 20-nm bandwidth non-polarizing beam splitter.

  8. The circulating air barrier: Effective prevention of liquid contaminant movement through soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.; Towers, T.; Johnson, H.; Overbey, W.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental cleanup task facing the United States Department of Energy (DOE) presents enormous technical, planning and institutional challenges, including the need to develop new technologies that are faster, better, safer, and cheaper, in order to expedite site cleanup. Characterization of contaminated sediments resulting from past tank leaks, continued safe operations of the tanks, total confinement of leaking materials, secondary waste minimization, and final closure of the single shell tanks are five of the many facets of the storage tank issue at Hanford and elsewhere in the nation. Each of these issues are considered in the development of the Circulating Air Barrier (CAB). The Circulating Air Barrier system is a desiccant-type barrier designed to prevent the movement of liquid contaminants toward the groundwater by using an air circulation and processing system to lower the water saturation in a targeted subsurface zone below the saturation level required for liquid flow. Vertical or horizontal wells can be installed to create a matrix of air injection and production so that air flows across the target barrier zone to the production wells. In the event of a tank leak, the system serves as a tool for early detection and provides a means to withdraw volatile contaminants to the surface for treatment. Demonstration and full-scale CAB systems have been designed for the Hanford Site. This includes chemical and geological characterization; model development, sensitivity analysis and performance optimization; subsurface configuration and surface processing equipment design; and development of a test program with associated cost estimates

  9. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.

    2014-04-04

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non-polar lipid layer, the thickness of the aqueous layer and the concentration of polar lipids which reside at the interface between the two. We also utilise a force balance in the non-polar lipid layer in order to determine its velocity. We show how to obtain previous models in the literature from our model by making particular choices of the parameters. We see the formation of boundary layers in some of these submodels, across which the concentration of polar lipid and the non-polar lipid velocity and film thickness vary. We solve our model numerically for physically realistic parameter values, and we find that the evolution of the aqueous layer and the polar lipid layer are similar to that described by previous authors. However, there are interesting dynamics for the non-polar lipid layer. The effects of altering the key parameters are highlighted and discussed. In particular, we see that the Marangoni number plays a key role in determining how far over the eye the non-polar lipid spreads.

  10. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1987-08-10

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

  11. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Liquid electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  13. Changes in liquid water alter nutrient bioavailability and gas diffusion in frozen antarctic soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alexis Nadine; Snape, Ian; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Bioremediation has been used to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC)-contaminated sites in polar regions; however, limited knowledge exists in understanding how frozen conditions influence factors that regulate microbial activity. We hypothesized that increased liquid water (θ(liquid) ) would affect nutrient supply rates (NSR) and gas diffusion under frozen conditions. If true, management practices that increase θ(liquid) should also increase bioremediation in polar soils by reducing nutrient and oxygen limitations. Influence of θ(liquid) on NSR was determined using diesel-contaminated soil (0-8,000 mg kg(-1)) from Casey Station, Antarctica. The θ(liquid) was altered between 0.007 and 0.035 cm(3) cm(-3) by packing soil cores at different bulk densities. The nutrient supply rate of NH 4+ and NO 3-, as well as gas diffusion coefficient, D(s), were measured at two temperatures, 21°C and -5°C, to correct for bulk density effects. Freezing decreased NSR of both NH 4+ and NO 3-, with θ(liquid) linked to nitrate and ammonia NSR in frozen soil. Similarly for D(s), decreases due to freezing were much more pronounced in soils with low θ(liquid) compared to soils with higher θ(liquid) contents. Additional studies are needed to determine the relationship between degradation rates and θ(liquid) under frozen conditions. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  14. Conversion of proteins from a non-polarized to an apical secretory pattern in MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Lotte K.; Larsen, Jakob E.; Hansen, Martin; Truffer, Renato

    2005-01-01

    Previously it was shown that fusion proteins containing the amino terminus of an apical targeted member of the serpin family fused to the corresponding carboxyl terminus of the non-polarized secreted serpin, antithrombin, are secreted mainly to the apical side of MDCK cells. The present study shows that this is neither due to the transfer of an apical sorting signal from the apically expressed proteins, since a sequence of random amino acids acts the same, nor is it due to the deletion of a conserved signal for correct targeting from the non-polarized secreted protein. Our results suggest that the polarity of secretion is determined by conformational sensitive sorting signals

  15. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOLID AND LIQUID WASTE PRODUCTS FROM THE HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATED ENERGY CROPS GASIFICATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Werle

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of basic physico-chemical properties of solid (ash and liquid (tar waste products of the gasification process of the heavy metal contaminated energy crops. The gasification process has carried out in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. Three types of energy crops: Miscanthus x giganteus, Sida hermaphrodita and Spartina Pectinata were used. The experimental plots were established on heavy metal contaminated arable land located in Bytom (southern part of Poland, Silesian Voivodship.

  16. The influence of interfacial properties on the two-phase liquid flow of organic contaminants in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demond, A.H.; Desai, F.N.; Hayes, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    DOE's waste sites are contaminated with a variety of organic liquids. Because of their low solubility in water, organic liquids such as these will persist as separate liquid phases and be transported as such in the subsurface. Thus, an improved understanding of the factors influencing the movement of a separate organic liquid phase in the subsurface is important to DOE's efforts to control groundwater contamination. Wettability is sometimes cited as the most important factor influencing two-phase flow in porous media. The wetting phase migrates preferentially through the smaller pores, whereas the nonwetting phase is concentrated in the larger pores. Typically, aquifers are thought of as strongly water-wet, implying that the organic liquid preferentially occupies the larger pores. But in fact, that state depends on the properties of the three interfaces of the system: between the organic liquid and water, water and the solid, and the organic liquid and the solid. Characteristics of the system which affect the interfacial properties also impact the wettability, such as the nature of the aquifer solids' surfaces, the composition of the goundwater and the properties of the organic contaminant. The alteration of wettability at DOE waste sites may be dominated by the presence of co-contaminants such as organic acids and bases which behave as surface-active agents or surfactants. Because of their physicochemical nature, surfactants will sorb preferentially at the interfaces of the system, thereby impacting the wettability and the distribution of the liquids in the porous medium. The over-all objective of this research was to determine how changes in interfacial properties affect two-phase flow. Specifically, the objective was to examine the effect of surfactant sorption on capillary pressure relationships by correlating measurements of sorption, zeta potential, interfacial tension and contact angle, with changes in the capillary pressure-saturation relationships

  17. DEMETERRES project: development of innovative technologies for removing radionuclides from contaminated solid and liquid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagvardieff, Pierre; Barré, Yves; Blin, Virginie; Faure, Sylvain; Fornier, Anne; Grange, Didier; Grandjean, Agnès; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Henner, Pascale; Siroux, Brice; Leybros, Antoine; Messalier, Marc; Paillard, Hervé; Prévost, Thierry; Rennesson, Malvina; Sarrobert, Catherine; Vavasseur, Alain; Véry, Anne-Aliénor

    2017-09-01

    As part of the « post-accidental » management, the DEMETERRES project (RSNR PIA) proposes to develop innovative and environmentally friendly methods for removal of cesium and strontium from soils and liquid matrices in order to rehabilitate them for an agricultural use while minimizing the volume of generated wastes in accordance with the nuclear waste existing processes. Complementary approaches are used: they are based on physico-chemical technologies (such as foams flotation, supercritical CO2 extraction, extractants in fluidized bed reactor …) and biological ones (bioextractants, phytoextraction) which concepts are described. These researches aim to design innovative and performing extractants in term of selectivity and to achieve the pilot reactor phase for each of them. These pilots will group in a network to provide a technological platform lasting the project, to which will be attached an available network of experts. The respective advances of these researches are presented, completed of tests initiated in Japan on contaminated soils through partnerships.

  18. Contaminant transport modelling in tidal influenced water body for low level liquid waste discharge out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Naidu, Velamala Simhadri

    2018-01-01

    Low level liquid waste is generated from nuclear reactor operation and reprocessing of spent fuel. This waste is discharged into the water body after removing bulk of its radioactivity. Dispersion of contaminant mainly depends on location of outfall and hydrodynamics of water body. For radiological impact assessment, in most of the analytical formulations, source term is taken as continuous release. However, this may not be always true as the water level is influenced by tidal movement and the selected outfall may come under intertidal zone in due course of the tidal cycle. To understand these phenomena, a case study has been carried out to evaluate hydrodynamic characteristics and dilution potential of outfall located in inter-tidal zone using numerical modelling

  19. Use of liquid nitrogen during storage in a cell and tissue bank: contamination risk and effect on the detectability of potential viral contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabet, Vicente; Alvarez, Manuel; Solves, Pilar; Ocete, Dolores; Gimeno, Concepción

    2012-04-01

    Cryopreservation is widely used for banking cells and tissues intended for transplantation. Liquid nitrogen provides a very stable ultra-low temperature environment. Thus, it is used for longterm storage. Unlike the exhaustive microbiological monitoring of the environmental conditions during tissue processing, storage is not usually considered as a critical point of potential contamination risk in professional standards for cell and tissue banking. We have analysed the presence of microbial agents inside our nitrogen tanks. We have mainly detected environmental and water-borne bacteria and fungi. In addition, we have studied the effect of liquid nitrogen exposure on virus detectability. Only differences for hepatitis C virus RNA were observed. Measures for contamination risk reduction during storage must be mandatory in cell and tissue banking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of the electronegativity for the interface properties of non-polar heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar; Singh, Nirpendra; Kahaly, M. Upadhyay; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the interfaces in the non-polar ATiO 3/SrTiO 3 (A=Pb, Ca, Ba) heterostructures. All TiO 2-terminated interfaces show an insulating behavior. By reduction of the O content in the AO, SrO, and TiO 2

  1. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.; Breward, C.  J.  W.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non

  2. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish [Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041-1518 (United States); Liebson, Lindsay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  3. Technical feasibility study for the electrochemical treatment of Phaeozem soil contaminated with radioactive organic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdovinos G, V.

    2014-01-01

    The application of radioisotopes in medicine and research generates radioactive waste. A large part of these wastes are composed by scintillation liquid (mixtures of organic solvents, as toluene and xylene, fluorescent materials and surfactants) contaminated with radioisotopes such as 3 H (12.3 y), 14 C (5730 y), 238 U (4.468 x 10 9 y), 232 Th (1.41 x 10 10 y), 204 Tl (3.7 y) or 22 Na (2.6 y). In Mexico during the 80 s, these wastes were absorbed on soil to decrease their hazardous behavior during interim storage. However, these wastes must be removed for reprocessing and final landscaping. Therefore, the objective of this thesis is to study the technical feasibility of the electrochemical treatment of soils types Phaeozem contaminated with radioactive organic liquid waste (ROLW). For this study, an electrochemical treatment at laboratory level was applied, giving it an electrokinetic tracking. Control samples were prepared with different scintillation liquid (INSTAL Gel- XF, ULTIMA Gold AB TM and ULTIMA Gold XR TM as support electrolyte and polarization curves were constructed to select the current with the highest mass transfer. An analysis of the liquids and solids, before and after the application of the different potentials; the liquid phase was characterized by Gas Chromatography coupled with Flame Ionized Detector (GC-FID) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (Ft-Irs), and the solids by Ft-Irs. From the fourteen supports electrolytes studied, eleven did not have a stable diffusion current and the other three showed a diffusion current plateau in 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 m A·cm -2 . From polarization curves, the following experimental conditions were chosen for the treatment: electrodes (meshes of titanium as anode and rod of stainless steel as cathode), scintillation liquid (ULTIMA Gold XR TM : water, 1:1) and a current of 0.06 m A·cm -2 . Subsequently, radioactive control samples were prepared with soil-scintillation liquid, labeled with 24 Na, 99m Tc

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Inhibition of Positronium by Chlorine- Substituted Hydrocarbons in Non-Polar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikander, G.; Mogensen, O.E.; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured for solutions of 1,2,3,5-C6H2Cl4 in hexane, toluene, m-xylene and mesitylene, CCl4 in hexane and toluene, and C2HCl3 in n-hexane for concentrations below 1 M and at various temperatures between −30°C and 67°C. The Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4 was r...

  5. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at -4°C. Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes using UFLC analysis. The contaminant peak detected was prominent, sharp detectable at 9.176 ± 0.138 min on a Waters 250-4.6 mm, 4 μ, Nova-Pak C18 column with mobile phase consisting of methanol:water (70:30). It was evident from the study that long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peak. Further, this may mislead in future reporting an unnatural compound by researchers. Long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peakContamination peak with higher area under the curve (609993) was obtained in ultra-flow liquid chromatographic run for methanol stored in PP microcentrifuge tubesContamination peak was detected at retention time 9.113 min with a lambda max of 220.38 nm and 300 mAU intensity on the given chromatographic conditionsGlass vials serve better option over PP microcentrifuge tubes for storing biological samples. Abbreviations used: UFLC: Ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography; LC: Liquid Chromatography; MS: Mass spectrometry; AUC: Area Under Curve.

  6. Advanced LWIR hyperspectral sensor for on-the-move proximal detection of liquid/solid contaminants on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Jay P.; Dixon, John; Dupuis, Julia R.; Cosofret, Bogdan R.; Marinelli, William J.

    2017-05-01

    Sensor technologies capable of detecting low vapor pressure liquid surface contaminants, as well as solids, in a noncontact fashion while on-the-move continues to be an important need for the U.S. Army. In this paper, we discuss the development of a long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-10.5 μm) spatial heterodyne spectrometer coupled with an LWIR illuminator and an automated detection algorithm for detection of surface contaminants from a moving vehicle. The system is designed to detect surface contaminants by repetitively collecting LWIR reflectance spectra of the ground. Detection and identification of surface contaminants is based on spectral correlation of the measured LWIR ground reflectance spectra with high fidelity library spectra and the system's cumulative binary detection response from the sampled ground. We present the concepts of the detection algorithm through a discussion of the system signal model. In addition, we present reflectance spectra of surfaces contaminated with a liquid CWA simulant, triethyl phosphate (TEP), and a solid simulant, acetaminophen acquired while the sensor was stationary and on-the-move. Surfaces included CARC painted steel, asphalt, concrete, and sand. The data collected was analyzed to determine the probability of detecting 800 μm diameter contaminant particles at a 0.5 g/m2 areal density with the SHSCAD traversing a surface.

  7. Time domain reflectometry-measuring dielectric permittivity to detect soil non-acqeous phase liquids contamination-decontamination processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Comegna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL constitutes a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and high mobility of these organic compounds. To develop effective decontamination methods, characterisation and identification of contaminated soils are needed. The objective of this work is to explore the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in soils. The dielectric permittivity was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry method (TDR in soil samples with either different volumetric content of water (w and NAPL (NAPL or at different stages during immiscible displacement test carried out with two different flushing solutions. A mixing model proposed by Francisca and Montoro, was calibrated to estimate the volume fraction of contaminant present in soil. Obtained results, showed that soil contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement, during soil remediation processes, can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements.

  8. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Minggui

    2017-08-15

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  9. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Minggui; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Li, Yanfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2017-08-01

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  10. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Minggui; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Li, Yanfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2017-01-01

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  11. Selective Extraction of Organic Contaminants from Soil Using Pressurised Liquid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the application of sorbents in pressurised liquid extraction (PLE cell to establish a selective extraction of a variety of organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, phenol, pentachlorophenol, and sterols from soil. The selectivity and efficiency of each sorbent depend on the properties of the material, extracting solvent, capacity factor, organic compounds of interest, and PLE operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and extraction time. Several sorbents (silica, alumina, and Florisil were evaluated and with the proper choice of solvents, polar and nonpolar compounds were successfully separated in two fractions. Nonpolar compounds (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, and pentachlorophenol were recovered in the first fraction using a polar sorbent such as Florisil or alumina, and n-hexane as eluting solvent, while more polar compounds (phenol and sterols were recovered in the second fraction using methanol. Silica (5 g was found to be effective for selective extraction with the satisfactory recoveries for all compounds (PAHs from 87.1–96.2%, chlorpyrifos 102.9%, sterols from 93.7–100.5%, phenol 91.9%, and pentachlorophenol 106.2%. The efficiency and precision of this extraction approach and the existing EPA Method 3545 were compared.

  12. Method of separation of uranium from contaminating ions in an aqueous feed liquid containing uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.; Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    A coupled cationic/anionic method for the separation of uranium from contaminated aqueous solutions which contain uranyl ions is proposed. The fluid is extracted using an organic solvent containing a reagent which, together with the uranyl ions, forms a soluble aggregate in that solvent. As an example, 0.1 - 1 Mol/l Di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphorous acid in kerosene is mentioned. The organic solvent is then treated with a sealing liquid (volume ratio 20 - 35). For separation, an aqueous carbonate solution or a sulfuric acid solution can be used; the most favorable pH-values and concentrations for both cases are mentioned. The U +4 -ion at the sulfuric acid separation is subsequently oxidized to the uranyl ion with air. In each case, an extraction with an amine follows; after that, the amine is separated using an ammonium-carbonate solution and the uranium aggregate is precipitated, for example as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, and then further processed to uranium oxide. The solvents and fluids used are led back in closed circuit; a flow diagram is given. (UWI) [de

  13. DEMETERRES project: development of innovative technologies for removing radionuclides from contaminated solid and liquid matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chagvardieff Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the « post-accidental » management, the DEMETERRES project (RSNR PIA proposes to develop innovative and environmentally friendly methods for removal of cesium and strontium from soils and liquid matrices in order to rehabilitate them for an agricultural use while minimizing the volume of generated wastes in accordance with the nuclear waste existing processes. Complementary approaches are used: they are based on physico-chemical technologies (such as foams flotation, supercritical CO2 extraction, extractants in fluidized bed reactor … and biological ones (bioextractants, phytoextraction which concepts are described. These researches aim to design innovative and performing extractants in term of selectivity and to achieve the pilot reactor phase for each of them. These pilots will group in a network to provide a technological platform lasting the project, to which will be attached an available network of experts. The respective advances of these researches are presented, completed of tests initiated in Japan on contaminated soils through partnerships.

  14. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A.; Kocher, Claudius; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  15. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Konstanz University, Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  16. NMR-Based Identification of Metabolites in Polar and Non-Polar Extracts of Avian Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Fariba; Brun, Antonio; Rott, Katherine H; Falco Cobra, Paulo; Tonelli, Marco; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H; Markley, John L

    2017-11-16

    Metabolites present in liver provide important clues regarding the physiological state of an organism. The aim of this work was to evaluate a protocol for high-throughput NMR-based analysis of polar and non-polar metabolites from a small quantity of liver tissue. We extracted the tissue with a methanol/chloroform/water mixture and isolated the polar metabolites from the methanol/water layer and the non-polar metabolites from the chloroform layer. Following drying, we re-solubilized the fractions for analysis with a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer equipped with a 1.7 mm cryogenic probe. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this protocol for metabolomics studies, we analyzed the metabolic profile of livers from house sparrow ( Passer domesticus ) nestlings raised on two different diets: livers from 10 nestlings raised on a high protein diet (HP) for 4 d and livers from 12 nestlings raised on the HP diet for 3 d and then switched to a high carbohydrate diet (HC) for 1 d. The protocol enabled the detection of 52 polar and nine non-polar metabolites in ¹H NMR spectra of the extracts. We analyzed the lipophilic metabolites by one-way ANOVA to assess statistically significant concentration differences between the two groups. The results of our studies demonstrate that the protocol described here can be exploited for high-throughput screening of small quantities of liver tissue (approx. 100 mg wet mass) obtainable from small animals.

  17. Charge transport in non-polar and semi-polar III-V nitride heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konar, Aniruddha; Verma, Amit; Fang, Tian; Zhao, Pei; Jana, Raj; Jena, Debdeep

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the intense research focus on the optical properties, the transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar III-nitride semiconductors remain relatively unexplored to date. The purpose of this paper is to discuss charge-transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar orientations of GaN in a comparative fashion to what is known for transport in polar orientations. A comprehensive approach is adopted, starting from an investigation of the differences in the electronic bandstructure along different polar orientations of GaN. The polarization fields along various orientations are then discussed, followed by the low-field electron and hole mobilities. A number of scattering mechanisms that are specific to non-polar and semi-polar GaN heterostructures are identified, and their effects are evaluated. Many of these scattering mechanisms originate due to the coupling of polarization with disorder and defects in various incarnations depending on the crystal orientation. The effect of polarization orientation on carrier injection into quantum-well light-emitting diodes is discussed. This paper ends with a discussion of orientation-dependent high-field charge-transport properties including velocity saturation, instabilities and tunneling transport. Possible open problems and opportunities are also discussed. (paper)

  18. Design of reproducible polarized and non-polarized edge filters using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejigu, Efrem Kebede; Lacquet, B M

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in optical fibre communications technology is partly due to the advancement of optical thin film technology. The advancement of optical thin film technology includes the development of new and existing optical filter design methods. The genetic algorithm is one of the new design methods that show promising results in designing a number of complicated design specifications. It is the finding of this study that the genetic algorithm design method, through its optimization capability, can give more reliable and reproducible designs of any specifications. The design method in this study optimizes the thickness of each layer to get to the best possible solution. Its capability and unavoidable limitations in designing polarized and non-polarized edge filters from absorptive and dispersive materials is well demonstrated. It is also demonstrated that polarized and non-polarized designs from the genetic algorithm are reproducible with great success. This research has accomplished the great task of formulating a computer program using the genetic algorithm in a Matlab environment for the design of a reproducible polarized and non-polarized filters of any sort from any kind of materials

  19. Electric Charge Accumulation in Polar and Non-Polar Polymers under Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Kenichiro; Honjoh, Masato; Takada, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    The electric charge accumulation under an electron beam irradiation (40 keV and 60 keV) was measured by using the pressure wave propagation (PWP) method in the dielectric insulation materials, such as polar polymeric films (polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET)) and non-polar polymeric films (polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). The PE and PTFE (non-polar polymers) showed the properties of large amount of electric charge accumulation over 50 C/m3 and long saturation time over 80 minutes. The PP and PS (non-polar polymer) showed the properties of middle amount of charge accumulation about 20 C/m3 and middle saturation time about 1 to 20 minutes. The PC, PEN, PI and PET (polar polymers) showed the properties of small amount of charge accumulation about 5 to 20 C/m3 and within short saturation time about 1.0 minutes. This paper summarizes the relationship between the properties of charge accumulation and chemical structural formula, and compares between the electro static potential distribution with negative charged polymer and its chemical structural formula.

  20. Electric charge accumulation in polar and non-polar polymers under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Kenichiro; Honjoh, Masato; Takada, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The electric charge accumulation under an electron beam irradiation (40 keV and 60 keV) was measured by using the pressure wave propagation (PWP) method in the dielectric insulation materials, such as polar polymeric films (polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET)) and non-polar polymeric films (polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). The PE and PTFE (non-polar polymers) showed the properties of large amount of electric charge accumulation over 50 C/m 3 and long saturation time over 80 minutes. The PP and PS (non-polar polymer) showed the properties of middle amount of charge accumulation about 20 C/m 3 and middle saturation time about 1 to 20 minutes. The PC, PEN, PI and PET (polar polymers) showed the properties of small amount of charge accumulation about 5 to 20 C/m 3 and within short saturation time about 1.0 minutes. This paper summarizes the relationship between the properties of charge accumulation and chemical structural formula, and compares between the electro static potential distribution with negative charged polymer and its chemical structural formula. (author)

  1. Simultaneous biodegradation of volatile and toxic contaminant mixtures by solid–liquid two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poleo, Eduardo E.; Daugulis, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.daugulis@chee.queensu.ca

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • We investigate the simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and butyl acetate. • We identify an effective polymer mixture to selectively absorb each of the substrates and decrease their initial concentration. •The polymer mixture is used to overcome the high phenol cytotoxicity and reduce the abiotic losses of butyl acetate associated with volatility. • The solid–liquid Two Phase Partitioning Bioreactor (TPPB) outperforms the liquid–liquid TPPB and the single phase systems. -- Abstract: Microbial inhibition and stripping of volatile compounds are two common problems encountered in the biotreatment of contaminated wastewaters. Both can be addressed by the addition of a hydrophobic auxiliary phase that can absorb and subsequently re-release the substrates, lowering their initial aqueous concentrations. Such systems have been described as Two Phase Partitioning Bioreactors (TPPBs). In the current work the performances of a solid–liquid TPPB, a liquid–liquid TPPB and a single phase reactor for the simultaneous degradation of butyl acetate (the volatile component) and phenol (the toxic component) have been compared. The auxiliary phase used in the solid–liquid TPPB was a 50:50 polymer mixture of styrene–butadiene rubber and Hytrel{sup ®} 8206, with high affinities for butyl acetate and phenol, respectively. The liquid–liquid TPPB employed silicone oil which has fixed physical properties, and had no capacity to absorb the toxic contaminant (phenol). Butyl acetate degradation was enhanced in both TPPBs relative to the single phase, arising from its sequestration into the auxiliary phase, thereby reducing volatilization losses. The solid–liquid TPPB additionally showed a substantial increase in the phenol degradation rate, relative to the silicone oil system, demonstrating the superiority and versatility of polymer based systems.

  2. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. Materials and Methods: One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at ?4?C. Results: Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene m...

  3. DEMONSTRATION SOLIDIFICATION TESTS CONDUCTED ON RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED ORGANIC LIQUIDS AT THE AECL WHITESHELL LABORATORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryz, R. A.; Brunkow, W. G.; Govers, R.; Campbell, D.; Krause, D.

    2002-01-01

    The AECL, Whiteshell Laboratory (WL) near Pinawa Manitoba, Canada, was established in the early 1960's to carry out AECL research and development activities for higher temperature versions of the CANDU(reg s ign) reactor. The initial focus of the research program was the Whiteshell Reactor-1 (WR-1) Organic Cooled Reactor (OCR) that began operation in 1965. The OCR program was discontinued in the early 1970's in favor of the successful heavy-water-cooled CANDU system. WR-1 continued to operate until 1985 in support of AECL nuclear research programs. A consequence of the Federal government's recent program review process was AECL's business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at the Whiteshell Laboratories and to consolidate its' activities at the Chalk River Laboratories. As a result, AECL received government concurrence in 1998 to proceed to plan actions to achieve closure of WL. The planning actions now in progress address the need to safely and effectively transition the WL site from an operational state, in support of AECL's business, to a shutdown and decommissioned state that meets the regulatory requirements for a licensed nuclear site. The decommissioning program that will be required at WL is unique within AECL and Canada since it will need to address the entire research site rather than individual facilities declared redundant. Accordingly, the site nuclear facilities are being systematically placed in a safe shutdown state and planning for the decommissioning work to place the facilities in a secure monitoring and surveillance state is in progress. One aspect of the shutdown activities is to deal with the legacy of radioactively contaminated organic liquid wastes. Use of a polymer powder to solidify these organic wastes was identified as one possibility for improved interim storage of this material pending final disposition

  4. Development of nondestructive measurement system for quantifying radioactivity from crud, liquids and gases in a contaminated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, Masaki; Ito, Hirokuni; Wakayama, Naoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1992-11-01

    A nondestructive measuring method was developed to quantify separately radioisotope concentrations of crud, liquids and gases in a contaminated pipe. For applying this method to practical in-situ measurement, a nondestructive measurement system was developed. The measurement system consists of an in-situ equipment for gamma-ray scanning measurements and a data-processing equipment for analysis of radioactivity. The communication between both equipments is performed by a wireless telemeter device. To construct the measurement system, a gas-cooled Ge detector of practical use, small-sized electronics circuits, a fast and reliable telemeter device and automatic measurement technics using a computer were developed. Through performance tests, it is confirmed that the measurement system is effective for in-situ measurements of radioactivity in a contaminated pipe. The measurement accuracy with this measurement system is 10 - 20 %, which was determined by comparison with solid and liquid radioisotope concentrations in a mock-up contaminated pipe that had been quantified in advance. (author).

  5. Response of gadolinium doped liquid scintillator to charged particles: measurement based on intrinsic U/Th contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Q.; Lin, S. T.; He, H. T.; Liu, S. K.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, L.; Wong, H. T.; Xing, H. Y.; Yue, Q.; Zhu, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    A measurement is reported for the response to charged particles of a liquid scintillator named EJ-335 doped with 0.5% gadolinium by weight. This liquid scintillator was used as the detection medium in a neutron detector. The measurement is based on the in-situ α-particles from the intrinsic Uranium and Thorium contamination in the scintillator. The β–α and the α–α cascade decays from the U/Th decay chains were used to select α-particles. The contamination levels of U/Th were consequently measured to be (5.54±0.15)× 10‑11 g/g, (1.45±0.01)× 10‑10 g/g and (1.07±0.01)× 10‑11 g/g for 232Th, 238U and 235U, respectively, assuming secular equilibrium. The stopping power of α-particles in the liquid scintillator was simulated by the TRIM software. Then the Birks constant, kB, of the scintillator for α-particles was determined to be (7.28±0.23) mg/(cm2ṡMeV) by Birks' formulation. The response for protons is also presented assuming the kB constant is the same as for α-particles.

  6. Dispersing surface-modified imogolite nanotubes in polar and non-polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Brant, Jonathan A.

    2018-02-01

    Furthering the development of nanocomposite structures, namely membranes for water treatment applications, requires that methods be developed to ensure nanoparticle dispersion in polar and non-polar solvents, as both are widely used in associated synthesis techniques. Here, we report on a two-step method to graft polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a one-step method for octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA), onto the outer surfaces of imogolite nanotubes. The goal of these approaches was to improve and maintain nanotube dispersion in polymer compatible polar and non-polar solvents. The PVP coating modified the imogolite surface charge from positive to weakly negative at pH ≤ 9; the OPA made it weakly positive at acidic pH values to negative at pH ≥ 7. The PVP surface coating stabilized the nanotubes through steric hindrance in polar protic, dipolar aprotic, and chloroform. In difference to the PVP, the OPA surface coating allowed the nanotubes to be dispersed in n-hexane and chloroform, but not in the polar solvents. The lack of miscibility in the polar solvents, as well as the better dispersion in n-hexane, was attributed to the stronger hydrophobicity of the OPA polymer relative to the PVP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jian-Yong; Xu Cheng; Qiang Ying-Huai; Zhu Ya-Bo

    2011-01-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ∼50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm∼1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. Non-Polar Natural Products from Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Johan Juvik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extensive regional droughts are already a major problem on all inhabited continents and severe regional droughts are expected to become an increasing and extended problem in the future. Consequently, extended use of available drought resistant food plants should be encouraged. Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile are excellent candidates in that respect because they are established drought resistant edible plants from the semi-arid Caatinga region. From a food safety perspective, increased utilization of these plants would necessitate detailed knowledge about their chemical constituents. However, their chemical compositions have previously not been determined. For the first time, the non-polar constituents of B. laciniosa, N. variegata and E. spectabile have been identified. This is the first thorough report on natural products from N. variegata, E. spectabile, and B. laciniosa. Altogether, 20 non-polar natural products were characterized. The identifications were based on hyphenated gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS and supported by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR plant metabolomics.

  9. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Yong; Xu, Cheng; Qiang, Ying-Huai; Zhu, Ya-Bo

    2011-10-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ~50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm~1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology.

  10. Rapid radiometric detection of microbial contamination using 14C-glucose and standard liquid scintillation counting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.H.; Kamble, S.B.; Pilkhwal, N.S.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    1998-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for detection of microbial contamination based on quantitation of 14 CO 2 released during metabolism of 14 C-Glucose by microorganisms is reported. Liquid scintillation counting system (LSCS) with a modified sample preparation method was utilised. The scintillator was impregnated on Whatman-1 paper on which 14 CO 2 evolved during metabolism could be absorbed. The important parameters of counting such as efficiency, position sensitivity and geometry as well as effect of NaOH quantity and of microbial load on detection period were studied. The efficiency of radioactivity assay was 18±2.8 %. Contamination of the order of 5-10 organism/ml of product could be detected in about 24 hours. (author)

  11. Use of complexones solutions in liquid carbon dioxide for cleaning of materials contaminated with heavy and radioactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrin, A.Yu.; Kamachev, V.A.; Kiseleva, R.N.; Murzin, A.A.; Shafikov, D.N.; Bondin, V.V.; Efremov, I.V.; Kovalev, D.N.; Podoinitsyn, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    I n this paper liquid carbon dioxide (pressure 50-70 atm) was used for decontamination. The performed experiments on removal of cobalt, nickel, uranium and americium nitrates and carbonates by different solutions have shown that the solutions of such complexing agents as hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA), tributylphosphate (TBP), di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in liquid CO 2 can be used for purification of pulps, metals, paper and fabrics. Liquid CO 2 is high viscosity of the medium and hence low diffusion coefficients and long duration of the processes. It is known that 20 minutes are sufficient to attain equilibrium in supercritical CO 2 medium on metal removal by HFA solutions. During the experiments it was established that with the use of liquid CO 2 the keeping time should be increased to 40 min, which is acceptable from the standpoint of technical feasibility of decontamination processes in these solutions. Experiments on really contaminated samples of pulps, metals and fabrics have confirmed that the decontamination coefficients of 30-100 can be easily obtained by 2-3 fold material treatment operations. The secondary waste volume therewith is less by a factor of 20-200 than that of traditional techniques. (authors)

  12. Supercritical fluids in ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.; Plechkova, N.V.; Seddon, K.R.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids and supercritical fluids are both alternative environmentally benign solvents, but their properties are very different. Ionic liquids are non-volatile but often considered highly polar compounds, whereas supercritical fluids are non-polar but highly volatile compounds. The combination

  13. Non-polarized cytokine profile of a long-term non-progressor HIV infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana Flávia; Matos, Vanessa Terezinha Gubert de; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Dal Fabbro, Márcia Maria Ferrairo Janini; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    The HIV-1 initial viral infection may present diverse clinical and laboratory course and lead to rapid, intermediate, or long-term progression. Among the group of non-progressors, the elite controllers are those who control the infection most effectively, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this paper, the TH1, TH2 and TH17 cytokines profiles are described, as well as clinical and laboratory aspects of an HIV-infected patient with undetectable viral load without antiretroviral therapy. Production of IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17 was detected; in contrast IL-4 was identified. Host-related factors could help explain such a level of infection control, namely the differentiated modulation of the cellular immune response and a non-polarized cytokine response of the TH1 and TH2 profiles. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Tridodecylamine, an efficient charge control agent in non-polar media for electrophoretic inks application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Amélie; Mirbel, Déborah; Cloutet, Eric; Fleury, Guillaume; Schatz, Christophe; Navarro, Christophe; Hadziioannou, Georges; CyrilBrochon

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain efficient electrophoretic inks, Tridodecylamine (Dod3N), has been studied as charge control agent (CCA) in a non-polar paraffin solvent (Isopar G) for various inorganic pigments (TiO2 and Fe2O3). All hydrophobic mineral oxides, i.e. treated with octyltrimethoxysilane (C8) or dodecyltrimethoxysilane (C12), were found to be negatively charged in presence of Dod3N. The electrophoretic mobilities of inorganic pigments seemed to be strongly dependent of their isoelectric point (IEP) and also of the concentration of dod3N with an optimum range between 10 and 20 mM depending on the pigments. Finally, an electrophoretic ink constituted of hydrophobic mineral oxides in presence of Dod3N was tested in a device. Its efficiency as charge control agent to negatively charge hydrophobic particles was confirmed through good optical properties and fast response time (220 ms at 200 kV m-1).

  15. Role of the electronegativity for the interface properties of non-polar heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-04-01

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the interfaces in the non-polar ATiO 3/SrTiO 3 (A=Pb, Ca, Ba) heterostructures. All TiO 2-terminated interfaces show an insulating behavior. By reduction of the O content in the AO, SrO, and TiO 2 layers, metallic interface states develop, due to the occupation of the Ti 3d orbitals. For PbTiO 3/SrTiO 3, the Pb 6p states cross the Fermi energy. O vacancy formation energies depend strictly on the electronegativity and the effective volume of the A ion, while the main characteristics of the interface electronic states are maintained. © Europhysics Letters Association, 2012.

  16. The atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells and the green gap problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, C.J., E-mail: colin.humphreys@msm.cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J.T., E-mail: jg641@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Tang, F., E-mail: ft274@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Oehler, F., E-mail: fabrice.oehler@lpn.cnrs.fr [CNRS/C2N, Paris Sud University, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C., E-mail: changlin.zheng@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@mcem.monash.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Martin, T.L., E-mail: tomas.martin@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bagot, P.A.J., E-mail: paul.bagot@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Moody, M.P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Sutherland, D., E-mail: danny.sutherland@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dawson, P., E-mail: philip.dawson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Schulz, S., E-mail: stefan.schulz@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings Complex, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); and others

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We have studied the atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells. • The non-polar (11-20) InGaN quantum wells contain indium-rich clusters, unlike the polar (0001) quantum wells. • The electrons and holes in the quantum wells are localised by different mechanisms. - Abstract: We have used high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), aberration-corrected quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM), atom probe tomography (APT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the atomic structure of (0001) polar and (11-20) non-polar InGaN quantum wells (QWs). This paper provides an overview of the results. Polar (0001) InGaN in QWs is a random alloy, with In replacing Ga randomly. The InGaN QWs have atomic height interface steps, resulting in QW width fluctuations. The electrons are localised at the top QW interface by the built-in electric field and the well-width fluctuations, with a localisation energy of typically 20 meV. The holes are localised near the bottom QW interface, by indium fluctuations in the random alloy, with a localisation energy of typically 60 meV. On the other hand, the non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs contain nanometre-scale indium-rich clusters which we suggest localise the carriers and produce longer wavelength (lower energy) emission than from random alloy non-polar InGaN QWs of the same average composition. The reason for the indium-rich clusters in non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs is not yet clear, but may be connected to the lower QW growth temperature for the (11-20) InGaN QWs compared to the (0001) polar InGaN QWs.

  17. Intrinsic Klebsiella pneumoniae contamination of liquid germicidal hand soap containing chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven E; Walczak, Mary A; Malcolm, Sharon; Hameed, Rizwanullah

    2004-10-01

    We describe intrinsic contamination with Klebsiella pneumoniae occurring during the manufacture of germicidal hand soap, labeled as containing 2% chlorhexidine, used throughout a 350-bed community medical center. A 3-year retrospective study failed to find evidence of increased incidence of clinical isolates of this strain.

  18. Nosocomial Serratia marcescens infections associated with extrinsic contamination of a liquid nonmedicated soap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, C; Jacomo, V; Duvivier, C; Tissot-Dupont, H; Sambuc, R; Drancourt, M

    2000-03-01

    To determine the role of nonmedicated soap as a source of Serratia marcescens nosocomial infections (NIs) in hospital units with endemic S marcescens NI and to examine the mechanisms of soap colonization. University-affiliated tertiary-care hospitals. A prospective case-control study and an environmental investigation were performed to assess the relationship between S marcescens NIs in hospital units and S marcescens-contaminated soap. Soap-bottle use and handwashing practices were reviewed. Cultures of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands were obtained before and after hand washing with soap. 5 of 7 hospital units with S marcescens NIs had soap bottles contaminated with S marcescens, compared to 1 of 14 other units (P=.006). After hand washing with an S marcescens-contaminated soap pump, HCWs' hands were 54 times more likely to be contaminated with S marcescens (Pliquid soap by S marcescens resulted in handborne transmission of S marcescens NIs by HCWs in our setting. This finding led to the application of strict guidelines for nonmedicated soap use and to the reinforcement of alcoholic hand disinfection.

  19. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to liquid disinfectants on contaminated surfaces before formation of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, J L; Bonifacino, A

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effectiveness of popular disinfectants (Cavicide, Cidexplus, Clorox, Exspor, Lysol, Renalin, and Wavicide) under conditions prescribed for disinfection in the respective product labels on Pseudomonas aeruginosa either in suspension or deposited onto surfaces of metallic or polymeric plastic devices. The testing also included 7 nonformulated germicidal agents (glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, phenol, and cupric ascorbate) commonly used in disinfection and decontamination. Results showed that P. aeruginosa is on average 300-fold more resistant when present on contaminated surfaces than in suspension. This increase in resistance agrees with results reported in studies of biofilms, but unexpectedly, it precedes biofilm formation. The surface to which bacteria are attached can influence the effectiveness of disinfectants. Viable bacteria attached to devices may require dislodging through more than a one-step method for detection. The data, obtained with a sensitive and quantitative test, suggest that disinfectants are less effective on contaminated surfaces than generally acknowledged.

  20. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  1. Evaluation of Extraction Protocols for Simultaneous Polar and Non-Polar Yeast Metabolite Analysis Using Multivariate Projection Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas P. Tambellini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic and lipidomic approaches aim to measure metabolites or lipids in the cell. Metabolite extraction is a key step in obtaining useful and reliable data for successful metabolite studies. Significant efforts have been made to identify the optimal extraction protocol for various platforms and biological systems, for both polar and non-polar metabolites. Here we report an approach utilizing chemoinformatics for systematic comparison of protocols to extract both from a single sample of the model yeast organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three chloroform/methanol/water partitioning based extraction protocols found in literature were evaluated for their effectiveness at reproducibly extracting both polar and non-polar metabolites. Fatty acid methyl esters and methoxyamine/trimethylsilyl derivatized aqueous compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to evaluate non-polar or polar metabolite analysis. The comparative breadth and amount of recovered metabolites was evaluated using multivariate projection methods. This approach identified an optimal protocol consisting of 64 identified polar metabolites from 105 ion hits and 12 fatty acids recovered, and will potentially attenuate the error and variation associated with combining metabolite profiles from different samples for untargeted analysis with both polar and non-polar analytes. It also confirmed the value of using multivariate projection methods to compare established extraction protocols.

  2. Technetium-99m labelled N,N-ethyldithiocarbamate, a non-polar complex with slow hepatic clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Baldas, J.

    1980-05-01

    A sup(99m)Tc-N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) complex was prepared using formamidine sulphinic acid as the reducing agent for pertechnetate sup(99m) Tc. The complex was found to be non-polar. In mice the complex localised in the liver and intestines. Urinary excretion was very low and hepatic clearance relatively slow

  3. [Structure identification of contaminants in a beverage product by liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yasuhisa; Washida, Kazuto; Uyama, Atsuo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The contaminants in a beverage product that had been reported to have a strange taste were identified. By comparative analysis with the normal product using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS), six unknown compounds were detected in the total ion current chromatograms of the product in question. Detailed analysis of the mass spectra and product ion spectra of these compounds strongly suggested that the compounds were capric acid diethanolamide, lauric acid diethanolamide, myristic acid diethanolamide, lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid, lauryl sulfate, and lauric acid, all of which are surfactants commonly used as ingredients of household detergents and shampoos. We searched commercially available detergent products to check for the presence of these six surfactants, and identified products that might have been intentionally or unintentionally mixed into the beverage product after opening.

  4. Effectiveness of Liquid Soap and Hand Sanitizer against Norwalk Virus on Contaminated Hands▿

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Pengbo; Yuen, Yvonne; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Moe, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Disinfection is an essential measure for interrupting human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission, but it is difficult to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants due to the absence of a practicable cell culture system for these viruses. The purpose of this study was to screen sodium hypochlorite and ethanol for efficacy against Norwalk virus (NV) and expand the studies to evaluate the efficacy of antibacterial liquid soap and alcohol-based hand sanitizer for the inactivation of NV on human finger pad...

  5. Task 15 - Remediation of Organically Contaminated Soil Using Hot/Liquid (Subcritical) Water. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996-- March 31,1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, Steven B.

    1997-01-01

    This activity will perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies will be performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal will also be performed

  6. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2016-01-01

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic...

  7. Piezoelectricity and rotostriction through polar and non-polar coupled instabilities in bismuth-based piezoceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Matias; Schmitt, Ljubomira A; Cazorla, Claudio; Studer, Andrew; Zintler, Alexander; Glaum, Julia; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Donner, Wolfgang; Hoffman, Mark; Rödel, Jürgen; Hinterstein, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Coupling of order parameters provides a means to tune functionality in advanced materials including multiferroics, superconductors, and ionic conductors. We demonstrate that the response of a frustrated ferroelectric state leads to coupling between order parameters under electric field depending on grain orientation. The strain of grains oriented along a specific crystallographic direction, 〈h00〉, is caused by converse piezoelectricity originating from a ferrodistortive tetragonal phase. For 〈hhh〉 oriented grains, the strain results from converse piezoelectricity and rotostriction, as indicated by an antiferrodistortive instability that promotes octahedral tilting in a rhombohedral phase. Both strain mechanisms combined lead to a colossal local strain of (2.4 ± 0.1) % and indicate coupling between oxygen octahedral tilting and polarization, here termed "rotopolarization". These findings were confirmed with electromechanical experiments, in situ neutron diffraction, and in situ transmission electron microscopy in 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3. This work demonstrates that polar and non-polar instabilities can cooperate to provide colossal functional responses.

  8. Thin film epitaxy and structure property correlations for non-polar ZnO films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, P.; Budai, J.D.; Aggarwal, R.; Narayan, Roger J.; Narayan, J.

    2009-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth and strain relaxation were investigated in non-polar a-plane (1 1 -2 0)ZnO films grown on r-plane (1 0 -1 2)sapphire substrates in the temperature range 200-700 deg. C by pulsed laser deposition. The lattice misfit in the plane of the film for this orientation varied from -1.26% in [0 0 0 1] to -18.52% in the [-1 1 0 0] direction. The alignment of (1 1 -2 0)ZnO planes parallel to (1 0 -1 2)sapphire planes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction θ-2θ scans over the entire temperature range. X-ray φ-scans revealed the epitaxial relationship:[0 0 0 1]ZnO-parallel [-1 1 0 1]sap; [-1 1 0 0]ZnO-parallel [-1 -1 2 0]sap. Depending on the growth temperature, variations in the structural, optical and electrical properties were observed in the grown films. Room temperature photoluminescence for films grown at 700 deg. C shows a strong band-edge emission. The ratio of the band-edge emission to green band emission is 135:1, indicating reduced defects and excellent optical quality of the films. The resistivity data for the films grown at 700 deg. C shows semiconducting behavior with room temperature resistivity of 2.2 x 10 -3 Ω-cm.

  9. Nanospikes functionalization as a universal strategy to disperse hydrophilic particles in non-polar media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Wang, Ji; Lin, Di-an; Wu, Jiangming; Liu, Di; Cao, Yuhong; Yang, Chengduan; Liu, Chenglin; Xiao, Shuai; Gu, Meilin; Pan, Shuolin; Wu, Mei X.; Xie, Xi

    2018-05-01

    Dispersion of hydrophilic particles in non-polar media has many important applications yet remains difficult. Surfactant or amphiphilic functionalization was conventionally applied to disperse particles but is highly dependent on the particle/solvent system and may induce unfavorable effects and impact particle hydrophilic nature. Recently 2 μm size polystyrene microbeads coated with ZnO nanospikes have been reported to display anomalous dispersity in phobic media without using surfactant or amphiphilic functionalization. However, due to the lack of understanding whether this phenomenon was applicable to a wider range of conditions, little application has been derived from it. Here the anomalous dispersity phenomenons of hydrophilic microparticles covered with nanospikes were systematically assessed at various conditions including different particle sizes, material compositions, particle morphologies, solvent hydrophobicities, and surface polar groups. Microparticles were functionalized with nanospikes through hydrothermal route, followed by dispersity test in hydrophobic media. The results suggest nanospikes consistently prevent particle aggregation in various particle or solvent conditions, indicating the universal applicability of the anomalous dispersion phenomenons. This work provides insight on the anomalous dispersity of hydrophilic particles in various systems and offers potential application to use this method for surfactant-free dispersions.

  10. Composition of the non-polar extracts and antimicrobial activity of Chorisia insignis HBK. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ahmed Mahmoud El Sawi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the chemical constituents of the petroleum ether extract and the ether fraction of the 70% ethanol extract of Chorisia insignis HBK. leaves, as well as screen its antimicrobial activity. Methods: Different chromatographic methods were applied to investigate the non-polar extracts and the diffusion assay method was applied to study the antimicrobial activity. Results: A total of 50 compounds from the unsaponifiable matter and 20 fatty acid methyl esters were identified from the petroleum ether extract by GC/MS analysis. n-Hentriacontane, n-tritriacontane, stigmastanol, 3-methoxy-5, 6-dihydrostigmasterol, 7,8-dihydroergosterol, 4-methylcholesterol, cholestanol, multiflorenol, cholest-5-en-3-one, cholest-6-one, 5,6- dihydroergosterol, stigmasterol, dihydroalbigenin and 11-methyl-Δ5,7,9,15,17,23-triacont-hex-ene were isolated from the petroleum ether extract. Methyl heptacosanoate and quinic acid ester of rhamnose were isolated from the ether fraction of the 70% ethanol extract. Antimicrobial activity of the total alcohol extract and the successive fractions showed that the ether and the ethyl acetate fractions have potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus. Conclusions: The ether and the ethyl acetate fractions could be used in pharmaceutical formulations as antibacterial agents against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus, and further clinical trials should be performed in order to support the above investigations.

  11. Atmospheric contamination by pesticides: Determination in the liquid, gaseous and particulate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, M; Wortham, H; Sanusi, A; Mirabel, P

    1997-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 18 fogwater samples, 31 rainwater samples and 17 atmosphere (gas and particles) samples were analysed for 13 pesticides (pp'DDT,pp'DDD,pp'DDE, aldrin, dieldrin, lindane, hexachlorobenzene, fenpropathrin, mecoprop, methyl-parathion, atrazine, isoproturon and aldicarb). The samples were collected in a rural area where some of the compounds are in use (experimental INRA farm, "Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique" in Colmar, Eastern France, 80,000 inhabitants). This paper briefly presents the analytical methodology used and, in detail, the contamination level of the different atmospheric phases. The contamination levels are roughly constant throughout the year in all the atmospheric phases and the most abundant pesticides are those commonly used on the experimental INRA farm and other surrounding farms. Nevertheless, some pesticides not used since the 1970s such as 1,1-Bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (pp'DDT) and 2,2-Bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (pp 'DDD) are also detected in the atmosphere of Colmar. A small increase in the pesticide concentrations in the atmosphere (gas and particles) was observed during treatments.

  12. Contaminant monitoring of biota downstream of a radioactive liquid waste treatment facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.D.; Biggs, J.R.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals, plants, and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfall number-sign 051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation/ingestion or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. The pelt was separated from the carcass of each animal and both were analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for americium ( 241 Am), strontium ( 90 Sr), plutonium ( 238 Pu and 239 Pu), and total uranium (U). With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring

  13. The effects of compressive stress and contamination liquids on the ultrasonic detection of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooldridge, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of compressive stress on the reflection and transmission of ultrasound has been investigated for fatigue cracks. An examination has been made of the shear wave corner echoes from surface breaking fatigue cracks which were grown at constant stress intensity factor to control the roughness of the faces. In this way a correlation has been established between the roughness of the surfaces and the ultrasonic response at both zero load and under stress. The effect of liquids in the cracks has also been studied and the results compared with theoretical predictions for a thin sided parallel gap. (author)

  14. SUPPORTED LIQUID CATALYSTS FOR REMOVAL OF HIGH TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL CONTAMINANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan W. Weimer (PI); Peter Czerpak; Patrick Hilbert

    2000-01-01

    A novel catalytic synthesis gas oxidation process using molten carbonate salts supported on compatible fluidized iron oxide particles (supported-liquid-phase-catalyst (SLPC) fluidized bed process) was investigated. This process combines the advantages of large scale fluidized bed processing with molten salt bath oxidation. Molten salt catalysts can be supported within porous fluidized particles in order to improve mass transfer rates between the liquid catalysts and the reactant gases. Synthesis gas can be oxidized at reduced temperatures resulting in low NO{sub x} formation while trace sulfides and halides are captured in-situ. Hence, catalytic oxidation of synthesis gas can be carried out simultaneously with hot gas cleanup. Such SLPC fluidized bed processes are affected by inter-particle liquid capillary forces that may lead to agglomeration and de-fluidization of the bed. An understanding of the origin and strength of these forces is needed so that they can be overcome in practice. Process design is based on thermodynamic free energy minimization calculations that indicate the suitability of eutectic Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures for capturing trace impurities in-situ (< 1 ppm SO{sub x} released) while minimizing the formation of NO{sub x}(< 10 ppm). Iron oxide has been identified as a preferred support material since it is non-reactive with sodium, is inexpensive, has high density (i.e. inertia), and can be obtained in various particle sizes and porosities. Force balance modeling has been used to design a surrogate ambient temperature system that is hydrodynamically similar to the real system, thus allowing complementary investigation of the governing fluidization hydrodynamics. The primary objective of this research was to understand the origin of and to quantify the liquid capillary interparticle forces affecting the molten carbonate SLPC fluidized bed process. Substantial theoretical and experimental exploratory results indicate process

  15. Tailoring of superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic coating morphologies for space exploration contamination control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirich, Ronald; Weir, John; Leyble, Dennis; Chu, Steven

    2010-08-01

    Dust and ice contamination is a serious problem for equipment and vehicles for air and space mission applications. Dust contamination gathers on photonic sensors inhibiting motion and data gathering. Photonic devices that require transparency to light for maximum efficiency, such as solar photovoltaic power systems, video cameras and optical or infrared detectors, can be seriously affected by dust accumulation. The lunar thermal and radiation environment also pose unique challenges because of its large temperature variations and its interaction with the local plasma environment and solar UV and X-rays induced photoemission of electrons. Superhydrophilic materials are composed of polar molecules and have been used to defog glass, enable oil spots to be swept away easily with water, as door mirrors for cars and coatings for buildings. Hydrophobic molecules tend to be non-polar and thus prefer other neutral molecules and nonpolar solvents. Hydrophobic molecules often cluster together. Hydrophobic surfaces contain materials that are difficult to wet with liquids, with superhyrophobic surfaces having contact angles in excess of 150° (the equilibrium angle of contact of a liquid on a rigid surface where liquid, solid and gas phases meet). This paper presents an overview of the fundamental forces (van der Waals) which allows certain contamination to adhere to critical photonic surfaces and the various passive coatings phenomenology (hydrophilic to hydrophobic) that is used to minimize this contamination.

  16. Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes for treating low-level radioactive contaminated liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenst, J.W.; Roberts, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed on Waste Disposal Facility (WD) influent using Romicon hollow fiber ultrafiltration modules with molecular weight cutoffs ranging from 2000 to 80,000. The rejection of conductivity was low in most cases. The rejection of radioactivity ranged from 90 to 98%, depending on the membrane type and on the feed concentration. Typical product activity ranged from 7 to 100 dis/min/ml of alpha radiation. Experiments were also performed on alpha-contaminated laundry wastewater. Results ranged from 98 to >99.8%, depending on the membrane type. This yielded a product concentration of less than 0.1 dis/min/ml of alpha radiation. Tests on PP-Building decontamination water yielded rejections of 85 to 88% alpha radiation depending on the membrane type. These experiments show that the ability to remove radioactivity by membrane is a function of the contents of the waste stream because the radioactivity in the wastewater is in various forms: ionic, polymeric, colloidal, and absorbed onto suspended solids. Although removal of suspended or colloidal material is very high, removal of ionic material is not as effective. Alpha-contaminated laundry wastewater proved to be the easiest to decontaminate, whereas the low-level PP-Building decontamination water proved to be the most difficult to decontaminate. Decontamination of the WD influent, a combined waste stream, varied considerably from day to day because of its constantly changing makeup. The WD influent was also treated with various substances, such as polyelectrolytes, complexing agents, and coagulants, to determine if these additives would aid in the removal of radioactive material from the various wastewaters by complexing the ionic species. At the present time, none of the additives evaluated has had much effect; but experiments are continuing

  17. Detection of environmental radioactive contamination levels using a liquid-scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calisto, W.; Kun, A.; Campos, E.

    1981-01-01

    A high-efficiency LS-100 C liquid scintillation counter was used to detect low levels of environmental activity. Different concentrations of primary scintillator were tested and these established the most suitable values. Work was carried out at the same time to find conditions which would ensure a low background and high efficiency. To reduce the sample volume used, various types of chelating agents were utilized: 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine), tannic acid, cupferron, dimethylglioxime and beta-naphthol. These were tested at pH levels of 1, 6 and 11. Measurements were performed by means of the Cerenkov effect using substances with differing refraction indices - 26% sodium chloride, water, glycerine, carbon bisulphide, nitrobenzene, benzyl alcohol and toluene. Finally, work was done on comparing spectra obtained by Cerenkov radiation and by 90 Sr and 90 Y beta radiation respectively. Clearly differentiated zones were obtained, thus making it possible to distinguish one isotope from another in an equilibrium solution. (author)

  18. Determination of 90Sr by liquid scintillation spectrometry in samples of contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ometakova, J.; Dulanska, S.

    2009-01-01

    On a model sample we optimized conditions of SPE separation of 90 Sr on Empore Sr Rad Disk in term of use eluent reagent and its appropriate concentration. Also the possibility of multiple use of both sorbents Empore Sr Rad Disk and AnaLig Sr-01 was confirmed. Not even after 8 separations radiochemical yield fall below 87%. For separation of 90 Sr from real sample of percolating water of controlled area of Bohunice NPP three commercially available products were used: 3M Empore Strontium Rad Disk, sorbents AnaLig (with different grain size) and Sr-Resin. The aim of this work was to compare the selected products in term of strontium extracts, the time demandingness and the possibility of multiple use of sorbents. For separation of strontium were also used two classical methods, namely liquid extraction with tributyl phosphate and carbonate precipitation due to the exclusion of interferents. (author)

  19. Nitrobenzene anti-parallel dimer formation in non-polar solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Shikata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dielectric and depolarized Rayleigh scattering behaviors of nitrobenzene (NO2-Bz, which is a benzene mono-substituted with a planar molecular frame bearing the large electric dipole moment 4.0 D, in non-polar solvents solutions, such as tetrachloromethane and benzene, at up to 3 THz for the dielectric measurements and 8 THz for the scattering experiments at 20 °C. The dielectric relaxation strength of the system was substantially smaller than the proportionality to the concentration in a concentrated regime and showed a Kirkwood correlation factor markedly lower than unity; gK ∼ 0.65. This observation revealed that NO2-Bz has a tendency to form dimers, (NO2-Bz2, in anti-parallel configurations for the dipole moment with increasing concentration of the two solvents. Both the dielectric and scattering data exhibited fast and slow Debye-type relaxation modes with the characteristic time constants ∼7 and ∼50 ps in a concentrated regime (∼15 and ∼30 ps in a dilute regime, respectively. The fast mode was simply attributed to the rotational motion of the (monomeric NO2-Bz. However, the magnitude of the slow mode was proportional to the square of the concentration in the dilute regime; thus, the mode was assigned to the anti-parallel dimer, (NO2-Bz2, dissociation process, and the slow relaxation time was attributed to the anti-parallel dimer lifetime. The concentration dependencies of both the dielectric and scattering data show that the NO2-Bz molecular processes are controlled through a chemical equilibrium between monomers and anti-parallel dimers, 2NO2-Bz ↔ (NO2-Bz2, due to a strong dipole-dipole interaction between nitro groups.

  20. Effectiveness of liquid soap and hand sanitizer against Norwalk virus on contaminated hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengbo; Yuen, Yvonne; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Moe, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Disinfection is an essential measure for interrupting human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission, but it is difficult to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants due to the absence of a practicable cell culture system for these viruses. The purpose of this study was to screen sodium hypochlorite and ethanol for efficacy against Norwalk virus (NV) and expand the studies to evaluate the efficacy of antibacterial liquid soap and alcohol-based hand sanitizer for the inactivation of NV on human finger pads. Samples were tested by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) both with and without a prior RNase treatment. In suspension assay, sodium hypochlorite concentrations of >or=160 ppm effectively eliminated RT-qPCR detection signal, while ethanol, regardless of concentration, was relatively ineffective, giving at most a 0.5 log(10) reduction in genomic copies of NV cDNA. Using the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard finger pad method and a modification thereof (with rubbing), we observed the greatest reduction in genomic copies of NV cDNA with the antibacterial liquid soap treatment (0.67 to 1.20 log(10) reduction) and water rinse only (0.58 to 1.58 log(10) reduction). The alcohol-based hand sanitizer was relatively ineffective, reducing the genomic copies of NV cDNA by only 0.14 to 0.34 log(10) compared to baseline. Although the concentrations of genomic copies of NV cDNA were consistently lower on finger pad eluates pretreated with RNase compared to those without prior RNase treatment, these differences were not statistically significant. Despite the promise of alcohol-based sanitizers for the control of pathogen transmission, they may be relatively ineffective against the HuNoV, reinforcing the need to develop and evaluate new products against this important group of viruses.

  1. Effectiveness of Liquid Soap and Hand Sanitizer against Norwalk Virus on Contaminated Hands▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengbo; Yuen, Yvonne; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Moe, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Disinfection is an essential measure for interrupting human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission, but it is difficult to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants due to the absence of a practicable cell culture system for these viruses. The purpose of this study was to screen sodium hypochlorite and ethanol for efficacy against Norwalk virus (NV) and expand the studies to evaluate the efficacy of antibacterial liquid soap and alcohol-based hand sanitizer for the inactivation of NV on human finger pads. Samples were tested by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) both with and without a prior RNase treatment. In suspension assay, sodium hypochlorite concentrations of ≥160 ppm effectively eliminated RT-qPCR detection signal, while ethanol, regardless of concentration, was relatively ineffective, giving at most a 0.5 log10 reduction in genomic copies of NV cDNA. Using the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard finger pad method and a modification thereof (with rubbing), we observed the greatest reduction in genomic copies of NV cDNA with the antibacterial liquid soap treatment (0.67 to 1.20 log10 reduction) and water rinse only (0.58 to 1.58 log10 reduction). The alcohol-based hand sanitizer was relatively ineffective, reducing the genomic copies of NV cDNA by only 0.14 to 0.34 log10 compared to baseline. Although the concentrations of genomic copies of NV cDNA were consistently lower on finger pad eluates pretreated with RNase compared to those without prior RNase treatment, these differences were not statistically significant. Despite the promise of alcohol-based sanitizers for the control of pathogen transmission, they may be relatively ineffective against the HuNoV, reinforcing the need to develop and evaluate new products against this important group of viruses. PMID:19933337

  2. Band offsets of non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterostructures measured by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ling; Zhu, Qin Sheng; Yang, Shao Yan; Liu, Gui Peng; Li, Hui Jie; Wei, Hong Yuan; Jiao, Chun Mei; Liu, Shu Man; Wang, Zhan Guo; Zhou, Xiao Wei; Mao, Wei; Hao, Yue; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The band offsets of non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions are measured by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the non-polar GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions. The valence-band offsets in the non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions are determined to be 1.33 ± 0.16 and 0.73 ± 0.16 eV, respectively. The large valence-band offset difference of 0.6 eV between the non-polar GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions is considered to be due to piezoelectric strain effect in the non-polar heterojunction overlayers.

  3. Radiation treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents for contaminant removal. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The Technical Meeting on Radiation Processing of Gaseous and Liquid Effluents conducted in Sofia, Bulgaria, 7-10 September 2004, discussed and evaluated issues related to the status and future trends in radiation application for environmental protection. Five experts from Bulgaria, India, the Republic of Korea, Poland, and the United States of America were invited to provide their experiences in this field. Twenty cost-free participants and observers - from Bulgaria, India, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine -joined the meeting, and 15 papers in total were presented. Research and development in radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents is undertaken in three fields: electron beam flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification and sewage sludge sterilization. Wastewater or sludge treatment and flue gas purification all differ from technological points of view, but they are common services and applications of environmental radiation technology applications, based mostly on electron accelerators. The technical meeting discussed new development in the field of radiation applications in environmental service, especially the status and prospects of radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents. Progress in the field of electron accelerators and gamma sources is crucial for routine application of the technology. Cost reduction and improvement of technical reliability are substantial especially for high power of accelerators and high activity of the sources needed for environmental applications. Environmental applications were carefully reviewed in accordance with the existing regulations and state of the art knowledge. The comparison with conventional commercial technologies was addressed as well. In flue gas treatment, applicability of the technology using different fossil fuels (coal, lignite, oil, etc.) was reviewed. The elaborated materials cover the technical and economical evaluation of the technologies. The possible applications of

  4. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) for rapid and efficient extraction of superficial and total mineral oil contamination from dry foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Sabrina; Scolaro, Marianna; Barp, Laura; Purcaro, Giorgia; Sander, Maren; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2014-08-15

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) represents a powerful technique which can be conveniently used for rapid extraction of mineral oil saturated (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) from dry foods with a low fat content, such as semolina pasta, rice, and other cereals. Two different PLE methods, one for rapid determination of superficial contamination mainly from the packaging, the other for efficient extraction of total contamination from different sources, have been developed and optimised. The two methods presented good performance characteristics in terms of repeatability (relative standard deviation lower than 5%) and recoveries (higher than 95%). To show their potentiality, the two methods have been applied in combination on semolina pasta and rice packaged in direct contact with recycled cardboard. In the case of semolina pasta it was possible to discriminate between superficial contamination coming from the packaging, and pre-existing contamination (firmly enclosed into the matrix). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of underground contamination of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) on the basis of the radon concentration in ground level air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, M.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated whether measurements of radon concentrations in ground level air are a suitable method of detecting sub-surface soil contamination with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The working postulation was that, due to the very high solubility of radon in NAPLs, and the resulting accumulation of radon in NAPLs, radon exhalation to the ground level air in the proximity of such NAPL contamination should be locally reduced, thus indicating contamination of sub-surface soils with NAPLs. The research work reported was to verify the working theory by way of experiments, and to finally develop a reliable detection method for NAPL contaminations. The investigations comprised theoretical studies, laboratory experiments, experiments in defined soil columns, and extensive field studies [de

  6. Liquids contamination analysis using ultrasonic technology; Analise de contaminacao de liquidos utilizando tecnologia ultra-sonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbalqueiro Neto, Orlando; Neves Junior, Flavio [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Parana (CEFET-PR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The easiness of the ultrasonic technology in the liquids quality control on-line, without intrusiveness, installation easiness and manuscript easiness (for the fact of not being toxic as X-rays) are the reasons to become this one of the best chooses. This work presents the development position period of an equipment and a methodology for a problem solution of filters disruption. For such, a revision of the techniques used currently was made and after one brief theoretical revision presents a practical methodology and its results for a refinery oils. In this in case that the industry using presses filters to eliminate particles, residues of the process. The disruption of these filters can cause the loss of part of the production. An equipment that determined if occurred or not an imperfection in the filter would prevent much damage. The results present that the methodology today used solve this problem, but for a higher precision of determination product quality exists the necessity to develop new works with new methodologies. (author)

  7. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-20

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2 }pulse{sup −1} per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  8. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10 11  cm −2  pulse −1 per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  9. Experience of management of plutonium-contaminated solid and liquid wastes at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcaillou, J.; Faure, J.C.; Tourret, G.

    1981-01-01

    At Cadarache the principal sources of alpha-contaminated waste are the facilities of the plutonium fuel assembly fabrication complex. The chosen management scheme shows two points where it is possible to implement procedures to limit the activities released and to reduce the storage volumes of treated waste: (1) At the fabrication units, three categories of solid waste ('rich', 'poor' and 'special') are distinguished by sorting at the time of production and by γ,n counting of the drums. The rich and special wastes with a high plutonium content are stored while awaiting treatment for recycling of the plutonium. In the case of liquid waste, different circuits are used to separate contaminated effluents and thus to limit their production; (2) In the solid-waste treatment shops, the waste has so far been compacted and then coated with bituminous cement mortar. At the same time, a new incinerator facility has been installed. The preliminary studies dealt mainly with: waste preparation (crushing) to obtain a continuous and regular feed for the incinerator; combustion (pyrolysis followed by burning of the gases and unburnt matter in the presence of excess air); containment of the equipment. Further studies will be made to determine what is to be done with the ash (treatment for plutonium recovery and/or coating). At the Effluent Treatment Station some adjustments have had to be made in order to cope with the increase in volume activity due mainly to the presence of americium. At the same time, with a view to limiting the production of treatment residues with a high alpha-emitter content it has been decided to carry out a research and development programme on the separation of americium and the improvement of the recycling of the plutonium contained in the process effluents. (author)

  10. Effect of Ionic Liquid on the Determination of Aromatic Amines as Contaminants in Hair Dyes by Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Electrochemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valnice Boldrin Zanoni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluorometanesulfonylimide BMIm[NTf2] was used as a novel medium for improvement of separation and quantization of 16 aromatic amines typically present as contaminants in consumer products and detected by HPLC coupled to an electrochemical detector. The aromatic amines, namely 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, 4-chloroaniline, 2-methoxy-5-methyl-aniline, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, 2,4-diaminotoluidine, 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline, 4,4'-oxydianiline, aniline, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, o-dianisidine, o-anisidine, o-toluidine, 4,4'-methylene-bis-2-chloroaniline and 2-naphthyl-amine are oxidized in methanol/BMIm[NTf2] at a potential around +0.68V to +0.93V vs. Ag/AgCl at a glassy carbon electrode, which is the base for their determination by HPLC/ED. Using the optimized conditions of methanol/BMIm[NTf2] 70:30 (v/v as mobile phase, flow-rate of 0.8 mL·min−1, column CLC-ODS, Eap = +1.0 V and T = 40 °C analytical curves were constructed for each of the tested amines. Good linearity was obtained in the concentration range of 1.09 mg·L−1 to 217 mg·L−1, with excellent correlation coefficients. The limits of detection reached 0.021 mg·L−1 to 0.246 mg·L−1 and good relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 3 were obtained from the measurements. Satisfactory recovery for each aromatic amine was achieved, ranging from 95 to 103%. The developed method was successfully applied to determine six aromatic amines present as contaminants in commercial hair dye samples.

  11. Irradiation of Liquid Fungi Isolated Media from Contaminated Sources with Heavy Metals Additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfiq, E.; Mohamed, A.A.; El-Kabbany, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational lead exposure is an important health issue in Egyptian workers, employees of paint factories, workers of copying centres, drivers, and tile making factories are in higher risk of lead toxicity. Wastewater, particularly from electroplating, paint, leather, metal and tanning industries, contain enormous amount of heavy metals. Microorganisms including fungi have been reported to exclude heavy metals from wastewater through bioaccumulation and bio sorption at low cost and in eco-friendly way. Low level lead exposure can significantly induce motor dis functions and cognitive impairment in children. Seventy six fungal isolates tolerant to heavy metals like Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni were isolated from sewage, sludge and industrial effluents containing heavy metals. Four fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride) were included in this study. The majority of the fungal isolates were able to tolerate up to 400 ppm concentration of Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni. The most heavy metal tolerant fungi were studied for removal of heavy metals from liquid media at 50 ppm concentration. Results indicated removal of substantial amount of heavy metals by some of the fungi with respect to Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni with maximum uptake of 59.67, 16.25, 0.55 and 0.55 mg/g by fungi Pb 3 (Aspergillus terreus), Trichoderma viride, C r 8 (Trichoderma longibrachiatum), and isolate Ni 27 (A. niger), respectively. This indicated the potential of these fungi as bio sorbent for removal of heavy metals from wastewater and industrial effluents containing higher concentration of heavy metals. The F-ratio was 0.55 and gives non-significant as irradiated

  12. A single step reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography separation of polar and non-polar lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Petter; Holmbäck, Jan; Herslöf, Bengt

    2014-11-21

    This paper reports a simple chromatographic system to separate lipids classes as well as their molecular species. By the use of phenyl coated silica as stationary phase in combination with a simple mobile phase consisting of methanol and water, all tested lipid classes elute within 30 min. Furthermore, a method to accurately predict retention times of specific lipid components for this type of chromatography is presented. Common detection systems were used, namely evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD), charged aerosol detection (CAD), electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and UV detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Survey of cotton (Gossypium sp.) for non-polar, extractable hydrocarbons for use as petrochemicals and liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ontogenetic study of a commercial cotton cultivar (FiberMax 1320), grown dryland, revealed that the dry weight (DW) of leaves reached a maximum at the 1st flower stage, and then declined as bolls opened. However, % pentane soluble hydrocarbon (HC) yield continued to increase throughout the growi...

  14. Rapid characterisation of Klebsiella oxytoca isolates from contaminated liquid hand soap using mass spectrometry, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Ralf; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Hahmann, Hartmut; Wicke, Amal; Kleta, Sylvia; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojciech; Nitsche, Andreas; Stämmler, Maren; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Lasch, Peter

    2016-06-23

    Microbiological monitoring of consumer products and the efficiency of early warning systems and outbreak investigations depend on the rapid identification and strain characterisation of pathogens posing risks to the health and safety of consumers. This study evaluates the potential of three rapid analytical techniques for identification and subtyping of bacterial isolates obtained from a liquid hand soap product, which has been recalled and reported through the EU RAPEX system due to its severe bacterial contamination. Ten isolates recovered from two bottles of the product were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca and subtyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS), near-infrared Fourier transform (NIR FT) Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Comparison of the classification results obtained by these phenotype-based techniques with outcomes of the DNA-based methods pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data revealed a high level of concordance. In conclusion, a set of analytical techniques might be useful for rapid, reliable and cost-effective microbial typing to ensure safe consumer products and allow source tracking.

  15. [High-performance liquid-liquid chromatography in beverage analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricout, J; Koziet, Y; de Carpentrie, B

    1978-01-01

    Liquid liquid chromatography was performed with columns packed with stationary phases chemically bonded to silica microparticules. These columns show a high efficiency and are used very easily. Flavouring compounds like aromatic aldehydes which have a low volatility were analyzed in brandy using a polar phase alkylnitrile. Sapid substances like amarogentin in Gentiana lutea or glyryrrhizin in Glycyrrhiza glabra were determined by reversed phase chromatography. Finally ionizable substances like synthetic dyes can be analyzed by paired ion chromatography witha non polar stationary phase.

  16. Liquid Oxygen Rotating Friction Ignition Testing of Aluminum and Titanium with Monel and Inconel for Rocket Engine Propulsion System Contamination Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, S.; Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic contaminant was found in the liquid oxygen (LOX) pre-valve screen of the shuttle main engine propulsion system on two orbiter vehicles. To investigate the potential for an ignition, NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility performed (modified) rotating friction ignition testing in LOX. This testing simulated a contaminant particle in the low-pressure oxygen turbo pump (LPOTP) and the high-pressure oxygen turbo pump (HPOTP) of the shuttle main propulsion system. Monel(R) K-500 and Inconel(R) 718 samples represented the LPOTP and HPOTP materials. Aluminum foil tape and titanium foil represented the contaminant particles. In both the Monel(R) and Inconel(R) material configurations, the aluminum foil tape samples did not ignite after 30 s of rubbing. In contrast, all of the titanium foil samples ignited regardless of the rubbing duration or material configuration. However, the titanium foil ignitions did not propagate to the Monel and Inconel materials.

  17. Remediation of radiocesium-contaminated liquid waste, soil, and ash: a mini review since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dahu; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan; Cai, Tianming

    2016-02-01

    The radiation contamination after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident attracts considerable concern all over the world. Many countries, areas, and oceans are greatly affected by the emergency situation other than Japan. An effective remediation strategy is in a highly urgent demand. Though plenty of works have been carried out, progressive achievements have not yet been well summarized. Here, we review the recent advances on the remediation of radiocesium-contaminated liquid waste, soil, and ash. The overview of the radiation contamination is firstly given. Afterwards, the current remediation strategies are critically reviewed in terms of the environmental medium. Special attentions are paid on the adsorption/ion exchange and electrically switched ion exchange methods. Finally, the present review outlines the possible works to do for the large-scale application of the novel remediation strategies.

  18. Reclamation of heavy metals from contaminated soil using organic acid liquid generated from food waste: removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn, and soil fertility improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shijin; Li, Yang; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Youcai

    2017-06-01

    Food waste fermentation generates complicated organic and acidic liquids with low pH. In this work, it was found that an organic acid liquid with pH 3.28 and volatile low-molecular-weight organic acid (VLMWOA) content of 5.2 g/L could be produced from food wastes after 9-day fermentation. When the liquid-to-solid ratio was 50:1, temperature was 40 °C, and contact time was 0.5-1 day, 92.9, 78.8, and 52.2% of the Cd, Cu, and Zn in the contaminated soil could be washed out using the fermented food waste liquid, respectively. The water-soluble, acid-soluble, and partly reducible heavy metal fractions can be removed after 0.5-day contact time, which was more effective than that using commercially available VLMWOAs (29-72% removal), as the former contained microorganisms and adequate amounts of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorous, and exchangeable Na, K, and Ca) which favored the washing process of heavy metals. It is thus suggested that the organic acid fractions from food waste has a considerable potential for reclaiming contaminated soil while improving soil fertility.

  19. Non-polar InGaN quantum dot emission with crystal-axis oriented linear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz 78457 (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-27

    Polarization sensitive photoluminescence is performed on single non-polar InGaN quantum dots. The studied InGaN quantum dots are found to have linearly polarized emission with a common polarization direction defined by the [0001] crystal axis. Around half of ∼40 studied dots have a polarization degree of 1. For those lines with a polarization degree less than 1, we can resolve fine structure splittings between −800 μeV and +800 μeV, with no clear correlation between fine structure splitting and emission energy.

  20. M-CARS and EFISHG study of the influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, E.; Louot, C.; Ould-Moussa, N.; Lefort, C.; Kaneyasu, J. F.; Kano, H.; Pagnoux, D.; Couderc, V.; Leproux, P.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule has been studied by means of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS). A parallel measurement of electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) has also been led. Both techniques suggest a reorientation of the molecule due to the presence of an electric field. This phenomenon can be used to increase the chemical selectivity and the signal to non-resonant background ratio, namely, the sensitivity of the M-CARS spectroscopy.

  1. The flotation of Roşia Poieni copper ore in column machine, with non-polar oils addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciocani V.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The most important natural resource of copper in Romania is the ore deposit of Roşia Poieni. At present, the utilization of Roşia Poieni poorphyry copper ore is possible by extraction in quarry of the mass ore and mineral processing into a technological flux with modest results for the value of metal recovery in concentrate 70-72 % and an average contents of 16,5 % Cu. Our researches were directed to studies regarding test and utilisation of special procedure of flotation – addition of the non-polar oil – applied to advanced grinding ore with column type machines.

  2. Nontarget analysis of polar contaminants in freshwater sediments influenced by pharmaceutical industry using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure for a reliable identification of nontarget polar contaminants in aquatic sediments was developed, based on the application of ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The procedure was applied for the analysis of freshwater sediment that was highly impacted by wastewater discharges from the pharmaceutical industry. A number of different contaminants were successfully identified owing to the high mass accuracy of the QTOFMS system, used in combination with high chromatographic resolution of UHPLC. The major compounds, identified in investigated sediment, included a series of polypropylene glycols (n = 3-16), alkylbenzene sulfonate and benzalkonium surfactants as well as a number of various pharmaceuticals (chlorthalidone, warfarin, terbinafine, torsemide, zolpidem and macrolide antibiotics). The particular advantage of the applied technique is its capability to detect less known pharmaceutical intermediates and/or transformation products, which have not been previously reported in freshwater sediments. - Research highlights: → UHPLC-QTOFMS coupling was applied for nontarget analysis of polar contaminants. → Wide spectrum of polar contaminants was identified in polluted sediments. → Pharmaceuticals and their intermediates were present in high concentrations. - Comprehensive analysis of freshwater sediments by UPLC/QTOF indicated importance of pharmaceutically-derived polar contaminants.

  3. Nontarget analysis of polar contaminants in freshwater sediments influenced by pharmaceutical industry using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzic, Senka, E-mail: terzic@irb.h [Division of Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ahel, Marijan [Division of Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-02-15

    A comprehensive analytical procedure for a reliable identification of nontarget polar contaminants in aquatic sediments was developed, based on the application of ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The procedure was applied for the analysis of freshwater sediment that was highly impacted by wastewater discharges from the pharmaceutical industry. A number of different contaminants were successfully identified owing to the high mass accuracy of the QTOFMS system, used in combination with high chromatographic resolution of UHPLC. The major compounds, identified in investigated sediment, included a series of polypropylene glycols (n = 3-16), alkylbenzene sulfonate and benzalkonium surfactants as well as a number of various pharmaceuticals (chlorthalidone, warfarin, terbinafine, torsemide, zolpidem and macrolide antibiotics). The particular advantage of the applied technique is its capability to detect less known pharmaceutical intermediates and/or transformation products, which have not been previously reported in freshwater sediments. - Research highlights: UHPLC-QTOFMS coupling was applied for nontarget analysis of polar contaminants. Wide spectrum of polar contaminants was identified in polluted sediments. Pharmaceuticals and their intermediates were present in high concentrations. - Comprehensive analysis of freshwater sediments by UPLC/QTOF indicated importance of pharmaceutically-derived polar contaminants.

  4. Sample handling and contamination encountered when coupling offline normal phase high performance liquid chromatography fraction collection of petroleum samples to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, Nicole E; Whittal, Randy M; Lucy, Charles A

    2012-09-05

    Normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used to separate a gas oil petroleum sample, and the fractions are collected offline and analyzed on a high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The separation prior to MS analysis dilutes the sample significantly; therefore the fractions need to be prepared properly to achieve the best signal possible. The methods used to prepare the HPLC fractions for MS analysis are described, with emphasis placed on increasing the concentration of analyte species. The dilution effect also means that contamination in the MS spectra needs to be minimized. The contamination from molecular sieves, plastics, soap, etc. and interferences encountered during the offline fraction collection process are described and eliminated. A previously unreported MS contamination of iron formate clusters with a 0.8 mass defect in positive mode electrospray is also described. This interference resulted from the stainless steel tubing in the HPLC system. Contamination resulting from what has tentatively been assigned as palmitoylglycerol and stearoylglycerol was also observed; these compounds have not previously been reported as contaminant peaks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Plazaola, F.; García, J. A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Egger, W.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 10 17 cm −3 and 10 18 cm −3 , respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 μm inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional Cd Zn in the ZnO crystal.

  6. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 11100, 00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika/Fisika Aplikatua II Sailak, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Posta Kutxatila 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Garcia, J. A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Posta Kutxatila 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Kuznetsov, A. Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Egger, W. [Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, Univ. der Bundeswehr Muenchen, 87755 Neubiberg (Germany); Zuniga-Perez, J. [CRHEA CNRS, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Munoz-Sanjose, V. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2013-01-14

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 {mu}m inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional Cd{sub Zn} in the ZnO crystal.

  7. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Plazaola, F.; García, J. A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Egger, W.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3, respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 μm inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional CdZn in the ZnO crystal.

  8. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Kalinin, S. V.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  9. Contaminated water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormly, Sherwin J. (Inventor); Flynn, Michael T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for processing of a liquid ("contaminant liquid") containing water and containing urine and/or other contaminants in a two step process. Urine, or a contaminated liquid similar to and/or containing urine and thus having a relatively high salt and urea content is passed through an activated carbon filter to provide a resulting liquid, to remove most of the organic molecules. The resulting liquid is passed through a semipermeable membrane from a membrane first side to a membrane second side, where a fortified drink having a lower water concentration (higher osmotic potential) than the resulting liquid is positioned. Osmotic pressure differential causes the water, but not most of the remaining inorganic (salts) contaminant(s) to pass through the membrane to the fortified drink. Optionally, the resulting liquid is allowed to precipitate additional organic molecules before passage through the membrane.

  10. Two-liquid-phase system: A promising technique for predicting bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congying; Wang, Ziyu; Li, Zengbo; Ahmad, Riaz

    2017-02-01

    A two-liquid-phase system (TLPS), which consisted of soil slurry and silicone oil, was employed to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four long-term contaminated soils in order to assess the bioavailability of PAHs. Extraction kinetics of six PAHs viz. phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthrancene were selected to investigate as they covered the susceptible and recalcitrant PAHs in soil. A parallel experiments were also carried out on the microbial degradation of these PAHs in soil with and without biostimulation (by adding (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 ). The rapidly desorbed fraction of fluoranthene, as indicated by the two-fraction model, was found the highest, ranging from 21.4% to 37.4%, whereas dibenzo(a,h)anthrancene was the lowest, ranging from 8.9% to 20.5%. The rapid desorption of selected PAHs was found to be finished within 24 h. The rapidly desorbed fraction of PAHs investigated using TLPS, was significantly correlated (R 2  = 0.95) with that degraded by microorganisms in biostimulation treatment. This suggested that the TLPS-assisted extraction could be a promising technique in determining the bioavailability of aged PAHs in contaminated soils. It also suggested that applying sufficient nutrients in bioremediation of field contaminated soils is crucial. Further work is required to test its application to more hydrophobic organic pollutants in long-term contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Overview of the mental health research among residents of contaminated territories and Chornobyl clean-up workers/'liquidators' in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igumnov, S.A.; Lapanov, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    This review deals with the latest information concerning the studies of the effect of the Chornobyl accident on the mental health of different population groups of Belarus. Observed the pathogenesis of mental disorders, develop ing in individuals living in the contaminated territories. Reviewed different factors affecting the mental health of such population group as the liquidators. Disclosed is a phenomenon of squatters ('samosely') - people who voluntarily returned to their homes in the exclusion zone after the forced relocation. The data studies, including its own, mental disorders in children, exposed to radioactive exposure in different periods of development

  12. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Extraction estimation and gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis of the non polar fraction of the pistia stratiotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The non-polar compounds of the Pistia stratiotes were extracted using n-hexane as solvent. The extraction yields were determined both for the cold and hot extraction procedure as 8.50 +- 0.05% and 12.00 +- 0.05%, respectively. The extract was analyzed and separated into its components using GC equipped with FID and GC mass in separate experiments. The most important compounds identified in n-hexane extract of leaves of P. stratiotes are long chain compound of the nitrogenous nature and oxygenated compounds of mixed functional groups. The antibacterial activity of this fraction was investigated against eight pathogenic bacteria using disc diffusion method. Larger zones of inhibition were observed for Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens as compared to Klebsiella pneumoniaee and Staphylococcus aureus where the activity was relatively less. No activity was observed against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Bacillus atrophaeus. (author)

  14. Basal-plane stacking faults in non-polar GaN studied by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lewis Z-Y; Rao, D V Sridhara; Kappers, M J; Humphreys, C J [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Geiger, D, E-mail: ZL249@cam.ac.u [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute for Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    We have studied basal-plane stacking faults in a non-polar (11-20) GaN epilayer using high-resolution electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography. The microstructure of the basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) has been determined to be I{sub 1} type from high-resolution TEM images. High-resolution holograms along the [11-20] zone axis were obtained by off-axis electron holography on a Cs-corrected TEM, providing {approx}2 A spatial resolution in the reconstructed amplitude and phase images. Phase fluctuations across the stacking faults were detected, suggesting the presence of a built-in electric field. The uncertainties in the experiments and their interpretation are discussed.

  15. Measuring polarization dependent dispersion of non-polarizing beam splitter cubes with spectrally resolved white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csonti, K.; Hanyecz, V.; Mészáros, G.; Kovács, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work we have measured the group-delay dispersion of an empty Michelson interferometer for s- and p-polarized light beams applying two different non-polarizing beam splitter cubes. The interference pattern appearing at the output of the interferometer was resolved with two different spectrometers. It was found that the group-delay dispersion of the empty interferometer depended on the polarization directions in case of both beam splitter cubes. The results were checked by inserting a glass plate in the sample arm of the interferometer and similar difference was obtained for the two polarization directions. These results show that to reach high precision, linearly polarized white light beam should be used and the residual dispersion of the empty interferometer should be measured at both polarization directions.

  16. Effect of asymmetrical transfer coefficients of a non-polarizing beam splitter on the nonlinear error of the polarization interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen-Guang; Tan, Jiu-Bin; Liu, Tao

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism of a non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) with asymmetrical transfer coefficients causing the rotation of polarization direction is explained in principle, and the measurement nonlinear error caused by NPBS is analyzed based on Jones matrix theory. Theoretical calculations show that the nonlinear error changes periodically, and the error period and peak values increase with the deviation between transmissivities of p-polarization and s-polarization states. When the transmissivity of p-polarization is 53% and that of s-polarization is 48%, the maximum error reaches 2.7 nm. The imperfection of NPBS is one of the main error sources in simultaneous phase-shifting polarization interferometer, and its influence can not be neglected in the nanoscale ultra-precision measurement.

  17. The effect of environmental parameters on contaminant uptake by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was also no discernable relationship between pH and contaminants uptake by the sampling devices as was expected with non polar, non-ioniseable solutes. The uptake of compounds with lower molar volumes was most susceptible to the presence oh humic materials. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental ...

  18. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  19. Measurement of surface contamination by certain antineoplastic drugs using high-performance liquid chromatography: applications in occupational hygiene investigations in hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, F M; Floridia, L; Pietropaolo, A M; Tavazzani, M; Colombi, A

    1999-01-01

    Within the context of continuing interest in occupational hygiene of hospitals as workplaces, the authors report the results of a preliminary study on surface contamination by certain antineoplastic drugs (ANDs), recently performed in eight cancer departments of two large general hospitals in Milan, Italy. Since reliable quantitative information on the exposure levels to individual drugs is mandatory to establish a strong interpretative framework for correctly assessing the health risks associated with manipulation of ANDs and rationally advise intervention priorities for exposure abatement, two automated analytical methods were set up using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography for the measurement of contamination by 1) methotrexate (MTX) and 2) the three most important nucleoside analogue antineoplastic drugs (5-fluorouracil 5FU, Cytarabin CYA, Gemcytabin GCA) on surfaces such as those of preparation hoods and work-benches in the pharmacies of cancer wards. The methods are characterized by short analysis time (7 min) under isocratic conditions, by the use of a mobile phase with a minimal content of organic solvent and by high sensitivity, adequate to detect surface contamination in the 5-10 micrograms/m2 range. To exemplify the performance of the analytical methods in the assessment of contamination levels from the target analyte ANDs, data are reported on the contamination levels measured on various surfaces (such as on handles, floor surfaces and window panes, even far from the preparation hood). Analyte concentrations corresponding to 0.8-1.5 micrograms of 5FU were measured on telephones, 0.85-28 micrograms/m2 of CYA were measured on tables, 1.2-1150 micrograms/m2 of GCA on furniture and floors. Spillage fractions between 1-5% of the used ANDs (daily use 5FU 7-13 g; CYA 0.1-7.1 g; GCA 0.2-5 g) were measured on the disposable polythene-backed paper cover sheet of the preparation hood.

  20. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  1. Beta emitter radionuclides (90Sr contamination in animal feed: validation and application of a radiochemical method by ultra low level liquid scintillation counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iammarino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 90Sr is considered as a dangerous contaminant of agri-food supply chains due to its chemical affinity with Calcium, which makes its absorption in bones easy. 90Sr accumulation in raw materials and then in final products is particularly significant in relationship to its ability to transfer into animal source products. The radionuclides transfer (137Cs and 90Sr from environment to forages and then to products of animal origin (milk, cow and pork meats was studied and evaluated in different studies, which were carried out in contaminated areas, from Chernobyl disaster until today. In the present work, the development and validation of a radiochemical method for the detection of 90Sr in different types of animal feed, and the application of this technique for routinely control activities, are presented. Liquid scintillation counting was the employed analytical technique, since it is able to determine very low activity concentrations of 90Sr (<0.01 Bq kg–1. All samples analysed showed a 90Sr contamination much higher than method detection limit (0.008 Bq kg–1. In particular, the highest mean activity concentration was registered in hay samples (2.93 Bq kg–1, followed by silage samples (2.07 Bq kg–1 and animal feeds (0.77 Bq kg–1. In fact, all samples were characterized by 90Sr activity concentrations much lower than reference limits. This notwithstanding, the necessity to monitor these levels was confirmed, especially considering that 90Sr is a possible carcinogen for human.

  2. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non-Polar Solvents by using Conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseda, Kazuya; Kokado, Kenta; Sada, Kazuki

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride ( TBACl ) ion-pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso -octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole ( CP ), which is a well-known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP , the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non-polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non-polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion-paired salt as well as a free anion in non-polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP - Cl ) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion-pairing constant ( K ip ) than TBACl in non-polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli-responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces.

  3. Study of excess carrier dynamics in polar, semi-polar, and non-polar (In,Ga)N epilayers and QWs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksiejunas, R. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Lubys, L.; Jarasiunas, K. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vengris, M. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Wernicke, T.; Hoffmann, V.; Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    We studied carrier recombination and diffusion in GaN/sapphire templates, (In,Ga)N layers, and (In,Ga)N quantum well structures oriented along the polar [0001], semi-polar [11-22], and non-polar [11-20] orientations by means of light induced transient grating, differential transmission, and photoluminescence optical techniques. We show that the lifetime of excess carriers drops by orders of magnitude when changing the orientation from polar to non-polar, both in GaN templates and (In,Ga)N layers. We attribute the shorter lifetime to carrier trapping by extended structural defects that are more abundant in non-polar grown samples. In addition, we observe pronounced carrier localization effects in the semi- and non-polar layers. We show that thick (In,Ga)N layers inherit the properties of the GaN templates. However, the thin quantum well structures show a lower carrier trapping activity. So, a better electrical quality can be assumed as compared to the thick (In,Ga)N layers. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Ab initio density functional theory study of non-polar (10-10), (11-20) and semipolar {20-21} GaN surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mutombo, Pingo; Romanyuk, Olexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 20 (2014), "203508-1"-"203508-5" ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101201 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-polar GaN * semipolar GaN * surface reconstructions * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  5. Environmental migration of radium and other contaminants present in liquid and solid wastes from the mining and milling of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This coordinated research programme has been directed at studying the migration of radium and other contaminants from tailings. It is therefore particularly concerned with the migration and transfer processes caused by ingress of water into tailings piles. Some of the studies in the programme have been concerned with the behaviour of radium after transfer into aquatic systems while others were concerned with the basic processes which occur in tailings piles. Studies of the latter type are essential if the long-term behaviour of radium and other contaminants is to be predicted with confidence and the effects of various treatment schemes are to be understood. The migration behaviour of radium-226, as a precursor to radon-222, will also have an effect on the long-term emission of this gas. The appendices of this report contain the guidance on analysis and measurement procedures and the summaries of research carried out by individual contractors

  6. Valuation of contamination of Am-241 by smear test and characterization of waste by scintillation liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Gabriella Souza [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUC-GO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dept. Matematica, Fisica, Quimica e Engenharia de Alimentos; Santos, Eliane Eugenia dos; Mingote, Raquel Maia; Barbosa, Rugles Cesar, E-mail: esantos@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: mingote@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rbarbosa@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil). Lab. de Radioprotecao

    2011-07-01

    The radioactive lightning rods Interim storage facility receives Midwest Regional Center for Nuclear Science - CRCN-CO, and contains the majority of devices called radioactive lightning rods, and so is our main study object with an interest in be adapt of Interim storage facility (ID) Radiation Protection requirements and management of radioactive waste. The radioactive lightning rods are devices that contain Americium 241 that fall under the categorization of radioactive sources (IAEA-TECDOC-1191) in category 4 (same device category of the static Eliminator type). The handling, transportation, maintenance, segregation and disposal of accessories and devices emitting ionizing radiation in which involve procedures require: special types of packaged, storage techniques, cleaning/hygiene and inventoried and equipment for Radiation Protection. Cleaning and hygiene as well as the disposition criterion of accessories makes it necessary for the introduction of safe cleanup criterion and more specific that the criterion for exemption. The radioactive lightning rods have brackets that represent physical danger in shipping and handling as well as liabilities of contamination as well as in the case of being contaminated, agents in the transfer of contaminants (Am-241) it is necessary to adopt analysis methodologies and procedures and criterion for the management of radioactive and nonradioactive materials. (author)

  7. Valuation of contamination of Am-241 by smear test and characterization of waste by scintillation liquid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Gabriella Souza; Santos, Eliane Eugenia dos; Mingote, Raquel Maia; Barbosa, Rugles Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive lightning rods Interim storage facility receives Midwest Regional Center for Nuclear Science - CRCN-CO, and contains the majority of devices called radioactive lightning rods, and so is our main study object with an interest in be adapt of Interim storage facility (ID) Radiation Protection requirements and management of radioactive waste. The radioactive lightning rods are devices that contain Americium 241 that fall under the categorization of radioactive sources (IAEA-TECDOC-1191) in category 4 (same device category of the static Eliminator type). The handling, transportation, maintenance, segregation and disposal of accessories and devices emitting ionizing radiation in which involve procedures require: special types of packaged, storage techniques, cleaning/hygiene and inventoried and equipment for Radiation Protection. Cleaning and hygiene as well as the disposition criterion of accessories makes it necessary for the introduction of safe cleanup criterion and more specific that the criterion for exemption. The radioactive lightning rods have brackets that represent physical danger in shipping and handling as well as liabilities of contamination as well as in the case of being contaminated, agents in the transfer of contaminants (Am-241) it is necessary to adopt analysis methodologies and procedures and criterion for the management of radioactive and nonradioactive materials. (author)

  8. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  9. Radium contamination of the banks of a small river receiving the liquid effluents of a large phosphate plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, H.; Paridaens, J.

    2000-01-01

    A chemical plant in the north of Belgium processes since 1929 large quantities of marine phosphate ore, with a 226 Ra content of 1500 Bq/kg, into products suited for animal feeding, using hydrochloric acid (HCl) as dissolution agent instead of the more common sulphuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ). Until 1991, two thirds of the radium was released with the waste water into two small rivers with a concentration of about 20 Bq/l and a flow rate of 1500 m 3 /h. Adding barium salts has recently reduced the radium concentration of the waste water to 3 Bq/l. The purpose of this study was to map the historical radium contamination of one of the receiving rivers, the Laak, over a distance of 20 km. Enhanced dose rates are found everywhere along the Laak between the discharge points and the merging with the Grote Nete. The contamination is mostly confined to a narrow strip of 5 to 10 m wide on one or on both sides, caused by the periodic dredging of the sediment. The measured dose rates vary between the low natural background of the region, 50 to 80 nSv/h, and 1000 to 2000 nSv/h. The total surface area contaminated above 100 nSv/h amounts to 22 ha. The radiological impact on the surrounding population was estimated. Realistic scenarios for critical groups for the external exposure result in doses of a few hundreds of μSv/year. Pastures and maize for animal feeding are currently the only cultures along the contaminated banks of the Laak. This additional step in the food chain reduces the internal doses to a few tens of μSv/year. The inhalation of radon decay products in open air poses no problem. The construction of dwellings on the contaminated banks would undo this favorable situation as radon gas could accumulate in the dwellings resulting in doses that could exceed the limit for radiation workers. (author)

  10. Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Amir; Heidler, Jochen; Halden, Rolf U

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS# 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9 ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200 mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110 ng/L) were significantly higher (P1219-99-4). In addition to TCC and DCC, municipal sludge contained a second co-contaminant, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorocarbanilide (TetraCC; CAS# 4300-43-0). Both newly detected compounds were present as impurities (0.2%(w/w) each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC.

  11. Reclamation of zinc-contaminated soil using a dissolved organic carbon solution prepared using liquid fertilizer from food-waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Tong, Ou-Yang; Chiou, Chyow-San; Lin, Yu-An; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Liu, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-15

    A liquid fertilizer obtained through food-waste composting can be used for the preparation of a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) solution. In this study, we used the DOC solutions for the remediation of a Zn-contaminated soil (with Zn concentrations up to 992 and 757 mg kg(-1) in topsoil and subsoil, respectively). We then determined the factors that affect Zn removal, such as pH, initial concentration of DOC solution, and washing frequency. Measurements using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) revealed that carboxyl and amide were the major functional groups in the DOC solution obtained from the liquid fertilizer. Two soil washes using 1,500 mg L(-1) DOC solution with a of pH 2.0 at 25°C removed about 43% and 21% of the initial Zn from the topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Following this treatment, the pH of the soil declined from 5.4 to 4.1; organic matter content slightly increased from 6.2 to 6.5%; available ammonium (NH4(+)-N) content increased to 2.4 times the original level; and in the topsoil, the available phosphorus content and the exchangeable potassium content increased by 1.65 and 2.53 times their initial levels, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polar and non-polar heterocyclic amines in cooked fish and meat products and their corresponding pan residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Augustsson, K; Steineck, G; Stenberg, M; Jägerstad, M

    1997-06-01

    Fourteen cooked dishes with their corresponding pan residues were analysed for polar and non-polar heterocyclic amines using HPLC. The choice of foods, including beef, pork, poultry, game, fish, egg and sausages, was based on an investigation of an elderly population in Stockholm participating in an analytical epidemiological case-control study on cancer risks after intake of heterocyclic amines. The food items were prepared using normal household cooking practices, and to reflect the wide range of surface browning of the cooked dishes that would be encountered in this population, four cooking temperatures were used in the range 150-225 degrees C. For all food samples, the total amount of heterocyclic amines formed at 150 degrees C was less than 1 ng/g cooked product, and at 175 degrees C less than 2 ng/g. The highest concentrations of heterocyclic amines were detected in fillet of pork, reindeer meat and chicken breast fried at 200 and 225 degrees C and their corresponding pan residues. The total sum of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine was about 1 microgram per 100 g portion (including pan residues) for reindeer meat and chicken breast, and between 1.9 and 6.3 micrograms per 100-g portion for fillet of pork. PhIP was the most abundant heterocyclic amine, identified in 73 of 84 samples, and the highest concentration of PhIP, 32.0 ng/g, was found in the pan residue from fillet of pork cooked at 225 degrees C. The non-polar heterocyclic amines 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole were detected in the range of 0.5-7.4 ng/g in most foods cooked at 225 degrees C, and also in meat sauce prepared at 200 and 175 degrees C. The other heterocyclic amines tested for: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-6-methyl-pyrido-[1,2-a:3',2'-d]-imidazole and 2

  13. Non-polar organic compounds in marine aerosols over the northern South China Sea: Influence of continental outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yingyi; Fu, Pingqing; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Liu, Fobang; Zou, Shichun; Wang, Shan; Lai, Senchao

    2016-06-01

    Filter samples of total suspended particle (TSP) collected during a cruise campaign over the northern South China Sea (SCS) from September to October 2013 were analyzed for non-polar organic compounds (NPOCs) as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble ions. A total of 115 NPOCs species in groups of n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), iso-/antiso-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, methylalkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes and phthalates were detected. The characteristics of NPOCs in marine TSP samples were investigated to understand the sources from the Asian continent and other regions. The concentrations of total NPOCs ranged from 19.8 to 288.2 ng/m(3) with an average of 87.9 ng/m(3), which accounted for 0.8-1.7% (average 1.0%) of organic matter (OM). n-Alkanes was the predominant group, accounting for 43.1-79.5%, followed by PAHs (5.5-44.4%) and hopanes (1.6-11.4%). We found that primary combustion (biomass burning/fossil fuel combustion) was the dominant source for the majority of NPOCs (89.1%). Biomass burning in southern/southeastern China via long-range transport was proposed to be a major contributor of NPOCs in marine aerosols over the northern SCS, suggested by the significant correlations between nss-K(+) and NPOCs groups as well as the analysis of air mass back-trajectory and fire spots. For the samples with strong continental influence, the strong enhancement in concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs, hopanes and steranes were attributed to fossil fuel (coal/petroleum) combustion. In addition, terrestrial plants waxes were another contributor to NPOCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antidiabetic, cytotoxic, antioxidant and antitrematodal medicinal efficacy of polar and non-polar phytochemicals of Balanites aegyptiaca Del.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Abd Al-Hay Saied Al-Ashaal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the biological activities of polar and non-polar extracts of Balanites aegyptiaca fruits. Methods: Antihyperglycemic activity using alloxan induced diabetic rats was evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity against human carcinoma cell lines activity in addition to antioxidant and antitrematodal effects were investigated. Phytochemicals were determined using chromatographic and spectral analyses including TLC, GC and LC/MS/MS methods. Results: The reduction in blood glucose level reached 64.13%, 69.07% and 77.01% for hexane, chloroform and methanol extract, respectively. Isolated organs and histopathological examination illustrated improvement in treated animal's pancreas which is the master gland in controlling glucose level. The highest in vitro free radical scavenging capacity was achieved by chloroform extract (75.72%. Meanwhile, hexane and methanol extracts exhibited 44.01% and 41.77% scavenging capacity, respectively. Cytotoxic activity against human carcinoma cell lines illustrated efficacious influence against brain, liver, lung, breast and lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Brain cell line was the most susceptible cell line by both chloroform and methanol extracts. In vitro antitrematodal effectiveness showed that 100% mortality of Schistosoma worms was induced at the 3rd and 5th days for methanol and chloroform extracts. Meanwhile, both extracts exhibited antifasciolosis activity with LC50 of 63.19 and 55.15 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: The current results illustrated that Balanites aegyptiaca phytochemicals induced potent hypoglycemic activity and potent to moderate antioxidant and cytotoxic effects. Chloroform and methanol extracts were found to have antitrematodal efficacy against Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola gigantica hepatic worms.

  15. Phytoremediation modelling - phytoextraction of 137Cs, 133Ba, and 90Sr from liquid media and artificially contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrcek, S.; Masnerova, G.

    2002-01-01

    The phytoremediation model based on experiments with plants cultivated in vitro in media supplemented with radionuclide salts was investigated. The plant species Brassica napus, Sinapis alba, Helianthus annuus, Zea mays and Pisum sativum were cultivated on the Murashige-Skoog basal salt mixture enriched with salts of 137 Cs, 133 Ba, and 90 Sr in aseptic conditions. The time-dependent radioactivity decrease in the medium was determined using LSC, and the phytoextraction curves were plotted. Radioactivity in the plant roots and shoots was measured and the efficiency of phytoextraction and the distribution between the roots and shoots as a measure of radionuclide transport in the plant tissues were calculated for each of the plants used. Cultivation experiments were also performed on artificially contaminated soil. Seeds of the plants were placed into contaminated soil and cultivated for 2 months in conditions similar to those of the in vitro experiments. The extracted radioactivity and distribution between roots and shoots were determined. The in vitro experiments simulated extraction of the radionuclide salt from solution analogously to real extraction from the soil solution, while the processes occurring in the rhizosphere were eliminated. The phytoextraction efficiency in terms of the percentage of the starting radioactivity ranged from 12 to 31 % for 90 Sr, 8 to 24% for 137 Cs, and 12 to 17 % for 133 Ba in a cultivation cycle. The root/shoot radioactivity ratios demonstrate that the plant species used may be suitable for real phytoremediation. The experiments in which the plants were cultivated from seeds in artificial contaminated substrate showed that the ability of roots to extract radionuclide salts from their environment remains unchanged. The relative efficiency values were lower than for the extraction from solutions (3 to 11.5 % for 90 Sr, 1.5 to 4 % for 137 Cs, and 1 to 6.2 %, for 133 Ba), but in this process, the equilibrium between the soil particles

  16. Bacterial contamination of tile drainage water and shallow groundwater under different application methods of liquid swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, A D; Glasauer, S M; Lauzon, J D; O'Halloran, I P; Parkin, Gary W; Dunfield, K E

    2012-05-01

    A 2 year field experiment evaluated liquid manure application methods on the movement of manure-borne pathogens (Salmonella sp.) and indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens) to subsurface water. A combination of application methods including surface application, pre-application tillage, and post-application incorporation were applied in a randomized complete block design on an instrumented field site in spring 2007 and 2008. Tile and shallow groundwater were sampled immediately after manure application and after rainfall events. Bacterial enumeration from water samples showed that the surface-applied manure resulted in the highest concentration of E. coli in tile drainage water. Pre-tillage significantly (p tile water and to shallow groundwater within 3 days after manure application (DAM) in 2008 and within 10 DAM in 2007. Pre-tillage also decreased the occurrence of Salmonella sp. in tile water samples. Indicator bacteria and pathogens reached nondetectable levels within 50 DAM. The results suggest that tillage before application of liquid swine manure can minimize the movement of bacteria to tile and groundwater, but is effective only for the drainage events immediately after manure application or initial rainfall-associated drainage flows. Furthermore, the study highlights the strong association between bacterial concentrations in subsurface waters and rainfall timing and volume after manure application.

  17. The physics and chemistry of room-temperature liquid-filled ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of excess electrons in non-polar liquids, such as tetramethylsilane and 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane, which are suitable for room-temperature liquid-filled ionization chambers are reviewed. Such properties as mobility, ionization yield, conduction band energy, trapping, and the influence of the electric field are considered. (orig.)

  18. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and phytotoxic potential of non-polar and polar fractions of seeds of Dioteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. from Venezuelan regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de J. Oliveros-Bastidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. is a tall arboreal species native to Central and Northern South America. This paper describes the chemical characterization and phytotoxic potential of polar and non-polar extracts from D. odorata seeds. Structural determinations were accomplished by chemical derivatization and analyzed by GC/MS. The chemical composition of the non-polar fraction (hexane and dichloromethane presented fatty acids as major constituent. Medium polar and polar fractions (ethyl acetate and ethanol: water contained carboxylic acid and high 6,7-Dyhidroxycoumarin-β-D-glucopyranoside content, not previously reported for seeds of D. odorata. Extracts showed a significant level of phytotoxic activity, correlated to the content of coumarin derivatives, predominantly in the polar fraction.

  19. Conversion of polar and non-polar algae oil lipids to fatty acid methyl esters with solid acid catalysts--A model compound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Martta; Munter, Tony; Linnekoski, Juha

    2015-09-01

    Bio-based fuels are becoming more and more important due to the depleting fossil resources. The production of biodiesel from algae oil is challenging compared to terrestrial vegetable oils, as algae oil consists of polar fatty acids, such as phospholipids and glycolipids, as well as non-polar triglycerides and free fatty acids common in vegetable oils. It is shown that a single sulphonated solid acid catalyst can perform the esterification and transesterification reactions of both polar and non-polar lipids. In mild reaction conditions (60-70 °C) Nafion NR50 catalyst produces methyl palmitate (FAME) from the palmitic acid derivatives of di-, and tri-glyceride, free fatty acid, and phospholipid with over 80% yields, with the glycolipid derivative giving nearly 40% yields of FAME. These results demonstrate how the polar and non-polar lipid derivatives of algal oil can be utilised as feedstocks for biodiesel production with a single catalyst in one reaction step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal properties of some small peptides (N-acetyl-amino acid-N′-methylamides) with non-polar side groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Elena; Della Gatta, Giuseppe; Pałecz, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T fus and Δ fus H m of methylamides of N-acetyl substituted non-polar amino acids were measured. • T fus and Δ fus H m increased as a function of the molar mass of the alkyl side chains. • DL racemates showed T fus of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers. • Ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K was estimated based on their T fus and Δ fus S m . - Abstract: Temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion of a series of uncharged small peptides, namely the methylamides of N-acetyl substituted glycine, α-amino-butyric acid, alanine, valine, norvaline, leucine, isoleucine, norleucine, and proline, were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.), and molar entropies of fusion were derived. Both L- and DL-compunds were taken into account for the chiral molecules. No solid-to-solid transitions were detected from room temperature to fusion except for N-acetyl-N′-methyl alaninamide. Comparisons were made with the values for the N-acetyl amides of the corresponding amino acids previously reported. Both L enantiomers and DL racemates of α-aminobutyric acid, alanine, valine and isoleucine methylamides displayed temperatures of fusion sharply increasing as a function of molar mass, whereas much lower values, in countertendency with their molar mass increase, were found for proline and leucine methylamides. The racemic DL crystals showed temperatures of fusion of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers, except for proline and leucine derivatives. The enthalpies and entropies of fusion also varied as a function of molar mass following a similar trend with that of temperatures of fusion, except for alanine derivatives which showed lower values than expected. The values of ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K were estimated based on their temperatures and molar entropies of fusion. Results were discussed with reference to the packing patterns based on hydrogen bonding and

  1. Smouldering (thermal) remediation of soil contaminated with industrial organic liquids: novel insights into heat transfer and kinetics uncovered by integrating experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Zanoni, M. A. B.; Torero, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Smouldering (i.e., flameless combustion) underpins the technology Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR). STAR achieves the in situ destruction of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) by generating a self-sustained smouldering reaction that propagates through the source zone. This research explores the nature of the travelling reaction and the influence of key in situ and engineered characteristics. A novel one-dimensional numerical model was developed (in COMSOL) to simulate the smouldering remediation of bitumen-contaminated sand. This model was validated against laboratory column experiments. Achieving model validation depended on correctly simulating the energy balance at the reaction front, including properly accounting for heat transfer, smouldering kinetics, and heat losses. Heat transfer between soil and air was demonstrated to be generally not at equilibrium. Moreover, existing heat transfer correlations were found to be inappropriate for the low air flow Reynold's numbers (Re remediation systems. Therefore, a suite of experiments were conducted to generate a new heat transfer correlation, which generated correct simulations of convective heat flow through soil. Moreover, it was found that, for most cases of interest, a simple two-step pyrolysis/oxidation set of kinetic reactions was sufficient. Arrhenius parameters, calculated independently from thermogravimetric experiments, allowed the reaction kinetics to be validated in the smouldering model. Furthermore, a simple heat loss term sufficiently accounted for radial heat losses from the column. Altogether, these advances allow this simple model to reasonably predict the self-sustaining process including the peak reaction temperature, the reaction velocity, and the complete destruction of bitumen behind the front. Simulations with the validated model revealed numerous unique insights, including how the system inherently recycles energy, how air flow rate and NAPL saturation dictate contaminant

  2. Reclamation of zinc-contaminated soil using a dissolved organic carbon solution prepared using liquid fertilizer from food-waste composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Tong, Ou-Yang; Chiou, Chyow-San; Lin, Yu-An; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Liu, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contents in soil are substantially increased after the DOC washing. • The removal of Zn is dominated by proton replacement at pH 2.0, rather than by complexation with DOC. • The removal of Zn is dominated by DOC complexation between pH 3.0 and pH 5.0. - Abstract: A liquid fertilizer obtained through food-waste composting can be used for the preparation of a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) solution. In this study, we used the DOC solutions for the remediation of a Zn-contaminated soil (with Zn concentrations up to 992 and 757 mg kg −1 in topsoil and subsoil, respectively). We then determined the factors that affect Zn removal, such as pH, initial concentration of DOC solution, and washing frequency. Measurements using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) revealed that carboxyl and amide were the major functional groups in the DOC solution obtained from the liquid fertilizer. Two soil washes using 1,500 mg L −1 DOC solution with a of pH 2.0 at 25 °C removed about 43% and 21% of the initial Zn from the topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Following this treatment, the pH of the soil declined from 5.4 to 4.1; organic matter content slightly increased from 6.2 to 6.5%; available ammonium (NH 4 + -N) content increased to 2.4 times the original level; and in the topsoil, the available phosphorus content and the exchangeable potassium content increased by 1.65 and 2.53 times their initial levels, respectively.

  3. Reclamation of zinc-contaminated soil using a dissolved organic carbon solution prepared using liquid fertilizer from food-waste composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Po-Neng [Experimental Forest, National Taiwan University, Chushan, Nantou County, 55750, Taiwan (China); Tong, Ou-Yang [Department of Environment Engineering, College of the Environment and Ecology, and The Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Chiou, Chyow-San; Lin, Yu-An [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ming-Kuang [Department of Animal Science, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Liu, Cheng-Chung, E-mail: ccliu@niu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contents in soil are substantially increased after the DOC washing. • The removal of Zn is dominated by proton replacement at pH 2.0, rather than by complexation with DOC. • The removal of Zn is dominated by DOC complexation between pH 3.0 and pH 5.0. - Abstract: A liquid fertilizer obtained through food-waste composting can be used for the preparation of a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) solution. In this study, we used the DOC solutions for the remediation of a Zn-contaminated soil (with Zn concentrations up to 992 and 757 mg kg{sup −1} in topsoil and subsoil, respectively). We then determined the factors that affect Zn removal, such as pH, initial concentration of DOC solution, and washing frequency. Measurements using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) revealed that carboxyl and amide were the major functional groups in the DOC solution obtained from the liquid fertilizer. Two soil washes using 1,500 mg L{sup −1} DOC solution with a of pH 2.0 at 25 °C removed about 43% and 21% of the initial Zn from the topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Following this treatment, the pH of the soil declined from 5.4 to 4.1; organic matter content slightly increased from 6.2 to 6.5%; available ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N) content increased to 2.4 times the original level; and in the topsoil, the available phosphorus content and the exchangeable potassium content increased by 1.65 and 2.53 times their initial levels, respectively.

  4. Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapkota, Amir; Heidler, Jochen; Halden, Rolf U.

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (P w/w each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC

  5. Liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry for identification of organic contaminants in fish fillet: screening and quantification assessment using two scan modes for data acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaretto, Juliana S; May, Marília M; Saibt, Nathália; Zanella, Renato

    2016-07-22

    This study proposed a strategy to identify and quantify 182 organic contaminants from different chemical classes, as for instance pesticides, veterinary drug and personal care products, in fish fillet using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF/MS). For this purpose, two different scan methods (full scan and all ions MS/MS) were evaluated to assess the best option for screening analysis in spiked fish fillet samples. In general, full scan acquisition was found to be more reliable (84%) in the automatic identification and quantification when compared to all ions MS/MS with 72% of the compounds detected. Additionally, a qualitative automatic search showed a mass accuracy error below 5ppm for 77% of the compounds in full scan mode compared to only 52% in all ions MS/MS scan. However, all ions MS/MS provides fragmentation information of the target compounds. Undoubtedly, structural information of a wide number of compounds can be obtained using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), but it is necessary thoroughly assess it, in order to choose the best scan mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of processing contaminants in edible oils. Part 1. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the direct detection of 3-monochloropropanediol monoesters and glycidyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Shaun; Mazzola, Eugene; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2013-05-22

    A new analytical method has been developed and validated for the detection of glycidyl esters (GEs) and 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) monoesters in edible oils. The target compounds represent two classes of potentially carcinogenic chemical contaminants formed during the processing of edible oils. Target analytes are separated from edible oil matrices using a two-step solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. The extracts are then analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). Chromatographic conditions that separate sn-1 and sn-2 monoesters of 3-MCPD have been developed for the first time. The method has been validated for GEs, sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters of lauric, myristic, linolenic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids, and sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters of oleic and palmitic acids in coconut, olive, and palm oils using an external calibration curve. The range of average recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) across the three oil matrices at three spiking concentrations are 84-115% (3-16% RSD) for the GEs, 95-113% (1-10% RSD) for the sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters, and 76.8-103% (5.1-11.2% RSD) for the sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters, with limits of quantitation at or below 30 ng/g for the GEs, 60 ng/g for sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters, and 180 ng/g for sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters.

  7. Analysis of processing contaminants in edible oils. Part 2. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the direct detection of 3-monochloropropanediol and 2-monochloropropanediol diesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Shaun; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2013-05-22

    A method was developed and validated for the detection of fatty acid diesters of 2-monochloropropanediol (2-MCPD) and 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) in edible oils. These analytes are potentially carcinogenic chemical contaminants formed during edible oil processing. After separation from oil matrices using a two-step solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure, the target compounds are quantitated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). The first chromatographic conditions have been developed that separate intact diesters of 2-MCPD and 3-MCPD, allowing for their individual quantitation. The method has been validated for 28 3-MCPD diesters of lauric, myristic, palmitic, linolenic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids in coconut, olive, and palm oils, as well as 3 2-MCPD diesters, using an external calibration curve. The range of average recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) across the three oil matrices at three spiking concentrations are 88-118% (2-16% RSD) with maximum limits of quantitation of 30 ng/g (ppb).

  8. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriko Asanuma; Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada; Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF 4 or NaF adsorbing UF 6 are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF 4 was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na 3 UO 2 F 5 . Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  9. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noriko Asanuma [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF{sub 4} or NaF adsorbing UF{sub 6} are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF{sub 4} was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na{sub 3}UO{sub 2}F{sub 5}. Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  10. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioral and electroencephalographic evaluation of the anticonvulsive activity of Moringa oleifera leaf non-polar extracts and one metabolite in PTZ-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Martínez-González, Claudia Lizbeth; Flores-Carrillo, Maricela; Luna-Nophal, Sara Ibeth; Contreras-Murillo, Gerardo; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel

    2018-01-15

    Moringa oleifera Lamarck is a species that has long been used in high demand in folk medicine, including for the treatment of epilepsy. Nevertheless, scientific studies demonstrating its anticonvulsant properties and the nature of the bioactive constituents are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activities of the Moringa oleifera leaves in non-polar vs. polar extracts using behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) analyses in rodents. First, PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced tonic-clonic seizures were assayed via a dose-response (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) evaluation in mice. Then, a dosage of the extracts (100 or 300 mg/kg) and one metabolite (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was selected to evaluate its effect on PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced EEG paroxystic activities in rats compared to the effects of ethosuximide (reference anticonvulsant drug, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Latent onset of the first paroxystic spike, first seizure and frequency as well as seizure severity, were determined using Racine's scale. Moringa oleifera ethanol and hexane extracts produced a delay in the seizure latency in mice and rats; this effect was improved in the presence of the hexane extract containing the active metabolite hexadecanoic acid. The anticonvulsant effects were corroborated in the spectral analysis by the potency of the EEG due to a reduction in the spike frequency and amplitude, as well as in the duration and severity of the seizures. The effects of the hexane extract resembled those observed in the reference antiepileptic drug ethosuximide. Moringa oleifera leaves possess anticonvulsant activities due to the complementary of the non-polar and polar constituents. However, the non-polar constituents appear to exert an important influence via the partial participation of fatty acids, providing evidence of the effects of this plant in epilepsy therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Comparison of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 growth in polarized genital epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional culture with non-polarized cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Moore, Cheryl G.; Whittimore, Judy D.; Wyrick, Priscilla B.

    2008-01-01

    A common model for studying Chlamydia trachomatis and growing chlamydial stocks uses Lymphogranuloma venereum serovar L2 and non-polarized HeLa cells. However, recent publications indicate that the growth rate and progeny yields can vary considerably for a particular strain depending on the cell line/type used, and seem to be partially related to cell tropism. In the present study, the growth of invasive serovar L2 was compared in endometrial HEC-1B and endocervical HeLa cells polarized on co...

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  14. Comparison of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 growth in polarized genital epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional culture with non-polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Moore, Cheryl G; Whittimore, Judy D; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2008-04-01

    A common model for studying Chlamydia trachomatis and growing chlamydial stocks uses Lymphogranuloma venereum serovar L2 and non-polarized HeLa cells. However, recent publications indicate that the growth rate and progeny yields can vary considerably for a particular strain depending on the cell line/type used, and seem to be partially related to cell tropism. In the present study, the growth of invasive serovar L2 was compared in endometrial HEC-1B and endocervical HeLa cells polarized on collagen-coated microcarrier beads, as well as in HeLa cells grown in tissue culture flasks. Microscopy analysis revealed no difference in chlamydial attachment/entry patterns or in inclusion development throughout the developmental cycle between cell lines. Very comparable growth curves in both cell lines were also found using real-time PCR analysis, with increases in chlamydial DNA content of 400-500-fold between 2 and 36 h post-inoculation. Similar progeny yields with comparable infectivity were recovered from HEC-1B and HeLa cell bead cultures, and no difference in chlamydial growth was found in polarized vs. non-polarized HeLa cells. In conclusion, unlike other C. trachomatis strains such as urogenital serovar E, invasive serovar L2 grows equally well in physiologically different endometrial and endocervical environments, regardless of the host cell polarization state.

  15. Exciplex fluorescence emission from simple organic intramolecular constructs in non-polar and highly polar media as model systems for DNA-assembled exciplex detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichenkova, Elena V; Sardarian, Ali R; Wilton, Amanda N; Bonnet, Pascal; Bryce, Richard A; Douglas, Kenneth T

    2006-01-21

    Organic intramolecular exciplexes, N-(4-dimethylaminobenzyl)-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (1) and N'-4-dimethylaminonaphthyl-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (2), were used as model systems to reveal major factors affecting their exciplex fluorescence, and thus lay the basis for developing emissive target-assembled exciplexes for DNA-mounted systems in solution. These models with an aromatic pyrenyl hydrocarbon moiety as an electron acceptor appropriately connected to an aromatic dimethylamino electron donor component (N,N-dimethylaminophenyl or N,N-dimethylaminonaphthyl) showed strong intramolecular exciplex emission in both non-polar and highly polar solvents. The effect of dielectric constant on the maximum wavelength for exciplex emission was studied, and emission was observed for 1 and 2 over the full range of solvent from non-polar hydrocarbons up to N-methylformamide with a dielectric constant of 182. Quantum yields were determined for these intramolecular exciplexes in a range of solvents relative to that for Hoechst 33,258. Conformational analysis of 1 was performed both computationally and via qualitative 2D NMR using (1)H-NOESY experiments. The results obtained indicated the contribution of pre-folded conformation(s) to the ground state of 1 conducive to exciplex emission. This research provides the initial background for design of self-assembled, DNA-mounted exciplexes and underpins further development of exciplex-based hybridisation bioassays.

  16. Interfacial B-site atomic configuration in polar (111) and non-polar (001) SrIrO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Zhou, H.; Xie, L.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Patzner, J. J.; Ryu, S.; Pan, X. Q.; Eom, C. B.

    2017-09-01

    The precise control of interfacial atomic arrangement in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures is paramount, particularly in cases where the subsequent electronic properties of the material exhibit geometrical preferences along polar crystallographic directions that feature inevitably complex surface reconstructions. Here, we present the B-site interfacial structure in polar (111) and non-polar (001) SrIrO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. The heterostructures were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based coherent Bragg rod analysis. Our results reveal the preference of B-site intermixing across the (111) interface due to the polarity-compensated SrTiO3 substrate surface prior to growth. By comparison, the intermixing at the non-polar (001) interface is negligible. This finding suggests that the intermixing may be necessary to mitigate epitaxy along heavily reconstructed and non-stoichiometric (111) perovskite surfaces. Furthermore, this preferential B-site configuration could allow the geometric design of the interfacial perovskite structure and chemistry to selectively engineer the correlated electronic states of the B-site d-orbital.

  17. Interfacial B-site atomic configuration in polar (111 and non-polar (001 SrIrO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Anderson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The precise control of interfacial atomic arrangement in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures is paramount, particularly in cases where the subsequent electronic properties of the material exhibit geometrical preferences along polar crystallographic directions that feature inevitably complex surface reconstructions. Here, we present the B-site interfacial structure in polar (111 and non-polar (001 SrIrO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. The heterostructures were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based coherent Bragg rod analysis. Our results reveal the preference of B-site intermixing across the (111 interface due to the polarity-compensated SrTiO3 substrate surface prior to growth. By comparison, the intermixing at the non-polar (001 interface is negligible. This finding suggests that the intermixing may be necessary to mitigate epitaxy along heavily reconstructed and non-stoichiometric (111 perovskite surfaces. Furthermore, this preferential B-site configuration could allow the geometric design of the interfacial perovskite structure and chemistry to selectively engineer the correlated electronic states of the B-site d-orbital.

  18. Simultaneous testing of multiclass organic contaminants in food and environment by liquid chromatography/dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Meyer, Cordula; Michels, Antje; Franzke, Joachim; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-11-21

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization (DBDI) LC/MS interface is based on the use of a low-temperature helium plasma, which features the possibility of simultaneous ionization of species with a wide variety of physicochemical properties. In this work, the performance of LC/DBDI-MS for trace analysis of highly relevant species in food and environment has been examined. Over 75 relevant species including multiclass priority organic contaminants and residues such as pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine species, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and drugs of abuse were tested. LC/DBDI-MS performance for this application was assessed and compared with standard LC/MS sources (electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)). The used benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer features a 10 Hz polarity switching mode, so that both positive and negative ion mode acquisitions are possible with acquisition cycles matching the requirements of fast liquid chromatography. Both polar and nonpolar species (including those typically analyzed by GC/electron ionization-MS) can be tested in a single run using polarity switching mode. The methodology was found to be effective in detecting a wide array of organic compounds at concentration levels in the low ng L(-1) to μg kg(-1) range in wastewater and food matrices, respectively. The linearity was evaluated in an olive oil extract, obtaining good correlation coefficients in the studied range. Additionally, minor matrix effects (≤15% of signal suppression or enhancement) were observed for most of the studied analytes in this complex fatty matrix. The results obtained were compared with data from both ESI and APCI sources, obtaining a merged coverage between ESI and APCI in terms of analyte ionization and higher overall sensitivity for the proposed ion source based on the DBD principle. The use of this approach further extends the coverage of current LC/MS methods towards

  19. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of Phytoplankton Pigments Using a C16-Amide Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method was developed to analyze in a single run, most polar and non-polar chlorophylls and carotenoids from marine phytoplankton. The method is based on a RP-C16-Amide column and a ternary gradient system consistin...

  20. Design of a 50/50 splitting ratio non-polarizing beam splitter based on the modal method with fused-silica transmission gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huajun; Yuan, Dairong; Ming, Hai

    2011-04-01

    The optical design of a beam splitter that has a 50/50 splitting ratio regardless of the polarization is presented. The non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) is based on the fused-silica rectangular transmission gratings with high intensity tolerance. The modal method has been used to estimate the effective index of the modes excited in the grating region for TE and TM polarizations. If a phase difference equals an odd multiples of π/2 for the first two modes (i.e. modes 0 and 1), the incident light will be diffracted into the 0 and -1 orders with about 50% and 50% diffraction efficiency for TM and TE polarizations, respectively.

  1. Polarization-independent rapidly tunable optical add-drop multiplexer utilizing non-polarizing beam splitters in Ti:LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Wook; Sung, Won Ju; Eknoyan, O.; Madsen, C. K.; Taylor, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    A polarization-independent four-port wavelength-tunable optical add drop multiplexer (OADM) that utilizes non-polarizing relaxed beam splitters has been analyzed and demonstrated in Ti:LiNbO3 at the 1530 nm wavelength regime. The design utilizes an asymmetric interferometer configuration with strain induced index grating for polarization coupling along its arms that are shifted in position relative to each other. Experimental results of the filter response agree with theoretical predictions. Electrooptic tuning over a range of 15.7 nm at a rate of 0.08 nm/V has been measured. A temporal response < 46 ns to a 20 V step change in tuning voltage has been demonstrated. Fiber-to-fiber insertion loss is ~ 6.5 dB.

  2. Electromembrane extraction with alkylated phosphites and phosphates as supported liquid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    -nitrophenyl octyl ether) was proposed as a new and successful SLM for EME of both polar and non-polar basic drugs. An assay based on EME-HPLC/UV with a TBP/NPOE SLM was evaluated from two-fold diluted human plasma under physiological pH conditions for both polar and non-polar basic drugs. The evaluation data......A range of alkylated phosphates and phosphites were for the first time investigated as potential supported liquid membranes (SLMs) for electromembrane extraction (EME) of basic drugs from human plasma samples. Six polar basic drugs were used as model analytes for initial testing of the different...

  3. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. I. Liquid phase structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C., E-mail: mccribei@iq.usp.br [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Molecular, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 26077, CEP 05513-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giles, Carlos [Departamento de Física da Matéria Condensada, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-06-14

    X-ray scattering experiments at room temperature were performed for the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}]. The peak in the diffraction data characteristic of charge ordering in [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}] is shifted to longer distances in comparison to [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], but the peak characteristic of short-range correlations is shifted in [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}] to shorter distances. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for these ionic liquids using force fields available from the literature, although with new sets of partial charges for [N{sub 1114}]{sup +} and [N{sub 1444}]{sup +} proposed in this work. The shifting of charge and adjacency peaks to opposite directions in these ionic liquids was found in the static structure factor, S(k), calculated by MD simulations. Despite differences in cation sizes, the MD simulations unravel that anions are allowed as close to [N{sub 1444}]{sup +} as to [N{sub 1114}]{sup +} because anions are located in between the angle formed by the butyl chains. The more asymmetric molecular structure of the [N{sub 1114}]{sup +} cation implies differences in partial structure factors calculated for atoms belonging to polar or non-polar parts of [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], whereas polar and non-polar structure factors are essentially the same in [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}]. Results of this work shed light on controversies in the literature on the liquid structure of tetraalkylammonium based ionic liquids.

  4. Energies of conduction bands in dielectric liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of excess electrons in non-polar liquids depend on the relative energies of the trapped and conducting states. We have measured the energies of the conducting states, denoted V 0 , for about twenty non-polar liquids. Two methods were used: In one the work functions of metals immersed in the liquid were measured. In the other, solutes (TMPD) were photoionized in the liquid and V 0 calculated from the wavelength at which ionization onsets occur. A wide variation in conduction state energies is observed from a high of +0.21 eV for tetradecane to a low of --0.60 eV for tetramethylsilane. In general V 0 shifts to more negative values with increasing molecular symmetry, and correlates well with electron mobility. The photoionization results indicate that V 0 decreases with increasing temperature. In mixtures V 0 is linearly dependent on mole fraction. It was found empirically for n-hexane-neopentane mixtures that μ = 0.34 exp [--15.2(V 0 )]. This equation relating V 0 to the electron mobility also applies approximately to pure hydrocarbons. Thus the role of the conduction state energy in influencing electron mobilities and photoionization onsets is established and recent evidence indicates V 0 also influences the rates of electron reactions in these liquids

  5. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ziming; Zhao Xin; Xu Xu; Wu Lijie; Su Rui; Zhao Yajing; Jiang Chengfei; Zhang Hanqi; Ma Qiang; Lu Chunmei; Dong Deming

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An absorbing microwave μ-SPE device packed with activated carbon was used. ► Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device was made and used to enrich the analytes. ► Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device was made and used to heat samples directly. ► MAE-μ-SPE was applied to the extraction of OPPs with non-polar solvent only. - Abstract: A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in μ-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave μ-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60 °C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-μ-SPE were directly analyzed by GC–MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5–104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  6. Transfection efficiency and uptake process of polyplexes in human lung endothelial cells: a comparative study in non-polarized and polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennesson, Eric; Erbacher, Patrick; Piller, Véronique; Kieda, Claudine; Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal

    2005-06-01

    Following systemic administration, polyplexes must cross the endothelium barrier to deliver genes to the target cells underneath. To design an efficient gene delivery system into lung epithelium, we evaluated capture and transfection efficiencies of DNA complexed with either Jet-PEI (PEI-polyplexes) or histidylated polylysine (His-polyplexes) in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMEC) and tracheal epithelial cells. After optimizing growth conditions to obtain a tight HLMEC monolayer, we characterized uptake of polyplexes by flow cytometry and evaluated their transfection efficiency. Polyplexes were formulated as small particles. YOYO-labelled plasmid fluorescence intensity and luciferase activity were used as readouts for uptake and gene expression, respectively. PEI-polyplexes were more efficiently taken up than His-polyplexes by both non-polarized (2-fold) and polarized HLMEC (10-fold). They were mainly internalized by a clathrin-dependent pathway whatever the cell state. In non-polarized cells, His-polyplexes entered also mainly via a clathrin-dependent pathway but with an involvement of cholesterol. The cell polarization decreased this way and a clathrin-independent pathway became predominant. PEI-polyplexes transfected more efficiently HLMEC than His-polyplexes (10(7) vs. 10(5) relative light units (RLU)/mg of proteins) with a more pronounced difference in polarized cells. In contrast, no negative effect of the cell polarization was observed with tracheal epithelial cells in which both polyplexes had comparable efficiency. We show that the efficiency of polyplex uptake by HLMEC and their internalization mechanism are polymer-dependent. By contrast with His-polyplexes, the HLMEC polarization has little influence on the uptake process and on the transfection efficiency of PEI-polyplexes. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ziming, E-mail: wangziming@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhao Xin; Xu Xu; Wu Lijie; Su Rui; Zhao Yajing; Jiang Chengfei; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma Qiang [Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing 100123 (China); Lu Chunmei [College of Technology Center, Jilin Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Changchun 130062 (China); Dong Deming [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device packed with activated carbon was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to enrich the analytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to heat samples directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAE-{mu}-SPE was applied to the extraction of OPPs with non-polar solvent only. - Abstract: A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction ({mu}-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in {mu}-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60 Degree-Sign C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-{mu}-SPE were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5-104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  8. Contribution of the Medical Radiology Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, to liquidation of radionuclide contamination aftereffects in the Kaluga Region that resulted from the Chernobyl power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, E.G.; Berdov, B.A.; Gorobets, V.F.; Tsyplyakovskaya, L.M.; Ivanov, V.K.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Pitkevich, V.A.; Omel'chenko, V.N.; Borovikova, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Specialists from the Medical Radiology Research Center, have been participating in liquidation of the Chernobyl power plant accident aftereffects since May-June, 1986. The basic trends of their work are mass dosimetric studies of the population of the contaminated areas, annual prophylactic check-ups of children and adolescents, pregnant and nursing women and other adults of high-risk groups (agricultural workers, patients with chronic diseases), development of recommendations for health and prophylactic measures in the districts under observation, treatment of patients from these regions, who are in need of a specialized care, at the clinic of the Center

  9. Identification of chemical contamination in an aqueous sample using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry during 2nd NATO mixed samples laboratory exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmusova, K.; Tkac, M.

    2010-01-01

    Biological and radiological screening was conducted to determine the type of biological and radiological contamination for a sample and the reference sample. Biological screening confirmed the presence of biological contamination. Radiological screening confirmed the presence of 235 U. Preliminary chemical screening military confirmed the presence of volatile chemicals (chemical warfare agents, CWA), but refute the presence of non-volatile CWA and their degradation products and precursors (1,2,3 directory Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, OPCW). To carry out further analysis it was necessary to adjust the aqueous sample so that it minimizes the possibility of radiological contamination, while maintaining chemical contamination. To remove 235 U from the water sample for selective extraction of chemical contamination SCX cartridges (strong cation exchange) by solid phase extraction were used. To identify chemical contamination (from the list of substances 1, 2, 3 OPCW) GC-MS and LC-MS were used. LC-ESI-MS analysis has demonstrated the presence of unknown substance designated as Chemical A in an aqueous sample. LC-ESI-MS chromatograms of the reference sample, water sample and standard were compared. Unknown substance was identified on the basis of the correlation of retention times and MS spectra of unknown substance Chemical A and standard such as triethanolamine (TEA, a breakdown product of nitrogen mustard - HN 3 fabric from the list 3B17Y OPCW).

  10. Identification of chemical contamination in an aqueous sample using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry during 2nd NATO mixed samples laboratory exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmusova, K.; Tkac, M.

    2010-01-01

    Biological and radiological screening was conducted on a sample and reference sample to determine the type of biological and radiological contamination. Biological screening confirmed the presence of biological contamination. Radiological screening confirmed the presence of 235 U. Preliminary chemical military screening confirmed the presence of volatile chemicals (chemical warfare agents, CWA), but refute the presence of non-volatile CWA and their degradation products and precursors (1,2,3 directory Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, OPCW). To carry out further analysis it was necessary to adjust aqueous sample so that it minimizes the possibility of radiological contamination, while maintaining chemical contamination. To remove of 235 U from the water sample for selective extraction of chemical contamination by solid phase extraction (solid phase extraction - SPE) using SCX (strong cation exchange) cartridges were used. To identify chemical contamination (from the list of substances 1, 2, 3 OPCW) GC-MS and LC-MS were used. LC-ESI-MS analysis has demonstrated the presence of an unknown substance designated as Chemical A in an aqueous sample. LC-ESI-MS chromatograms of the reference sample, water sample and standard were compared. Unknown substance has been identified on the basis of the correlation of retention times and MS spectra of unknown substances - chemical A and standard such as triethanolamine (TEA, a breakdown product of nitrogen mustard - HN 3 fabric from the list 3B17Y OPCW).

  11. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  12. Preparation of a Non-Polar ZnO Film on a Single-Crystal NdGaO3 Substrate by the RF Sputtering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaba, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Sakuma, M.; Abe, T.; Imai, Y.; Kawasaki, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Niikura, I.; Kashiwaba, Y.; Osada, H.

    2018-04-01

    Preparation of non-polar ZnO ( 11\\overline{2} 0 ) films on single-crystal NdGaO3 (NGO) (001) substrates was successfully achieved by the radio frequency (RF) sputtering method. Orientation, deposition rate, and surface roughness of ZnO films strongly depend on the working pressure. Characteristics of ZnO films deposited on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates were compared with those of ZnO films deposited on single-crystal sapphire ( 01\\overline{1} 2 ) substrates. An x-ray diffraction peak of the ZnO ( 11\\overline{2} 0 ) plane was observed on ZnO films deposited on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates under working pressure of less than 0.5 Pa. On the other hand, uniaxially oriented ZnO ( 11\\overline{2} 0 ) films on single-crystal sapphire ( 01\\overline{1} 2 ) substrates were observed under working pressure of 0.1 Pa. The mechanism by which the diffraction angle of the ZnO ( 11\\overline{2} 0 ) plane on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates was shifted is discussed on the basis of anisotropic stress of lattice mismatch. The deposition rate of ZnO films decreased with an increase in working pressure, and the deposition rate on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates was larger than that on single-crystal sapphire ( 01\\overline{1} 2 ) substrates. Root mean square (RMS) roughness of ZnO films increased with an increase in working pressure, and RMS roughness of ZnO films on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates was smaller than that of ZnO films on single-crystal sapphire ( 01\\overline{1} 2 ) substrates even though the film thickness on single-crystal NGO (001) substrates was greater than that on sapphire substrates. It is thought that a single-crystal NGO (001) substrate is useful for deposition of non-polar ZnO ( 11\\overline{2} 0 ) films.

  13. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-01-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL's are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry

  14. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  15. Human hepatoma cells exposed to estuarine sediment contaminant extracts permitted the differentiation between cytotoxic and pro-mutagenic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, M.; Costa, P.M.; Louro, H.; Costa, M.H.; Lavinha, J.

    2014-01-01

    Complex toxicant mixtures present in estuarine sediments often render contaminant screening unfeasible and compromise determining causation. HepG2 cells were subjected to bioassays with sediment extracts obtained with a series of progressively polar solvents plus a crude extract. The sediments were collected from an impacted area of an estuary otherwise regarded as pristine, whose stressors result mostly from aquaculture effluents and hydrodynamic shifts that enhance particle deposition. Compared to a reference scenario, the most polar extracts yielded highest cytotoxicity while higher genotoxicity (including oxidative damage) was elicited by non-polar solvents. While the former caused effects similar to those expected from biocides, the latter triggered effects compatible with known pro-mutagens like PAHs, even though the overall levels of toxicants were considered of low risk. The results indicate that the approach may constitute an effective line-of-evidence to infer on the predominant set of hazardous contaminants present in complex environmental mixtures. -- Highlights: • Estuarine sediment contaminants were extracted with different organic solvents. • More polar solvents contained the most cytotoxic contaminant fraction. • Non-polar solvents extracted the main genotoxic component of the mixture. • DNA base oxidation was detected through FPG/Comet assay. • The contamination pattern could be inferred from cytoassays with HepG2 cells. -- Polar/non-polar sediment fractions elicited differential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in human HepG2 cells

  16. Cathodoluminescence study of Mg activation in non-polar and semi-polar faces of undoped/Mg-doped GaN core-shell nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, V.; Martínez, O.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally and spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out at 80 K on undoped/Mg-doped GaN core-shell nanorods grown by selective area growth metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate locally the optical activity of the Mg dopants. A study of the luminescence emission distribution over the different regions of the nanorods is presented. We have investigated the CL fingerprints of the Mg incorporation into the non-polar lateral prismatic facets and the semi-polar facets of the pyramidal tips. The amount of Mg incorporation/activation was varied by using several Mg/Ga flow ratios and post-growth annealing treatment. For lower Mg/Ga flow ratios, the annealed nanorods clearly display a donor-acceptor pair band emission peaking at 3.26-3.27 eV and up to 4 LO phonon replicas, which can be considered as a reliable indicator of effective p-type Mg doping in the nanorod shell. For higher Mg/Ga flow ratios, a substantial enhancement of the yellow luminescence emission as well as several emission subbands are observed, which suggests an increase of disorder and the presence of defects as a consequence of the excess Mg doping.

  17. Optical properties of InN nanocolumns: Electron accumulation at InN non-polar surfaces and dependence on the growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Cantarero, A. [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia (Spain); Garro, N. [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia (Spain); Fundacio General de la Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica ' ' Gleb Wataghin' ' , UNICAMP, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    InN nanocolumns grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE). The PL peak energy was red-shifted with respect to the PLE onset and both energies were higher than the low temperature band-gap reported for InN. PL and PLE experiments for different excitation and detection energies indicated that the PL peaks were homogeneously broadened. This overall phenomenology has been attributed to the effects of an electron accumulation layer present at the non-polar surfaces of the InN nanocolumns. Variations in the growth conditions modify the edge of the PLE spectra and the PL peak energies evidencing that the density of free electrons can be somehow controlled by the growth parameters. It was observed that In-BEP and substrate temperature leading to shorter In diffusion lengths diminished the effects of the electron accumulation layer on the optical properties. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Optical properties of InN nanocolumns: Electron accumulation at InN non-polar surfaces and dependence on the growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2009-01-01

    InN nanocolumns grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE). The PL peak energy was red-shifted with respect to the PLE onset and both energies were higher than the low temperature band-gap reported for InN. PL and PLE experiments for different excitation and detection energies indicated that the PL peaks were homogeneously broadened. This overall phenomenology has been attributed to the effects of an electron accumulation layer present at the non-polar surfaces of the InN nanocolumns. Variations in the growth conditions modify the edge of the PLE spectra and the PL peak energies evidencing that the density of free electrons can be somehow controlled by the growth parameters. It was observed that In-BEP and substrate temperature leading to shorter In diffusion lengths diminished the effects of the electron accumulation layer on the optical properties. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziming; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Xu; Wu, Lijie; Su, Rui; Zhao, Yajing; Jiang, Chengfei; Zhang, Hanqi; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Chunmei; Dong, Deming

    2013-01-14

    A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave μ-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in μ-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave μ-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60°C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-μ-SPE were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5-104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro biocompatibility and proliferative effects of polar and non-polar extracts of cucurbita ficifolia on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Alshammari, Ghedeir M

    2017-05-01

    Cucurbita ficifolia (C. ficifolia) has been traditionally known for its medicinal properties as an antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory agent. However, there has been an enduring attention towards the identification of unique method, to isolate the natural components for therapeutic applications. Our study focuses on different polar and non-polar solvents (methanol, hexane and chloroform) to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia (pumpkin) and to study the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity effects on human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). The extracts were screened for their effects on cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and cell cycle on the hBM-MSCs cell line. The assays demonstrated that the chloroform extract was highly biocompatible, with less cytotoxic effect, and enhanced the cell proliferation. The methanol extract did not exhibit significant cytotoxicity when compare to the control. Concordantly, the cell cycle analysis confirmed that chloroform extract enhances the proliferation at lower concentrations. On the other hand, hexane extract showed high level of cytotoxicity with apoptotic and necrotic changes in hBM-MSCs. Collectively, our data revealed that chloroform is a good candidate to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia. Furthermore, our results suggest that specific gravity and density of the solvent might play a crucial role in the extraction process, which warrants further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites

  2. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  3. Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Zapka, Carrie A.; Campbell, Esther J.; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Dolan, Michael J.; Arbogast, James W.; Macinga, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log10 CFU/ml of Serratia marcesc...

  4. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  5. Technical feasibility study for the electrochemical treatment of Phaeozem soil contaminated with radioactive organic liquids; Estudio de la viabilidad tecnica para el tratamiento electroquimico de suelo Phaeozem contaminado con liquidos organicos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdovinos G, V.

    2014-07-01

    The application of radioisotopes in medicine and research generates radioactive waste. A large part of these wastes are composed by scintillation liquid (mixtures of organic solvents, as toluene and xylene, fluorescent materials and surfactants) contaminated with radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H (12.3 y), {sup 14}C (5730 y), {sup 238}U (4.468 x 10{sup 9} y), {sup 232}Th (1.41 x 10{sup 10} y), {sup 204}Tl (3.7 y) or {sup 22}Na (2.6 y). In Mexico during the 80 s, these wastes were absorbed on soil to decrease their hazardous behavior during interim storage. However, these wastes must be removed for reprocessing and final landscaping. Therefore, the objective of this thesis is to study the technical feasibility of the electrochemical treatment of soils types Phaeozem contaminated with radioactive organic liquid waste (ROLW). For this study, an electrochemical treatment at laboratory level was applied, giving it an electrokinetic tracking. Control samples were prepared with different scintillation liquid (INSTAL Gel- XF, ULTIMA Gold AB{sup TM} and ULTIMA Gold XR{sup TM} as support electrolyte and polarization curves were constructed to select the current with the highest mass transfer. An analysis of the liquids and solids, before and after the application of the different potentials; the liquid phase was characterized by Gas Chromatography coupled with Flame Ionized Detector (GC-FID) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (Ft-Irs), and the solids by Ft-Irs. From the fourteen supports electrolytes studied, eleven did not have a stable diffusion current and the other three showed a diffusion current plateau in 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 m A·cm{sup -2}. From polarization curves, the following experimental conditions were chosen for the treatment: electrodes (meshes of titanium as anode and rod of stainless steel as cathode), scintillation liquid (ULTIMA Gold XR{sup TM} : water, 1:1) and a current of 0.06 m A·cm{sup -2}. Subsequently, radioactive control samples were

  6. Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

    2011-05-21

    Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

  7. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  8. Simultaneous determination of fumonisins B1, B2 and B3 contaminants in maize by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yiping; Zhang Yu; Han Shiyun; Han Zheng; Wu Yongning

    2011-01-01

    The present work developed an analytical method for simultaneous determination of fumonisins B 1 , B 2 and B 3 residues in maize by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) under the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, and especially focused on the optimization of extraction, clean-up, UHPLC separation and MS/MS parameters. The method involves addition of fumonisins isotope internal standards, extraction with a mixture of acetonitrile and water and clean-up with solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges before UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. A single-laboratory method validation was conducted by testing three different spiking levels for repeatability and recovery according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) guidelines. The LOQ of FB 1 , FB 2 and FB 3 were 1.50, 1.65 and 0.4 μg kg -1 , respectively, which were lower than the criteria of EU, USA and other countries regarding minimum residue limits of fumonisins in foods including baby foods and feedstuffs. Recoveries of three fumonisins ranged from 80.9% to 97.0% with RSD values of 2.4-11.1%.The advantages of this method include simple pretreatment, rapid determination and high sensitivity, and it fulfills the requirements for food analysis with respect to minimum residue limits of fumonisins in various countries.

  9. Direct injection of tissue extracts in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern in mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Estrada, Elvagris Segovia; Juhel, Guillaume; Kelly, Barry C

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, a straightforward approach was validated for the analysis of pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the mollusk tissues, with a focus on two species commonly consumed in Southeast Asia (green mussels: Perna viridis; lokan clams: Polymesoda expansa). This approach relied on a simple solvent extraction (shaker table) followed by direct injection in liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This "cleanup-free" approach was made possible by the use of isotopically labeled surrogates (to correct for matrix effects) and a post-column switch on the LC-MS/MS system (to remove potential interfering material). Altogether, relative recoveries were satisfactory for 36 out of 44 compounds (26-163% range) and excellent for 27 out of 44 compounds (79-107% range). Method detection limits (MDLs) were usually expressed in the nanogram per gram wet weight (ww) range and below. The method was successfully applied to 16 batches of green mussel samples collected in Singapore coastal waters. Trace levels of six compounds were detected in mussel tissues: caffeine (0.22-1.55 ng g(-1) ww), carbamazepine (

  10. Evaluation of graphene-based sorbent in the determination of polar environmental contaminants in water by micro-solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-01-04

    A facile method of extraction using porous membrane protected micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) with a graphene-based sorbent followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detector was developed. The reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) (1mg), synthesized from graphite oxide, was enclosed in a polypropylene bag representing the μ-SPE device, which was used for the extraction of estrogens such as estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol and diethylstilbestrol in water. The r-GO obtained was identified and characterized by Fourier transform infrared, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The sorbent was loaded with sodium dodecyl sulfate by sonication to prevent agglomeration in aqueous solution. With this method, low limits of detection of between 0.24 and 0.52 ng L(-1) were achieved. For estrogen analysis a linear calibration range of 0.01-100 μg L(-1) was obtained, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) higher than 0.992. This proposed method was successfully applied to determine estrogens in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of copper in liquid and solid insulation for large electrical equipment by ICP-OES. Application to copper contamination assessment in power transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; De Carlo, Rosa Maria; Sarzanini, Corrado; Maina, Riccardo; Tumiatti, Vander

    2012-09-15

    Copper is one of the main constituents of the components in power transformers and its presence both in liquid (mineral oil) and in solid (Kraft paper) insulators can lead to enhanced dielectric losses and to the subsequent deterioration of their insulating properties. Recently the latter have been correlated to plant failures which in turn may have severe impact on the environment. This paper describes the direct analysis of copper in insulating mineral oil by ICP-OES and how it was first optimized compared to the official American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D7151 method. Detection and quantification limits of 8.8 μg kg(-1) and 29.3 μg kg(-1) were obtained. Secondly, copper determination was improved by coupling a microwave assisted dissolution procedure of the mineral oil which avoided the problems, in the real samples, due to the presence of solid species of copper which cannot be nebulized following traditional methods described in literature. Sixteen mineral insulating oils sampled from transformers in service were analyzed before and after dissolution. In order to evaluate copper speciation, size fractionation was performed by filtration on PTFE filters (0.45, 1 and 5 μm). This test was performed on all the oil samples. Finally, because of the key role of the solid insulator in failed transformers, the Authors applied the developed method to study the copper deposition tendency onto the insulating Kraft paper tapes exerted by two unused oils (a corrosive and a non-corrosive one) under defined ageing conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

    1999-11-01

    Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and

  13. Simple and quick determination of analgesics and other contaminants of emerging concern in environmental waters by on-line solid phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Aguirre, Alejandra; Romero-González, Roberto; Vidal, J L Martínez; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2016-05-13

    A simple and quick analytical method has been developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water. An on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been optimized to determine 7 contaminants of emerging concern in environmental waters at ngL(-1) levels. This procedure requires minimal sample handling and small sample volume (900μL) with a total running time of 18min. Several SPE parameters were evaluated and optimized in order to achieve a high sample throughput. Therefore sample volume, carryover and reusability of the cartridges were evaluated. Performance characteristics were evaluated and good linearity was obtained (R(2)>0.98). Recoveries were evaluated in spiked samples at three concentrations and the values ranged from 71 to 104%. Intra and inter-day precision was lower than 10 and 13% respectively. Limits of quantification were equal to or lower than 10ngL(-1), except for 1,7-dimethylxanthine (20ngL(-1)) and ibuprofen (50ngL(-1)). The method was applied to 20 environmental water samples, and ibuprofen was the compound most widely detected at concentrations up to 42.06μgL(-1), whereas the other compounds were detected in fewer samples at lower concentrations (up to 15.99μgL(-1)). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Contaminants assessment in the coral reefs of Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Timothy A.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Alvarez, David A.; Echols, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Coral, fish, plankton, and detritus samples were collected from coral reefs in Virgin Islands National Park (VIIS) and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (VICR) to assess existing contamination levels. Passive water sampling using polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semi-permeable membrane devices found a few emerging pollutants of concern (DEET and galaxolide) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Very little persistent organic chemical contamination was detected in the tissue or detritus samples. Detected contaminants were at concentrations below those reported to be harmful to aquatic organisms. Extracts from the POCIS were subjected to the yeast estrogen screen (YES) to assess potential estrogenicity of the contaminant mixture. Results of the YES (estrogen equivalency of 0.17–0.31 ng/L 17-β-estradiol) indicated a low estrogenicity likelihood for contaminants extracted from water. Findings point to low levels of polar and non-polar organic contaminants in the bays sampled within VICR and VIIS.

  15. Light contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda Pena, William Enrique

    1998-01-01

    The article tries on the wrong use of the artificial light, of the main problems of the light contamination, dispersion of the light, noxious effects of the light contamination, ecological effects, effects on the man's biological rhythm, economic effects and effects about the civic and vial security, among other topics

  16. Impacts of Spatio-Variability of Source Morphology on Field-Scale Predictions of Subsurface Contaminant Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hatfield, Kirk

    1998-01-01

    ... (organic immiscible liquids distribution and composition) and aquifer properties on predicting solute transport in saturated groundwater systems contaminated with residual Organic Immiscible Liquids (OIL's...

  17. Microorganism mediated liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troiano, Richard

    2018-03-20

    Herein disclosed is a method for producing liquid hydrocarbon product, the method comprising disintegrating a hydrocarbon source; pretreating the disintegrated hydrocarbon source; solubilizing the disintegrated hydrocarbon source to form a slurry comprising a reactant molecule of the hydrocarbon source; admixing a biochemical liquor into the slurry, wherein the biochemical liquor comprises at least one conversion enzyme configured to facilitate bond selective photo-fragmentation of said reactant molecule of the hydrocarbon source, to form liquid hydrocarbons via enzyme assisted bond selective photo-fragmentation, wherein said conversion enzyme comprises reactive sites configured to restrict said reactant molecule such that photo-fragmentation favorably targets a preselected internal bond of said reactant molecule; separating the liquid hydrocarbons from the slurry, wherein contaminants remain in the slurry; and enriching the liquid hydrocarbons to form a liquid hydrocarbon product. Various aspects of such method/process are also discussed.

  18. Analysis of polar organic contaminants in surface water of the northern Adriatic Sea by solid-phase extraction followed by ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-QTRAP® MS using a hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Robert; Tavazzi, Simona; Paracchini, Bruno; Canuti, Elisabetta; Weissteiner, Christof

    2013-07-01

    Water-soluble polar organic contaminants are discharged by rivers, cities, and ships into the oceans. Little is known on the fate, pollution effects, and thresholds of toxic chemical mixtures in the marine environment. A new trace analytical method was developed for the multi-compound analysis of polar organic chemical contaminants in marine waters. The method is based on automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) of one-liter water samples followed by ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography triple-quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTRAP(®) MS). Marine water samples from the open Adriatic Sea taken 16 km offshore from Venice (Italy) were analyzed. Method limits of quantification (LOQs) in the low picogram per liter (pg/l) concentration range were achieved. Among the 67 target chemicals analyzed, 45 substances could be detected above the LOQ. The chemicals detected at the highest concentrations were caffeine (up to 367 ng/l), nitrophenol (36 ng/l), 2,4-dinitrophenol (34 ng/l), 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (18.5 ng/l), sucralose (11 ng/l), 1H-benzotriazole (9.2 ng/l), terbuthylazine (9 ng/l), alachlor (7.7 ng/l), atrazine-desisopropyl (6.6 ng/l), diethyltoluamide (DEET) (5.0 ng/l), terbuthylazine-desethyl (4.3 ng/l), metolachlor (2.8 ng/l), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (2.5 ng/l), perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPeA) (2.3 ng/l), linuron (2.3 ng/l), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) (2.2 ng/l), diuron (2.0 ng/l), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) (1.6 ng/l), simazine (1.6 ng/l), atrazine (1.5 ng/l), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (1.3 ng/l). Higher concentrations were detected during summer due to increased levels of tourist activity during this period.

  19. Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Training & Education Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Water Contamination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ...

  20. The separation of solid and liquid components of mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method of separating solid and liquid components of mixtures is described which is particularly suited for use in automated radioimmunoassay systems in the analysis of bound and free fractions. A second liquid, having a density intermediate between those of the solid and liquid components, is delivered to the solid/ liquid mixture to form a discrete layer below the mixture and the solid separates into this lower liquid layer assisted by centrifugal force. The second liquid of intermediate density is an aqueous solution of a highly hydrophilic and electrically non-polar solute, such as an aqueous sucrose solution. Further liquids of intermediate density and progressively higher density may be delivered to form further discrete layers below the initial layer of the second dense liquid. After separation of the solid and liquid components of the mixture, the supernatant liquid component of the original mixture is removed in a controlled and non-turbulent manner. The method is illustrated in radioimmunoassays for platelet β-thromboglobulin and human follicle stimulating hormone. (U.K.)

  1. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  2. Microfiltration of radioactive contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L P; Slade, J A; Vijayan, S; Wong, C F

    1993-04-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration processing of radioactive liquids has been in use at Chalk River Laboratories for about four years. The separation process removes suspended particles from radioactive waste solutions. The clean liquid can then be treated with conventional reverse osmosis membranes to achieve volume reduction factors approaching 100. Microfiltration removes particles below the rating of 0.2 microns, in part from particle agglomeration. Operating experience relating to a 15 USGPM unit is presented. Coupling microfiltration technology with chemical treatment enhances the removal of soluble species. Research and development experience with the removal of soluble contaminants found in ground water and waste water will be discussed. The technology has advantages over other membrane technologies, namely lower energy costs, a lesser degree of fouling, and a higher recovery of processed solution. Future applications of the technology are addressed. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. Microfiltration of radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Slade, J.A.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.

    1993-04-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration processing of radioactive liquids has been in use at Chalk River Laboratories for about four years. The separation process removes suspended particles from radioactive waste solutions. The clean liquid can then be treated with conventional reverse osmosis membranes to achieve volume reduction factors approaching 100. Microfiltration removes particles below the rating of 0.2 microns, in part from particle agglomeration. Operating experience relating to a 15 USGPM unit is presented. Coupling microfiltration technology with chemical treatment enhances the removal of soluble species. Research and development experience with the removal of soluble contaminants found in ground water and waste water will be discussed. The technology has advantages over other membrane technologies, namely lower energy costs, a lesser degree of fouling, and a higher recovery of processed solution. Future applications of the technology are addressed. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  4. Radioactive contamination mapping system detailed design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.G.; O'Callaghan, P.B.

    1996-08-01

    The Hanford Site's 100 Area production reactors released radioactively and chemically contaminated liquids into the soil column. The primary source of the contaminated liquids was reactor coolant and various waste waters released from planned liquid discharges, as well as pipelines, pipe junctions, and retention basins leaking into the disposal sites. Site remediation involves excavating the contaminated soils using conventional earthmoving techniques and equipment, treating as appropriate, transporting the soils, and disposing the soils at ERDF. To support remediation excavation, disposal, and documentation requirements, an automated radiological monitoring system was deemed necessary. The RCMS (Radioactive Contamination Mapping System) was designed to fulfill this need. This Detailed Design Report provides design information for the RCMS in accordance with Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Engineering Design Project Instructions

  5. Study of the Correlation Between Contact Angle Values with the Polarity of Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Syahara, Muhammad Alwi; Kurniawan, Fredy; Anggriawan, Wahyu

    2015-01-01

    Contact angle measurement is a technique which can be used to determine the surface properties of a substance and observe the interaction of surfaces. When polar liquid dropped on a non-polar solid, it will make an interaction that can observed from the contact angle. In simple way, the different polarity of the solid and the liquid sample will affect to the contact angle obtained. In this work the value of contact angle will be correlated to the polarity of the sample. The results showed tha...

  6. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in baked sponge cake prepared with irradiated liquid egg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Boegl, K.W.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    For identification of irradiated food, radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons (HC) are determined by gas chromatography in the non-polar fraction of fat. However, in complex food matrices the detection is often disturbed by fat-associated compounds. On-line coupling of high performance liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) is very efficient to remove such compounds from the HC fraction. The high sensitivity of this fast and efficient technique is demonstrated by the example of detection of radiation-induced HC in fat isolated from baked sponge cake which had been prepared with irradiated liquid egg. (Author)

  7. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in baked sponged cake prepared with irradiated liquid egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Bögl, K. W.; Schreiber, G. A.

    1995-02-01

    For identification of irradiated food, radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons (HC) are determined by gas chromatography in the non-polar fraction of fat. However, in complex food matrices the detection is often disturbed by fat-associated compounds. On-line coupling of high performance liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) is very efficient to remove such compounds from the HC fraction. The high sensitivity of this fast and efficient technique is demonstrated by the example of detection of radiation-induced HC in fat isolated from baked sponge cake which had been prepared with irradiated liquid egg.

  8. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  9. In situ electro-osmotic cleanup of tar contaminated soil—Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2012-12-01

    An in situ electro-osmosis experiment was set up in a tar contaminated clay soil in Olst, the Netherlands, at the site of a former asphalt factory. The main goal of this experiment was to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the contaminated clay layer by applying an electric gradient of 12 V m-1 across the soil over an electrode distance of 1 m. With the movement of water by electro-osmosis and the addition of a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80), the non-polar PAHs were dragged along by convection and removed from the fine soil fraction. Soil samples were taken at the start and after 159 days at the end of the experiment. Water at the electrode wells was sampled regularly during the course of the experiment. The results reflect the heterogeneity of the soil characteristics and show the PAH concentrations within the experimental set up. After first having been released into the anolyte solution due to extraction by Tween 80 and subsequent diffusion, PAH concentrations increased significantly in the electrode reservoirs at the cathode side after 90 days of experiment. Although more detailed statistical analysis is necessary to quantify the efficiency of the remediation, it can be concluded that the use of electro-osmosis together with a non-ionic surfactant is a feasible technique to mobilize non-polar organic contaminants in clayey soils. Crown Copyright © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contamination shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, W.; Pecornik, D.

    1982-01-01

    An acrylate resin is presented as contamination protection coating for components and instruments in nuclear facilities and for spent fuel transport containers. The resin is evaporated or sublimated at 130 0 C and can thus be removed easily from the protected component. The radioactive particles entrained during evaporation are retained by suitable filters. (TK) [de

  11. Cotton contamination

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Sluijs, MHJ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focusses on physical forms of contaminant including the presence, prevention and/or removal of foreign bodies, stickiness and seed-coat fragments rather than the type and quantity of chemical residues that might be present in cotton...

  12. Metabolomic method: UPLC-q-ToF polar and non-polar metabolites in the healthy rat cerebellum using an in-vial dual extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amera A Ebshiana

    Full Text Available Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for maximising the biological information obtained from small tissue samples by optimising sample preparation, LC-MS analysis and metabolite identification. Here we describe an in-vial dual extraction (IVDE method, with reversed phase and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC which reproducibly measured over 4,000 metabolite features from as little as 3mg of brain tissue. The aqueous phase was analysed in positive and negative modes following HILIC separation in which 2,838 metabolite features were consistently measured including amino acids, sugars and purine bases. The non-aqueous phase was also analysed in positive and negative modes following reversed phase separation gradients respectively from which 1,183 metabolite features were consistently measured representing metabolites such as phosphatidylcholines, sphingolipids and triacylglycerides. The described metabolomics method includes a database for 200 metabolites, retention time, mass and relative intensity, and presents the basal metabolite composition for brain tissue in the healthy rat cerebellum.

  13. New biphasic solvent system based on cyclopentyl methyl ether for the purification of a non-polar synthetic peptide by pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarouche, Nassima; Boudesocque, Leslie; Borie, Nicolas; Giraud, Matthieu; Forni, Luciano; Butte, Alessandro; Edwards, Florence; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-06-01

    A new type 1 ternary biphasic system composed of cyclopentyl methyl ether, dimethylformamide and water was developed, characterized and successfully used for the purification of a lipophilic, protected peptide by pH-zone refining centrifugal partition chromatography. The protected peptide is an 8-mer, key intermediate in bivalirudin (Angiomax®) synthesis and shows a very low solubility in the solvents usually used in liquid chromatography. All ionic groups, except the N-terminal end of the peptide, are protected by a benzyl group. The purification of this peptide was achieved with a purity of about 99.04% and a recovery of 94% using the new ternary biphasic system cyclopentyl methyl ether/dimethylformamide/water (49:40:11, v/v) in the descending pH-zone refining mode with triethylamine (28 mM) as the retainer and methanesulfonic acid (18 mM) as the eluter. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Plutonium contaminated materials research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is a progress report for 1985 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party (PCMWP). The PCMWP co-ordinates research and development on a national basis in the areas of management, treatment and immobilisation of plutonium contaminated materials, for the purpose of waste management. The progress report contains a review of the development work carried out in eight areas, including: reduction of arisings, plutonium measurement, sorting and packaging, washing of shredded combustible PCM, decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, PCM immobilisation, treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes, and engineering objectives. (UK)

  15. Anisotropically biaxial strain in non-polar (112-0) plane In x Ga1-x N/GaN layers investigated by X-ray reciprocal space mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guijuan; Li, Huijie; Wang, Lianshan; Meng, Yulin; Ji, Zesheng; Li, Fangzheng; Wei, Hongyuan; Yang, Shaoyan; Wang, Zhanguo

    2017-07-03

    In this study, the indium composition x as well as the anisotropically biaxial strain in non-polar a-plane In x Ga 1-x N on GaN is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. In accordance with XRD reciprocal lattice space mapping, with increasing indium composition, the maximum of the In x Ga 1-x N reciprocal lattice points progressively shifts from a fully compressive strained to a fully relaxed position, then to reversed tensile strained. To fully understand the strain in the ternary alloy layers, it is helpful to grow high-quality device structures using a-plane nitrides. As the layer thickness increases, the strain of In x Ga 1-x N layer releases through surface roughening and the 3D growth-mode.

  16. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line

  17. Evaluation of Unfixed Tritium Surface Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, C.; Matei, Lidia

    2005-01-01

    Surface unfixed radioactive contamination represents the amount of surface total radioactive contamination which can be eliminated by pure mechanical processes. This unfixed contamination represents the main risk factor for contamination of the personnel which operates in tritium laboratories. Unfixed contamination was determined using sampling smears type FPCSN-PSE-AA. Those FPCSN-PSE-AA smears are disks of expanded polystyrene which contain acrylic acid fragments superficially grafted. Sampling factor was determinated by contaminated surface wiping with moisten smears in 50 μL butylic alcohol and activity measuring at liquid scintillation measuring device. Sampling factor was determined by the ratio between measured activity and initially real conventional activity. The sampling factor was determined for Tritium Laboratory existent surfaces: stainless steel, aluminum, glass, ceramics, linoleum, washable coats, epoxy resins type ALOREX LP-52.The sampling factors and the reproducibility were determined in function of surface nature

  18. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R. T.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Cox, J. D.; Weinstein, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10Mw CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the inherent advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high power densities. Liquids also have inherent advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13:Nd(3+):ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency as well as its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development and testing of the laser liquid and the development of a large solar concentrator to pump the laser was emphasized. The procedure to manufacture the laser liquid must include diagnostic tests of the solvent purity (from protic contamination) at various stages in the production process.

  19. Contamination Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  20. Hazard evaluation of soil contaminants from an abandoned oil refinery site with chemical and biological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, A.; Yates, C.W.; Burks, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    The phytotoxic characteristics of soil and leachates of soil from an abandoned oil refinery site were evaluated with rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed germinations and root elongation assays. Toxicity of soil leachates to aquatic animals was determined with acute and martial chronic toxicity tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnows, and Microtox reg-sign. Soil samples from uncontaminated (control) and selected contaminated areas within the old refinery were extracted with Toxic Characteristics Leachate Procedure (TCLP), an aqueous procedure and a supercritical carbon dioxide method. Aqueous extracts of soil from the oil leaded gasoline storage area exhibited greatest effects in all tests. Aqueous extracts from this site also caused a significant reduction in rice root development. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction proved to be a quick and non-toxic procedure for isolating non-polar organics for assay with aquatic toxicity tests. Subsequent supercritical extracts collected in solvent can help characterize the class of toxicants through HPLC and Gas Chromatography. The toxic constituents were characterized with a Toxicity Identification/Toxicity Reduction Evaluation protocol to fractionate the contaminants into conventional non-polar organics, weak acids, base-neutrals, or heavy metals for subsequent analysis

  1. Enhanced ordering reduces electric susceptibility of liquids confined to graphene slit pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Kiley, Patrick J.; Elliott, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviours of a range of polar and non-polar organic liquids (acetone, ethanol, methanol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), carbon tetrachloride and water) confined to 2D graphene nanochannels with thicknesses in the range of 4.5 Å to 40 Å were studied using classical molecular dynamics and hybrid density functional theory. All liquids were found to organise spontaneously into ordered layers parallel to the confining surfaces, with those containing polar molecules having their electric dipoles aligned parallel to such surfaces. In particular, monolayers of NMP showed remarkable in-plane ordering and low molecular mobility, suggesting the existence of a previously unknown 2D solid-like phase. Calculations for polar liquids showed dramatically reduced static permittivities normal to the confining surfaces; these changes are expected to improve electron tunnelling across the liquid films, modifying the DC electrical properties of immersed assemblies of carbon nanomaterials. PMID:27265098

  2. First-principles prediction of liquid/liquid interfacial tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Bennetzen, M.V.; Klamt, A.

    2014-01-01

    of groundwater aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents to drug delivery and a host of industrial processes. Here, we present a model for predicting interfacial tension from first principles using density functional theory calculations. Our model requires no experimental input and is applicable to liquid...

  3. TNF-α decreases VEGF secretion in highly polarized RPE cells but increases it in non-polarized RPE cells related to crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Terasaki

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in situ is critical for maintaining the homeostasis of the retina and choroid. VEGF is also involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We studied the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α on the secretion of VEGF in polarized and non-polarized RPE cells (P-RPE cells and N-RPE cells, respectively in culture and in situ in rats. A subretinal injection of TNF-α caused a decrease in VEGF expression and choroidal atrophy. Porcine RPE cells were seeded on Transwell™ filters, and their maturation and polarization were confirmed by the asymmetrical VEGF secretion and trans electrical resistance. Exposure to TNF-α decreased the VEGF secretion in P-RPE cells but increased it in N-RPE cells in culture. TNF-α inactivated JNK in P-RPE cells but activated it in N-RPE cells, and TNF-α activated NF-κB in P-RPE cells but not in N-RPE cells. Inhibition of NF-κB activated JNK in both types of RPE cells indicating crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB. TNF-α induced the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on JNK in P-RPE cells because NF-κB is continuously inactivated. In N-RPE cells, however, it was not evident because NF-κB was already activated. The basic activation pattern of JNK and NF-κB and their crosstalk led to opposing responses of RPE cells to TNF-α. These results suggest that VEGF secretion under inflammatory conditions depends on cellular polarization, and the TNF-α-induced VEGF down-regulation may result in choroidal atrophy in polarized physiological RPE cells. TNF-α-induced VEGF up-regulation may cause neovascularization by non-polarized or non-physiological RPE cells.

  4. Incineration plant for thermal destruction of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoli, B.; Lisbonne, P.

    1988-01-01

    Incineration was selected to destroy organic liquids contaminated by radioelements. This treatment offers the advantage of reducing the volume of wastes considerably. Therefore an incineration plant has been built within the nuclear research center of Cadarache. After an experimental work with inactive organic liquids from June 1980 to March 1981, the incineration plant was approved by safety authorities for the incineration of contaminated organic liquids. The capacity ranges from 20l/hr to 50l/hr. On the basis of 6 years of operation and a volume of 200 m3 the incineration plant has shown reliable operating conditions in the destruction of various contaminated organic liquids

  5. The performance of silicon solar cells operated in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yiping; Fang Zhenlei; Zhu Li; Huang Qunwu; Zhang Yan; Zhang Zhiying

    2009-01-01

    Better performance can be achieved when the bare silicon solar cells are immersed into liquids for the enhanced heat removing. In this study, the performance of solar cells immersed in liquids was examined under simulated sunlight. To distinguish the effects of the liquid optic and electric properties on the solar cells, a comparison between immersion of the solar module and the bare solar cells was carried out. It was found that the optic properties of the liquids can cause minor efficiency changes on the solar cells, while the electric properties of the liquids, the molecular polarizable and ions, are responsible for the most of the changes. The bare solar cells immersed in the non-polar silicon oil have the best performance. The accelerated life tests were carried out at 150 deg. C high temperature and under 200 W/m 2 ultraviolet light irradiation, respectively. It was found that the silicon oil has good stability. This study can give support on the cooling of the concentrated photovoltaic systems by immersing the solar cells in the liquids directly

  6. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  7. Simplified analysis for liquid pathway studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codell, R.B.

    1984-08-01

    The analysis of the potential contamination of surface water via groundwater contamination from severe nuclear accidents is routinely calculated during licensing reviews. This analysis is facilitated by the methods described in this report, which is codified into a BASIC language computer program, SCREENLP. This program performs simplified calculations for groundwater and surface water transport and calculates population doses to potential users for the contaminated water irrespective of possible mitigation methods. The results are then compared to similar analyses performed using data for the generic sites in NUREG-0440, Liquid Pathway Generic Study, to determine if the site being investigated would pose any unusual liquid pathway hazards

  8. Treatment of plutonium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three kinds of plutonium contaminations were considered: skin contamination; contaminated wounds; contamination by inhalation. The treatment of these contaminations was studied for insoluble (oxide and metal forms) and soluble plutonium (complexes). The use of DTPA and therapeutic problems encountered with stable plutonium complexes were analyzed. The new possibilities of internal decontamination using Puchel and LICAM were evaluated [fr

  9. System and process for polarity swing assisted regeneration of gas selective capture liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Tegrotenhuis, Ward E.; Freeman, Charles J.; Elliott, Michael L.; Koech, Phillip K.; Humble, Paul H.; Zheng, Feng; Zhang, Jian

    2017-07-18

    A polarity swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process is disclosed for improving the efficiency of releasing gases chemically bound to switchable ionic liquids. Regeneration of the SWIL involves addition of a quantity of non-polar organic compound as an anti-solvent to destabilize the SWIL, which aids in release of the chemically bound gas. The PSAR decreases gas loading of a SWIL at a given temperature and increases the rate of gas release compared to heating in the absence of anti-solvent.

  10. Contamination vs. Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into the environment can cause air, water, surfaces, soil, plants, buildings, people, or animals to become contaminated. ... water to remove contamination. This process is called decontamination. Try to avoid spreading contamination to parts of ...

  11. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug; Øiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2016-09-10

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic solvent used as supported liquid membranes (SLMs), and into 50μL aqueous acceptor solutions. The acceptor solutions were subsequently analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using in-source fragmentation and monitoring the m/z 184→184 transition for investigation of phosphatidylcholines (PC), sphingomyelins (SM), and lysophosphatidylcholines (Lyso-PC). In both generic methods, no phospholipids were detected in the acceptor solutions. Thus, PALME appeared to be highly efficient for phospholipid removal. To further support this, qualitative (post-column infusion) and quantitative matrix effects were investigated with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and quetiapine as model analytes. No signs of matrix effects were observed. Finally, PALME was evaluated for the aforementioned drug substances, and data were in accordance with European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Containment of transuranic contamination at the early waste retrieval project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harness, J.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    On July 26, 1976, while retrieving buried transuranic waste under the Early Waste Retrieval Program, a corroded 55-gallon 17H drum was retrieved. When uprighted, several liters of liquid escaped from the drum. This liquid was contaminated with transuranics, principally Pu-239, Am-241, and some Pu-238. As a result of the spread of this contamination in the Operating Area Confinement, six working days were required to decontaminate the area. At no time did the contamination escape the interior of the Operating Area Confinement building, and no contamination to personnel resulted from this occurrence, nor was a hazard presented to the general public. The facility was designed and constructed to contain the transuranic contamination resulting from such an occurrence. Proper prior planning and personnel training prevented the contamination occurrence from becoming a major event. This report details the occurrence, the recovery, and the information obtained from this event

  13. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  14. Analytical strategies for organic food packaging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Yovana; Yusà, Vicent; Coscollà, Clara

    2017-03-24

    In this review, we present current approaches in the analysis of food-packaging contaminants. Gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection have been widely used in the analysis of some relevant families of these compounds such as primary aromatic amines, bisphenol A, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and related compounds, UV-ink photoinitiators, perfluorinated compounds, phthalates and non-intentionally added substances. Main applications for sample treatment and different types of food-contact material migration studies have been also discussed. Pressurized Liquid Extraction, Solid-Phase Microextraction, Focused Ultrasound Solid-Liquid Extraction and Quechers have been mainly used in the extraction of food contact material (FCM) contaminants, due to the trend of minimising solvent consumption, automatization of sample preparation and integration of extraction and clean-up steps. Recent advances in analytical methodologies have allowed unequivocal identification and confirmation of these contaminants using Liquid Chromatography coupled to High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) through mass accuracy and isotopic pattern applying. LC-HRMS has been used in the target analysis of primary aromatic amines in different plastic materials, but few studies have been carried out applying this technique in post-target and non-target analysis of FCM contaminants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation contamination monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsutomu; Iba, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    To make sure of no contamination on people, used articles and working uniforms coming out of the radiation controlled area, nuclear power plants are equipped with radioactive contamination monitors. This paper outlines the basic specifications and advantages of our personnel surface contamination monitors to inspect whole-body surface contamination of people coming out, article surface contamination monitors to inspect the surface and inside contamination of used articles brought out, laundry monitors to inspect surface contamination of working uniforms used in the area before and after a wash, and whole-body counters to inspect and measure the internal contamination of a person out of the area. (author)

  16. Modeling of the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of polydisperse hyperbranched polymer solutions by lattice-cluster theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enders, Sabine; Browarzik, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Calculation of the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of hyperbranched polymer solutions. • Description of branching effects by the lattice-cluster theory. • Consideration of self- and cross association by chemical association models. • Treatment of the molar-mass polydispersity by the use of continuous thermodynamics. • Improvement of the theoretical results by the incorporation of polydispersity. - Abstract: The (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of solutions of hyperbranched polymers of the Boltorn type is modeled in the framework of lattice-cluster theory. The association effects are described by the chemical association models CALM (for self association) and ECALM (for cross association). For the first time the molar mass polydispersity of the hyperbranched polymers is taken into account. For this purpose continuous thermodynamics is applied. Because the segment-molar excess Gibbs free energy depends on the number average of the segment number of the polymer the treatment is more general than in previous papers on continuous thermodynamics. The polydispersity is described by a generalized Schulz–Flory distribution. The calculation of the cloud-point curve reduces to two equations that have to be numerically solved. Conditions for the calculation of the spinodal curve and of the critical point are derived. The calculated results are compared to experimental data taken from the literature. For Boltorn solutions in non-polar solvents the polydispersity influence is small. In all other of the considered cases polydispersity influences the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium considerably. However, association and polydispersity influence phase equilibrium in a complex manner. Taking polydispersity into account the accuracy of the calculations is improved, especially, in the diluted region

  17. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  18. Decontamination method for radiation contaminated metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Hosaka, Katsumi; Sakai, Hitoshi.

    1997-01-01

    An organic acid solution is used as a decontamination liquid, and base materials of radiation contaminated metals are dissolved in the solution. The concentration of the organic acid is measured, and the organic acid is supplied by an amount corresponding to the lowering of the concentration. The decontamination liquid wastes generated during the decontamination step are decomposed, and metals leached in the organic acid solution are separated. With such procedures, contamination intruded into the inside of the mother materials of the metals can be removed, and radioactivity of the contaminated metals such as stainless steels and carbon steels can be eliminated, or the radiation level thereof can be reduced. In addition, the amount of secondary wastes generated along with the decontamination can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  19. Subsidizing Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinova, Katya; Park, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    the breakdown of trading fees between liquidity demanders and suppliers matters. Posted quotes adjust after the change in fee composition, but the transaction costs for liquidity demanders remain unaffected once fees are taken into account. However, as posted bid-ask spreads decline, traders (particularly......Facing increased competition over the last decade, many stock exchanges changed their trading fees to maker-taker pricing, an incentive scheme that rewards liquidity suppliers and charges liquidity demanders. Using a change in trading fees on the Toronto Stock Exchange, we study whether and why...... retail) use aggressive orders more frequently, and adverse selection costs decrease....

  20. Studies on thermo-acoustic parameters in binary liquid mixtures of phosphinic acid (Cyanex 272) with different diluents at temperature 303.15 K: an ultrasonic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamila, Susmita; Jena, Satyaban; Swain, Bipin Bihari

    2005-01-01

    Acoustical investigations for the binary mixtures of phosphinic acid (Cyanex 272), used as liquid-liquid extractant, have been made in various diluents such as benzene, toluene, and xylene from ultrasonic velocity and density measurements at temperature 303.15 K and atmospheric pressure. This study involves evaluation of different thermo-acoustic parameters along with the excess properties, which are interpreted in the light of molecular interaction between a polar extractant, Cyanex 272 with non-polar diluent, benzene and weakly polar diluents, toluene and xylene. The excess values are correlated using Redlich-Kister polynomial equation, and corresponding adjustable parameters are derived

  1. Radioactive food and environment contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Food and Environment Control Centre of Abu Dhabi Municipality with the help of IAEA has established facilities for regular monitoring of food and environmental samples for radioactive contamination. The Centre is now capable of measuring gamma, beta as well as alpha activity in different types of samples. The main activities in the area of food monitoring are as follows: General monitoring of food gamma radionuclides in foodstuffs by high resolution gamma spectrometry; Determination of specific gamma radionuclides in foodstuffs by high resolution gamma spectrometry; Radiochemical determination of Sr-90 using liquid scintillation analyzer or by gas flow proportional counter; Measurement of gross alpha activity in drinking water

  2. Liquidity Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matta, R.; Perotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Can the risk of losses upon premature liquidation produce bank runs? We show how a unique run equilibrium driven by asset liquidity risk arises even under minimal fundamental risk. To study the role of illiquidity we introduce realistic norms on bank default, such that mandatory stay is triggered

  3. Radioactive surface contamination monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kei; Minagoshi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Toru

    1994-01-01

    To reduce radiation exposure and prevent contamination from spreading, each nuclear power plant has established a radiation controlled area. People and articles out of the controlled area are checked for the surface contamination of radioactive materials with surface contamination monitors. Fuji Electric has repeatedly improved these monitors on the basis of user's needs. This paper outlines typical of a surface contamination monitor, a personal surface contamination monitor, an article surface contamination monitor and a laundry monitor, and the whole-body counter of an internal contamination monitor. (author)

  4. Managing liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pokutta, Sebastian; Schmaltz, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Large banking groups face the question of how to optimally allocate and generate liquidity: in a central liquidity hub or in many decentralized branches. We translate this question into a facility location problem under uncertainty. We show that volatility is the key driver behind (de......-)centralization. We provide an analytical solution for the 2-branch model and show that a liquidity center can be interpreted as an option on immediate liquidity. Therefore, its value can be interpreted as the price of information, i.e., the price of knowing the exact demand. Furthermore, we derive the threshold...... above which it is advantageous to open a liquidity center and show that it is a function of the volatility and the characteristic of the bank network. Finally, we discuss the n-branch model for real-world banking groups (10-60 branches) and show that it can be solved with high granularity (100 scenarios...

  5. Procedures involving lipid media for detection of bacterial contamination in breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vuuren, H J; Louw, H A; Loos, M A; Meisel, R

    1977-02-01

    The liquid equivalent of universal beer agar, designated universal beer liquid medium, and its beer-free equivalent, universal liquid medium (UL), were equally effective in demonstrating bacterial contamination in 120 of 200 samples from different stages of commercial brewing process. Growth of the contaminants after 3 days was consistently more luxuriant in the UL medium. A yeast-water substrate medium failed to reveal many contaminants detected with UL in 392 samples from three breweries and revealed only a few not detected with UL. The use of UL and a lactose-peptone medium, with microscope examination of the media for bacterial growth, permitted detection of 93% of the known contaminants compared to 87%, detected with UL alone; this combination or universal beer liquid medium plus lactose-peptone medium can therefore be recommended for the detection of bacterial contaminants in brewery samples. Bacterial contamination of pitching yeasts appeared to be a particular problem in the breweries investigated.

  6. Nonuniformities in organic liquid ionization calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    Hermeticity and uniformity in SSC calorimeter designs are compromised by structure and modularity. Some of the consequences of the cryogenic needs of liquid argon calorimetry are relatively well known. If the active medium is an organic liquid (TMP, TMS, etc.), a large number of independent liquid volumes is needed for safety and for rapid liquid exchange to eliminate local contamination. Modular construction ordinarily simplifies fabrication, assembly, handling and preliminary testing at the price of additional walls, other dead regions and many nonuniformities. Here we examine ways of minimizing the impact of some generic nonuniformities on the quality of calorimeter performance. 6 refs., 7 figs

  7. Mechanical heterogeneity in ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhorst, Arno A.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of five ionic liquids based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations, [CnC1im]+, have been performed in order to calculate high-frequency elastic moduli and to evaluate heterogeneity of local elastic moduli. The MD simulations of [CnC1im][NO3], n = 2, 4, 6, and 8, assessed the effect of domain segregation when the alkyl chain length increases, and [C8C1im][PF6] assessed the effect of strength of anion-cation interaction. Dispersion curves of excitation energies of longitudinal and transverse acoustic, LA and TA, modes were obtained from time correlation functions of mass currents at different wavevectors. High-frequency sound velocity of LA modes depends on the alkyl chain length, but sound velocity for TA modes does not. High-frequency bulk and shear moduli, K∞ and G∞, depend on the alkyl chain length because of a density effect. Both K∞ and G∞ are strongly dependent on the anion. The calculation of local bulk and shear moduli was accomplished by performing bulk and shear deformations of the systems cooled to 0 K. The simulations showed a clear connection between structural and elastic modulus heterogeneities. The development of nano-heterogeneous structure with increasing length of the alkyl chain in [CnC1im][NO3] implies lower values for local bulk and shear moduli in the non-polar domains. The mean value and the standard deviations of distributions of local elastic moduli decrease when [NO3]- is replaced by the less coordinating [PF6]- anion.

  8. Effects of capillarity and heterogeneity on flow of organic liquid in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wipfler, E.L.

    2003-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by organic liquids, such as gasoline, fuel oils and chlorinated hydrocarbons, forms a serious treat to subsurface water resources. These liquids have a low miscibility with water and move as a discrete liquid phase. A small part of the liquid may dissolve in water and

  9. System for removing contaminated surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo.

    1987-04-01

    The object of the present invention is to offer a new type of useful decontamination system, with which the contaminated surface layers can be removed effectively by injection of such solid microparticles. Liquid carbon dioxide is passed from a liquid carbon dioxide tank via the carbon dioxide supply line into the system for injecting solid carbon dioxide particles. Part of the liquid carbon dioxide introduced into the system is converted to solid carbon dioxide particles by the temperature drop resulting from adiabatic expansion in the carbon dioxide expansion space of the injection system. The solid carbon dioxide particles reach the injection nozzle, which is connected through the expansion space. The carbon dioxide microparticles are further cooled and accelerated by nitrogen gas injected from the nitrogen gas nozzle at the tip of the nitrogen gas supply line, which is connected to a liquid nitrogen tank. The cooled and accelerated solid carbon dioxide microparticles are injected from the injection nozzle for the solid carbon dioxide and directed against the contaminated surface to be cleaned, and, as a result, the surface contamination is removed

  10. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmur, N.F.

    1987-06-01

    An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined

  11. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  12. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to

  13. Sorption Properties of Aerogel in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogel products are now available as insulation materials of the future. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is developing aerogel-based thermal insulation systems for space launch applications. Aerogel beads (Cabot Nanogel ) and aerogel blankets (Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft ) have outstanding ambient pressure thermal performance that makes them useful for applications where sealing is not possible. Aerogel beads are open-celled silicone dioxide and have tiny pores that run throughout the body of the bead. It has also recently been discovered that aerogel beads can be used as a filtering device for aqueous compounds at room temperature. With their hydrophobic covering, the beads absorb any non-polar substance and they can be chemically altered to absorb hot gases. The combination of the absorption and cryogenic insulating properties of aerogel beads have never been studied together. For future cryogenic insulation applications, it is crucial to know how the beads react while immersed in cryogenic liquids, most notably liquid nitrogen. Aerogel beads in loose-fill situation and aerogel blankets with composite fiber structure have been tested for absorption properties. Depending on the type of aerogel used and the preparation, preliminary results show the material can absorb up to seven times its own weight of liquid nitrogen, corresponding to a volumetric ratio of 0.70 (unit volume nitrogen per unit volume aerogel). These tests allow for an estimate on how much insulation is needed in certain situations. The theory behind the different processes of sorption is necessary for a better understanding of the preparation of the beads before they are used in an insulation system.

  14. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  15. Contaminated Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Sites contaminated by hazardous materials or wastes. These sites are those administered by the Contaminated Sites Section of Iowa DNR. Many are sites which are...

  16. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, J. D.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Weinstein, N. H.; Schneider, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10 mW CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high-power densities. Liquids also have advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13: Nd sup 3+:ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency and its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development of a manufacturing procedure and performance testing of the laser, liquid and the development of an inexpensive large solar concentrator to pump the laser are examined.

  17. Optimal Liquidation under Stochastic Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Becherer, Dirk; Bilarev, Todor; Frentrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We solve explicitly a two-dimensional singular control problem of finite fuel type for infinite time horizon. The problem stems from the optimal liquidation of an asset position in a financial market with multiplicative and transient price impact. Liquidity is stochastic in that the volume effect process, which determines the inter-temporal resilience of the market in spirit of Predoiu, Shaikhet and Shreve (2011), is taken to be stochastic, being driven by own random noise. The optimal contro...

  18. Hydrothermal processing of actinide contaminated organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worl, A.; Buelow, S.J.; Le, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrothermal oxidation is an innovative process for the destruction of organic wastes, that occurs above the critical temperature and pressure of water. The process provides high destruction and removal efficiencies for a wide variety of organic and hazardous substances. For aqueous/organic mixtures, organic materials, and pure organic liquids hydrothermal processing removes most of the organic and nitrate components (>99.999%) and facilitates the collection and separation of the actinides. We have designed, built and tested a hydrothermal processing unit for the removal of the organic and hazardous substances from actinide contaminated liquids and solids. Here we present results for the organic generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

  19. Decontamination of hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes the method of treating hydrocarbon contaminated soil. It comprises forming the soil into a flowing particulate stream, forming an aqueous liquid mixture of water and treating substance that reacts with hydrocarbon to form CO 2 and water, dispersing the liquid mixture into the particulate soil stream to wet the particulate, allowing the substance to react with the wetted soil particulate to thereby form CO 2 and water, thereby the resultant soil is beneficially treated, the stream being freely projected to dwell at a level and then fall, and the dispersing includes spraying the liquid mixture into the projected stream at the dwell, the substance consisting of natural bacteria, and at a concentration level in the mixture of between 100 to 3,000 PPM of bacteria to water, the soil forming step including impacting the soil to reduce it to particles less than about 1 inches in cross dimension, and including forming the wetting particulate into a first layer on a surface to allow the substance to react

  20. Restoration of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda J, Jose Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    A great variety of techniques are used for the restoration of contaminated soils. The contamination is present by both organic and inorganic pollutants. Environmental conditions and soil characteristics should take into account in order to implement a remedial technique. The bioremediation technologies are showed as help to remove a variety of soil contaminants. (author) [es

  1. Urban atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldasano Jose, M.

    1997-01-01

    The problems of contamination are not only limited to this century, pale pathology evidences of the effects of the contamination of the air exist in interiors in the health of the old ones; the article mention the elements that configure the problem of the atmospheric contamination, atmospheric pollutants and emission sources, orography condition and effects induced by the urbanization process

  2. A Review of Ionic Liquid Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E. Somers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to ever increasing demands on lubricants, such as increased service intervals, reduced volumes and reduced emissions, there is a need to develop new lubricants and improved wear additives. Ionic liquids (ILs are room temperature molten salts that have recently been shown to offer many advantages in this area. The application of ILs as lubricants in a diverse range of systems has found that these materials can show remarkable protection against wear and significantly reduce friction in the neat state. Recently, some researchers have shown that a small family of ILs can also be incorporated into non-polar base oils, replacing traditional anti-wear additives, with excellent performance of the neat IL being maintained. ILs consist of large asymmetrical ions that may readily adsorb onto a metal surface and produce a thin, protective film under boundary lubrication conditions. Under extreme pressure conditions, certain IL compounds can also react to form a protective tribofilm, in particular when fluorine, phosphorus or boron atoms are present in the constituent ions.

  3. Eco-friendly ionic liquid based ultrasonic assisted selective extraction coupled with a simple liquid chromatography for the reliable determination of acrylamide in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albishri, Hassan M; El-Hady, Deia Abd

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide in food has drawn worldwide attention since 2002 due to its neurotoxic and carcinogenic effects. These influences brought out the dual polar and non-polar characters of acrylamide as they enabled it to dissolve in aqueous blood medium or penetrate the non-polar plasma membrane. In the current work, a simple HPLC/UV system was used to reveal that the penetration of acrylamide in non-polar phase was stronger than its dissolution in polar phase. The presence of phosphate salts in the polar phase reduced the acrylamide interaction with the non-polar phase. Furthermore, an eco-friendly and costless coupling of the HPLC/UV with ionic liquid based ultrasonic assisted extraction (ILUAE) was developed to determine the acrylamide content in food samples. ILUAE was proposed for the efficient extraction of acrylamide from bread and potato chips samples. The extracts were obtained by soaking of potato chips and bread samples in 1.5 mol L(-1) 1-butyl-3-methylimmidazolium bromide (BMIMBr) for 30.0 and 60.0 min, respectively and subsequent chromatographic separation within 12.0 min using Luna C18 column and 100% water mobile phase with 0.5 mL min(-1) under 25 °C column temperature at 250 nm. The extraction and analysis of acrylamide could be achieved within 2h. The mean extraction efficiency of acrylamide showed adequate repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.5%. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 25.0 and 80.0 ng mL(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was tested by recovery in seven food samples giving values ranged between 90.6% and 109.8%. Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated by official guidelines, indicating its reliability to be applied to analysis of real samples, proven to be useful for its intended purpose. Moreover, it served as a simple, eco-friendly and costless alternative method over hitherto reported ones. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Examination of soil contaminated by coal-liquids by size exclusion chromatography in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution to evaluate interference from humic and fulvic acids and extracts from peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J; Herod, A A; Brain, S A; Chambers, F M; Kandiyoti, R

    2005-11-18

    Soil from a redundant coke oven site has been examined by extraction of soluble materials using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the extracted material. The extracted material was found to closely resemble a high temperature coal tar pitch. Standard humic and fulvic acids were also examined since these materials are very soluble in NMP and would be extracted with pitch if present in the soil. Humic substances derived from peat samples and NMP-extracts of peats were also examined. The results show that the humic and fulvic substances were not extracted directly by NMP from peats. They were extracted using caustic soda solution and were different from the peat extracts in NMP. These results indicate that humic and fulvic acids were soluble in NMP in the protonated polyelectrolyte form but not in the original native polyelectrolyte form. The extraction of soil using NMP followed by SEC appears to be a promising method for identifying contamination by coal-based industries.

  5. Liquidity risk and contagion for liquid funds

    OpenAIRE

    Darolles , Serge; Dudek , Jeremy; Le Fol , Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Fund managers face liquidity problems but they have to distinguish the market liquidity risk implied by their assets and the funding liquidity risk. This latter is due to both the liquidity mismatch between assets and liabilities and the redemption risk due to the possible outflows from clients. The main contribution of this paper is the analysis of contagion looking at common market liquidity problems to detect funding liquidity problems. Using the CDS Bond Spread basis as a liquidity indica...

  6. Hidden Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Cebiroglu, Gökhan; Horst, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We cross-sectionally analyze the presence of aggregated hidden depth and trade volume in the S&P 500 and identify its key determinants. We find that the spread is the main predictor for a stock’s hidden dimension, both in terms of traded and posted liquidity. Our findings moreover suggest that large hidden orders are associated with larger transaction costs, higher price impact and increased volatility. In particular, as large hidden orders fail to attract (latent) liquidity to the market, hi...

  7. Enhanced bioremediation of PAH contaminated soils from coal processing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S.

    1995-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are a potential hazard to health due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic nature and acute toxicity and there is an imminent need for remediation of PAH contaminated soils abounding the several coke oven and town gas sites. Aerobic biological degradation of PAHs is an innovative technology and has shown high decontamination efficiencies, complete mineralization of contaminants, and is environmentally safe. The present study investigates the remediation of PAH contaminated soils achieved using Acinetobacter species and fungal strain Phanerochaete Chrysosporium. The soil used for the experiments was an industrially contaminated soil obtained from Alberta Research Council (ARC) primary cleanup facility, Alberta, Canada. Soil characterization was done using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the contaminants in the soil. Artificially contaminated soil was also used for some experiments. All the experiments were conducted under completely mixed conditions with suitable oxygen and nutrient amendments. The removal efficiency obtained for various PAHs using the two microorganisms was compared

  8. Tailored liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis improves the coverage of the intracellular metabolome of HepaRG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuykx, Matthias; Negreira, Noelia; Beirnaert, Charlie; Van den Eede, Nele; Rodrigues, Robim; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Laukens, Kris; Covaci, Adrian

    2017-03-03

    Metabolomics protocols are often combined with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) using mostly reversed phase chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, e.g. quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometers to measure as many metabolites as possible. In this study, we optimised the LC-MS separation of cell extracts after fractionation in polar and non-polar fractions. Both phases were analysed separately in a tailored approach in four different runs (two for the non-polar and two for the polar-fraction), each of them specifically adapted to improve the separation of the metabolites present in the extract. This approach improves the coverage of a broad range of the metabolome of the HepaRG cells and the separation of intra-class metabolites. The non-polar fraction was analysed using a C18-column with end-capping, mobile phase compositions were specifically adapted for each ionisation mode using different co-solvents and buffers. The polar extracts were analysed with a mixed mode Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) system. Acidic metabolites from glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, together with phosphorylated compounds, were best detected with a method using ion pairing (IP) with tributylamine and separation on a phenyl-hexyl column. Accurate mass detection was performed with the QTOF in MS-mode only using an extended dynamic range to improve the quality of the dataset. Parameters with the greatest impact on the detection were the balance between mass accuracy and linear range, the fragmentor voltage, the capillary voltage, the nozzle voltage, and the nebuliser pressure. By using a tailored approach for the intracellular HepaRG metabolome, consisting of three different LC techniques, over 2200 metabolites can be measured with a high precision and acceptable linear range. The developed method is suited for qualitative untargeted LC-MS metabolomics studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electric discharge for treatment of trace contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, D. L.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A radio frequency glow discharge reactor is described for removing trace oxidizable contaminants from an oxygen bearing atmosphere. The reaction chamber is defined by an inner metal electrode facing a dielectric backed by an outer conductive electrode. In one embodiment, a conductive liquid forms the conductor of an outer electrode and cools the dielectric. A resonator coupled to a variable radio frequency source generates the high voltages for creating a glow discharge in the chamber at a predetermined pressure whereby the trace contaminants are oxidized into a few simple non-toxic products that may be easily recovered. The corresponding process for removal of trace contaminants from an oxygen-bearing atmosphere with high efficiency independent of the concentration level is also disclosed.

  10. Liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported.

  11. Liquid Marbles

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Kareem

    2012-12-01

    Granulation, the process of formation of granules from a combination of base powders and binder liquids, has been a subject of research for almost 50 years, studied extensively for its vast applications, primarily to the pharmaceutical industry sector. The principal aim of granulation is to form granules comprised of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API’s), which have more desirable handling and flowability properties than raw powders. It is also essential to ensure an even distribution of active ingredients within a tablet with the goal of achieving time‐controlled release of drugs. Due to the product‐specific nature of the industry, however, data is largely empirical [1]. For example, the raw powders used can vary in size by two orders of magnitude with narrow or broad size distributions. The physical properties of the binder liquids can also vary significantly depending on the powder properties and required granule size. Some significant progress has been made to better our understanding of the overall granulation process [1] and it is widely accepted that the initial nucleation / wetting stage, when the binder liquid first wets the powders, is key to the whole process. As such, many experimental studies have been conducted in attempt to elucidate the physics of this first stage [1], with two main mechanisms being observed – classified by Ivenson [1] as the “Traditional description” and the “Modern Approach”. See Figure 1 for a graphical definition of these two mechanisms. Recent studies have focused on the latter approach [1] and a new, exciting development in this field is the Liquid Marble. This interesting formation occurs when a liquid droplet interacts with a hydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) powder. The droplet can become encased in the powder, which essentially provides a protective “shell” or “jacket” for the liquid inside [2]. The liquid inside is then isolated from contact with other solids or liquids and has some

  12. Bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A; Campbell, Esther J; Maxwell, Sheri L; Gerba, Charles P; Dolan, Michael J; Arbogast, James W; Macinga, David R

    2011-05-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log(10) CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log(10) CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log(10) CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log(10) CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log(10) CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log(10) CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log(10) CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings.

  13. A positron lifetime study of properties of light particles in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, F.M.

    1981-04-01

    The positron lifetime technique has been used for studying the behaviour of the three light particles: the positron, positronium (Ps) (a bound state of an electron and positron), and excess electron in non-polar liquids. A brief introduction to the subject and a short description of the experimental techniques are given. Further, the principles of the data analyses are discussed in some detail. Positron lifetime measurements have been performed on the liquids: SF 6 , neopentane, hexane, and two viscoelastic organic liquids. The experiments have been performed as function of temperature, e.g., from just above the melting point to above the critical point in the cases of liquid SF 6 and neopentane. In all of the liquids the experimental results show that Ps is formed. The analyses of the lifetime spectra show that the Ps yields as well as the state of Ps in these liquids change with temperature. A detailed discussion of the state of Ps in liquids is given. The present results can be explained fairly well in terms of the Ps bubble model. In liquid SF 6 the experimental results strongly indicate that ortho-Ps can annihilate from two different states. The longest-lived ortho-Ps state seems to be similar to that observed in most liquids while the shortest-lived state seems not to have been observed in any other liquids before. A detailed discussion of the measured Ps yield in liquid neopentane and hexane is given. The Ps yield is interpreted by means of the positron spur model. (author)

  14. Evaporation of petroleum products from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Bioremediation can remove petroleum products from soil that has been contaminated by leaking underground storage tanks, but abiotic processes such as evaporation can contribute significantly to the overall removal process. The mathematical model described in this paper was developed to predict the evaporation rate of volatile liquids from petroleum-contaminated sand. The model is based on simple concepts relating to molecular diffusion embodied in the theory underlying the estimation of binary diffusivities using measurements made with an Arnold diffusion cell. The model in its simplified form indicates that the rate of evaporation for a particular volatile liquid is proportional to the square root of the product of diffusivity and partial pressure divided by the molecular weight of the liquid. This in part explains why evaporative losses from sand are so much higher for gasoline than for diesel fuel. The model also shows that the time for evaporation is directly proportional to the square of the depth dried out and inversely proportional to the vapor pressure of the volatile liquid. The model was tested using gravimetric measurements of the evaporation of n-heptane, unleaded gasoline, and diesel fuel from sand under laboratory conditions

  15. Coastal marine contamination in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garay T, Jesus A; Marin Z, Bienvenido; Velez G, Ana Maria

    2002-01-01

    The paper tries about the problem of the marine contamination and their marked influence in the health of the coastal ecosystems, of their narrow relationship with the growing increase of the populations that they inhabit the coastal areas and of equal it forms, with the increment of the domestic, agricultural and industrial activities that, for the wrong handling and inadequate control of the solid and liquid waste, they affect the marine environment with significant implications at ecological, socioeconomic level and of health. Another component of the environmental problem of the marine ecosystems in the country, resides in that don't exist in general normative on the chemical quality and sanitary for its marine waters, that which limits the categorization of this agreement ecosystems with its environmental quality, conditioning this the lack of adequate mechanisms to mitigate the causes that originate the deterioration of the quality of the Colombian coasts

  16. Fast determination of pesticides and other contaminants of emerging concern in treated wastewater using direct injection coupled to highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Mañas, Marina Celia; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Sánchez-Pérez, José Antonio; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana

    2017-07-21

    It is well known that wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents usually contain micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals (or their transformation products, TPs) or pesticides, which is a major issue when evaluating their possible reuse (e.g. for irrigation in agriculture). In search for an improved accuracy and simplicity, methods based on the direct injection of the sample (DI) represent a recent trend taking advantage of the increasing sensitivity of new mass spectrometry (MS) instruments. Thus, the present study shows the development and validation of a DI-based method by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-linear ion trap analyser (UHPLC-QqLIT-MS/MS). The proposed method was applied to the monitoring of 115 organic microcontaminants (including pharmaceuticals, TPs and pesticides) at the ngL -1 /μgL -1 level in wastewater effluents from urban WWTPs. Sample pre-treatment was reduced to acetonitrile addition and filtration of the mixture previous to LC-MS analysis. Total analysis time was <15min. A subsequent validation protocol was carried out in treated WW (TWW), following indications of SANTE and Eurachem Guidelines. Linearity and matrix effect were evaluated in the range of 10-1000ngL -1 . 70% of the analytes showed a moderate matrix effect (≤25%). Trueness (expressed as recovery) and precision (calculated as relative standard deviation, RSD) were evaluated at four concentration levels (20, 50, 500 and 1000ngL -1 ) in TWW samples. The LODs ranged from 1 to 357ngL -1 and the LOQs from 10 to 500ngL -1 . 92% of the compounds showed limits of quantification ≤100ngL -1 . In most cases, mean recoveries were in the range 70-120%, and RSD values were ≤20%. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of 10 TWW samples, demonstrating the occurrence of 67 target compounds at concentration levels from 26705ngL -1 (4-aminoantipyrine) to 10ngL -1 (tebuconazole and bezafibrate). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding the impact of the central atom on the ionic liquid behavior: Phosphonium vs ammonium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Pedro J.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Batista, Marta L. S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, João A. P.; Gonçalves, Fernando; Esperança, José; Mutelet, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the cation's central atom in the behavior of pairs of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids was investigated through the measurement of densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, activity coefficients at infinite dilution, refractive indices, and toxicity against Vibrio fischeri. All the properties investigated are affected by the cation's central atom nature, with ammonium-based ionic liquids presenting higher densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, and enthalpies. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution show the ammonium-based ionic liquids to present slightly higher infinite dilution activity coefficients for non-polar solvents, becoming slightly lower for polar solvents, suggesting that the ammonium-based ionic liquids present somewhat higher polarities. In good agreement these compounds present lower toxicities than the phosphonium congeners. To explain this behavior quantum chemical gas phase DFT calculations were performed on isolated ion pairs at the BP-TZVP level of theory. Electronic density results were used to derive electrostatic potentials of the identified minimum conformers. Electrostatic potential-derived CHelpG and Natural Population Analysis charges show the P atom of the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids cation to be more positively charged than the N atom in the tetraalkylammonium-based analogous IL cation, and a noticeable charge delocalization occurring in the tetraalkylammonium cation, when compared with the respective phosphonium congener. It is argued that this charge delocalization is responsible for the enhanced polarity observed on the ammonium based ionic liquids explaining the changes in the thermophysical properties observed

  18. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of organic solutes in the ionic liquid, methyl(trioctyl)ammonium thiosalicylate, [N1888][TS] by gas-liquid chromatography at T = (303.15, 313.15, and 323.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Prashant; Gwala, Nobuhle V.; Deenadayalu, Nirmala; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Ammonium ionic liquid selectivity value lower than for imidazolium ionic liquid. → Ammonium ionic liquids with smaller alkyl groups have higher selectivity values. → For the same cation the [TS] anion has a higher selectivity than the [NTf 2 ]. - Abstract: In this work, activity coefficients at infinite dilution (γ 13 ∞ ) have been obtained for 19 polar and non-polar organic solutes in the form of n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, 1-alkenes, 1-alkynes, aromatic compounds, and ketones in the ionic liquid methyl(trioctyl)ammonium thiosalicylate by gas-liquid chromatography at three different temperatures, i.e. T = (303.15, 313.15, and 323.15) K. Two columns with different phase loadings of the ionic liquid in the stationary phase (25% and 30%) were employed to obtain γ 13 ∞ values at each temperature investigated. Partial molar excess enthalpies at infinite dilution (ΔH 1 E,∞ ) were calculated for each of the solutes from the temperature dependency of the γ 13 ∞ values for the temperature range in this study. Selectivity values at infinite dilution (S ij ∞ ) were computed from the γ 13 ∞ values to screen the potential candidacy of the ionic liquid for the separation of n-hexane/benzene mixtures. The results from this study have been compared to those available for several other classes of ionic liquids and commercial solvents employed in solvent-enhanced industrial separation processes.

  19. Contamination analysis unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig

  20. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  1. Commercial Scale Production of Mushroom Liquid Seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosnani Abdul Rashid; Hassan Hamdani Hassan Mutaat; Mohd Meswan Maskom; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom liquid seed production technology was developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in the late 1990s. Initially, the liquid seeds were used mainly in the solid state fermentation process for converting oil palm empty fruit bunch fibres into ruminant feed. Considering widespread problems encountered by mushroom growers from use of solid seeds, especially in cases of contaminant agents infecting cultivated bags and inconsistencies in yield, we diverted our focus to utilising liquid seeds as alternative inocula for mushroom cultivation. These problems provide us opportunities to look into the issues and address the problems faced by mushroom growers. However, the technology of producing liquid seed at laboratory scale needs to be primed for commercial production. This paper discusses developmental aspects of mushroom liquid seed at commercial scale for the advancement of the country's mushroom industry. (author)

  2. Liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, K R

    1959-01-01

    Originally published in 1959 as part of the Cambridge Monographs on Physics series, this book addresses liquid helium from the dual perspectives of statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics. Atkins looks at both Helium Three and Helium Four, as well as the properties of a combination of the two isotopes. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of science and the study of one of the universe's most fundamental elements.

  3. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of organic solutes in N-alkylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([CnPY][NTf2], n = 2, 4, 5) using gas-liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Peifang; Liu Qingshan; Yang Miao; Liu Xiumei; Tan Zhicheng; Welz-Biermann, Urs

    2010-01-01

    The activity coefficients at infinite dilution, γ i ∞ for both polar and non-polar solutes in the ionic liquids N-alkylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C n PY][NTf 2 ], n = 2, 4, 5) have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography using the ionic liquid as the stationary phase. The measurements were carried out at the temperatures from (303 to 353) K. The partial molar excess enthalpies at infinite dilution H i E,∞ of the solutes in the ionic liquids were also derived from the temperature dependence of the γ i ∞ values. The values of the selectivity for the hexane/benzene and cyclohexane/benzene separation problems were calculated from experimental infinite dilution activity coefficient values and compared to the other ionic liquids, taken from the recent literatures.

  4. Analysis of food contaminants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbert, John

    1984-01-01

    ... quantification methods used in the analysis of mycotoxins in foods - Confirmation and quantification of trace organic food contaminants by mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring - Chemiluminescence...

  5. Plasma inactivation of food-related microorganisms in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsili, Lisa; Espie, Steven; Anderson, J.G.John G.; MacGregor, S.J.Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on a plasma process that inactivates microorganisms in liquids through the application of high-voltage pulses. These pulses result in breakdown of the gas and liquid layers, producing many active species such as UV photons, ozone, free radicals and free electrons. Several test microorganisms representing a range of problematic microorganisms were investigated. Significant reductions in microbial population were achieved, demonstrating the effectiveness of using the plasma discharge process to treat contaminated liquids

  6. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  7. BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED WASTE BY CADMIUM (Cd) IN WATERS USING INDIGEN BACTERIUM WITH EX-SITU WAY

    OpenAIRE

    Titik Wijayanti; Dinna Eka Graha Lestari

    2017-01-01

    The bioremediation technique for a contaminated liquid waste of heavy metals using indigenous bacteria is a convenient alternative to steps continues to be developed. The research aims to find out the effectiveness of an indigenous bacterial consortium in bioremediation of contaminated liquid waste by cadmium by ex-situ. Experiments were arranged in RAL made in ex-situ where a liquid waste industry was given five treatments, namely control and four indigenous bacterial consortia (A, D, E, and...

  8. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In

  9. Surface soil contamination standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define surface soil contamination limits for radioactive materials below which posting, restrictions and environmental controls are not necessary in order to protect personnel and the environment. The standards can also be used to determine if solid waste or other material is contaminated relative to disposal requirements. The derivation of the standards is given

  10. Contamination Control Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  11. Contamination Control Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics

  12. Materials SIG quantification and characterization of surface contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, E. Russ

    1992-01-01

    When LDEF entered orbit its cleanliness was approximately a MIL-STD-1246B Level 2000C. Its burden of contaminants included particles from every part of its history including a relatively small contribution from the shuttle bay itself. Although this satellite was far from what is normally considered clean in the aerospace industry, contaminating events in orbit and from processing after recovery were easily detected. The molecular contaminants carried into orbit were dwarfed by the heavy deposition of UV polymerized films from outgassing urethane paints and silicone based materials. Impacts by relatively small objects in orbit could create particulate contaminants that easily dominated the particle counts within a centimeter of the impact site. During the recovery activities LDEF was 'sprayed' with a liquid high in organics and water soluble salts. With reentry turbulence, vibration, and gravitational loading particulate contaminants were redistributed about LDEF and the shuttle bay.

  13. Bioremediation of contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balba, M.T.; Ying, A.C.; McNeice, T.G.

    1992-01-01

    Microorganisms, especially bacteria, yeast and fungi are capable of degrading many kinds of xenobiotic compounds and toxic chemicals such as petroleum hydrocarbon compounds. These microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature and, despite their enormous versatility, there are numerous cases in which long-term contamination of soil and groundwater has been observed. The persistence of the contamination is usually caused by the inability of microorganisms to metabolize these compounds under the prevailing environmental condition. This paper reports on biological remediation of contaminated sites which can be accomplished by using naturally-occurring microorganisms to treat the contaminants. The development of a bioremediation program for a specific contaminated soil system usually includes: A thorough site/soil/waste characterization; Treatability studies

  14. Biologically inspired hairy surfaces for liquid repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hau

    water-methanol mixture (gamma < 35.2 mN/m) was raised from 60° to around 140°. The surface energy of coated samples, however, was still not low enough to repel non-polar liquids. Moreover, the hairy structure is not favorable for maintaining the low surface tension liquid in Cassie-Baxter state.

  15. Contamination sources, prevention, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination is defined as anything other than cotton in cotton lint. Worldwide, contamination is on the rise and plastic contamination has increased at a faster rate than contamination overall. In the U.S., there are many sources of plastic contaminants, such as plastic trash that collects in cott...

  16. Use of membrane separation processes for the separation of radionuclides from liquid and gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladisavljevic, G.T.; Rajkovic, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    Use of membranes for the separation and recovery of radionuclides from contaminated liquid and gas streams has been discussed in this paper. The special attention has been paid to the use of ion-exchange membranes for electrodialysis and Donnan dialysis, as well as the use of facilitated liquid membranes for liquid pertraction. (author)

  17. Liquid diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The liquid diode is designed for a flowmeter chamber which has an inlet and an outlet duct, and a flow chamber with a cross-section which is greater than inlet. In the space between the inlet and outlet are two screens with a number of spheres, which may be of different sizes and weights. The screen on the inlet side is smaller than that at the outlet, so that the spheres are able to block the inlet under reverse flow conditions, but do not block the outlet. The system functions as a non-return valve. (G.C.)

  18. From Funding Liquidity to Market Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Lund, Jesper; Gyntelberg, Jacob

    This paper shows empirically that funding liquidity drives market liquidity. As it becomes harder to secure term funding in the money markets, liquidity deteriorates in the Danish bond market. We show that the first principal component of bond market liquidity is driven by the market makers...... for other European government bonds using MTS data. The findings suggest that regulatory bond based liquidity buffers for banks will have limited effectiveness....

  19. Speciation of zinc in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Chadi H.; Courchesne, Francois; Hendershot, William H.; McGrath, Steve P.; Chaudri, Amar M.; Sappin-Didier, Valerie; Sauve, Sebastien

    2008-01-01

    The chemical speciation of zinc in soil solutions is critical to the understanding of its bioavailability and potential toxic effects. We studied the speciation of Zn in soil solution extracts from 66 contaminated soils representative of a wide range of field conditions in both North America and Europe. Within this dataset, we evaluated the links among the dissolved concentrations of zinc and the speciation of Zn 2+ , soil solution pH, total soil Zn, dissolved organic matter (DOM), soil organic matter (SOM) and the concentrations of different inorganic anions. The solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (K d ) for Zn ranged from 17 to 13,100 L kg -1 soil. The fraction of dissolved Zn bound to DOM varied from 60% to 98% and the soil solution free Zn 2+ varied from 40% to 60% of the labile Zn. Multiple regression equations to predict free Zn 2+ , dissolved Zn and the solid-liquid partitioning of Zn are given for potential use in environmental fate modeling and risk assessment. The multiple regressions also highlight some of the most important soil properties controlling the solubility and chemical speciation of zinc in contaminated soils. - We studied the relationships among the chemical speciation of Zn in soil solution extracts from 66 contaminated soils and various physicochemical properties of the soils

  20. Direct contamination - seasonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.

    1994-01-01

    Direct contamination is the primary pathway to terrestrial vegetation in the first period after an activity release to the atmosphere. All radionuclides are able to be transferred via this pathway. Deposition, interception and retention are the three processes involved in direct contamination of crops. Wet deposition is more important than dry deposition in temperature regions. Resuspension and rainsplash both belong to secondary direct deposition and became evident for e.g. radiocaesium after the Chernobyl accident. Seasonality is the varying response to radioactive contamination of crops according to the time of the year when the contamination occurs. Shortlived radionuclides (as 131 I) and those that mainly enter the foodchain by direct contamination (e.g. 137 Cs) are especially important in this connection. In particular, the contamination of cereal crops is influenced by seasonality. As a result of seasonality the impact of the Chernobyl accident on the radioactive contamination of human diet was for the same deposition density higher in southern than in northern Europe. (orig.)

  1. Safety against radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The ALWIT anticontamination suit is briefly described, consisting of lasting antistatic ''NDMEX III''. It was specially developed for the fire brigade who are exposed to a particular kind of contamination while carrying out radiation measurements during fire fighting, rescue and clearing up work. The ALWIT suit reliably prevents radioactive contamination of the surface of the body while wearing a breathing apparatus, independent of the ambient air. Tightly fitting cuffs on the neck, arms and legs together with zippers placed behind prevent contamination even with extreme movement. (P.F.K.)

  2. Contacting particulate solids with liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for contacting particulate solids with a fluid. The particular applications described are 1) an acid dissolver for dissolving plutonium from plutonium contaminated ash produced by the incineration of waste such as rubber gloves, tissue paper etc. and 2) apparatus for dissolving gel spheres of nuclear fuel material. The liquid, e.g. acid for use in a leaching process flows through a vertical conduit and past a series of baffles spaced along the axis of the conduit. Each baffle defines a mixing chamber and provides a small gap around its perimeter between the baffle and the wall of the conduit. The baffles are provided with sloping top surfaces for preventing solid particles from settling on the baffles and sloping undersurfaces to improve mixing of the liquid and the solid particles. The liquid flows upwards in the conduit but solid particles may be fed from the top or from the bottom of the conduit to mix with the liquid. Gas may be introduced to promote improved flow conditions. (U.K.)

  3. A multi-objective optimization framework for surfactant-enhanced remediation of DNAPL contaminations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaerlaekens, J.; Mertens, J.; Van Linden, J.; Vermeiren, G.; Carmeliet, J.; Feyen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) contaminations in the subsurface is a threat for drinkwater resources in the western world. Surfactant-Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) is widely considered as one of the most promising techniques to remediate DNAPL contaminations in-situ,

  4. Engineered/designer biochar for contaminant removal/immobilization from soil and water: Potential and implication of biochar modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhang, Ming; Vithanage, Meththika; Mandal, Sanchita; Gao, Bin; Bolan, Nanthi S; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar has been suggested as a means of remediating contaminated soil and water. The practical applications of conventional biochar for contaminant immobilization and removal however need further improvements. Hence, recent attention has focused on modification of biochar with novel structures and surface properties in order to improve its remediation efficacy and environmental benefits. Engineered/designer biochars are commonly used terms to indicate application-oriented, outcome-based biochar modification or synthesis. In recent years, biochar modifications involving various methods such as, acid treatment, base treatment, amination, surfactant modification, impregnation of mineral sorbents, steam activation and magnetic modification have been widely studied. This review summarizes and evaluates biochar modification methods, corresponding mechanisms, and their benefits for contaminant management in soil and water. Applicability and performance of modification methods depend on the type of contaminants (i.e., inorganic/organic, anionic/cationic, hydrophilic/hydrophobic, polar/non-polar), environmental conditions, remediation goals, and land use purpose. In general, modification to produce engineered/designer biochar is likely to enhance the sorption capacity of biochar and its potential applications for environmental remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cleanup of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beone, G.; Carbone, A.I.; Zagaroli, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of contaminated areas cleanup, in order to eliminate every possible damage for man safety and environment and to site recovery for some utilization, The first step of cleanup operation is site characterization, that is followed by a pianificazion activity for a better definition of staff qualification, technology to be used, protection and prevention instruments for the risks due to contaminants handling. The second section describes the different remedial technologies for contaminated sites. Remedial technologies may be divided into on-site/off-site and in-situ treatments, according to whether materials (waste, soil, water) are moved to another location or not, respectively. Finally, it is outlined that contaminated areas cleanup is a typical multidisciplinary activity because very different competences are required. (author)

  6. Contaminant Candidate List 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 2 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  7. Contaminant Candidate List 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 3 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  8. Contaminant Candidate List 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 1 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  9. Tracers Detect Aquifer Contamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Enfield, Carl

    1995-01-01

    The EPA's National Laboratory (NRMRL) at Ada, OK, along with the University of Florida and the University of Texas, have developed a tracer procedure to detect the amount of contamination in aquifer formations...

  10. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-01-01

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  11. Monitoring of transport contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkin, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    Organization of monitoring of transport contamination is considered. A particularly thorough monitoring is recommended to be carried out in loading-unloading operations. The monitoring is performed when leaving loading-unloading site and zone under control and prior to preventive examination, technical service or repair. The method of monitoring of auto transport contamination with high-energy β-emitters by means of a special stand permitting the automation of the monitoring process is described [ru

  12. Reconditioning contaminated gravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, H.; Bowers, J.S.; Cadwell, K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a portable screening system that will recondition radioactively contaminated gravel in the field. The separation technique employed by this system removes dirt, contaminated debris, and other fine particles from gravel. At LLNL, gravel is used in conjunction with the experimental testing of explosives to reduce shock wave propagation. The gravel surrounds the experimental device and buffers the energy generated from the explosion. During an explosion, some of the gravel is broken down into small particles and mixed with contaminants. Contaminants in the used gravel originate from metal sheathing and other parts comprising, the experimental device. These contaminants may consist of radionuclides and metals that are considered hazardous by the State of California when disposed. This paper describes the process that conveys contaminated material into the screener system, sprays the material with recycled water or other mild cleaning chemicals, and separates particles based on size. Particles greater than a specified size are discharged out of the screener separator and recycled back into use, thereby reducing the amount of mixed waste generated and minimizing the need for new gravel. The fines or silt are flushed out of the separator with the water and are removed from the water and consolidated into a drum with the use of a hydrocyclone separator and drum decant system. Because the water in the spray system is recycled, minimal makeup water is needed. The system monitors pH and total dissolved solids

  13. Phytoextraction of low level U-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.A.; Hees, M. van

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle may be a source of environmental contamination. Uranium exploitation produces large quantities of wastes but also accidental spills at nuclear fuel production, reprocessing or waste treatment plants have led to soil contamination with uranium. U-contaminated soil is generally excavated, packaged and removed which is a costly enterprise. Soil washing has also shown promising in removing U from contaminated soil, but results in the generation of liquid wastes and the deterioration of soil properties. In contrast, phytoextraction, the use of plants to remove contaminants from polluted soil, allows for in situ treatment and does not generate liquid wastes. Furthermore, the contaminated site is covered by plants during phytoextraction and wind and water erosion will be reduced. The phytoextraction potential depends on the amount of radionuclides extracted and the biomass produced. Hyper-accumulating plants often have a low biomass production. Moreover, uranium soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF: ratio of U concentration in dry plant tissue to concentration in soil) rarely exceed a value of 0.1 gg -1 . With a TF of 0.1 gg -1 and a biomass yield of 15t dry weigh ha -1 only 0.1% of the soil uranium will be annually immobilised in the plant biomass. These figures clearly show that the phytoextraction option is not a feasible remediation option, unless the uranium bioavailability could be drastically increased. It was shown that citric acid addition to highly contaminated U contaminated soil increased the U-accumulation of Brassica juncea 1000-fold. The objective of the present paper is to find out if low level U contaminated soil can be phytoextracted in order to achieve proposed release limits

  14. Status of outdoor radioactive contamination at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1994-12-01

    This document summarizes the status of outdoor radioactive contamination near Hanford Site facilities and disposal sites. It defines the nature and areal extend of the radioactively contaminated areas and describes the historical, ongoing, and planned radiological monitoring and control activities. Radioactive waste has been disposed of to the soil column since shortly after the reactors and production facilities began operating. Radioactive liquid wastes were placed directly into the ground via liquid discharges to cribs, ponds, ditches, and reverse wells. Solid wastes were placed in trenches, burial vaults, and caissons. Although the Hanford Site covers 1,450 km 2 , the radioactively contaminated area is only about 36 km 2 or 2.5% of the original site. Over time, contamination has migrated from some of the waste management sites through various vectors (e.g., burrowing animals, deep-rooted vegetation, erosion, containment system failure) or has been deposited to the surface soil via spills and unplanned releases (e.g., line leaks/breaks, tank leaks, and stack discharges) and created areas of outdoor radioactivity both on and below the surface. Currently 26 km 2 are posted as surface contamination and 10 km 2 are posted as underground contamination

  15. EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR IN SITU CLEANUP OF DNAPL CONTAMINATED SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water contamination by non-aqueous phase liquids poses one of the greatest remedial challenges in the field of environmental engineering. Denser-than-water non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are especially problematic due to their low water solubility, high density, an...

  16. Avaliação de solventes de extração por ultrassom usando-se cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência para a determinação de hidrocarbonetos policíclicos aromáticos em solos contaminados Evaluation of solvent extraction by ultrasound by using high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Aparecida Oliveira Cotta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A method using ultrasonication extraction for the determination of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, selected by the USEPA and NIOSH as "consent decree" priority pollutants, in soil by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC was studied. Separation and detection were completed in 20 min with a C18 columm, acetonitrile-water gradient elution and ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence detections. The detection limits, for a 10 µL of solution injection, were less than 9,917 ng/g in UV detection and less than 1,866 ng/g in fluorescence detection. Several organic solvents were tested for extraction of the 17 PAHs from soils. Acetone was the best solvent among the three solvents tested, and the order of the extraction efficiencies was: acetone>methanol>acetonitrile. Ultrasonication using acetone as solvent extraction was used to evaluate the biodegradation of those compounds in contaminated soil during a vermicomposting process.

  17. The Liquid State

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    like iron, aluminium, lead, zinc, etc .. Metals are cast ... dropping molten liquid of the alloys on a rapidly spinning copper wheel. ... Ed. Computer simulation studies in ... liquids, modelling ofliquids and study of the dynamic behaviour of liquids ...

  18. Remotely controllable liquid marbles

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin; Cha, Dong Kyu; Wang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Liquid droplets encapsulated by self-organized hydrophobic particles at the liquid/air interface - liquid marbles - are prepared by encapsulating water droplets with novel core/shell-structured responsive magnetic particles, consisting of a

  19. Contamination control by laundry monitor at NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Rana, P.K.; Lokeshwar Rao, S.; Managanvi, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    The operation of nuclear power reactor produces electricity as well as small quantity of radioactive waste as gaseous, liquid and solid. The waste contains radionuclides produced by fission and activation in reactor systems with wide spectrum of energy and half life. The long-lived nuclides Sr, Cs, Ba, Iodine and Co etc compared to short-lived are important in view of radiation protection. The radioactive contamination on the materials, human body or other places where it is undesirable is enormously harmful to workers at Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The spread of radioactive from controlled areas is very complex problem for power reactor plant management

  20. Nondestructive analysis of plutonium contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.E.; Taylor, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium contaminated soil is currently being removed from a covered liquid waste disposal trench near the Pu Processing facility on the Hanford Project. This soil with the plutonium is being mined using remote techniques and equipment. The mined soil is being packaged for placement into retrievable storage, pending possible recovery. To meet the requirements of criticality safety and materials accountability, a nondestructive analysis program has been developed to determine the quantity of plutonium in each packing-storage container. This paper describes the total measurement program: equipment systems, calibration techniques, matrix assumption, instrument control program and a review of laboratory operating experience

  1. Combining innovative technology demonstrations with dense nonaqueous phase liquids cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagood, M.C.; Koegler, K.J.; Rohay, V.J.; Trent, S.J.; Stein, S.L.; Brouns, T.M.; McCabe, G.H.; Tomich, S.

    1993-05-01

    Radioactively contaminated acidic aqueous wastes and organic liquids were discharged to the soil column at three disposal sites within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, Washington. As a result, a portion of the underlying groundwater is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride several orders of magnitude above the maximum contaminant level accepted for a drinking water supply. Treatability testing and cleanup actions have been initiated to remove the contamination from both the unsaturated soils to minimize further groundwater contamination and the groundwater itself. To expedite cleanup, innovative technologies for (1) drilling, (2) site characterization, (3) monitoring, (4) well field development, and (5) contaminant treatment are being demonstrated and subsequently used where possible to improve the rates and cost savings associated with the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the soils and groundwater

  2. Contaminants migration in the soil: the influence of transfer between the mobile and stationary phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, R.M.; Sabino, C.S.V.; Macedo, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Three transport mechanisms control the contaminant migration in saturated soils: advection, diffusion and interchanges between liquid and solid phases. These interchanges define the retention by the soil and the contaminant delay related to the liquid phase flow. Therefore, the knowledge of the adsorption/desorption characteristics of the solute in solid surfaces is fundamental for the evaluation of toxic agent releases to the compartment soil. This communication reports the study which is being performed by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) in this area, particularly with cesium and mercury by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy for contaminants migration

  3. Theory of soil decontamination in mixing liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Emets, E.P.; Poluehktov, P.P.; Rybakov, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The theory of soil decontamination from radioactive pollution in mixing liquid flow is described. It is shown that there exists the threshold intensity of liquid mixing up to which there is no decontamination. Beyond the threshold and by increasing the mixing intensity the decontamination of large soil fractions is allowable whereby the higher is the mixing intensity and lower is the soil contamination, the laser is the characteristic decontamination time. The above theory is related to cases of uniform pollution of the particles surface

  4. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  5. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of perfluorocarbons with fluorinated ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinho, S.; Araújo, J.M.M.; Rebelo, L.P.N.; Pereiro, A.B.; Marrucho, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • (Liquid + liquid) equilibria perfluorocarbons and fluorinated ionic liquids. • Non-Random Two Liquid model was successfully applied. • Thermodynamic functions that describe the solvation process were calculated. -- Abstract: In order to evaluate the feasibility of partially replace perfluorocarbons (PFCs) with fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) in PFCs-in-water emulsions, usually used for biomedical purposes, herein the (liquid + liquid) phase equilibria of FILs containing fluorinated chains longer than four carbons with PFCs were carried out in a wide range of temperatures. With this goal in mind, two PFCs (perfluorooctane and perfluorodecalin) were selected and the (liquid + liquid) equilibria of the binary mixtures of these PFCs and FILs were studied at atmospheric pressure in a temperature range from T (293.15 to 343.15) K. For these studies, FILs containing ammonium, pyridinium and imidazolium cations and different anions with fluorocarbon alkyl chains between 4 and 8 were included. Additionally, Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) thermodynamic model was successfully applied to correlate the behaviour of the PFCs + FILs binary mixtures. Moreover, thermodynamic functions that describe the solvation process were calculated from the experimental data

  6. Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A.; Campbell, Esther J.; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Dolan, Michael J.; Arbogast, James W.; Macinga, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log10 CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log10 CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log10 CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log10 CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log10 CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log10 CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log10 CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings. PMID:21421792

  7. Thermochemistry of ionic liquid heat-transfer fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Valkenburg, Michael E.; Vaughn, Robert L.; Williams, Margaret; Wilkes, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale solar energy collectors intended for electric power generation require a heat-transfer fluid with a set of properties not fully met by currently available commercial materials. Ionic liquids have thermophysical and chemical properties that may be suitable for heat transfer and short heat term storage in power plants using parabolic trough solar collectors. Ionic liquids are salts that are liquid at or near room temperature. Thermal properties important for heat transfer applications are melting point, boiling point, liquidus range, heat capacity, heat of fusion, vapor pressure, and thermal conductivity. Other properties needed to evaluate the usefulness of ionic liquids are density, viscosity and chemical compatibility with certain metals. Three ionic liquids were chosen for study based on their range of solvent properties. The solvent properties correlate with solubility of water in the ionic liquids. The thermal and chemical properties listed above were measured or compiled from the literature. Contamination of the ionic liquids by impurities such as water, halides, and metal ions often affect physical properties. The ionic liquids were analyzed for those impurities, and the impact of the contamination was evaluated by standard addition. The conclusion is that the ionic liquids have some very favorable thermal properties compared to targets established by the Department of Energy for solar collector applications

  8. Dynamic and structural evidence of mesoscopic aggregation in phosphonium ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosby, T.; Vicars, Z.; Heres, M.; Tsunashima, K.; Sangoro, J.

    2018-05-01

    Mesoscopic aggregation in aprotic ionic liquids due to the microphase separation of polar and non-polar components is expected to correlate strongly with the physicochemical properties of ionic liquids and therefore their potential applications. The most commonly cited experimental evidence of such aggregation is the observation of a low-q pre-peak in the x-ray and neutron scattering profiles, attributed to the polarity alternation of polar and apolar phases. In this work, a homologous series of phosphonium ionic liquids with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion and systematically varying alkyl chain lengths on the phosphonium cation are investigated by small and wide-angle x-ray scattering, dynamic-mechanical spectroscopy, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. A comparison of the real space correlation distance corresponding to the pre-peak and the presence or absence of the slow sub-α dielectric relaxation previously associated with the motion of mesoscale aggregates reveals a disruption of mesoscale aggregates with increasing symmetry of the quaternary phosphonium cation. These findings contribute to the broader understanding of the interplay of molecular structures, mesoscale aggregation, and physicochemical properties in aprotic ionic liquids.

  9. Prevalence of Parasitic Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Yazan

    2016-01-01

    One of the main ways in transmitting parasites to humans is through consuming contaminated raw vegetables. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of parasitological contamination (helminthes eggs, Giardia and Entamoeba histolytica cysts) of salad vegetables sold at supermarkets and street vendors in Amman and Baqa’a – Jordan. A total of 133 samples of salad vegetables were collected and examined for the prevalence of parasites. It was found that 29% of the samples were contaminated with different parasites. Of the 30 lettuce, 33 tomato, 42 parsley and 28 cucumber samples examined the prevalence of Ascaris spp. eggs was 43%, 15%, 21% and 4%; Toxocara spp. eggs was 30%, 0%, 0% and 4%; Giardia spp. cysts was 23%, 6%, 0% and 0%; Taenia/Echinococcus eggs was 20%, 0%, 5% and 0%; Fasciola hepatica eggs was 13%, 3%, 2% and 0%; and E. histolytica cysts was 10%, 6%, 0% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of parasite in salad vegetables either between supermarkets and street vendors, or between Amman and Baqa’a, Ascaris spp. was found to be the highest prevalent parasite in salad vegetables from supermarkets and street vendors and from Amman and Baqa’a. Our results pointed out that, the parasitic contamination of salad vegetables found in our study might be caused by irrigating crops with faecal contaminated water. We concluded that salad vegetables sold in Amman and Baqa’a may cause a health risk to consumers.

  10. Separation of contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiewicz, J.L.; Reymer, A.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Separating the contaminated parts from the non-contaminated parts from decommissioned nuclear facilities may strongly reduce the amount of contaminated concrete. The reduction in volume of the radioactive contaminated concrete is dependent on how much cementstone is in the concrete. This research program shows that the radioactive contamination is mostly in the cementstone. However the choice that the cementstone parts, (or better said the radioactive parts) are smaller than 1 mm may not always be true. Normally the cementstone takes about 30% of the total concrete volume. A separation procedure composed by a combination of milling and thermal shock has been assessed. Both the cold and hot thermal shock in combination with milling are not able to separate the cementstone from the larger aggregates completely. However, the cementstone from the concrete with a low nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination cold thermal shock/milling, while the cementstone from the concrete with a high nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination hot thermal shock/milling. After both methods a layer of cementstone was still visible on the aggregates. Washing followed by a nitric acid treatment removed each 2 wt% of cementstone

  11. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  12. Solvent Vapour Detection with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals—Optical and Mass-Sensitive Evaluation of the Sensor Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Mujahid

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs are used as sensitive coatings for the detection of organic solvent vapours for both polar and non-polar substances. The incorporation of different analyte vapours in the CLC layers disturbs the pitch length which changes the optical properties, i.e., shifting the absorption band. The engulfing of CLCs around non-polar solvent vapours such as tetrahedrofuran (THF, chloroform and tetrachloroethylene is favoured in comparison to polar ones, i.e., methanol and ethanol. Increasing solvent vapour concentrations shift the absorbance maximumto smaller wavelengths, e.g., as observed for THF. Additionally, CLCs have been coated on acoustic devices such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM to measure the frequency shift of analyte samples at similar concentration levels. The mass effect for tetrachloroethylene was about six times higher than chloroform. Thus, optical response can be correlated with intercalation in accordance to mass detection. The mechanical stability was gained by combining CLCs with imprinted polymers. Therefore, pre-concentration of solvent vapours was performed leading to an additional selectivity.

  13. Contamination Control for Thermal Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel B.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). This course will cover the basics of Contamination Control, including contamination control related failures, the effects of contamination on Flight Hardware, what contamination requirements translate to, design methodology, and implementing contamination control into Integration, Testing and Launch.

  14. Mussels as bioindicators of diclofenac contamination in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2017-06-01

    Diclofenac a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) has been confirmed as an emerging contaminant in the aquatic environment. Toxicology studies have revealed that harmful effects may emerge from diclofenac presence not only for human health, but also for marine organisms, which implies its monitoring. To overcome the demanding challenges of diclofenac quantification in biotic aquatic species, a novel method for the determination of diclofenac in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus edulis) and macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated according to the EC Decision 2002/657/EC. Additionally, a study was done about diclofenac contamination in mussels collected from 8 sites along the 1115 miles of coastline in Portugal in 2015. The results suggested that levels in mussels are closely related to the environmental contamination. Therefore, mussels can be a potential bioindicator of diclofenac contamination in the coastal environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitrification of transuranic and beta-gamma contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    Vitrification of solid transuranic contaminated (TRU) wastes alone and with high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) was studied. Homogeneous glasses containing 20 to 30 wt % ash were made by using glass frits previously developed at the Savannah River Plant and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. If the ash is vitrified along with the HLLW, 1.0 wt % as can be added to the waste forms without affecting their quality. This loading of ash is well above the loading required by the relative amounts of HLLW and TRU ash that will be processed at the Savannah River Plant. Vitrification of TRU-contaminated electropolishing sludges and high efficiency particular air filter materials along with HLLW would require an increase in the quantity of glass to be produced. However, if these TRU-contaminated solids were vitrified with the HLLW, the addition of low-level beta-gamma contaminated ash would require no further increase in glass production

  16. CASH AND LIQUIDITY/LIQUIDITY AND LIQUIDITY RATIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BEATRIX LIGHEZAN BREUER

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the correlation as well as the differences between liquidity/cash and liquidity ratio in terms of economic entities. Researches on this topic are based on the opinions of some specialists in accounting and in the economic-financial analysis, as well as on the national legal stipulations and the ones set out in the International Accounting Standards, the Financial report, respectively. The object of this paper is represented by the correlation between liquidity/cash and liquidity ratios representing the liquidity as current assets, assets implied in the determination of liquidity ratios. The end of the paper consists of the conclusions drawn from the issues presented in the paper but also our views on this research topic.

  17. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  18. The Contaminant Cobweb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech Albertsen, Anita Nell

    2017-01-01

    This article maps out character complexity in Penny Dreadful by focusing on the intertextuality of monstrous female characters. The aim of this study is twofold. First, it seeks to examine show how mashup characters gain complexity through textual contamination as they are woven into an intertext......This article maps out character complexity in Penny Dreadful by focusing on the intertextuality of monstrous female characters. The aim of this study is twofold. First, it seeks to examine show how mashup characters gain complexity through textual contamination as they are woven...... into an intertextual cobweb of signification. Secondly, it aims at examining how monstrous complex characters like Vanessa Ives can be conceived as mashups contaminated by different manifestations of the monstrous-feminine as coined by Barbara Creed. An overarching hypothesis of this study is that interfigural...

  19. Phytovolatilization of Organic Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Matt; Burken, Joel

    2016-07-05

    Plants can interact with a variety of organic compounds, and thereby affect the fate and transport of many environmental contaminants. Volatile organic compounds may be volatilized from stems or leaves (direct phytovolatilization) or from soil due to plant root activities (indirect phytovolatilization). Fluxes of contaminants volatilizing from plants are important across scales ranging from local contaminant spills to global fluxes of methane emanating from ecosystems biochemically reducing organic carbon. In this article past studies are reviewed to clearly differentiate between direct- and indirect-phytovolatilization and we discuss the plant physiology driving phytovolatilization in different ecosystems. Current measurement techniques are also described, including common difficulties in experimental design. We also discuss reports of phytovolatilization in the literature, finding that compounds with low octanol-air partitioning coefficients are more likely to be phytovolatilized (log KOA < 5). Reports of direct phytovolatilization at field sites compare favorably to model predictions. Finally, future research needs are presented that could better quantify phytovolatilization fluxes at field scale.

  20. Radiologically contaminated lead shot reuse at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heileson, W.M.; Grant, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    This project involved the utilization of radioactively contaminated lead shot located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for radiation shielding on a radioactive liquid process tank located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The use of previously contaminated shot precludes the radioactive contamination of clean shot. With limited treatment and disposal options for contaminated lead shot, the reuse of lead for shielding is significant due to the inherent characteristic of becoming a mixed waste when radiologically contaminated. The INEL conducted a lead cleanup campaign in 1990. This was designed to ensure control of potential Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated waste. Contaminated lead from throughout the INEL, was containerized per the lead Waste Acceptance Criteria at the generator sites. Limited areas at the INEL are designated for mixed waste storage. As a result, some of the lead was stored at the RWMC in the air support weather shield (ASWS). This lead was contaminated with small amounts of fission product contamination. The lead was in the form of shot, brick, sheet, casks, and other various sized pieces. In 1993, ANL-W identified a need for lead shot to be used as shielding in a radioactive liquid waste storage and processing tank at the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF). The contaminated lead used on this project had been in storage as mixed waste at the RWMC. This paper will focus on the processes and problems encountered to utilize the contaminated lead shot

  1. Contamination Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents 3 different tools developed recently for contamination analysis:HTML QCM analyzer: runs in a web browser, and allows for data analysis of QCM log filesJava RGA extractor: can load in multiple SRS.ana files and extract pressure vs. time dataC++ Contamination Simulation code: 3D particle tracing code for modeling transport of dust particulates and molecules. Uses residence time to determine if molecules stick. Particulates can be sampled from IEST-STD-1246 and be accelerated by aerodynamic forces.

  2. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  3. Treatment of low-level liquid radioactive wastes by electrodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DelDebbio, J.A.; Donovan, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of pilot plant studies on the use of electrodialysis (ED) for the removal of radioactive and chemical contaminants from acidic low-level radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations. Decontamination efficiencies are reported for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-129, ruthenium-106 and mercury. Data for contaminant adsorption on ED membranes and liquid waste volumes generated are also presented

  4. Contamination of dried blood spots - an underestimated risk in newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Theresa; Lange, Anja; Hannemann, Anke; Nauck, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia

    2018-01-26

    Newborn screening (NBS) is an established screening procedure in many countries worldwide, aiming at the early detection of inborn errors of metabolism. For decades, dried blood spots have been the standard specimen for NBS. The procedure of blood collection is well described and standardized and includes many critical pre-analytical steps. We examined the impact of contamination of some anticipated common substances on NBS results obtained from dry spot samples. This possible pre-analytical source of uncertainty has been poorly examined in the past. Capillary blood was obtained from 15 adult volunteers and applied to 10 screening filter papers per volunteer. Nine filter papers were contaminated without visible trace. The contaminants were baby diaper rash cream, baby wet wipes, disinfectant, liquid infant formula, liquid infant formula hypoallergenic (HA), ultrasonic gel, breast milk, feces, and urine. The differences between control and contaminated samples were evaluated for 45 NBS quantities. We estimated if the contaminations might lead to false-positive NBS results. Eight of nine investigated contaminants significantly altered NBS analyte concentrations and potentially caused false-positive screening outcomes. A contamination with feces was most influential, affecting 24 of 45 tested analytes followed by liquid infant formula (HA) and urine, affecting 19 and 13 of 45 analytes, respectively. A contamination of filter paper samples can have a substantial effect on the NBS results. Our results underline the importance of good pre-analytical training to make the staff aware of the threat and ensure reliable screening results.

  5. Remediation of PCB [polychlorinated biphenyl] -contaminated soils from scrapyards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKnight, S.

    1991-01-01

    Much of the recent attention on contamination of the environment by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) has focused on liquid PCB spills from electrical equipment. A new, and possibly more serious, source of PCB contamination is the scrap yard, typically located in or near major urban centers, where the local scrap dealer would purchase used transformers or other PCB-containing electrical equipment, recover copper and other metals, and dump the PCB-containing oils on the ground. With the rising value of urban and suburban lands, these scrap yards may be slated for redevelopment, making the cleanup of contaminated soils necessary. The heterogeneous distribution of scrap yard contaminants requires a very detailed site assessment, and the heterogeneous mixture of typical scrap yard contaminants (not only PCB) cannot be treated in a simple fashion. These problems are illustrated for the case of the assessment and cleanup of a scrap yard site in Nova Scotia. A grid block system was used to sample soil at the site, and samples were analyzed for PCB, metals, and hydrocarbons. The most severely contaminated spots were mapped; groundwater patterns were also examined. The remediation process can be divided into 5 phases: physical separation of uncontaminated material; three stages of separation of materials into those having single, several-but-similar, and multicomponent mixed contaminations; and selection of appropriate process technologies. Since there is currently no approved PCB destruction facility in Atlantic Canada, excavated soils containing PCB are stored securely on the site to await approval for some type of incineration process

  6. Hybrid electrokinetic method applied to mix contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, H.; Maria, E. [Dept. of Building Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Several industrials and municipal areas in North America are contaminated with heavy metals and petroleum products. This mix contamination presents a particularly difficult task for remediation when is exposed in clayey soil. The objective of this research was to find a method to cleanup mix contaminated clayey soils. Finally, a multifunctional hybrid electrokinetic method was investigated. Clayey soil was contaminated with lead and nickel (heavy metals) at the level of 1000 ppm and phenanthrene (PAH) of 600 ppm. Electrokinetic surfactant supply system was applied to mobilize, transport and removal of phenanthrene. A chelation agent (EDTA) was also electrokinetically supplied to mobilize heavy metals. The studies were performed on 8 lab scale electrokinetic cells. The mix contaminated clayey soil was subjected to DC total voltage gradient of 0.3 V/cm. Supplied liquids (surfactant and EDTA) were introduced in different periods of time (22 days, 42 days) in order to optimize the most excessive removal of contaminants. The ph, electrical parameters, volume supplied, and volume discharged was monitored continuously during each experiment. At the end of these tests soil and cathalyte were subjected to physico-chemical analysis. The paper discusses results of experiments including the optimal energy use, removal efficiency of phenanthrene, as well, transport and removal of heavy metals. The results of this study can be applied for in-situ hybrid electrokinetic technology to remediate clayey sites contaminated with petroleum product mixed with heavy metals (e.g. manufacture Gas Plant Sites). (orig.)

  7. Treatment of ORNL liquid low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Fowler, V.L.; Robinson, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Discontinuation of the hydrofracture disposal method at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has caused intensive efforts to reduce liquid waste generation. Improving the treatment of slightly radioactive liquid waste, called process waste, has reduced the volume of the resulting contaminated liquid radioactive waste effluent by 66%. Proposed processing improvements could eliminate the contaminated liquid effluent and reduce solid low-level waste by an additional one-third. The improved process meets stringent discharge limits for radionuclides. Discharge limits for radionuclides are expected to be enforced at the outfall of the treatment plant to a creek; currently, limits are enforced at the reservation boundary. Plant discharge is monitored according to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for ORNL. 1 ref., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. 21 CFR 524.1742 - N-(Mercaptomethyl) phthalimide S-(O,O-dimethyl phosphorodithioate) emulsifiable liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... phosphorodithioate) emulsifiable liquid. 524.1742 Section 524.1742 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... phosphorodithioate) emulsifiable liquid. (a) Specifications. The emulsifiable liquid contains 11.6 percent N... soap and water; for eyes, flush with water. Wash all contaminated clothing with soap and hot water...

  9. Treatment to Destroy Chlorohydrocarbon Liquids in the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Clausen, Christian A., III; Geiger, Cherie L.; Reinhart, Debra; Brooks, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    A relatively simple chemical treatment that involves the use of emulsified iron has been found to be effective in remediating groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene and other dense chlorohydrocarbon liquids. These liquids are members of the class of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are commonly recognized to be particularly troublesome as environmental contaminants. The treatment converts these liquids into less-harmful products. As a means of remediation of contaminated groundwater, this treatment takes less time and costs less than do traditional pump-and-treat processes. At some sites, long-term leakage and/or dissolution of chlorohydrocarbon liquids from pools and/or sorbed concentrations in rock and soil gives rise to a need to continue pumpand- treat processes for times as long as decades in order to maintain protection of human health and the environment. In contrast, the effects of the emulsified-iron treatment are more lasting, decreasing the need for long-term treatment and monitoring of contaminated areas. The material used in this treatment consists of iron particles with sizes of the order of nanometers to micrometers contained within the micelles of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable, oil-in-water emulsion. The emulsion is simple to prepare and consists of relatively inexpensive and environmentally acceptable ingredients: One typical formulation consists of 1.3 weight percent of a food-grade surfactant, 17.5 weight percent of iron particles, 23.2 weight percent of vegetable oil, and 58.0 weight percent of water.

  10. Triple-bore hollow fiber membrane contactor for liquid desiccant based air dehumidification

    KAUST Repository

    Bettahalli Narasimha, Murthy Srivatsa; Lefers, Ryan; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Leiknes, TorOve; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    the potential for desiccant carryover to the air and the potential for contamination of the liquid desiccant by dust and other airborne materials, as well as minimizing corrosion. However, the expected additional mass transport barrier of the membrane surface

  11. Transportation cask contamination weeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.; Doughty, D.H.; Chambers, W.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of cask contamination weeping, and efforts to understand the phenomenon and to eliminate its occurrence during spent nuclear fuel transport. The paper summarizes analyses of field experience and scoping experiments, and concentrates on current modelling and experimental validation efforts. (J.P.N.)

  12. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  13. Contaminants of Emerging Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past decade, the scientific community and general public have become increasingly aware of the potential for the presence of unregulated, and generally unmonitored contaminants, found at low concentrations (sub-ug/L) in surface, ground and drinking water. The most common...

  14. Mercury contamination extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  15. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  16. Automatic personnel contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattin, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    United Nuclear Industries, Inc. (UNI) has developed an automatic personnel contamination monitor (APCM), which uniquely combines the design features of both portal and hand and shoe monitors. In addition, this prototype system also has a number of new features, including: micro computer control and readout, nineteen large area gas flow detectors, real-time background compensation, self-checking for system failures, and card reader identification and control. UNI's experience in operating the Hanford N Reactor, located in Richland, Washington, has shown the necessity of automatically monitoring plant personnel for contamination after they have passed through the procedurally controlled radiation zones. This final check ensures that each radiation zone worker has been properly checked before leaving company controlled boundaries. Investigation of the commercially available portal and hand and shoe monitors indicated that they did not have the sensitivity or sophistication required for UNI's application, therefore, a development program was initiated, resulting in the subject monitor. Field testing shows good sensitivity to personnel contamination with the majority of alarms showing contaminants on clothing, face and head areas. In general, the APCM has sensitivity comparable to portal survey instrumentation. The inherit stand-in, walk-on feature of the APCM not only makes it easy to use, but makes it difficult to bypass. (author)

  17. Coupling of Plasmas and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander David

    the design and characterization of our plasma-liquid systems, we illustrate their applications to plant fertilization and wastewater disinfection. In a four-week collaborative experiment with the NCSU greenhouse, plants that received plasma-treated water grew significantly larger than plants that received tap water. This is directly attributable to the approximately hundred mg/L of NO-3 dissolved into solution by the plasma. The VHF source also proved effective at removing several aqueous contaminants designated harmful to humans by the EPA. Air plasma treatment of solutions contaminated with 1,4-dioxane showed log reduction times competitive with other advanced oxidative processes (AOP). Argon treatment of dixoane was an order of magnitude more effective in terms of log reduction time, although the associated costs are significantly higher. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) proved resistant to several VHF design iterations. However, the water electrode design introduced in the passage above achieved a log reduction in low level PFOS concentrations over the course of twenty five minutes, suggesting that it may be viable as an advanced technology for degradation of persistent perfluorinated compounds. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  18. Implied liquidity : towards stochastic liquidity modeling and liquidity trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corcuera, J.M.; Guillaume, F.M.Y.; Madan, D.B.; Schoutens, W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of implied (il)liquidity of vanilla options. Implied liquidity is based on the fundamental theory of conic finance, in which the one-price model is abandoned and replaced by a two-price model giving bid and ask prices for traded assets. The pricing is done by

  19. Subsurface Contamination Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the

  20. Dismantling without contaminating: The EUREX plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The EUREX pilot plant of ENEA Research Centre of Saluggia (Italy) reprocessed, between 1970 and 1983, some 600 elements and 1.5 tonnes of irradiated fuel from MTR and CANDU reactors. The general programme of denuclearization of the site actually focuses on the main priority of the conditioning of the about 400 m 3 of High and Low Level Liquid wastes stored in Saluggia. For this reason, in 1997 a project for the H and LLW conditioning, named 'CORA' has started. The 'CORA' unit will solidify the liquid wastes applying the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) technology; due to the low volume amount of wastes to vitrify, the 'CORA' project has been accurately tailored in order to reduce social impact on public acceptance, costs and conditioning plant volumes to dismantle at the end of the work. For this reason, all the main nuclear components of the conditioning unit (input tank and pretreatment section, CC Melter, pot handling, off-gas system, interim glass storage) will be hosted inside four existing cells of the EUREX plant, duly dismantled. The EUREX plant services (electric and process fluid supplies, controlled areas, ventilation system...) will be reused too, revamped in some cases. The reuse of a nuclear plant which was built in the 60's, as the EUREX is, for future conditioning activities to be 'transplanted' there in the next years, it is not quite an easy job: the partial EUREX dismantling must permit an easy recovery of process areas and spread of contamination from old components (tanks, pipes, valves...) has to be minimized as far as possible. In order to minimize contamination spread, pipe cutting is made by a hydraulic shear, leaving the cut edges closed. Size reduction of pipes and tanks, to optimize the 5 m 3 steel storage containers filling is, as far as possible, made out of the working area of the cells. To achieve this goal a preliminary sketch of pipes to be cut and where the minimal cuts ought to be done is prepared before each intervention. The time

  1. Emerging Contaminants and Federal Facility Contaminants of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page links to fact sheets summarizing contaminants of concern and emerging contaminants that present unique issues and challenges to the environmental community in general and to FFRRO in particular.

  2. PILOT-SCALE SUBCRITICAL WATER REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON- AND PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825394)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subcritical water (hot water under enough pressure to maintain the liquid state) was used to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides from highly contaminated soils. Laboratory-scale (8 g of soil) experiments were used to determine conditions f...

  3. Probability mapping of contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A.; Kaplan, P.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McGraw, M.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Sigda, J.M. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. The probability mapping approach illustrated in this paper appears to offer site operators a reasonable, quantitative methodology for many environmental remediation decisions and allows evaluation of the risk associated with those decisions. For example, output from this approach can be used in quantitative, cost-based decision models for evaluating possible site characterization and/or remediation plans, resulting in selection of the risk-adjusted, least-cost alternative. The methodology is completely general, and the techniques are applicable to a wide variety of environmental restoration projects. The probability-mapping approach is illustrated by application to a contaminated site at the former DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Fernald, Ohio. Soil geochemical data, collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project, have been used to construct a number of geostatistical simulations of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit (the 3-m width of a bulldozer blade). Each such simulation accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination (potential clean-up or personnel-hazard thresholds).

  4. Probability mapping of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; McGraw, M.A.; Istok, J.D.; Sigda, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. The probability mapping approach illustrated in this paper appears to offer site operators a reasonable, quantitative methodology for many environmental remediation decisions and allows evaluation of the risk associated with those decisions. For example, output from this approach can be used in quantitative, cost-based decision models for evaluating possible site characterization and/or remediation plans, resulting in selection of the risk-adjusted, least-cost alternative. The methodology is completely general, and the techniques are applicable to a wide variety of environmental restoration projects. The probability-mapping approach is illustrated by application to a contaminated site at the former DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Fernald, Ohio. Soil geochemical data, collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project, have been used to construct a number of geostatistical simulations of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit (the 3-m width of a bulldozer blade). Each such simulation accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination (potential clean-up or personnel-hazard thresholds)

  5. Development and assessment of closure technology for liquid-waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Relyea, J.F.; Seitz, R.R.; Cammann, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Discharge of low-level liquid wastes into soils was practiced previously at the Hanford Site. Technologies for long-term confinement of subsurface contaminants are needed. Additionally, methods are needed to assess the effectiveness of confinement technologies in remediating potentially diverse environmental conditions. Recently developed site remediation systems and assessment methods for in situ stabilization and isolation of radioactive and other contaminants within and below low-level liquid-waste disposal structures are summarized

  6. Dielectric response and transport properties of alkylammonium formate ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazet, Andreas; Buchner, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Dielectric relaxation spectra of three members of the alkylammonium formate family of protic ionic liquids (PILs), namely, ethylammonium formate (EAF), n-butylammonium formate (BuAF), and n-pentylammonium formate (PeAF), as well as the pseudo-PIL triethylamine + formic acid (molar ratio 1:2; TEAF) have been studied over a wide frequency (50 MHz to 89 GHz) and temperature range (5-65 °C), complemented by measurements of their density, viscosity, and conductivity. It turned out that the dominating relaxation of EAF, BuAF, and PeAF arises from both cation and anion reorientations which are synchronized in their dynamics due to hydrogen bonding. Amplitudes and relaxation times of this mode reflect the—compared to nitrate—different nature of H bonding between the formate anion and ethylammonium cation, as well as increasing segregation of the PIL structure into polar and non-polar domains. The TEAF data suggest that its dominating relaxation is due to the rotation of the complex triethylamineṡ(formic acid)2 in which no significant proton transfer to an ion pair occurred. Weak dissociation of this complex into ions was postulated to account for the high conductivity of TEAF.

  7. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  8. Soil contamination adjacent to waste tank 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odum, J.V.

    1976-11-01

    In March and April 1961, miscalibrated liquid level instrumentation resulted in an overfilling of tank 8 to about 5 in. above the fill-line entrance. The resultant liquid head caused waste to seep through an asbestos-packed sleeve to the fill-line encasement and from there into the main encasement. Most of this waste returned to primary containment (i.e., the catch tank) through a separately encased drain line. However, approximately 1500 gal of high heat waste leaked from the fill-line encasement into the ground, probably through the joint at the juncture of the fill-line encasement and the concrete encasement of the waste tank. The contamination is contained in a 1000- to 1500-ft 3 zone of soil 12 to 26 ft below grade, 18 ft above the maximum elevation of the water table, and distributed roughly symmetrically around the fill-line encasement. Estimates from a continuing monitoring program indicate that less than 5000 Ci of 137 Cs, less than 0.005 Ci of 238 239 Pu, and less than 0.5 Ci of 89 90 Sr are in the soil. Analysis indicates that the contamination presents no current or future hazard to the environment; consequently, there is no technical reason for excavation of this soil. The high cost of excavation and exposure of personnel make excavation undesirable. The contaminated soil will remain under surveillance and undisturbed at tank 8 until the tank is removed from service, at which time its disposition will be re-evaluated

  9. Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Program Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA uses the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring (UCM) program to collect data for contaminants suspected to be present in drinking water, but that do not have...

  10. Plutonium contaminated materials research programme. Progress Report for 1983/84 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Plutonium contaminated material (PCM) is a generic term applied to a wide variety of materials which have become contaminated by plutonium compounds, by virtue of their use inside the primary containment of fuel cycle plants, but which generally have low beta gamma content. The report falls under the headings: introduction; organisation and role of the PCMWP; management practices; 1983/84 progress report (a) reduction of arisings; (b) plutonium measurement; (c) treatment of solid PCM; (d) treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes; (e) actinide chemistry; (f) engineering objectives. (U.K.)

  11. Contamination Control: a systems approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donck, J.C.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Contamination influences a wide variety of industrial processes. For complex systems, contamination control, the collective effort to control contamination to such a level that it guarantees or even improves process or product functionality, offers a way for finding workable solutions. Central in

  12. The contamination factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989 the Senate Committee on Armed Services asked the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) to investigate the environmental and public health impacts of contamination at the nation's nuclear weapons complex and to review the Department of Energy's (DOE) program to clean up past contamination and manage huge quantities of radioactive and hazardous wastes. The DOE Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Program is a massive, multibillion-dollar effort engaging state governments and several federal agencies, and including some of the most technically challenging environmental characterization and remediation projects ever attempted. Congress recognized the enormity of DOE's environmental and legal problems and is interested in insuring that the cleanup program is both adequate and efficient. This summary of the OTA report has been adapted for publication in the Bulletin

  13. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  14. Electrolyze radioactive contamination away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility is using electrolysis to clean the surfaces of hazardous materials. In the past, contaminated metals were cleaned with concentrated acids. Although these treatments make the surfaces safer, they produce other radioactive and toxic wastes in turn. Anodic current passes through a piece of stainless steel submersed in a sodium nitrate solution, and steel dissolves at the surfaces. Surface contamination strips away along with the surface layers. The authors are using this electrolysis approach to remove plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium. Unlike acid washing processes, electrolytic decontamination can be accomplished quickly. Little waste is generated regardless of how much material has to be removed from the surface. Material removal is proportional to the applied current, which gives the operator control over the rate and extent of decontamination

  15. Emerging contaminants in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Lapworth, Dan; Stuart, Marianne; Hart, Alwyn; Crane, Emily; Baran, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The term ‘emerging contaminants’ (ECs) is used to cover not only newly developed compounds but also includes newly discovered compounds in the environment (often due to analytical developments), and compounds that have been recently categorised as contaminants. ECs include a huge array of different compounds (and their metabolites) that are used by society for a range of purposes and include; pharmaceuticals, pesticides, personal care products, veterinary medicines, engineered nano-materials,...

  16. Indexing contamination surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The responsibility for safely managing the Tank Farms at Hanford belongs to Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation which is part of the six company Project Hanford Management Team led by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc.. These Tank Farm Facilities contain numerous outdoor contamination areas which are surveyed at a periodicity consistent with the potential radiological conditions, occupancy, and risk of changes in radiological conditions. This document describes the survey documentation and data tracking method devised to track the results of contamination surveys this process is referred to as indexing. The indexing process takes a representative data set as an indicator for the contamination status of the facility. The data are further manipulated into a single value that can be tracked and trended using standard statistical methodology. To report meaningful data, the routine contamination surveys must be performed in a manner that allows the survey method and the data collection process to be recreated. Three key criteria are necessary to accomplish this goal: Accurate maps, consistent documentation, and consistent consolidation of data meeting these criteria provides data of sufficient quality to be tracked. Tracking of survey data is accomplished by converting the individual survey results into a weighted value, corrected for the actual number of survey points. This information can be compared over time using standard statistical analysis to identify trends. At the Tank Farms, the need to track and trend the facility's radiological status presents unique challenges. Many of these Tank Farm facilities date back to the second world war. The Tank Farm Facilities are exposed to weather extremes, plant and animal intrusion, as well as all of the normal challenges associated with handling radiological waste streams. Routine radiological surveys did not provide a radiological status adequate for continuing comparisons

  17. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Paulo Barbeitas

    solid/liquid interface. It is shown that the conformation of a monolayer adsorbed onto a solid substrate and immersed in a liquid is highly dependent on the monolayer surface density and on the nature of intermolecular interactions in the liquid. Fully packed monolayers are well ordered in any environment due to strong surfactant-surfactant interactions and limited liquid penetration into the monolayer. In contrast, loosely packed monolayers are very sensitive to the liquid environment. Non-polar liquids cause a mild increase in the surfactant conformational disorder. Polar liquids induce more disorder and hydrogen-bonding liquids produce highly disordered conformations due to the hydrophobic effect. When immersed in alkanes, under certain conditions the surfactant chains may become highly ordered due to their interaction with the liquid molecules (chain-chain interaction). In the case of long-chain alcohols, competition between the hydrophobic effect and chain-chain interaction is observed.

  18. Eliminating PCR contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.C.; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Webster, Alison; Emery, V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can mean that even very low levels of contamination with the target DNA will result in a positive signal. At present this aspect is a major limitation in the use of PCR as a routine diagnostic method. By exposing PCR reagents to UV light, contaminating DNA can be inactivated, thus providing an opportunity to eradicate false positive reactions. UV irradiation was applied to PCR systems used for detection of human cytomegalovirus CMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and shown to be effective in eradicating both laboratory encountered contamination and plasmid DNA (below 100 pg) added to PCR systems prior to UV exposure. Sensitivity of a PCR system to amplify the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of HIV-1 was not affected by the irradiation procedure; however, ultimate sensitivity of a PCR system for the amplification of an early gene pro-motor sequence of the CMV genome was reduced 1000-fold. UV irradiation did not affect the size of the PCR product as determined by strand separating polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a 32 P-labelled amplimer. Thus, a simple pre-exposure to UV light would seem a worth-wile step to incorporate into PCR protocols provided that the effects on sensitivity have been determined empirically for each PCR system. (author). 11 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Thorium-230 contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noey, K.C.; Liedle, S.D.; Hickey, C.R.; Doane, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors are currently performing radiological surveys on approximately ninety properties in the St. Louis, Missouri area as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The properties involved are the St. Louis Airport Site, Latty Avenue Properties, St. Louis Downtown Site, Coldwater Creek, and the associated roads and vicinity properties. The primary radioactive contaminant on these properties is thorium-230. Since field instrumentation is not available to detect the presence of alpha-emitting contamination in soil, soil samples are being collected and sent to an analytical laboratory for analysis. Thorium-230 analysis is costly and time-consuming, and as a result, soil sample analysis results are not available to help direct the field sampling program. This paper provides discussion of the manner in which the properties became radioactively contaminated, followed by a discussion of the difficulties associated with the detection of thorium-230. Finally, new methodologies for detecting alpha-emitting radionuclides in the field are described

  20. Contaminant Hazard Reviews (compilation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.; Munro, R.E.; Loges, L.M.; Boone, K.; Paul, M.M.; Garrett, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    This compact disc (CD) contains the 35 reports in the Contaminant Hazard Reviews (CHR) that were published originally between 1985 and 1999 in the U.S. Department of the Interior Biological Report series. The CD was produced because printed supplies of these reviews--a total of 105,000--became exhausted and demand remained high. Each review was prepared at the request of environmental specialists of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and each contained specific information on the following: mirex, cadmium, carbofuran, toxaphene, selenium, chromium, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, diazinon, mercury, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arsenic, chlorpyrifos, lead, tin, index issue, pentachlorophenol, atrazine, molybdenum, boron, chlordane, paraquat, cyanide, fenvalerate, diflubenzuron, zinc, famphur, acrolein, radiation, sodium monofluoroacetate, planar PCBs, silver, copper, nickel, and a cumulative index to chemicals and species. Each report reviewed and synthesized the technical literature on a single contaminant and its effects on terrestrial plants and invertebrates, aquatic plants and animals, avian and mammalian wildlife, and other natural resources. The subtopics include contaminant sources and uses; physical, chemical, and metabolic properties; concentrations in field collections of abiotic materials and living organisms; deficiency effects, where appropriate; lethal and sublethal effects, including effects on survival, growth, reproduction, metabolism, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and carcinogenicity; proposed criteria for the protection of human health and sensitive natural resources; and recommendations for additional research.

  1. Liquid waste sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuge, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    A liquid pumping pressure regulator is disposed on the midway of a pressure control tube which connects the upper portion of a sampling pot and the upper portion of a liquid waste storage vessel. With such a constitution, when the pressure in the sampling pot is made negative, and liquid wastes are sucked to the liquid pumping tube passing through the sampling pot, the difference between the pressure on the entrance of the liquid pumping pressure regulator of the pressure regulating tube and the pressure at the bottom of the liquid waste storage vessel is made constant. An opening degree controlling meter is disposed to control the degree of opening of a pressure regulating valve for sending actuation pressurized air to the liquid pumping pressure regulator. Accordingly, even if the liquid level of liquid wastes in the liquid waste storage vessel is changed, the height for the suction of the liquid wastes in the liquid pumping tube can be kept constant. With such procedures, sampling can be conducted correctly, and the discharge of the liquid wastes to the outside can be prevented. (T.M.)

  2. Are PAHS the Right Metric for Assessing Toxicity Related to Oils, Tars, Creosote and Similar Contaminants in Sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oils, tars, and other non-aqueous phase hydrocarbon liquids (NAPLs) are common sources of contamination in aquatic sediments, and the toxicity of such contamination has generally been attributed to component chemicals, particularly PAHs. While there is no doubt PAHs can be toxic ...

  3. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors

  4. HPLC and MS/MS study of polar contaminants in a wetland adjoining a sour-gas plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, L.C.; Headley, J.V.; Peru, K.; Spiegel, K.; Gandrass, J.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed for target analyses and broad spectrum characterization of polar contaminants such as nitrogenous and organosulfur compounds in wetlands using the complementary techniques of HPLC with electrochemical (EC) detection and tandem MS with probe and electrospray ionization. Tandem MS was well suited for the identification and quantification of mixtures of polar compounds in water samples and soil extracts, while HPLC-EC provided sensitive detection of compounds transparent to MS detection and conventional methods. The usefulness of the methodology is demonstrated by studying the removal of polar contaminants from a wetland in western Canada affected by releases of hydrocarbon-rich condensate and free product from an adjoining sour-gas plant. The concern is that the mobile water-soluble polar contaminants may not be as efficiently attenuated by volatilization or adsorption processes as the more hydrophobic hydrocarbons and that some of the polar toxic compounds may break through to contaminate groundwater and surface waters. Samples of groundwater, surface water, and aqueous soil extracts were analyzed to quantify levels of polar contaminants in the presence of high concentrations of hydrocarbons. The use of water extracts reduced the background interference from hydrocarbons and other non-polar compounds that were present in the soil samples. HPLC-EC was used to quantify the target compounds that included monoethanolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine and sulfolane-derived compounds while tandem MS was used to identify related compounds and degradation products. Influent concentrations were in the ppm range and discharge concentrations were in the ppb range

  5. Removing high-level contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Using biomimicry, an Australian cleantech innovation making inroads intoChinas's industrial sector offers multiple benefits to miners and processors in Australia. Stephen Shelley, the executive chairman of Creative Water Technology (CWT), was on hand at a recent trade show to explain how his Melbourne company has developed world-class techniques in zero liquid discharge and fractional crystallization of minerals to apply to a wide range of water treatment and recycling applications. “Most existing technologies operate with high energy distillation, filters or biological processing. CWT's appliance uses a low temperature, thermal distillation process known as adiabatic recovery to desalinate, dewater and/or recycle highly saline and highly contaminated waste water,” said Shelley. The technology has been specifically designed to handle the high levels of contaminant that alternative technologies struggle to process, with proven water quality results for feed water samples with TDS levels over 300,000ppm converted to clean water with less than 20ppm. Comparatively, reverse osmosis struggles to process contaminant levels over 70,000ppm effectively. “CWT is able to reclaim up to 97% clean usable water and up to 100% of the contaminants contained in the feed water,” said Shelley, adding that soluble and insoluble contaminants are separately extracted and dried for sale or re-use. In industrial applications CWT has successfully processed feed water with contaminant levels over 650,000 mg/1- without the use of chemicals. “The technology would be suitable for companies in oil exploration and production, mining, smelting, biofuels, textiles and the agricultural and food production sectors,” said Shelley. When compared to a conventional desalination plant, the CWT system is able to capture the value in the brine that most plants discard, not only from the salt but the additional water it contains. “If you recover those two commodities... then you

  6. CASH AND LIQUIDITY/LIQUIDITY AND LIQUIDITY RATIO

    OpenAIRE

    ADELA BREUER; MIHAELA LESCONI FRUMUSANU; BEATRIX LIGHEZAN BREUER; ANDRA MANCIU

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims to present the correlation as well as the differences between liquidity/cash and liquidity ratio in terms of economic entities. Researches on this topic are based on the opinions of some specialists in accounting and in the economic-financial analysis, as well as on the national legal stipulations and the ones set out in the International Accounting Standards, the Financial report, respectively. The object of this paper is represented by the correlation between liquidit...

  7. Contamination trapped in a cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sender, E.

    2003-01-01

    Some abandoned industrial sites are so strongly contaminated that they threaten to contaminate underground waters. Pollutants are driven through the soil by raining waters. The principle of the ''hydro-Faraday'' cage is to prevent raining waters from flowing through the contaminated part of the soil. The cage is in fact a structure of buried drain tubes that envelop the contaminated zone. Physics make waters flow through the tubes rather than the soil, so the contaminated zone receives no more water and as a consequence pollutants are stopped in their way towards the phreatic bed. (A.C.)

  8. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells.

  10. Buckling of liquid columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, D.; Ribe, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and

  11. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  12. Model evaluation for the prediction of solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs to guide solid–liquid separator design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuveneshan Moodley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The assumptions and models for solubility modelling or prediction in systems using non-polar solvents, or water and complex triterpene and other active pharmaceutical ingredients as solutes aren't well studied. Furthermore, the assumptions concerning heat capacity effects (negligibility, experimental values or approximations are explored, using non-polar solvents (benzene, or water as reference solvents, for systems with solute melting points in the range of 306–528 K and molecular weights in the range of 90–442 g/mol. New empirical estimation methods for the ΔfusCpi of APIs are presented which correlate the solute molecular masses and van der Waals surface areas with ΔfusCpi. Separate empirical parameters were required for oxygenated and non-oxygenated solutes. Subsequently, the predictive capabilities of the various approaches to solubility modelling for complex pharmaceuticals, for which data is limited, are analysed. The solute selection is based on a principal component analysis, considering molecular weights, fusion temperatures, and solubilities in a non-polar solvent, alcohol, and water, where data was available. New NRTL-SAC parameters were determined for selected steroids, by regression. The original UNIFAC, modified UNIFAC (Dortmund, COSMO-RS (OL, and COSMO-SAC activity coefficient predictions are then conducted, based on the availability of group constants and sigma profiles. These are undertaken to assess the predictive capabilities of these models when each assumption concerning heat capacity is employed. The predictive qualities of the models are assessed, based on the mean square deviation and provide guidelines for model selection, and assumptions concerning phase equilibrium, when designing solid–liquid separators for the pharmaceutical industry on process simulation software. The most suitable assumption regarding ΔfusCpi was found to be system specific, with modified UNIFAC (Dortmund performing well in benzene as

  13. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  14. NCRP soil contamination task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recently established a Task Group on Soil Contamination to describe and evaluate the migration pathways and modes of radiation exposure that can potentially arise due to radioactive contamination of soil. The purpose of this paper is to describe the scientific principles for evaluation of soil contamination which can be used as a basis for derivation of soil contamination limits for specific situations. This paper describes scenarios that can lead to soil contamination, important characteristics of soil contamination, the subsequent migration pathways and exposure modes, and the application of principles in the report in deriving soil contamination limits. The migration pathways and exposure modes discussed in this paper include: direct radiation exposure; and exhalation of gases

  15. Contamination monitoring activities in Kanupp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S S [Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Pakistan)

    1997-06-01

    The Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Kanupp) is a 137 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor, designed and erected by the Canadian General Electric Company as a turn key project. The plant is in operation since it was commissioned in the year 1972. It is located at the Arabian Sea Coast about 15 miles to the west of Karachi. During its more than two decades of operation, the plant has generated about 8 billion units of electricity with an average life time availability factor of 60%. In Kanupp, radioactive contamination may exit due to the release of fission product, activation products etc., which may somehow escape from its confinement and may contaminate surface or other media such as air, water etc. In this paper, following items are described: main aspects of contamination, status of contamination monitoring, need of contamination monitoring, radiation protection activity, instruments, contamination, current status of contamination survey materials and their disposal, and environmental monitoring. (G.K.)

  16. Biological Remediation of Petroleum Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are generated in the form of oily sludges and contaminated soils during crude oil transportation and processing. Although many physical, chemical and biological treatment technologies are available for petroleum contaminants petroleum contaminants in soil, biological methods have been considered the most cost-effective. Practical biological remediation methods typically involve direct use of the microbes naturally occurring in the contaminated environment and/or cultured indigenous or modified microorganisms. Environmental and nutritional factors, including the properties of the soil, the chemical structure of the hydrocarbon(s), oxygen, water, nutrient availability, pH, temperature, and contaminant bioavailability, can significantly affect the rate and the extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation hydrocarbon biodegradation by microorganisms in contaminated soils. This chapter concisely discusses the major aspects of bioremediation of petroleum contaminants.

  17. Liquid helium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Kitami, T.; Torikoshi, M.

    1984-12-01

    A liquid helium target system has been built and used for the experiment on the reaction 4 He(γ, p). The target system has worked satisfactorily; the consumption rate of liquid helium is 360 ml/h and the cryogenic system retains liquid helium for about ten hours. The structure, operation and performance of the target system are reported. (author)

  18. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  19. Liquid--liquid contact in vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.

    1978-08-01

    The contact of two liquid materials, one of which is at a temperature substantially above the boiling point of the other, can lead to fast energy conversion and a subsequent shock wave. This well-known phenomenon is called a ''vapor explosion.'' One method of producing intimate, liquid--liquid contact (which is known to be a necessary condition for vapor explosion) is a shock tube configuration. Such experiments in which water was impacted upon molten aluminum showed that very high pressures, even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure, could occur. The mechanism by which such sharp pressure pulses are generated is not yet clear. In this experiment cold liquids (Freon-11, Freon-22, water, or butanol) were impacted upon various hot materials (mineral oil, silicone oil, water, mercury, molten Wood's metal or molten salt mixture). The main conclusion from the experimental study is that hydrodynamic effects may be very significant in any shock tube analyses, especially when multiple interactions are observed. A theoretical study was performed to check the possibility of vapor film squeezing (between a drop in film boiling and a surface) as a controlling mechanism for making liquid--liquid contact. Using experimental data, the film thickness was calculated and it was found to be too thick for any conceivable film rupture mechanism. It was suggested that the coalescence is a two-stage process, in which the controlling stage depends mainly on temperature and surface properties and can be described as the ability of cold liquid to spread on a hot surface

  20. T cells recognizing a peptide contaminant undetectable by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Østerbye, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used in immunological research as epitopes to stimulate their cognate T cells. These preparations are never completely pure, but trace contaminants are commonly revealed by mass spectrometry quality controls. In an effort to characterize novel major histocompatibility...... complex (MHC) Class I-restricted ß-cell epitopes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, we identified islet-infiltrating CD8+ T cells recognizing a contaminating peptide. The amount of this contaminant was so small to be undetectable by direct mass spectrometry. Only after concentration by liquid...... chromatography, we observed a mass peak corresponding to an immunodominant islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214) epitope described in the literature. Generation of CD8+ T-cell clones recognizing IGRP(206-214) using a novel method confirmed the identity...

  1. Leaching of RA-226 contaminated gravel using different aqueous treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamoon, A; Abulfaraj, W H; Sohsah, M A [King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arbabia (Saudi Arabia)

    1997-12-31

    Investigation of the efficiencies of different aqueous leaching treatments was carried out on gravel artificially contaminated with Ra-226. The extent of leaching efficiency was determined in terms of Ra-226 and its daughter Rn-222. Liquid scintillation counting using high efficiency mineral oil based liquid scintillator was the technique adopted for measuring Ra-226 and Rn-222 leached off the contaminated gravel. Water, dilute solutions of barium chloride and HCl were used as leachants. Different masses of gravel were leached with 200 mL of leachant for various contact time periods. The leached Rn-222 activity measured was plotted vs the decay factor e; from which Rn-222 and Ra-226 originally present in the sample were determined. Several leaching parameters were tested; namely type of leachant, leachant volume/gravel mass ratio, leachant contact time, effect of varying Ba Cl{sub 2} concentration, and successive leaching. Optimization of the leaching parameters for desorption of Ra-226 off the contaminated gravel under laboratory conditions may help determine the ideal conditions for remediating soil contaminated with radium or chemically similar radionuclides. 7 figs.

  2. Environmental radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucedo, Edgardo

    2000-01-01

    The environmental radioactive contamination with the scientific and technological advances can produce big benefits or damages to the human beings or the environment. The approval of national or international laws in the population's education so that it can face the topic critically and the scientific formation of human resources and ethically for application of the ionizing radiations, they are the best road to take advantage to the maximum of benefits of these radiations, reducing to the minimum the risks on the man and the environment

  3. Soil contamination studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a quick screening method that accurately identifies and quantifies the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides in infinitely-thick soil samples using a Frisch grid ionization chamber. An additional objective of the work was to provide the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and its contractors with information on the theoretical and actual measured results of atmospheric testing contamination of soil and water at the Nevada Test Site through a comprehensive search of existing literature

  4. Radioactive contamination of oil produced from nuclear-broken shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; Crouse, D.J.

    1970-01-01

    The results of small-scale exposure and retorting tests indicate that oil recovered from shale that has been broken with nuclear explosives will be contaminated with tritium. When oil shale was heated in sealed flasks with tritiated water vapor or with tritiated hydrogen, both the shale and the oil subsequently retorted from the shale contained tritium. There was much less contamination of the shale or oil, however, when the shale was exposed to tritiated methane and ethane. Contamination of shale and oil with tritium, as the result, of exposure to tritiated water, increased as the exposure temperature, exposure pressure, and the tritium concentration in the water were increased. This contamination also increased as the exposure time was increased up to 25 days, but not significantly thereafter. More than 90% of the tritium was removed from contaminated shale by treating the shale with moist air at elevated temperatures. Only small amounts of the tritium were removed from crude oil by contacting it with solid drying agents or with water. When tritium-contaminated shale oil was distilled, the tritium contents of the recovered fractions were found to be approximately equal. After being heated with a sample of underground test-shot debris, liquid shale oil became contaminated with radioactive fission products. Most of the radioactivity of the oil was due to finely dispersed solids rather than to dissolved radionuclides. Filtration of the oil removed a major fraction of the radioactive material. When the contaminated oil was distilled, more than 99% of the radionuclides remained in the pot residue. (author)

  5. Radioactive contamination of oil produced from nuclear-broken shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, W D; Crouse, D J

    1970-05-15

    The results of small-scale exposure and retorting tests indicate that oil recovered from shale that has been broken with nuclear explosives will be contaminated with tritium. When oil shale was heated in sealed flasks with tritiated water vapor or with tritiated hydrogen, both the shale and the oil subsequently retorted from the shale contained tritium. There was much less contamination of the shale or oil, however, when the shale was exposed to tritiated methane and ethane. Contamination of shale and oil with tritium, as the result, of exposure to tritiated water, increased as the exposure temperature, exposure pressure, and the tritium concentration in the water were increased. This contamination also increased as the exposure time was increased up to 25 days, but not significantly thereafter. More than 90% of the tritium was removed from contaminated shale by treating the shale with moist air at elevated temperatures. Only small amounts of the tritium were removed from crude oil by contacting it with solid drying agents or with water. When tritium-contaminated shale oil was distilled, the tritium contents of the recovered fractions were found to be approximately equal. After being heated with a sample of underground test-shot debris, liquid shale oil became contaminated with radioactive fission products. Most of the radioactivity of the oil was due to finely dispersed solids rather than to dissolved radionuclides. Filtration of the oil removed a major fraction of the radioactive material. When the contaminated oil was distilled, more than 99% of the radionuclides remained in the pot residue. (author)

  6. [Perceived risks of food contaminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Severine; Lohmann, Mark; Epp, Astrid; Böl, Gaby-Fleur

    2017-07-01

    Food contaminants can pose a serious health threat. In order to carry out adequate risk communication measures, the subjective risk perception of the public must be taken into account. In this context, the breadth of the topic and insufficient terminological delimitations from residues and food additives make an elaborate explanation of the topic to consumers indispensable. A representative population survey used language adequate for lay people and a clear definition of contaminants to measure risk perceptions with regard to food contaminants among the general public. The study aimed to assess public awareness of contaminants and the perceived health risks associated with them. In addition, people's current knowledge and need for additional information, their attitudes towards contaminants, views on stakeholder accountability, as well as compliance with precautionary measures, such as avoiding certain foods to reduce health risks originating from contaminants, were assessed. A representative sample of 1001 respondents was surveyed about food contaminants via computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The majority of respondents rated contaminants as a serious health threat, though few of them spontaneously mentioned examples of undesirable substances in foods that fit the scientific or legal definition of contaminants. Mercury and dioxin were the most well-known contaminants. Only a minority of respondents was familiar with pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The present findings highlight areas that require additional attention and provide implications for risk communication geared to specific target groups.

  7. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  8. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  9. Density of liquid Ti-6Al-4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmon Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V is due to its high strength-density ratio a commonly used alloy in aerospace industry applications. But liquid phase data are scarce as preventing contaminations of the reactive high temperature melt during the investigation process poses a challenge. The thermophysical quantity density is of special interest since it is necessary input parameter in modern numerical casting and solidification simulations. Liquid phase density of Ti-6Al-4V as function of temperature was determined employing a fast resistive pulse-heating technique based on the approach to avoid contaminations of the specimen by extremely reducing the experimental duration of the investigation process. Temperature dependent density of liquid Ti-6Al-4V was determined in a temperature range between 2050 K and 2590 K and is presented.

  10. Liquid-liquid contact in vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.

    1978-08-01

    The contact of two liquid materials, one of which is at a temperature substantially above the boiling point of the other, can lead to fast energy conversion and a subsequent shock wave. This phenomenon is called a vapor explosion. One method of producing intimate, liquid-liquid contact (which is known to be a necessary condition for vapor explosion) is a shock tube configuration. Such experiments in which water was impacted upon molten aluminum showed that very high pressures, even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure, could occur. The mechanism by which such sharp pressure pulses are generated is not yet clear. The report describes experiments in which cold liquids (Freon-11, Freon-22, water, or butanol) were impacted upon various hot materials

  11. Non-Polar Lipid Components of Human Cerumen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stránský, Karel; Valterová, Irena; Kofroňová, Edita; Urbanová, Klára; Zarevúcka, Marie; Wimmer, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 8 (2011), s. 781-788 ISSN 0024-4201 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/10/1734; GA MŠk 2B06024; GA MŠk 2B06007; GA MŠk(CZ) OC10001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cerumen * ear wax * lipids * ECL values * ACL values Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.129, year: 2011

  12. Epoxidation of polybutadiene rubber in non polar solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Luciane K. de A.; Jacobi, Marly A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The epoxidation of polybutadiene rubber in cyclohexane, at 50 deg C, by the method of performic acid generated in situ, at different reagent concentration was investigated. The epoxy degree was determined by 1 H-RMN, and because of the gelation and coagulation of modified rubber during the reaction, only a maximum of 30 mol % of epoxy degree could be achieved. The reaction followed a first order kinetic in relation to hydrogen peroxide and acid concentration showing a rate constant of 4,0 (± 0,5) x 10 -5 L.mol-1.seg -1 . (author)

  13. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and excited states of the solute with the compressibility and solvent structure is found to have .... The organization of the rest of the paper is as follows. ...... For the ground state term, as C2 is nearly flat at qσ = q0 = 2π, we can safely ignore.

  14. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include 234 Th, 234 Pa, 137 Cs, 239 Pu (trace), 60 Co, U, 99 Tc, and 237 Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs

  15. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  16. REMOVAL OF COPPER ELECTROLYTE CONTAMINANTS BY ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Gabai

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - Selective adsorbents have become frequently used in industrial processes. Recent studies have shown the possibility of using adsorption to separate copper refinery electrolyte contaminants, with better results than those obtained with conventional techniques. During copper electrorefinning, many impurities may be found as dissolved metals present in the anode slime which forms on the electrode surface, accumulated in the electrolyte or incorporated into the refined copper on the cathode by deposition. In this study, synthetic zeolites, chelating resins and activated carbons were tested as adsorbents to select the best adsorbent performance, as well as the best operating temperature for the process. The experimental method applied was the finite bath, which consists in bringing the adsorbent into contact with a finite volume of electrolyte while controlling the temperature. The concentration of metals in the liquid phase was continuously monitored by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS

  17. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Incineration of simulated plutonium-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Jenkins, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Pyrolysis rate data are presented which will enable larger pyrolyser furnaces to be made for processing solid plutonium-contaminated materials at throughputs of up to 20 kg/h using either 1 or 2.5 kg packages as feed. The influence of liquids, such as water, kerosene or oil, on the pyrolysis process has also been assessed. The products of pyrolysis for a range of individual materials and their mixtures have been defined. The oxidation rates for both static and stirred beds of char have been obtained. The implications of both the pyrolysis and char-oxidation processes for plant design are discussed. This work has been commissioned by the Department of the Environment as part of its radioactive waste management programme. The results will be used in the formulation of government policy, but as this stage they do not necessarily represent that policy

  19. Cross-contamination in Porcelain Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Brandl, A; Falck, A; Ingebrigtsen, L; Nilson, C

    2001-01-01

    Porcelain mortars and pestles are frequently used to comminute drug substances on a small scale and (in some cases) in the production of liquid and semisolid suspensions. Although it is generally accepted that removal of a drug substance from a rough surface by rinsing may be difficult and may lead to cross-contamination, no hard data support that theory. In this study, the amount of salicylic acid remaining on a porcelain mortar after different washing procedures was quantified and compared with the amount remaining on a plastic mortar. Drug residues in the "mg" range on the porcelain mortars made common rinsing procedures appear inappropriate, but no traces of drug were detected on plastic mortars. In addition, the quality of suspension ointments with respect to particle size and homogeneity produced by the two types of mortars was compared. Porcelain and plastic mortars appeared equally suitable for use in the production of semisolid suspensions.

  20. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, M; Fujii, M; Kitaguchi, H

    1982-03-29

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode.

  1. Organic solvents improve hydrocarbon desorption and biodegradation in highly contaminated weathered soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rivero, M. [Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Mexico City (Mexico); Saucedo-Casteneda, G.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M. [Autonoma Metropolitan Univ., Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2007-07-15

    A toluene-based microbial slurry phase system was used to remediate hydrocarbons (HC) in highly contaminated soil samples collected from a site next to a working refinery in Mexico. Initial HC concentrations of the samples were 237.2 {+-} 16,6 g kg{sup -1} in dry soil. The microbial consortium consisted of 10 different strains in a mineral solution. Non-polar solvents used in the phase system included hexane, benzene, and toluene. Polar solvents included n-butanol, acetone, and methanol. The bioavailability of the HCs was increased using both polar and nonpolar solvents in order to promote desorption from the soil and to enhance overall HC biodegradation. HC desorption was analyzed in an abiotic system. Respiration and residual HCs were examined after a period of 30 days in order to compare the effects of the 2 solvents. The biodegradation extracts were then fractionated in a silica gel column to determine if the solvents actually enhanced the biodegradation of specific HC fractions. The study showed that induced dipole interactions forces resulted when nonpolar molecules were dissolved into a nonpolar solvent. Results for desorption and solubility varied among the 6 solvents. Higher dielectric constants resulted in higher solubility and desorption of HCs for nonpolar solvents, while the opposite effect was observed for polar solvents. It was concluded that toluene produced better biodegradation results than any of the milder solvents. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  2. Progress report for 1984/85 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1985-01-01

    The progress report for 1984/5 from the 'Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party' is presented. The report is divided into eight main topics, each discussed separately, and include: reduction of arisings, plutonium measurement, sorting and packaging, washing of shredded combustible plutonium contaminated materials (PCM), decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, PCM immobilization, treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes, and engineering objectives. (U.K.)

  3. Progress report for 1982/83 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction (definitions of plutonium contaminated materials (PCM)); organisation and role of the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party; management practices in relation to PCM; 1982/1983 Progress Report (engineering objectives; reduction of PCM arisings; plutonium measurement; development of treatment processes; decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment; washing of shredded combustible PCM; PCM immobilisation; liquid effluent treatment; actinide chemistry); programme management. (U.K.)

  4. Degradation of Nafion due to contamination from Swelling-Dehydration Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Morgen, Per; Skou, Eivind Morten

    degradation in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), where liquid water has direct contact with the electrolyte. An ex-situ experiment was established with swelling-dehydration cycles on the membrane. However, formation of sulfonic anhydride was not detected during the entire treatment; instead contamination...... from traces calcium in the nominally pure water used in the experiment was found to be the primary reason for the deterioration of the membrane properties. Trace impurities in the liquid methanol feed in DMFC may therefore represent an important contamination source....

  5. A cleanroom contamination control system

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, W.; Eaton, T.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical methods for hazard and risk analysis are being considered for controlling contamination\\ud in pharmaceutical cleanrooms. The most suitable method appears to be the HACCP system that has\\ud been developed for the food industry, but this requires some reinterpretation for use in\\ud pharmaceutical manufacturing. This paper suggests a possible system.\\ud To control contamination effectively, it is necessary to have a good appreciation of the routes and\\ud sources of contamination, and ...

  6. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  7. Forestry on the contamination territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavrov, A.I.; Kovalev, S.D.; Zhukovskaya, O.V.; Drobyshevskaya, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    The common characteristic of a contamination of the Belarus' forests by radionuclides after the Chernobyl accident is indicated. The recommendations for population about the picking up the mushrooms, berries, juices, medicinal herbs, preparation of forages, wood and other production in the contaminated forests are given. The information about the using of forests in depending on a level of the soil contamination is given. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  8. Comparative study of surrogate models for groundwater contamination source identification at DNAPL-contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zeyu; Lu, Wenxi

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of groundwater contamination sources is critical for effectively protecting groundwater resources, estimating risks, mitigating disaster, and designing remediation strategies. Many methods for groundwater contamination source identification (GCSI) have been developed in recent years, including the simulation-optimization technique. This study proposes utilizing a support vector regression (SVR) model and a kernel extreme learning machine (KELM) model to enrich the content of the surrogate model. The surrogate model was itself key in replacing the simulation model, reducing the huge computational burden of iterations in the simulation-optimization technique to solve GCSI problems, especially in GCSI problems of aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). A comparative study between the Kriging, SVR, and KELM models is reported. Additionally, there is analysis of the influence of parameter optimization and the structure of the training sample dataset on the approximation accuracy of the surrogate model. It was found that the KELM model was the most accurate surrogate model, and its performance was significantly improved after parameter optimization. The approximation accuracy of the surrogate model to the simulation model did not always improve with increasing numbers of training samples. Using the appropriate number of training samples was critical for improving the performance of the surrogate model and avoiding unnecessary computational workload. It was concluded that the KELM model developed in this work could reasonably predict system responses in given operation conditions. Replacing the simulation model with a KELM model considerably reduced the computational burden of the simulation-optimization process and also maintained high computation accuracy.

  9. Separating liquids. Oppsamlingsutstyr for fjernelse av forurensninger som flyter paa vaesker, saerlig slike som har lavere spesifikk vekt enn vaesken, fortrinnsvis til rensing av oljeholdig kloakkvann eller spillvann

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, F.; Morva, A.

    1985-04-15

    To remove a contaminating layer of a liquid of lower specific gravity (e.g.oil) floating on a liquid of higher spesific gravity (e.g.seawage), the liquids are forced to flow along a settling tank towards a collector whose open bottom is disposed well below the boundary between the liquids. The top of the collector is sealed to an inclined weir dipping just below the boundary so that the contaminating layer ascends the weir, assisted by air jets from nozzles and flows into the collector. A discharge duct is disposed in the collector with an adjustable inlet arranged in a plane higher than the liquid-liquid boundary but lower than the surface of the contaminating liquid in the collector. The collector and nozzles are supported by floats, and duct is connected to tank outlet by a flexible tube. 1 drawing.

  10. Thermodynamic modeling of saturated liquid compositions and densities for asymmetric binary systems composed of carbon dioxide, alkanes and alkanols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayestehparvin, Bita; Nourozieh, Hossein; Kariznovi, Mohammad; Abedi, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase behavior of the binary systems containing largely different components. • Equation of state modeling of binary polar and non-polar systems by utilizing different mixing rules. • Three different mixing rules (one-parameter, two-parameters and Wong–Sandler) coupled with Peng–Robinson equation of state. • Two-parameter mixing rule shows promoting results compared to one-parameter mixing rule. • Wong–Sandler mixing rule is unable to predict saturated liquid densities with sufficient accuracy. - Abstract: The present study mainly focuses on the phase behavior modeling of asymmetric binary mixtures. Capability of different mixing rules and volume shift in the prediction of solubility and saturated liquid density has been investigated. Different binary systems of (alkane + alkanol), (alkane + alkane), (carbon dioxide + alkanol), and (carbon dioxide + alkane) are considered. The composition and the density of saturated liquid phase at equilibrium condition are the properties of interest. Considering composition and saturated liquid density of different binary systems, three main objectives are investigated. First, three different mixing rules (one-parameter, two parameters and Wong–Sandler) coupled with Peng–Robinson equation of state were used to predict the equilibrium properties. The Wong–Sandler mixing rule was utilized with the non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model. Binary interaction coefficients and NRTL model parameters were optimized using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. Second, to improve the density prediction, the volume translation technique was applied. Finally, Two different approaches were considered to tune the equation of state; regression of experimental equilibrium compositions and densities separately and spontaneously. The modeling results show that there is no superior mixing rule which can predict the equilibrium properties for different systems. Two-parameter and Wong–Sandler mixing rule show promoting

  11. Ionic liquids as electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galinski, Maciej; Lewandowski, Andrzej; Stepniak, Izabela

    2006-01-01

    Salts having a low melting point are liquid at room temperature, or even below, and form a new class of liquids usually called room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL). Information about RTILs can be found in the literature with such key words as: room temperature molten salt, low-temperature molten salt, ambient-temperature molten salt, liquid organic salt or simply ionic liquid. Their physicochemical properties are the same as high temperature ionic liquids, but the practical aspects of their maintenance or handling are different enough to merit a distinction. The class of ionic liquids, based on tetraalkylammonium cation and chloroaluminate anion, has been extensively studied since late 1970s of the XX century, following the works of Osteryoung. Systematic research on the application of chloroaluminate ionic liquids as solvents was performed in 1980s. However, ionic liquids based on aluminium halides are moisture sensitive. During the last decade an increasing number of new ionic liquids have been prepared and used as solvents. The general aim of this paper was to review the physical and chemical properties of RTILs from the point of view of their possible application as electrolytes in electrochemical processes and devices. The following points are discussed: melting and freezing, conductivity, viscosity, temperature dependence of conductivity, transport and transference numbers, electrochemical stability, possible application in aluminium electroplating, lithium batteries and in electrochemical capacitors

  12. Applying Freeze Technology for Characterisation of Liquids, Sludge and Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Jens; Foster, Adam; Lindberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Contaminated solids below a water table or solids in a water saturated environment can be major cost drivers and have a massive impact on the overall schedule and scope for a decommissioning project if not managed properly. One well recognized key activity in the preparation for decommissioning is to perform a proper characterisation covering all objects and areas which have been affected or potentially affected by contamination. Characterization of potentially contaminated material located below water or in water saturated environments can be difficult to perform accurately. Furthermore, traditional sampling techniques typically result in the disturbance or spreading of the contamination during sample collection. Sampling programs should be done in such a way that the radioactivity is contained (to avoid further spread of contamination), and in a way that the risk for cross contamination is minimised. Studsvik's Freeze Technology has been used to develop the necessary sampling techniques to meet these objectives. This technology is proven and frequently used for environmental characterization and remediation applications. The design of the sampling tools for radiological characterisation allows for samples to be taken at specific depths and at specific locations within the contaminated area without disturbing the contaminated material around the sample location. In addition to the sampling technique described above, a modified freeze sampling design has proven to be very useful in collecting frozen core samples that provide an accurate profile of the contamination and chemical and physical characteristics of the sediment or sludge as a function of depth into the sludge or sediment. Ultimately, this technique is used to develop a 3-D map of the physical characteristics and the chemical and radiological composition of the contaminated area. For many projects, this type of information will allow for a large reduction in the

  13. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity

  14. New Approaches to Cleaning Liquid Radioactive Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabulonov, Yu.L.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The industrial cleaning methods of liquid radioactive waste and technologically contaminated solutions, which contain heavy metals and radionuclides, are considered. It is shown that in the case when heavy metal ions exclusively exist in ionic form, the cleaning method with highest efficiency is electrodialysis. In the case when components, which must be removed, are in ionic and colloidal forms at the same time, the previous destruction of colloidal and organic matter (method of hydrodynamic cavitation, lowtemperature plasma etc is necessary. The developed «PTANK» method enables an effective purification of multicomponent metalcontaining man-made solutions, which contain additionally organic substances and complexes. Development of advanced membrane technologies, creation of complex recycling schemes and their synergistic combination will provide an opportunity to achieve deep cleaning of technologically contaminated solutions and minimize the amount of secondary wastes.

  15. Contamination control plan for prelaunch operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A unified, systematic plan is presented for contamination control for space flight systems. Allowable contaminant quantities, or contamination budgets, are determined based on system performance margins and system-level allowable degradations. These contamination budgets are compared to contamination rates in ground environments to establish the controls required in each ground environment. The use of feedback from contamination monitoring and some contamination control procedures are discussed.

  16. PRAMU. Contamination sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Armando R.

    2000-01-01

    Mining and milling activities have been carried out in Argentina during the last 40 years, and nowadays National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina is undertaking the Uranium Mining Environmental Restoration Project (PRAMU). The aim of this project is to achieve that in all the places where uranium mining activities were developed, to restore the environment as much as it is possible, according to the legislation in force. The sites which are studied are: Malargue (Mendoza province), Cordoba (Cordoba province), Los Gigantes (Cordoba province), Huemul (Mendoza province), Pichinan (Chubut province), Tonco (Salta province), La Estela (San Luis province), Los Colorados (La Rioja province). In order to develop the restoration project in each site, one of the first task to be performed is to know quantities and the chemical, physicals and radiological characteristics of the contamination sources. In the present paper the activities of PRAMU in this field, are informed. (author)

  17. Management of contaminated forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.; Tikhomirov, F.A.; Grebenkov, A.; Dubourg, M.; Belli, M.; Arkhipov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the main radioecological issues, the consequence of which are the distribution of doses for critical group of populations living in the vicinity of contaminated forest after the Chernobyl accident and the effects on the forestry economy. The main problems that have to be tackled are to avert doses for the population and forest workers, mitigate the economical burden of the lost forestry production and comply with the permissible levels of radionuclides in forest products. Various options are examined with respect to their application, and their cost effectiveness in terms of dose reduction when such attribute appears to be relevant. It is found that the cost effectiveness of the various options is extremely dependant of the case in which it is intended to be applied. Little actions are available for decreasing the doses, but most of them can lead to an economical benefit

  18. Sources of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, H.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2007-09-01

    In spite of the importance of water for life, either for drinking, irrigation, industry or other wide uses in many fields, human beings seem to contaminate it and make it unsuitable for human uses. This is due to disposal of wastes in the environment without treatment. In addition to population increase and building expanding higher living costs, industrial and economical in growth that causes an increase in water consumption. All of these factors have made an increase pressure on our water environment quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, there is an increase of potential risks to the water environmental due to disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater in areas near the water sources. Moreover, the use of unacceptable irrigation systems may increase soil salinity and evaporation rates. The present report discusses the some groundwater sources and problem, hot and mineral waters that become very important in our life and to our health due to its chemical and radioactivity characteristics.(authors)

  19. Bioremediation of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, C.

    1996-01-01

    By volatilizing aromatic compounds through aeration, landfarming is a recognized approach to the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. With this method, the soil is cultivated and aided with fertilizer amendment to provide a nutrient source for the microbial population involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons. The effectiveness of bioremediation will depend on several factors, including topographic features, soil properties, and biochemistry. Since bioremediation is inhibited by anaerobic conditions, sites that are sloped or have trenches to collect runoff water are preferable. As for soil properties, the percentage of sand should not be too high, but aeration is essential to avoid anaerobic conditions. Addition of straw is generally beneficial, and fertilizers with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium will help degrading hydrocarbons. Temperature, pH, and salt content are also important factors since they facilitate microbial activity. 3 refs

  20. Treatment of Gravel Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohsah, M. A.; Kamal, S. M.; Mamoon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental protection primarily means controlling the releases of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes to the environment and involves treatment, storage, cleanup and disposal of these wastes. The present study concerns the cleanup of gravel that has been contaminated with 2 26 R a. Aqueous solutions of different compositions including water and various concentrations of calcium chloride and barium chloride were used to leach the contaminated gravel. The leaching experiments were carried out in glass column. In some leaching experiments, samples of sandy soil were placed below the gravel to test the sorption of the leached 2 26 R a by the soil. The relative efficiencies of the leachant and the extent of sorption of the leached radionuclide were determined both by the liquid scintillation counting and by the thermoluminescent chips. The TLD chips record the dose before and after decontamination of the gravel and before and after contamination of the soil samples when used. The results obtained indicated that acidified barium chloride was relatively the most effective leachant of 2 26 R a contamination. It reduced the dose from the contaminated gravel to almost half. The soil sample used adsorbs the leached radionuclides efficiently, increasing the soil naturally low dose to about six folds

  1. Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Udell, Kent S.; Bruton, Carol J.; Carrigan, Charles R.

    1999-01-01

    A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

  2. Use of diatomaceous to liquid organic wastes adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza M, Azucena; Padilla S, Ulises

    1999-01-01

    Background: One of the radioactive wastes that the Radioactive Wastes Management Unit must process are organic liquids from external generators and from sections of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). The wastes from external generators contain H 3 and C 14; while the wastes from the CCHEN are contaminated with uranium. The total volume of liquid organic wastes that must be treated is 5 m3. The options recommended for processing these wastes are incineration or the adsorption of the organic liquid by some adsorbing medium and its subsequent immobilization in cement molds. Due to the cost of incineration, the adsorption method was chosen for study. Objective: To find the optimum amount of adsorbent to be saturated with radioactive organic liquid from liquid scintillation and to study immobilization in cement molds. Methodology: Adsorption granulated (1568 Merck) and diatom earth were tested as adsorbent mediums. The adsorbents were mixed in different ratios of volume with the organic liquid. Then the waste was mixed with different water/cement ratios to define the best immobilization conditions. Conclusions: The tests carried out with 2 adsorbents recommended in the literature and available in the CCHEN show that as adsorbent waste ratio decreases, the percentage of liquid adsorbed increases, as expected: a greater volume of adsorbent retains a greater quantity of liquid, with an increase in the final volume, depending on the adsorbent used. Of these adsorbents, the diatom earth was better for treating liquid organic wastes. It had 100% adsorption and an increased volume of 0%, which is more than enough from the volumetric point of view of waste management. The ratio 0.8 liquid/adsorbent also showed good characteristics, but more study is needed to decide on the above, since liquid remains to be adsorbed. This work must continue to study the repeatability of results, to obtain physical and radiological characteristics for the immobilized products and to

  3. Liquid Sloshing Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2005-06-01

    The problem of liquid sloshing in moving or stationary containers remains of great concern to aerospace, civil, and nuclear engineers; physicists; designers of road tankers and ship tankers; and mathematicians. Beginning with the fundamentals of liquid sloshing theory, this book takes the reader systematically from basic theory to advanced analytical and experimental results in a self-contained and coherent format. The book is divided into four sections. Part I deals with the theory of linear liquid sloshing dynamics; Part II addresses the nonlinear theory of liquid sloshing dynamics, Faraday waves, and sloshing impacts; Part III presents the problem of linear and nonlinear interaction of liquid sloshing dynamics with elastic containers and supported structures; and Part IV considers the fluid dynamics in spinning containers and microgravity sloshing. This book will be invaluable to researchers and graduate students in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, designers of liquid containers, and applied mathematicians.

  4. Liquid metal steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal heated steam generator is described which in the event of a tube failure quickly exhausts out of the steam generator the products of the reaction between the water and the liquid metal. The steam is generated in a plurality of bayonet tubes which are heated by liquid metal flowing over them between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder. The inner cylinder extends above the level of liquid metal but below the main tube sheet. A central pipe extends down into the inner cylinder with a centrifugal separator between it and the inner cylinder at its lower end and an involute deflector plate above the separator so that the products of a reaction between the liquid metal and the water will be deflected downwardly by the deflector plate and through the separator so that the liquid metal will flow outwardly and away from the central pipe through which the steam and gaseous reaction products are exhausted. (U.S.)

  5. Ionic liquid marbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2007-10-09

    Liquid marbles have been reported during this decade and have been argued to be potentially useful for microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications. The liquid marbles described to date have been composed of either water or glycerol as the liquid and hydrophobized lycopodium or silica as the stabilizing particles. Both of these components are potentially reactive and do not permit the use of organic chemistry; the liquids are volatile. We report the use of perfluoroalkyl particles (oligomeric (OTFE) and polymeric (PTFE) tetrafluoroethylene, which are unreactive) to support/stabilize a range of ionic liquid marbles. Ionic liquids are not volatile and have been demonstrated to be versatile solvents for chemical transformations. Water marbles prepared with OTFE are much more robust than those prepared with hydrophobized lycopodium or silica.

  6. Quantum liquids get thin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2018-01-01

    A liquid exists when interactions that attract its constituent particles to each other are counterbalanced by a repulsion acting at higher densities. Other characteristics of liquids are short-range correlations and the existence of surface tension (1). Ultracold atom experiments provide a privileged platform with which to observe exotic states of matter, but the densities are far too low to obtain a conventional liquid because the atoms are too far apart to create repulsive forces arising from the Pauli exclusion principle of the atoms' internal electrons. The observation of quantum liquid droplets in an ultracold mixture of two quantum fluids is now reported on page 301 of this issue by Cabrera et al. (2) and a recent preprint by Semeghini et al. (3). Unlike conventional liquids, these liquids arise from a weak attraction and repulsive many-body correlations in the mixtures.

  7. Transdermal nicotine absorption handling e-cigarette refill liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Giovanni; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Passini, Valter; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Mauro, Marcella; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2016-02-01

    The concentrated nicotine in e-cigarette refill liquids can be toxic if inadvertently ingested or absorbed through the skin. Reports of poisonings due to accidental ingestion of nicotine on refill liquids are rapidly increasing, while the evaluation of nicotine dermally absorbed still lacks. For that reason we studied transdermal nicotine absorption after the skin contamination with e-liquid. Donor chambers of eight Franz diffusion cells were filled with 1 mL of 0.8 mg/mL nicotine e-liquid for 24 h. The concentration of nicotine in the receiving phase was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (LOD:0.1 μg/mL). Nicotine was detectable in receiving solution 2 h after the start of exposure and increased progressively. The medium flux calculated was 4.82 ± 1.05 μg/cm(2)/h with a lag time of 3.9 ± 0.1 h. After 24 h, the nicotine concentration in the receiving compartment was 101.02 ± 22.35 μg/cm(2) corresponding to 3.04 mg of absorbed nicotine after contamination of a skin surface of 100 cm(2). Skin contamination with e-liquid can cause nicotine skin absorption: caution must be paid when handling refill e-liquids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface induced smectic order in ionic liquids - an X-ray reflectivity study of [C22C1im]+[NTf2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Julian; Hou, Binyang; Weiss, Henning; Li, Hailong; Konovalov, Oleg; Festersen, Sven; Murphy, Bridget M; Rütt, Uta; Bier, Markus; Mezger, Markus

    2017-10-11

    Surface induced smectic order was found for the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-docosylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethlysulfonyl)imide by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence scattering experiments. Near the free liquid surface, an ordered structure of alternating layers composed of polar and non-polar moieties is observed. This leads to an oscillatory interfacial profile perpendicular to the liquid surface with a periodicity of 3.7 nm. Small angle X-ray scattering and polarized light microscopy measurements suggest that the observed surface structure is related to fluctuations into a metastable liquid crystalline SmA 2 phase that was found by supercooling the bulk liquid. The observed surface ordering persists up to 157 °C, i.e. more than 88 K above the bulk melting temperature of 68.1 °C. Close to the bulk melting point, we find a thickness of the ordered layer of L = 30 nm. The dependency of L(τ) = Λ ln(τ/τ 1 ) vs. reduced temperature τ follows a logarithmic growth law. In agreement with theory, the pre-factor Λ is governed by the correlation length of the isotropic bulk phase.

  9. Recovering volatile liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregeat, J H

    1925-07-30

    The products of hydrogenation of alicyclic compounds, such as terpenes, for example, pinene or oil of turpentine, are used as washing liquids for absorbing vapours of volatile liquids from gases, such as natural gases from petroliferous regions, gases from the distillation of coal, lignite, schist, peat, etc. or from the cracking of heavy oils. Other liquids such as tar oils vaseline oils, cresols, etc. may be added.

  10. Density of liquid Ytterbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankus, S.V.; Basin, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of the density of metallic ytterbium in the liquid state and at the liquid-solid phase transition. Based on the numerical data obtained, the coefficient of thermal expansion βZ of the liquid and the density discontinuity on melting deltarho/sub m/ are calculated. The magnitudes of βZ and deltarho/sub m/ for the heavy lanthanides are compared

  11. Liquid Metal Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series...

  12. Liquidity and International Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework to study the links between the supply of liquid assets for the financial market and the international allocation of economic activity. Private assets’ liquidity properties - their usefulness as collateral or media of exchange in financial transactions - affect assets’ values and interest rates, with consequences on firm entry, production, aggregate productivity, and total market capitalization. In a closed economy, the liquidity market increases the size and ...

  13. ROMANIAN BANKS LIQUIDITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BATRANCEA MARIA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Most transactions or financial commitments have implications for a bank liquidity. Transactions are particularly vulnerable to liquidity problems at a specific institution. Therefore, one can deduce the importance of the correct calculation and liquidity indicator, not only for the bank concerned, but especially for NBR uses that bank risk management tool. That is why the authors took into consideration a sample of banks in Romania to show to what extent the banking crisis has influenced the development banks.

  14. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL...Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing • Engines and their components are extensively static-tested in development • This

  15. Viscous effects in liquid encapsulated liquid bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Duane T.

    2002-01-01

    An analytical derivation of the surface deflections and the streamfunctions for the flow inside a liquid encapsulated liquid bridge has been derived using an asymptotic expansion about a small capillary number. The model assumes an initially flat and cylindrical interface under the assumption that the densities of both fluids are equal. To simplify the analysis, the top and bottom walls are assumed to be stress-free and the Reynolds number is assumed to be negligible. Flow is generated either by a moving outer wall (shear-driven flow) or by applying a temperature difference across the top and bottom walls (Marangoni-driven flow). The resulting equations show that for the shear-driven flow, as the viscosity ratio increases, the surface deflections increase monotonically. For the Marangoni-driven flow there exist values of the viscosity ratio where the surface deflections reach a minimum and then switch signs. This investigation shows that it may be possible in more realistic systems to use an outer encapsulating liquid of the proper viscosity ratio to stabilize the liquid-liquid interface during float zone crystal growth

  16. Risk of thyroid cancer among Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Tenet, Vanessa; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ivanov, Viktor K.; Chekin, Sergei; Malakhova, Irina V.; Polyakov, Semion; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gavrilin, Yuri; Golovanov, Ivan; Krjuchkov, Viktor P.; Tukov, Aleksandr R.; Maceika, Evaldas; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: While the increased risk of thyroid cancer is well demonstrated in people exposed to radioactive iodines in childhood and adolescence in the most contaminated areas around the Chernobyl power plant, following the accident which took place on 26 April 1986, the effect of exposure on adults remains unclear. A collaborative case-control study of thyroid cancer was set-up, nested within cohorts of Belarus, Russian and Baltic countries liquidators of the Chernobyl accident, to evaluate the radiation-induced risk of this disease among liquidators, and to assess the roles of screening and of radiation exposures in the observed increased thyroid cancer incidence among liquidators. The study population consisted of the cohorts of approximately 66,000 Belarus, 65,000 Russian and 15,000 Baltic countries liquidators who took part in the clean-up activities on the reactor site and in the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 1987. The liquidators were mainly exposed to external radiation, although substantial dose to the thyroid from iodine isotopes may have been received by liquidators who worked in May-June 1986 and by those who resided in the most contaminated territories of Belarus. Information was collected on study subjects by use of a standardized questionnaire that was administrated during a face-to-face interview with the study subject and/or a proxy (a relative or a colleague). The interview included questions on demographic factors, time, place and conditions of work as a liquidator and on potential risk and confounding factors for thyroid cancer. A method of analytical dose reconstruction, entitled RADRUE (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed within the study and applied to estimate individual doses to the thyroid from external radiation and related uncertainties for each subject. Approaches to derive individual thyroid dose estimates from inhaled and

  17. Low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhnerov, L. V.; Konstantinov, Ye. A.; Prokopenko, V. A.; Sorokin, N. M.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents the results of research in developing a low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination founded on the of easily removed protective polymeric coating based on water and alcohol latexes and dispersion of polymers with special activating additives. The developed technology provides for the reduction of weakly fixed radioactive contamination of non-painted and painted surfaces to admissible levels (as a rule), it securely prevents and localizes contamination and does not generate secondary liquid radioactive wastes

  18. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Kuribayashi, Nobuhide; Minami, Yuji; Kamiyama, Hisashi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To greatly reduce the quantity of radioactive liquid wastes by subjecting the same to drying treatment, and to granulate the thus formed dry powders to prevent scattering thereof thereby to fill a storage vessel safely with the powders without contaminating the surroundings. Constitution: Radioactive liquid wastes within a storage tank are supplied to a drier where the wastes are subjected to evaporation treatment, and pulverized. The thus dried powders are temporarily stored in a hopper by means of a screw feeder. The dry powders which have reached a predetermined quantity are supplied to a stirrer-granulator by means of a quantitative screw feeder, and mixed and stirred with a binder sent from a binder storage tank through a binder quantity determining device, whereby the powders are granulated. After the granulation, the granulated powders are extruded by a centrifugal force, and filled in the storage vessel by way of a conduit. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Anders, Bojesen; Skydsgaard, Karen

    2004-01-01

    injection are dependent on the preservative used in the formulation and the concentration of GH. Injection pain may also be related to the buffer substance and injection volume. A liquid formulation of GH, Norditropi SimpleXx, has been developed that dispenses with the need for reconstitution before...... solution. More pain was also reported following large volume injections and following injections with solutions containing high protein concentrations. In summary, optimization of the preservative and buffer content of a liquid GH formulation may reduce injection pain and lead to improved patient...... administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate...

  20. Storage of solid and liquid radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasic, A.; Gacinovic, O.

    1961-01-01

    Solid radioactive waste collected during 1961 from the laboratories of the Institute amounted to 22.5 m 3 . This report contains data about activity of the waste collected from january to November 1961. About 70% of the waste are short lived radioactive material. Material was packed in metal barrels and stored in the radioactive storage in the Institute. There was no contamination of the personnel involved in these actions. Liquid radioactive wastes come from the Isotope production laboratory, laboratories using tracer techniques, reactor cooling; decontamination of the equipment. Liquid wastes from isotope production were collected in plastic bottles and stored. Waste water from the RA reactor were collected in special containers. After activity measurements this water was released into the sewage system since no activity was found. Table containing data on quantities and activity of radioactive effluents is included in this report