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Sample records for non-phenolic beta-o-4 lignin

  1. EFFECT OF SOLVENT ON THE BETA-O-4 BOND CLEAVAGE OF A LIGNIN MODEL COMPOUND BY TERT-BUTOXIDE UNDER MILD CONDITIONS

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    Yuji Matsumoto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The beta-O-4 bond cleavage of a non-phenolic β-O-4 type dimeric lignin model compound, 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-ethanol (III, was examined in systems using potassium tert-butoxide as a base (0.5 mol/l and tert-butanol (tBuOH, dimethylsulfoxide, 1,4-dioxane, or tetrahydrofuran as a solvent. The β-O-4 bond of compound III was cleaved in any system at 30°C, and 2-methoxyphenol (II was liberated. The amount of compound II liberated was close to the quantitative yield on the basis of the amount of compound III that disappeared, except for the treatment in the t-BuOH system. The reaction rate was dependent on what solvent was used. Half-life periods for these systems were roughly about 6.0, 3.0, 0.7, and 0.2h, respectively. It seemed that the rates were very high when the polarity of the solvents was low. Two reaction products generated from the aromatic ring with two methoxyl groups of compound III, 4-acetyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene and 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid, were detected in all the systems. A peculiar reaction product, 1,2-dimethoxybenzene, was detected in a fairly large quantity, only when the latter two solvents with low polarities were applied.

  2. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PYROLYSIS RESPONSE OF BETA-O-4 LIGNIN MODEL POLYMER

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    Jiang-Yan Liu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyphenyl (H-type and guaiacyl (G-type lignin model polymers composed of the β–O–4 structure without gamma–hydroxymethyl groups were synthesized. The chemical structures of the H- and G-type lignin models were characterized by 1H- and 13C-NMR, as well as MALDI-TOF/MS. The pyrolysis response was analyzed by means of TG-DTG, Py-GC/MS, and a tube furnace technique. 1H-, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF/MS showed that the lignin models were linear polymers. The polymers included the β–O–4 linkage, as in natural lignin. Pyrolytic products from H-type lignin model only possessed p-hydroxyphenyl structure without methoxyl groups, and the pyrolytic products from G-type lignin model only possessed guaiacyl structure with methoxyl groups. Pyrolysis products from H- and G- type lignin models were classified into char, gas, and liquid (bio-oil, and the gaseous products of two model compounds mainly consisted of H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and C2H4.

  3. Kinetic analysis of the phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-O-4 lignin model compounds: A computational study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beste, Ariana [ORNL; Buchanan III, A C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-phenethyl phenyl ether ($\\beta - \\rm PhCH_2CH_2OPh$, $\\beta$-PPE) is an integral step in the pyrolysis of PPE, which is a model compound for the $\\beta$-O-4 linkage in lignin. We investigated the influence of natural occurring substituents (hydroxy, methoxy) on the reaction rate by calculating relative rate constant using density functional theory in combination with transition state theory, including anharmonic correction for low-frequency modes. The phenyl-shift reaction proceeds through an intermediate and the overall rate constants were computed invoking the steady-state approximation (its validity was confirmed). Substituents on the phenethyl group have only little influence on the rate constants. If a methoxy substituent is located in para position of the phenyl ring adjacent to the ether oxygen, the energies of the intermediate and second transition state are lowered, but the overall rate constant is not significantly altered. This is a consequence of the dominating first transition from pre-complex to intermediate in the overall rate constant. {\\it O}- and di-{\\it o}-methoxy substituents accelerate the phenyl-migration rate compared to $\\beta$-PPE.

  4. Oxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and of a non-phenolic lignin structure in the manganese peroxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander N. Kapich; Tatyana V. Korneichik; Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids have been proposed to mediate the oxidation of recalcitrant, non-phenolic lignin structures by fungal manganese peroxidases (MnP), but their precise role remains unknown. We investigated the oxidizability of three fatty acids with varying degrees of polyunsaturation (linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids) by measuring conjugated dienes...

  5. Oxidation of wheat straw lignin by fungal lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase: A comparative study

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    Martinez-Ingo, M.J.; Kurek, B. [Laboratorie de Chimie Biologique, Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    1996-10-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and laccase from Pleurotus eryngii were separately used to degrade alkali wheat straw lignin (AL). In order to characterize the catalytic action of the different enzymes, the chemical structure and the hydrodynamic properties of the treated lignin were analyzed by thioacidolysis-gas chromatography and molecular size exclusion chromatography. The results confirmed that only LiP was able to degrade guiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) structures in non-phenolic methylated lignins. However, provided that some phenolic terminal structures are present, MnP and laccase were able to degrade the non-phenolic portion of the polymer linked by {beta}-O-4 alkyl aryl ether bonds. This suggested that the oxidative reactions catalyzed in alkali straw lignin could progress through bond cleavages generating phenoxy radicals. The molecular size distribution of both thioacidolysis products and the oxidized polymer showed that AL underwent condensation side-reactions regardless of the enzyme treatment, but only LiP oxidation led to the increase in the hydrodynamic volume of the recovered lignin. This indicated that modification of enzymes by bonding patterns in lignin is not always associated with alterations in the spatial network of the polymer.

  6. Method of producing prepolymers from hydroxyalkyl lignin derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A method of producing prepolymeric materials from lignin is disclosed. The method uses lignin which has been hydroxyalkyl modified, such that the lignin is substantially non-phenolic and solvent soluble and/or liquid. The modified lignin is reacted with materials which yield prepolymers which may be polymerized according to known methods to produce useful polymers.

  7. Microbial degradation of lignin: how a bulky recalcitrant polymer is efficiently recycled in nature and how we can take advantage of this

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2009-01-01

    .... The lignin polymer is highly recalcitrant towards chemical and biological degradation due to its molecular architecture, where different non-phenolic phenylpropanoid units form a complex three...

  8. Experimental Study of Mechanistic Acid Deconstruction of Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Katahira, R.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of biomass, which remains highly underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in studying the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. Model dimers, imitating H, S, and G lignins, were synthesized with the most abundant {beta} - O - 4 linkage in lignin. These compounds were then depolymerized using various acids and at different operating conditions. The deconstruction products were analyzed to complement the QM studies and investigate proposed mechanisms.

  9. Lignin degradation by a white-rot fungus lacking lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, C.B.; Eriksson, K.E.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been the organism of choice for studies of lignin degradation and much of this work has focused on two phenol oxidases, lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), secreted by the fungus under ligninolytic conditions. However, many white-rot fungi, including a number of aggressive lignin degraders, seem to operate without expressing LiP activity. Laccase is another phenol oxidase that white-rot fungi often produce. However, the role played by laccase in lignin degradation has remained obscured since its low redox potential appeared to make it incapable of oxidizing non-phenolic lignin constituents. We have identified, Pychnoporus cinnabarinus lacking both LiP and MnP, but a high producer of laccase, to degrade lignin as efficiently as UP producing fungi. We have found that P. cinnabarinus, to overcome the redox potential barrier for laccase, produces a mediator for oxidation of non-phenolic lignin structures. This is the first description of how laccase may be used in a biological system for the degradation of lignin.

  10. Manganese-dependent cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora in the absence of lignin peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, K.A. Jr.; Bao, W.; Kawai, S. [USDA Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Many ligninolytic fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), the enzyme generally thought to cleave nonphenolic structures in lignin. However, the fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, is able to degrade these nonphenolic structures. Experiments showed wood block cultures and defined liquid medium cultures of C. subvermispora rapidly deploymerized and mineralized a {sup 14}C-labeled, polyethylene glycol-linked, high-molecular-weight {beta}-O-4 lignin model compound (model I) that represents the major nonphenolic structure of lignin. The fungus cleaved model I between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release benzylic fragments, which were shown in isotope trapping experiments to be major products of model I metabolism. The C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} cleavage of {beta}-O-4 lignin structures to release benzylic fragments is characteristic of LiP catalysis, but no detectable LiP activity. Three results pointed, instead, to the participation of a different enzyme, manganese peroxidase (MnP), in the degradation of nonphenolic lignin structures by C. subvermispora. (1) The degradation of model I and of exhaustively methylated (nonphenolic), {sup 14}C-labeled, synthetic lignin by the fungus in liquid cultures was almost completely inhibited when the Mn concentration of the medium was decreased from 35 {mu}M to approximately 5 {mu}M. (2) The fungus degraded model I and methylated lignin significantly faster in the presence of Tween 80, a source of unsaturated fatty acids, than it did in the presence of Tween 20, which contains only saturated fatty acids. Previous work has shown that nonphenolic lignin structures are degraded during the MnP-mediated peroxidation of unsaturated lipids. (3) In experiments with MnP, Mn(II), and unsaturated lipid in vitro, this system mimicked intact C. subvermispora cultures in that it cleaved nonphenolic {beta}-O-4 lignin model compounds between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release a benzylic fragment. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Structural characterization of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, José C; Rencoret, Jorge; Marques, Gisela; Li, Jiebing; Gellerstedt, Göran; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2009-11-11

    The structural characteristics of the lignin from jute (Corchorus capsularis ) fibers, which are used for high-quality paper pulp production, were studied. The lignin content (13.3% Klason lignin) was high compared to other nonwoody bast fibers used for pulp production. The lignin structure was characterized by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), 2D-NMR, and thioacidolysis. Upon Py-GC/MS, jute fibers released predominantly products from syringylpropanoid units with the S/G ratio being 2.1 and a H/G/S composition of 2:33:65. 2D-NMR of the milled wood lignin (MWL) isolated from jute fibers showed a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (72% of total side chains), followed by beta-beta' resinol-type linkages (16% of total side chains) and lower amounts of beta-5' phenylcoumaran (4%) and beta-1' spirodienone-type (4%) linkages and cinnamyl end groups (4%). The high predominance of the S-lignin units, together with the high proportion of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages, which are easily cleaved during alkaline cooking, are advantageous for pulping. On the other hand, a small percentage (ca. 4%) of the lignin side chain was found to be acetylated at the gamma-carbon, predominantly over syringyl units. The analysis of desulphurated thioacidolysis dimers provided additional information on the relative abundances of the various carbon-carbon and diaryl ether bonds and the type of units (syringyl or guaiacyl) involved in each of the above linkage types. Interestingly, the major part of the beta-beta' dimers included two syringyl units, indicating that most of the beta-beta' substructures identified in the HSQC spectra were of the syringaresinol type (pinoresinol being absent), as already observed in the lignin of other angiosperms.

  12. Characterization and enzymatic hydrolysis of wood from transgenic Pinus taeda engineered with syringyl lignin or reduced lignin content

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    Edmunds, Charles W.; Peralta, Perry; Kelley, Stephen S.; Chiang, Vincent L.; Sharma-Shivappa, Ratna R.; Davis, Mark F.; Harman-Ware, Anne E.; Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica; Cunningham, Michael W.; Rottmann, William; Miller, Zachary D.; Peszlen, Ilona

    2017-02-22

    Softwood is an abundant resource; however, currently its utilization for bioconversion to obtain platform sugars is limited. Pinus taeda trees which were genetically modified to either produce S lignin or to decrease lignin content were characterized with a suite of analytic techniques. Syringyl lignin was visualized in the secondary xylem of one genetic line with Maule staining. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance identified the S lignin units were coupled into the lignin through ..beta..-O-4 linkages, and thioacidolysis measured approximately 13% S lignin content in the same sample. Reductions of the lignin of as much as 33% were observed in the transgenics. To better understand how these modifications affect bioconversion, their amenability to hot water and dilute acid pretreatments and enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated. Lignin reductions resulted in 1.9-3.2-fold increases in glucose release compared to the control. However, no apparent benefit was observed by S lignin incorporation at the concentrations reported in this study. These results highlight the potential for softwood cell wall properties to be improved for bioenergy/biochemical applications.

  13. Insights into lignin degradation and its potential industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Solbiati, Jose O; Cann, Isaac K O

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose is an abundant biomass that provides an alternative source for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers in lignocellulosic biomass is hindered by lignin, which is recalcitrant to chemical and biological degradation due to its complex chemical structure and linkage heterogeneity. The role of fungi in delignification due to the production of extracellular oxidative enzymes has been studied more extensively than that of bacteria. The two major groups of enzymes that are involved in lignin degradation are heme peroxidases and laccases. Lignin-degrading peroxidases include lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP). LiP, MnP, and VP are class II extracellular fungal peroxidases that belong to the plant and microbial peroxidases superfamily. LiPs are strong oxidants with high-redox potential that oxidize the major non-phenolic structures of lignin. MnP is an Mn-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic substrates but is not capable of oxidizing the more recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin. VP enzymes combine the catalytic activities of both MnP and LiP and are able to oxidize Mn(2+) like MnP, and non-phenolic compounds like LiP. DyPs occur in both fungi and bacteria and are members of a new superfamily of heme peroxidases called DyPs. DyP enzymes oxidize high-redox potential anthraquinone dyes and were recently reported to oxidize lignin model compounds. The second major group of lignin-degrading enzymes, laccases, are found in plants, fungi, and bacteria and belong to the multicopper oxidase superfamily. They catalyze a one-electron oxidation with the concomitant four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Fungal laccases can oxidize phenolic lignin model compounds and have higher redox potential than bacterial laccases. In the presence of redox mediators, fungal laccases can oxidize non-phenolic

  14. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade, Ayodeji O; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iweriebor, Benson C; Green, Ezekiel; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-02-01

    Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non-phenolic constituents. Over the years, ligninolytic enzymes have been studied however; research on lignin peroxidase seems to have been lagging when compared to other ligninolytic enzymes which are extracellular in nature including laccase and manganese peroxidase. This assertion becomes more pronounced when the application of lignin peroxidase is put into perspective. Consequently, a succinct documentation of the contemporary functionalities of lignin peroxidase and, some prospective applications of futuristic relevance has been advanced in this review. Some articulated applications include delignification of feedstock for ethanol production, textile effluent treatment and dye decolourization, coal depolymerization, treatment of hyperpigmentation, and skin-lightening through melanin oxidation. Prospective application of lignin peroxidase in skin-lightening functions through novel mechanisms, hence, it holds high value for the cosmetics sector where it may serve as suitable alternative to hydroquinone; a potent skin-lightening agent whose safety has generated lots of controversy and concern. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Highly acylated (acetylated and/or p-coumaroylated) native lignins from diverse herbaceous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, José C; Rencoret, Jorge; Marques, Gisela; Gutiérrez, Ana; Ibarra, David; Santos, J Ignacio; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Zhang, Liming; Martínez, Angel T

    2008-10-22

    The structure of lignins isolated from the herbaceous plants sisal ( Agave sisalana), kenaf ( Hibiscus cannabinus), abaca ( Musa textilis) and curaua ( Ananas erectifolius) has been studied upon spectroscopic (2D-NMR) and chemical degradative (derivatization followed by reductive cleavage) methods. The analyses demonstrate that the structure of the lignins from these plants is highly remarkable, being extensively acylated at the gamma-carbon of the lignin side chain (up to 80% acylation) with acetate and/or p-coumarate groups and preferentially over syringyl units. Whereas the lignins from sisal and kenaf are gamma-acylated exclusively with acetate groups, the lignins from abaca and curaua are esterified with acetate and p-coumarate groups. The structures of all these highly acylated lignins are characterized by a very high syringyl/guaiacyl ratio, a large predominance of beta- O-4' linkages (up to 94% of all linkages), and a strikingly low proportion of traditional beta-beta' linkages, which indeed are completely absent in the lignins from abaca and curaua. The occurrence of beta-beta' homocoupling and cross-coupling products of sinapyl acetate in the lignins from sisal and kenaf indicates that sinapyl alcohol is acetylated at the monomer stage and that, therefore, sinapyl acetate should be considered as a real monolignol involved in the lignification reactions.

  16. Utilization of lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machihara, A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical structure of lignin, the composition of pulping spent liquors, conversion of lignin into fine chemicals, utilization of lignin products, and physical and chemical properties of lignin and and derivatives are reviewed. (Refs 29).

  17. Extraction and characterization of original lignin and hemicelluloses from wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, RunCang; Fowler, Paul; Baird, Mark S

    2005-02-23

    Original lignin and hemicelluloses were sequentially extracted with high yield/purity, using acidic dioxane/water solution and dimethyl sulfoxide, from ball-milled wheat straw. The acidic dioxane lignin fraction is distinguished by high beta-O-4' structures and by low amounts of condensed units (beta-5', 5-5', and beta-1'). Hemicelluloses contain arabinoxylans as the major polysaccharides, which are substituted by alpha-l-arabinofuranose, 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, acetyl group (DS = 0.1), and xylose at O-3 and/or O-2 of xylans. It was found that arabinoxylans form cross-links with lignins through ferulates via ether bonds, glucuronic acid via ester bonds, and arbinose/xylose via both ether and glycosidic bonds, respectively, in the cell walls of wheat straw. Diferulates are also incorporated into cross-links between lignin and hemicelluloses as well as lignification of wheat straw cell walls. The guaiacyl unit is considered to be a significant condensed structural constructor in extracted lignin and a connector between lignin and carbohydrates.

  18. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  19. Modulating lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  20. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR

  1. Both phenolic and non-phenolic green tea fractionsinhibit migration of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ean-Jeong Seo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Green tea consumption is associated with chemoprevention of many cancer types. Fresh tea leaves are rich in polyphenolic catechins, which can constitute up to 30% of the dry leaf weight. While the polyphenols of green tea have been well investigated, it is still largely unknown, whether or not non-phenolic constituents also reveal chemopreventive and anti-metastatic effects.In this study, we investigated the effects of a fraction of green tea rich in phenolic compounds (PF, a non-phenolic fraction (NPF, which contains glyceroglycolipids (GGL, and a pure glyceroglycolipid compound isolated from the non-phenolic fraction in human cancer.Dried green tea leaves were extracted and applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column. The resazurin reduction assay was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of green tea samples towards human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and normal AML12 hepatocytes cells. Gene expression profiling was performed by mRNA microarray hybridization and the microarray results were validated by RT-PCR. The scratch migration assay was used to investigate the effects of green tea samples on cell migration in vitro. The changes of microtubule dynamics were observed using fluorescence microscopy.PF and NPF were prepared from methanol extract of green tea. A GGL was isolated from NPF. All three green tea samples did not show significant cytotoxic activity up to 10 µg/mL in both HepG2 and AML12 cells, whereas cytotoxicity of the control drug doxorubicin was observed with both cell lines (IC50 on AML12: 0.024 µg/mL, IC50 on HepG2: 2.103 µg/mL. We identified three sets of genes differentially expressed upon treatment with the green tea samples. The genes were associated with cytoskeleton formation, cellular movement and morphology. The correlation coefficients between mRNA expression values determined by microarray and RT-PCR were R = 0.94. HepG2 and U2OS cells treated with green tea extracts showed the delayed closures. Besides, the number of

  2. Analytical methodology for sulfonated lignins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brudin, S.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to characterize and classify lignins and sulfonated lignins. Lignins have so far received a good deal of attention, whereas this is not true for sulfonated lignins. There is a clear demand for a better understanding of sulfonated lignins on a chemical as well as physical

  3. Analytical methodology for sulfonated lignins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brudin, S.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to characterize and classify lignins and sulfonated lignins. Lignins have so far received a good deal of attention, whereas this is not true for sulfonated lignins. There is a clear demand for a better understanding of sulfonated lignins on a chemical as well as physical

  4. Physicochemical and structural characterization of alkali soluble lignins from oil palm trunk and empty fruit-bunch fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R; Fang, J M; Tomkinson, J; Bolton, J

    1999-07-01

    Six alkali soluble lignin fractions were extracted from the cell wall materials of oil palm trunk and empty fruit-bunch (EFB) fibers with 5% NaOH, 10% NaOH, and 24% KOH/2% H(3)BO(3). All of the lignin fractions contained rather low amounts of associated neutral sugars (0.8-1.2%) and uronic acids (1.1-2.0%). The lignin fractions isolated with 5% NaOH from the lignified palm trunk and EFB fibers gave a relatively higher degree of polymerization as shown by weight-average molecular weights ranging between 2620 and 2840, whereas the lignin fractions isolated with 10% NaOH and 24% KOH/2% H(3)BO(3) from the partially delignified palm trunk and EFB fibers showed a relatively lower degree of polymerization, as shown by weight-average molecular weights ranging between 1750 and 1980. The results obtained by alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation showed that all of the lignin preparations contained a high proportion of noncondensed syringyl units with small amounts of noncondensed guaiacyl and fewer p-hydroxyphenyl units. The lignin fraction extracted with 5% NaOH from the lignified EFB fiber was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether-linked units. Small amounts of 5-5', beta-5, and beta-beta' carbon-carbon linkages were also found to be present between the lignin structural units. Further studies showed that uronic, p-hydroxybenzoic, and ferulic acids in the cell walls of palm fibers were esterified to lignin.

  5. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  6. Function of the iron-binding chelator produced by Coriolus versicolor in lignin biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Yan, WenChao; Chen, JiaChuan; Huang, Feng; Gao, PeiJi

    2008-03-01

    An ultrafiltered low-molecular-weight preparation of chelating compounds was isolated from a wood-containing culture of the white-rot basidiomycete Coriolus versicolor. This preparation could chelate Fe3+ and reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+, demonstrating that the substance may serve as a ferric chelator, oxygen-reducing agent, and redox-cycling molecule, which would include functioning as the electron transport carrier in Fenton reaction. Lignin was treated with the iron-binding chelator and the changes in structure were investigated by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, difference spectrum caused by ionization under alkaline conditions and nitrobenzene oxidation. The results indicated that the iron-binding chelator could destroy the beta-O-4 bonds in etherified lignin units and insert phenolic hydroxyl groups. The low-molecular-weight chelator secreted by C. versicolor resulted in new phenolic substructures in the lignin polymer, making it susceptible to attack by laccase or manganese peroxidase. Thus, the synergic action of the iron-binding chelator and the lignocellulolytic enzymes made the substrate more accessible to degradation.

  7. Biotechnological modification of lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    A literature search of organisms capable of degrading lignin was conducted. Four fungi were selected for study and these were Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Chrysosporium pruinosum, Phlebia tremellosus and Trametes versicolor. Other organisms, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus florida and Lentinus edodes were also tested in preliminary experiments. All cultures were screened for their ability to degrade the lignin component of aspen sawdust and also lignin extracted from steam-exploded wood. This type of screen was followed by analysis of culture filtrates for the presence of ligninase, the marker enzyme for lignin degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium and consequently chosen for further studies in fermentors. Considerable efforts were directed to production of ligninase in fermentors. Only when Chrysosporium pruinosum was pre-cultured in a shake flask for 4 days and then transferred to a fermentor could ligninase activity be detected. The enzyme from shake flasks has been concentrated ready for use in bench-scale studies on cell-free depolymerization of lignin. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

  8. Lignin Sulfonation - A different Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørkmann, Anders

    2001-01-01

    . It was found that lignin is very reactive, that is why the sulfonation chemistry alone does not necessarily determine its dissolution rate. It became evident that the ultrastructure dispersion of lignin in wood is beneficial for its dissolution. For W, the rate was much higher at pH 1.5 than at 6. MW lignin...... and MWL dissolved (after extraction of the "immediate" lignin) at higher rates than W lignin. For MWL, the rate difference between pH 1.5 and 6 was moderate, compared to W lignin. Borohydride reduction did not affect the lignin dissolution from W, but gave a large decrease of sulfonation rate for MWL...

  9. Through Lignin Biodegradation to Lignin-based Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Yan

    The consequences of strong noncovalent intermolecular interactions between oligomeric and/or polymeric lignin components are encountered during enzyme-catalyzed lignin degradation and in the properties of lignin-based plastics. A new chapter in the 30-year quest for functional lignin-depolymerizing enzymes has been opened. The lignin-degrading capacity of the flavin-dependent monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase acting as a putative lignin depolymerase, has been characterized using a water-soluble native softwood lignin substrate under mildly acidic aqueous conditions. When macromolecular lignins undergo lignin-depolymerase catalyzed degradation, the cleaved components tend to associate with one another, or with nearby associated lignin complexes, through processes mediated by the enzyme acting in a non-catalytic capacity. As a result, the radius of gyration (Rg) falls rapidly to approximately constant values, while the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of the substrate rises more slowly to an extent dependent on enzyme concentration. Xylanase, when employed in an auxiliary capacity, is able to facilitate dissociation of the foregoing complexes through its interactions with the lignin depolymerase. The flavin-dependent lignin depolymerase must be reduced before reaction with oxygen can occur to form the hydroperoxy intermediate that hydroxylates the lignin substrate prior to cleavage. In the absence of the cofactor, NADH, the necessary reducing power can be provided (albeit more slowly) by the lignin substrate itself. Under such conditions, a simultaneous decrease in R g and Mw is initially observed during the enzymatic process through which the lignin is cleaved. The partially degraded product-lignins arising from lignin depolymerase activity can be readily converted into polymeric materials with mechanical properties that supersede those of polystyrene. Methylation and blending of ball-milled softwood lignins with miscible low-Tg polymers, or simple low

  10. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  11. Lignin-Based Thermoplastic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Kelley, Stephen S; Venditti, Richard A

    2016-04-21

    Lignin-based thermoplastic materials have attracted increasing interest as sustainable, cost-effective, and biodegradable alternatives for petroleum-based thermoplastics. As an amorphous thermoplastic material, lignin has a relatively high glass-transition temperature and also undergoes radical-induced self-condensation at high temperatures, which limits its thermal processability. Additionally, lignin-based materials are usually brittle and exhibit poor mechanical properties. To improve the thermoplasticity and mechanical properties of technical lignin, polymers or plasticizers are usually integrated with lignin by blending or chemical modification. This Review attempts to cover the reported approaches towards the development of lignin-based thermoplastic materials on the basis of published information. Approaches reviewed include plasticization, blending with miscible polymers, and chemical modifications by esterification, etherification, polymer grafting, and copolymerization. Those lignin-based thermoplastic materials are expected to show applications as engineering plastics, polymeric foams, thermoplastic elastomers, and carbon-fiber precursors.

  12. Lignin biodegradation and industrial implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulose, which comprises the cell walls of plants, is the Earth’s most abundant renewable source of convertible biomass. However, in order to access the fermentable sugars of the cellulose and hemicellulose fraction, the extremely recalcitrant lignin heteropolymer must be hydrolyzed and removed—usually by harsh, costly thermochemical pretreatments. Biological processes for depolymerizing and metabolizing lignin present an opportunity to improve the overall economics of the lignocellulosic biorefinery by facilitating pretreatment, improving downstream cellulosic fermentations or even producing a valuable effluent stream of aromatic compounds for creating value-added products. In the following review we discuss background on lignin, the enzymology of lignin degradation, and characterized catabolic pathways for metabolizing the by-products of lignin degradation. To conclude we survey advances in approaches to identify novel lignin degrading phenotypes and applications of these phenotypes in the lignocellulosic bioprocess.

  13. Lignin as renewable raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Flores, Francisco García; Dobado, José A

    2010-11-22

    Lignin is by far the most abundant substance based on aromatic moieties in nature, and the largest contributor to soil organic matter. Millions of tonnes of several lignin preparations are produced by the paper industry every year, and a minimal amount of lignin is isolated by direct extraction of lignin from plants. Lignin is used either directly or chemically modified, as a binder, dispersant agent for pesticides, emulsifier, heavy metal sequestrant, or component for composites and copolymers. For value-added applications of lignin to be improved, medium- and long-term conversion technologies must be developed, especially for the preparation of low-molecular-weight compounds as an alternative to the petrochemical industry.

  14. Lignin Sulfonation - A different Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørkmann, Anders

    2001-01-01

    . It was found that lignin is very reactive, that is why the sulfonation chemistry alone does not necessarily determine its dissolution rate. It became evident that the ultrastructure dispersion of lignin in wood is beneficial for its dissolution. For W, the rate was much higher at pH 1.5 than at 6. MW lignin....... Methylation had also a small rate effect for W, but again a large decrease for MWL....

  15. Lignin Valorization: Improving Lignin Processing in the Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Beckham, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Biddy, Mary J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Chandra, Richard [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, Fang [University of North Texas; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Dixon, Richard [University of North Texas; Gilna, Paul [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Langan, Paul [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Saddler, Jack N [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Wyman, Charles E, [University of California, Riverside; Harber, Karen S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Research and development activities directed toward commercial production of cellulosic ethanol have created the opportunity to dramatically increase the transformation of lignin to value-added products. Here we highlight recent advances in this lignin valorization effort. Discovery of genetic variants in native populations of bioenergy crops and direct manipulation of biosynthesis pathways have produced lignin feedstocks with favorable properties for recovery and downstream conversion. Advances in analytical chemistry and computational modeling detail the structure of the modified lignin and direct bioengineering strategies for future targeted properties. Refinement of biomass pretreatment technologies has further facilitated lignin recovery, and this coupled with genetic engineering will enable new uses for this biopolymer, including low-cost carbon fibers, engineered plastics and thermoplastic elastomers, polymeric foams, fungible fuels, and commodity chemicals.

  16. Transition metal catalyzed oxidation of Alcell lignin, soda lignin, and lignin model compounds in ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326160256; Jongerius, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325840202; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a component of lignocellulosic biomass from which important aromatic compounds can potentially be obtained. In the present work, Alcell and soda lignin were dissolved in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate (EMIM DEP) and subsequently oxidized using several transit

  17. Transition metal catalyzed oxidation of Alcell lignin, soda lignin, and lignin model compounds in ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326160256; Jongerius, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325840202; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a component of lignocellulosic biomass from which important aromatic compounds can potentially be obtained. In the present work, Alcell and soda lignin were dissolved in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate (EMIM DEP) and subsequently oxidized using several

  18. Polymerization of different lignins by laccase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattinen, M.L.; Suortti, T.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Argyropoulos, D.S.; Evtuguin, D.; Suurnäkki, A.; Jong, de E.; Tamminen, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the oxidative polymerization of different lignins, i.e. Flax Soda lignin, Spruce EMAL, and Eucalyptus Dioxane lignin by Trametes hirsuta laccase was compared. Initially the structures of the different lignins were compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of l

  19. Kraft lignin biorefinery: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-09-01

    Lignin is a huge energy and carbon reserve but owing to its highly biologically recalcitrant nature it is commonly regarded as a waste in lignocellulosic biomass biorefinery. To realize the lignin biorefinery, it is proposed to use Kraft lignin, isolated from black liquor from Kraft pulping mills, as starting material to be fragmented by fast pyrolysis or selective catalysis to aromatic sub-units and to be post-refining with additional cleavage reaction and separation/purification as commodity aromatics pool in chemical industries. This Note calls for research efforts on detailed investigation of the feasibility of this proposed scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  1. Mechanochemical modification of lignin and application of the modified lignin for thermoplastics and thermosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Zhang, Jinwen; Xin, Junna

    In this work, mechanochemical modification of lignin and use of the modified lignin in thermoplastics and thermosets were studied. Oleated lignin was successfully prepared by transesterification between lignin and methyl, and the oleation reaction was performed in a solvent-free and room temperature ball milling process with a relatively short time. PLA/lignin blends were prepared through melt extrusion. Compared with the PLA/lignin blends, the PLA/oleated lignin blends exhibited finer dispersion of lignin in the blends, increased glass transition temperature and higher tensile properties, suggesting improved compatibility between lignin and PLA. Carboxylic and anhydride groups were also introduced into the structure of lignin via mechanochemical modification, and the resulting lignin derivatives were used as curing agents for epoxies. The dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability of the cured epoxy resins were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  2. Lignin biosynthesis and its molecular regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Lignin biosynthesis has become increasingly highlighted because it plays an important role in the growth and development of plant, in the systematic evolution of plant and in the human life. Due to the progress in the field of lignin studies in recent years, the lignin biosynthesis pathway has been 修订日期:. Here we discuss some genetic engineering approaches on lignin biosynthesis, and conceive strategy to regulate lignin biosynthesis in order to use lignin resource more efficiently in agricultural and industrial productions.

  3. Preparation and Analysis of Biomass Lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    Lignin, comprised primarily of three randomly polymerized phenylpropenyl monomers, is, arguably, the second most common organic molecule on earth. In current biorefinery applications, lignin is burned, usually in concentrated pulping or hydrolysis liquor, as a source of process steam and both internal and exported electricity. The aromatic content of lignin makes it a potentially attractive feedstock for high-value aromatic chemicals, polymers, and carbon products (graphite, activated carbon, and carbon fiber). Revenue from production of lignin-based chemicals could play a major role in biorefinery profitability if cost-effective methods for lignin separation and purification can be developed. This chapter presents descriptions of methods for assessing and purifying biorefinery lignins so that they can be evaluated for use as feedstock for production of chemical products. Areas covered are: (1) initial evaluations of as-received lignin samples (visual, microscopic, separable organics); (2) analysis of common contaminants (bulk and filterable ash and particulate contaminants in liquid and dry lignin samples); (3) preparation of lignins for experimental use as chemical feedstock (prefiltration, filtration using bench-scale chemical apparatus and larger scale bag filters, one-step lignin precipitation, two-step carbohydrate and lignin precipitation, desalting of dry powdered or precipitated lignin, and lyophilization). These methods have been used successfully at the bench scale to produce the 1-50 kg amounts of wood and grass lignins typically required for bench-scale assessment as chemical feedstocks.

  4. Does elevated N make lignin more recalcitrant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, M. N.; Rinkes, Z. L.; Grandy, S.; Wickings, K.; Bertrand, I.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in nitrogen (N) availability are often found to reduce decomposition rates of lignin-rich plant litter. However, the biological and chemical mechanisms that cause this inhibitory effect are still unclear. Our goal was to determine why increased N availability inhibits lignin decomposition. We tested two competing hypotheses: 1) decomposers degrade lignin to obtain protected N compounds and stop producing lignin-degrading enzymes if mineral N is available; or 2) chemical reactions between lignin and mineral N make lignin more recalcitrant, thereby limiting the ability of decomposers to break it down. To test these hypotheses, we followed changes in carbon (C) mineralization, microbial biomass and enzyme activities, litter chemistry, and lignin monomer concentrations over a 478-day laboratory incubation of three genotypes of maize stem internodes varying in litter quality. They were factorially combined with either an acidic or neutral pH sandy soil, with and without added N. Adding N reduced C mineralization, microbial biomass, and lignin-degrading enzyme activities in all treatments. Furthermore, our data on litter chemistry and lignin monomers indicate that N addition did not significantly alter the quantity or quality of lignin in any treatment. These results suggest that abiotic interactions between N and lignin compounds did not alter the ability of decomposers to breakdown lignin. Thus, we conclude that mineral N alters microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics, but not lignin chemistry during maize decomposition.

  5. Catalytic efficiency of natural and synthetic compounds used as laccase-mediators in oxidising veratryl alcohol and a kraft lignin, estimated by electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Arzola, K. [Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arevalo, M.C. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: carevalo@ull.es; Falcon, M.A. [Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: mafalcon@ull.es

    2009-03-30

    The electrochemical properties of eighteen natural and synthetic compounds commonly used to expand the oxidative capacity of laccases were evaluated in an aqueous buffered medium using cyclic voltammetry. This clarifies which compounds fulfil the requisites to be considered as redox mediators or enhancers. Cyclic voltammetry was also applied as a rapid way to assess the catalytic efficiency (CE) of those compounds which oxidise a non-phenolic lignin model (veratryl alcohol, VA) and a kraft lignin (KL). With the exception of gallic acid and catechol, all assayed compounds were capable of oxidising VA with varying CE. However, only some of them were able to oxidise KL. Although the oxidised forms of HBT and acetovanillone were not electrochemically stable, their reduced forms were quickly regenerated in the presence of VA. They thus act as chemical catalysts. Importantly, HBT and HPI did not attack the KL via the same mechanism as in VA oxidation. Electrochemical evidence suggests that violuric acid oxidises both substrates by an electron transfer mechanism, unlike the other N-OH compounds HBT and HPI. Acetovanillone was found to be efficient in oxidising VA and KL, even better than the synthetic mediators TEMPO, violuric acid or ABTS. Most of the compounds produced a generalised increase in the oxidative charge of KL, probably attributed to chain reactions arising between the phenolic and non-phenolic components of this complex molecule.

  6. Unravelling lignin formation and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, N.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    During this study, we established that the Fagaceae exclusively accumulate Z-monolignois/glucosides, and not the E-isomers. Evidence for the presence of a novel E{yields}Z isomerse has been obtained. Our pioneering work in lignin biosynthesis and structure in situ has also progressed smoothly. We established the bonding environments of a woody angiosperm, Leucanea leucocephala, as well as wheat (T. aestivum) and tobacco (N. tabacum). A cell culture system from Pinus taeda was developed which seems ideal for investigating the early stages of lignification. These cultures excrete peroxidase isozymes, considered to be specifically involved in lignin deposition. We also studied the effect of the putative lignin-degrading enzyme, lignin peroxidase, on monolignols and dehydropolymerisates therefrom. In all cases, polymerization was observed, and not degradation; these polymers are identical to that obtained with horseradish peroxidases/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It seems inconceivable that these enzymes can be considered as being primarily responsible for lignin biodegradation.

  7. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  8. Photodegradation of Acidolysis Lignin from BCMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jahan Latibari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A mild acidic dioxane extraction method was employed to isolate lignin from hardwood bleached chemimechanical pulp (BCMP. The isolated lignin was then purified and undergone elemental analysis. To study the photodegradation behavior, the lignin samples were impregnated onto the Whatman filter papers and irradiated with UV light for various periods. The photolyzed lignin was then recovered and analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Phenylpropane-based formula (C9 of CMP pulp lignin and the photolyzed samples were then established with elemental analysis and 1H-NMR spectroscopy data. The results indicated that the benzaldehyde and benzoic acid type compounds were the main photodegradation products of BCMP lignin. The lignin photodegradation probably involved the degradation of phenylcoumaran units. Irradiation also increased the phenolic hydroxyl group content and decreased that of methoxyl groups, due to demethoxylation. The degrees of aromatic ring condensation were increased upon continuing the irradiation time, which imples the formation of condensed structures in photolyzed lignin.

  9. Lignin analysis by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, U.P.; Obst, J.R.; Cannon, A.B. [USDA Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Traditional methods of lignin analysis, such as Klason (acid insoluble) lignin determinations, give satisfactory results, are widely accepted, and often are considered as standard analyses. However, the Klason lignin method is laborious and time consuming; it also requires a fairly large-amount of isolated analyte. FT-Raman spectroscopy offers an opportunity to simplify and speed up lignin analyses. FT-Raman data for a number of hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms) are compared with data obtained using other analytical methods, including Klason lignin (with corrections for acid soluble lignin), acetyl bromide, and FT-IR determinations. In addition, 10 different specimens of Nothofagus dombeyii (chosen because of the widely varying syringyl:guaiacyl monomer compositions of their lignins) were also analyzed. Lignin monomer compositions were determined by thioacidolysis of by nitrobenzene oxidation.

  10. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  11. Photodegradation of acidolysis lignin from BCMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadfallah, Mohammad; Mirshokraei, Seyed Ahmad; Latibari, Ahmad Jahan

    2008-12-15

    A mild acidic dioxane extraction method was employed to isolate lignin from hardwood bleached chemimechanical pulp (BCMP). The isolated lignin was then purified and undergone elemental analysis. To study the photodegradation behavior, the lignin samples were impregnated onto the Whatman filter papers and irradiated with UV light for various periods. The photolyzed lignin was then recovered and analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Phenylpropane-based formula (C(9)) of CMP pulp lignin and the photolyzed samples were then established with elemental analysis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy data. The results indicated that the benzaldehyde and benzoic acid type compounds were the main photodegradation products of BCMP lignin. The lignin photodegradation probably involved the degradation of phenylcoumaran units. Irradiation also increased the phenolic hydroxyl group content and decreased that of methoxyl groups, due to demethoxylation. The degrees of aromatic ring condensation were increased upon continuing the irradiation time, which imples the formation of condensed structures in photolyzed lignin.

  12. Lignin degradation during plant litter photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; King, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant compound, after cellulose, synthesized by plants. Numerous studies have demonstrated that initial lignin concentration is negatively correlated with litter decomposition rate under both laboratory and field conditions. Thus lignin is commonly considered to be a "recalcitrant" compound during litter decomposition. However, lignin can also serve as a radiation-absorbing compound during photodegradation, the process through which solar radiation breaks down organic matter. Here, we synthesize recent studies concerning lignin degradation during litter photodegradation and report results from our study on how photodegradation changes lignin chemistry at a molecular scale. Recent field studies have found that litter with high initial lignin concentration does not necessarily exhibit high mass loss during photodegradation. A meta-analysis (King et al. 2012) even found a weak negative correlation between initial lignin concentration and photodegradation rate. Contradicting results have been reported with regard to the change in lignin concentration during photodegradation. Some studies have found significant loss of lignin during photodegradation, while others have not. In most studies, loss of lignin only accounts for a small proportion of the overall mass loss. Using NMR spectroscopy, we found significant loss of lignin structural units containing beta-aryl ether linkages during photodegradation of a common grass litter, Bromus diandrus, even though conventional forage fiber analysis did not reveal changes in lignin concentration. Both our NMR and fiber analyses supported the idea that photodegradation induced loss of hemicellulose, which was mainly responsible for the litter mass loss during photodegradation. Our results suggest that photodegradation induces degradation, but not necessarily complete breakdown, of lignin structures and consequently exposes hemicellulose and cellulose to microbial decomposition. We conclude that lignin

  13. Redox Catalysis Facilitates Lignin Depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque, Irene; Magallanes, Gabriel; Rigoulet, Mathilde; Kärkäs, Markus D; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2017-06-28

    Lignin is a recalcitrant and underexploited natural feedstock for aromatic commodity chemicals, and its degradation generally requires the use of high temperatures and harsh reaction conditions. Herein we present an ambient temperature one-pot process for the controlled oxidation and depolymerization of this potent resource. Harnessing the potential of electrocatalytic oxidation in conjugation with our photocatalytic cleavage methodology, we have developed an operationally simple procedure for selective fragmentation of β-O-4 bonds with excellent mass recovery, which provides a unique opportunity to expand the existing lignin usage from energy source to commodity chemicals and synthetic building block source.

  14. Lignin biopolymer based triboelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yukai; Wang, Ruoxing; Lu, Yunmei; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-07-01

    Ongoing research in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) focuses on increasing power generation, but obstacles concerning economical and eco-friendly utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, lignin offers a valuable opportunity for low-cost TENG applications in biomedical devices, benefitting from its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we develop for the first time a lignin biopolymer based TENGs for harvesting mechanical energy in the environment, which shows great potential for self-powered biomedical devices among other applications and opens doors to new technologies that utilize otherwise wasted materials for economically feasible and ecologically friendly production of energy devices.

  15. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  16. Lignin Valorization using Heterogenous Catalytic Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Kegnæs, Søren

    is complex so different model compounds are often used to study lignin valorization. These model compounds contain the linkages present in lignin, simplifying catalytic analysis and present analytical challenges related to the study of the complicated lignin polymer and the plethora of products that could...

  17. Lignin pyrolysis for profitable lignocellulosic biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based industries (pulp and paper and biorefineries) produce > 50 Mt/yr of lignin that results from fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is world's second biopolymer and a major potential source for production of performance materials and aromatic chemicals. Lignin valorization is

  18. Disinfection byproduct formation from lignin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guanghui; Kim, Junsung; Reckhow, David A

    2014-10-15

    Lignin is the most abundant aromatic plant component in terrestrial ecosystems. This study was conducted to determine the contribution of lignin residues in natural water to the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water. We investigated the formation of different classes of DBPs from lignin model compounds, lignin polymers, and humic substances using two common disinfection techniques, chlorination and chloramination. The contributions of lignin to the overall formation of DBPs from these organic products were determined based on the observed abundances of individual lignin phenols and their DBP yields. Model lignin phenols generally produced higher trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) yields than chloroform and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) during chlorination. Lignin phenols generally produced higher DBP yields but lower percentages of unknown total organic halogen compared to bulk humic substances and lignin polymers. The relative significance of lignin phenols as chlorination DBP precursors generally follows the order of TCAA > DCAA&chloroform. The relative significance of lignin phenols to DBP formation by chloramination follows the order: TCAA > DCAA&DCAN > chloroform. Overall, lignin phenols are more important as TCAA precursors than as chloroform and DCAA precursors.

  19. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating material

  20. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  1. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating material

  2. POLYMERIZATION OF DIFFERENT LIGNINS BY LACCASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija-Liisa Mattinen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the oxidative polymerization of different lignins, i.e. Flax Soda lignin, Spruce EMAL, and Eucalyptus Dioxane lignin by Trametes hirsuta laccase was compared. Initially the structures of the different lignins were compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of laccase with the different types of lignins in the absence of mediators was examined and verified by oxygen consumption measurements. The molecular weight distributions of treated and untreated lignins were determined by two different size exclusion chromatography methods. Furthermore, the potential of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight-mass spectroscopy for determination of the absolute molecular weights of the different lignins was evaluated. The data showed that all the technical lignins could be activated and polymerized by laccase to different degrees. The efficiency as indicated by measurements of the degree of polymerization was found to increase in the order of Spruce EMAL < Eucalyptus Dioxane lignin < Flax Soda lignin. Overall, this data supplies foundations for using enzymes more efficiently in the enzymatic upgrading of lignin.

  3. Occurrence of naturally acetylated lignin units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, José C; Marques, Gisela; Rencoret, Jorge; Martínez, Angel T; Gutiérrez, Ana

    2007-07-11

    This work examines the occurrence of native acetylated lignin in a large set of vascular plants, including both angiosperms and gymnosperms, by a modification of the so-called Derivatization Followed by Reductive Cleavage (DFRC) method. Acetylated lignin units were found in the milled wood lignins of all angiosperms selected for this study, including mono- and eudicotyledons, but were absent in the gymnosperms analyzed. In some plants (e.g., abaca, sisal, kenaf, or hornbeam), lignin acetylation occurred at a very high extent, exceeding 45% of the uncondensed (alkyl-aryl ether linked) syringyl lignin units. Acetylation was observed exclusively at the gamma-carbon of the lignin side chain and predominantly on syringyl units, although a predominance of acetylated guaiacyl over syringyl units was observed in some plants. In all cases, acetylation appears to occur at the monomer stage, and sinapyl and coniferyl acetates seem to behave as real lignin monomers participating in lignification.

  4. COMMERCIAL VIABILITY ANALYSIS OF LIGNIN BASED CARBON FIBRE

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a rich renewable source of aromatic compounds. As a potentialpetroleum feedstock replacement, lignin can reduce environmental impacts such ascarbon emission. Due to its complex chemical structure, lignin is currently underutilized.Exploiting lignin as a precursor for carbon fibre adds high economic value to lignin andencourages further development in lignin extraction technology. This report includes apreliminary cost analysis and identifies the key aspects of lignin-based carbon fi...

  5. Lignin phenols derivatives in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzina, A G; Romankevich, E A; Peresypkin, V I; Ulyantzev, A S; Belyaev, N A; Zavarzin, A A

    2015-01-01

    Lignin monophenols have been measured in the cupric oxide oxidation products from lichens of different systematic groups. It is shown for the first time that syringyl structures in most lichens strongly dominate over vanillyl and p-hydroxyl ones (S/V 7-583, S/P 3-30). This distinguishes lichens from algae and mosses (p-hydroxyl phenols are dominant) and from higher plants (S/V ratios are from 0 in gymnosperms to 1.1-5.2 in angiosperms). Molecular ratios of phenols as well as the ratios of acids to aldehydes in lichens were different from lignin of higher plants, suggesting contribution of non-lignin phenols in CuO oxidation products. The contents of syringyl and vanillyl phenols in some lichen species were comparable to non-woody tissues of higher plants. Results of the study suggest that lichens can be important source of aromatic structures in soils and hydrosphere, particularly in the regions were lichens are abundant.

  6. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK(-1) , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m(-3) (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-07

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications

    OpenAIRE

    Falade, Ayodeji O.; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.; Iweriebor, Benson C.; Green, Ezekiel; Leonard V. Mabinya; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non‐phe...

  9. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  10. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference.

  11. Valorization of Lignin to Simple Phenolic Compounds over Tungsten Carbide: Impact of Lignin Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haiwei; Zhang, Bo; Qi, Zaojuan; Li, Changzhi; Ji, Jianwei; Dai, Tao; Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2017-02-08

    Lignins isolated from representative hardwood, softwood, and grass materials were effectively hydrocracked to aromatics catalyzed by tungsten carbide over activated carbon (W2 C/AC). The effects of botanical species and fractionation methods on lignin structure and the activity of W2 C/AC were studied in detail. Gas permeation chromatography (GPC), FTIR, elemental analysis, and 2 D HSQC NMR showed that all the extracted samples shared the basic skeleton of lignin, whereas the fractionation method significantly affected the structure. The organosolv process provided lignin with a structure more similar to the native lignin, which was labile to be depolymerized by W2 C/AC. Softwood lignins (i.e., spruce and pine) possessed higher molecular weights than hardwood lignins (i.e., poplar and basswood); whereas corn stalk lignin that has noncanonical subunits and exhibited the lowest molecular weight owing to its shorter growth period. β-O-4 bonds were the major linkages in all lignin samples, whereas softwood lignins contained more resistant linkages of β-5 and less β-β than corn stalk and hardwood lignins; as a result, lowest hydrocracking efficiency was obtained in softwood lignins, followed by corn stalk and hardwood lignins. 2 D HSQC NMR spectra of lignin and the liquid oil as well as the solid residue showed that W2 C/AC exhibited high activity not only in β-O-4 cleavage, but also in deconstruction of other ether linkages between aromatic units, so that high yield of liquid oil was obtained from lignin. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Studies on the photochemistry of 1,7-diphenyl-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, a non-phenolic curcuminoid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaryono, Agus; Nourmamode, Aziz; Gardrat, Christian; Grelier, Stéphane; Bravic, Georges; Chasseau, Daniel; Castellan, Alain

    2003-09-01

    The comparative photostability of curcumin 1, and two non-phenolic curcuminoids: 1,7-diphenyl-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione 2 (unsubstituted curcumin) and dimethylcurcumin 3 in non-degassed dilute solutions (approximately 3-5 x 10(-5) mol l(-1)) has been established by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy; disappearance quantum yields were measured. The similar behavior of the three studied curcuminoids is indicative of only a moderate role of phenol groups in the photodegradation process. Structural analysis of the photodegradation products of compound 2 in more concentrated solution (approximately 3.6 x 10(-3) mol l(-1)) shows formation of benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, 2'-hydroxy-5',6'-benzochalcone 4, flavanone 5 and some other unidentified photoproducts. Flavanone 5 is formed by irradiation of chalcone 4. It represents a unique example of photochemical conversion of a diarylheptanoid molecule into a flavonoid, another very important class of natural products.

  13. Performance characterization of rigid polyurethane foam with refined alkali lignin and modified alkali lignin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-ming; YU Fei; FANG Gui-zhen; YANG Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    The two kinds of rigid polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared with respectively adding the refined alkali lignin and alkali lignin modified by 3-chloro-1,2-epoxypropane to be instead of 15% of the polyether glycol in weight. The indexes of mechanical performance, apparent density, thermal stability and aging resistance were separately tested for the prepared PU foams. The results show that the mechanical property, thermal insulation and thermal stability for PU foam with modified alkali lignin are excellent among two kinds of PU foams and control samples. The additions of the refined alkali lignin and modified alkali lignin to PU foam have little effect on the natural aging or heat aging resistance except for decreasing hot alkali resistance apparently. Additionally, the thermal conductivity of modified alkali lignin PU foam is lowest among two kinds of PU foams and control samples. The alkali lignin PU foam modified by 3-chloro-1,2-epoxypropane could be applied in the heat preservation field.

  14. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)p

  15. Effects of lignin on nitrification in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effects of two lignins isolated from black liquor from pulping process on nitrification in soils after addition of urea, (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)2HPO4 were investigated by incubation at 20 or 30℃ for 7 or 14d. The effects of lignin on nitrous oxide emissions from soil were also determined. Results showed that both lignins were more effective for inhibiting nitrification of NH4+-N as (NH4)2SO4 or (NH4)2HPO4 as compared to urea-N. The effectiveness of lignin on nitrification was markedly affected by different soil type and temperature. Nitrous oxide emissions from soil declined when lignin was used. Urea plus 20 and 50 g/kg lignin reduced N2O emissions by about 83% and 96%, respectively, while (NH4)2HPO4 plus 20 and 50 g/kg lignin respectively reduced emissions by 83% and 93%. Because of its low cost and nonhazardous characteristics, lignin has potential value as a fertilizer amendment to improve N fertilizer efficiency.

  16. Structural elucidation of inhomogeneous lignins from bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Long; Xue, Bai-Liang; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the inhomogeneous molecular structure of lignin from bamboo is a prerequisite for promoting the "biorefinery" technologies of the bamboo feedstock. A mild and successive method for fractionating native lignin from bamboo species was proposed in the present study. The molecular structure and structural inhomogeneity of the isolated lignin polymers were comprehensively investigated by elemental analysis, carbohydrate analysis, state-of-the-art NMR and analytical pyrolysis techniques (quantitative (13)C NMR, (13)C-DEPT 135 NMR, 2D-HSQC NMR, (31)P NMR, and pyrolysis-GC-MS). The results showed that the proposed method is effective for extracting lignin from bamboo. NMR results showed that syringyl (S) was the predominant unit in bamboo lignin over guaiacyl (G) and p-hydroxyphenyl (H) units. In addition, the lignin was associated with p-coumarates and ferulates via ester and ether bonds, respectively. Moreover, various substructures, such as β-O-4, β-β, β-5, β-1, and α,β-diaryl ether linkages, were identified and quantified by NMR techniques. Based on the results obtained, a proposed schematic diagram of structural heterogeneity of the lignin polymers extracted from the bamboo is presented. In short, well-defined inhomogeneous structures of native lignin from bamboo will facilitate further applications of bamboo in current biorefineries.

  17. Fabrication of Environmentally Biodegradable Lignin Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangville, C.; Rutkevicius, M.; Richter, A.P.; Velev, O.D.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The fi

  18. Can laccases catalyze bond cleavage in lignin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna; Kalyani, Dayanand

    2015-01-01

    Modification of lignin is recognized as an important aspect of the successful refining of lignocellulosic biomass, and enzyme-assisted processing and upcycling of lignin is receiving significant attention in the literature. Laccases (EC 1.103.2) are taking the centerstage of this attention, since...... is proposed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  19. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the

  20. Biodegradation of lignin by Agaricus Bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vane, C.H.; Abbott, G.D.; Head, I.M. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The lignolytic activity of Agaricus bisporus will be addressed in this paper. Sound and fungally degraded lignins were characterized by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FnR) and elemental analysis. Fungally degraded lignins displayed increased wt%N, wt%H and wt%O content and decreased wt%C content The FTIR spectrum of decayed lignin showed an increase in the relative intensity of absorption bands assigned to carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups located on the aliphatic side chain and a decrease in absorption bands assigned to aromatic skeletal vibration modes. Semiquantitative Py-GC-MS revealed an 82% decrease in lignin derived pyrolysis products upon biodegradation. No significant increase in pyrolysis products with an oxygenated aliphatic side chain were detected in the fungally degraded lignin however shortening of the aliphatic side chain via cleavage at the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} positions was observed.

  1. Lignin biomass conversion into chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra

    % of the weight and 40% of the energy content of lignocellulosic biomass. While designated applications for cellulose already exist in form of the current pulp and paper production as well as its prospective hydrolysis and fermentation into biofuels (mainly bioethanol), sustainable ways to valorize the lignin...... fraction of wood are yet to be established, due to its poor solubility and complex heterogeneous structure. This constitutes a major drawback in the economic viability of a biorefinery, where complete valorization of lignocellulosic biomass is necessary. For this reason, and due to its potential...... as a valuable feedstock for the production of organic chemicals, lignin valorization has become an important issue to solve. For a better understanding and analysis of the catalytic performance of lignin, it is common to use lignin model compounds, which contain the most significant linkages present in lignin...

  2. Opportunities and challenges in biological lignin valorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Johnson, Christopher W; Karp, Eric M; Salvachúa, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R

    2016-12-01

    Lignin is a primary component of lignocellulosic biomass that is an underutilized feedstock in the growing biofuels industry. Despite the fact that lignin depolymerization has long been studied, the intrinsic heterogeneity of lignin typically leads to heterogeneous streams of aromatic compounds, which in turn present significant technical challenges when attempting to produce lignin-derived chemicals where purity is often a concern. In Nature, microorganisms often encounter this same problem during biomass turnover wherein powerful oxidative enzymes produce heterogeneous slates of aromatics compounds. Some microbes have evolved metabolic pathways to convert these aromatic species via 'upper pathways' into central intermediates, which can then be funneled through 'lower pathways' into central carbon metabolism in a process we dubbed 'biological funneling'. This funneling approach offers a direct, biological solution to overcome heterogeneity problems in lignin valorization for the modern biorefinery. Coupled to targeted separations and downstream chemical catalysis, this concept offers the ability to produce a wide range of molecules from lignin. This perspective describes research opportunities and challenges ahead for this new field of research, which holds significant promise towards a biorefinery concept wherein polysaccharides and lignin are treated as equally valuable feedstocks. In particular, we discuss tailoring the lignin substrate for microbial utilization, host selection for biological funneling, ligninolytic enzyme-microbe synergy, metabolic engineering, expanding substrate specificity for biological funneling, and process integration, each of which presents key challenges. Ultimately, for biological solutions to lignin valorization to be viable, multiple questions in each of these areas will need to be addressed, making biological lignin valorization a multidisciplinary, co-design problem.

  3. Opportunities and challenges in biological lignin valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Karp, Eric M.; Salvachúa, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R.

    2016-12-01

    Lignin is a primary component of lignocellulosic biomass that is an underutilized feedstock in the growing biofuels industry. Despite the fact that lignin depolymerization has long been studied, the intrinsic heterogeneity of lignin typically leads to heterogeneous streams of aromatic compounds, which in turn present significant technical challenges when attempting to produce lignin-derived chemicals where purity is often a concern. In Nature, microorganisms often encounter this same problem during biomass turnover wherein powerful oxidative enzymes produce heterogeneous slates of aromatics compounds. Some microbes have evolved metabolic pathways to convert these aromatic species via ‘upper pathways’ into central intermediates, which can then be funneled through ‘lower pathways’ into central carbon metabolism in a process we dubbed ‘biological funneling’. This funneling approach offers a direct, biological solution to overcome heterogeneity problems in lignin valorization for the modern biorefinery. Coupled to targeted separations and downstream chemical catalysis, this concept offers the ability to produce a wide range of molecules from lignin. This perspective describes research opportunities and challenges ahead for this new field of research, which holds significant promise towards a biorefinery concept wherein polysaccharides and lignin are treated as equally valuable feedstocks. In particular, we discuss tailoring the lignin substrate for microbial utilization, host selection for biological funneling, ligninolytic enzyme–microbe synergy, metabolic engineering, expanding substrate specificity for biological funneling, and process integration, each of which presents key challenges. Ultimately, for biological solutions to lignin valorization to be viable, multiple questions in each of these areas will need to be addressed, making biological lignin valorization a multidisciplinary, co-design problem.

  4. CHEMICAL AND THERMAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THREE INDUSTRIAL LIGNINS AND THEIR CORRESPONDING LIGNIN ESTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Carter Fox

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Corn stover and rice straw lignin samples received from ethanol pilot plants, along with softwood kraft lignin samples, were characterized using pyrolysis GC-MS, 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, and permanganate oxidation degradation. The lignins were then esterified using 1-methylimidazole as a catalyst in a pyridine-free reaction, and the thermal properties of the products were evaluated. Solid state NMR showed the rice straw lignin contained 18% residual polysaccharides. Pyrolysis GC-MS showed the softwood kraft, corn stover, and rice straw lignins to be G – type, H/G/S – type, and G/S – type, respectively. However, some discrepancy was apparent between the pyrolysis and permanganate oxidation studies as to the ratios of the monomeric make-up of the lignins. The kraft and rice straw lignins were determined to have high degrees of condensation, while the corn stover lignin was uncondensed. Little to no increase in solubility was noticed for corn stover or rice straw lignin esters in organic solvents. Glass transition temperatures (Tg of the lignin derivatives were determined by a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and parallel plate rheometry.

  5. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  6. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; Klis, van der F.; Es, van D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilising lignin using liquid ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilise technical lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A commercial pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temperature and 7–11

  7. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; van der Klis, F.; van Es, D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilizing lignin using liq. ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilize tech. lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A com. pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temp. and 7-​11 bars autogenous

  8. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-05-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 - 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  9. Lignin from Micro- to Nanosize: Production Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisl, Stefan; Miltner, Angela; Friedl, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose. It has long been obtained as a by-product of cellulose production in pulp and paper production, but had rather low added-value applications. A changing paper market and the emergence of biorefinery projects should generate vast amounts of lignin with the potential of value addition. Nanomaterials offer unique properties and the preparation of lignin nanoparticles and other nanostructures has therefore gained interest as a promising technique to obtain value-added lignin products. Due to lignin’s high structural and chemical heterogeneity, methods must be adapted to these different types. This review focuses on the ability of different formation methods to cope with the huge variety of lignin types and points out which particle characteristics can be achieved by which method. The current research’s main focus is on pH and solvent-shifting methods where the latter can yield solid and hollow particles. Solvent shifting also showed the capability to cope with different lignin types and solvents and antisolvents, respectively. However, process conditions have to be adapted to every type of lignin and reduction of solvent demand or the integration in a biorefinery process chain must be focused. PMID:28604584

  10. Lignin from Micro- to Nanosize: Production Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Beisl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose. It has long been obtained as a by-product of cellulose production in pulp and paper production, but had rather low added-value applications. A changing paper market and the emergence of biorefinery projects should generate vast amounts of lignin with the potential of value addition. Nanomaterials offer unique properties and the preparation of lignin nanoparticles and other nanostructures has therefore gained interest as a promising technique to obtain value-added lignin products. Due to lignin’s high structural and chemical heterogeneity, methods must be adapted to these different types. This review focuses on the ability of different formation methods to cope with the huge variety of lignin types and points out which particle characteristics can be achieved by which method. The current research’s main focus is on pH and solvent-shifting methods where the latter can yield solid and hollow particles. Solvent shifting also showed the capability to cope with different lignin types and solvents and antisolvents, respectively. However, process conditions have to be adapted to every type of lignin and reduction of solvent demand or the integration in a biorefinery process chain must be focused.

  11. FT-Raman investigation of milled-wood lignins : softwood, hardwood, and chemically modified black spruce lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; James D. McSweeny; Sally A. Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being increasingly applied to study wood and other lignin-containing biomass/biomaterials. Lignin’s contribution to the Raman spectra of such materials needs to be understood in the context of various lignin structures, substructures, and functional groups so that lignin-specific features could be identified and the spectral information could be...

  12. Characterization of the effects of lignin and lignin complex particles as filler on a polystyrene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawawy, Waleed K., E-mail: wkzawawy@yahoo.com [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Ibrahim, Maha M. [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Dufresne, Alain [Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP) - The International School of Paper, Print Media and Biomaterials (PAGORA), BP 65, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres cedex, Grenoble (France)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have studied the use of Co(II) to form a complex with the lignin. We use first vanillin as the lignin model and we observed a change in color for the produced complex depending on the light wavelength. The use of other transition metals does not give the same observation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of the transition metal with the lignin precipitated from the black liquor after pulping of agricultural residues, gave a fluorescent color under fluorescent microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We applied the resulted lignin complex to prepare polymer film that can be used as special polymer packaging which can be color changed under different wavelengths. - Abstract: The work in this research outlines the use of lignin precipitated from lignocellulosic substrate as fillers after modified with transition metal cations, Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II), in the production of a polystyrene based composite for polymer packaging applications. Virgin polystyrene was compared with lignin and lignin complex filled composites with loading of 5% by weight prepared using twin screw extrusion. The lignin complexes were first characterized by the UV spectra to identify the new absorption bands occurred due to the complex formation. Moreover, lignin model, namely vanillin, was used to notify the geometric structure of the resulting complexes applying the GC mass spectra. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate the change in the morphological structure of the filler particles. On the other hand, the mechanical and thermal analysis for the resulting polymer composites was studied and it was noticed that the type of lignin or lignin complex plays a roll in the results. The inclusion of the Co(II)-lignin complex was observed to increase the tensile strength of the resulting polymer composite and a decrease of the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, light wave lengths and UV fluorescent microscope were used to identify

  13. Organosolv Lignin-Based Wood Adhesive. Influence of the Lignin Extraction Conditions on the Adhesive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Dababi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol organosolv alfa grass lignins were extracted in the presence of sulfuric acid or Lewis acids (Sc(OTf3, FeCl3 as catalysts and subjected to a comprehensive structural characterization by solid state 13C NMR, GPC, MALDI-TOF, and ASAP-MS/MS. The impact of the severity of the treatment and of the nature of the acid catalyst on the recovered lignin structure was investigated. The lignins isolated at high severity were highly recondensed and partly composed of regular structures composed of furan-like rings. The alfa (Stipa tenacissima L. organosolv lignins were used for the preparation of formaldehyde-free adhesives which were characterized by TMA and used for the preparation of particleboard without any addition of synthetic resin. It has been demonstrated for the first time that: (1 the addition of 10% to 30% of organosolv alfa lignin in a tannin-based adhesive improved the adhesive performance; and (2 the conditions of the lignin extraction strongly impact the lignin-based adhesive performances. The highly recondensed lignin extracted with sulfuric acid as a catalyst allowed the production of resins with improved performances. Formulations composed of 50% glyoxalated alfa lignin and 50% of Aleppo Pine tannins yielded good internal bond strength results for the panels (IB = 0.45 MPa and satisfied relevant international standard specifications for interior-grade panels.

  14. Isolation and Physicochemical Characterization of Lignin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muzakir

    2 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Gombe State University, P. M. B. 127, Gombe, Nigeria. .... remaining solid is the acid insoluble lignin (Toledano et al., 2012). .... dmso/licl system induced by microwave-assisted irradiation.

  15. Composition comprising lignin and antidi arrheal component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising lignin and at least one compound selected from the group consisting of bromelain, papain, tannin, carvacrol, thymol, alliin, allicin, fenugreek seed, egg, poppy, poppy seeds, humic acid, roots, kaolin, catechu, cellulase, flavonoid...

  16. Use of lignin extracted from different plant sources as standards in the spectrophotometric acetyl bromide lignin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Romualdo S; Kerley, Monty S

    2011-04-27

    A nongravimetric acetyl bromide lignin (ABL) method was evaluated to quantify lignin concentration in a variety of plant materials. The traditional approach to lignin quantification required extraction of lignin with acidic dioxane and its isolation from each plant sample to construct a standard curve via spectrophotometric analysis. Lignin concentration was then measured in pre-extracted plant cell walls. However, this presented a methodological complexity because extraction and isolation procedures are lengthy and tedious, particularly if there are many samples involved. This work was targeted to simplify lignin quantification. Our hypothesis was that any lignin, regardless of its botanical origin, could be used to construct a standard curve for the purpose of determining lignin concentration in a variety of plants. To test our hypothesis, lignins were isolated from a range of diverse plants and, along with three commercial lignins, standard curves were built and compared among them. Slopes and intercepts derived from these standard curves were close enough to allow utilization of a mean extinction coefficient in the regression equation to estimate lignin concentration in any plant, independent of its botanical origin. Lignin quantification by use of a common regression equation obviates the steps of lignin extraction, isolation, and standard curve construction, which substantially expedites the ABL method. Acetyl bromide lignin method is a fast, convenient analytical procedure that may routinely be used to quantify lignin.

  17. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF KRAFT LIGNIN-BASED EPOXY RESINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Eddine El Mansouri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidization is an interesting way to develop a new application of lignin and therefore to improve its application potential. In this work, kraft lignin-based epoxy resins were obtained by the epoxidization reaction, using the kraft lignin recovered directly from pulping liquor and modified by a methylolation reaction. The methylolated lignins were obtained by the reaction of original kraft lignin with formaldehyde and glyoxal, which is a less volatile and less toxic aldehyde. 1H-NMR spectroscopy showed that methylolated kraft lignin has more hydroxymethyl groups than glyoxalated kraft lignin. For the epoxidization reaction we studied the influence of the lignin:NaOH (w/w ratio, temperature, and time of the reaction on the properties of the prepared epoxidized lignins. The structures of lignin-based epoxy resins were followed by epoxy index test and FTIR spectroscopy. Optimal conditions were obtained for lignin-based epoxy resin produced at lignin/NaOH = 1/3 at 70 ºC for 3h. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA revealed that the epoxidization enhances the thermal stability of lignins and may allow a wider temperature range for applications with lignin epoxy-PF blends.

  18. Multiphase materials with lignin. VI. Effect of cellulose derivative structure on blend morphology with lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy G. Rials; Wolfgang G. Glasser

    1989-01-01

    Polymeric blends of lignin with ethyl cellulose (EC) and cellulose acetate/butyrate (CAB) prepared by solution casting from dioxane. Fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed phase separation when the lignin content exceeded 10% for blends with EC and 5% in the CAB system. While this phase behavior is as predicted for the EC blends, a greater...

  19. Added value of lignin as lignin-based hybrid polyurethane for a compatibilizing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmiati, S.; Haris Mustafa, J.; Yaumal, A.; Hanum, F.; Chalid, M.

    2017-07-01

    As biomass-based material, lignin contains abundant hydroxyl groups promising to be used as chain extender in building hybrid polyurethanes. Consisting of polyehtylene glycol (PEG) content as hydrophobic part and lignin as hydrophilic part, the hybrid PU is expected to be as a novel compatibilizing agent in new materials production such as polyblends and composites. The hybrid PU was synthesized via two reaction stages, viz. pre-polyurethanization through reacting 4,4'-Methylenebis (Cyclohexyl Isocyanate) (HMDI) and PEG as polyol, and chain extention through adding lignin in the pre-polyurethanization system. The composition effect of lignin in hybrid PU syntehsis, to chemical structure corelated to hydrophobic to hydrophilic ratio, thermal and morphological properties, was evaluated by measuring NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA and FE-SEM. The experiments showed that addition of lignin was able to extend the pre-polyurethane into hybrid polyurethane and to increase the lignin/polyol ratio in the hybrid polyurethanes, which were indicated by NMR and FTIR Analysis. And change of the ratio lead to increase the glass transition from 60.9 until 62.1°C and degradation temperature from 413.9 until 416.0°C. Observation of the morphology implied that addition of lignin gave more agglomerations. A Further investigation for this characterization study should be focused on a feasibility for this modified lignin as a novel compatibilizing agent.

  20. Systematic Parameterization of Lignin for the CHARMM Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Joshua; Petridis, Loukas; Beckham, Gregg; Crowley, Michael

    2017-07-06

    Plant cell walls have three primary components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, the latter of which is a recalcitrant, aromatic heteropolymer that provides structure to plants, water and nutrient transport through plant tissues, and a highly effective defense against pathogens. Overcoming the recalcitrance of lignin is key to effective biomass deconstruction, which would in turn enable the use of biomass as a feedstock for industrial processes. Our understanding of lignin structure in the plant cell wall is hampered by the limitations of the available lignin forcefields, which currently only account for a single linkage between lignins and lack explicit parameterization for emerging lignin structures both from natural variants and engineered lignin structures. Since polymerization of lignin occurs via radical intermediates, multiple C-O and C-C linkages have been isolated , and the current force field only represents a small subset of lignin the diverse lignin structures found in plants. In order to take into account the wide range of lignin polymerization chemistries, monomers and dimer combinations of C-, H-, G-, and S-lignins as well as with hydroxycinnamic acid linkages were subjected to extensive quantum mechanical calculations to establish target data from which to build a complete molecular mechanics force field tuned specifically for diverse lignins. This was carried out in a GPU-accelerated global optimization process, whereby all molecules were parameterized simultaneously using the same internal parameter set. By parameterizing lignin specifically, we are able to more accurately represent the interactions and conformations of lignin monomers and dimers relative to a general force field. This new force field will enables computational researchers to study the effects of different linkages on the structure of lignin, as well as construct more accurate plant cell wall models based on observed statistical distributions of lignin that differ between

  1. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri [School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada); Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-22

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  2. Analysis of Lignin-Polysaccharide Complexes Formed during Grass Lignin Degradation by Cultures of Pleurotus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A; Bocchini, P; Galletti, G C; Martinez, A T

    1996-06-01

    A brown material, precipitable with ethanol, was formed during wheat straw and lignin degradation by liquid cultures of different species of Pleurotus. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that most of the precipitable material was formed from exopolysaccharide secreted by the fungus but it also contained an aromatic fraction. The results of acid hydrolysis, methylation analysis, and Smith degradation indicated that the major exopolysaccharide produced by these fungi is a (1(symbl)3)-(beta)-glucan branched at C-6 every two or three residues along the main chain. The presence of lignin or straw in the culture medium had little effect on the composition and structure of the extracellular polysaccharide. Cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided an estimation of the aromatic content of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes, assigning 20% of the total (sup13)C signal in the material recovered from cultures of Pleurotus eryngii in lignin medium to aromatic carbon. Analytical pyrolysis indicated that the aromatic fractions of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes were derived from lignin, since products characteristic of pyrolytic breakdown of H (p-hydroxyphenylpropane), G (guaiacylpropane), and S (syringylpropane) lignin units were identified. These complexes cannot be fractionated by treatment with polyvinylpyrrolidone or extraction with lignin solvents, suggesting that the two polymers were chemically linked. Moreover, differences in composition with respect to the original lignin indicated that this macromolecule was modified by the fungi during the process of formation of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes.

  3. Sorption of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) on lignin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rabih Saad; Zorana Radovic-Hrapovic; Behzad Ahvazi; Sonia Thiboutot; Guy Ampleman; Jalal Hawari

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the use of two commercially available lignins,namely,alkali and organosolv lignin,for the removal of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN),a chemical widely used by the military and the dye industry,from water.Sorption of DNAN on both lignins reached equilibrium within 10 hr and followed pseudo second-order kinetics with sorption being faster with alkali than with organosolv lignin,i.e.k2 10.3 and 0.3 g/(mg.hr),respectively.In a separate study we investigated sorption of DNAN between 10 and 40℃ and found that the removal of DNAN by organosolv lignin increased from 0.8 to 7.5 mg/g but reduced slightly from 8.5 to 7.6 mg/g in the case of alkali lignin.Sorption isotherms for either alkali or organosolv lignin best fitted Freundlich equation with enthalpy of formation,△H0 equaled to 14 or 80 kJ/mol.To help understand DNAN sorption mechanisms we characterized the two lignins by elemental analysis,BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption and 31p NMR.Variations in elemental compositions between the two lignins indicated that alkali lignin should have more sites (O- and S-containing functionalities) for H-bonding.The BET surface area and calculated total pore volume of alkali lignin were almost 10 times greater than that of organosolv lignin suggesting that alkali lignin should provide more sites for sorption.31p NMR showed that organosolv lignin contains more phenolic -OH groups than alkali lignin,i.e.,70% and 45%,respectively.The variations in the type of OH groups between the two lignins might have affected the strength of H-bonding between DNAN and the type of lignin used.

  4. Sorption of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) on lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Rabih; Radovic-Hrapovic, Zorana; Ahvazi, Behzad; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the use of two commercially available lignins, namely, alkali and organosolv lignin, for the removal of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), a chemical widely used by the military and the dye industry, from water. Sorption of DNAN on both lignins reached equilibrium within 10 hr and followed pseudo second-order kinetics with sorption being faster with alkali than with organosolv lignin, i.e. k2 10.3 and 0.3 g/(mg x hr), respectively. In a separate study we investigated sorption of DNAN between 10 and 40 degrees C and found that the removal of DNAN by organosolv lignin increased from 0.8 to 7.5 mg/g but reduced slightly from 8.5 to 7.6 mg/g in the case of alkali lignin. Sorption isotherms for either alkali or organosolv lignin best fitted Freundlich equation with enthalpy of formation, deltaH0 equaled to 14 or 80 kJ/mol. To help understand DNAN sorption mechanisms we characterized the two lignins by elemental analysis, BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption and 31P NMR. Variations in elemental compositions between the two lignins indicated that alkali lignin should have more sites (O- and S-containing functionalities) for H-bonding. The BET surface area and calculated total pore volume of alkali lignin were almost 10 times greater than that of organosolv lignin suggesting that alkali lignin should provide more sites for sorption. 31P NMR showed that organosolv lignin contains more phenolic -OH groups than alkali lignin, i.e., 70% and 45%, respectively. The variations in the type of OH groups between the two lignins might have affected the strength of H-bonding between DNAN and the type of lignin used.

  5. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  6. Formaldehyde stabilization facilitates lignin monomer production during biomass depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Li; Amiri, Masoud Talebi; Questell-Santiago, Ydna M; Héroguel, Florent; Li, Yanding; Kim, Hoon; Meilan, Richard; Chapple, Clint; Ralph, John; Luterbacher, Jeremy S

    2016-10-21

    Practical, high-yield lignin depolymerization methods could greatly increase biorefinery productivity and profitability. However, development of these methods is limited by the presence of interunit carbon-carbon bonds within native lignin, and further by formation of such linkages during lignin extraction. We report that adding formaldehyde during biomass pretreatment produces a soluble lignin fraction that can be converted to guaiacyl and syringyl monomers at near theoretical yields during subsequent hydrogenolysis (47 mole % of Klason lignin for beech and 78 mole % for a high-syringyl transgenic poplar). These yields were three to seven times those obtained without formaldehyde, which prevented lignin condensation by forming 1,3-dioxane structures with lignin side-chain hydroxyl groups. By depolymerizing cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin separately, monomer yields were between 76 and 90 mole % for these three major biomass fractions. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. PYROLYSIS KINETICS OF WASHED PRECIPITATED LIGNIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gustafsson

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the pyrolysis behavior of precipitated washed lignin in a Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor between 700 and 1000°C and at different residence times. Lignin was precipitated by acidification of softwood black liquor using CO2. After acid washing, the solid material was dried and sieved (80-100 μm. This material was then fed into the reactor at a rate of about 0.1 g/min. The formed gases were analyzed with respect to CO, CO2, and CH4, and char was collected and weighed. A traditional first order Arrhenius kinetic expression, based on the temperature of the particles with respect to residence time, was adapted to the experimental results. The activation energy was found to be 32.1 kJ/mol. The low ash content in the washed lignin gave a very low solid material residue after the reactor.

  8. Mechanochemical Lignin-Mediated Strecker Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Dabral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanochemical Strecker reaction involving a wide range of aldehydes (aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic, amines, and KCN afforded a library of α-aminonitriles upon mechanical activation. This multicomponent process was efficiently activated by lignocellulosic biomass as additives. Particularly, commercially available Kraft lignin was found to be the best activator for the addition of cyanide to the in situ formed imines. A comparative study of the 31P-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance along with IR (Infrared data analysis for the Kraft lignin and methylated Kraft lignin samples ascertained the importance of the free hydroxyl groups in the activation of the mechanochemical reaction. The solvent-free mechanochemical Strecker reaction was then coupled with a lactamization process leading to the formation of the N-benzylphthalimide (5a and the isoindolinone derivative 6a.

  9. Lignin as a renewable aromatic resource for the chemical industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gosselink, R.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Valorization of lignin plays a key role in the further development of lignocellulosic biorefinery processes for biofuels and biobased materials production. Today’s increased demand for alternatives to fossil carbon-based products expands the interest and the need to create added value to the unconverted lignin fraction. The aim of the research was to study the potential of lignin to become a renewable aromatic resource for the chemical industry. Lignin can be considered as an abundantly...

  10. Radical Nature of C-Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berstis, Laura; Elder, Thomas; Crowley, Michael; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-10-03

    The recently discovered lignin composed of caffeoyl alcohol monolignols or C-lignin is particularly intriguing given its homogeneous, linear polymeric structure and exclusive benzodioxane linkage between monomers. By virtue of this simplified chemistry, the potential emerges for improved valorization strategies with C-lignin relative to other natural heterogeneous lignins. To better understand caffeoyl alcohol polymers, we characterize the thermodynamics of the radical recombination dimerization reactions forming the benzodioxane linkage and the bond dissociation into radical monolignol products. These properties are also predicted for the cross-coupling of caffeoyl alcohol with the natural monolignols, coniferyl alcohol, sinapyl alcohol, and p-coumaryl alcohol, in anticipation of polymers potentially enabled by genetic modification. The average BDEs for the C-lignin benzodioxane ..alpha..- and ..beta..-bonds are 56.5 and 63.4 kcal/mol, respectively, with similar enthalpies for heterodimers. The BDE of the ..alpha..-bond within the benzodioxane linkage is consistently greater than that of the ..beta..-bond in all dimers of each stereochemical arrangement, explained by the ability the ..alpha..-carbon radical generated to delocalize onto the adjacent phenyl ring. Relative thermodynamics of the heterodimers demonstrates that the substituents on the phenyl ring directly neighboring the bond coupling the monolignols more strongly impact the dimer bond strengths and product stability, compared to the substituents present on the terminal phenyl ring. Enthalpy comparisons furthermore demonstrate that the erythro stereochemical configurations of the benzodioxane bond are slightly less thermodynamically stable than the threo configurations. The overall differences in strength of bonds and reaction enthalpies between stereoisomers are generally found to be insignificant, supporting that postcoupling rearomatization is under kinetic control. Projecting the lowest

  11. Lignin removal and benzene-alcohol extraction effects on lignin measurements of the hydrothermal pretreated bamboo substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X J; Cao, S L; Yang, X F; Lin, L; Chen, L H; Huang, L L

    2014-01-01

    Lignin content of hydrothermal pretreated bamboo chips was determined by the two methods: TAPPI standard method (222om-06) and TAPPI standard method without benzene-alcohol extraction (BAE). The results showed that including BAE resulted in lower Klason lignin (KL) and acid soluble lignin (ASL) measurements in the prehydrolyzed substrate, that is to say, BAE removed parts of KL and ASL. Therefore, the TAPPI standard method should be modified by omitting the BAE for lignin measurements of pretreated substrate. The following lignin removal analysis suggested that lignin was removed from the bamboo substrate during pretreatment by a combination of degradation reaction and deconstruction; thereafter the pseudo lignin generated in the hydrothermal pretreatment and condensation reaction between the lignin fragments accounted for the later KL increase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pyrolysis of wheat straw-derived organosolv lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, P.J. de; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Heeres, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of a lignocellulose biorefinery may be improved by developing applications for lignin with a higher value than application as fuel. We have developed a pyrolysis based lignin biorefinery approach, called LIBRA, to transform lignin into phenolic bio-oil and biochar using bubbli

  13. Flocculation of high purity wheat straw soda lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocculant action on lignocellulose mixtures has been studied, but flocculant action on purified sulfur-free lignin has not been reported. In the last step of the industrial process, the purified lignin solution is acidified with sulfuric acid which causes the lignin to become insoluble. The feasi...

  14. Diesel-soluble lignin oils and methods of their production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Solvent consumption in supercritical ethanol, propanol or butanol treatment of either refined pre-extracted lignin or comparatively impure lignin-rich solid residual from hydrothermally pretreated lignocellulosic biomass can be minimized by conducting the reaction at very high loading of lignin...

  15. Analytical methods for lignin characterization - Differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koullas, D.P.; Koukios, E.G.; Avgerinos, E.; Abaecherli, A.; Gosselink, R.; Vasile, C.; Lehnen, R.; Saake, B.; Suren, J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of a round robin on lignin thermal analyses are reported. Six laboratories have conducted thermal analyses of four lignin types to determine their cp values and softening points, and to study the thermal behaviour, materials endo- and exotherms included. The lignin types examined were wood

  16. Genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Vincent Lee; Li, Laigeng

    2004-11-02

    The present invention relates to a novel DNA sequence, which encodes a previously unidentified lignin biosynthetic pathway enzyme, sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that regulates the biosynthesis of syringyl lignin in plants. Also provided are methods for incorporating this novel SAD gene sequence or substantially similar sequences into a plant genome for genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants.

  17. Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

  18. Propensity of lignin to associate: light scattering photometry study with native lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Sofía; Gaspar, Armindo R; Guerra, Anderson; Lucia, Lucian A; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2008-12-01

    Many studies of lignins in solution invoke association and aggregation phenomena to explain their solution behavior (e.g., reprecipitation onto pulp fibers, condensation, etc.). Following their colloidal (apparent) molecular weights in solution as a function of time allows us to explore observable dissociation phenomena. These measurements were carried out using multiple angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometry in the static mode. The challenges and opportunities of measuring the specific refractive index increment (dn/dC) of lignin solutions and determining the kinetics of the dissociation process were thus investigated. Hardwood and softwood representative lignins were isolated, and method for their full dissolution in THF was further developed, which then lead to accurate dn/dC values being obtained as a function of time. When coupled to additional work using light scattering static measurements and Zimm plots for the same solutions, this effort offers insight into the aggregation and ensuing dissociative events that operate within the lignin macromolecules.

  19. Accelerated solvent extraction of lignin from Aleurites moluccana (Candlenut) nutshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andrew P; Beach, Evan S; Emerson, John W; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2010-09-22

    Lignin from candlenut shells was isolated using an ethanol-water accelerated solvent extraction method. Yields (based on Klason lignin) increased from about 14 to 33% as temperature increased from 100 to 195 °C and were also influenced by the amount of aqueous acid used to precipitate lignin from the extraction liquor. These yields were higher than could be obtained using a conventional dioxane-water acidolysis method. The resulting lignin was characterized by IR, 31P NMR, and 1H-13C HMQC NMR spectroscopic techniques. The lignin contained predominantly guaiacyl units, and both the total hydroxyl group content and phenolic hydroxyl group content were high.

  20. POTENSI MELANOTUS SP. DALAM MENDEGRADASI LIGNIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUNIK SULISTINAH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten isolates of fungus were isolated from oil palm stem at oil palm plantation in Medan All of them were tested its abilities to degrade lignin. The results showed that one of them was able to grow on ligninase media and the fungi has the ability to degrade ligin. The fungi is identified as Melanotus sp.

  1. Analytical methods for lignin characterization. I. Thermogravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasile, C.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Quintus, P.; Koukios, E.G.; Koullas, D.P.; Avgerinos, E.; Abacherli, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of a round robin experiment initiated by the participants to "EUROLIGNIN", an EC network, meant at standardizing thermogravimetry as an useful method for the thermal characterization of lignins obtained from different sources or by different extraction methods. Five

  2. Nylon biodegradation by lignin-degrading fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, T; Kakezawa, M; Nishida, T

    1997-01-01

    The biodegradation of nylon by lignin-degrading fungi was investigated. The fungus IZU-154 significantly degraded nylon-66 membrane under ligninolytic conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that four end groups, CHO, NHCHO, CH3, and CONH2, were formed in the biodegraded nylon-66 membranes, suggesting that nylon-66 was degraded oxidatively.

  3. Analytical methods for lignin characterization. I. Thermogravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasile, C.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Quintus, P.; Koukios, E.G.; Koullas, D.P.; Avgerinos, E.; Abacherli, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of a round robin experiment initiated by the participants to "EUROLIGNIN", an EC network, meant at standardizing thermogravimetry as an useful method for the thermal characterization of lignins obtained from different sources or by different extraction methods. Five l

  4. Lignin isolation process from rice husk by alkaline hydrogen peroxide: Lignin and silica extracted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'ruf, Anwar; Pramudono, Bambang; Aryanti, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Biomass is one of abundance resources in the world. Biomass consists of three main materials such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Therefore, biomass can be referred to lignocellulosic material. Both the cellulose and hemicelluloses fractions are polymers of sugars, and thereby a potential source of fermentable sugars, or other processes that convert sugars into products. Lignin is a polymer compound which contains of phenolic compounds. Rice husk is one of biomass, which has high contain of lignin. Rice husk has special characteristics because of silica content. The aim of this paper is to analyze lignin and silica extracted during lignin isolation process of rice husk using alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Three main variables such as solvent/solid ratio, concentration of hydrogen peroxide and pH of the mixture are studied. The optimum conditions for lignin isolation are at solvent/solid ratio 9:1 ml/gr, hydrogen peroxide concentration of 1.5%v and pH of the mixture of 11.

  5. STUDY ON LIGNIN COVERAGE OF MASSON PINE FIBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beihai He

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the adhesion force of fiber in a paper sheet easily, the relationships between internal bonding strength (IBS and surface lignin content of masson pine CTMP treated with peracetic acid (PAA have been investigated with XPS technique, and the surface morphology of fibers was also imaged by AFM. The results showed that the extent of lignin covered on the fiber surface was two times as high as that of whole pulp lignin, and the IBS was inversely proportional to surface lignin. The relationship between IBS and lignin coverage was formulated based on the experimental data. The mutual adhesion forces, cellulose-to-cellulose and lignin-to-lignin, were calculated using these equations, and the results were 28.69 mN/m and 2.487mN/m, respectively.

  6. Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2009-09-15

    Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

  7. Lignin depolymerization by fungal secretomes and a microbial sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Katahira, Rui; Cleveland, Nicholas S.; Khanna, Payal; Resch, Michael G.; Black, Brenna A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María J.; Martínez, Angel T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Gladden, John M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-08-25

    In Nature, powerful oxidative enzymes secreted by white rot fungi and some bacteria catalyze lignin depolymerization and some microbes are able to catabolize the resulting aromatic compounds as carbon and energy sources. Taken together, these two processes offer a potential route for microbial valorization of lignin. However, many challenges remain in realizing this concept, including that oxidative enzymes responsible for lignin depolymerization also catalyze polymerization of low molecular weight (LMW) lignin. Here, multiple basidiomycete secretomes were screened for ligninolytic enzyme activities in the presence of a residual lignin solid stream from a corn stover biorefinery, dubbed DMR-EH (Deacetylation, Mechanical Refining, and Enzymatic Hydrolysis) lignin. Two selected fungal secretomes, with high levels of laccases and peroxidases, were utilized for DMR-EH lignin depolymerization assays. The secretome from Pleurotus eryngii, which exhibited the highest laccase activity, reduced the lignin average molecular weight by 63% and 75% at pH 7 compared to the Mw of the control treated at the same conditions and the initial DMR-EH lignin, respectively, and was applied in further depolymerization assays as a function of time. As repolymerization was observed after 3 days of incubation, an aromatic-catabolic microbe (Pseudomonas putida KT2440) was incubated with the fungal secretome and DMR-EH lignin. These experiments demonstrated that the presence of the bacterium enhances lignin depolymerization, likely due to bacterial catabolism of LMW lignin, which may partially prevent repolymerization. In addition, proteomics was also applied to the P. eryngii secretome to identify the enzymes present in the fungal cocktail utilized for the depolymerization assays, which highlighted a significant number of glucose/ methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductases and laccases. Overall, this study demonstrates that ligninolytic enzymes can be used to partially depolymerize a solid, high

  8. Lignin Depolymerization by Fungal Secretomes and a Microbial Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvachua, Davinia; Katahira, Rui; Cleveland, Nicholas S.; Khanna, Payal; Resch, Michael G.; Black, Brenna A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Prieto, Alicia; Martinez, Maria J.; Martinez, Angel T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Gladden, John M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-11-21

    In Nature, powerful oxidative enzymes secreted by white rot fungi and some bacteria catalyze lignin depolymerization and some microbes are able to catabolize the resulting aromatic compounds as carbon and energy sources. Taken together, these two processes offer a potential route for microbial valorization of lignin. However, many challenges remain in realizing this concept, including that oxidative enzymes responsible for lignin depolymerization also catalyze polymerization of low molecular weight (LMW) lignin. Here, multiple basidiomycete secretomes were screened for ligninolytic enzyme activities in the presence of a residual lignin solid stream from a corn stover biorefinery, dubbed DMR-EH (Deacetylation, Mechanical Refining, and Enzymatic Hydrolysis) lignin. Two selected fungal secretomes, with high levels of laccases and peroxidases, were utilized for DMR-EH lignin depolymerization assays. The secretome from Pleurotus eryngii, which exhibited the highest laccase activity, reduced the lignin average molecular weight (Mw) by 63% and 75% at pH 7 compared to the Mw of the control treated at the same conditions and the initial DMR-EH lignin, respectively, and was applied in further depolymerization assays as a function of time. As repolymerization was observed after 3 days of incubation, an aromatic-catabolic microbe (Pseudomonas putida KT2440) was incubated with the fungal secretome and DMR-EH lignin. These experiments demonstrated that the presence of the bacterium enhances lignin depolymerization, likely due to bacterial catabolism of LMW lignin, which may partially prevent repolymerization. In addition, proteomics was also applied to the P. eryngii secretome to identify the enzymes present in the fungal cocktail utilized for the depolymerization assays, which highlighted a significant number of glucose/methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductases and laccases. Overall, this study demonstrates that ligninolytic enzymes can be used to partially depolymerize a solid

  9. Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Jackson, Lisa; Nakashima, Jin; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described a hitherto unsuspected catechyl lignin polymer (C-lignin) in the seed coats of Vanilla orchid and in cacti of one genus, Melocactus (Chen et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2012, 109, 1772-1777.). We have now determined the lignin types in the seed coats of 130 different cactus species. Lignin in the vegetative tissues of cacti is of the normal guaiacyl/syringyl (G/S) type, but members of most genera within the subfamily Cactoidae possess seed coat lignin of the novel C-type only, which we show is a homopolymer formed by endwise β-O-4-coupling of caffeyl alcohol monomers onto the growing polymer resulting in benzodioxane units. However, the species examined within the genera Coryphantha, Cumarinia, Escobaria and Mammillaria (Cactoideae) mostly had normal G/S lignin in their seeds, as did all six species in the subfamily Opuntioidae that were examined. Seed coat lignin composition is still evolving in the Cactaceae, as seeds of one Mammillaria species (M. lasiacantha) possess only C-lignin, three Escobaria species (E. dasyacantha, E. lloydii and E. zilziana) contain an unusual lignin composed of 5-hydroxyguaiacyl units, the first report of such a polymer that occurs naturally in plants, and seeds of some species contain no lignin at all. We discuss the implications of these findings for the mechanisms that underlie the biosynthesis of these newly discovered lignin types.

  10. Organosolv ethanol lignin from hybrid poplar as a radical scavenger: relationship between lignin structure, extraction conditions, and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuejun; Kadla, John F; Ehara, Katsunobu; Gilkes, Neil; Saddler, Jack N

    2006-08-09

    Twenty-one organosolv ethanol lignin samples were prepared from hybrid poplar (Populus nigra xP. maximowiczii) under varied conditions with an experimental matrix designed using response surface methodology (RSM). The lignin preparations were evaluated as potential antioxidants. Results indicated that the lignins with more phenolic hydroxyl groups, less aliphatic hydroxyl groups, low molecular weight, and narrow polydispersity showed high antioxidant activity. Processing conditions affected the functional groups and molecular weight of the extracted organosolv ethanol lignins, and consequently influenced the antioxidant activity of the lignins. In general, the lignins prepared at elevated temperature, longer reaction time, increased catalyst, and diluted ethanol showed high antioxidant activity. Regression models were developed to enable the quantitative prediction of lignin characteristics and antioxidant activity based on the processing conditions.

  11. Dynamics and turnover of lignins in soils: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, M.; Rumpel, C.; Dignac, M.-F.

    2009-04-01

    Lignins are amongst the most studied bio-macromolecules in natural environments, for their properties as biomarkers and their suggested influence on soil organic carbon dynamics. A large number of methods exists to characterize lignins, but the alkaline CuO oxidation is the most used for determining lignin fate in soils. The CuO oxidation products of lignins yield quantitative information (sum of V, S and C monomers) as well as qualitative information on the degradation of lignins (S/V, C/V, (Ad/Al)V,S…). The CuO-lignin products provide information on lignins but also on the environment and particularly on the present and past vegetation. Data from several studies were compiled in order to evaluate the relations between lignins in soils and various environmental parameters. The results of the multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) performed suggest that the lignin content in soils is directly related to the C and N contents, confirming its contribution to the pool of organic carbon. The lignin distribution appears also related to the climate and to the soil texture, which suggests the impact of these parameters on the lignin degradation and retention in soils, as observed for organic carbon (Burke et al., 1989). The total lignin content generally decreases with the soil depth and with the decreasing size of the granulometric fractions. Hence, the more lignins are degraded, the more they are associated with the finest fractions. In addition, it appears that lignin contents are linked to land-use. Thus, in accordance with the land cover, management type and amount of annual input, the forest soils are described by high contents of VSC, C and N, in contrast with the arable land. Lignins were often considered to greatly participate to the stock of slowly degradable and stable carbon in soils. However, several studies suggest that lignin turnover can be more rapid than that of the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), suggesting that they are not stabilized in soil. On the

  12. Oxidative depolymerization of lignin in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stärk, Kerstin; Taccardi, Nicola; Bösmann, Andreas; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2010-06-21

    Beech lignin was oxidatively cleaved in ionic liquids to give phenols, unsaturated propylaromatics, and aromatic aldehydes. A multiparallel batch reactor system was used to screen different ionic liquids and metal catalysts. Mn(NO(3))(2) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate [EMIM][CF(3)SO(3)] proved to be the most effective reaction system. A larger scale batch reaction with this system in a 300 mL autoclave (11 g lignin starting material) resulted in a maximum conversion of 66.3 % (24 h at 100 degrees C, 84x10(5) Pa air). By adjusting the reaction conditions and catalyst loading, the selectivity of the process could be shifted from syringaldehyde as the predominant product to 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ). Surprisingly, the latter could be isolated as a pure substance in 11.5 wt % overall yield by a simple extraction/crystallization process.

  13. Incorporation of hydroxy-cinnamaldehydes into lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Ralph; Hoon. Kim; Fachuang. Lu; Sally A. Ralph; Larry L. Landucci; Takashi. Ito; Shingo. Kawai

    1999-01-01

    Peroxidase/H2O2-mediated radical coupling of hydroxycinnamaldehydes produced 81O14-, 8-5-, 818-, and 5-5dimers as had been documented earlier (although we found that the 815-dimer is produced in its cyclic phenylcoumaran form at neutral pH). Spectral data from dimers and oligomers has allowed a more substantive assignment of aldehyde components in lignins isolated from...

  14. De novo assembly, transcriptome characterization, lignin accumulation, and anatomic characteristics: novel insights into lignin biosynthesis during celery leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Guang-Long; Xiong, Fei; Yu, Xu-Run; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-02-05

    Celery of the family Apiaceae is a biennial herb that is cultivated and consumed worldwide. Lignin is essential for cell wall structural integrity, stem strength, water transport, mechanical support, and plant pathogen defense. This study discussed the mechanism of lignin formation at different stages of celery development. The transcriptome profile, lignin distribution, anatomical characteristics, and expression profile of leaves at three stages were analyzed. Regulating lignin synthesis in celery growth development has a significant economic value. Celery leaves at three stages were collected, and Illumina paired-end sequencing technology was used to analyze large-scale transcriptome sequences. From Stage 1 to 3, the collenchyma and vascular bundles in the petioles and leaf blades thickened and expanded, whereas the phloem and the xylem extensively developed. Spongy and palisade mesophyll tissues further developed and were tightly arranged. Lignin accumulation increased in the petioles and the mesophyll (palisade and spongy), and the xylem showed strong lignification. Lignin accumulation in different tissues and at different stages of celery development coincides with the anatomic characteristics and transcript levels of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis. Identifying the genes that encode lignin biosynthesis-related enzymes accompanied by lignin distribution may help elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of lignin biosynthesis in celery.

  15. Advanced Model Compounds for Understanding Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Depolymerization: Identification of Renewable Aromatics and a Lignin-Derived Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Deuss, Peter J; Lancefield, Christopher S; Sun, Zhuohua; Cordes, David B; Young, Claire M; Tran, Fanny; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; de Vries, Johannes G; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Barta, Katalin

    2016-07-20

    The development of fundamentally new approaches for lignin depolymerization is challenged by the complexity of this aromatic biopolymer. While overly simplified model compounds often lack relevance to the chemistry of lignin, the direct use of lignin streams poses significant analytical challenges to methodology development. Ideally, new methods should be tested on model compounds that are complex enough to mirror the structural diversity in lignin but still of sufficiently low molecular weight to enable facile analysis. In this contribution, we present a new class of advanced (β-O-4)-(β-5) dilinkage models that are highly realistic representations of a lignin fragment. Together with selected β-O-4, β-5, and β-β structures, these compounds provide a detailed understanding of the reactivity of various types of lignin linkages in acid catalysis in conjunction with stabilization of reactive intermediates using ethylene glycol. The use of these new models has allowed for identification of novel reaction pathways and intermediates and led to the characterization of new dimeric products in subsequent lignin depolymerization studies. The excellent correlation between model and lignin experiments highlights the relevance of this new class of model compounds for broader use in catalysis studies. Only by understanding the reactivity of the linkages in lignin at this level of detail can fully optimized lignin depolymerization strategies be developed.

  16. Effect of lignin on water vapor barrier, mechanical, and structural properties of agar/lignin composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable composite films were prepared using two renewable resources based biopolymers, agar and lignin alkali. The lignin was used as a reinforcing material and agar as a biopolymer matrix. The effect of lignin concentration (1, 3, 5, and 10wt%) on the performance of the composite films was studied. In addition, the mechanical, water vapor barrier, UV light barrier properties, FE-SEM, and TGA of the films were analyzed. The agar/lignin films exhibited higher mechanical and UV barrier properties along with lower water vapor permeability compared to the neat agar film. The FTIR and SEM results showed the compatibility of lignin with agar polymer. The swelling ratio and moisture content of agar/lignin composite films were decreased with increase in lignin content. The thermostability and char content of agar/lignin composite films increased with increased lignin content. The results suggested that agar/lignin films have a potential to be used as a UV barrier food packaging material for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  17. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF CHITOSAN/LIGNIN COMPOSITE FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Chen; Chang-yu Tang; Nan-ying Ning; Chao-yu Wang; Qiang Fu; Qin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable composite films based on chitosan and lignin with various composition were prepared via the solution-casting technique.FT-IR results indicate the existence of hydrogen bonding between chitosan and lignin,and SEM images show that lignin could be well dispersed in chitosan when the content of lignin is below 20 wt% due to the strong interfacial interaction.As a result of strong interaction and good dispersion,the tensile strength,storage modulus,thermal degradation temperature and glass transition temperature of chitosan have been largely improved by adding lignin.Our work provides a simple and cheap way to prepare fully biodegradable chitosan/lignin composites,which could be used as packaging films or wound dressings.

  18. Comparison of lignin extraction processes: Economic and environmental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Juan C; Gómez, Álvaro; Cardona, Carlos A

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the technical-economic and environmental assessment of four lignin extraction processes from two different raw materials (sugarcane bagasse and rice husks). The processes are divided into two categories, the first processes evaluates lignin extraction with prior acid hydrolysis step, while in the second case the extraction processes are evaluated standalone for a total analysis of 16 scenarios. Profitability indicators as the net present value (NPV) and environmental indicators as the potential environmental impact (PEI) are used through a process engineering approach to understand and select the best lignin extraction process. The results show that both economically and environmentally process with sulfites and soda from rice husk presents the best results; however the quality of lignin obtained with sulfites is not suitable for high value-added products. Then, the soda is an interesting option for the extraction of lignin if high quality lignin is required for high value-added products at low costs.

  19. Lignin profiling in extracted xylans by size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Kliba, Gerhard; Potthast, Antje

    2016-10-20

    Utilization of the polymeric parts of lignocellulose is expected to gain increasing importance in future biorefinery scenarios. In that respect, a particular focus is placed on hemicelluloses from different wood species gained from an industrially feasible upgrading step in the production of dissolving pulps from paper pulps. During alkaline post-extractions for hemicellulose removal, residual lignins are extracted as well. They are either covalently linked to the extracted hardwood xylans or simply co-dissolved in the alkaline lye. In order to better describe the lignin in xylan containing lyes, a method for lignin profiling was set up by hyphenating size-exclusion chromatography of xylans with UV detection which facilitates visualization of the residual lignin distribution. Simultaneous lignin quantification was achieved with lignin standards prepared from Kraft cooking liquors. The setup presented may serve as advanced characterization for novel xylan products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biobased Epoxy Resins from Deconstructed Native Softwood Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pas, Daniel J; Torr, Kirk M

    2017-08-14

    The synthesis of novel epoxy resins from lignin hydrogenolysis products is reported. Native lignin in pine wood was depolymerized by mild hydrogenolysis to give an oil product that was reacted with epichlorohydrin to give epoxy prepolymers. These were blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or glycerol diglycidyl ether and cured with diethylenetriamine or isophorone diamine. The key novelty of this work lies in using the inherent properties of the native lignin in preparing new biobased epoxy resins. The lignin-derived epoxy prepolymers could be used to replace 25-75% of the bisphenol A diglycidyl ether equivalent, leading to increases of up to 52% in the flexural modulus and up to 38% in the flexural strength. Improvements in the flexural strength were attributed to the oligomeric products present in the lignin hydrogenolysis oil. These results indicate lignin hydrogenolysis products have potential as sustainable biobased polyols in the synthesis of high performance epoxy resins.

  1. Lignin-rich Enzyme Lignin (LREL), a Cellulase-treated Lignin-Carbohydrate Derived from Plants, Activates Myeloid Dendritic Cells via Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ryohei; Koizumi, Hideki; Aoki, Dan; Watanabe, Yuta; Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Lignin-carbohydrates, one of the major cell wall components, are believed to be the structures that form chemical linkage between lignin and cell wall polysaccharides. Due to the molecular complexity of lignin-containing substances, their isolation and the assignment of their biological activities have so far remained a difficult task. Here, we extracted two lignin-containing carbohydrates, lignin-rich enzyme lignin (LREL) and pure enzyme lignin (PEL), from barley husk and demonstrated that they act as immune stimulators of dendritic cells (DCs), which are particularly important in linking innate and adaptive immunity. Thioacidolysis, acid hydrolysis, and mild alkali hydrolysis of both LREL and PEL revealed that their immunostimulatory activities depended on the lignin structure and/or content, neutral sugar content (especially the characteristic distribution of galactose and mannose), and presence of an ester bond. Furthermore, we showed that the immunostimulatory potency of the lignin-carbohydrate depended on its molecular weight and degree of polymerization. We also demonstrated that the LREL-induced activation of DCs was mediated via TLR4. Thus, LREL-induced increases in the expression levels of several cell surface marker proteins, production of inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and TNF-α, and activation and nuclear translocation of transcription factors, as was observed in the WT DCs, were completely abrogated in DCs derived from the TLR4−/− mice but not in DCs derived from the TLR2−/−, TLR7−/−, and TLR9−/− mice. We further demonstrated that LRELs isolated from other plant tissues also activated DCs. These immunostimulatory activities of lignin-carbohydrates, extracted from edible plant tissues, could have potential relevance in anti-infectious immunity and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25548274

  2. Evidence for lignin oxidation by the giant panda fecal microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fang

    Full Text Available The digestion of lignin and lignin-related phenolic compounds from bamboo by giant pandas has puzzled scientists because of the lack of lignin-degrading genes in the genome of the bamboo-feeding animals. We constructed a 16S rRNA gene library from the microorganisms derived from the giant panda feces to identify the possibility for the presence of potential lignin-degrading bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the phylotypes of the intestinal bacteria were affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria (53% and Firmicutes (47%. Two phylotypes were affiliated with the known lignin-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the mangrove forest bacteria. To test the hypothesis that microbes in the giant panda gut help degrade lignin, a metagenomic library of the intestinal bacteria was constructed and screened for clones that contained genes encoding laccase, a lignin-degrading related enzyme. A multicopper oxidase gene, designated as lac51, was identified from a metagenomic clone. Sequence analysis and copper content determination indicated that Lac51 is a laccase rather than a metallo-oxidase and may work outside its original host cell because it has a TAT-type signal peptide and a transmembrane segment at its N-terminus. Lac51 oxidizes a variety of lignin-related phenolic compounds, including syringaldazine, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, ferulic acid, veratryl alcohol, guaiacol, and sinapinic acid at conditions that simulate the physiologic environment in giant panda intestines. Furthermore, in the presence of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS, syringic acid, or ferulic acid as mediators, the oxidative ability of Lac51 on lignin was promoted. The absorbance of lignin at 445 nm decreased to 36% for ABTS, 51% for syringic acid, and 51% for ferulic acid after incubation for 10 h. Our findings demonstrate that the intestinal bacteria of giant pandas may facilitate the oxidation of lignin moieties, thereby clarifying the digestion

  3. Solubilization and Mineralization of Lignin by White Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, C. David; Bradley R. Kropp; Reid, Ian D.

    1992-01-01

    The white rot fungi Lentinula edodes, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus sajor-caju, Flammulina velutipes, and Schizophyllum commune were grown in liquid media containing 14C-lignin-labelled wood, and the formation of water-soluble 14C-labelled products and 14CO2, the growth of the fungi, and the activities of extracellular lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and laccase were measured. Conditions that affect the rate of lignin degradation were imposed, and both long-term (0- to 16-da...

  4. Biodegradation of alkaline lignin by Bacillus ligniniphilus L1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Daochen; Zhang, Peipei; Xie, Changxiao; Zhang, Weimin; Sun, Jianzhong; Qian, Wei-Jun; Yang, Bin

    2017-02-21

    Background: Lignin is the most abundant aromatic biopolymer in the biosphere and it comprises up to 30% of plant biomass. Although lignin is the most recalcitrant component of the plant cell wall, still there are microorganisms able to decompose it or degrade it. Fungi are recognized as the most widely used microbes for lignin degradation. However, bacteria have also been known to be able to utilize lignin as a carbon or energy source. Bacillus ligniniphilus L1 was selected in this study due to its capability to utilize alkaline lignin as a single carbon or energy source and its excellent ability to survive in extreme environments. Results: To investigate the aromatic metabolites of strain L1 decomposing alkaline lignin, GC-MS analyze was performed and fifteen single phenol ring aromatic compounds were identified. The dominant absorption peak included phenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxy-benzoicacid, and vanillic acid with the highest proportion of metabolites resulting in 42%. Comparison proteomic analysis were carried out for further study showed that approximately 1447 kinds of proteins were produced, 141 of which were at least 2-fold up-regulated with alkaline lignin as the single carbon source. The up-regulated proteins contents different categories in the biological functions of protein including lignin degradation, ABC transport system, environmental response factors, protein synthesis and assembly, etc. Conclusions: GC-MS analysis showed that alkaline lignin degradation of strain L1 produced 15 kinds of aromatic compounds. Comparison proteomic data and metabolic analysis showed that to ensure the degradation of lignin and growth of strain L1, multiple aspects of cells metabolism including transporter, environmental response factors, and protein synthesis were enhanced. Based on genome and proteomic analysis, at least four kinds of lignin degradation pathway might be present in strain L1, including a Gentisate pathway, the benzoic acid pathway and the

  5. Lignin valorization: lignin nanoparticles as high-value bio-additive for multifunctional nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dong; Hu, Jinguang; Bao, Jie; Chandra, Richard P; Saddler, Jack N; Lu, Canhui

    2017-01-01

    Although conversion of low value but high-volume lignin by-product to its usable form is one of the determinant factors for building an economically feasible integrated lignocellulose biorefinery, it has been challenged by its structural complexity and inhomogeneity. We and others have shown that uniform lignin nanoparticles can be produced from a wide range of technical lignins, despite the varied lignocellulosic biomass and the pretreatment methods/conditions applied. This value-added nanostructure lignin enriched with multifunctional groups can be a promising versatile material platform for various downstream utilizations especially in the emerging nanocomposite fields. Inspired by the story of successful production and application of nanocellulose biopolymer, two types of uniform lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) were prepared through self-assembling of deep eutectic solvent (DES) and ethanol-organosolv extracted technical lignins derived from a two-stage fractionation pretreatment approach, respectively. Both LPNs exhibited sphere morphology with unique core-shell nanostructure, where the DES-LNPs showed a more uniform particle size distribution. When incorporated into the traditional polymeric matrix such as poly(vinyl alcohol), these LPN products displayed great potential to formulate a transparent nanocomposite film with additional UV-shielding efficacy (reached ~80% at 400 nm with 4 wt% of LNPs) and antioxidant functionalities (reached ~160 μm mol Trolox g(-1) with 4 wt% of LNPs). At the same time, the abundant phenolic hydroxyl groups on the shell of LNPs also provided good interfacial adhesion with PVA matrix through the formation of hydrogen bonding network, which further improved the mechanical and thermal performances of the fabricated LNPs/PVA nanocomposite films. Both LNPs are excellent candidates for producing multifunctional polymer nanocomposites using facile technical route. The prepared transparent and flexible LNPs/PVA composite films with

  6. Selective conversion of biorefinery lignin into dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-02-01

    The emerging biomass-to-biofuel conversion industry has created an urgent need for identifying new applications for biorefinery lignin. This paper demonstrates a new route to producing dicarboxylic acids from biorefinery lignin through chalcopyrite-catalyzed oxidation in a highly selective process. Up to 95 % selectivity towards stable dicarboxylic acids was obtained for several types of biorefinery lignin and model compounds under mild, environmentally friendly reaction conditions. The findings from this study paved a new avenue to biorefinery lignin conversions and applications. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Gramineae and Fabaceae Soda Lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Robles, Juan; Sánchez, Rafael; Espinosa, Eduardo; Savy, Davide; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Some agricultural residues such as wheat or barley straw, as well as certain fast-growing plants like Leucaena leucocephala and Chamaecytisus proliferus, could be used as raw materials for the paper industry as an alternative to traditional plants (eucalyptus, pine, etc.). In the present study, four types of lignin obtained from the spent liquors produced by the pulping processes using the abovementioned feedstocks were isolated and characterized. Lignin samples were acquired through an acid precipitation from these spent liquors. The characterization of the precipitated lignin samples were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and both liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to analyse the chemical structure, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for determining the thermal properties. Additionally, chemical composition of lignin fractions was also measured. Even though they were of different botanical origin, all the studied samples except for wheat straw lignin had a similar chemical composition and thermal behaviour, and identical chemical structure. Wheat straw lignin showed a greater amount of Klason lignin and lower carbohydrate content. Furthermore, this lignin sample showed a higher thermal stability and significantly different cross-peak patterns in the 2D-NMR experiments. The molecular structures corresponding to p-coumarate (PCA), ferulate (FA) and cinnamyl aldehyde end-groups (J) were only detected in wheat isolated lignin. PMID:28165411

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Gramineae and Fabaceae Soda Lignins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Domínguez-Robles

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some agricultural residues such as wheat or barley straw, as well as certain fast-growing plants like Leucaena leucocephala and Chamaecytisus proliferus, could be used as raw materials for the paper industry as an alternative to traditional plants (eucalyptus, pine, etc.. In the present study, four types of lignin obtained from the spent liquors produced by the pulping processes using the abovementioned feedstocks were isolated and characterized. Lignin samples were acquired through an acid precipitation from these spent liquors. The characterization of the precipitated lignin samples were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and both liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR to analyse the chemical structure, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA for determining the thermal properties. Additionally, chemical composition of lignin fractions was also measured. Even though they were of different botanical origin, all the studied samples except for wheat straw lignin had a similar chemical composition and thermal behaviour, and identical chemical structure. Wheat straw lignin showed a greater amount of Klason lignin and lower carbohydrate content. Furthermore, this lignin sample showed a higher thermal stability and significantly different cross-peak patterns in the 2D-NMR experiments. The molecular structures corresponding to p-coumarate (PCA, ferulate (FA and cinnamyl aldehyde end-groups (J were only detected in wheat isolated lignin.

  9. CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGNIN REACTIONS IN SODA COOKING OF WHEAT STRAW——PART 1 REACTION OF UNCONDENSED LIGNIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaminZhai; YuanzongLai

    2004-01-01

    Characteristics of uncondensed lignin reactions in soda cooking of wheat straw were studied. Mild and intense cooking conditions were used to get the pulp sample in which lignin was dissolved physically and the pulp sample in which lignin was dissolved chemically respectively. The pulp samples were analyzed by phenolic group determination, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation and ozonation method. The results indicated that around 90% of lignin in wheat straw is alkali-soluble at the mild conditions, is basically dissolved physically without chemical change. The phenolic group content was not changed greatly, the nitrobenzene oxidation yield only changed slightly during the mild cooking. The phenolic group content was increased obviously and uncondensed lignin content was decreased very much when the intense cooking conditions were applied and the delignification was over 90%. The lignin structure was changed greatly during this period.

  10. Effective Release of Lignin Fragments from Lignocellulose by Lewis Acid Metal Triflates in the Lignin-First Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Jiadong; Korányi, Tamás I; Boot, Michael D; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-12-08

    Adding value to lignin, the most complex and recalcitrant fraction in lignocellulosic biomass, is highly relevant to costefficient operation of biorefineries. We report the use of homogeneous metal triflates to rapidly release lignin from biomass. Combined with metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis, the process separates woody biomass into few lignin-derived alkylmethoxyphenols and cellulose under mild conditions. Model compound studies show the unique catalytic properties of metal triflates in cleaving lignin-carbohydrate interlinkages. The lignin fragments can then be disassembled by hydrogenolysis. The tandem process is flexible and allows obtaining good aromatic monomer yields from different woods (36-48 wt %, lignin base). The cellulose-rich residue is an ideal feedstock for established biorefining processes. The highly productive strategy is characterized by short reaction times, low metal triflate catalyst requirement, and leaving cellulose largely untouched. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins: a comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra; Wienk, Hans L.J.; Frissen, A.E.; Peinder, de Peter; Boelens, Rolf; Es, van D.S.; Grisel, Ruud J.H.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to deviseefficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering threemain industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  12. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins : A comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374650519; Wienk, Hans L J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203884884; Frissen, Augustinus E.; Peinder, Peter De|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325810818; Boelens, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Van Es, Daan S.; Grisel, Ruud J H; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Gosselink, Richard J A; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  13. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins: a comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra; Wienk, Hans L.J.; Frissen, A.E.; Peinder, de Peter; Boelens, Rolf; Es, van D.S.; Grisel, Ruud J.H.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to deviseefficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering threemain industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and Alcel

  14. Biosynthesis and incorporation of side-chain-truncated lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization and enhance saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; George, Anthe; Mukerjee, Purba; Kim, Jin S; Pollet, Brigitte; Benke, Peter I; Yang, Fan; Mitra, Prajakta; Sun, Lan; Cetinkol, Ozgül P; Chabout, Salem; Mouille, Grégory; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Balzergue, Sandrine; Singh, Seema; Holmes, Bradley M; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Lapierre, Catherine; Ralph, John; Loqué, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is utilized as a renewable feedstock in various agro-industrial activities. Lignin is an aromatic, hydrophobic and mildly branched polymer integrally associated with polysaccharides within the biomass, which negatively affects their extraction and hydrolysis during industrial processing. Engineering the monomer composition of lignins offers an attractive option towards new lignins with reduced recalcitrance. The presented work describes a new strategy developed in Arabidopsis for the overproduction of rare lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization degree (DP). Biosynthesis of these 'DP reducers' is achieved by expressing a bacterial hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase-lyase (HCHL) in lignifying tissues of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. HCHL cleaves the propanoid side-chain of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA lignin precursors to produce the corresponding hydroxybenzaldehydes so that plant stems expressing HCHL accumulate in their cell wall higher amounts of hydroxybenzaldehyde and hydroxybenzoate derivatives. Engineered plants with intermediate HCHL activity levels show no reduction in total lignin, sugar content or biomass yield compared with wild-type plants. However, cell wall characterization of extract-free stems by thioacidolysis and by 2D-NMR revealed an increased amount of unusual C₆C₁ lignin monomers most likely linked with lignin as end-groups. Moreover the analysis of lignin isolated from these plants using size-exclusion chromatography revealed a reduced molecular weight. Furthermore, these engineered lines show saccharification improvement of pretreated stem cell walls. Therefore, we conclude that enhancing the biosynthesis and incorporation of C₆C₁ monomers ('DP reducers') into lignin polymers represents a promising strategy to reduce lignin DP and to decrease cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied

  15. Silencing CHALCONE SYNTHASE in Maize Impedes the Incorporation of Tricin into Lignin and Increases Lignin Content1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is a phenolic heteropolymer that is deposited in secondary-thickened cell walls, where it provides mechanical strength. A recent structural characterization of cell walls from monocot species showed that the flavone tricin is part of the native lignin polymer, where it is hypothesized to initiate lignin chains. In this study, we investigated the consequences of altered tricin levels on lignin structure and cell wall recalcitrance by phenolic profiling, nuclear magnetic resonance, and saccharification assays of the naturally silenced maize (Zea mays) C2-Idf (inhibitor diffuse) mutant, defective in the CHALCONE SYNTHASE Colorless2 (C2) gene. We show that the C2-Idf mutant produces highly reduced levels of apigenin- and tricin-related flavonoids, resulting in a strongly reduced incorporation of tricin into the lignin polymer. Moreover, the lignin was enriched in β-β and β-5 units, lending support to the contention that tricin acts to initiate lignin chains and that, in the absence of tricin, more monolignol dimerization reactions occur. In addition, the C2-Idf mutation resulted in strikingly higher Klason lignin levels in the leaves. As a consequence, the leaves of C2-Idf mutants had significantly reduced saccharification efficiencies compared with those of control plants. These findings are instructive for lignin engineering strategies to improve biomass processing and biochemical production. PMID:27940492

  16. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  17. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the influence of lignin on biofuel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raut, Mahendra P; Couto, Narciso; Pham, Trong K; Evans, Caroline; Noirel, Josselin; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    ... cellobiose, prior to bioproduction of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) and hydrogen. Fermentation capability is limited by lignin and thus process optimization requires knowledge of lignin inhibition...

  19. Selective aerobic alcohol oxidation method for conversion of lignin into simple aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Shannon S; Rahimi, Alireza

    2015-03-03

    Described is a method to oxidize lignin or lignin sub-units. The method includes oxidation of secondary benzylic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit to a corresponding ketone in the presence of unprotected primarily aliphatic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit. The optimal catalyst system consists of HNO.sub.3 in combination with another Bronsted acid, in the absence of a metal-containing catalyst, thereby yielding a selectively oxidized lignin or lignin sub-unit. The method may be carried out in the presence or absence of additional reagents including TEMPO and TEMPO derivatives.

  20. Near-Ir surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Compacted powders of commercially available nano- and microparticles of silver were used to successfully induce the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in spruce milled-wood lignin (MWL). For the two silver particle sizes used in this investigation, the spectra were mostly similar. Some general characteristics of the lignin SERS spectrum are described. The...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTIONATED LIGNINS POLYMERIZED BY FUNGAL LACCASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel van de Pas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Lignins are important biopolymers that can be converted into value-added materials by enzymatic treatments. However, the heterogeneity of the lignin polymer makes it a challenging material to modify. Thus, chemical fractionation was used to obtain lignins with high homogeneity in order to assess their biotechnological utilization. Commercial Alcell, birch organosolv lignins, and steam-exploded pine and eucalypt lignins were sequentially fractionated by ether, ether/acetone 4:1 (v:v, and acetone. All fractions were structurally characterized prior to treatments with Thielavia arenaria, Trametes hirsuta, and Melanocarpus albomyces laccases. The reactivities of the enzymes towards the lignins were determined by oxygen consumption measurements, and the degree of polymerization was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that the surfaces of the lignin nanoparticles were dispersed in the enzyme treatment, suggesting an increase in hydrophilicity of the surfaces detected as loosened morphology. Hence, it was concluded that enzyme-aided valorization is an attractive means for lignin modification, provided that optimum reaction conditions are employed.

  2. Noncatalytic Direct Liquefaction of Biorefinery Lignin by Ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann; Jensen, Anders; Madsen, Line Riis

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in lignin valorization to biofuels and chemicals. Here, we propose a novel and simple noncatalytic process to directly liquefy lignin rich solid residual from second generation bioethanol production by solvolysis with ethanol. Through an extensive parameter study...

  3. Metal Triflates for the Production of Aromatics from Lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Peter J.; Lahive, Ciaran W.; Lancefield, Christopher S.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Kamer, Paul C. J.; Barta, Katalin; de Vries, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    The depolymerization of lignin into valuable aromatic chemicals is one of the key goals towards establishing economically viable biorefineries. In this contribution we present a simple approach for converting lignin to aromatic monomers in high yields under mild reaction conditions. The methodology

  4. Activated effect of lignin on α-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Cui, Jun-Hui; Yin, Tingting; Sun, Lizhou; Li, Genxi

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a new kind of activator of α-amylase, lignin, which can greatly increase α-amylase activity. The promoted ratio of lignin is even much higher than that of chloride ion, the traditional activator of α-amylase. Further experimental results reveal that lignin may interact with α-amylase to form a 1:1 complex with a binding constant of 4.47×10(5) M(-1). The binding is spontaneous and lignin/α-amylase complex formation is an exothermal reaction. Hydrogen bonding plays a key role and non-radiation energy transfers from α-amylase to lignin in the binding process. Lignin, combining with α-amylase, conforms to a first-order exponential decay function. The formation of the lignin/α-amylase complex results in the reduction of α-helical content from 57.7% to 53.9%, the increase of the polarity around tryptophan residues, the decrease of the hydrophobicity, and the enlargement of protein granule volume. This work will give a deeper insight into lignin as a kind of dietary fibre, known as an important food functional factor. Furthermore, it also contributes to the exploration of an activator of α-amylase, used in the food industry.

  5. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  6. Lignin-degrading enzyme from the hymenomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, M.; Kirk, T.K.

    1983-08-12

    The extracellular fluid of ligninolytic cultures of the wood-decomposing basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burds contains an enzyme that degrades lignin substructure model compounds as well as spruce and birch lignins. It has a molecular size of 42,000 daltons and requires hydrogen peroxide for activity. (Refs. 24).

  7. Lignin-based cement fluid loss control additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, P.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a hydraulic cement slurry composition. It comprises: a hydraulic cement, and the following expressed as parts by weight per 100 parts of the hydraulic cement, water from about 25 to 105 parts, and from abut 0.5 to 2.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of a sulfonated lignin and a sulfomethylated lignin, wherein the lignin has been sequentially crosslinked by reacting the lignin with a member of the group consisting of formaldehyde and epichlorohydrin and alkoxylated with between about 2 to about 6 moles of a compound selected from the group consisting of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, butylene oxide and a combination thereof per 1000 g of the lignin.

  8. Selective production of 4-ethylphenolics from lignin via mild hydrogenolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yueyuan; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Juan; Chang, Jie

    2012-08-01

    Selective production of 4-ethylphenolics from lignin via mild hydrogenolysis was reported in this short communication. The hydrogenolysis of lignin was carried out in an autoclave with 65 vol.% ethanol/water as solvent, with 5% Ru/C, Pd/C and Pt/C as catalysts. The influences of catalysts, lignin species, and reaction conditions including reaction temperature, reaction time, and initial H(2) pressure on yield of target compounds were investigated. 3.1% 4-Ethylphenol and 1.3% 4-ethylguaiacol based on lignin could be obtained simultaneously from hydrogenolysis of corn stalk lignin, which is approximate to the yield obtained from petrochemical route. The results of this work showed that this novel method is a quite promising technique for the substitution of petrochemical route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. INFLUENCE OF REACTION CONDITIONS ON LIGNIN HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier eErdocia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Organosolv lignin, obtained from olive tree pruning under optimised conditions, was subjected to a hydrothermal depolymerisation process catalysed by sodium hydroxide. The depolymerisation of lignin was carried out at 300 ºC using different reaction times (20, 40, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 min in order to study the influence of this parameter on lignin depolymerisation. The resulting products (oil and residual lignin were measured and analysed by different techniques (GC/MS, HPSEC and pyrolysis-GC/MS in order to determine their nature and composition. Coke was also formed, at a lower quantity, incompetitive repolymerisation reactions during the lignin hydrothermal treatment. The maximum oil yield and concentration of monomeric phenolic compounds was obtained after80 min of reaction time. The highest reaction time studied (100 min had the worst results with the lowest oil yield and highest coke production.

  10. EFFECT OF LIGNIN CONTENT ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF FURFURAL RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic saccharification of pretreated furfural residues with different lignin content was studied to verify the effect of lignin removal in the hydrolysis process. The results showed that the glucose yield was improved by increasing the lignin removal. A maximum glucose yield of 96.8% was obtained when the residue with a lignin removal of 51.4% was hydrolyzed for 108 h at an enzyme loading of 25 FPU/g cellulose. However, further lignin removal did not increase the hydrolysis. The effect of enzyme loading on the enzymatic hydrolysis was also explored in this work. It was concluded that a high glucose yield of 90% was achieved when the enzyme dosage was reduced from 25 to 15 FPU/g cellulose, which was cost-effective for the sugar and ethanol production. The structures of raw material and delignified samples were further characterized by XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.

  11. POLYETHER POLYURETHANE FROM MODIFIED WHEAT STRAW OXYGEN-ALKALINE LIGNIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QuanxiaoLiu; HuaiyuZhan; BeihaiHe; ShuhuiYang; JianhuaLiu; JianluLiu(1); ZhenxingPang

    2004-01-01

    Polyether polyurethane was synthesized from modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin, polyethylene glycol and two different diisocyanates (diphenylemethane-4, 4'-diisocyanate, tolulene diisocyanate) by solution casting method, its properties were investigated. The results show that modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin can substitute part of polyethylene glycol to react with diisocyanate to synthesize polyurethane. The molar ratio of NCO to OH and modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin content affect the properties of lignin-based polyether polyurethane respectively. The addition of plasticizer in the polyurethane synthesis process improves the properties of synthesized polyurethane, especially the elasticity of polyurethane. The synthesized polyurethane from modified wheat straw oxygen-alkali lignin can be used as both engineering plastic and hard foam plastic in future.

  12. POLYETHER POLYURETHANE FROM MODIFIED WHEAT STRAW OXYGEN-ALKALINE LIGNIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanxiao Liu; Huaiyu Zhan; Beihai He; Shuhui Yang; Jianhua Liu; Jianlu Liu; Zhenxing Pang

    2004-01-01

    Polyether polyurethane was synthesized from modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin,polyethylene glycol and two different diisocyanates (diphenylemethane-4, 4′-diisocyanate, tolulene diisocyanate) by solution casting method, its properties were investigated. The results show that modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin can substitute part of polyethylene glycol to react with diisocyanate to synthesize polyurethane. The molar ratio of NCO to OH and modified wheat straw oxygen-alkaline lignin content affect the properties of lignin-based polyether polyurethane respectively. The addition of plasticizer in the polyurethane synthesis process improves the properties of synthesized polyurethane, especially the elasticity of polyurethane. The synthesized polyurethane from modified wheat straw oxygen-alkali lignin can be used as both engineering plastic and hard foam plastic in future.

  13. Extraction and characterization of lignin from different biomass resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereca Watkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass has been acknowledged for potential use to produce chemicals and biomaterials. Lignin is the second most abundant natural polymer with cellulose being number one, making up to 10–25% of lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a three-dimensional, highly cross-linked macromolecule composed of three types of substituted phenols, which include: coniferyl, sinapyl, and p-coumaryl alcohols by enzymatic polymerization, yielding a vast number of functional groups and linkages. There is a wide range of lignin sources available, including: jute, hemp, cotton, and wood pulp. Hence, the lignin's physical and chemical behavior will be different with respect to the original source and extraction method used. The objective of this research is to extract lignin from nonwood cellulosic biomass (Wheat straw, Pine straw, Alfalfa, Kenaf, and Flax fiber by formic acid treatment followed by peroxyformic acid treatment for the potential use as a partial replacement for the phenol precursor in resole phenolic systems. Isolated lignins were purified to remove impurities and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis to compare thermal properties and chemical composition. It was found that lignin obtained from alfalfa provided the greatest yield of the various sources. Enthalpy measurements were higher for lignin from flax fiber and alfalfa at 190.57 and 160.90 J/g, respectively. The source of lignin samples was seen to affect the thermal properties. Overall, lignin extracted from wheat straw had the greatest thermal stability followed very closely by that obtained from flax fiber.

  14. Ammonia Pretreatment of Corn Stover Enables Facile Lignin Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Kandemkavil, Sindhu; Reed, Michelle L.; Biddy, Mary J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2017-01-30

    Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose is often employed to render polysaccharides more digestible by carbohydrate-active enzymes to maximize sugar yields. The fate of lignin during pretreatment, however, is highly dependent on the chemistry employed and must be considered in cases where lignin valorization is targeted alongside sugar conversion - an important feature of future biorefinery development. Here, a two-step process is demonstrated in which anhydrous ammonia (AA) pretreatment is followed by mild NaOH extraction on corn stover to solubilize and fractionate lignin. As known, AA pretreatment simultaneously alters the structure of cellulose with enhanced digestibility while redistributing lignin. The AA-pretreated residue is then extracted with dilute NaOH at mild conditions to maximize lignin separation, resulting in a digestible carbohydrate-rich solid fraction and a solubilized lignin stream. Lignin removal of more than 65% with over 84% carbohydrate retention is achieved after mild NaOH extraction of AA-pretreated corn stover with 0.1 M NaOH at 25 degrees C. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy of the AA-pretreated residue shows that ammonolysis of ester bonds occurs to partially liberate hydroxycinnamic acids, and the AA-pretreated/NaOH-extracted residue exhibits a global reduction of all lignin moieties caused by reduced lignin content. A significant reduction (~70%) in the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of extracted lignin is also achieved. Imaging of AA-pretreated/NaOH extracted residues show extensive delamination and disappearance of coalesced lignin globules from within the secondary cell walls. Glycome profiling analyses demonstrates ultrastructural level cell wall modifications induced by AA pretreatment and NaOH extraction, resulting in enhanced extractability of hemicellulosic glycans, indicating enhanced polysaccharide accessibility. The glucose and xylose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis of AA

  15. On the propensity of lignin to associate: a size exclusion chromatography study with lignin derivatives isolated from different plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Anderson; Gaspar, Armindo R; Contreras, Sofía; Lucia, Lucian A; Crestini, Claudia; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2007-10-01

    Despite evidence that lignin associates under both aqueous and organic media, the magnitude and nature of the underlying driving forces are still a matter of discussion. The present paper addresses this issue by examining both solution properties and size exclusion behaviour of lignins isolated from five different species of softwoods, as well as from the angiosperms Eucalyptus globulus and wheat straw. This investigation has used the recently described protocol for isolating enzymatic mild acidolysis lignin (EMAL), which offers lignin samples highly representative of the overall lignin present in the wood cell wall. The molecular weight distributions of these EMALs were found to be dependent upon the wood species from which they were isolated and upon the incubation conditions used prior to size exclusion chromatography. While the chromatograms of EMALs isolated from softwoods displayed a bimodal behaviour, the elution profiles of EMAL from E. globulus and straw were nearly unimodal. A marked tendency to dissociate prevailed under incubation at room temperature for all examined species with the exception of the straw lignin preparation; furthermore, lignin solutions incubated at 4 degrees C showed an associative behaviour manifested by an increase in the weight and number average molecular weights for some species. The extent of such association/dissociation, as well as the time needed for the process to reach completion, was also found to depend upon the wood species, i.e. lignins from softwoods were found to associate/dissociate to a greater extent than lignins from E. globulus and straw. The origin of such effects within the lignin structure is also discussed.

  16. Lignin Characterization of Triploid Clones of Populus tomentosa Carr.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xiao-juan; Pu Jun-wen; Xie Yi-min; Takeshi Furuno; Liu Xin-yu

    2005-01-01

    In order to understand the structural characteristics of lignin in triploid clones ofPopulus tomentosa and its changes in the processes of pulping and bleaching, milled wood lignin (MWL), lignin carbohydrate complex (LCC) and the residual lignin from kraft pulp (KP) and sulfite pulp (SP) were isolated and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The most diagnostic peaks were assigned and the differences were discussed. The spectral patterns reveal that triploid P. tomentosa shows the specific features of hardwood from temperate areas, but in the spectrum of FTIR, the strength ratio of A1270 cm-1 to A1226 cm-1 is 0.88, higher than the average of hardwood from temperate areas, which will make the lignin delignification more difficult during pulping and bleaching. The LCC from triploid P. tomentosa is mainly composed of xyloglucan and glucuronic acid, and other glucides have much lower ratio. In LCC FTIR, there are three peaks at 1 427, 1 329 and 1046 cm--1, indicating that both semi-cellulose and cellulose could exist in LCC, and that there might be relationships between cellulose and lignin. Compared with the residual lignin from KP and SP, the condensed structure in KP is more than that in SP.

  17. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  18. Dissolving Lignin in Water through Enzymatic Sulfation with Aryl Sulfotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Pepijn; Narani, Anand; Hartog, Aloysius F; Wever, Ron; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2017-05-22

    We introduce the concept of using site-specific sulfation of various lignins for increasing their aqueous solubility and thereby their processability. Using p-nitrophenylsulfate as a sulfate source and an aryl sulfotransferase enzyme as catalyst, lignins are easily sulfated at ambient conditions. We demonstrate the specific sulfation of phenolic hydroxyl groups on five different lignins: Indulin AT (Kraft softwood), Protobind 1000 (mixed wheat straw/Sarkanda grass soda) and three organosolv lignins. The reaction proceeds smoothly and the increase in solubility is visible to the naked eye. We then examine the reaction kinetics, and show that these are easily monitored qualitatively and quantitatively using UV/Vis spectroscopy. The UV/Vis results are validated with (31) P NMR spectroscopy of the lignin phenol groups after derivatization with phosphorylation reagent II. In general, the results are more significant with organosolv lignins, as Kraft and soda lignins are produced from aqueous lignocellulose extraction processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Enzymatic Degradation of Lignin in Soil: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Datta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a major component of soil organic matter and also a rich source of carbon dioxide in soils. However, because of its complex structure and recalcitrant nature, lignin degradation is a major challenge. Efforts have been made from time to time to understand the lignin polymeric structure better and develop simpler, economical, and bio-friendly methods of degradation. Certain enzymes from specialized bacteria and fungi have been identified by researchers that can metabolize lignin and enable utilization of lignin-derived carbon sources. In this review, we attempt to provide an overview of the complexity of lignin’s polymeric structure, its distribution in forest soils, and its chemical nature. Herein, we focus on lignin biodegradation by various microorganism, fungi and bacteria present in plant biomass and soils that are capable of producing ligninolytic enzymes such as lignin peroxidase (LiP, manganese peroxidase (MnP, versatile peroxidase (VP, and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP. The relevant and recent reports have been included in this review.

  20. Characterization of the lignin polymer in Brassicaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hemmati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Residues of medicinal plants after extraction and weeds are suitable candidates for bioethanol production. Significant barriers exist to make the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstock to biofuel cost effective and environmentally friendly; one of which is the lignin polymer. Brassicaceae family is one of the potential targets for biofuel production. The structural characteristics of lignin from Hirschfeldia incana, Sisymbrium altissimum and Cardaria draba were studied in comparison to that of Brassica napus. Methods: Lignin deposition was observed by phloroglucinol and Mäule staining. The total lignin content was determined by Klason method. Maximum UV absorbance and FT-IR spectra were compared. Ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignin (S/G ratio as a metric of lignin digestibility was determined by DFRC followed by GC-MS analysis. 1H-NMR spectra of the total lignin was compared with other spectroscopic methods. Results: Staining of thestem cross sections of C. draba showed higher G units in contrast to the higher S units in S. altissimum which was in agreement with 1H-NMR analysis. Total lignin content for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum was 27.10%, 23.8% and 24.5%, respectively. The specific maximum UV absorbance appeared between 230-260 nm. FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of more aromatic structures in the seed maturation stage than the flowering stage. S/G ratio was 0.26, 0.10 and 0.22 for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum, respectively.  Conclusion: Except Cardaria draba with the predominance of G subunits in lignin polymer, Hirschfeldia incana and Sisymbrium altissimum are suitable candidates for bioethanol production.

  1. Tunable Pickering emulsions with polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silmore, Kevin S; Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2016-03-15

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer that has native interfacial functions but aggregates strongly in aqueous media. Polyacrylamide was grafted onto kraft lignin nanoparticles using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) chemistry to form polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs) that tune aggregation strength while retaining interfacial activities in forming Pickering emulsions. Polymer graft density on the particle surface, ionic strength, and initial water and cyclohexane volume fractions were varied and found to have profound effects on emulsion characteristics, including emulsion volume fraction, droplet size, and particle interfacial concentration that were attributed to changes in lignin aggregation and hydrophobic interactions. In particular, salt concentration was found to have a significant effect on aggregation, zeta potential, and interfacial tension, which was attributed to changes in solubility of both the kraft lignin and the polyacrylamide grafts. Dynamic light scattering, UV-vis spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and tensiometry were used to quantify emulsion properties and nanoparticle behavior. Under all conditions, the emulsions exhibited relatively fast creaming but were stable against coalescence and Ostwald ripening for a period of months. All emulsions were also oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions, as predicted by the Bancroft rule, and no catastrophic phase inversions were observed for any nanoparticle compositions. We conclude that lower grafting density of polyacrylamide on a lignin core resulted in high levels of interfacial activity, as characterized by higher concentration at the water-cyclohexane interface with a corresponding decrease in interfacial tension. These results indicate that the interfacial properties of polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles are primarily due to the native hydrophobic interactions of the lignin core. These results suggest that the forces that drive aggregation are also correlated with interfacial

  2. Synthesis of novel ionic liquids from lignin-derived compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socha, Aaron; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Bergeron, Maxime

    2017-09-19

    Methods and compositions are provided for synthesizing ionic liquids from lignin derived compounds comprising: contacting a starting material comprising lignin with a depolymerization agent to depolymerize the lignin and form a mixture of aldehyde containing compounds; contacting the mixture of aldehyde containing compounds with an amine under conditions suitable to convert the mixture of aldehyde containing compounds to a mixture of amine containing compounds; and contacting the mixture of amine containing compounds with an acid under conditions suitable to form an ammonium salt, thereby preparing the ionic liquid.

  3. Stimulation of two step degradation of sodium ascorbate by lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, H; Satoh, K

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-lignin stimulated the degradation of sodium ascorbate in phosphate-buffered saline, fetal bovine serum and culture medium, but not in distilled water. ESR spectroscopy revealed that alkali-lignin stimulated ascorbyl radical production even in distilled water. Similar stimulation activity was found in several other plant extracts, commercial and natural lignified materials. These data suggest that the lignin-stimulated degradation process of ascorbate might be separated into two processes, the first being the ascorbyl radical production process and the second the degradation process.

  4. The dual effects of lignin content on enzymatic hydrolysis using film composed of cellulose and lignin as a structure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Tian; Wu, Yuying; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The degree of delignification during pretreatment is a critical question for economic conversion of biomass to sugar platform. Many models have been used to study the optimum lignin content in biomass, but few of them are able to study without disturbances, such as the complex component and structure of biomass. A novel film model composed of only cellulose and lignin was used to investigate the effect of lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis. High lignin-cellulose proportion (10.00-31.25%) hindered enzymatic hydrolysis, whereas low lignin-cellulose proportion (2.00-8.00%) showed a notable potential to promote enzymatic hydrolysis. The enzymatic hydrolysis rate of lignin-cellulose (6.00%) film was 11.5% higher than that of pure cellulose films. Further study indicated that the promotion was due to the enhancement of film porosity and roughness by residual lignin. Thus, based on the biomimetic model, excessive delignification is not recommended in view of efficient conversion and economy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A facile method for processing lignin reinforced chitosan biopolymer microfibres: optimising the fibre mechanical properties through lignin type and concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Loo, L. S.; Goh, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    A chitosan biopolymer microfibre—reinforced by lignin—has been processed by a wet-spinning method. To optimise the fibre mechanical and structural properties two types of lignin, with molecular weights 28 000 g mol-1 and 60 000 g mol-1, were examined and the chitosan fibre was blended with the respective lignin type at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 wt% lignin concentrations. The main effects of lignin type and concentration, as well as the interaction between the two parameters, on the fibre tensile stiffness, extensibility, strength and toughness were evaluated using the two-factor analysis of variance. Significant variations in the respective mechanical properties were observed with varying lignin concentrations (P results were related to the dispersion of lignin in the fibre and the nature of the bonds between lignin and chitosan, based on findings from scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This new method for the fabrication of chitosan biopolymer microfibre is inexpensive and versatile and could lend itself to the production of high performance biocomposite structures.

  6. Lignin peroxidase-negative mutant of the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Boominathan, K; Dass, S B; Randall, T A; Kelley, R.L.; Reddy, C A

    1990-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces two classes of extracellular heme proteins, designated lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases, that play a key role in lignin degradation. In this study we isolated and characterized a lignin peroxidase-negative mutant (lip mutant) that showed 16% of the ligninolytic activity (14C-labeled synthetic lignin----14CO2) exhibited by the wild type. The lip mutant did not produce detectable levels of lignin peroxidase, whereas the wild type, under identical...

  7. Membrane Technology for the Recovery of Lignin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Humpert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of renewable resources is becoming increasingly important, and only sustainable processes that convert such resources into useful products can achieve environmentally beneficial economic growth. Wastewater from the pulp and paper industry is an unutilized resource offering the potential to recover valuable products such as lignin, pigments, and water [1]. The recovery of lignin is particularly important because it has many applications, and membrane technology has been investigated as the basis of innovative recovery solutions. The concentration of lignin can be increased from 62 to 285 g∙L−1 using membranes and the recovered lignin is extremely pure. Membrane technology is also scalable and adaptable to different waste liquors from the pulp and paper industry.

  8. Hydrothermal fractionation of woody biomass: Lignin effect on sugars recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedro, Florencia M; Cantero, Danilo A; Pascual, Marcos; García-Serna, Juan; Cocero, M José

    2015-09-01

    Subcritical water was employed to fractionate woody biomass into carbohydrates and lignin. Nine urban trees species (hardwood and softwood) from Spain were studied. The experiments were carried out in a semi-continuous reactor at 250 °C for 64 min. The hemicellulose and cellulose recovery yields were between 30%wt. and 80%wt. while the lignin content in the solid product ranged between 32%wt. and 92%wt. It was observed that an increment of solubilized lignin disfavored the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses. It was determined that the maximum extraction of hemicellulose was achieved at 20 min of solid reaction time while the extraction of celluloses not exhibited a maximum value. The hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose would be governed by the hydrolysis kinetic and the polymers accessibility. In addition, the extraction of hemicellulose was negatively affected by the lignin content in the raw material while cellulose hydrolysis was not affected by this parameter.

  9. Valorization of lignin from biorefineries for fuels and chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann

    to deoxygenation as the majority of CO2 comes from the lignin. Solvent reaction routes were investigated in a separate study where different primaryalcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol) were used. Primary reactions responsible for solvent loss were direct decomposition to gas through...... without theneed for exhaustive deoxygenation. Batch autoclave experiments on lignin supercritical solvolysis in ethanol revealed the effects of different reaction temperatures, reaction times and degrees of ligninloading on product yields and bio-oil quality. The highest oil yield of 50 wt......Direct lignin liquefaction is a promising process for lignin valorization in which ligninis treated in a solvent at elevated temperature and pressure. Liquefaction of sulfur freelignin obtained as a waste product from 2nd generation bio-ethanol production canprovide a sulfur free bio-oil which may...

  10. Treatment of Lignin and Waste residues by Flash Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    Lignin, sewage sludge and macroalg ae (nonconventional biomasses) fast pyrolysis properties has been studied through experimental investigations on a la boratory Pyrolysis Centrifugal Reactor (PCR) and a model on lignin pyrolysis have been developed. Fu rthermore the nonconventional biomass...... ethanol plant a bio-oil can be produced with oil yields of 36% (daf) and an oil en ergy recovery of 45%. This is a relatively low bio-oil yield compared to other feedstock’s, however, it may increase the value of the lignin residual product, such that the lignin char is used for combustion on the ethanol...... plant, and the bio-oil is sold for use on heavy oil burners. The macroalgae is a promising feedstock w ith a high bio-oil yield of 54 wt% daf and an energy recovery of 76 % in the liquid oil. Detailed characteriza tion of the pyrolysis products in the form of bio-oil, gas and char has been performed...

  11. LIGNIN ADSORPTION AND KAPPA NUMBER IN ETHANOL PULPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjian Xu; Xinping Li; Meiyun Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of washing temperature, washing stages and the cooking operation on the ethanol pulp had been investigated, and the reason for higher kappa number of the ethanol pulp was discussed. The results preliminarily showed that the dissolved lignin could re-adsorb to fiber surface by means of fiber classification technology and explained the questions found during the study. Some measures were taken to reduce the kappa number, the results had shown that there was obvious absorption in the ethanol pulping;lignin remained in the pulp could easily be dissolved and the pulp with lower kappa number could be obtained at a higher temperature; the kappa number could reduce by increasing washing time; it could enable dissolved lignin to separate out from the ethanol pulp and restrain the lignin absorption by blowing cooking liquid at high temperature.

  12. Lignin in Marine Environment and Its Analysis-A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianguo; ZHANG Ting; SUN Shuwen; LAN Haiqing; YU Tao

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a group of phenolic polymers which is abundant in the woody tissues of vascular plants,and is essentially absent from all other living organisms.It has therefore been accepted as a tracer for terrestrial organic carbon (TOC) in marine environment since the 1970s.Lignin polymers are not amenable to direct chemical analysis without prior isolation.This review focused on the methods of chemical decomposition,extraction,derivatization and detection of lignin in marine environment.We described and compared several chemical decomposition methods,including nitrobenzene oxidation,alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation and thermochemolysis,and detection methods such as gas chromatography (GC),gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS),high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and so on.Possible improvement of lignin analysis and the application prospects of this tracer were also discussed.

  13. Membrane Technology for the Recovery of Lignin: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpert, Daniel; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of renewable resources is becoming increasingly important, and only sustainable processes that convert such resources into useful products can achieve environmentally beneficial economic growth. Wastewater from the pulp and paper industry is an unutilized resource offering the potential to recover valuable products such as lignin, pigments, and water [1]. The recovery of lignin is particularly important because it has many applications, and membrane technology has been investigated as the basis of innovative recovery solutions. The concentration of lignin can be increased from 62 to 285 g∙L−1 using membranes and the recovered lignin is extremely pure. Membrane technology is also scalable and adaptable to different waste liquors from the pulp and paper industry. PMID:27608047

  14. Calculation of IR-spectra of structural fragments of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.; Ishankhodzhaeva, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    To study structure of softwood lignins the experimental and theoretical IR-spectra in middle IR-diapason were analyzed. To interpret these data the quantum chemical calculations of IR-spectra of general dimmer fragments of softwood lignins by method of density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set were carried out. These calculations showed that frequencies of normal vibrations of fragment with β-alkyl-aryl linkage are close to the experimental values of the IR absorption bands of lignin, and infrared spectrum of this structure is similar to the experimental spectrum of lignin. The calculations with accounting for the solvent showed a strong increase in the intensity of the majority of the bands and the solvent effect on the frequencies of vibrations.

  15. Industrial Utilization of Lignin Based on its Structure and Capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Chemical modification and industrial utilization of lignin based on its structure were reviewed in this paper. And its economic value and significance for the society and environmental protection were also evaluated.

  16. 硫酸盐浆残余木素在漆酶/介体体系中的降解%Degradation of Residual Lignin in Kraft Pulp by Laccase and Mediator System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付时雨; 詹怀宇; 何为

    2002-01-01

    桉木硫酸盐浆(EMCC浆)用漆酶/介体(N-羟基-N-乙酰苯胺)体系(LMS)进行处理.采用GPC、FTIR和2D13C-1H-NMR技术分析了原浆木素、LMS处理过的浆中残余木素以及E段废液中分离出来的木素,并在碱性条件下用硝基苯氧化上述木素.实验结果表明,LMS处理后桉木EMCC浆中残余木素发生很大的变化,大多数非缩合的木素结构单元被降解.NMR研究结果表明,LMS处理的浆中木素和E段废液木素的β-O-4和β-5结构消失,紫丁香基结构的信号大大减弱,而木素中二苯乙烯结构、二苯甲烷结构和非酚型的5-5'结构在LMS生物处理时比较稳定,难于降解.LMS处理时木素发生α-位羟基的氧化产生α-羰基,并在其后的碱处理段被降解成小分子量的碎片.纸浆残余木素经漆酶/介体体系处理发生一定的苯环开环作用,使木素的羧基增加.%Eucalyptus EMCC pulp was treated with laccase and N-acetyl-N-hydroxyl-aniline system. The residual lignin from the original pulp and the LMS treated pulp, as well as lignin isolated from the E-stage effluent, were prepared, then analyzed using GPC, FTIR and 2D13C-1H-NMR techniques, and oxidized by nitrobenzene in the alkaline condition. The results indicated that the structure of residual lignin undertook a lot of changes in the eucalyptus EMCC pulp after LMS treatment, most of noncondensed substructures of lignin were degraded. The NMR studies showed the disappearance of β-O-4 and β-5 bonds in the structure of residual lignin from LMS treated pulp and the lignin from E-stage effluent, and the signal strength of syringyl structure decreased greatly. Stilbene, dibenzene methane and non-phenolic 5-5' type substructures in lignin were stable to LMS treatment, and difficult to be degraded. During the LMS treatment, α-carbon with hydroxyl group in lignin was subjected to oxidize to α-carbonyl, which can be degraded by alkaline extraction to fragment with small molecular weight; open

  17. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  18. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  19. Ultrafine microporous and mesoporous activated carbon fibers from alkali lignin

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A facile and sustainable approach has been successfully devised to fabricate ultrafine (100-500 nm) highly porous activated carbon fibers (ACFs) by electrospinning of aqueous solutions of predominantly alkali lignin (low sulfonate content) followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation at 850 °C under N2. Incorporating a polyethylene oxide (PEO) carrier with only up to one ninth of lignin not only enabled efficient electrospinning into fibers but also retained fibrous structures during...

  20. Density functional theory study of spirodienone stereoisomers in lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Laura Berstis; Gregg T. Beckham; Michael F. Crowley

    2017-01-01

    The spirodienone structure in lignin is a relatively recent discovery, and it has been found to occur in lignin of various plant species at concentrations of ∼3%, which is sufficiently high to be important for better understanding of its properties and reactivity. The cyclic structure, with a β-1 bond, has been proposed to be a precursor for acyclic β-1 linkages in...

  1. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  2. Characteristics of lignin from flax shives as affected by extraction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kelly; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2010-10-20

    Lignin, a polyphenolic molecule, is a major constituent of flax shives. This polyphenolic molecular structure renders lignin a potential source of a variety of commercially viable products such as fine chemicals. This work compares the performance of different lignin isolation methods. Lignin from flax shive was isolated using both conventional alkaline extraction method and a novel experimental pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) extraction process. The lignin yields and chemical composition of the lignin fractions were determined. The conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h, extracted 92 g lignin per kg flax shives, while lignin yields from the PLPW extracts ranged from 27 to 241 g lignin per kg flax shives. The purity and monomeric composition of the lignins obtained from the different extraction conditions was assessed via UV spectroscopy and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. Lignin obtained from conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h was of low purity and exhibited the lowest yields of nitrobenzene oxidation products. With respect to alkali assisted PLPW extractions, temperature created an opposing effect on lignin yield and nitrobenzene oxidation products. More lignin was extracted as temperature increased, yet the yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products decreased. The low yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products may be attributed to either the formation of condensed structures or the selective dissolution of condensed structures of lignin during the pressurized alkaline high temperature treatment. Analytical pyrolysis, using pyroprobe GC-MS, was used to investigate the molecular composition of the lignin samples. The total yield of pyrolysis lignin products was 13.3, 64.7, and 30.5% for the 1.25 M NaOH extracted lignin, alkaline assisted PLPW extracted lignin, and the unprocessed flax shives, respectively. Key lignin derived compounds such as guaiacol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, 4-methyl guaiacol

  3. Preparation and properties of lignin-epoxy resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanfu Yin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-linked biomass-polymer composite with a lignin content of up to 60% was prepared by blending lignin with an epoxy resin and polyamine using a hot press molding process. The characteristics of the curing reaction of lignin with epoxy resin were studied using DSC and FTIR analysis. The effect of molding temperature and molding pressure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the lignin/epoxy resin composite was also studied by SEM, DMA, and TG analyses. The results showed that the epoxy resin can be cured by lignin, and the curing temperature for the blends can be reduced by the introduction of a polyamine cure agent. The properties of the composite, such as bending strength, impact strength, glass-transition temperature, and thermal stability, were evidently influenced by the molding process. A good interfacial combination was formed between lignin and epoxy resin. Increasing the molding temperature and pressure proved beneficial to achieve a better interfacial combination for the composite, and the degree of ductile fracture was increased in the fracture surface of the composite.

  4. Cellulase-lignin interactions in the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahikainen, J.

    2013-11-01

    Today, the production of transportation fuels and chemicals is heavily dependent on fossil carbon sources, such as oil and natural gas. Their limited availability and the environmental concerns arising from their use have driven the search for renewable alternatives. Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the most abundant, but currently underutilised, renewable carbon-rich resource for fuel and chemical production. Enzymatic degradation of structural polysaccharides in lignocellulose produces soluble carbohydrates that serve as ideal precursors for the production of a vast amount of different chemical compounds. The difficulty in full exploitation of lignocellulose for fuel and chemical production lies in the complex and recalcitrant structure of the raw material. Lignocellulose is mainly composed of structural polysaccharides, cellulose and hemicellulose, but also of lignin, which is an aromatic polymer. Enzymatic degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose is restricted by several substrate- and enzyme-related factors, among which lignin is considered as one of the most problematic issues. Lignin restricts the action of hydrolytic enzymes and enzyme binding onto lignin has been identified as a major inhibitory mechanism preventing efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. In this thesis, the interactions between cellulase enzymes and lignin-rich compounds were studied in detail and the findings reported in this work have the potential to help in controlling the harmful cellulase-lignin interactions, and thus improve the biochemical processing route from lignocellulose to fuels and chemicals.

  5. TREATMENT OF SWEET GUM LIGNIN BY LACCASE AND LMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huali Wei; Shulan Shi; Jicheng Pei

    2004-01-01

    Cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) from sweet gum is treated by laccase and laccase/mediator system (LMS). Phenolic hydroxyl content of lignin is measured, and IR, GPC, 13C-NMR spectrograms are analyzed. Compared with control sample, phenolic hydroxyl content of lignin is a little higher after laccase treatment, whereas they are lower after LMS treatment. In LMS, lignin modification by laccase/ABTS is greater than by laccase/VA. It is found from IR that in lignin treated by laccase and LMS, relative content of siringyl hydroxyl group is higher, and α- conjugated carbonyl group content is a little higher. From GPC analysis, compared with control sample, molecular weight decrease after the treatment by laccase and LMS. And the decrement is greater by laccase alone than by LMS. According to 13C-NMR, relative content of carbonyl group and methoxyl group increase during the treatment by laccase alone, but the amount of them are lower after LMS treatment.And the amount of Cαand C β in β-O-4 has a little decrement after LMS treatment. It indicates that the oxidation of lignin by laccase and LMS proceed through different reaction pathways.

  6. TREATMENT OF SWEET GUM LIGNIN BY LACCASE AND LMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HualiWei; ShulanShi; JichengPei

    2004-01-01

    Cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) from sweet gum is treated by laccase and laccase/mediator system (LMS). Phenoli hydroxyl content of lignin is measured, and IR, GPC, 13C-NMR spectrograms are analyzed. Compar. I with control sample, phenolic hydroxyl content of lignin is a little higher after laccase treatment, whereas they are lower after LMStreatment. In LMS, lignin modification by laccase/ABTS is greater than by laccase/VA. It is found from IR that in lignin treated by laccase and LMS, relative content of siringyl hydroxyl group is higher, and α- conjugated carbonyl group content is a little higher. From GPC analysis, compared with control sample, molecular weight decrease after the treatment by laccase and LMS. And the decrement is greater bv laccase alone than by LMS. According to 13C-NMR, relative content of carbonyl group and methoxvl group increase during the treatment by laccase alone, but theamount of them are lower after LMS treatment. And the amount of Cα and Cβ in β-Ο-4 has a little decrement after LMS treatment. It indicates that the oxidation of lignin by laccase and LMS proceed through different reaction pathways.

  7. Study on biodegradation process of lignin by FTIR and DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Tianjue; Wu, Zhengping; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Shen, Ying; He, Xiaoxiao; Lai, Mingyong; He, Yibin

    2014-12-01

    The biodegradation process of lignin by Penicillium simplicissimum was studied to reveal the lignin biodegradation mechanisms. The biodegradation products of lignin were detected using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis spectrophotometer, different scanning calorimeter (DSC), and stereoscopic microscope. The analysis of FTIR spectrum showed the cleavage of various ether linkages (1,365 and 1,110 cm(-1)), oxidation, and demethylation (2,847 cm(-1)) by comparing the different peak values in the corresponding curve of each sample. Moreover, the differences (Tm and ΔHm values) between the DSC curves indirectly verified the FTIR analysis of biodegradation process. In addition, the effects of adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to lignin biodegradation process were analyzed, which indicated that H2O2 could accelerate the secretion of the MnP and LiP and improve the enzymes activity. What is more, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase catalyzed the lignin degradation effectively only when H2O2 was presented.

  8. Biobleaching of flax by degradation of lignin with laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotova, L. K.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on lignin biodegradation has become of great interest, due to the fact that lignin is one of the most abundant renewable materials, next to cellulose. Lignin is also the substance that gives color to raw flax fibers. In order to bleach the flax and to keep its tenacity high enough for textile applications, it is necessary to remove the lignin and partially to preserve the pectin. Lignin and pectin are the main constituents of the layer which sticks the flax cells together within the multicellular technical fiber. White-rot fungi and their oxidative enzymes, laccases and peroxid-ases (lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases, are being applied for the biobleaching of papermaking pulp, thereby reducing the need for environmentally harmful chemicals. Some data also suggest that it is possible to use other phenolytic enzymes, such as pure laccase, for this purpose. The objective of the present work was to study the possibility of bleaching flax fibers by pure laccase and combined laccase peroxide treatment, aimed at obtaining fibers with high whiteness and well-preserved tenacity.

  9. Experiences of Kraft Lignin Functionalization by Enzymatic and Chemical Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kalliola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Linear hydrophilic derivatives are expected to soften lignin and improve its utilization in composite applications. Oxidation by means of laccase in the presence of oxygen was employed in an attempt to functionalize commercial kraft lignin by vanillic acid-PEG ester and ether derivatives. Thielavia arenaria and Melanocarpus albomyces laccases at pH 6 and 8 were used. According to O2 consumption and the increase in molar mass, the tested laccases were active toward the lignin and the vanillic acid derivatives and also formed corresponding phenoxyl radicals. However, homogenous polymerization instead of cross-coupling and functionalization took place. As an alternative, lignin functionalization by the ester derivative by chemical oxidation under alkali-O2 conditions was also tested. Efficient lignin polymerization was observed. However, functionalization was not detected. Interestingly, a clear decrease in lignin glass transition temperature was obtained by an isolation procedure that included freeze-drying. This suggests that functionalization may not be necessary to induce the desired softening effect.

  10. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A {beta}-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 {eta}g/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. {sup 125}I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO{sub 2} delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed.

  11. Characterization of anaerobic consortia coupled lignin depolymerization with biomethane generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Rui; He, Jianzhong

    2013-07-01

    Two sediment-free microbial consortia (LI3 and LP3) were established to depolymerize lignin under anaerobic conditions. During depolymerizing high molecular weight lignin to low molecular weight molecules, the two cultures produced biomethane up to 151.7 and 113.0 mL g(-1) total lignin. Furthermore, LI3 and LP3 could also utilize the biomass - oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber (OPEFB) to produce 190.6 and 195.6 mL methaneg(-1) total lignin in OPEFB, and at the same time improve the bioavailability of lignocellulosic matters for further enzymatic hydrolysis. The microbial community analysis by denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the high-density 16S rDNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) exhibited that Methanomethylovorans sp. (LI3) and Methanoculleus sp. (LP3) were the main methanogens present, and phylum Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly involved in the lignin depolymerization. The established microbial consortia with both lignin depolymerization and biomethane production provide profound application on the environmental friendly pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials.

  12. Bioconversion of lignin model compounds with oleaginous Rhodococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosa, Matyas; Ragauskas, Arthur J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2012-01-15

    Although economically efficient biomass conversion depends on the utilization of the complete cell wall (biorefinery concept), including polysaccharides and lignin, current biofuels research concentrate mostly on cellulose conversion, while lignin is viewed as a side-product that is used primarily as a thermal resource. Microbiological conversion of lignin is almost exclusive to fungi, usually resulting in increased cell mass and lignolytic enzymes. Some bacteria can also degrade lignin-related compounds using the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway; for example, Rhodococcus opacus DSM 1069 can degrade coniferyl alcohol and grow on it as sole carbon source. Moreover, this strain belongs to the actinomycetes group that is also known for oleaginous species with lipid accumulation over 20%. Present work shows that R. opacus DSM 1069 and PD630 strains under nitrogen limiting conditions can convert lignin model compounds into triacylglycerols, also known as neutral lipids. 4-Hydroxybenzoic and vanillic acid lignin model compounds were used as sole carbon sources, and after brief adaptation periods, the cells not only began growing but accumulated lipids to the level of oleaginicity. These lipids were extracted for transesterification and analysis of fatty acid methyl esters showed good composition for biodiesel applications with no aromatics. Furthermore, the two strains showed distinct substrate metabolism and product profiles. (orig.)

  13. System analyse cellulose ethanol in combines - Combustion characterisation of lignin from cellulose based ethanol production; Systemanalys foer cellulosabaserad etanol i kombinat - Foerbraenningskarakterisering av lignin fraan cellulosabaserad etanolproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstedt, Jan; Wingren, Anders; Magnusson, Staffan; Wiinikka, Henrik; Westbom, Urban; Lidman, Marcus; Groenberg, Carola

    2012-02-15

    In this work 3 different hydrolysed lignin fractions produced from Sugarcane Bagasse, Spruce and Wheat Straw were burned in a 150 kW horizontal furnace equipped with a powder burner to assess the combustion behaviour of hydrolysed lignin fuels. The combustion experiments showed that the feeding properties of all three lignin fractions were better compared to ordinary wood powder

  14. Treatment of Lignin Precursors to Improve their Suitability for Carbon Fibers: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Hausner, Andrew [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.

    2015-04-17

    Lignin has been investigated as a carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although there have been a number of reports of successful lignin-based carbon fiber production at the lab scale, lignin-based carbon fibers are not currently commercially available. This review will highlight some of the known challenges, and also the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Lignin can come from different sources (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction methods (e.g. organosolv, kraft), meaning that lignin can be found with a diversity of purity and structure. The implication of these conditions on lignin as carbon fiber precursor is not comprehensively known, especially as the lignin landscape is evolving. The work presented in this review will help guide the direction of a project between GrafTech and ORNL to develop lignin carbon fiber technology, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  15. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Solid Lignin-Rich Streams Enables Microbial Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Salvachua Rodriguez, Davinia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Katahira, Rui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pleitner, Brenna P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cleveland, Nicholas S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nolker, Michelle L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Holly K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rodriguez, Alberto [Sandia National Laboratories; Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute; Keasling, Jay D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; DOE Joint BioEnergy InstituteUniversity of California, Berkeley; Technical University of Denmark; Simmons, Blake A. [Sandia National Laboratories; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute; Technical University of Denmark; Gladden, John M. [Sandia National Laboratories; DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-08-01

    Lignin valorization offers significant potential to enhance the economic viability of lignocellulosic biorefineries. However, because of its heterogeneous and recalcitrant nature, conversion of lignin to value-added coproducts remains a considerable technical challenge. In this study, we employ base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) using a process-relevant solid lignin stream produced via deacetylation, mechanical refining, and enzymatic hydrolysis to enable biological lignin conversion. BCD was conducted with the solid lignin substrate over a range of temperatures at two NaOH concentrations, and the results demonstrate that the lignin can be partially extracted and saponified at temperatures as low as 60 degrees C. At 120 degrees C and 2% NaOH, the high extent of lignin solubility was accompanied by a considerable decrease in the lignin average molecular weight and the release of lignin-derived monomers including hydroxycinnamic acids. BCD liquors were tested for microbial growth using seven aromatic-catabolizing bacteria and two yeasts. Three organisms (Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Corynebacterium glutamicum) tolerate high BCD liquor concentrations (up to 90% v/v) and rapidly consume the main lignin-derived monomers, resulting in lignin conversion of up to 15%. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, muconic acid production from a representative lignin BCD liquor was demonstrated with an engineered P. putida KT2440 strain. These results highlight the potential for a mild lignin depolymerization process to enhance the microbial conversion of solid lignin-rich biorefinery streams.

  16. Composition of Lignin-to-Liquid Solvolysis Oils from Lignin Extracted in a Semi-Continuous Organosolv Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løhre, Camilla; Vik Halleraker, Hilde; Barth, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    The interest and on-going research on utilisation of lignin as feedstock for production of renewable and sustainable aromatics is expanding and shows great potential. This study investigates the applicability of semi-continuously organosolv extracted lignin in Lignin-to-Liquid (LtL) solvolysis, using formic acid as hydrogen donor and water as solvent under high temperature–high pressure (HTHP) conditions. The high purity of the organosolv lignin provides high conversion yields at up to 94% based on lignin mass input. The formic acid input is a dominating parameter in lignin conversion. Carbon balance calculations of LtL-solvolysis experiments also indicate that formic acid can give a net carbon contribution to the bio-oils, in addition to its property as hydrogenation agent. Compound specific quantification of the ten most abundant components in the LtL-oils describe up to 10% of the bio-oil composition, and reaction temperature is shown to be the dominating parameter for the structures present. The structural and quantitative results from this study identify components of considerable value in the LtL-oil, and support the position of this oil as a potentially important source of building blocks for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:28124994

  17. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kecheng Li; Douglas W. Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. Withthe thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration, and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  18. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KechengLi; DouglasW.Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. With the thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  19. Molecular architecture requirements for polymer-grafted lignin superplasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chetali; Sverdlove, Madeline J; Washburn, Newell R

    2015-04-07

    Superplasticizers are a class of anionic polymer dispersants used to inhibit aggregation in hydraulic cement, lowering the yield stress of cement pastes to improve workability and reduce water requirements. The plant-derived biopolymer lignin is commonly used as a low-cost/low-performance plasticizer, but attempts to improve its effects on cement rheology through copolymerization with synthetic monomers have not led to significant improvements. Here we demonstrate that kraft lignin can form the basis for high-performance superplasticizers in hydraulic cement, but the molecular architecture must be based on a lignin core with a synthetic-polymer corona that can be produced via controlled radical polymerization. Using slump tests of ordinary Portland cement pastes, we show that polyacrylamide-grafted lignin prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization can reduce the yield stress of cement paste to similar levels as a leading commercial polycarboxylate ether superplasticizer at concentrations ten-fold lower, although the lignin material produced via controlled radical polymerization does not appear to reduce the dynamic viscosity of cement paste as effectively as the polycarboxylate superplasticizer, despite having a similar affinity for the individual mineral components of ordinary Portland cement. In contrast, polyacrylamide copolymerized with a methacrylated kraft lignin via conventional free radical polymerization having a similar overall composition did not reduce the yield stress or the viscosity of cement pastes. While further work is required to elucidate the mechanism of this effect, these results indicate that controlling the architecture of polymer-grafted lignin can significantly enhance its performance as a superplasticizer for cement.

  20. Structural characterization of lignin from triploid of Populus tomentosa Carr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Shao-Ni; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2011-06-22

    To improve yields while minimizing the extent of mechanical action (just 2 h of planetary ball-milling), the residual wood meal obtained from extraction of milled wood lignin (MWL) was sequentially treated with cellulolytic enzyme and alkali, and the yields of MWL, cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL), and alkaline lignin (AL) were 5.4, 23.2, and 16.3%, respectively. The chemical structures of the lignin fractions obtained were characterized by carbohydrate analysis, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and various advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that the lignin isolated as MWL during the early part of ball milling may originate mainly from the middle lamella. This lignin fraction was less degradable and contained more linear hemicelluloses and more C═O in unconjugated groups as well as more phenolic OH groups. Both 1D and 2D NMR spectra analyses confirmed that the lignin in triploid of Populus tomentosa Carr. is GSH-type and partially acylated at the γ-carbon of the side chain. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (¹³C-¹H) NMR of MWL, CEL, and AL showed a predominance of β-O-4' aryl ether linkages (81.1-84.5% of total side chains), followed by β-β' resinol-type linkages (12.2-16.4%), and lower amounts of β-5' phenylcoumaran (2.1-2.6%) and β-1' spirodienone-type (0.4-1.4%) linkages. The syringyl (S)/guaiacyl (G) ratios were estimated to be 1.43, 2.29, and 2.83 for MWL, CEL, and AL, respectively.

  1. Lignin Composition and Structure Differs between Xylem, Phloem and Phellem in Quercus suber L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Ana; Rencoret, Jorge; Chemetova, Catarina; Gominho, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; del Río, José C.; Pereira, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The composition and structure of lignin in different tissues—phellem (cork), phloem and xylem (wood)—of Quercus suber was studied. Whole cell walls and their respective isolated milled lignins were analyzed by pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D-NMR) and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC). Different tissues presented varied p-hydroxyphenyl:guaiacyl:syringyl (H:G:S) lignin compositions. Whereas lignin from cork has a G-rich lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 2:85:13), lignin from phloem presents more S-units (H:G:S molar ratio of 1:58:41) and lignin from xylem is slightly enriched in S-lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 1:45:55). These differences were reflected in the relative abundances of the different interunit linkages. Alkyl-aryl ethers (β–O–4′) were predominant, increasing from 68% in cork, to 71% in phloem and 77% in xylem, as consequence of the enrichment in S-lignin units. Cork lignin was enriched in condensed structures such as phenylcoumarans (β-5′, 20%), dibenzodioxocins (5–5′, 5%), as corresponds to a lignin enriched in G-units. In comparison, lignin from phloem and xylem presented lower levels of condensed linkages. The lignin from cork was highly acetylated at the γ-OH of the side-chain (48% lignin acetylation), predominantly over G-units; while the lignins from phloem and xylem were barely acetylated and this occurred mainly over S-units. These results are a first time overview of the lignin structure in xylem, phloem (generated by cambium), and in cork (generated by phellogen), in agreement with literature that reports that lignin biosynthesis is flexible and cell specific. PMID:27833631

  2. Lignin Composition and Structure Differs between Xylem, Phloem and Phellem in Quercus suber L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Ana; Rencoret, Jorge; Chemetova, Catarina; Gominho, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Del Río, José C; Pereira, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The composition and structure of lignin in different tissues-phellem (cork), phloem and xylem (wood)-of Quercus suber was studied. Whole cell walls and their respective isolated milled lignins were analyzed by pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D-NMR) and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC). Different tissues presented varied p-hydroxyphenyl:guaiacyl:syringyl (H:G:S) lignin compositions. Whereas lignin from cork has a G-rich lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 2:85:13), lignin from phloem presents more S-units (H:G:S molar ratio of 1:58:41) and lignin from xylem is slightly enriched in S-lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 1:45:55). These differences were reflected in the relative abundances of the different interunit linkages. Alkyl-aryl ethers (β-O-4') were predominant, increasing from 68% in cork, to 71% in phloem and 77% in xylem, as consequence of the enrichment in S-lignin units. Cork lignin was enriched in condensed structures such as phenylcoumarans (β-5', 20%), dibenzodioxocins (5-5', 5%), as corresponds to a lignin enriched in G-units. In comparison, lignin from phloem and xylem presented lower levels of condensed linkages. The lignin from cork was highly acetylated at the γ-OH of the side-chain (48% lignin acetylation), predominantly over G-units; while the lignins from phloem and xylem were barely acetylated and this occurred mainly over S-units. These results are a first time overview of the lignin structure in xylem, phloem (generated by cambium), and in cork (generated by phellogen), in agreement with literature that reports that lignin biosynthesis is flexible and cell specific.

  3. Lignin composition and structure differs between xylem, phloem and phellem in Quercus suber L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lourenço

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition and structure of lignin in different tissues - phellem (cork, phloem and xylem (wood - of Quercus suber was studied. Whole cell walls and their respective isolated milled lignins were analyzed by pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D-NMR and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC. Different tissues presented varied p-hydroxyphenyl:guaiacyl:syringyl (H:G:S lignin compositions. Whereas lignin from cork has a G-rich lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 2:85:13, lignin from phloem presents more S-units (H:G:S molar ratio of 1:58:41 and lignin from xylem is slightly enriched in S-lignin (H:G:S molar ratio 1:45:55. These differences were reflected in the relative abundances of the different interunit linkages. Alkyl-aryl ethers (β–O–4´ were predominant, increasing from 68% in cork, to 71% in phloem and 77% in xylem, as consequence of the enrichment in S-lignin units. Cork lignin was enriched in condensed structures such as phenylcoumarans (β-5´, 20%, dibenzodioxocins (5-5´, 5%, as corresponds to a lignin enriched in G-units. In comparison, lignin from phloem and xylem presented lower levels of condensed linkages. The lignin from cork was highly acetylated at the γ-OH of the side-chain (48% lignin acetylation, predominantly over G-units; while the lignins from phloem and xylem were barely acetylated and this occurred mainly over S-units. These results are a first time overview of the lignin structure in xylem, phloem (generated by cambium, and in cork (generated by phellogen, in agreement with literature that lignin biosynthesis is flexible and cell specific.

  4. An insight into the lignin peroxidase of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Mohammed Touaha; Habib, Abdul Musaweer; Chowdhury, Dil Umme Salma; Bhuiyan, Md Iqbal Kaiser; Mostafa, Kazi Md Golam; Mondol, Sobuj; Mosleh, Ivan Mhai

    2013-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the deadliest necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species including major food, fiber, and oil crops all throughout the globe. It secretes a cocktail of ligninolytic enzymes along with other hydrolytic enzymes for degrading the woody lignocellulosic plant cell wall and penetrating into the host tissue. Among them, lignin peroxidase has been reported only in Phanerochaete chrysosporium so far. But interestingly, a recent study has revealed a second occurrence of lignin peroxidase in M. phaseolina. However, lignin peroxidases are of much significance biotechnologically because of their potential applications in bio-remedial waste treatment and in catalyzing difficult chemical transformations. Besides, this enzyme also possesses agricultural and environmental importance on account of their role in lignin biodegradation. In the present work, different properties of the lignin peroxidase of M. phaseolina along with predicting the 3-D structure and its active sites were investigated by the use of various computational tools. The data from this study will pave the way for more detailed exploration of this enzyme in wet lab and thereby facilitating the strategies to be designed against such deadly weapons of Macrophomina phaseolina. Furthermore, the insight of such a ligninolytic enzyme will contribute to the assessment of its potentiality as a bioremediation tool.

  5. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  6. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Salvador

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G, and syringyl (S lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth.

  7. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, John I.; Cowie, Gregory L.; Ertel, John R.; James Barbour, R.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    1985-03-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p- hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > α-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source.

  8. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2016-06-15

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of the ..alpha..-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the ..beta..-O reaction. The catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets.

  9. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, J.I.; Cowie, G.L.; Ertel, J.R.; James, Barbour R.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p-hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > ??-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source. ?? 1985.

  10. Rapid room temperature solubilization and depolymerization of polymeric lignin at high loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian; Dutta, Tanmoy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Kim, Kwang Ho; Tolic, Nikola; Chu, Rosalie K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2016-10-03

    The relatively poor solubility of lignin in most pretreatment solvents remains one of the biggest challegnes in lignin valorization to improve overall biorefinery economics. In this work, rapid room temperature solubilization of lignin at high solid loadings (>30 wt%) can be easily achieved in a single step using ethylene glycol (EG). The solubilized lignin can be rapidly and quantitively recovered with the addtion of ethanol. The computational and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies confirm that strong hydrogen bond interactions between EG and the free hydroxyl groups present in lignin contribute to the lignin dissolution. In addition, hydrogen peroxide mediated depolymerization of dissolved lignin at low temperature (80 oC) was tested and the effect of EG molecules on depolymerization of ligin was also theoritically studied. The findings of this work provide mechanistic insights of hydrogen bond interactions in high lignin solubilization and valorization.

  11. Comparative study of organosolv lignin extracted from prairie cordgrass, switchgrass and corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Iwona; Brudecki, Grzegorz; Rosentrater, Kurt; Julson, James L; Lei, Hanwu

    2012-08-01

    Lignin extracted from prairie cordgrass, switchgrass, and corn stover (using ethyl acetate-ethanol-water organosolv pretreatment) was analyzed and characterized using several methods. These methods included analysis of purity (by determination of Klason lignin, carbohydrate, and ash contents), solubility (with several organic solvents), phenolic group analysis (ultraviolet ionization difference spectra, and nitrobenzene oxidation), and general functional group analysis (by (1)H NMR). Results showed that all the examined lignin samples were relatively pure (contained over 50% Klason lignin, less than 5% carbohydrate contamination, and less than 3% ash), but switchgrass-derived lignin was observed to be the purest. All the lignins were found to contain high amounts of phenolic groups, while switchgrass-derived lignin was the most phenolic, according to the ionization difference spectra. Nitrobenzene oxidation revealed that all the lignin samples contained available guaiacyl units in high amounts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lignin Modification for Biopolymer/Conjugated Polymer Hybrids as Renewable Energy Storage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ting Yang; Wagner, Michal; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-12-07

    Lignin derivatives, which arise as waste products from the pulp and paper industry and are mainly used for heating, can be used as charge storage materials. The charge storage function is a result of the quinone groups formed in the lignin derivative. Herein, we modified lignins to enhance the density of such quinone groups by covalently linking monolignols and quinones through phenolation. The extra guaiacyl, syringyl, and hydroquinone groups introduced by phenolation of kraft lignin derivatives were monitored by (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance and size exclusion chromatography. Electropolymerization in ethylene glycol/tetraethylammonium tosylate electrolyte was used to synthesize the kraft lignin/polypyrrole hybrid films. These modifications changed the phenolic content of the kraft lignin with attachment of hydroquinone units yielding the highest specific capacity (around 70 mA h g(-1) ). The modification of softwood and hardwood lignin derivatives yielded 50 % and 23 % higher charge capacity than the original lignin, respectively.

  13. Engineering Plant Biomass Lignin Content and Composition for Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassie Marie Welker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is an aromatic biopolymer involved in providing structural support to plant cell walls. Compared to the other cell wall polymers, i.e., cellulose and hemicelluloses, lignin has been considered a hindrance in cellulosic bioethanol production due to the complexity involved in its separation from other polymers of various biomass feedstocks. Nevertheless, lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemical compounds and upgradable building blocks. Though the biosynthetic pathway of lignin has been elucidated in great detail, the random nature of the polymerization (free radical coupling process poses challenges for its depolymerization into valuable bioproducts. The absence of specific methodologies for lignin degradation represents an important opportunity for research and development. This review highlights research development in lignin biosynthesis, lignin genetic engineering and different biological and chemical means of depolymerization used to convert lignin into biofuels and bioproducts.

  14. Enzymatic polymerisation and effect of fractionation of dissolved lignin from Eucalyptus globulus Kraft liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, S; Fernández-Costas, C; Sanromán, M A; Moldes, D

    2012-10-01

    The potential ability of the laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila, either alone or with low molecular weight (LMW) additives, to polymerise a dissolved lignin from Kraft liquor of eucalypt cooking was investigated. A previous study of enzymatic performance (activity and stability) was carried out using a design experiment methodology. In addition, Kraft dissolved lignin (KDL) was fractionated according to two different protocols (solvent extraction and acidic fractionation) in order to identify possible lignin fractions with noticeable polymerisation ability. KDL and its corresponding lignin fractions were treated with laccase and analysed by size exclusion chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results provide conclusive evidence of notable lignin modifications after incubation with laccase. Moreover, lignin fractionation allows to obtain lignin fractions with different chemical characteristics and polymerisation capability. Depending on the type of raw lignin, molecular weight can increase from 4- to 21-fold by means of laccase polymerisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. LIGNIN ADSORPTION AND KAPPA NUMBER IN ETHANOL PULPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongjianXu; XinpingLi; MeiyunZhang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of washing temperature, washing stagesand the cooking operation on the ethanol pulp hadbeen investigated, and the reason for higher kappanumber of the ethanol pulp was discussed. Theresults preliminarily showed that the dissolved lignincould re-adsorb to fiber surface by means of fiberclassification technology and explained the questionsfound during the study. Some measures were taken toreduce the kappa number, the results had shown thatthere was obvious absorption in the ethanol pulping;lignin remained in the pulp could easily be dissolvedand the pulp with lower kappa number could beobtained at a higher temperature; the kappa numbercould reduce by increasing washing time; it couldenable dissolved lignin to separate out fi'om theethanol pulp and restrain the lignin absorption byblowing cooking liquid at high temperature.

  16. Monolignol ferulate conjugates are naturally incorporated into plant lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Steven D; Zhang, Chengcheng; Peck, Matthew L; Smith, Rebecca A; Padmakshan, Dharshana; Helmich, Kate E; Free, Heather C A; Lee, Seonghee; Smith, Bronwen G; Lu, Fachuang; Sedbrook, John C; Sibout, Richard; Grabber, John H; Runge, Troy M; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Harris, Philip J; Bartley, Laura E; Ralph, John

    2016-10-01

    Angiosperms represent most of the terrestrial plants and are the primary research focus for the conversion of biomass to liquid fuels and coproducts. Lignin limits our access to fibers and represents a large fraction of the chemical energy stored in plant cell walls. Recently, the incorporation of monolignol ferulates into lignin polymers was accomplished via the engineering of an exotic transferase into commercially relevant poplar. We report that various angiosperm species might have convergently evolved to natively produce lignins that incorporate monolignol ferulate conjugates. We show that this activity may be accomplished by a BAHD feruloyl-coenzyme A monolignol transferase, OsFMT1 (AT5), in rice and its orthologs in other monocots.

  17. Tailoring lignin biosynthesis for efficient and sustainable biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Xuebin; Gou, Mingyue; Yang, Huijun

    2014-12-01

    Increased global interest in a bio-based economy has reinvigorated the research on the cell wall structure and composition in plants. In particular, the study of plant lignification has become a central focus, with respect to its intractability and negative impact on the utilization of the cell wall biomass for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Striking progress has been achieved in the last few years both on our fundamental understanding of lignin biosynthesis, deposition and assembly, and on the interplay of lignin synthesis with the plant growth and development. With the knowledge gleaned from basic studies, researchers are now able to invent and develop elegant biotechnological strategies to sophisticatedly manipulate the quantity and structure of lignin and thus to create economically viable bioenergy feedstocks. These concerted efforts open an avenue for the commercial production of cost-competitive biofuel to meet our energy needs.

  18. Monolignol ferulate conjugates are naturally incorporated into plant lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Steven D.; Zhang, Chengcheng; Peck, Matthew L.; Smith, Rebecca A.; Padmakshan, Dharshana; Helmich, Kate E.; Free, Heather C. A.; Lee, Seonghee; Smith, Bronwen G.; Lu, Fachuang; Sedbrook, John C.; Sibout, Richard; Grabber, John H.; Runge, Troy M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Harris, Philip J.; Bartley, Laura E.; Ralph, John

    2016-01-01

    Angiosperms represent most of the terrestrial plants and are the primary research focus for the conversion of biomass to liquid fuels and coproducts. Lignin limits our access to fibers and represents a large fraction of the chemical energy stored in plant cell walls. Recently, the incorporation of monolignol ferulates into lignin polymers was accomplished via the engineering of an exotic transferase into commercially relevant poplar. We report that various angiosperm species might have convergently evolved to natively produce lignins that incorporate monolignol ferulate conjugates. We show that this activity may be accomplished by a BAHD feruloyl–coenzyme A monolignol transferase, OsFMT1 (AT5), in rice and its orthologs in other monocots. PMID:27757415

  19. Chemical characterization of lignin from kraft pulping black liquor of Acacia mangium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermiati, Euis; Risanto, Lucky; Lubis, M. Adly Rahandi; Laksana, Raden Permana Budi; Dewi, Aniva Rizkia

    2017-01-01

    In order to know the proper use of lignin derived from pulping process of A. mangium, it is important to study the characteristics of lignin obtained from this species. The objective of this research was to study the characteristics of lignin isolated from kraft pulping black liquor of A. mangium. Lignin was isolated from the black liquor by single step and two step acid precipitation. The lignins were characterized for their moisture, ash, acid soluble lignin (ASL), and acid insoluble lignin (AIL) contents. Elemental composition, FTIR spectra, UV spectra, and microscopic structure using SEM were also analyzed. The yield of lignin obtained through one step precipitation of black liquor (45.76%) was much higher than that through two step precipitation (7.38%), while ash contents of lignin from one step and two step precipitations were almost the same. Ultimate analysis shows that carbon content in lignin from one step precipitation was lower than that from two step precipitation, while hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur content were relatively the same. Two step precipitation could increase the AIL and decrease the ASL content of the lignin isolate. Results of UV analysis show that in neutral medium (dioxane-water) the two lignin isolates had strong absorbance at 240 nm, while in alkaline medium (NaOH pH 12) there were strong absorption at 210 nm, and weak absorption at 280 nm. The FT-IR spectra reveal that the two lignin isolates had similar functional groups. This means that the removal of sugar from lignin did not change the lignin structure. The SEM analysis shows that both lignin isolates still contain some dirts.

  20. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  1. Pemanfaatan Lignin Isolat Lindi Hitam Dari Toba Pulp Lestari

    OpenAIRE

    Sah, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of black liquor lignin isolates natural binder of Toba Pulp Lestari as asphalt reinforcement has been done. Asphalt modifier made in 9 different types of formulations with a variation ratio of lignin isolates with asphalt at 40:60 ; 35:65 ; 30:70 ; 25:75 ; 20:80 ; 15:85 ; 10:90 ; 5:95 and 0:100 (b/b) in 100 grams, the addition of 300 grams of fine sand aggregate, and processed in an extruder at a temperature of 150oC. Mechanical properties and thermal properties of tested asphalt ...

  2. Catalytic hydrotreatment of Alcell lignin fractions using a Ru/C catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloekhorst, Arjan; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2016-01-01

    We here report the catalytic hydrotreatment of three different Alcell lignin fractions using a Ru/C catalyst in a batch reactor set-up (400 °C, 4 h, 100 bar H2 intake, 5 wt% catalyst on lignin). The fractions, obtained by a solvent fractionation scheme from Alcell lignin, differ in composition and m

  3. Paving the Way for Lignin Valorisation : Recent Advances in Bioengineering, Biorefining and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaldi, Roberto; Jastrzebski, Robin; Clough, Matthew T; Ralph, John; Kennema, Marco; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer with a high carbon content and high aromaticity. Despite its potential as a raw material for the fuel and chemical industries, lignin remains the most poorly utilised of the lignocellulosic biopolymers. Effective valorisation of lignin requires careful fine-tuning of

  4. Lignins : natural polymers from oxidative coupling of 4-hydroxyphenyl-propanoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Knut Lundquist; Gosta Brunow; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Paul F. Schatz; Jane M. Marita; Ronald D. Hatfield; Sally A. Ralph; Jorgen Holst Christensen; Wout Boerjan

    2004-01-01

    Lignins are complex natural polymers resulting from oxidative coupling of, primarily, 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoids. An understanding of their nature is evolving as a result of detailed structural studies, recently aided by the availability of lignin-biosynthetic-pathway mutants and transgenics. The currently accepted theory is that the lignin polymer is formed by...

  5. Lewis acid-catalyzed depolymerization of soda lignin in supercritical ethanol/water mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güvenatam, Burcu; Heeres, Erik H.J.; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-01-01

    The depolymerization of lignin model compounds and soda lignin by super Lewis acidic metal triflates has been investigated in a mixture of ethanol and water at 400 °C. The strong Lewis acids convert representative model compounds for the structure-forming linkages in lignin, namely α-O-4, 5-O-4

  6. Engineering a fungal peroxidase that degrades lignin at very acidic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Fueyo, E.; Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.; Martinez, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ligninolytic peroxidases are divided into three families: manganese peroxidases (MnPs), lignin peroxidases (LiPs), and versatile peroxidases (VPs). The latter two are able to degrade intact lignins, as shown using nonphenolic lignin model compounds, with VP oxidizing the widest range of r

  7. Mini-review: Current Understanding of the Correlation of Lignin Structure with Biomass Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    Lignin, a complex aromatic polymer in terrestrial plants, contributes significantly to biomass recalcitrance to microbial and/or enzymatic deconstruction. To reduce biomass recalcitrance, substantial endeavors have been exerted on pretreatment and lignin engineering in the past few decades. Lignin removal and/or alteration of lignin structure have been shown to result in reduced biomass recalcitrance with improved cell wall digestibility. While high lignin content is usually a barrier to a cost-efficient application of bioresource to biofuels, the direct correlation of lignin structure and its concomitant properties with biomass remains unclear due to the complexity of cell wall and lignin structure. Advancement in application of biorefinery to production of biofuels, chemicals, and biomaterials necessitates a fundamental understanding of the relationship of lignin structure and biomass recalcitrance. In this mini-review, we focus on recent investigations on the influence of lignin chemical properties on bioprocessability— pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Specifically, lignin-enzyme interaction and the effects of lignin compositional units, hydroxycinnamates, and lignin functional groups on biomass recalcitrance have been highlighted, which will be useful not only in addressing biomass recalcitrance but also in deploying renewable lignocelluloses efficiently.

  8. Engineering a fungal peroxidase that degrades lignin at very acidic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Fueyo, E.; Ruiz-Duenas, F.J.; Martinez, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ligninolytic peroxidases are divided into three families: manganese peroxidases (MnPs), lignin peroxidases (LiPs), and versatile peroxidases (VPs). The latter two are able to degrade intact lignins, as shown using nonphenolic lignin model compounds, with VP oxidizing the widest range of

  9. Lignin solubilization and aqueous phase reforming for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The solubilization and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, and alcell lignin along with sugarcane bagasse, at low temperatures (T≤498 K) and pressures (P≤29 bar) is reported for the first time for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. Analysis of lignin model compo

  10. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable lignin nanoparticles with tunable surface properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Alexander P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Armstrong, Hinton B.; Brown, Joseph S.; Plemmons, Dayne; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin nanoparticles can serve as biodegradable carriers of biocidal actives with minimal environmental footprint. Here we describe the colloidal synthesis and interfacial design of nanoparticles with tunable surface properties using two different lignin precursors, Kraft (Indulin AT) lignin and

  11. Lignin solubilization and aqueous phase reforming for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The solubilization and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, and alcell lignin along with sugarcane bagasse, at low temperatures (T≤498 K) and pressures (P≤29 bar) is reported for the first time for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. Analysis of lignin model

  12. Isolation and characterization of lignin from the oak wood bioethanol production residue for adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Cho, Eun Jin; Song, Younho; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Lignin was isolated from the residue of bioethanol production with oak wood via alkaline and catalyzed organosolv treatments at ambient temperature to improve the purity of lignin for the materials application. The isolated lignins were analyzed for their chemical composition by nitrobenzene oxidation method and their functionality was characterized via wet chemistry method, element analysis, (1)H NMR, GPC and FTIR-ATR. The isolated lignin by acid catalyzed organosolv treatment (Acid-OSL) contained a higher lignin content, aromatic proton, phenolic hydroxyl group and a lower nitrogen content that is more reactive towards chemical modification. The lignin-based adhesives were prepared and the bond strength was measured to evaluate the enhanced reactivity of lignin by the isolation. Two steps of phenolation and methylolation were applied for the modification of the isolated lignins and their tensile strengths were evaluated for the use as an adhesive. The acid catalyzed organosolv lignin-based adhesives had comparable bond strength to phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. The analysis of lignin-based adhesives by FTIR-ATR and TGA showed structural similarity to phenol adhesive. The results demonstrate that the reactivity of lignin was enhanced by isolation from hardwood bioethanol production residues at ambient temperature and it could be used in a value-added application to produce lignin-based adhesives.

  13. The Paleozoic Origin of Enzymatic Lignin Decomposition Reconstructed from 31 Fungal Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios Floudas; Manfred Binder; Robert Riely; Kerrie Barry; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Angel T. Martínez; Robert Otillar; Joseph W. Spatafora; Jagjit S. Yadav; Andrea Aerts; Isabelle Benoit; Alex Boyd; Alexis Carlson; Alex Copeland; Pedro M. Coutinho; Ronald P. deVries; Patricia Ferreira; Keisha Findley; Brian Foster; Jill Gaskell; Dylan Glotzer; Pawe³ Górecki; Joseph Heitman; Cedar Hesse; Chiaki Hori; Kiyohiko Igarashi; Joel A. Jurgens; Nathan Kallen; Phil Kersten; Annegret Kohler; Ursula Kües; T. K. ArunKumar; Alan Kuo; Kurt LaButti; Luis F. Larrondo; Erika Lindquist; Albee Ling; Vincent Lombard; Susan Lucas; Taina Lundell; Rachael Martin; David J. McLaughlin; Ingo Morgenstern; Emanuelle Morin; Claude Murat; Laszlo G. Nagy; Matt Nolan; Robin A. Ohm; Aleksandrina Patyshakuliyeva; Antonis Rokas; Francisco J. Ruiz-Dueñas; Grzegorz Sabat; Asaf Salamov; Masahiro Samejima; Jeremy Schmutz; Jason C. Slot; Franz St. John; Jan Stenlid; Hui Sun; Sheng Sun; Khajamohiddin Syed; Adrian Tsang; Ad Wiebenga; Darcy Young; Antonio Pisabarro; Daniel C. Eastwood; Francis Martin; Dan Cullen; Igor V. Grigoriev; David S. Hibbett

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non–lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study)...

  14. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins : A comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra; Wienk, Hans L J; Frissen, Augustinus E.; Peinder, Peter De; Boelens, Rolf; Van Es, Daan S.; Grisel, Ruud J H; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Gosselink, Richard J A; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and Alc

  15. Coupling and reactions of 5- hydroxyconiferyl alcohol in lignin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Laura Berstis; Gregg T. Beckham; Michael F. Crowley

    2016-01-01

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable lignin nanoparticles with tunable surface properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Alexander P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Armstrong, Hinton B.; Brown, Joseph S.; Plemmons, Dayne; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin nanoparticles can serve as biodegradable carriers of biocidal actives with minimal environmental footprint. Here we describe the colloidal synthesis and interfacial design of nanoparticles with tunable surface properties using two different lignin precursors, Kraft (Indulin AT) lignin and

  17. Precipitation and valorisation of lignin obtained from South African Kraft mill black liquor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, Mpho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available was established. Lignin was precipitated from kraft mill black liquor by utilising sulphuric acid and three organic acids (acetic, citric, and formic acids). During recovery of the lignin, it was noticed that recovery of the precipitated lignin was a long...

  18. Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

  19. Unique low-molecular-weight lignin with high purity extracted from wood by deep eutectic solvents (DES): a source of lignin for valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Ma, Ruoshui; Quintero, Melissa; Guo, Mond; Geleynse, Scott; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wolcott, Michael; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new method of applying Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES) for extracting lignin from woody biomass with high yield and high purity. DES mixtures prepared from Choline Chloride (ChCl) and four hydrogen-bond donors–acetic acid, lactic acid, levulinic acid and glycerol–were evaluated for treatment of hardwood (poplar) and softwood (D. fir). It was found that these DES treatments can selectively extract a significant amount of lignin from wood with high yields: 78% from poplar and 58% from D. fir. The extracted lignin has high purity (95%) with unique structural properties. We discover that DES can selectively cleave ether linkages in wood lignin and facilitate lignin removal from wood. The mechanism of DES cleavage of ether bonds between phenylpropane units was investigated. The results from this study demonstrate that DES is a promising solvent for wood delignification and the production of a new source of lignin with promising potential applications.

  20. Surface properties of woody thin boards composed of commercially available lignin and cellulose: Relationship between the orientation of lignin and water repellency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kamba, Tomoya; Yang, Wei [Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushimanaka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Aoyagi, Satoka [Department of Material and Lie Science, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Musashino, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Kimura, Yukitaka, E-mail: yktkkimu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushimanaka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Woody thin boards were formed by adequate ratio of lignin/cellulose/moisture. • Component ratio of lignin/cellulose/moisture determined water repellency. • Increase of water repellency resulted from the surface orientation of lignin. - Abstract: Woody thin boards were prepared from lignin, cellulose, and water by compression molding at 180 °C and 25 MPa for 10 min. Boards with higher contact angles gave lower values of relative permittivity on their surface. Attenuated-total reflection Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy suggested that more lignin existed on the surface of the boards with the high contact angle, which was also supported by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our findings thus revealed that the orientation of lignin at the surface resulted in increased hydrophobicity of the surface and contributed to the enhancement of water repellency.

  1. Toward a better understanding of the lignin isolation process from wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Anderson; Filpponen, Ilari; Lucia, Lucian A; Saquing, Carl; Baumberger, Stephanie; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2006-08-09

    The recently developed protocol for isolating enzymatic mild acidolysis lignins (EMAL) coupled with the novel combination of derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC) and quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy were used to better understand the lignin isolation process from wood. The EMAL protocol is shown to offer access at lignin samples that are more representative of the overall lignin present in milled wood. The combination of DFRC/(31)P NMR provided a detailed picture on the effects of the isolation conditions on the lignin structure. More specifically, we have used vibratory and ball milling as the two methods of wood pulverization and have compared their effects on the lignin structures and molecular weights. Vibratory-milling conditions cause substantial lignin depolymerization. Lignin depolymerization occurs via the cleavage of uncondensed beta-aryl ether linkages, while condensed beta-aryl ethers and dibenzodioxocins were found to be resistant to such mechanical action. Condensation and side chain oxidations were induced mechanochemically under vibratory-milling conditions as evidenced by the increased amounts of condensed phenolic hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups. Alternatively, the mild mechanical treatment offered by ball milling was found not to affect the isolated lignin macromolecular structure. However, the overall lignin yields were found to be compromised when the mechanical action was less intense, necessitating longer milling times under ball-milling conditions. As compared to other lignin preparations isolated from the same batch of milled wood, the yield of EMAL was about four times greater than the corresponding milled wood lignin (MWL) and about two times greater as compared to cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL). Molecular weight distribution analyses also pointed out that the EMAL protocol allows the isolation of lignin fractions that are not accessed by any other lignin isolation procedures.

  2. Effects of lignin on the anaerobic degradation of (ligno) cellulosic wastes by rumen microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, H.J.M. op den; Verhagen, F.J.M.; Kivaisi, A.K.; Windt, F.E. de; Lubberding, H.J.; Gijzen, H.J.; Vogels, G.D.

    1988-10-01

    There appeared to be a clear correlation between the lignin content (% of TS) of several waste and natural materials and their degradability by rumen microorgansims. Materials with lignin contents higher than 25% were not degraded within 72 h. The effects of Kraft pine lignin and some lignin momomers on filter paper degradation, methane production and CMCase activity were tested. Testing these compounds in concentrations comparable to natural conditions showed minor effects. At higher concentrations p-coumaric acid strongly inhibited cellulose degradation and methane production in batch cultures. Influence of lignin compounds on degradation is discussed in relation to structural effects and enzyme or growth inhibition.

  3. Lignin-derived thermoplastic co-polymers and methods of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Saito, Tomonori; Pickel, Joseph M.; Baker, Frederick S.; Eberle, Claude Clifford; Norris, Robert E.; Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2014-06-10

    The present invention relates to a crosslinked lignin comprising a lignin structure having methylene or ethylene linking groups therein crosslinking between phenyl ring carbon atoms, wherein said crosslinked lignin is crosslinked to an extent that it has a number-average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g/mol, is melt-processible, and has either a glass transition temperature of at least 100.degree. C., or is substantially soluble in a polar organic solvent or aqueous alkaline solution. Thermoplastic copolymers containing the crosslinked lignin are also described. Methods for producing the crosslinked lignin and thermoplastic copolymers are also described.

  4. Switchgrass contains two cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases involved in lignin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial polyploid grass with considerable potential as a bioenergy species. Many aspects of its biology and cell wall development are yet to be elucidated. Lignin content of cell walls is one of the key determinants of biomass quality and is a negative trai...

  5. Complex between lignin and a Ti-based coupling agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas Stensgaard; Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    coating formulations would have a better performance if the adhesion to wood could be improved. In the present work, the chemical interaction between a titanium-based coupling agent, isopropyl triisostearoyl titanate (titanium agent, TA) and lignin has been studied by means of attenuated total reflectance...

  6. Yield and forage nutritive value of reduced lignin alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduced lignin alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) cultivars have the potential to increase the feeding value of alfalfa for livestock by improving the forage fiber digestibility and to increase harvest management flexibility. The objectives were to compare the yield and forage nutritive value of reduced ...

  7. Spectroscopic analysis of carbonization behavior of wood, cellulose and lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishimaru, Kengo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Bronsveld, Paul; Meier, Dietrich; Imamura, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The surface and bulk chemistry of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria Japonica), cotton cellulose and lignin samples carbonized at 500-1,000 degrees C was investigated by elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectrometry.

  8. Recent Development in Chemical Depolymerization of Lignin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviewed recent development of chemical depolymerization of lignins. There were five types of treatment discussed, including base-catalyzed, acid-catalyzed, metallic catalyzed, ionic liquids-assisted, and supercritical fluids-assisted lignin depolymerizations. The methods employed in this research were described, and the important results were marked. Generally, base-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed methods were straightforward, but the selectivity was low. The severe reaction conditions (high pressure, high temperature, and extreme pH resulted in requirement of specially designed reactors, which led to high costs of facility and handling. Ionic liquids, and supercritical fluids-assisted lignin depolymerizations had high selectivity, but the high costs of ionic liquids recycling and supercritical fluid facility limited their applications on commercial scale biomass treatment. Metallic catalyzed depolymerization had great advantages because of its high selectivity to certain monomeric compounds and much milder reaction condition than base-catalyzed or acid-catalyzed depolymerizations. It would be a great contribution to lignin conversion if appropriate catalysts were synthesized.

  9. Flash pyrolysis properties of algae and lignin residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sørensen, Hanne Risbjerg

    A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis...

  10. A computational study of pyrolysis reactions of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder

    2010-01-01

    Enthalpies of reaction for the initial steps in the pyrolysis of lignin have been evaluated at the CBS-4m level of theory using fully substituted b-O-4 dilignols. Values for competing unimolecular decomposition reactions are consistent with results previously published for phenethyl phenyl ether models, but with lowered selectivity. Chain propagating reactions of free...

  11. Cellulose-Lignin interactions during slow and fast pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, T.J.; Wang, Z.; Pecha, B.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between lignin and cellulose during the slow pyrolysis of their blends were studied by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fast pyrolysis was studied using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py–GC/MS). Crystalline cellulose

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Novel PVC/Silica–Lignin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Klapiszewski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An advanced SiO2–lignin hybrid material was obtained and tested as a novel poly(vinyl chloride (PVC filler. The processing of compounds of poly(vinyl chloride in the form of a dry blend with silica–lignin hybrid material and, separately, with the two components from which that material was prepared, was performed in a Brabender mixing chamber. An analysis was made of processing (mass melt flow rate, MFR, thermal (thermogravimetric analysis, Congo red and Vicat softening temperature test and tensile properties of the final PVC composites with fillers in a range of concentrations between 2.5 wt % and 10 wt %. Additionally, the effects of filler content on the fusion characteristics of PVC composites were investigated. The homogeneity of dispersion of the silica–lignin hybrid material in the PVC matrix was determined by optical microscopy and SEM. Finally, it should be noted that it is possible to obtain a PVC composite containing up to 10 wt % of silica–lignin filler using a melt processing method. The introduction of hybrid filler into the PVC matrix results in a homogeneous structure of the composites and positive processing and functional properties, especially thermal stability and Vicat softening temperature.

  13. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene.

  14. The omnipresent water fern Azolla caroliniana does not contain lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, K.G.J.; Speelman, E.N.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Reichart, G.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported the presence of large amounts of lignin in ubiquitously occurring species of the freshwater fern Azolla. Molecular analysis using flash pyrolysis and thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation shows, however, that neither the leaves nor the roots of Azolla contain

  15. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor dissolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-11

    Jan 11, 2011 ... B Moodley1*, DA Mulholland1,2 and HC Brookes1. 1School of ... Hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidising agent that tends to over-oxidise the lignin during long reaction times. .... oxalic, acetic and methylfumaric acids (Bailey and Dence, 1969). .... 4-(phenylazo)-phenol (RT = 12.96 min) were also identified.

  16. Lignin as a renewable aromatic resource for the chemical industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Valorization of lignin plays a key role in the further development of lignocellulosic biorefinery processes for biofuels and biobased materials production. Today’s increased demand for alternatives to fossil carbon-based products expands the interest and the need to create added value to the u

  17. Density Functional Theory Study of Spirodienone Stereoisomers in Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, Thomas [USDA-Forest; Berstis, Laura [National; Biosciences; Beckham, Gregg T. [National; Crowley, Michael F. [National; Biosciences

    2017-07-10

    The spirodienone structure in lignin is a relatively recent discovery, and it has been found to occur in lignin of various plant species at concentrations of ~3%, which is sufficiently high to be important for better understanding of its properties and reactivity. The cyclic structure, with a ..beta..-1 bond, has been proposed to be a precursor for acyclic ..beta..-1 linkages in lignin. Previous analytical work has revealed the presence, but not the absolute configuration, of two stereoisomeric forms of spirodienone. The objective of the current work was to determine if there are thermodynamic differences that could help identify the experimentally observed stereoisomers. Results from density functional theory calculations reveal the presence of clusters of stereoisomers with varying stability that may be of use in narrowing the list of possible structures. Furthermore, the bond dissociation enthalpy of the cyclic ring exhibited a particularly high value for the C-O cleavage reaction relative to more conventional ether bonds in lignin, perhaps due to limited electron delocalization possibilities.

  18. Base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin : separation of monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneault, A. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Johnson, D.K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Chornet, E. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Biofuels produced from residual lignocellulosic biomass range from ethanol to biodiesel. The use of lignin for the production of alternate biofuels and green chemicals has been studied with particular emphasis on the structure of lignin and its oxyaromatic nature. In an effort to fractionate lignocellulosic biomass and valorize specific constitutive fractions, the authors developed a strategy for the separation of 12 added value monomers produced during the hydrolytic base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of a Steam Exploded Aspen Lignin. The separation strategy was similar to vanillin purification to obtain pure monomers, but combining more steps after the lignin depolymerization such as acidification, batch liquid-liquid-extraction (LLE), followed by vacuum distillation, liquid chromatography (LC) and crystallization. The purpose was to develop basic data for an industrial size process flow diagram, and to evaluate both the monomer losses during the separation and the energy requirements. Experimentally testing of LLE, vacuum distillation and flash LC in the laboratory showed that batch vacuum distillation produced up to 4 fractions. Process simulation revealed that a series of 4 vacuum distillation columns could produce 5 distinct monomer streams, of which 3 require further chromatography and crystallization operations for purification. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  19.  The application of computational chemistry to lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Laura Berstis; Nele Sophie Zwirchmayr; Gregg T. Beckham; Michael F. Crowley

    2017-01-01

    Computational chemical methods have become an important technique in the examination of the structure and reactivity of lignin. The calculations can be based either on classical or quantum mechanics, with concomitant differences in computational intensity and size restrictions. The current paper will concentrate on results developed from the latter type of calculations...

  20. Screening heterogenous catalysts for the pyrolysis of lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pyrolytic conversion of pure lignin at 600°C in flowing helium over five catalysts is described and compared to the control bed material, sand. Product distribution as char, liquid and gas are described as well as the composition of the liquid and gas fractions. The catalysts examined were HZS...

  1. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  2. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    Lignin is a potentially plentiful source of renewable organics, with %7E50Mtons/yr produced by the pulp/paper industry and 200-300 Mtons/yr projected production by a US biofuels industry. This industry must process approximately 1 billion tons of biomass to meet the US Renewable Fuel goals. However, there are currently no efficient processes for converting lignin to value-added chemicals and drop-in fuels. Lignin is therefore an opportunity for production of valuable renewable chemicals, but presents staggering technical and economic challenges due to the quantities of material involved and the strong chemical bonds comprising this polymer. Aggressive chemistries and high temperatures are required to degrade lignin without catalysts. Moreover, chemical non-uniformity among lignins leads to complex product mixtures that tend to repolymerize. Conventional petrochemical approaches (pyrolysis, catalytic cracking, gasification) are energy intensive (400-800 degC), require complicated separations, and remove valuable chemical functionality. Low-temperature (25-200 degC) alternatives are clearly desirable, but enzymes are thermally fragile and incompatible with liquid organic compounds, making them impractical for large-scale biorefining. Alternatively, homogeneous catalysts, such as recently developed vanadium complexes, must be separated from product mixtures, while many heterogenous catalysts involve costly noble metals. The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of concept that an entirely new class of biomimetic, efficient, and industrially robust synthetic catalysts based on nanoporous Metal- Organic Frameworks (MOFs) can be developed. Although catalytic MOFs are known, catalysis of bond cleavage reactions needed for lignin degradation is completely unexplored. Thus, fundamental research is required that industry and most sponsoring agencies are currently unwilling to undertake. We introduce MOFs infiltrated with titanium and nickel species as catalysts

  3. Flocculation of wheat straw soda lignin by hemoglobin and chicken blood: Effects of cationic polymer or calcium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocculation can be used to separate non-sulfonated lignin from base hydrolyzed biomass. In the industrial process, the lignin is isolated by filtration and washed with water. Some of the lignin is lost in the wash water, and flocculation can be used to recover this lignin. Several ways of enhanc...

  4. SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF LIGNIN BY MEANS OF ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUHede; LIANGHao; 等

    1993-01-01

    The effect of resin structure on desalination of lignin solution was investigated,the optimal structure of resin is as follows;cross linking degree as 4%,ratio of cationogen to anionogen is near 1.with such resin the desalination of lignin was produced very well because the resin has both molecule sieving and ion retardation properties.The sulfonation degress of lignin and total salt content of lignin solution were determinred with ion exchange technique,the relative error less than 1%.The salt content of small molecule in the lignin solution was calculated from sulfonation degree of lignin and total salt.Among gel and macroporous resins the best separation of lignin from reducing sugar was achieved with interpenetrating sulfonated resin 2×1.5×1.The separation of lignin with interpenetrating resin was carried out simultaneously with fractionation of lignin,the effect of fractionation with macroporous sulfonated resin is better than that with interpenetrating resin,but the former has a definite sorption of lignin which decreased the recovery of lignin.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALINE LIGNINS FOR USE IN PHENOL-FORMALDEHYDE AND EPOXY RESINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Eddine El Mansouri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Besides polyurethanes and polyesters, phenolic and epoxy resins are the most prominent applications for technical lignins in thermosetting materials. To evaluate the potential application of lignin raw materials in phenol formaldehyde and epoxy resins, three types of alkaline lignins were characterized in terms of their structures and thermal properties. The lignin samples analyzed were kraft lignin (LIG-1, soda–rice straw lignin (LIG-2, and soda-wheat straw lignin (LIG-3. FTIR and 1H-NMR methods were used to determine their structure. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC was used to determine the molecular weight distribution (MWD. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to measure the glass transition temperature (Tg, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA to determine the thermal stability of lignin samples. Results showed that kraft lignin (LIG-1 has moderate hydroxyl-group content, is rich in G-type units, and has good thermal stability. These properties make it more suitable for direct use in phenol formaldehyde resins, and it is therefore a good raw material for this purpose. The alkaline soda-rice straw lignin (LIG-2 with a high hydroxyl-group content and excellent thermal stability is most suited to preparing lignin-based epoxy resins.

  6. [Phenolic foam prepared by lignin from a steam-explosion derived biorefinery of corn stalk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanhua; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-06-01

    To increase the integral economic effectiveness, biorefineries of lignocellulosic materials should not only utilize carbohydrates hydrolyzed from cellulose and hemicellulose but also use lignin. We used steam-exploded corn stalk as raw materials and optimized the temperature and alkali concentration in the lignin extraction process to obtain lignin liquor with higher yield and purity. Then the concentrated lignin liquor was used directly to substitute phenol for phenolic foam preparation and the performances of phenolic foam were characterized by microscopic structure analysis, FTIR, compression strength and thermal conductivity detection. The results indicated that, when steam-exploded corn stalk was extracted at 120 degrees C for 2 h by 1% NaOH with a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10, the extraction yield of lignin was 79.67%. The phenolic foam prepared from the concentrated lignin liquor showed higher apparent density and compression strength with the increasing substitution rate of lignin liquor. However, there were not significant differences of thermal conductivity and flame retardant properties by the addition of lignin, which meant that the phenolic foam substituted by lignin liquor was approved for commercial application. This study, which uses alkali-extracted lignin liquor directly for phenolic foam preparation, provides a relatively simple way for utilization of lignin and finally increases the overall commercial operability ofa lignocellulosic biorefinery derived by steam explosion.

  7. Correlation between lignin physicochemical properties and inhibition to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Pan, Xuejun

    2016-06-01

    Using isolated organosolv lignins from hardwood poplar and softwood lodgepole pine with varied physicochemical properties (molecular weight, aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and hydrophobicity), the inhibitory effect of the lignins on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated and the relationship between lignin properties and the inhibitory effect was elucidated. The results indicated that the lignin inhibition to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was closely related to the hydrophobicity and the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the lignin. The overall hydrophobicity of the lignin quantified by contact angle could serve as a predictor of the inhibitory effect of lignin. Hydrophilic modification of the lignin by carboxylation and sulfonation reduced the hydrophobicity by 22-30% and thereby removed the lignin inhibition by 76-96%. Phenolic hydroxyl group was a crucial factor affecting the inhibitory effect of lignin. Blocking free phenolic hydroxyl group by chemical reaction such as hydroxypropylation significantly (65-91%) reduced the inhibitory effect of lignin. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1213-1224. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Recovery and Utilization of Lignin Monomers as Part of the Biorefinery Approach

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    Kirsten M. Davis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a substantial component of lignocellulosic biomass but is under-utilized relative to the cellulose and hemicellulose components. Historically, lignin has been burned as a source of process heat, but this heat is usually in excess of the process energy demands. Current models indicate that development of an economically competitive biorefinery system requires adding value to lignin beyond process heat. This addition of value, also known as lignin valorization, requires economically viable processes for separating the lignin from the other biomass components, depolymerizing the lignin into monomeric subunits, and then upgrading these monomers to a value-added product. The fact that lignin’s biological role is to provide biomass with structural integrity means that this heteropolymer can be difficult to depolymerize. However, there are chemical and biological routes to upgrade lignin from its native form to compounds of industrial value. Here we review the historical background and current technology of (thermo chemical depolymerization of lignin; the natural ability of microbial enzymes and pathways to utilize lignin, the current prospecting work to find novel microbial routes to lignin degradation, and some applications of these microbial enzymes and pathways; and the current chemical and biological technologies to upgrade lignin-derived monomers.

  9. Microwave-assisted extraction of lignin from triticale straw: optimization and microwave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Huang, Guang Hai; Paquet, Louise; Deschamps, Stéphane; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-01-01

    Presently lignin is used as fuel but recent interests in biomaterials encourage the use of this polymer as a renewable feedstock in manufacturing. The present study was undertaken to explore the potential applicability of microwaves to isolate lignin from agricultural residues. A central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the processing conditions for the microwave (MW)-assisted extraction of lignin from triticale straw. Maximal lignin yield (91%) was found when using 92% EtOH, 0.64 N H(2)SO(4), and 148 °C. The yield and chemical structure of MW-extracted lignin were compared to those of lignin extracted with conventional heating. Under similar conditions, MW irradiation led to higher lignin yields, lignins of lower sugar content, and lignins of smaller molecular weights. Except for these differences the lignins resulting from both types of heating exhibited comparable chemical structures. The present findings should provide a clean source of lignin for potential testing in manufacturing of biomaterials. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fractionation of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin by sequential extraction for enhancing antioxidant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Liangliang; Wang, Guanhua; Jia, Hongyu; Liu, Cuiyun; Sui, Wenjie; Si, Chuanling

    2017-06-01

    The heterogeneity of lignin chemical structure and molecular weight results in the lignin inhomogeneous properties which also covers the antioxidant performance. In order to evaluate the effects of lignin heterogeneity on its antioxidant activity, four lignin fractions from enzymatic hydrolysis lignin were classified by sequential organic solvent extraction and further evaluated by DPPH (1,1-Diphenyl-2-Picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging capacity and reducing power analysis. The characterization including FTIR, (1)H NMR and GPC showed that the fractionation process could effectively separate lignin fractions with distinctly different molecular weight and weaken the heterogeneity of unfractionated lignin. The antioxidant performance comparison of lignin fractions indicated that the dichloromethane fraction (F1) with lowest molecular weight (4585g/mol) and highest total phenolics content (246.13mg GAE/g) exhibited the highest antioxidant activity whose value was close to commercial antioxidant BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene). Moreover, the relationship between the antioxidant activity and the structure of lignin was further discussed to elucidate the mechanism of antioxidant activity improvement of lignin fractionation. Consequently, this study suggested that the sequential extraction was an effective way to obtain relatively homogeneous enzymatic hydrolysis lignin fractions which showed the potential for the value-added antioxidant application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and Tribological Behavior of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE-Lignin Composites

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    Surojit Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the synthesis and characterization of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE-lignin composites. During this study four different compositions, namely UHMWPE, UHMWPE-13 wt. % lignin, UHMWPE-25 wt. % lignin and UHMWPE-42.5 wt. % lignin were fabricated by hot pressing. Detailed microstructural studies by scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that UHMWPE and UHMWPE-13 wt. % lignin had a uniform microstructure, whereas UHMWPE-25 wt. % lignin and UHMWPE-42.5 wt. % lignin samples were riddled with pores. UHMWPE and UHMWPE-13% lignin showed comparable flexural strengths of ~32.2 MPa and ~32.4 MPa, respectively. However, the flexural strength dropped drastically in UHMWPE-25 wt. % lignin and UHMWPE-42.5 wt. % samples to ~13 MPa and ~8 MPa, respectively. The tribology of UHMWPE-lignin composites is governed by the tribofilm formation. All the compositions showed similar µmean values and the specific wear rates (WR decreased gradually as the concentration of lignin in UHMWPE was increased.

  12. Application of Sulphur-Free Lignins as a Filler for Elastomers: Effect of Hexamethylenetetramine Treatment

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    Paola Frigerio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignins from a steam explosion process in crude and purified forms and modified sulphur-free commercial lignin (Protobind 3000® were characterised to establish their chemical compositions. Then, the lignins were tested again after treatment with hexamethylenetetramine (HMT. The resulting products were used to make rubber composites, and their mechanical properties were compared to rubber composites made with carbon black to test the possibility of using HMT-treated lignins as a partial replacement for carbon black in the production of rubber composites. In the crude lignin, a significant amount of impurities were detected, such as ash and residual polysaccharides, and these substances interfered in filler-elastomer interactions. The purified lignin maintained a high content of strongly polarised hydroxyl groups that interfered with the interaction of the filler and elastomer, resulting in low performance. Improvements in the mechanical properties were observed using Protobind 3000® lignin or purified lignin with HMT added during mixing with the rubber. Finally, the mixing of HMT-treated lignin with elastomers resulted in composites with higher reinforcement abilities compared to previously described rubber composites. However, in all samples, a poor and unsatisfactory dispersion of lignin in the polymeric matrix was observed. This is likely due to the incompatibility of lignin with the hydrophobic rubber, resulting in lower performances compared to the carbon black.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of new 5-linked pinoresinol lignin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Fengxia; Lu, Fachuang; Sun, Runcang; Ralph, John

    2012-12-14

    Pinoresinol structures, featuring a β-β'-linkage between lignin monomer units, are important in softwood lignins and in dicots and monocots, particularly those that are downregulated in syringyl-specific genes. Although readily detected by NMR spectroscopy, pinoresinol structures largely escaped detection by β-ether-cleaving degradation analyses presumably due to the presence of the linkages at the 5 positions, in 5-5'- or 5-O-4'-structures. In this study, which is aimed at helping better understand 5-linked pinoresinol structures by providing the required data for NMR characterization, new lignin model compounds were synthesized through biomimetic peroxidase-mediated oxidative coupling reactions between pre-formed (free-phenolic) coniferyl alcohol 5-5'- or 5-O-4'-linked dimers and a coniferyl alcohol monomer. It was found that such dimers containing free-phenolic coniferyl alcohol moieties can cross-couple with the coniferyl alcohol producing pinoresinol-containing trimers (and higher oligomers) in addition to other homo- and cross-coupled products. Eight new lignin model compounds were obtained and characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and one tentatively identified cross-coupled β-O-4'-product was formed from a coniferyl alcohol 5-O-4'-linked dimer. It was demonstrated that the 5-5'- and 5-O-4'-linked pinoresinol structures could be readily differentiated by using heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. With appropriate modification (etherification or acetylation) to the newly obtained model compounds, it would be possible to identify the 5-5'- or 5-O-4'-linked pinoresinol structures in softwood lignins by 2D HMBC NMR spectroscopic methods. Identification of the cross-coupled dibenzodioxocin from a coniferyl alcohol 5-5'-linked moiety suggested that thioacidolysis or derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC) could be used to detect and identify whether the coniferyl alcohol itself undergoes 5-5'-cross-linking during

  14. Effect of steam explosion on biodegradation of lignin in wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lian-Hui; Li, Dong; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Ti-Peng; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Mao, Zhi-Huai

    2008-11-01

    The effect of steam explosion pretreatment on biodegradation of lignin in wheat straw was studied in this paper. Through experiments and analysis, 0.8MPa operation pressure and 1:20 wheat straw to water ratio are optimum for destroying lignin and the maximum of lignin loss rate is 19.94%. After steam explosion pretreatment, the wheat straw was retted by Trametes versicolor for 40 days. Biodegradation rate of lignin was tested and the maximum of 55.40% lignin loss rate was found on day 30. During the whole process of both steam explosion pretreatment and biodegradation, 75.34% lignin was degraded, without steam explosion the biodegradation of raw material the degradation rate of lignin was 31.23% only. FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA and SEM were used for further validating the results of biodegradation.

  15. Biomimetic Fenton-catalyzed lignin depolymerization to high-value aromatics and dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jijiao; Yoo, Chang Geun; Wang, Fei; Pan, Xuejun; Vermerris, Wilfred; Tong, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    By mimicking natural lignin degradation systems, the Fenton catalyst (Fe(3+), H2O2) can effectively facilitate lignin depolymerization in supercritical ethanol (7 MPa, 250 °C) to give organic oils that consist of mono- and oligomeric aromatics, phenols, dicarboxylic acids, and their derivatives in yields up to (66.0±8.5) %. The thermal properties, functional groups, and surface chemistry of lignin before and after Fenton treatment were examined by thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, (31)P NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results suggest that the Fenton catalyst facilitates lignin depolymerization through cleavage of β-ether bonds between lignin residues. The formation of a lignin-iron chelating complex effectively depresses lignin recondensation; thus minimizing charcoal formation and enhancing the yield of liquid products.

  16. Modifying lignin to improve bioenergy feedstocks: strengthening the barrier against pathogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eSattler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a ubiquitous polymer present in cell walls of all vascular plants, where it rigidifies and strengthens the cell wall structure through covalent cross-linkages to cell wall polysaccharides. The presence of lignin makes the cell wall recalcitrant to conversion into fermentable sugars for bioenergy uses. Therefore, reducing lignin content and modifying its linkages have become major targets for bioenergy feedstock development through either biotechnology or traditional plant breeding. In addition, lignin synthesis has long been implicated as an important plant defense mechanism against pathogens, because lignin synthesis is often induced at the site of pathogen attack. This article explores the impact of lignin modifications on the susceptibility of a range of plant species to their associated pathogens, and the implications for development of feedstocks for the second-generation biofuels industry. Surprisingly, there are some instances where plants modified in lignin synthesis may display increased resistance to associated pathogens, which is explored in this article.

  17. Effects of lignin modification on wheat straw cell wall deconstruction by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jijiao; Singh, Deepak; Gao, Difeng; Chen, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    A key focus in sustainable biofuel research is to develop cost-effective and energy-saving approaches to increase saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass. Numerous efforts have been made to identify critical issues in cellulose hydrolysis. Aerobic fungal species are an integral part of the carbon cycle, equip the hydrolytic enzyme consortium, and provide a gateway for understanding the systematic degradation of lignin, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. This study attempts to reveal the complex biological degradation process of lignocellulosic biomass by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in order to provide new knowledge for the development of energy-efficient biorefineries. In this study, we evaluated the performance of a fungal biodegradation model, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, in wheat straw through comprehensive analysis. We isolated milled straw lignin and cellulase enzyme-treated lignin from fungal-spent wheat straw to determine structural integrity and cellulase absorption isotherms. The results indicated that P. chrysosporium increased the total lignin content in residual biomass and also increased the cellulase adsorption kinetics in the resulting lignin. The binding strength increased from 117.4 mL/g to 208.7 mL/g in milled wood lignin and from 65.3 mL/g to 102.4 mL/g in cellulase enzyme lignin. A detailed structural dissection showed a reduction in the syringyl lignin/guaiacyl lignin ratio and the hydroxycinnamate/lignin ratio as predominant changes in fungi-spent lignin by heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy. P. chrysosporium shows a preference for degradation of phenolic terminals without significantly destroying other lignin components to unzip carbohydrate polymers. This is an important step in fungal growth on wheat straw. The phenolics presumably locate at the terminal region of the lignin moiety and/or link with hemicellulose to form the lignin-carbohydrate complex. Findings may inform the development of a biomass hydrolytic enzyme

  18. Fate and transport of lignin in the soil-water continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. S.; Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; Abbott, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Soils have been identified as having the potential to store greater amounts of carbon (C) in soil organic matter (SOM) through appropriate land uses and management practices to increase the input of recalcitrant components of organic matter, such as lignin. Lignin is allocated to the 'slow' soil C pools with residence times between 15 - 100 yrs. Lignin is 30% of the C fixed by plants and is an important C input to soils. However, Recent research has shown that the configuration of lignin monomers within the lignin macromolecule is not random [1], that lignin degradation is monomer specific [2], and that lignin is preferentially degraded relative to the bulk SOM [3], thereby questioning the role of lignin in C sequestration. Although guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) lignin monomers have been identified in fresh, estuarine, and marine waters [4], the initial forms to which lignin is degraded into water-transportable products and lost from the soil C reservoir are not known. The aims of this project are to (i) identify and quantify the lignin-derived products entering the soluble phase in soils, and (ii) determine the rate of lignin degradation into water-soluble components, and their rate of transport through soil. In experiment 1 we tested the best approach to extract and analyse dissolved lignin from outflows from grassland and woodland sites. C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) or freeze-drying (FD) was used to isolate water-borne lignin monomers. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives or tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis was used to analyse the samples. In a subsequent experiment, we allowed leaves from different vegetation types (Lolium perenne, Ranunculus repens, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus robur), corresponding to the vegetation at our initial sites in Experiment 1, to degrade in soil lysimeters for 1.5 years to determine the rates of decomposition of different plant material and dominant form of lignin

  19. Characteristics of Lignin from Flax Shives as Affected by Extraction Conditions

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    Kelly Ross

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin, a polyphenolic molecule, is a major constituent of flax shives. This polyphenolic molecular structure renders lignin a potential source of a variety of commercially viable products such as fine chemicals. This work compares the performance of different lignin isolation methods. Lignin from flax shive was isolated using both conventional alkaline extraction method and a novel experimental pressurized low polarity water (PLPW extraction process. The lignin yields and chemical composition of the lignin fractions were determined. The conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h, extracted 92 g lignin per kg flax shives, while lignin yields from the PLPW extracts ranged from 27 to 241 g lignin per kg flax shives. The purity and monomeric composition of the lignins obtained from the different extraction conditions was assessed via UV spectroscopy and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. Lignin obtained from conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h was of low purity and exhibited the lowest yields of nitrobenzene oxidation products. With respect to alkali assisted PLPW extractions, temperature created an opposing effect on lignin yield and nitrobenzene oxidation products. More lignin was extracted as temperature increased, yet the yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products decreased. The low yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products may be attributed to either the formation of condensed structures or the selective dissolution of condensed structures of lignin during the pressurized alkaline high temperature treatment. Analytical pyrolysis, using pyroprobe GC-MS, was used to investigate the molecular composition of the lignin samples. The total yield of pyrolysis lignin products was 13.3, 64.7, and 30.5% for the 1.25 M NaOH extracted lignin, alkaline assisted PLPW extracted lignin, and the unprocessed flax shives, respectively. Key lignin derived compounds such as guaiacol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, 4

  20. Comparison of XAD with other dissolved lignin isolation techniques and a compilation of analytical improvements for the analysis of lignin in aquatic settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dyda, Rachael Y.; Butler, Kenna; Bergamaschi, Brian; Hernes, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript highlights numerous incremental improvements in dissolved lignin measurements over the nearly three decades since CuO oxidation of lignin phenols was first adapted for environmental samples. Intercomparison of the recovery efficiency of three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques, namely XAD, C18with both CH3OH (C18M) and CH3CN (C18A) used independently for priming and elution steps, and tangential flow filtration (TFF) for a range of aquatic samples including fresh, estuarine and marine waters, was undertaken. With freshwater samples XAD8-1, C18M and TFF were all observed to recover ca. 80–90% of the lignin phenols and showed no fractionation effects with respect to diagnostic lignin parameters. With estuarine and marine samples more lignin phenols were recovered with C18M and XAD8-1 than TFF because of the increased prevalence of low molecular weight lignin phenols in marine influenced samples. For marine systems, differences were also observed between diagnostic lignin parameters isolated via TFF vs. C18M and XAD8-1 as a result of the high molecular weight lignin phenols being less degraded than the bulk. Therefore, it is recommended for future studies of marine systems that only one technique is utilized for ease of intercomparison within studies. It is suggested that for studies solely aimed at recovering bulk dissolved lignin in marine environments that C18M and XAD8-1 appear to be more suitable than TFF as they recover more lignin. Our results highlight that, for freshwater samples, all three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques are comparable to whole water concentrated by rotary evaporation (i.e. not isolated) but, that for marine systems, the choice of concentration and isolation techniques needs to be taken into consideration with respect to both lignin concentration and diagnostic parameters. Finally, as the study highlights XAD8-1 to be a suitable method for the isolation of dissolved

  1. Fast Pyrolysis of Four Lignins from Different Isolation Processes Using Py-GC/MS

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    Xiaona Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a promising approach that is being investigated to convert lignin into higher value products including biofuels and phenolic chemicals. In this study, fast pyrolysis of four types of lignin, including milled Amur linden wood lignin (MWL, enzymatic hydrolysis corn stover lignin (EHL, wheat straw alkali lignin (AL and wheat straw sulfonate lignin (SL, were performed using pyrolysis gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA showed that the four lignins exhibited widely different thermolysis behaviors. The four lignins had similar functional groups according to the FTIR analysis. Syringyl, guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenylpropane structural units were broken down during pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis product distributions from the four lignins depended strongly on the lignin origin and isolation process. Phenols were the most abundant pyrolysis products from MWL, EHL and AL. However, SL produced a large number of furan compounds and sulfur compounds originating from kraft pulping. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and time on the product distributions from corn stover EHL were also studied. At 350 °C, EHL pyrolysis mainly produced acids and alcohols, while phenols became the main products at higher temperature. No obvious influence of pyrolysis time was observed on EHL pyrolysis product distributions.

  2. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  3. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  4. VARIABILITY IN THE LIGNINOLYTIC ENZYMES ACTIVITY BY LENTINULA EDODES IN SUBMERGED CULTURE WITH LIGNIN AND GLUCOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlalli Harris-Valle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The white-rot basidiomycete Lentinula edodes is the second most edible mushroom cultivated on the world. This fungus decomposes cell-wall associated macromolecules, is a natural degrader of lignin polymers. The differences in enzyme activities between strains of L. edodes provided useful information about the participation of enzymes in different development stages of the fungus. The effect of lignin on the fungal biomass production and activity behavior of ligninolytic enzymes when L. edodes is cultivated in a medium containing lignin with and without glucose as a carbohydrate source was tested. When glucose was present in the culture, lignin increase the mycelial biomass by 70% at 22 days compared to the control culture. The lignin media without glucose affected mycelial growth up to 20% less that the control without lignin and glucose. The activity of laccase, lignin peroxidase, aryl alcohol oxidase, manganese dependent peroxidase and catalase was modified depending on whether the medium had lignin and glucose, or lignin alone. A carbohydrate source is important to fungal growth, but the dissolution of lignin monomers might switch the signal that controls growth rate and enzymatic activity.

  5. Investigation of structural modification and thermal characteristics of lignin after heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Hwang, Hyewon; Oh, Shinyoung; Kim, Yong-Sik; Kim, Ung-Jin; Choi, Joon Weon

    2014-05-01

    Milled wood lignin was subjected to heat treatment between 150 and 300°C to understand the pattern of its structural modification and thermal properties. When the temperature was elevated with interval of 50°C, the color of the lignin became dark brown and the lignin released various forms of phenols from terminal phenolic groups in the lignin, leading to two physical phenomena: (1) gradual weight loss of the lignin, up to 19% based on dry weight and (2) increase in the carbon content and decrease in the oxygen content. Nitrobenzene oxidation and (13)C NMR analyses confirmed a cleavage of β-O-4 linkage (depolymerization) and reduction of methoxyl as well as phenolic hydroxyl group were also characteristic in the lignin structure during heat treatment. Simultaneously with lignin depolymerization, GPC analysis provided a possibility that condensation between lignin fragments could also occur during heat treatment. TGA/DTG/DSC data revealed that thermal stability of lignin obviously increased after heat treatment, implicating the structural rearrangement of lignin to reduction of β-O-4 linkage as well as accumulation of CC bonds.

  6. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  7. KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Townsley

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I KNOX genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed.

  8. Genoprotective effects of lignin isolated from oil palm black liquor waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Prashantha; Rozman, Hj Din; Bhat, Rajeev

    2013-07-01

    Black liquor waste (BLW), a major by-product of palm oil extraction process contains lignin as one of the constituents. Lignin isolated from BLW was evaluated for antioxidant and genoprotective properties and was compared with the commercial lignin for overall efficacy. Antioxidant compounds (phenolics and tannins) and antioxidant activities (phosphomolybdenum assay, ABTS(+) and FRAP assays) of lignin isolated from BLW were compared with commercial lignin. Bone marrow micronucleus (MN) test was employed for evaluating the dose-yield protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP, 50mg/kg b.w.) induced genotoxicity in mouse. Results revealed isolated lignin to exhibit rich antioxidant activities. A decrease in MN frequency and recovery of P/N ratio (P: polychromatic erythrocytes, N: normochromatic erhythocytes) indicated protective effects of lignin against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. The efficacy of BLW-derived lignin as an antioxidant and genoprotective agent was comparable to commercial lignin. Results on lignin isolated from BLW are envisaged to find potential applications in food and/or pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrocarbon recovery comprising injecting a slug comprising oil soluble alkoxylated surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; DaGue, M.G.; Dunn, N.G.

    1993-07-27

    A method is described of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of oil soluble surfactants produced from lignin, said oil soluble surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into relatively low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen, said reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200 C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reaction mixture, alkoxylating the lignin phenols by reacting the lignin phenols with an a-olefin epoxide having about 6 to about 20 carbon atoms at about 100 to about 200 C for about 1 to about 3 hours in an organic solvent, and changing the alkoxylated lignin phenols into oil soluble lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of sulfonation, sulfation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  10. Preparation and characterization of lignin based macromonomer and its copolymers with butyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohuan; Wang, Jifu; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Chunpeng; Xu, Yuzhi; Chu, Fuxiang

    2013-09-01

    Copolymerization of butyl methacrylate (BMA) with biobutanol lignin (BBL) was achieved by free-radical polymerization (FRP) using a lignin-based macromonomer. The lignin-based macromonomer containing acrylic groups was prepared by reacting acryloyl chloride with biobutanol lignin using triethylamine (TEA) as absorb acid agentin. From the results of elemental analysis and GPC, the average degree of polymerization (DP) of BBL was estimated to be five. A detailed molecular characterization has been performed, including techniques such as (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, which provided quantitative information about the composition of the copolymers. The changes in the solubility of lignin-g-poly(BMA) copolymers in ethyl ether were dependent on the length of poly(BMA) side chain. TGA analysis indicated that the lignin-containing poly(BMA) graft copolymers exhibited high thermal stability. The bulky aromatic group of lignin increased the glass-transition temperature of poly(BMA). In order to confirm the main structure of copolymer, (AC-g-BBL)-co-BMA copolymer was also synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and the results revealed that the copolymer prepared by ATRP had the same solution behavior as that prepared by FRP, and the lignin-based macromonomer showed no homopolymerizability due to the steric hindrance. In addition, the lignin-co-BMA copolymer had a surprisingly higher molecular weight than poly(BMA) under the same reaction condition, suggesting that a branched lignin based polymer could be formed.

  11. Prediction of Klason lignin and lignin thermal degradation products by Py-GC/MS in a collection of Lolium and Festuca grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmi, R.; Bridgwater, A.V. [Bio-Energy Research Group, Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Thain, S.C.; Donnison, I.S.; Morris, P.M. [Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Plas Gogerddan, Aberystwyth SY23 3EB (United Kingdom); Yates, N. [Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    A rapid method for the analysis of biomass feedstocks was established to identify the quality of the pyrolysis products likely to impact on bio-oil production. A total of 15 Lolium and Festuca grasses known to exhibit a range of Klason lignin contents were analysed by pyroprobe-GC/MS (Py-GC/MS) to determine the composition of the thermal degradation products of lignin. The identification of key marker compounds which are the derivatives of the three major lignin subunits (G, H, and S) allowed pyroprobe-GC/MS to be statistically correlated to the Klason lignin content of the biomass using the partial least-square method to produce a calibration model. Data from this multivariate modelling procedure was then applied to identify likely 'key marker' ions representative of the lignin subunits from the mass spectral data. The combined total abundance of the identified key markers for the lignin subunits exhibited a linear relationship with the Klason lignin content. In addition the effect of alkali metal concentration on optimum pyrolysis characteristics was also examined. Washing of the grass samples removed approximately 70% of the metals and changed the characteristics of the thermal degradation process and products. Overall the data indicate that both the organic and inorganic specification of the biofuel impacts on the pyrolysis process and that pyroprobe-GC/MS is a suitable analytical technique to asses lignin composition. (author)

  12. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV.

  13. Biological activities of lignin hydrolysate-related compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siseon Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignin hydrolysates contain many different chemical species,including ferulic acid, coumaric acid, vanillic acid, vanillin,syringaldehyde and furfural. From the perspective of biofuels,these compounds are problematic and can cause downstreamloss of product if not removed prior to beginning the fermentativeprocess. In contrast, a search for these compounds withinthe literature turns up many papers where the same compoundshave beneficial properties pertaining to human health,including as antioxidants and in cancer prevention, or are involvedin bacterial cell-to-cell signaling. Consequently, this articlereviews the dual nature of these and other compoundsfound in lignin hydrolysates, highlighting both their detrimentaland beneficial activities. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(5:265-274

  14. Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Li-ion battery technology into electric and hybrid electric vehicles and portable electronic devices such as smart phones, laptops and tablets, creates a demand for efficient, economic and sustainable materials for energy storage. However, the high cost and long processing time associated with manufacturing battery-grade anode and cathode materials are two big constraints for lowering the total cost of batteries and environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Lignin, a byproduct of the pulp and paper industry and biorefinery, is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fibers with optimal properties for use as anode materials. Recent developments in the preparation of lignin precursors and conversion to carbon fiber-based anode materials have created a new class of anode materials with excellent electrochemical characteristics suitable for immediate use in existing Li- or Na-ion battery technologies.

  15. Biobased Epoxy Nanocomposites Derived from Lignin-Based Monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shou; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-07-13

    Biobased epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized based on 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol (dihydroeugenol, DHE), a molecule that has been obtained from the lignin component of biomass. To increase the content of hydroxyl groups, DHE was o-demethylated using aqueous HBr to yield propylcatechol (DHEO), which was subsequently glycidylated to epoxy monomer. Optimal conditions in terms of yield and epoxy equivalent weight were found to be 60 °C with equal NaOH/phenolic hydroxyl molar ratio. The structural evolution from DHE to cured epoxy was followed by (1)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nano-montmorillonite modified DHEO epoxy exhibited improved storage modulus and thermal stability as determined from dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. This study widens the synthesis routes of biobased epoxy thermosets from lignin-based molecules.

  16. Countercurrent Process for Lignin Separation from Biomass Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran Kadam; Ed Lehrburger

    2006-03-31

    The overall goal of the project was to test the concept of using a twin-screw extruder to conduct autohydrolysis pretreatment of wheat straw in countercurrent fashion, demonstrate in situ solid/liquid separation, and produce a low-lignin cellulose product using ethanol as an extractant. The resultant solid product is suitable for sugar production through enzymatic hydrolysis and for pulp applications. Pilot-scale equipment was used to successfully demonstrate the process both for sugar and pulp applications.

  17. Rapid Synthesis of Carbon Dots by Hydrothermal Treatment of Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A rapid approach has been developed for the fluorescent carbon dots (CDs by the hydrothermal treatment of lignin in the presence of H2O2. The as-synthesized CDs were found to emit blue photoluminescence with excellent photostability. Moreover, the CDs displayed biocompatibility, low cytotoxicity, and high water solubility properties. Finally, the as-resulted CDs were demonstrated to be excellent probes for bioimaging and biosensing applications.

  18. Phenolic compounds in ectomycorrhizal interaction of lignin modified silver birch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Vincent L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monolignol biosynthetic pathway interconnects with the biosynthesis of other secondary phenolic metabolites, such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and condensed tannins. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether genetic modification of the monolignol pathway in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth. would alter the metabolism of these phenolic compounds and how such alterations, if exist, would affect the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Results Silver birch lines expressing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides L. caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase (PtCOMT under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV promoter showed a reduction in the relative expression of a putative silver birch COMT (BpCOMT gene and, consequently, a decrease in the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl composition ratio. Alterations were also detected in concentrations of certain phenolic compounds. All PtCOMT silver birch lines produced normal ectomycorrhizas with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus (Batsch: Fr., and the formation of symbiosis enhanced the growth of the transgenic plants. Conclusion The down-regulation of BpCOMT in the 35S-PtCOMT lines caused a reduction in the syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of lignin, but no significant effect was seen in the composition or quantity of phenolic compounds that would have been caused by the expression of PtCOMT under the 35S or UbB1 promoter. Moreover, the detected alterations in the composition of lignin and secondary phenolic compounds had no effect on the interaction between silver birch and P. involutus.

  19. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  20. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  1. Study of Antioxidant Effectiveness of Kraft Lignin in HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Piña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers are subject to oxidative degradation during all steps of their useful cycle. This degradative process is prevented using stabilizers like antioxidant of the type sterically hindered phenols or amines. Lignin, due to the presence of phenolic groups in their structure, can present characteristic as antioxidant agent, in a similar way to the additives used in polymers. Therefore, in this work, the antioxidant capacity of the lignin in a sample of polyethylene is studied. For this reason, in this paper, a method based on nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to evaluate this property is used. The samples studied were subjected to heat treatment at different scan rates and in presence of oxygen to promote thermooxidation of the material. The antioxidant capacity of different formulations of lignin and additives in the polymer resin was determined from the temperature of onset of oxidation (Ti at different heating rates and adjusting Arrhenius model prediction. The results indicate that the procedure can predict the antioxidant capacity of antioxidant additives in HDPE with good reproducibility and accuracy, according to the Arrhenius model prediction.

  2. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor. Final report. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffers, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    The ultimate objective of the DOE-sponsored program discussed in this report is to commercialize an instrument for real-time, in-situ measurement of lignin in wood pulp at a variety of locations in the pulp process stream. The instrument will be used as a primary sensor for process control in the pulp and paper industry. Work done by B&W prior to the initiation of this program had shown: there is a functional relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the Kappa number as measured at the pulp mill laboratory. Kappa number is a standard wet chemical method for determination of the lignin concentration; the relationship is one of decreasing intensity with Kappa number, indicating operation in the quenched fluorescence regime; a great deal of scatter in the data. Because of the preliminary nature of the study, the origin of the scatter was not identified. This report documents the results of laboratory measurements made on a variety of well defined pulp samples to generate the data necessary to: determine the feasibility of an instrument for on-line lignin concentration measurement using laser fluorescence; identify the preferred measurement strategy; define the range of applicability of the instrument; and to provide background information to guide the design of a field-worthy prototype.

  3. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... to be major chemical components in the lignin oil. The maximal yields of 0.62, 0.67, and 0.38 wt % db were obtained for syringol, p-vinylguaiacol, and guaiacol, respectively. The reactor temperature effect was investigated in a range of 450−600 °C and has a considerable effect on the observed chemical...

  4. Polyoxometalates in Oxidative Delignification of Chemical Pulps: Effect on Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolby Hirth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical pulps are produced by chemical delignification of lignocelluloses such as wood or annual non-woody plants. After pulping (e.g., kraft pulping, the remaining lignin is removed by bleaching to produce a high quality, bright paper. The goal of bleaching is to remove lignin from the pulp without a negative effect on the cellulose; for this reason, delignification should be performed in a highly selective manner. New environmentally-friendly alternatives to conventional chlorine-based bleaching technologies (e.g., oxygen, ozone, or peroxide bleaching have been suggested or implemented. In an attempt to find inorganic agents that mimic the action of highly selective lignin-degrading enzymes and that can be applicable in industrial conditions, the researchers have focused on polyoxometalates (POMs, used either as regenerable redox reagents (in anaerobic conditions or as catalysts (in aerobic conditions of oxidative delignification. The aim of this paper is to review the basic concepts of POM delignification in these two processes.

  5. A Comparison of Lignin, Macroalgae, Wood and Straw Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    with respect to carbon and oxygen contents, HHV, thermal behaviors and mean molecular weight. The HHV of wood, straw, lignin and algae oils were 24.0, 23.7, 29.7 and 25.7 MJ/kg db, respectively. The distributions of metals, Cl and S in char and bio-oil were investigated for the biomasses. Almost all the metals......A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor at pyrolysis temperature of 550 ºC. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among...... these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis of macroalgae showed a promising result with a bio-oil yield of 65 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 76 % energy recovery in the bio-oil while the lignin fast pyrolysis provides a bio-oil yield of 47 wt% daf and energy recovery in bio-oil of 45 %. The physiochemical properties...

  6. Lignin modification leads to increased nodule numbers in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Bhattarai, Kishor; Pislariu, Catalina I; Nakashima, Jin; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Udvardi, Michael K; Monteros, Maria J; Dixon, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of lignin levels in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by down-regulation of the monolignol biosynthetic enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl coenzyme A:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) results in strongly increased digestibility and processing ability of lignocellulose. However, these modifications are often also associated with dwarfing and other changes in plant growth. Given the importance of nitrogen fixation for legume growth, we evaluated the impact of constitutively targeted lignin modification on the belowground organs (roots and nodules) of alfalfa plants. HCT down-regulated alfalfa plants exhibit a striking reduction in root growth accompanied by an unexpected increase in nodule numbers when grown in the greenhouse or in the field. This phenotype is associated with increased levels of gibberellins and certain flavonoid compounds in roots. Although HCT down-regulation reduced biomass yields in both the greenhouse and field experiments, the impact on the allocation of nitrogen to shoots or roots was minimal. It is unlikely, therefore, that the altered growth phenotype of reduced-lignin alfalfa is a direct result of changes in nodulation or nitrogen fixation efficiency. Furthermore, HCT down-regulation has no measurable effect on carbon allocation to roots in either greenhouse or 3-year field trials.

  7. Purification, structural characterization, and modification of organosolv wheat straw lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbotchak, Laurie; Le Morvan, Clara; Duong, Khanh Linh; Rousseau, Brigitte; Tessier, Martine; Fradet, Alain

    2015-06-03

    Biolignin, a wheat straw lignin produced by acetic acid/formic acid/water hydrolysis, was characterized by (31)P and (13)C-(1)H 2D NMR spectroscopy and by size-exclusion chromatography. Biolignin is a mixture of low molar mass compounds (Mn = 1660 g/mol) made up of S, G, and H units and of coumaric and ferulic acid units. β-5 and β-O-4 interunit linkages are partially acylated in the γ-position by acetate and p-coumarate groups. Deacylated samples with a low content of contaminants were obtained by combining alkaline hydrolysis and solvent extraction. The high phenolic OH content found by (31)P NMR reflects the presence of condensed aromatic units, such as 5-5 units. Reaction of purified lignin with ethanol and ethane-1,2-diol yielded esterified lignins much more soluble than Biolignin in common organic solvents. During this reaction, the secondary OH of β-O-4 linkages was simultaneously etherified. Phenol hydroxyethylation by 2-chloroethanol yielded samples containing only aliphatic hydroxyl groups.

  8. Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

  9. AN OXIDANT TO REPLACE NITROBENZENE IN LIGNIN ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Masingale

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Four metal organic frameworks (MOFs are being evaluated as possible catalysts for alkaline lignin oxidation. One aspect of the screening process is the oxidation of in-situ hardwood lignin by a high mole ratio of Cu, Fe, or Cu + Fe contained in the MOFs. The MOF’s were prepared in a microwave-assisted synthesis. One of the MOFs, a benzenetricar-boxylic acid complex of Cu (II and Fe (III, converted the phenylpropane (C9 units in in-situ poplar lignin to approximately 50% monomers. The ratio of syringyl (S to guiacyl (G monomers was similar to the S:G ratio obtained from nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO. The S:G ratio from NBO was then compared to that from MOF oxidation (MOFO for two other poplars. The S:G ratios for the three poplars by MOFO were 1.20, 1.51 and 1.67, respectively while the corresponding NBO values were 1.25, 1.45 and 1.68. These initial results indicate that MOFO could be developed into a credible replacement for NBO, because it affords a higher yield of monomers when a large MOF dose is used. Some preliminary results are also presented for MOF acting as a catalyst (100 ppm Cu (II plus 81 ppm Fe (III in NaOH for oxygenation of the hardwoods. The products from O2 + MOF are identical to MOF only, but the ratios amongst them are different.

  10. Lignin removal from paper mill wastewaters in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) by adsorption to the sludge; Entfernung von Lignin aus Papierfabrikabwaessern in Sequencing-Batch-Reaktoren (SBR) durch Schlamm-Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiegl, C.; Kriebitzsch, K.; Helmreich, B.; Wilderer, P.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Pruefamt fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1997-11-01

    Lignin is known to be poorly biodegradable. During the mechanical pulp lignin gets dissolved in the water because of high temperatures and pressures. By biological treatment of mechanical pulp wastewater the amount of lignin is decreased. Experiments about lignin adsorption were carried out in a lab scale batch-test with different sludge ages to clarify whether lignin is removed from the waste water by biodegradation or by adsorption to the activated sludge. By carrying out pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (pyGC/MS) the amount of lignin was quantified for the different sludges. Up to 30 weight percent of lignin could be adsorbed to the activated sludge which proves the excellent adsorption properties of the activated sludge. The adsorbed quantity of lignin depends on the sludge age which results in a higher adsorptive capacity of the sludge at lower sludge ages than at higher ones. A total removal of the lignin from the wastewater could be reached if there was a satisfying high content of sludge for total lignin adsorption or a relatively low amount of lignin in the influent. (orig.) [Deutsch] Lignin gilt als biologisch schwerabbaubar. Beim Holzschliffprozess wird aufgrund der hohen Temperaturen und Druecke Lignin im Wasser geloest. Durch die biologische Reinigung von Holzschliffabwasser in Sequencing-Batch Reaktoren (SBR) kann die Menge an geloestem Lignin reduziert werden. Um zu klaeren, ob Lignin biologisch metabolisiert wird oder aber lediglich durch Adsorption an Schlamm aus dem Abwasser entfernt wird, werden Batch-Versuche zur Adsorption des Lignin im Labormassstab mit verschiedenen Schlammaltern durchgefuehrt. Mit Hilfe der Pyrolyse-Gaschromatographie/Massenspektrometrie (pyGC/MS) wird der Lingingehalt der einzelnen Schlaemme quantifiziert. Der Belebtschlamm erweist sich dabei als hervorragendes Adsorbermaterial, an dem sich Lignin mit bis zu 30 Gewichtsprozent adsorbieren laesst. Die Adsorptionskapazitaet der einzelnen Schlaemme sinkt mit

  11. In vitro degradation of natural insoluble lignin in aqueous media by the extracellular peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.N.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Hames, B.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Biomass Analysis Group; Grethlein, H.E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)]|[Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States)

    1998-03-20

    The lignin peroxidases (LIP) and manganese peroxidases (MNP) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium catalyze a wide range of lignin depolymerization reactions with lignin models and synthetic lignins in solution. However, their ability to degrade insoluble natural lignin in aqueous media has not been demonstrated. Insoluble isolated poplar lignin similar to natural lignin was treated in vitro in aqueous media for 12 h with LIP, MNP, and both. Treatment with MNP alone slightly increased the solid mass and produced measurable amounts of lignin-derived 2,6-dimethoxyhydroquinone and 2-methoxyhydroquinone but did not appreciably decrease the total lignin content. Treatment with LIP alone did not decrease the mass but produced measurable amounts of lignin-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid and slightly decreased the lignin content. Finally, treatment with LIP and MNP together decreased the solid mass by 11%, decreased the lignin content by 5%, and released low-concentration compounds with mass spectra containing the typical lignin-derived electron-impact fragments of mass 107, 137, 151, 167, and 181. These results suggest that MNP increases the effectiveness of LIP-mediated lignin degradation.

  12. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products.

  13. Mechanism of the catalytic ozonization of lignin in the presence of Mn(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanova, A. N.; Khudoshin, A. G.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    The reaction between ozone and lignin in aqueous solutions catalyzed by Mn(II) ions is studied. The rate of destruction for aromatic structures of lignin is found to increase in the presence of Mn(II) ions. However, the greatest catalytic effect is observed upon the transformation of aliphatic acids that are difficult to oxidize with ozone. The introduction of catalyst raises the total consumption of ozone from 3 to 7 mol per each structural unit of lignin. A scheme is proposed for the transformation of phenol fragments of lignin using ozone with the participation of Mn(II) ions: at the initial stage, we observe the ozone oxidation of lignin and Mn(II) to Mn(III) ions stabilized with products of lignin oxidation and accompanied by the formation of chelate complexes, and the Mn(III) chelate complexes act as low-molecular mediators, attacking phenol structures and initiating radical processes.

  14. Tandem Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin by Water-Tolerant Lewis Acids and Rhodium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Constant, Sandra; Lancefield, Christopher S; Westwood, Nicholas J; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2016-08-23

    Lignin is an attractive renewable feedstock for aromatic bulk and fine chemicals production, provided that suitable depolymerization procedures are developed. Here, we describe a tandem catalysis strategy for ether linkage cleavage within lignin, involving ether hydrolysis by water-tolerant Lewis acids followed by aldehyde decarbonylation by a Rh complex. In situ decarbonylation of the reactive aldehydes limits loss of monomers by recondensation, a major issue in acid-catalyzed lignin depolymerization. Rate of hydrolysis and decarbonylation were matched using lignin model compounds, allowing the method to be successfully applied to softwood, hardwood, and herbaceous dioxasolv lignins, as well as poplar sawdust, to give the anticipated decarbonylation products and, rather surprisingly, 4-(1-propenyl)phenols. Promisingly, product selectivity can be tuned by variation of the Lewis-acid strength and lignin source. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to lignin: effects of hydrophobicity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Ahmad, Mahtab; Lee, Sang Soo; Xu, Li Heng; Ok, Yong Sik

    2014-07-01

    The study of the sorption of contaminants to lignin is significant for understanding the migration of contaminants in the environment as well as developing low cost sorbent. In this study, sorption of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene, acenaphthene and phenanthrene, to lignin was investigated. Sorption isotherms were well described by both linear and Freundlich sorption models. Sorption coefficients of PAHs to lignin from water obtained from regression of both linear model (K d) and Freundlich model (K f) were highly positively correlated with hydrophobicity of PAHs. The amorphous structure of lignin provided sufficient sorption domain for partitioning of PAHs, and the attraction between PAHs molecules and aromatic fractions in lignin via π-π electron-donor-acceptor (π-π EDA) interaction is hypothesized to provide a strong sorption force. Thermodynamic modeling revealed that sorption of PAHs to lignin was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  16. Biomass pretreatments capable of enabling lignin valorization in a biorefinery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narron, Robert H; Kim, Hoyong; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan; Park, Sunkyu

    2016-04-01

    Recent techno-economic studies of proposed lignocellulosic biorefineries have concluded that creating value from lignin will assist realization of biomass utilization into valuable fuels, chemicals, and materials due to co-valorization and the new revenues beyond carbohydrates. The pretreatment step within a biorefinery process is essential for recovering carbohydrates, but different techniques and intensities have a variety of effects on lignin. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments have been shown to produce diverse lignins based on delignification chemistry. The valorization potential of pretreated lignin is affected by its chemical structure, which is known to degrade, including inter-lignin condensation under high-severity pretreatment. Co-valorization of lignin and carbohydrates will require dampening of pretreatment intensities to avoid such effects, in spite of tradeoffs in carbohydrate production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lignin distribution in waterlogged archaeological Picea abies (L.) Karst degraded by erosion bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nanna Bjerregaard; Schmitt, Uwe Schmitt; Koch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    degraded S2 showed a varied lignin distribution as evidenced by the different local UV-absorbance intensities. However, evaluation of UV-absorbance line spectra of RM revealed no change in conjugation of the aromatic ring system. Presence of RM with both very low and very high lignin absorbances showed......The lignin distribution in poles of waterlogged archaeological Picea abies (L.) Karst, which was decayed by erosion bacteria (EB) under anoxic conditions for approximately 400 years, was topochemically identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution UV...... evidence for disassembly of lignin during degradation combined with aggregation of lignin fragments and physical movement of these fractions. In contrast to TEM analysis, locally decreasing lignin content was found by UMSP in CML regions....

  18. Purification of major lignin peroxidase isoenzymes from Phanerochaete chrysosporium by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollikka, P; Leppänen, V M; Anttila, T; Suominen, I

    1995-06-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces several isoforms of lignin peroxidase, which catalyzes the oxidative depolymerization of lignin To date, ion-exchange chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF) have been commonly used for isolation of lignin peroxidase isoenzymes. In this work we have purified major lignin peroxidases to high purity by a one-step chromatographic method, chromatofocusing. The purified isoenzymes were identified by analytical IEF using isoenzymes purified by preparative IEF as standards. The specific activities and spectral properties of the isoenzymes were comparable with the previously published data. The predominant isoenzyme under the growth conditions used was LiP 4.65. Almost 50% of the lignin peroxidase activity applied into the column was recovered in the LiP 4.65 fraction. The total recovery of the lignin peroxidase activity was over 80%.

  19. Aktivitas Ligninolitik Beberapa Jamur Aphyllophorales dan Kemampuannya Mendegradasi Lignin pada Lindi Hitam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atria Martina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen local isolate Aphyllophorales fungi were screened their ligninolytic activity. The isolate with highest ligninolytic activity was tested it capability to degrade kraft blackliquor lignin. The biodegradability of black liquor is low because the presence of lignin and lignin derivative in the wastewater. These fungal were screened for ligninolytic activity by decolorization on solid mediacontaining RBBR dye. The ability of the fungal strains to biodegrade kraft black liquor lignin was performed by submerged fermentation condition with agitation and incubation time as treatment. The solid culture result in 3 isolates had ligninolytic activity and Ganoderma sp.BTA1 gave the highest ligninolytic. Agitation and incubation time influenced ligninbiodegradation of blackliquor significantly. Optimum condition for lignin biodegradation was at 200 rpm during 25 days with lignin reduction was 45,786%.

  20. Interactions of a lignin-rich fraction from brewer's spent grain with gut microbiota in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Piritta; Aura, Anna-Marja; Maukonen, Johanna; Smeds, Annika I; Mattila, Ismo; Niemelä, Klaus; Tamminen, Tarja; Faulds, Craig B; Buchert, Johanna; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2013-07-10

    Lignin is a constituent of plant cell walls and thus is classified as part of dietary fiber. However, little is known about the role of lignin in gastrointestinal fermentation. In this work, a lignin-rich fraction was prepared from brewer's spent grain and subjected to an in vitro colon model to study its potential bioconversions and interactions with fecal microbiota. No suppression of microbial conversion by the fraction was observed in the colon model, as measured as short-chain fatty acid production. Furthermore, no inhibition on the growth was observed when the fraction was incubated with strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. In fact, the lignin-rich fraction enabled bifidobacteria to survive longer than with glucose. Several transiently appearing phenolic compounds, very likely originating from lignin, were observed during the fermentation. This would indicate that the gut microbiota was able to partially degrade lignin and metabolize the released compounds.

  1. Free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of Acacia nilotica wood lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadil, Keshaw Ram; Barapatre, Anand; Sahu, Sudha; Jha, Harit; Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2014-06-01

    Nine different fractions of lignin extracted by alkali, hot water and organosolv methods from Acacia wood powder were assessed for antioxidants activity. Results indicated that methanolic lignin fraction had highest polyphenol content of 393.30±9.2μg/ml (GAE). The oraganosolv lignin with total phenols and phenolic hydroxyl group content exhibited significant antioxidant activity as compared to other lignin fractions. Antioxidant properties of acetone fractions revealed a high antiradical scavenging activity (extraction methods on functional groups of lignin fractions was confirmed by analytical methods and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Whereas the phenolic content showed strong correlation with reducing capacity, the antiradical activity was moderately correlated with phenolic content. A high phenolic hydroxyl groups content of organosolv lignin fractions provides evidence for the presence of active therapeutic antioxidant compounds for their testing as potential value added products for cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro simulation studies of silica deposition induced by lignin from rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To reveal the possible mechanism of silica deposition in higher plants, lignin was isolated from rice straw following a modified method to conduct a simulation experiment in vitro. UV and infrared absorption spectra showed that the substance had the unique characteristics of pure lignin. The presence of silicon in the precipitation was revealed by TEM (transmission electron microscopy) with EDXA (energy dispersive X-ray analysis) device. It was found that in the borax solution where lignin precipitation occurred silica-lignin co-precipitation was produced but not in the DMSO solution where lignin was broken into its composition compounds and did not precipitate. This means that it is macromolecular lignin itself but not its compounds that could induce silica deposition in higher plants.

  3. Purification of empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf soda lignin with acidified water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin

    2014-09-01

    In this current study, the soda lignins from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf core were recovered by two step precipitation method. The objective of this research is to study the purity of lignin by washing the lignins with acidified water. The purified lignins were undergone characterization by FT-IR, Uv-Vis and XRD. The FT-IR analysis shows that kenaf core has Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit meanwhile EFB has Hydroxyphenyl(H), Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit of lignin. As for XRD analysis, the non-purified shows that the existence of impurities which is salt (NaCl). The UV analysis shows the higher absorbance which lead to the purity of lignin.

  4. Lignin charcoal: byproduct of acid hydrolysis of eucalypt wood. [E. urophylla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foelkel, C.E.B.; Zvinakevicius, C.; Carolino, J.M.; Pimenta, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are described in which wood of Eucalyptus urophylla was subjected to hydrolysis with sulphuric acid and the acidic or neutralized lignin residue was converted to charcoal in a laboratory oven with a nitrogen atmosphere. The lignin charcoal compared favourably with charcoal from eucalypt wood with regard to fixed carbon content and calorific capacity. Yield of charcoal from the lignin was about 53% based on the residue, or 15-16% based on the original amount of wood.

  5. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  6. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the influence of lignin on biofuel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Mahendra P; Couto, Narciso; Pham, Trong K; Evans, Caroline; Noirel, Josselin; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum has been a focus of research because of its ability to produce high-value compounds that can be used as biofuels. Lignocellulose is a promising feedstock, but the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex requires chemical pre-treatment to yield fermentable saccharides, including cellulose-derived cellobiose, prior to bioproduction of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) and hydrogen. Fermentation capability is limited by lignin and thus process optimization requires knowledge of lignin inhibition. The effects of lignin on cellular metabolism were evaluated for C. acetobutylicum grown on medium containing either cellobiose only or cellobiose plus lignin. Microscopy, gas chromatography and 8-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic technologies were applied to interrogate the effect of lignin on cellular morphology, fermentation and the proteome. Our results demonstrate that C. acetobutylicum has reduced performance for solvent production when lignin is present in the medium. Medium supplemented with 1 g L(-1) of lignin led to delay and decreased solvents production (ethanol; 0.47 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.27 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin and butanol; 0.13 g L(-1) for cellobiose and 0.04 g L(-1) for cellobiose plus lignin) at 20 and 48 h, respectively, resulting in the accumulation of acetic acid and butyric acid. Of 583 identified proteins (FDR acetobutylicum to lignin at metabolic and physiological levels. These data will enable targeted metabolic engineering strategies to optimize biofuel production from biomass by overcoming limitations imposed by the presence of lignin.

  8. Enzymatic Specific Production and Chemical Functionalization of Phenylpropanone Platform Monomers from Lignin

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Yukari; Hasegawa, Ryoichi; Kurosawa, Kanako; Maeda, Allyn H.; Koizumi, Toshio; Nishimura,Hiroshi; Okada, Hitomi; Qu, Chen; Saito, Kaori; Watanabe, Takashi; Hatada, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enzymatic catalysis is an ecofriendly strategy for the production of high‐value low‐molecular‐weight aromatic compounds from lignin. Although well‐definable aromatic monomers have been obtained from synthetic lignin‐model dimers, enzymatic‐selective synthesis of platform monomers from natural lignin has not been accomplished. In this study, we successfully achieved highly specific synthesis of aromatic monomers with a phenylpropane structure directly from natural lignin using a casca...

  9. High Molecular-Weight Thermoplastic Polymerization of Kraft Lignin Macromers with Diisocyanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Dai Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A high molecular-weight thermoplastic lignin-based polymer was successfully synthesized by adjusting the degree of polymerization while inducing linear growth of lignin macromers via methylene diphenyldiisocyanate. The thermoplastic lignin-urethane polymer was desirably achieved in a narrow range of reaction conditions of 2.5 to 3.5 h at 80 oC in this study, and the molecular weight of the resulting lignin-based polyurethanes (LigPU reached as high as 912,000 g/mole, which is far above any reported values of lignin-based polymer derivatives. The thermal stability of LigPU was greatly improved by the urethane polymerization, giving the initial degradation temperature (T2% at 204 °C, which should be compared with T2% = 104 °C of the pristine lignin. This was due to the fact that the OH groups in the lignin macromers, having low bond-dissociation energy, were replaced by the urethane bonds. In dielectric analysis, the synthesized LigPU exhibited a softening transition at 175 °C corresponding to a combinatorial dual process of the dry Tg,dry of the lignin macromers and the softening of methylenediphenyl urethane chains. This work clearly demonstrated that a high molecular weight of thermoplastic LigPU could be desirably synthesized, broadening the lignin application for value added and eco-friendly products through common melt processes of polymer blend or composites.

  10. Characterization of lignin extracted from birch wood by a modified hydrotropic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabov, Konstantin; Gosselink, Richard J A; Smeds, Annika I; Fardim, Pedro

    2014-11-05

    In this work an environmentally friendly hydrotropic process was used to extract lignin from industrial birch wood chips. Two hydrotropic treatments were performed, a conventional and a modified process. The lignins were characterized using FTIR, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS), (31)P and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR, and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The chemical (carbohydrates, extractives, etc.) and elemental compositions of the lignins were also determined. The yields of both lignins were 16.1% (dry wood basis), and the obtained lignins had very low contents of non-lignin compounds. The treatments resulted in significant changes of the structure of the lignins, a decrease in aliphatic hydroxyls and an increase in phenolic ones. The lignin isolated by the modified treatment underwent more substantial change than the reference one. It is believed that the data presented will facilitate utilization of hydrotropic lignin and promote the adoption of the hydrotropic process in the pulp and biorefinery industry.

  11. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Lignin Model Systems by Merging Visible-Light Photoredox and Palladium Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Bosque, Irene; Matsuura, Bryan S; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2016-10-07

    Lignin valorization has long been recognized as a sustainable solution for the renewable production of aromatic compounds. Two-step oxidation/reduction strategies, whereby the first oxidation step is required to "activate" lignin systems for controlled fragmentation reactions, have recently emerged as viable routes toward this goal. Herein we describe a catalytic protocol for oxidation of lignin model systems by combining photoredox and Pd catalysis. The developed dual catalytic protocol allowed the efficient oxidation of lignin model substrates at room temperature to afford the oxidized products in good to excellent yields.

  12. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  13. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadif, A.; Hunkeler, D.; Kauper, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Chimie

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocells, Aicello and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin. (author)

  14. Optimizing Noncovalent Interactions Between Lignin and Synthetic Polymers to Develop Effective Compatibilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Nathan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are designed and completed to identify an effective polymeric compatibilizer for lignin polystyrene blends. Copolymers of styrene and vinylphenol are chosen as the structure of the compatibilizer as the VPh unit can readily form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the lignin molecule. Electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and neutron refl ectivity results demonstrate that among these compatibilizers, a copolymer of styrene and VPh with 20% 30% VPh most readily forms intermolecular interactions with the lignin molecule and results in the most well-dispersed blends with lignin. This behavior is explained by invoking the competition of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding and functional group accessibility in forming intermolecular interactions.

  15. Identification of the primary mechanism for fungal lignin degradation. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Many lignin-degrading fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), an enzyme generally thought important for fungal ligninolysis. The authors are working with one of these fungi, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, an aggressive white-rotter that selectively removes lignin from wood. During this project period, they have obtained the following principal results: new polymeric lignin model compounds were developed to assist in the elucidation of fungal ligninolytic mechanisms; experiments with one of the polymeric lignin models showed that C. subvermispora cultures which express no detectable LiP activity are nevertheless able to degrade nonphenolic lignin structures, this result is significant because LiPs were previously considered essential for fungal attack on these recalcitrant structures, which constitute about 90% of lignin; manganese peroxidases (MnPs), which C. subvermispora does produce, catalyze the peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids to give fatty acid hydroperoxides, fatty acid hydroperoxides are also used by MnP as oxidants (in place of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) that support the MnP catalytic cycle, these results indicate that MnP turnover in the presence of unsaturated lipids generates reactive lipid oxyradicals that could act as oxidant of other molecules; MnP-mediated lipid peroxidation results in the co-oxidative cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures, the MnP/lipid peroxidation system may therefore provide C. subvermispora and other LiP-negative fungi with a mechanism to degrade the principal structures of lignin.

  16. Roles of silica and lignin in horsetail (Equisetum hyemale), with special reference to mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Shigeru; Sato, Kanna; Ito, Fuyu; Komatsubara, Satoshi; Ohata, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2012-02-01

    This research deals with detailed analyses of silica and lignin distribution in horsetail with special reference to mechanical strength. Scanning electron images of a cross-section of an internode showed silica deposited densely only around the outer epidermis. Detailed histochemical analyses of lignin showed no lignin deposition in the silica-rich outer internodes of horsetail, while a characteristic lignin deposition was noticed in the vascular bundle in inner side of internodes. To analyze the structure of horsetail from a mechanical viewpoint, we calculated the response of a model structure of horsetail to a mechanical force applied perpendicularly to the long axis by a finite element method. We found that silica distributed in the outer epidermis may play the major structural role, with lignin's role being limited ensuring that the vascular bundle keep waterproof. These results were in contrast to more modern tall trees like gymnosperms, for which lignin provides mechanical strength. Lignin has the advantage of sticking to cellulose, hemicellulose, and other materials. Such properties make it possible for plants containing lignin to branch. Branching of tree stems aids in competing for light and other atmospheric resources. This type of branching was impossible for ancient horsetails, which relied on the physical properties of silica. From the evolutional view points, over millennia in trees with high lignin content, true branching, and many chlorophyll-containing leaves developed.

  17. Progress and obstacles in the production and application of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, Camilla; Ece, Selin; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Lignin is 1 of the 3 major components of lignocellulose. Its polymeric structure includes aromatic subunits that can be converted into high-value-added products, but this potential cannot yet been fully exploited because lignin is highly recalcitrant to degradation. Different approaches for the depolymerization of lignin have been tested, including pyrolysis, chemical oxidation, and hydrolysis under supercritical conditions. An additional strategy is the use of lignin-degrading enzymes, which imitates the natural degradation process. A versatile set of enzymes for lignin degradation has been identified, and research has focused on the production of recombinant enzymes in sufficient amounts to characterize their structure and reaction mechanisms. Enzymes have been analyzed individually and in combinations using artificial substrates, lignin model compounds, lignin and lignocellulose. Here we consider progress in the production of recombinant lignin-degrading peroxidases, the advantages and disadvantages of different expression hosts, and obstacles that must be overcome before such enzymes can be characterized and used for the industrial processing of lignin.

  18. Chemical Changes of Raw Materials and Manufactured Binderless Boards during Hot Pressing: Lignin Isolation and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomechanical pulp (TMP is used for fiber production in binderless boards industries. Milled wood lignin (MWL and enzymatic mild acidolysis lignin (EMAL isolated from raw material and from binderless boards (BB were comparatively analyzed to investigate the effects of chemical changes on the bonding performance in BB. The results showed that acid-insoluble lignin of the BB were increased during the sodium silicate solution pretreatment after hot-pressing. The lignin fractions obtained were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, and 1H-13C correlation heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Results showed that 31.1% of EMAL (based on Klason lignin with low molecular weight (Mw=1630 g/mol was isolated from the BB. The increased total phenolic OH groups (3.97 mmol/g of EMAL from sodium silicate solution pretreated BB indicated that there was degradation of lignin and cleavage of lignin-carbohydrate linkages during hot-pressing. In addition, the content of β-O-4' aryl ether linkages of EMAL from the BB increased to 69.2%, which was higher than that of the untreated sample (60.1%. It was found that S units (syringyl-like lignin structures were preferentially condensed by hot pressing over G (guaiacyl-like lignin structures units, and the S/G ratio increased after the hot-pressing process.

  19. Properties of Lignin from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch and Its Application for Plywood Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Risanto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a potential biopolymer for wood adhesive. The aims of this study were to characterize lignin isolated from the black liquor of oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber pretreated with steam explosion in alkaline conditions and to examine the bond quality of aqueous polymer isocyanate (API adhesive prepared from lignin, natural rubber latex (NRL, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA as base polymers with isocyanate crosslinkers. Lignin was precipitated from the black liquor by adding hydrochloric acid; then the precipitate was separated by filtration, thoroughly washed with water up to pH 2 and pH 5, and dried. The isolated lignin was characterized by ultimate analysis, UV spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. Three-layer plywood samples were prepared, and the bond strengths of the plywood samples were determined in dry conditions and after cyclic boiling. The lignin isolates with different pH values did not have significantly different chemical and thermal properties. Both lignin isolates had similar C, H, and O contents, identical functional groups in the FTIR spectra, similar absorption in the UV spectra, and high decomposition temperatures. The base polymers composition that could produce API adhesive for exterior applications was NRL/PVA/lignin (4/4/2. The use of more lignin in the adhesive formulation decreased the bond strength of the plywood.

  20. Structural variation of bamboo lignin before and after ethanol organosolv pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-10-28

    In order to make better use of lignocellulosic biomass for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, it is necessary to disrupt its recalcitrant structure through pretreatment. Specifically, organosolv pretreatment is a feasible method. The main advantage of this method compared to other lignocellulosic pretreatment technologies is the extraction of high-quality lignin for the production of value-added products. In this study, bamboo was treated in a batch reactor with 70% ethanol at 180 °C for 2 h. Lignin fractions were isolated from the hydrolysate by centrifugation and then precipitated as ethanol organosolv lignin. Two types of milled wood lignins (MWLs) were isolated from the raw bamboo and the organosolv pretreated residue separately. After the pretreatment, a decrease of lignin (preferentially guaiacyl unit), hemicelluloses and less ordered cellulose was detected in the bamboo material. It was confirmed that the bamboo MWL is of HGS type (p-hydroxyphenyl (H), vanillin (G), syringaldehyde (S)) associated with a considerable amount of p-coumarate and ferulic esters of lignin. The ethanol organosolv treatment was shown to remove significant amounts of lignin and hemicelluloses without strongly affecting lignin primary structure and its lignin functional groups.

  1. Morphology, Tensile Strength and Oil Resistance of Gum Rubber Sheets Prepared from Lignin Modified Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrul M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the preparation of lignin filled natural rubber latex composite and its subsequent use to obtain lignin modified rubber. Two types of lignin i.e.: rubber wood and commercial alkali lignin were used as rubber filler. Gum rubber sheets were prepared from the lignin modified rubber and their properties were compared to Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR 20 and a type of rubber obtained from the coagulation of high ammonia latex. Rubber morphology was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope on the cross-sectional area of cryo-fractured samples. Oil resistance of the rubber sheets was determined by measuring the mass change before and after ASTM IRM 903 oil immersion, while the tensile strengths were determined according to ASTM D412 standard. Low values of tensile strength obtained for the commercial alkali lignin modified rubber sheet relative to the rest of the rubber samples was attributed to poor lignin dispersion. This occurrence was substantiated by the SEM analysis of cryo-fractured samples where crazes and inhomogeneity was observed. Nonetheless, both lignin modified rubbers exhibited higher level of oil resistance compared to SMR 20. This is due to the nature of lignin as a hydrophilic component and its presence in the rubber matrix complicates the oil diffusion process into rubber.

  2. SbCOMT (Bmr12) is involved in the biosynthesis of tricin-lignin in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Dutta, Tanmoy; Deng, Kai; Jacquet, Nicolas; Sinha, Anagh; Benites, Veronica T; Baidoo, Edward E K; Richel, Aurore; Sattler, Scott E; Northen, Trent R; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Loqué, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Lignin in plant biomass represents a target for engineering strategies towards the development of a sustainable bioeconomy. In addition to the conventional lignin monomers, namely p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols, tricin has been shown to be part of the native lignin polymer in certain monocot species. Because tricin is considered to initiate the polymerization of lignin chains, elucidating its biosynthesis and mechanism of export to the cell wall constitute novel challenges for the engineering of bioenergy crops. Late steps of tricin biosynthesis require two methylation reactions involving the pathway intermediate selgin. It has recently been demonstrated in rice and maize that caffeate O-methyltransferase (COMT) involved in the synthesis syringyl (S) lignin units derived from sinapyl alcohol also participates in the synthesis of tricin in planta. In this work, we validate in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) that the O-methyltransferase responsible for the production of S lignin units (SbCOMT / Bmr12) is also involved in the synthesis of lignin-linked tricin. In particular, we show that biomass from the sorghum bmr12 mutant contains lower level of tricin incorporated into lignin, and that SbCOMT can methylate the tricin precursors luteolin and selgin. Our genetic and biochemical data point toward a general mechanism whereby COMT is involved in the synthesis of both tricin and S lignin units.

  3. CmMYB19 Over-Expression Improves Aphid Tolerance in Chrysanthemum by Promoting Lignin Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinjie Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the MYB (v-myb avian myeloblastosis vira l oncogene homolog transcription factor CmMYB19 was isolated from chrysanthemum. It encodes a 200 amino acid protein and belongs to the R2R3-MYB subfamily. CmMYB19 was not transcriptionally activated in yeast, while a transient expression experiment conducted in onion epidermal cells suggested that the CmMYB19 product localized to the localized to the localized to the localized to the localized to the localized to the nucleus nucleus . CmMYB19 transcription was induced by aphid (Macrosiphoniella sanborni infestation, and the abundance of transcript was higher in the leaf and stem than in the root. The over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids. A comparison of transcript abundance of the major genes involved in lignin synthesis showed that CmPAL1 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1, CmC4H (cinnamate4 hydroxylase, Cm4CL1 (4-hydroxy cinnamoyl CoA ligase 1, CmHCT (hydroxycinnamoyl CoA-shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, CmC3H1 (coumarate3 hydroxylase1, CmCCoAOMT1 (caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase 1 and CmCCR1 (cinnamyl CoA reductase1 were all upregulated, in agreement in agreement in agreement in agreement in agreement in agreement with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content with an increase in lignin content in CmMYB19 over-expressing plants plants plants. Collectively, the over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids on the host, mediated by an enhanced accumulation of lignin.

  4. Lignin recovery from alkaline hydrolysis and glycerolysis of oil palm fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nur Syakilla; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, two types of treatment namely alkaline hydrolysis and glycerolysis have been conducted for lignin extraction from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fiber. Lignin has been retrieved from two sequential methods, which was the klason lignin from residue and lignin from precipitation of the filtrate. Alkaline hydrolysis was performed using 10% NaOH solution at room condition. This has extracted 13.0 % lignin. On the other hand, glycerolysis was carried out using 70% glycerol catalyzed with 5% of 1 M NaOH at 60-70 °C. This has successfully extracted 16.0% lignin. The SEM micrographs exhibited some physical changes on the surface where the impurities and waxes have been removed, exposing the, lumen. Besides that, FTIR analysis was conducted on untreated EFB, treated EFB and extracted lignin. Delignification of EFB fiber was confirmed based on the intensity reduction at 1245 cm-1 that showed lignin was removed from the fiber. The presence of CO, CC and CC aromatic peaks in the FTIR spectra of the dried filtrate gave an evidence on the presence of lignin.

  5. A comparison of various lignin-extraction methods to enhance the accessibility and ease of enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of steam-pretreated poplar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong Tian; Richard P Chandra; Jin-Suk Lee; Canhui Lu; Jack N Saddler

    2017-01-01

    ...% of the hemicellulose from poplar while limiting the acid-catalysed condensation of lignin. This potentially allowed for subsequent lignin extraction using various lignin solvents to produce a more accessible cellulosic substrate...

  6. Effect of liquid hot water pretreatment severity on properties of hardwood lignin and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Lignin, one of the major components of lignocellulosic biomass, plays an inhibitory role on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. This work examines the role of lignin in pretreated hardwood, where extents of cellulose hydrolysis decrease, rather than increase with increasing severity of liquid hot water pretreatment. Hardwood pretreated with liquid hot water at severities ranging from log Ro  = 8.25 to 12.51 resulted in 80-90% recovery of the initial lignin in the residual solids. The ratio of acid insoluble lignin (AIL) to acid soluble lignin (ASL) increased and the formation of spherical lignin droplets on the cell wall surface was observed as previously reported in the literature. When lignins were isolated from hardwoods pretreated at increasing severities and characterized based on glass transition temperature (Tg ), the Tg of isolated lignins was found to increase from 171 to 180°C as the severity increased from log Ro  = 10.44 to 12.51. The increase in Tg suggested that the condensation reactions of lignin molecules occurred during pretreatment and altered the lignin structure. The contribution of the changes in lignin properties to enzymatic hydrolysis were examined by carrying out Avicel hydrolysis in the presence of isolated lignins. Lignins derived from more severely pretreated hardwoods had higher Tg values and showed more pronounced inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Final Report: Investigation of Catalytic Pathways for Lignin Breakdown into Monomers and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluckstein, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Sturgeon, Matthew R [ORNL

    2010-12-01

    Lignin is a biopolymer that comprises up to 35% of woody biomass by dry weight. It is currently underutilized compared to cellulose and hemicellulose, the other two primary components of woody biomass. Lignin has an irregular structure of methoxylated aromatic groups linked by a suite of ether and alkyl bonds which makes it difficult to degrade selectively. However, the aromatic components of lignin also make it promising as a base material for the production of aromatic fuel additives and cyclic chemical feed stocks such as styrene, benzene, and cyclohexanol. Our laboratory research focused on three methods to selectively cleave and deoxygenate purified lignin under mild conditions: acidolysis, hydrogenation and electrocatalysis. (1) Acidolysis was undertaken in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. (2) Hydrogenation was carried out by dissolving lignin and a rhodium catalyst in 1:1 water:methoxyethanol under a 1 atm H2 environment. (3) Electrocatalysis of lignin involved reacting electrically generated hydrogen atoms at a catalytic palladium cathode with lignin dissolved in a solution of aqueous methanol. In all of the experiments, the lignin degradation products were identified and quantified by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and flame ionization detection. Yields were low, but this may have reflected the difficulty in recovering the various fractions after conversion. The homogeneous hydrogenation of lignin showed fragmentation into monomers, while the electrocatalytic hydrogenation showed production of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes. In addition to the experiments, promising pathways for the conversion of lignin were assessed. Three conversion methods were compared based on their material and energy inputs and proposed improvements using better catalyst and process technology. A variety of areas were noted as needing further experimental and theoretical effort to increase the feasibility of lignin conversion to fuels.

  8. Lignin depletion enhances the digestibility of cellulose in cultured xylem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine I Lacayo

    Full Text Available Plant lignocellulose constitutes an abundant and sustainable source of polysaccharides that can be converted into biofuels. However, the enzymatic digestion of native plant cell walls is inefficient, presenting a considerable barrier to cost-effective biofuel production. In addition to the insolubility of cellulose and hemicellulose, the tight association of lignin with these polysaccharides intensifies the problem of cell wall recalcitrance. To determine the extent to which lignin influences the enzymatic digestion of cellulose, specifically in secondary walls that contain the majority of cellulose and lignin in plants, we used a model system consisting of cultured xylem cells from Zinniaelegans. Rather than using purified cell wall substrates or plant tissue, we have applied this system to study cell wall degradation because it predominantly consists of homogeneous populations of single cells exhibiting large deposits of lignocellulose. We depleted lignin in these cells by treating with an oxidative chemical or by inhibiting lignin biosynthesis, and then examined the resulting cellulose digestibility and accessibility using a fluorescent cellulose-binding probe. Following cellulase digestion, we measured a significant decrease in relative cellulose content in lignin-depleted cells, whereas cells with intact lignin remained essentially unaltered. We also observed a significant increase in probe binding after lignin depletion, indicating that decreased lignin levels improve cellulose accessibility. These results indicate that lignin depletion considerably enhances the digestibility of cellulose in the cell wall by increasing the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic attack. Although other wall components are likely to contribute, our quantitative study exploits cultured Zinnia xylem cells to demonstrate the dominant influence of lignin on the enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This system is simple enough for quantitative image analysis

  9. Molecular products and radicals from pyrolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibet, J; Khachatryan, L; Dellinger, B

    2012-12-04

    Thermal degradation of lignin under two reaction regimes (pyrolysis in N(2) and oxidative pyrolysis in 4% O(2) in N(2)) has been investigated in a tubular, isothermal, flow-reactor over the temperature range 200-900 °C at a residence time of 0.2 s. Two experimental protocols were adopted: (1) Partial pyrolysis in which the same lignin sample was continuously pyrolyzed at each temperature and (2) conventional pyrolysis, in which new lignin samples were pyrolyzed at each pyrolysis temperature. The results identified common relationships between the two modes of experiments, as well as some differences. The majority of products from partial pyrolysis peaked between 300 and 500 °C, whereas for conventional pyrolysis reaction products peaked between 400 and 500 °C. The principal products were syringol (2,6-dimethoxy phenol), guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol), phenol, and catechol. Of the classes of compounds analyzed, the phenolic compounds were the most abundant, contributing over 40% of the total compounds detected. Benzene, styrene, and p-xylene were formed in significant amounts throughout the entire temperature range. Interestingly, six ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were formed during partial pyrolysis. Oxidative pyrolysis did not result in large differences from pyrolysis; the main products still were syringol, guaiacol, phenol, the only significant difference being the product distribution peaked between 200 and 400 °C. For the first time, low temperature matrix isolation electron paramagnetic resonance was successfully interfaced with the pyrolysis reactor to elucidate the structures of the labile reaction intermediates. The EPR results suggested the presence of methoxyl, phenoxy, and substituted phenoxy radicals as precursors for formation of major products; syringol, guaiacol, phenols, and substituted phenols.

  10. Lignin isolated from steam-exploded eucalyptus wood chips by phase separation and its affinity to Trichoderma reesei cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ai; Funaoka, Masamitsu

    2013-07-01

    Steam-exploded eucalyptus wood chips were treated with p-cresol and 72% sulfuric acid at ambient temperature. Steam-exploded lignin was isolated as acetone-soluble and diethyl ether-insoluble compounds from the cresol layer. The lignin extraction yield was only 47%, and the amount of cresol grafted to lignin was much less than that in the case of eucalyptus lignin without steam explosion. Clearly, the steam explosion process depolymerized native lignin, and simultaneously, promoted polymerization via labile benzyl positions. The steam-exploded eucalyptus lignin adsorbed more Trichoderma reesei cellulase; however, its enzymatic activity was less than that of eucalyptus lignin that did not undergo steam explosion. It is evident that pretreatment potentially affects the affinity between lignin and cellulase and the resultant saccharification efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin from pulp paper wastewater and its metabolites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amar Abhishek; Ashish Dwivedi; Neeraj Tandan; Urwashi Kumar

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, the chemical texture of kraft lignin in terms of pollution parameters (COD, TOC, BOD, etc.) was quite different and approximately twofold higher as compared to model lignin at same optical density...

  12. Centrifugal washing and recovery as an improved method for obtaining lignin precipitated from South African kraft mill black liquor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes centrifugal recovery as an improved method for collection of lignin isolated from black liquor obtained from a South African kraft mill. Precipitation of lignin was achieved by utilising 6 M sulphuric acid. Recovery...

  13. Preparation of activated carbons from Chinese coal and hydrolysis lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Y.; Han, B.X. [Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL (USA). School of Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Activated carbons from Chinese coal and Chinese hydrolysis lignin have been prepared by chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. The following aspects of these activated materials have been analyzed: raw material; pre-treatment of raw material; activation agent, activation temperature and time, acid the activation agent/raw material ratio. Activated carbons with BET specific surface areas of the order of 2400-2600 m{sup 2}/g which exhibited substantial microporosity, a total pore volume of over 1.30 cm{sup 3}/g and a Methylene Blue adsorption capacity of over 440 mg/g were obtained.

  14. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin

  15. Lignin Valorisation for Chemicals and (Transportation) Fuels via (Catalytic) Pyrolysis and Hydrodeoxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, Paul; Van der Laan, Ron; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Heeres, Hero

    2009-01-01

    New technology is needed to exploit the potential of lignin as a renewable feedstock for fuels, chemicals and performance products. Fast fluidized bed pyrolysis of different lignins at 400 degrees C yields up to 2.1 wt% (d.b.) of a phenolic fraction containing 10 wt%, (d.b.) of several phenols. Subs

  16. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin co

  17. Effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on the structural changes of alkaline ethanol lignin from wheat straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Li, Hanyin; Sun, Shaoni; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-01

    Due to the enormous abundance of lignin and its unique aromatic nature, lignin has great potential for the production of industrially useful fuels, chemicals, and materials. However, the rigid and compact structure of the plant cell walls significantly blocks the separation of lignin. In this study, wheat straw was hydrothermally pretreated at different temperatures (120–200 °C) followed by post-treatment with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH to improve the isolation of lignin. Results demonstrated that the content of associated carbohydrates of the lignin fractions was gradually reduced with the increment of the hydrothermal severity. The structure of the lignins changed regularly with the increase of the pretreatment temperature from 120 to 200 °C. In particular, the contents of β-O-4‧, β-β‧, β-5‧ linkages and aliphatic OH in the lignins showed a tendency of decrease, while the content of phenolic OH and thermal stability of the lignin fractions increased steadily as the increment of the pretreatment temperature.

  18. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...... new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert....

  19. Fluorescence-based proxies for lignin in freshwater dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Eckard, Robert S.; Spencer, Robert G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Lignin phenols have proven to be powerful biomarkers in environmental studies; however, the complexity of lignin analysis limits the number of samples and thus spatial and temporal resolution in any given study. In contrast, spectrophotometric characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is rapid, noninvasive, relatively inexpensive, requires small sample volumes, and can even be measured in situ to capture fine-scale temporal and spatial detail of DOM cycling. Here we present a series of cross-validated Partial Least Squares models that use fluorescence properties of DOM to explain up to 91% of lignin compositional and concentration variability in samples collected seasonally over 2 years in the Sacramento River/San Joaquin River Delta in California, United States. These models were subsequently used to predict lignin composition and concentration from fluorescence measurements collected during a diurnal study in the San Joaquin River. While modeled lignin composition remained largely unchanged over the diurnal cycle, changes in modeled lignin concentrations were much greater than expected and indicate that the sensitivity of fluorescence-based proxies for lignin may prove invaluable as a tool for selecting the most informative samples for detailed lignin characterization. With adequate calibration, similar models could be used to significantly expand our ability to study sources and processing of DOM in complex surface water systems.

  20. Differential expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of membrane- associated proteins relevant to lignin degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semarjit Shary; Alexander N. Kapich; Ellen A. Panisko; Jon K. Magnuson; Daniel Cullen; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2008-01-01

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems likely include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, production of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew...

  1. Recovery of wheat straw soda lignin using flocculation by proteins, synthetic flocculants, and a metal coagulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-sulfonated lignin, a byproduct of biomass conversion to fuel ethanol, is finding increasing applications and can be converted to chemical substances which replace those obtained from petrochemicals. To date, most studies of flocculant function on non-sulfonated lignin have used mixtures of lign...

  2. Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2014-08-04

    Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

  3. Biomass-derived Lignin to Jet Fuel Range Hydrocarbons via Aqueous Phase Hydrodeoxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang; Ruan, Hao; Pei, Haisheng; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Xiaowen; Tucker, Melvin P.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-09-14

    A catalytic process, involving the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the dilute alkali extracted corn stover lignin catalysed by noble metal catalyst (Ru/Al2O3) and acidic zeolite (H+-Y), to produce lignin-substructure-based hydrocarbons (C7-C18), primarily C12-C18 cyclic structure hydrocarbons in the jet fuel range, was demonstrated.

  4. Chemical characterization of Klason lignin preparations from plant-based foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Mirko; Schüssler, Anne; Tchetseubu Saha, Gérard

    2011-12-14

    To analyze the accuracy of the Klason lignin method as applied for the determination of lignin contents in plant based-food products, Klason lignin preparations from curly kale, pears, whole wheat grains, and corn bran were chemically characterized. Characterization included routine ash and protein determinations and the extraction of fat/waxes as well as cutin/suberin depolymerization and extraction of the liberated monomers. Fat/wax and cutin/suberin amounts in the Klason lignin preparations were determined gravimetrically, and their compositions were analyzed by using GC-MS. Typical fat, wax, and cutin (and suberin) constituents such as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, hydroxy and/or epoxy fatty acids, and phenolic acids were identified in all samples, whereas the detection of long-chain hydrocarbons, alcohols, and ketones, sterols, stanols, and dioic acids was dependent on the sample analyzed. Estimation of the contribution of non-lignin compounds to the Klason lignin contents reduced the noncorrected Klason lignin contents of the insoluble fibers from 28.7% (kale), 22.8% (pear), 14.8% (wheat), and 9.9% (corn) to maximum lignin contents of 6.5% (kale), 16.4% (pear), 4.9% (wheat), and 2.3% (corn). These data demonstrate that certain commonly used statements such as "cereal brans are highly lignified" need to be revised.

  5. [Study on the corn stover lignin oxidized by chlorine dioxide and modified by furfuryl alcohol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Jin-ping; Yang, Gang; Li, Zuo-hu

    2007-10-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and TG analysis were used to study the oxidation of corn stover lignin by chloride dioxide and subsequently modified by furfuryl alcohol. The results were as following: The selective oxidation of lignin by chlorine dioxide was obtained by spectroscopy study. FTIR showed that the characteristic absorbance peaks of aromatic units were decreased after chloride dioxide oxidation. The increased absorbance for the band around 1720 cm(-1) corresponding to carbonyl stretching was achieved in the oxidized lignin and the lignin modified with furfuryl alcohol. The ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the absorbance around 280 nm was largely reduced after the lignin was oxidized. The 1H NMR spectroscopy also showed the decrease of aromatic units and methoxyl group in the oxidized lignin. All these indicated the formation of muconic acid and ester, or quinone derivatives when the lignin was selectively oxidized by chloride dioxide. The modification by furfuryl alcohol made the oxidized lignin more thermally stable.

  6. THE LIGNIN CONTENT IN BLACK LIQUID OF STRAW AS-AQ BY ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaiqiangShi; BingyueLiu; XingqiangLi; LongquanXu; BeihaiHe

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of lignin content in black liquid of straw AS-AQ by ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UV) is discussed in this paper. Different dilution multiple and contrast solutions have an effect on the measured results of the lignin content by UV. The calculation method for the absorption coefficient and thes canning spectrum property of liquor acidified by SO are introduced in this paper.

  7. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane;

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  8. Enzymatic modification of different lignins through oxidative coupling with hydrophilic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiţigəu, Ionita Firuta; Boeriu, Carmen Gabriela; Peter, Francisc

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic oxidative coupling of five technical lignins from different sources and with different molecular properties, with glucosamine and the tripeptide glycil-tyrosyl-glycine was studied in acetone/water mixture, using laccase as catalyst. The modified lignin was isolated and the product w

  9. Precipitation and valorisation of lignin in South African kraft mill black liquor - first stages: Poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available environmentally sustainable. The aims objectives of the current project is to precipitate and characterize lignin form kraft black liquor with an attempts to obtain narrow molecular weight lignin that can further be valorised to encourage Biorefineries in South...

  10. Isolation of Thermophilic Lignin Degrading Bacteria from Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) Compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. M. T.; Chua, H. B.; Danquah, M. K.; Saptoro, A.

    2017-06-01

    Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) is a potential and sustainable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high cellulosic content and availability in Malaysia. Due to high lignin content of EFB and the lack of effective delignification process, commercial bioethanol production from EFB is presently not viable. Enzymatic delignification has been identified as one of the key steps in utilising EFB as a feedstock for bioethanol conversion. To date, limited work has been reported on the isolation of lignin degrading bacteria. Hence, there is a growing interest to search for new lignin degrading bacteria with greater tolerance to temperature and high level of ligninolytic enzymes for more effective lignin degradation. This study aimed to isolate and screen thermophilic ligninolytic microorganisms from EFB compost. Ten isolates were successfully isolated from EFB compost. Although they are not capable of decolorizing Methylene Blue (MB) dye under agar plate assay method, they are able to utilize lignin mimicked compound - guaiacol as a sole carbon on the agar plate assay. This infers that there is no correlation of ligninolytic enzymes with dye decolourization for all the isolates that have been isolated. However, they are able to produce ligninolytic enzymes (Lignin peroxidase, Manganese peroxidase, Laccase) in Minimal Salt Medium with Kraft Lignin (MSM-KL) with Lignin Peroxidase (LiP) as the predominant enzyme followed by Manganese Peroxidase (MnP) and Laccase (Lac). Among all the tested isolates, CLMT 29 has the highest LiP production up to 8.7673 U/mL following 24 h of growth.

  11. Characterisation of structure-dependent functional properties of lignin with infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Bravo, D.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2004-01-01

    Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was evaluated as an analytical technique for the estimation of the chemical composition and functional properties of lignin. A sample set containing various non-wood, hardwood and softwood lignins isolated by different processing technologies was use

  12. A new conceptual model for the fate of lignin in decomposing plant litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Kaiser, K.; Guggenberger, G.; Gatzek, C.; Kalbitz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is a main component of plant litter. Its degradation is thought to be critical for litter decomposition rates and the build-up of soil organic matter. We studied the relationships between lignin degradation and the production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and of CO2 during litter decompos

  13. Lewis-acid catalyzed depolymerization of Protobind lignin in supercritical water and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenatam, Burcu; Heeres, Erik H.J.; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Ernie J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal acetates, metal chlorides and metal triflates as Lewis acid catalysts for the depolymerization of soda lignin under supercritical conditions was investigated. The reactions were carried out at 400 degrees C in water and ethanol. Lignin conversion in supercritical water led to format

  14. Lignin depolymerisation in supercritical carbon dioxide/acetone/water fluid for the production of aromatic chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Teunissen, W.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Jong, de E.; Gellerstedt, G.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Valorisation of lignin plays a key role in further development of lignocellulosic biorefinery processes the production of biofuels and bio-based materials. In the present study, organosolv hardwood and wheat straw lignins were converted in a supercritical fluid consisting of carbon dioxide/acetone/w

  15. Retention of lignin in seagrasses: angiosperms that returned to the sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klap, V.A.; Hemminga, M.A.; Boon, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Using Curie-point Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Direct Temperature-resolved Mass Spectrometry (DT-MS), lignin was detected in highly purified preparations (Milled Wood Lignin = MWL) of various tissues of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Posidonia oceanica. The results

  16. A new starting point for powerful lignin promotion : Eurolignin and linked activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abaecherli, A.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Jong, de E.; Guran, B.

    2004-01-01

    The International Lignin Institute (ILI) was created in 1991 as a new platform for promotion of lignin utilisations. For a few years, the activity was based on informal information exchange, such as Newsletters, international conferences (Forums) and Workshops, as well as in the proceedings of these

  17. Effects of lignin-metal complexation on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Liu; Junyong Zhu; S.Y. Fu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by unbound lignin (soluble and insoluble) with or without the addition of metal compounds. Sulfonated, Organosolv, and Kraft lignin were added in aqueous enzyme-cellulose systems at different concentrations before hydrolysis. The measured substrate enzymatic digestibility (SED) of cellulose was decreased by...

  18. Monodisperse lignin fractions as standards in size-exclusion analysis: comparison with polystyrene standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botaro, Vagner Roberto; Curvelo, Antonio Aprígio da Silva

    2009-05-01

    The difficulty of preparing monodisperse lignin fractions on a large scale is a limiting factor in many applications. The present paper addresses this problem by examining the properties and size-exclusion behavior of lignin isolated by the acetosolv pulping process from post-extraction crushed sugarcane bagasse. The isolated lignin was subjected to a solvent pretreatment, followed by preparative gel permeation chromatography fractionation. The fractions were analyzed by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and these samples showed a great decrease in polydispersity, compared to the original acetosolv lignin. Several fractions of very low polydispersity, close to unity, were employed as calibration curve standards in HPSEC analysis. This original analytical approach allowed calibration with these lignin fractions to be compared with the polystyrene standards that are universally employed for lignin molecular mass determination. This led to a noteworthy result, namely that the lignin fractions and polystyrene standards showed very similar behavior over a large range of molecular masses in a typical HPSEC analysis of acetosolv lignin.

  19. Fractionation of five technical lignins by selective extraction in green solvents and characterization of isolated fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Fitigau, F.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Frissen, A.E.; Stoutjesdijk, J.H.; Peter, F.

    2014-01-01

    Lignins from softwood, hardwood, grass and wheat straw were fractionated by selective extraction at ambient temperature using green solvents like acetone/water solutions of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90% (v/v) acetone and ethyl acetate. A comparison between the isolated fractions and unfractionated lignins

  20. Exploring the antioxidant potential of lignin isolated from black liquor of oil palm waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rajeev; Khalil, H P S A; Karim, A A

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the potential antioxidant activity of lignin obtained from black liquor, a hazardous waste product generated during the extraction of palm oil. Antioxidant potential of the extracted lignin was evaluated by dissolving the extracted samples in 2 different solvent systems, namely, 2-methoxy ethanol and DMSO. Results revealed high percent inhibition of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical in the lignin sample dissolved in 2-methoxy ethanol over DMSO (concentration range of 1-100 microg/ml). Lignin extracted in 2-methoxy ethanol exhibited higher inhibition percentage (at 50 microg/ml, 84.2%), whereas a concentration of 100 microg/ml was found to be effective in the case of the DMSO solvent (69.8%). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry revealed that the functional groups from the extracted lignin and commercial lignin were highly similar, indicating the purity of the lignin extracted from black liquor. These results provide a strong basis for further applications of lignin in the food industry and also illustrate an eco-friendly approach to utilize oil palm black liquor.

  1. Molar mass determination of lignins by size-exclusion chromatography: towards standardisation of the method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumberger, S.; Abaecherli, A.; Fasching, M.; Gellerstedt, G.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Hortling, B.; Li, J.; Saake, B.; Jong, de E.

    2007-01-01

    The reactivity and physicochemical properties of lignins are partly governed by their molar mass distribution. The development of reliable standard methods for determination of the molar mass distribution is not only relevant for designing technical lignins for specific applications, but also for mo

  2. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas S; Riisager, Anders; Beach, Evan S; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin co

  3. Separation and characterization of lignin from bio-ethanol production residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guowan; Li, Shujun; Wang, Lu; Ren, Shixue; Fang, Guizhen

    2013-05-01

    In order to develop an adequate method to separate lignin from bio-ethanol production residue, solvent extraction was conducted by using benzyl alcohol, dioxane and ethanol. Compared to the conventional alkali-solution and acid-isolation method, benzyl alcohol and dioxane extraction could reach higher lignin yield of 71.55% and 74.14% respectively. FTIR and XRD analysis results indicate that sodium hydroxide solution dissolved most of the lignin in the raw material. However, the low lignin yield by this method may be attributed to the products loss during the complex separation process. GPC and (1)H NMR results revealed that the dioxane-lignin had closer molecular weight with alkali-lignin, lower S/G ratio (0.22) and higher OHPh/OHAl ratio (0.45) with respect to benzyl alcohol-lignin. The results divulge that the lignin products separated from bio-ethanol production residue by dioxane extraction had fairly potential application with better chemical activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of temperature during wood torrefaction on the formation of lignin liquid intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Eini Lowell; Armando G. McDonald

    2014-01-01

    Torrefaction enhances physical properties of lignocellulosic biomass and improves its grindability. Energy densification, via fuel pellets production, is one of the most promising uses of torrefaction. Lignin contributes to self-bonding of wood particles during pelletization. In biomass thermal pretreatment, part oflignin (in the form of lignin liquid intermediates –...

  5. Characterization of Lignins Isolated from Alkali Treated Prehydrolysate of Corn Stover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Mingliu; ZHANG Hongman; ZHENG Hongbo; LI Yuanyuan; HUANG He; XU Rong

    2013-01-01

    Lignins were isolated and purified from alkali treated prehydrolysate of corn stover.The paper presents the structural features of lignins in a series purification processes.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical structure.Thermogravimetric analysis was applied to follow the thermal degradation,and wet chemical method was used to determine the sugar content.The results showed that the crude lignin from the prehydrolysate of corn stover was a heterogeneous material of syringyl,guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenyl units,containing associated polysaccharides,lipids,and melted salts.Some of the crude lignin was chemically linked to hemicelluloses (mainly xylan).The lipids in crude lignin were probably composed of saturated and/or unsaturated long carbon chains,fatty acids,triterpenols,waxes,and derivatives of aromatic.The sugar content of purified lignin was less than 2.11%,mainly composed of guaiacyl units.DTGmax of purified lignin was 359 ℃.The majority of the hydroxyl groups were phenolic hydroxyl groups.The main type of linkages in purified lignin was β-O-4.Other types of linkages includedβ-5,β-β and α-O-4.

  6. Characterization of Organosolv Lignins using Thermal and FT-IR Spectroscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea J. Sammons; David P. Harper; Nicole Labbe; Joseph J. Bozell; Thomas Elder; Timothy G. Rials

    2013-01-01

    A group of biomass-derived lignins isolated using organosolv fractionation was characterized by FT-IR spectral and thermal property analysis coupled with multivariate analysis. The principal component analysis indicated that there were significant variations between the hardwood, softwood, and grass lignins due to the differences in syringyl and guaiacyl units as well...

  7. Liquid-phase reforming and hydrodeoxygenation as a two-step route to aromatics from lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, A.L.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    A two-step approach to the conversion of organosolv, kraft and sugarcane bagasse lignin to monoaromatic compounds of low oxygen content is presented. The first step consists of lignin depolymerization in a liquid phase reforming (LPR) reaction over a 1 wt% Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst at 225 °C in alkaline

  8. Impact of lignins isolated from pretreated lignocelluloses on enzymatic cellulose saccharification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Selig, Michael Joseph; Felby, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Lignins were enzymatically isolated from corn stover and wheat straw samples and subjected to hydrothermal or wet oxidation pretreatments for enzyme adsorption experimentations. Lignin contents of the isolates ranged from 26 to 71 % (w/w); cellulose ranged from 3 to 22 % (w/w); xylan from 0.7 to 6...

  9. A multi-analytical study of degradation of lignin in archaeological waterlogged wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Maria P; Lucejko, Jeannette J; Modugno, Francesca; Orlandi, Marco; Tolppa, Eeva-Liisa; Zoia, Luca

    2009-11-15

    Historical or archaeological wooden objects are generally better conserved in wet environments than in other contexts. Nevertheless, anaerobic erosion bacteria can slowly degrade waterlogged wood, causing a loss of cellulose and hemicellulose and leading to the formation of water-filled cavities. During this process, lignin can also be altered. The result is a porous and fragile structure, poor in polysaccharides and mainly composed of residual lignin, which can easily collapse during drying and needs specific consolidation treatments. For this reason, the chemical characterization of archaeological lignin is of primary importance in the diagnosis and conservation of waterlogged wood artifacts. Current knowledge of the lignin degradation processes in historical and archaeological wood is extremely inadequate. In this study lignin extracted from archaeological waterlogged wood was examined using both Py-GC/MS, NMR spectroscopy and GPC analysis. The samples were collected from the Site of the Ancient Ships of San Rossore (Pisa, Italy), where since 1998 31 shipwrecks, dating from 2nd century BC to 5th century AD, have been discovered. The results, integrated by GPC analysis, highlight the depolymerization of lignin with cleavage of ether bonds, leading to an higher amount of free phenol units in the lignin from archaeological waterlogged wood, compared to sound lignin from reference wood of the same species.

  10. A Novel Partially Biobased PAN-Lignin Blend as a Potential Carbon Fiber Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Özgür Seydibeyoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blends of polyacrylonitrile (PAN and lignin were prepared with three different lignin types by solution blending and solution casting. Among three types of lignin, one type was chosen and different blend concentrations were prepared and casted. The casted blend films were characterized chemically with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and thermally with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The mechanical properties of the blends were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. FTIR analysis shows an excellent interaction of PAN and lignin. The interaction of the lignins and PAN was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DMA results reveal that the lignin enhance the mechanical properties of PAN at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The blend structure and morphology were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. SEM images show that excellent polymer blends were prepared. The results show that it is possible to develop a new precursor material with a blend of lignin and PAN. These studies show that the side product of paper and cellulosic bioethanol industries, namely, lignin can be used for new application areas.

  11. Lewis-acid catalyzed depolymerization of Protobind lignin in supercritical water and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenatam, Burcu; Heeres, Erik H.J.; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Ernie J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal acetates, metal chlorides and metal triflates as Lewis acid catalysts for the depolymerization of soda lignin under supercritical conditions was investigated. The reactions were carried out at 400 degrees C in water and ethanol. Lignin conversion in supercritical water led to

  12. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  13. Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora Infection Induced "Defense Lignin" Accumulation and Lignin Biosynthetic Gene Expression in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) infects and causes soft rot disease in hundreds of crop species including vegetables, flowers and fruits. Lignin biosynthesis has been implicated in defensive reactions to injury and pathogen Infection in plants. In this work, variations of lignin content and gene expression in the molecular interaction between Chinese cabbage and Ecc were investigated. H2O2 accumulation and peroxidase activity were detected by 3, 3'-Dimethoxybenzidine staining at mocked and Ecc-inoculated sites of Chinese cabbage leafstalks. Klason lignin content in inoculated plants increased by about 7.84%, 40.37%, and 43.13% more than that of the mocked site at 12, 24 and 72 h after inoculation, respectively. Gas chromatography detected more p-coumaryl (H) and less coniferyl (G) and sinapyl (S)monolignins in leafstalks of Chinese cabbage. All three monomers increased in Ecc-infected leafstalks, and the Ecc-induced "defense lignin" were composed of more G and H monolignins, and less S monolignin. After searching the expressed sequence tags (EST) data of Chinese cabbage, 12 genes putatively encoding enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis were selected to study their expression. All of these genes could be Induced by mock inoculation and Ecc infection, while the gene expression lasted for several more hours in the infected samples than in mocked and untreated plants. Our results indicated that "defense lignin" was different from the developmental lignin in composition; G and S monolignins were significantly induced in plants in response to the soft rot Ecc; thus, lignin biosynthesis was differentially regulated and played a role in plant response to the soft rot Ecc.

  14. Production of some extracellular enzymes by a lignin peroxidase-producing brown rot fungus, Polyporus ostreiformis, and its comparative abilities for lignin degradation and dye decolorization.

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, S; Maiti, T. K.; Bhattacharyya, B C

    1994-01-01

    Polyporus ostreiformis produced Mn peroxidase, acid protease, alpha-amylase, and lignin peroxidase, with maximum activities of 40, 8,300, and 4,200 U liter-1 and 50 nkat liter-1, respectively, in nitrogen-limited liquid media. The fungus removed only 18.6% lignin from rice straw in 3 weeks but effected 99% decolorization of Congo red dye in 9 days.

  15. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein: Protein Redesign to Lower Protein-lignin Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Smith, Matthew D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Chundawat, Shishir P. S. [Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey; Sammond, Deanne [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Whitehead, Timothy A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824

    2016-11-07

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue towards energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28 to 0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active

  16. Influence of lignin on morphology, structure and thermal behavior of polylactic acid-based biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Maurizio; Cacciamani, Adriana; Bertini, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a thermoplastic biodegradable polymer that can be made from annually renewable resources. Lignin is a natural amorphous polyphenolic macromolecule inexpensive and easily available. In the present study PLA and acetylated lignin biocomposites were prepared by casting from chloroform solution. PLA can crystallize from the melt in the α and α' forms, depending on the adopted crystallization conditions. The presence of the lignin in the biocomposites can interfere with the crystal formation process. Isothermal crystallizations were performed at different temperatures, the presence of lignin causes an increase of the time of crystallization, while the overall crystallization rate and the spherulite radial growth rate decrease with enhancing the lignin content in the biocomposites.

  17. A phenol-enriched cuticle is ancestral to lignin evolution in land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Hugues; Alber, Annette; Horst, Nelly A.; Basilio Lopes, Alexandra; Fich, Eric A.; Kriegshauser, Lucie; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Ullmann, Pascaline; Herrgott, Laurence; Erhardt, Mathieu; Pineau, Emmanuelle; Ehlting, Jürgen; Schmitt, Martine; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Reski, Ralf; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2017-01-01

    Lignin, one of the most abundant biopolymers on Earth, derives from the plant phenolic metabolism. It appeared upon terrestrialization and is thought critical for plant colonization of land. Early diverging land plants do not form lignin, but already have elements of its biosynthetic machinery. Here we delete in a moss the P450 oxygenase that defines the entry point in angiosperm lignin metabolism, and find that its pre-lignin pathway is essential for development. This pathway does not involve biochemical regulation via shikimate coupling, but instead is coupled with ascorbate catabolism, and controls the synthesis of the moss cuticle, which prevents desiccation and organ fusion. These cuticles share common features with lignin, cutin and suberin, and may represent the extant representative of a common ancestor. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the ancestral phenolic metabolism in moss erect growth and cuticle permeability, consistent with importance in plant adaptation to terrestrial conditions. PMID:28270693

  18. Application of bioethanol derived lignin for improving physico-mechanical properties of thermoset biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Dilpreet S; Wang, Xinnan; Sitz, Evan; Loll, Tyler; Bhattacharjee, Sujal

    2016-08-01

    Lignin is the most abundant of renewable polymers next to cellulose with a global annual production of 70million tons, largely produced from pulping and second generation biofuel industries. Low value of industrial lignin makes it an attractive biomaterial for wide range of applications. The study investigated the application of wheat straw and corn stover based lignin derived from ethanol production for use in thermoset biocomposites. The biocomposite matrix constituted a two component low viscosity Araldite(®)LY 8601/Aradur(®) 8602 epoxy resin system and the lignin content varied from 0 to 25% by weight fraction. The analysis of the physical and mechanical properties of the biocomposites show bioethanol derived lignin can improve selective properties such as impact strength, and thermal stability without compromising the modulus and strength attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of non-structural components and lignin on hemicellulose extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Xuan; Li, Hong-Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    As the important structural component of corn stover, hemicellulose could be converted into a variety of high value-added products. However, high quality hemicellulose extraction is not an easy issue. The present study aims to investigate the effects of non-structural components (NSCs) and lignin removal on alkaline extraction of hemicellulose. Although NSCs were found to have a minimal effect on hemicellulose dissolution, they affected the color values of the hemicellulose extracts. The lignin limited the hemicellulose dissolution and increased the color value by binding to hemicellulose molecules and forming lignin-carbohydrate complexes. Sodium chlorite method can remove about 90% lignin from corn stover, especially the lignin connected to hemicellulose through p-coumaric and ferulic acids. Which increased the hemicellulose dissolution ratio to 93% and reduced the color value 14-28%, but the cost is about 20% carbohydrates lost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lignin depolymerization/repolymerization and its critical role for delignification of aspen wood by steam explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiebing; Henriksson, Gunnar; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2007-11-01

    Steam explosion is an important process for the fractionation of biomass components. In order to understand the behaviour of lignin under the conditions encountered in the steam explosion process, as well as in other types of steam treatment, aspen wood and isolated lignin from aspen were subjected to steam treatment under various conditions. The lignin portion was analyzed using NMR and size exclusion chromatography as major analytical techniques. Thereby, the competition between lignin depolymerization and repolymerization was revealed and the conditions required for these two types of reaction identified. Addition of a reactive phenol, 2-naphthol, was shown to inhibit the repolymerization reaction strongly, resulting in a highly improved delignification by subsequent solvent extraction and an extracted lignin of uniform structure.

  1. Structural modification of hemicelluloses and lignin based on the biorefinery process with white-rot fungal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Feng; Yang, Hai-Yan; Kun, Wang; Liu, Xing-E

    2016-11-20

    On the concept of biorefinery, hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were isolated from white-rot fungal Trametes velutina D10149 biodegraded poplar, and the structural modification was elucidated in detail according to the different incubation duration. Transversal-section Raman images showed that the fiber secondary walls were preferentially degraded, whereas the compound middle lamellae, including the cell corner regions, were mainly intact after 16 weeks incubation. More importantly, lignin and carbohydrates were simultaneously removed within the fiber secondary wall. From wet chemistry analysis, the yields and structural properties for both hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were not significantly altered. The synergistic effect of ligninolytic system finally obviously appeared after 16 weeks incubation, evidenced by the remarkable decrement of hemicellulose and lignin molecular weights. Additionally, the preferential degradation of S units in lignin biomacromolecule was further confirmed by composition analysis of cell wall phenolics and the integration of 2D NMR correlations in the aromatic region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adding nickel formate in alkali lignin to increase contents of alkylphenols and aromatics during fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jing; Wang, Wen-Liang; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Chang, Jian-Min; Cai, Li-Ping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2017-03-01

    The composition of pyrolysis vapors obtained from alkali lignin pyrolysis with the additive of nickel formate was examined using the pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Characterization of bio-chars was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that the nickel formate significantly increased liquid yield, simplified the types of alkali lignin pyrolysis products and increased individual component contents. The additive of nickel formate increased contents of alkylphenols and aromatics from alkali lignin pyrolysis. With an increase in temperature, a greater amount of the relative contents can be achieved. The nickel formate was thermally decomposed to form hydrogen, resulting in hydrodeoxygenation of alkali lignin during pyrolysis. It was also found that Ni is in favor of producing alkylphenols. The analysis based on the experimental result provided evidences used to propose reaction mechanism for pyrolysis of nickel formate-assisted alkali lignin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Influence of RANEY Nickel on the Formation of Intermediates in the Degradation of Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Forchheim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignin forms an important part of lignocellulosic biomass and is an abundantly available residue. It is a potential renewable source of phenol. Liquefaction of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin as well as catalytical hydrodeoxygenation of the main intermediates in the degradation of lignin, that is, catechol and guaiacol, was studied. The cleavage of the ether bonds, which are abundant in the molecular structure of lignin, can be realised in near-critical water (573 to 673 K, 20 to 30 MPa. Hydrothermal treatment in this context provides high selectivity in respect to hydroxybenzenes, especially catechol. RANEY Nickel was found to be an adequate catalyst for hydrodeoxygenation. Although it does not influence the cleavage of ether bonds, RANEY Nickel favours the production of phenol from both lignin and catechol. The main product from hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol with RANEY Nickel was cyclohexanol. Reaction mechanism and kinetics of the degradation of guaiacol were explored.

  4. Pleurotus ostreatus decreases cornstalk lignin content, potentially improving its suitability for animal feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Fan, Huan; Meng, Fanrui

    2017-03-01

    The capacity of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade lignin was investigated in the fermentation of cornstalk. Cornstalk was incubated with P. ostreatus for 30 days, and acid-soluble and acid-insoluble lignins were assessed. The microscopic structure of cornstalk samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and spectroscopic characteristics were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR) spectroscopy. During fermentation of cornstalk, the proportion of acid-soluble lignin did not vary significantly (P > 0.05), but that of acid-insoluble lignin decreased gradually from 17.8% on day 0 to 7.6% on day 30 (P ostreatus within 30 days. Pleurotus ostreatus decreases cornstalk lignin content, potentially improving its suitability for animal feed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Lignin extraction from straw by ionic liquids and enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulosic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dongbao; Mazza, Giuseppe; Tamaki, Yukihiro

    2010-03-10

    Lignocellulose is a promising starting material for bioproducts, ranging from biofuels to specialty chemicals; however, lignocellulose is resistant to enzymatic degradation. Overcoming this resistance is therefore an important priority for the development of the lignocellulosic biorefinery concept. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim]Ac) was selected from six ionic liquid candidates for the extraction of lignin from triticale and wheat straw and flax shives. Lignin extractability, composition, and cellulose enzymatic digestibility of the residues after extraction by [emim]Ac were determined at various temperatures (70-150 degrees C) and time intervals (0.5-24 h). The optimal result (52.7% of acid insoluble lignin in triticale straw) was obtained at 150 degrees C after 90 min, yielding >95% cellulose digestibility of the residue. Little cellulose was extracted, and the extracted lignin was recovered by acid precipitation. Selective extraction of lignin by ionic liquids is a potentially efficient technique for the comprehensive utilization of lignocellulose.

  6. LIGNIN-STIMULATED PROTECTION OF POLYPROPYLENE FILMS AND DNA IN CELLS OF MICE AGAINST OXIDATION DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božena Košíková

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The blending of polypropylene with lignin derived from chemical wood pulp manufacture makes it possible to prepare optically transparent films (thickness 50-60μm with acceptable mechanical properties in the absence of a commercial stabilizer. The lignin preparation in the concentration 1-2 wt% possessed the ability to act as a processing stabilizer and as an antioxidant during thermal aging of polypropylene films. A DNA-protective effect of lignin in mice testicular cells and mice peripheral blood lymphocytes against oxidation stress was examined using in vitro experiments. Hydrogen peroxide and visible light-excited methylene blue (MB were used as DNA damaging agents. The isolated cells were preincubated with lignin before treatment with the oxidative agents. The level of breaks in the DNA was measured by a comet assay. The results showed that preincubation with lignin significantly decreased the level of strand breaks induced by both oxidants in mice lymphocytes and testicular cells.

  7. Control of lignin solubility and particle formation modulates its antioxidant efficiency in lipid medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Sanadi, Anand Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant plant polymer usually regarded as waste material. In the present work, antioxidant properties of lignin preparations with differing lipid solubility were studied using biodiesel as a convenient lipid test substrate. In place of formerly used assays, we used attenuated total...... reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy to follow in situ biodiesel autoxidation on a heated ATR crystal as a function of time. The study demonstrates that a complex balance between intrinsic (chemical) efficiency, solubility, and particle formation controls the antioxidant efficiency of differently prepared...... lignin fractions. It was found that solubility and particle formation of lignin preparations strongly modulate its antioxidant efficiency and that these properties might depend on the presence of lipid components within the original lignin source....

  8. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of lignin production from empty fruit bunch via liquefaction with ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Dilaeleyana Abu Bakar; Ngadi, Norzita; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2013-05-01

    The production of lignin from empty fruit bunch (EFB) has been carried out using liquefaction method with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl) ionic liquid (IL), in presence of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) as a catalyst. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial Central Composite Design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum condition for lignin yield. The result indicated that the second order model was adequate for all the independent variables on the response with R(2)=0.8609. The optimum temperature, time, ionic liquid to EFB ratio, and catalyst concentration were 150.5 °C, 151 min, 3:1 wt/wt and 4.73 wt%, respectively for lignin yield=26.6%. The presence of lignin liquefied product was confirmed by UV-Vis and FTIR analysis. It was also demonstrated lignin extraction from lignocellulosic using recycled IL gave sufficient performance.

  10. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  11. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2012-03-12

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  12. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  13. Experimental Studies on the Hydrotreatment of Kraft Lignin to Aromatics and Alkylphenolics Using Economically Viable Fe-Based Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, Shilpa; Chowdari, Ramesh Kumar; Hita, Idoia; Heeres, Hero Jan

    Limonite, a low-cost iron ore, was investigated as a potential hydrotreatment catalyst for kraft lignin without the use of an external solvent (batch reactor, initial H-2 pressure of 100 bar, 4 h). The best results were obtained at 450 degrees C resulting in 34 wt % of liquefied kraft lignin (lignin

  14. Slow and fast pyrolysis of Douglas-fir lignin: Importance of liquid-intermediate formation on the distribution of products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Pecha, Brennan; Kuppevelt, van Michiel; McDonald, Armando G.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The formation of liquid intermediates and the distribution of products were studied under slow and fast pyrolysis conditions. Results indicate that monomers are formed from lignin oligomeric products during secondary reactions, rather than directly from the native lignin. Lignin from Douglas-fir (Ps

  15. Thermochemical Conversion of Lignin for Fuels and Chemicals: A Review Conversion thermochimique de la lignine en carburants et produits chimiques : une revue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffres B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is one of the biomass components potentially usable as renewable resource to produce fuels or chemicals. After separation from the lignocellulosic matrix, this macromolecule is nowadays essentially valorized by combustion in paper mills. If second generation ethanol is produced in the future from lignocellulosic biomass, some increasing reserves of lignin will be available in addition to the ones coming from the paper industry. The main thermochemical ways such as pyrolysis, solvolysis, hydrothermal conversion and hydroconversion considered for the valorization of the lignin are reviewed in this article. La lignine est une des composantes de la biomasse lignocellulosique potentiellement valorisable comme ressource renouvelable pour la production de carburants ou de produits chimiques. Après séparation de la matrice lignocellulosique, cette macromolécule est de nos jours essentiellement utilisée comme combustible dans l’industrie papetière. Outre cette filière papetière, la production d’éthanol de seconde génération à partir de la cellulose aura comme conséquence la mise à disponibilité d’encore plus grandes quantités de lignine. De nouvelles applications pourront donc être proposées pour l’utilisation de cette bio-ressource. Les différentes voies thermochimiques : pyrolyse, solvolyse, conversion hydrothermale et hydroconversion envisagées pour la valorisation de la lignine sont décrites dans cet article.

  16. Studies on polyphenols and lignin of Astronium urundeuva wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais Sérgio A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available An Astronium urundeuva ball-milled wood sample was successively extracted with benzene, benzene-ethanol (2:1, v/v-1, chloroform, and water in a soxhlet apparatus. The extracted wood was air-dried giving the residue A that was then treated with ketone-water (9:1, in a soxhlet apparatus. From the ketone-water extract was precipitated the milled wood lignin (MWL. With exception of MWL, the extract contents summed up 18.19% (o.d.w.. The Klason lignin content of A and the methoxyl content of the MWL were 23.84% and 19.00%, respectively. Another sample of A gave hardly and easily hydrolysable polysaccharide contents of 34.86% and 18.81%, respectively. A second sample of ball-milled wood was submitted to a single extraction with methanol, at room temperature, affording the methanol extract B (23.85% o.d.w.. Liquid and solid state 13C-NMR spectroscopies indicated that B is mainly constituted by proanthocyanidins of profisetinidin and prorobinetidin types.

  17. Ethanol and lignin production from Brazilian empty fruit bunch biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jegannathan Kenthorai; Gnansounou, Edgard

    2014-11-01

    Brazil Government is promoting palm plantations to use degraded land for biofuels. Palm production is expected to increase 35 per cent in future and there would be profuse biomass available that needs to be handled efficiently. Therefore, in this study the potential of EFB from Brazil as raw material for biorefinery was explored by compositional analysis and pretreatment conditions optimization to produce ethanol and co-products. EFB from Brazil contains significant cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and low ash content. The optimized dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment conditions for efficient cellulose and hemicellulose separation were 160°C temperature, 1.025% v/v acid concentration, 10.5min and 20% solid loading. Under optimum pretreatment process conditions, low enzyme loading (10FPU, 20IU cellulase and glucosidase enzyme/g glucan) and 15% solid loading, 51.1g ethanol, 344.1g solid residue (65% lignin and 24.87MJ/kg LHV) and 3.7l xylose rich liquid could be produced per kg dry EFB.

  18. THERMAL INSULATION FROM LIGNIN-DERIVED CARBON FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, Tracy [GrafTech International; Chen, Chong [GrafTech International; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Webb, Daniel C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International Holdings Inc. (GrafTech) have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). This was the first reported production of LBCF or resulting products at scale > 1 kg. The results will potentially lead to the first commercial application of LBCF. The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, foreign-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help resolve supply chain vulnerability and reduce the production cost for high temperature thermal insulation as well as create US jobs. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, the project team demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production.

  19. [Chemical structure of bioethanol lignin by low-temperature alkaline catalytic hydrothermal treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Wang, Ji-Fu; Xu, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Chun-Peng; Chu, Fu-Xiang

    2013-11-01

    In order to improve the reaction activity of bioethanol lignin, we investigated the activation of bioethanol lignin by a hydrothermal treatment method. Catalytic hydrothermal treatment of bioethanol lignin was performed at 180 degrees C for 3 h in the presence of alkaline solutions (NaOH, Na2 CO3, KOH and K2 CO3), the change in bioethanol lignin structures was studied comparatively by FTIR, 1H NMR,GPC and elemental analysis. FTIR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the band at 1 375 cm(-1) attributed to the phenolic hydroxyl groups increased, and the band intensity at 1 116 cm(-1) attributed to the ether bond decreased. On the other hand, the band at 1 597 and 1 511 cm(-1) attributed to aromatic skeletal vibration remained almost unchanged. 1H NMR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the number of aromatic methoxyl is increased, and based on the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl, the catalytic activity can be ranked as follows: KOH > NaOH > K2 CO3 > Na2 CO3. Especially for KOH, the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl was 170%, because the ion radius of potassium cation is bigger than sodium cation, so the potassium cations more easily formed cation adducts with lignin. GPC results showed that the molecular weight of alkali hydrothermal treatment lignin decreased and the molecular distribution got wider. Elemental analysis showed that hydrothermal treatment could break the interlinkage between lignin and protein, which can reduce the protein content and increase the purity of lignin, meanwhile, the content of O and H both decreased,while C fell, indicating that the bioethanol lignin had suffered a decarbonylation reaction. This is the most benefit of the lignin as a substitute for phenol.

  20. Characterization of Miscanthus giganteus lignin isolated by ethanol organosolv process under reflux condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Sorek, Hagit; Mitchell, Valerie D; Ibáñez, Ana B; Wemmer, David E

    2012-08-22

    Miscanthus giganteus lignin was extracted by an organosolv process under reflux conditions (4 h) with varying concentrations of ethanol (65%, 75%, 85%, 95%) and 0.2 M hydrochloric acid as catalyst. The resulting lignin was extensively characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D-NMR), and chemical analysis (residual sugars, Klason lignin, ash). The predominant linkage units present were β-O-4' (82-84%), resinol (6-7%), and phenylcoumaran (10-11%). The 65% ethanol solvent system gave the lowest lignin yield (14% of starting biomass) compared to 29-32% of the other systems. Increasing ethanol concentration resulted in decreasing carbohydrate content of the lignins (3.6-1.1%), a higher solubility in tetrahydrofuran (THF), a slight reduction of the molecular weight (M(w) 2.72-2.25 KDa), an increasing α-ethoxylation, and an increase in ethoxylated phenylpropenoic compounds (p-coumaric and ferulic acid), but the S/G ratio of the monolignols (0.63, GC/MS) and Klason lignin content (86-88%) were unaffected. An extraction method for these ethyl-esterified phenylpropenoids and smaller molecular weight lignin compounds was developed. The effect of reaction time (2, 4, and 8 h) was investigated for the 95% ethanol solvent system. Besides increased lignin yield (13-43%), a slight increase in M(w) (2.21-2.38 kDa) and S/G ratio (0.53-0.68, GC-MS) was observed. Consecutive extractions suggested that these changes were not from lignin modifications (e.g., condensations) but rather from extraction of lignin of different composition. The results were compared to similar solvent systems with 95% acetone and 95% dioxane.

  1. Structural modification of lignin and characterization of pretreated wheat straw by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bule, Mahesh V; Gao, Allan H; Hiscox, Bill; Chen, Shulin

    2013-04-24

    Ozonolysis is potentially an effective method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass to improve the production of fermentable sugars via enzymatic hydrolysis. Further understanding of the ozonolysis process and identifying specific lignin structural changes are crucial for improving the pretreatment process. Investigation into pretreatment of wheat straw using ozonolysisis is reported in this paper, with special emphasis on selective modification/degradation of lignin subunits. The ozonolysis was performed for 2 h with less than 60 mesh particles in order to achieve maximum lignin oxidation. The results showed that the lignin structure was significantly modified under these conditions, leading to higher sugar recovery of more than 50% which increased from 13.11% to 63.17% corresponding to the control and ozone treated samples, respectively. Moisture content was found to be an important parameter for improving sugar recovery. Ninety percent (w/w) moisture produced the highest sugar recovery. The concentration of acid soluble lignin in the ozone treated sample increased from 4% to 11% after 2 h treatment. NMR analysis revealed that the S2/6 and G2 lignin units in the wheat straw were most prone to oxidation by ozone as the concentration of aromatic units decreased while the carboxylic acids became more abundant. The experimental data suggest the degradation of β-O-4 moieties and aromatic ring opening in lignin subunits. The pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results revealed that the rate of lignin unit degradation was in the following order: syringyl > guaiacyl > p-hydroxyphenyl. Long ozone exposure resulted in few condensed lignin structure formation. In addition, the formation of condensed units during this process increased the activation energy from ASTM-E, 259.74 kJ/mol; Friedman-E, 270.08 kJ/mol to ASTM-E, 509.29 kJ/mol; Friedman-E, 462.17 kJ/mol. The results provide new information in overcoming lignin barrier for lignocellulose utilization.

  2. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of

  3. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Muyang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses

  4. Effect of lignin structure and surfactant on cellulase adsorption by lignin%木质素结构以及表面活性剂对木质素吸附纤维素酶的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚兰; 赵建; 谢益民; 杨海涛; 曲音波

    2012-01-01

    As substitute of petrol, bioethanol production from lignocelluloses is one of hot point of research in recent years. A main obstacle of bioethanol production in commercial scale is its cost.'One of the most important methods to solve the key problem is raising yield of cellulose hydrolysis by enzyme. However, content and type of lignin in lignocellulosic substrates has a significant effect on the hydrolysis process, as lignin has double actions: as a physical barrier that decreases accessibility of cellulase to cellulose, and as an attractant that adsorbs cellulases i. e. forming non-productive binding. In this paper, structure and adsorption for cellulase of three kinds of ligin, milled wood lignin, Klasson lignin and alkaline lignin were studied, and various surfactants were screened and used for improving enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses because they have a great impact on cellulase adsorption on lignin. The results showed that there are different structure characteristics for the three kinds of lignin: the highest ability of adsorption for cellulase is Klasson lignin, and then milled wood lignin, the lowest alkaline lignin. The surfactant that can significantly increase enzymatic hydrolysis yield of lignocelluloses is PEG-8000, because it can make cellulase desorption from lignin and reactivation for hydrolysis of cellulose.

  5. Solid-state 29Si NMR and FTIR analyses of lignin-silica coprecipitates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera Orozco, Yohanna; Cabrera, Andrés; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann;

    2016-01-01

    When agricultural residues are processed to ethanol, lignin and silica are some of the main byproducts. Separation of these two products is difficult and the chemical interactions between lignin and silica are not well described. In the present study, the effect of lignin-silica complexing has been...... in the distribution of silanol hydroxyl groups among different coprecipitates. These differences are dependent on the lignin type. The results are interpreted that the underlying mechanism of the interactions is the formation of hydrogen bonds between lignin aliphatic hydroxyl or carboxyl groups and the silanols...

  6. Hydrogen peroxide sensing and cytotoxicity activity of Acacia lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadil, Keshaw Ram; Barapatre, Anand; Meena, Avtar Singh; Jha, Harit

    2016-01-01

    The study is aimed at detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using Acacia lignin mediated silver nanoparticles (AGNPs). The synthesis of AGNPs was achieved at conditions optimized as, 3 ml of 0.02% lignin and 1mM silver nitrate incubated for 30 min at 80°C and pH 9. Initial screening of AGNPs was performed by measuring the surface plasmon resonance peak at 410-430 nm using UV-vis spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis confirmed the spherical shaped face centered cubic structure and 10-50 nm size of AGNPs. The infrared spectroscopy study further revealed that the active functional groups present in lignin were responsible for the reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) to metallic silver (Ag(0)). Lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles showed good sensitivity and a linear response over wide concentrations of H2O2 (10(-1) to 10(-6)M). Further, the in vitrocytotoxicity activity of the lignin mediated AGNPs (5-500 μg/ml) demonstrated toxicity effects in MCF-7 and A375 cell lines. Thus, lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles based optical sensor for H2O2 could be potentially applied in the determination of reactive oxygen species and toxic chemicals which further expands the importance of lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

  7. Increased water resistance of CTMP fibers by oat (Avena sativa L.) husk lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi A; Strengell, Reetta; Hyötyläinen, Juha M I; Heiskanen, Isto T; Laakso, Simo

    2010-12-13

    The insertion of oat husk lignin onto chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP) fibers was studied to increase fiber hydrophobicity. The pretreated pulp samples were subsequently used for preparation of handsheets for characterization. Treatment of CTMP with laccase in the presence of oat husk lignin resulted in a significant increase in hydrophobicity of the handsheet surface, as indicated by dynamic contact angle analysis. Water absorption time of 8 s was obtained with initial contact angle of 118°. Although the handsheet's brightness was reduced by 33%, tensile index was only subtly decreased. Neither laccase nor oat husk lignin alone gave much improved water absorption times. Therefore, handsheets made of laccase-treated pulp with and without oat husk lignin were further examined by XPS, which suggested that both laccase and oat husk lignin were inserted onto CTMP fibers. The oat husk lignin was distributed as heterogeneous aggregates on the handsheet surface whereas laccase was uniformly distributed. Evidence was obtained that the adsorbed laccase layer formed a noncovalent base for the insertion of oat husk lignin onto fiber surfaces.

  8. Enzymatic Transesterification of Kraft Lignin with Long Acyl Chains in Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Hulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Valorization of lignin is essential for the economic viability of the biorefinery concept. For example, the enhancement of lignin hydrophobicity by chemical esterification is known to improve its miscibility in apolar polyolefin matrices, thereby helping the production of bio-based composites. To this end and due to its many reactive hydroxyl groups, lignin is a challenging macromolecular substrate for biocatalyzed esterification in non-conventional media. The present work describes for the first time the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of Kraft lignin in ionic liquids (ILs. Three lipases, three 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ILs and ethyl oleate as long chain acyl donor were selected. Best results were obtained with a hydrophilic/hydrophobic binary IL system (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate/1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluoro- phosphate, 1/1 v/v and the immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB that afforded a promising transesterification yield (ca. 30%. Similar performances were achieved by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a coating agent for CALB rather than as a co-solvent in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate thus limiting the use of hydrophobic IL. Structural characterization of lignin oleate was performed by spectroscopic studies (FTIR and 1H-NMR. The synthesized lignin oleate exhibited interesting thermal and textural properties, different from those of the original Kraft lignin.

  9. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake A.; Isern, Nancy G.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Robinson, Errol W.

    2013-08-29

    The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have examined differential expression of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth on lignin. After 48 hours of growth, we used transcriptomics and proteomics to define the enzymes and other regulatory machinery that these organisms use to degrade lignin, as well as metabolomics to measure lignin degradation and monitor the use of lignin and iron as terminal electron acceptors that facilitate more efficient use of carbon. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  10. Recent Progress in Producing Lignin-Based Carbon Fibers for Functional Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Burwell, Deanna [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Akato, Kokouvi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2015-10-29

    Lignin, a biopolymer, has been investigated as a renewable and low-cost carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although successful lab-scale production of lignin-based carbon fibers has been reported, there are currently not any commercial producers. This paper will highlight some of the known challenges with converting lignin-based precursors into carbon fiber, and the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Several of the challenges with lignin are related to its diversity in chemical structure and purity, depending on its biomass source (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction method (e.g. organosolv, kraft). In order to make progress in this field, GrafTech and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are collaborating to develop lignin-based carbon fiber technology and to demonstrate it in functional applications, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office. The progress made to date with producing lignin-based carbon fiber for functional applications, as well as developing and qualifying a supply chain and value proposition, are also highlighted.

  11. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin: Effects of process and upgrading parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liangliang; Zhang, Yaning; Liu, Shiyu; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Paul; Cheng, Yanling; Addy, Min; Lu, Qian; Omar, Muhammad Mubashar; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Anderson, Erik; Peng, Peng; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Effects of process parameters on the yield and chemical profile of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin and the processes for lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading were reviewed. Various process parameters including pyrolysis temperature, reactor types, lignin characteristics, residence time, and feeding rate were discussed and the optimal parameter conditions for improved bio-oil yield and quality were concluded. In terms of lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading, three routes including pretreatment of lignin, catalytic upgrading, and co-pyrolysis of hydrogen-rich materials have been investigated. Zeolite cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) treatment are two main methods for catalytic upgrading of lignin-derived bio-oil. Factors affecting zeolite activity and the main zeolite catalytic mechanisms for lignin conversion were analyzed. Noble metal-based catalysts and metal sulfide catalysts are normally used as the HDO catalysts and the conversion mechanisms associated with a series of reactions have been proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding lignin-degrading reactions of ligninolytic enzymes: binding affinity and interactional profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Tan, Zhongyang; Jiang, Min; Li, Hui; Liu, Lifeng; Zhu, Yi; Yu, Zhen; Wei, Zhen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Gengxin

    2011-01-01

    Previous works have demonstrated that ligninolytic enzymes mediated effective degradation of lignin wastes. The degrading ability greatly relied on the interactions of ligninolytic enzymes with lignin. Ligninolytic enzymes mainly contain laccase (Lac), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP). In the present study, the binding modes of lignin to Lac, LiP and MnP were systematically determined, respectively. Robustness of these modes was further verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Residues GLU460, PRO346 and SER113 in Lac, residues ARG43, ALA180 and ASP183 in LiP and residues ARG42, HIS173 and ARG177 in MnP were most crucial in binding of lignin, respectively. Interactional analyses showed hydrophobic contacts were most abundant, playing an important role in the determination of substrate specificity. This information is an important contribution to the details of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in the process of lignin biodegradation, which can be used as references for designing enzyme mutants with a better lignin-degrading activity.

  13. Understanding lignin-degrading reactions of ligninolytic enzymes: binding affinity and interactional profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    Full Text Available Previous works have demonstrated that ligninolytic enzymes mediated effective degradation of lignin wastes. The degrading ability greatly relied on the interactions of ligninolytic enzymes with lignin. Ligninolytic enzymes mainly contain laccase (Lac, lignin peroxidase (LiP and manganese peroxidase (MnP. In the present study, the binding modes of lignin to Lac, LiP and MnP were systematically determined, respectively. Robustness of these modes was further verified by molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Residues GLU460, PRO346 and SER113 in Lac, residues ARG43, ALA180 and ASP183 in LiP and residues ARG42, HIS173 and ARG177 in MnP were most crucial in binding of lignin, respectively. Interactional analyses showed hydrophobic contacts were most abundant, playing an important role in the determination of substrate specificity. This information is an important contribution to the details of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in the process of lignin biodegradation, which can be used as references for designing enzyme mutants with a better lignin-degrading activity.

  14. Enhancement of Lignin Biopolymer Isolation from Hybrid Poplar by Organosolv Pretreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant renewable resource that has the potential to displace petroleum in the production of biomaterials and biofuels. In the present study, the fractionation of different lignin biopolymers from hybrid poplar based on organosolv pretreatments using 80% aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol at 220°C for 30 min was investigated. The isolated lignin fractions were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, high-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC, 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results showed that the lignin fraction obtained with aqueous ethanol (EOL possessed the highest yield and the strongest thermal stability compared with other lignin fractions. In addition, other lignin fractions were almost absent of neutral sugars (1.16–1.46% though lignin preparation extracted with 1-butanol (BOL was incongruent (7.53%. 2D HSQC spectra analysis revealed that the four lignin fractions mainly consisted of β-O-4′ linkages combined with small amounts of β-β′ and β-5′ linkages. Furthermore, substitution of Cα in β-O-4′ substructures had occurred due to the effects of dissolvent during the autocatalyzed alcohol organosolv pretreatments. Therefore, aqueous ethanol was found to be the most promising alcoholic organic solvent compared with other alcohols to be used in noncatalyzed processes for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in biorefinery.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of lignin-based carbon materials with tunable microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lignin-based carbons can be used as a low-cost alternative to graphite and petroleum-based carbons enabling the production of sustainable, functional carbon materials for various applications. The microstructure development of these carbons can be controlled through chemical modification of the lignin precursor and choice of carbonization parameters. In this work, microstructured carbon materials are synthesized from lignin using a combination of chemical modification and carbon fiber processing techniques. Lignin is modified by incorporating different ester groups which results in a precursor highly compatible with melt processing using the fiber extrusion technique and conversion into microstructured carbons by oxidative stabilization and subsequent carbonization. Furthermore, the impact of esterifications on precursor chemistry and carbonizations is investigated. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of modified lignins shows characteristic spectral changes as a result of esterifications. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry shows the modification process does not affect the polymeric character of the lignin backbone. Esterifications result in moderate shifts in O:C and H:C ratios. Thermogravimetric analysis of lignins reveals distinct differences in mass loss trends during oxidations and carbonizations.

  16. [Recent advances in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 for lignin aromatic compounds degradation--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Xue; Masai, Eiji

    2014-08-01

    Lignin is complex heteropolymer produced from hydroxycinnamyl alcohols through radical coupling. In nature, white-rot fungi are assumed initially to attack native lignin and release lignin-derived-low-molecular-weight compounds, and soil bacteria play an importent role for completely degradation of these compounds. Study on the soil bacteria degrading lignin-derived-low-molecular-weight compounds will give way to understand how aromatic compounds recycle in nature, and to utilize lignin compounds as the renewable materials for valuable materials production. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 that grows on lignin biphenyl (5,5'-dehydrodivanillate) had been isolated from pulp effluent in 1987. We have researched this bacterium more than 25 years, a serious aromatic metabolic pathway has been determined, and related genes have been isolated. As the complete genome sequence of SYK-6 has been opened to the public in 2012, the entire aromatic compounds degradation mechanisms become more clear. Main contents in our review cover: (1) genome information; (2) aryl metabolism; (3) biphenyl metabolism; (4) ferulate metabolism; (5) tetrahydrofolate-dependent O-demethylation system for lignin compound degrdation; (6) protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway; (7) multiple pathways for 3-O-methylgallate metabolism.

  17. Use of Agave tequilana-lignin and zinc oxide nanoparticles for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Escalante, Alfredo; Murillo-Vázquez, Raquel Nalleli; Delgado, Ezequiel; González, Francisco Javier; Toríz, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The use of sunscreens is essential for preventing skin damage and the potential appearance of skin cancer in humans. Inorganic active components such as zinc oxide (ZnO) have been used commonly in sunscreens due to their ability to block UVA radiation. This ultraviolet (UV) protection might be enhanced to cover the UVB and UVC bands when combined with other components such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work we evaluate the photoprotection properties of organic nanoparticles made from lignin in combination with ZnO nanoparticles as active ingredients for sunscreens. Lignin nanoparticles were synthesized from Agave tequilana lignin. Two different pulping methods were used for dissolving lignin from agave bagasse. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the precipitation method. All nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were mixed with a neutral vehicle in different concentrations and in-vitro sun protection factor (SPF) values were calculated. Different sizes of spherical lignin nanoparticles were obtained from the spent liquors of two different pulping methods. ZnO nanoparticles resulted with a flake shape. The mixture of all components gave SPF values in a range between 4 and 13. Lignin nanoparticles showed absorption in the UVB and UVC regions which can enhance the SPF value of sunscreens composed only of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Lignin nanoparticles have the added advantage of being of organic nature and its brown color can be used to match the skin tone of the person using it.

  18. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  19. Fractionation of hemp hurds by organosolv pretreatment and its effect on production of lignin and sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Stefano; Ottolina, Gianluca; Consonni, Roberto; Riva, Sergio; Patel, Ilabahen

    2014-07-01

    Fractionation of hemp hurds into its three main components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, was carried out using organosolv pretreatment. The effect of processing parameters, such as temperature, catalyst concentration, reaction time, and methanol (MeOH) concentration, on the dissolution and recovery of hemicellulose and lignin was determined. More than 75% of total hemicellulose and 75% of total lignin was removed in a single step with low amounts of degradation products under the following conditions: 165 °C, 3% H2 SO4 , 20 min reaction time, and 45% MeOH. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual pretreated biomass yielded up to 60% of cellulose-to-glucose conversion. The maximum recovery of the main components was obtained at a combined severity factor value of around one. Characterization of pretreated biomass and isolated lignin was carried out with FTIR and 2D (13) C-(1) H correlation HSQC NMR spectroscopy, the latter technique providing detailed structural information about the obtained methanol organosolv lignin (MOSL). Results suggested that xylopyranoside is the major carbohydrate associated with hemp lignin. The chemical properties of MOSL samples in terms of their phenolic group content and antioxidant capacity were also investigated. The results showed that MOSL samples have a high phenolic group content and antioxidant capacity relative to Klason lignin.

  20. Hidden lignin in soils: What's left behind is probably more important than what's measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, P.; Kaiser, K.; Dyda, R. Y.; Cerli, C.

    2013-12-01

    The relative importance of lignin toward stabilized soil organic matter has been a subject of much debate, with early paradigms based on supposed recalcitrance replaced by more recent studies in surface soils that suggest turnover times similar to bulk organic matter. A primary tool in these studies has been alkaline CuO oxidation in which soils are subjected to high temperatures and 2N basic conditions, which is presumed to extract all lignin from mineral soils. However, we conducted an experiment using plant litter leachates sorbed to various minerals to demonstrate that even the hot alkaline conditions of CuO oxidation are insufficient to extract all lignin. This irreversible lignin (determined by difference) is almost certainly more stable than the measured lignin in previous turnover studies, and compositionally quite distinct from either the parent litter leachates or what can be measured on the sorbed systems. Further, our optical characterizations of the leachate (carbon-specific absorbance in the UV range as a proxy for aromaticity) indicate that lignin may be more broadly representative of aromatic compounds in general, if not all surface active compounds. This has clear implications for deep-soil organic carbon as sorption of dissolved organic matter leached from upper layers is a primary mechanism for building up and stabilizing deep-soil carbon stores, namely that lignin and other aromatics may become increasingly important toward soil organic matter stabilization with depth, even if we cannot directly measure them.

  1. Enzymatic Specific Production and Chemical Functionalization of Phenylpropanone Platform Monomers from Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yukari; Hasegawa, Ryoichi; Kurosawa, Kanako; Maeda, Allyn H; Koizumi, Toshio; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Okada, Hitomi; Qu, Chen; Saito, Kaori; Watanabe, Takashi; Hatada, Yuji

    2017-01-20

    Enzymatic catalysis is an ecofriendly strategy for the production of high-value low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds from lignin. Although well-definable aromatic monomers have been obtained from synthetic lignin-model dimers, enzymatic-selective synthesis of platform monomers from natural lignin has not been accomplished. In this study, we successfully achieved highly specific synthesis of aromatic monomers with a phenylpropane structure directly from natural lignin using a cascade reaction of β-O-4-cleaving bacterial enzymes in one pot. Guaiacylhydroxylpropanone (GHP) and the GHP/syringylhydroxylpropanone (SHP) mixture are exclusive monomers from lignin isolated from softwood (Cryptomeria japonica) and hardwood (Eucalyptus globulus). The intermediate products in the enzymatic reactions show the capacity to accommodate highly heterologous substrates at the substrate-binding sites of the enzymes. To demonstrate the applicability of GHP as a platform chemical for bio-based industries, we chemically generate value-added GHP derivatives for bio-based polymers. Together with these chemical conversions for the valorization of lignin-derived phenylpropanone monomers, the specific and enzymatic production of the monomers directly from natural lignin is expected to provide a new stream in "white biotechnology" for sustainable biorefineries.

  2. Characterization of the radical scavenging activity of lignins--natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizhbite, Tatiana; Telysheva, Galina; Jurkjane, Vilhelmina; Viesturs, Uldis

    2004-12-01

    The present work is devoted to studies of the radical scavenging properties of lignins, which are recognized as efficient antioxidants of natural origin. Radical scavenging efficiency of a series of lignins isolated from deciduous and coniferous wood species and 10 lignin related monomeric compounds were examined against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) radical in homogeneous conditions using ESR and spectrophotometry methods. Some structure-activity relationships are proposed, pointing out the importance of the non-etherified OH phenolic groups, ortho-methoxy groups, hydroxyl groups and the double bond between the outermost carbon atoms in the side chain for increasing scavenger activity. Analysis of rate constants for the lignins-DPPH* interaction revealed the contribution of polymer molecular weight and pi-polyconjugation systems. The pi-conjugation systems of lignins operate as catalysts/activators of the interaction with DPPH*. Heterogeneity in terms of component composition (carbohydrate admixtures) and polydispersity is the factor which can decrease drastically the antioxidant efficiency of isolated lignins. The connection of the antibacterial effect of kraft lignin with radical scavenging activity of its soluble fraction was assumed.

  3. Lignin peroxidase-negative mutant of the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boominathan, K.; Dass, S.B.; Randall, T.A.; Kelley, R.L.; Reddy, C.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces two classes of extracellular heme proteins, designated lignin peroxidases and manganese peroxidases, that play a key role in lignin degradation. In this study the authors isolated and characterized a lignin peroxidase-negative mutant (lip mutant) that showed 16% of the ligninolytic activity ({sup 14}C-labeled synthetic lignin {yields}{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) exhibited by the wild type. The lip mutant did not produce detectable levels of lignin peroxidase, whereas the wild type, under identical conditions, produced 96 U of lignin peroxidase per liter. Both the wild type and the mutant produced comparable levels of manganese peroxidase and glucose oxidases, a key H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-generating secondary metabolic enzyme in P. chrysosporium. Fast protein liquid chromatographic analysis of the concentrated extracellular fluid of the lip mutant confirmed that it produced only heme proteins with manganese peroxidase activities were produced by the wild type. The lip mutant appears to be a regulatory mutant that is defective in the production of all the lignin peroxidases.

  4. Sources and transformations of dissolved lignin phenols and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Otsuchi Bay, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung eLu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved lignin phenols and optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM were measured to investigate the sources and transformations of terrigenous DOM (tDOM in Otsuchi Bay, Japan. Three rivers discharge into the bay, and relatively high values of syringyl:vanillyl phenols (0.73 ± 0.07 and cinnamyl:vanillyl phenols (0.33 ± 0.10 indicated large contributions of non-woody angiosperm tissues to lignin and tDOM. The physical mixing of river and seawater played an important role in controlling the concentrations and distributions of lignin phenols and chromophoric DOM (CDOM optical properties in the bay. Lignin phenol concentrations and the CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm, a(350, were strongly correlated in river and bay waters. Measurements of lignin phenols and CDOM in bay waters indicated a variety of photochemical and biological transformations of tDOM, including oxidation reactions, photobleaching and a decrease in molecular weight. Photodegradation and biodegradation of lignin and CDOM were investigated in decomposition experiments with river water and native microbial assemblages exposed to natural sunlight or kept in the dark. There was a rapid and substantial removal of lignin phenols and CDOM during the first few days in the light treatment, indicating transformations of tDOM and CDOM can occur soon after discharge of buoyant river water into the bay. The removal of lignin phenols was slightly greater in the dark (34% than in the light (30% during the remaining 59 days of the incubation. Comparison of the light and dark treatments indicated biodegradation was responsible for 67% of total lignin phenol removal during the 62-day incubation exposed to natural sunlight, indicating biodegradation is a dominant removal process in Otsuchi Bay.

  5. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  6. Renewable biofuel additives from the ozonolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Christopher J; Parker, Heather J; Jenkins, Rhodri W; Donnelly, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    In this investigation ozonolysis in the presence of ethanol was used to depolymerise lignin, resulting in a low conversion of oxygenated aromatics over short reaction times, or a range of saturated esters over 24 h. Short chain oxygenates can be used as fuel additives, displacing a percentage of a hydrocarbon fuel while leading to improvement in some of the fuel properties. The utility of the resulting bio-oils was therefore assessed by blending with a range of fuels. Guaiacol, a potential antioxidant, was formed over short reaction times and was found to be completely miscible with low-sulphur petrol (ULSP), diesel, aviation kerosene and rapeseed methyl ester. The mainly aliphatic proportion of the bio-oil produced over 24 h could be blended with the fuels replacing a maximum of 12-17 wt.% of the hydrocarbon fuel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Studies on a Cationically Modified Quaternary Ammonium Salt of Lignin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ai-li; JIANG Wen-ju

    2007-01-01

    A new quaternary ammonium salt monomer was synthesized and a quaternary amination of lignin( noted as QL),with the monomer was carried out by grafting copolymerization. The products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy(FTIR). The experimental results indicate that the yield of the monomer was 99.06%, and the conversion of the monomer and the grafting yield of QL were 93.69% and 185.78%, respectively. The feasibility of QL as the fiocculant to be applied in color removal of five artificial dyes, eriochrome black T( dye A), gongo red( dye B), direct fast black G (dye C), cuprofix blue green B (dye D), and acid black ATT (dye E) was examined.Results show that QL exhibits the favorable flocculation performance and high stability.

  8. Structural Analysis of Novel Lignin-derived Carbon Composite Anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL; Keffer, David J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel lignin-based carbon composite anodes consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains motivates the understanding of a relationship of the structural properties characterizing these materials, such as crystallite size, intracrystallite dspacing, crystalline volume fraction and composite density, with their pair distribution functions (PDF), obtained from both molecular dynamics simulation and neutron scattering. A model for these composite materials is developed as a function of experimentally measurable parameters and realized in fifteen composite systems, three of which directly match all parameters of their experimental counterparts. The accurate reproduction of the experimental PDFs using the model systems validates the model. The decomposition of the simulated PDFs provides an understanding of each feature in the PDF and allows for the development of a mapping between the defining characteristics of the PDF and the material properties of interest.

  9. Depolymerization of organosolv lignin using doped porous metal oxides in supercritical methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Genoa; Hansen, Thomas Søndergaard; Riisager, Anders

    2014-01-01

    conversion to methanol-soluble products, without char formation, were based on copper in combination with other dopants based on relatively earth-abundant metals. Nearly complete conversion of lignin to bio-oil composed of monomers and low-mass oligomers with high aromatic content was obtained in 6. h at 310......An isolated, solvent-extracted lignin from candlenut (Aleurites moluccana) biomass was subjected to catalytic depolymerization in the presence of supercritical methanol, using a range of porous metal oxides derived from hydrotalcite-like precursors. The most effective catalysts in terms of lignin...

  10. Conditions for selective degradation of lignin by the fungus Ganoderma australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, S.; Eyzaguirre, J. (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Lab. de Bioquimica)

    1992-08-01

    The white-rot fungus Ganoderma australis selectively degrades lignin in the ecosystem 'palo podrido'. Using conditions that simulate those of 'palo podrido' in the laboratory, it was found that low nitrogen content and low O{sub 2} tension stimulate the production of manganese peroxidase and lignin degradation, and depress cellulose degradation and cellulase production. The inverse is found at high nitrogen concentration and high O{sub 2} tension. This agrees with previous results indicating that low O{sub 2} tension and low nitrogen stimulate selective lignin degradation by this fungus. (orig.).

  11. Environmental effects on the lignin model monomer, vanillyl alcohol, studied by raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kiki Lyster; Barsberg, Søren Talbro

    2011-01-01

    units, respectively. Raman spectroscopy gives valuable knowledge on lignin and has a large potential for further developments. Thus in the present work we show how the use of electronic structure theory can support the study of environmental effects on lignin Raman bands. Raman spectra of the lignin...... model monomer, vanillyl alcohol (G type), dissolved in different solvents were compared to investigate such effects on the Raman band shapes and positions. Density functional theory combined with the polarizable continuum model were applied to assign the observed bands and tested for prediction accuracy...

  12. LIGNIN, STRUCTURE AND APPLICATIONS: DEPOLYMERIZATION METHODS FOR OBTAINING AROMATIC DERIVATIVES OF INDUSTRIAL INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Chávez-Sifontes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article significant data related to the structural characteristics of lignin, the extraction and isolation processes from biomass, and also the characteristics of different types of commercial lignins are presented. The review focuses on the different depolymerization processes (hydrolysis, hydrogenolysis, hydrodeoxygenation, pyrolysis, among others up to now developed and investigated analyzing the different aromatic derivatives obtained in each case, as well as the interesting reactions some of them may undergo. Application possibilities for lignin and its derivatives in new industrial processes integrated into the bio-refinery of the future are finally assessed

  13. Laser microdissection and genetic manipulation technologies to probe lignin heterogeneity and configuration in plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Oliver R A; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-01-01

    Single and multiple T-DNA knockouts of genes encoding arogenate dehydratases (ADTs) in Arabidopsis were obtained in homozygous form. These were analyzed for potential differences in lignin contents and compositions, as well as for distinct phenotypes over growth and development. Of these different lines, distinct reductions in lignin contents were obtained, with those having different G:S ratios depending upon the combination of ADT genes being knocked out. Results from pyrolysis GC/MS analyses indicated that differential carbon flux occurred into the vascular bundles (vb) and interfascicular fibers (if). These results provide additional new insight into factors controlling lignin heterogeneity and configuration.

  14. Simultaneous fast pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of lignin to obtain a marine diesel fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng

    The topic of this Ph.D. project is to convert lignin, a by-product from a 2nd generation bio-ethanol plant, into a marine diesel fuel by fast pyrolysis followed with catalytic upgrading of the pyrolysis vapor. Lignin, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, is underutilized in the 2nd...... generation bio-ethanol plants. Shipping industry on the other hand is looking for clean alternative fuels in order to meet stricter fuel quality and emission standards. To convert lignin into a renewable marine diesel fuel will both accelerate the development of modern bio-refinery and transfer the marine...

  15. Can genetic engineering of lignin deposition be accomplished without an unacceptable yield penalty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Chapple, Clint

    2013-04-01

    The secondary cell wall polymer lignin impedes the extraction of fermentable sugars from biomass, and has been one of the major impediments in the development of cost-effective biofuel technologies. Unfortunately, attempts to genetically engineer lignin biosynthesis frequently result in dwarfing or developmental abnormalities of unknown cause, thus limiting the benefits of increased fermentable sugar yield. In this brief review, we explore some of the possible mechanisms that could underlie this poorly understood phenomenon, with the expectation that an understanding of the cause of dwarfing in lignin biosynthetic mutants and transgenic plants could lead to new strategies for the development of improved bioenergy feedstocks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. REMOVAL OF ACID-SOLUBLE LIGNIN FROM BIOMASS EXTRACTS USING AMBERLITE XAD-4 RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas James Schwartz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for the removal of acid-soluble lignin from acid hydrolyzed hemicelluloses extracted from a mixture of northern hardwood chips, by using Amberlite XAD-4 resin, which was shown to remove 100% of furan derivatives and 90% of acid-soluble lignin. Subsequent fermentation of the resin treated hydrolyzates gave ethanol yields as high as 97% of theoretical and showed a marked increase in fermentation rate. Regeneration of resin performed with 75% acetone was 85% efficient with respect to acid soluble lignin.

  17. Pathways associated with lignin biosynthesis in lignomaniac jute fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Avrajit; Sarkar, Debabrata; Satya, Pratik; Karmakar, Pran Gobinda; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    We generated the bast transcriptomes of a deficient lignified phloem fibre mutant and its wild-type jute (Corchorus capsularis) using Illumina paired-end sequencing. A total of 34,163 wild-type and 29,463 mutant unigenes, with average lengths of 1442 and 1136 bp, respectively, were assembled de novo, ~77-79 % of which were functionally annotated. These annotated unigenes were assigned to COG (~37-40 %) and GO (~22-28 %) classifications and mapped to 189 KEGG pathways (~19-21 %). We discovered 38 and 43 isoforms of 16 and 10 genes of the upstream shikimate-aromatic amino acid and downstream monolignol biosynthetic pathways, respectively, rendered their sequence similarities, confirmed the identities of 22 of these candidate gene families by phylogenetic analyses and reconstructed the pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis in jute fibres. We also identified major genes and bast-related transcription factors involved in secondary cell wall (SCW) formation. The quantitative RT-PCRs revealed that phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1 (CcPAL1) was co-down-regulated with several genes of the upstream shikimate pathway in mutant bast tissues at an early growth stage, although its expression relapsed to the normal level at the later growth stage. However, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 7 (CcCAD7) was strongly down-regulated in mutant bast tissues irrespective of growth stages. CcCAD7 disruption at an early growth stage was accompanied by co-up-regulation of SCW-specific genes cellulose synthase A7 (CcCesA7) and fasciclin-like arabinogalactan 6 (CcFLA6), which was predicted to be involved in coordinating the S-layers' deposition in the xylan-type jute fibres. Our results identified CAD as a promising target for developing low-lignin jute fibres using genomics-assisted molecular approaches.

  18. Probing native lignin macromolecular configuration in Arabidopsis thaliana in specific cell wall types: further insights into limited substrate degeneracy and assembly of the lignins of ref8, fah 1-2 and C4H::F5H lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Ann M; Jourdes, Michaël; Cardenas, Claudia L; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D; Nakazawa, Yoshihisa; Chung, Byung-Yeoup; Franceschi, Vincent R; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2010-03-01

    The interest in renewable, plant-derived, bioenergy/biofuels has resulted in a renaissance of plant cell-wall/lignin research. Herein, effects of modulating lignin monomeric compositions in a single plant species, Arabidopsis, are described. The earliest stage of putative "AcBr/Klason lignin" deposition was apparently unaffected by modulating p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase or ferulate 5-hydroxylase activities. This finding helps account for the inability of many other studies to fully suppress the reported putative levels of lignin deposition through monolignol biosynthesis manipulation, and also underscores limitations in frequently used lignin analytical protocols. The overall putative lignin content was greatly reduced (circa 62%) in a plant line harboring an H-(p-hydroxyphenyl) enriched lignin phenotype. This slightly increased H-monomer deposition level apparently occurred in cell-wall domains normally harboring guaiacyl (G) and/or syringyl (S) lignin moieties. For G- and S-enriched lignin phenotypes, the overall lignification process appeared analogous to wild type, with only xylem fiber and interfascicular fiber cells forming the S-enriched lignins. Laser microscope dissection of vascular bundles and interfascicular fibers, followed by pyrolysis GC/MS, supported these findings. Some cell types, presumably metaxylem and possibly protoxylem, also afforded small amounts of benzodioxane (sub)structures due to limited substrate degeneracy (i.e. utilizing 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol rather than sinapyl alcohol). For all plant lines studied, the 8-O-4' inter-unit frequency of cleavable H, G and/or S monomers was essentially invariant of monomeric composition for a given (putative) lignin content. These data again underscore the need for determination of lignin primary structures and identification of all proteins/enzymes involved in control of lignin polymer assembly/macromolecular configuration.

  19. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    Biofuels, like cellulosic ethanol, may only be cost effective if the lignin byproduct is upgraded to value-added products. However, lignin's inherent aromatic structure and interunit crosslinkages hinder effective conversion. High temperature H2O is considered for lignin conversion, because H2O exhibits unusual properties at higher temperatures (particularly at its supercritical point of 374°C and 3205 psi) including a decreased ion product and a decreased static dielectric constant (similar to those of polar organic solvents at room temperature) such that there is a high solubility for organic compounds, like lignin. Much of the research concerning lignin and supercritical H2O has focused on further decomposition to gases (e.g., H2, CH4, and CO2) where nearly no char formation is expected in the presence of a catalyst. However, the conditions required for supercritical H2O are difficult to maintain, catalysts can be expensive, and gases are not favorable to the current liquid fuel infrastructure. Reactions using Organosolv lignin, subcritical H2O (365°C) and various industrial gases (N2, H2, CO, and CO2 at an initial pressure of 500 psi) for 30 min. were examined to determine both lignin's potential to generate value-added products (e.g., monomer compounds and methanol) and the role (if any) of the H2O and the gases during the reactions. The behavior of H2O at reaction temperature and pressure is expected to be similar to the behavior of supercritical H 2O without the need to maintain supercritical conditions. Different characterization techniques were used for the products collected including primarily GC/FID-TCD of the evolved gases, GC/MS analysis of the organic liquids, solid phase microextraction analysis of the water, and solid state 13C-NMR analysis of the residues. The reactor pressure at temperature was shown to influence the reactivity of the H2O and lignin, and the highest conversions (≈54--62%) were obtained when adding a gas. However, the

  20. The Structure of Lignin of Corn Stover and its Changes Induced by Mild Sodium Hydroxide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou-yong Min

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Corn stover is an abundant feedstock in the US that can be used for second generation bioethanol production. However, there is little useful data on structure of the lignin of corn stover. The following principal tasks will be addressed to profile the structure of corn stover: (1 separation of corn stover into stem, cob, and leaf; (2 isolation of cellulolytic enzyme lignins (CEL from extractive-free and the alkali-treated fractions; (3 quantification of p-coumarate and ferulate of fractions by HPLC. The results of alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation and 1H-13C HSQC NMR indicated: (1 the structure of lignin varied in the fractions; (2 a remarkable amount of p-coumarate and ferulate was identified and determined; (3 the remarkable structural changes of lignin induced by alkaline treatment were elucidated.

  1. ADSORPTION OF DIETARY OILS ONTO LIGNIN FOR PROMISING PHARMACEUTICAL AND NUTRITIONAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Tolba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kraft lignin, a by-product of the pulp and paper industry, was explored as an adsorbent for six dietary oils and was compared to chitosan, which is widely used in the pharmaceutical market. The dissolution and adsorption efficiency of kraft lignin were tested at an acidic pH corresponding to the stomach, as well as at a basic pH corresponding to the intestine. Results showed that kraft lignin is a powerful adsorbent that can take up dietary oils at up to about 6 times its own weight. Kraft lignin exhibits higher stability and insolubility at the pH of the stomach in comparison to chitosan. The adsorption isotherm of dietary oils fits well with the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetics follows a pseudo-second order relationship.

  2. Effects of Downregulation of CCoAOMT Expression on Lignin Biosynthesis in Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hua-yan; WEI Jian-hua; LIU Hui-rong; ZHU Zhi-qing; SONG Yan-ru

    2002-01-01

    Antisense CCoAOMT cDNA of Chinese white poplar( Populus tomentosa ) was transformed into tobacco W38 mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The results of PCR, PCR-Southern and Northern dot analysis indicated that the antisense CCoAOMT cDNA was integrated in the genome of the transgenic tobacco and expressed at transcriptional level. The basal stems of the 3-month-old transgenic plants growing in the greenhouse were cut off and dried for Klason lignin analysis. Lignin content in most of the transgenic plants declined compared with the control plants, and one of them, the lignin content decreased by 37%. Our results suggest that the suppression of endogenous CCoAOMT expression can reduce lignin content of the plants effectively.

  3. Application of Solubility Parameter Theory to Organosolv Extraction of Lignin from Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Cornstalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyuan Ye

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand solubility parameter (delta-value was applied to explain the effect of organic solvent concentration on lignin removal during organosolv extraction of lignin from enzymatically hydrolyzed cornstalks under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (≤ 75 °C without additional catalyst. The -value of lignin, calculated using the group-contribution method, was 13.70 (cal/cm31/2. The proximity of the delta-value between organic solvent-water and lignin explained the delignification capacity of the organic solvent-water. The concentration of organic solvent in the aqueous mixture that led to the highest delignification (i.e., 34.5%, 41.8%, and 53.7% delignification for ethanol-water, 1,4-dioxane-water, and tetrahydrofuran-water, respectively was around 65 to 75% vol., which was in keeping with the prediction by the solubility parameter theory.

  4. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yarbrough, John M; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, 2nd, Larry E; Hobdey, Sarah E; Sammond, Deanne W; Bomble, Yannick J; Crowley, Michael F; Decker, Stephen R; Himmel, Michael E; Vinzant, Todd B

    2015-01-01

    ... to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall. In this study, we have compared component enzyme affinities of a commercial Trichoderma reesei cellulase formulation, Cellic CTec2, towards extracted corn stover lignin using sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  5. Transition-metal catalyzed valorization of lignin: the key to a sustainable carbon-neutral future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Matsuura, Bryan S; Monos, Timothy M; Magallanes, Gabriel; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2016-02-14

    The development of a sustainable, carbon-neutral biorefinery has emerged as a prominent scientific and engineering goal of the 21st century. As petroleum has become less accessible, biomass-based carbon sources have been investigated for utility in fuel production and commodity chemical manufacturing. One underutilized biomaterial is lignin; however, its highly crosslinked and randomly polymerized composition have rendered this biopolymer recalcitrant to existing chemical processing. More recently, insight into lignin's molecular structure has reinvigorated chemists to develop catalytic methods for lignin depolymerization. This review examines the development of transition-metal catalyzed reactions and the insights shared between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems towards the ultimate goal of valorizing lignin to produce value-added products.

  6. Biopolymer-based nanocomposites: effect of lignin acetylation in cellulose triacetate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevárez, Laura Alicia Manjarrez; Casarrubias, Lourdes Ballinas; Celzard, Alain; Fierro, Vanessa; Muñoz, Vinicio Torres; Davila, Alejandro Camacho; Lubian, José Román Torres; Sánchez, Guillermo González

    2011-01-01

    We have prepared all-biopolymer nanocomposite films using lignin as a filler and cellulose triacetate (CTA) as a polymer matrix, and characterized them by several analytical methods. Three types of lignin were tested: organosolv, hydrolytic and kraft, with or without acetylation. They were used in the form of nanoparticles incorporated at 1 wt% in CTA. Self-supported films were prepared by vapor-induced phase separation at controlled temperature (35–55 °C) and relative humidity (10–70%). The efficiency of acetylation of each type of lignin was studied and discussed, as well as its effects on film structure, homogeneity and mechanical properties. The obtained results are explained in terms of intermolecular filler-matrix interaction at the nanometer scale, for which the highest mechanical resistance was reached using hydrolytic lignin in the nanocomposite. PMID:27877425

  7. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Felby, Claus

    2015-12-21

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert.

  8. Relationship between hydroxycinnamic acid content, lignin composition and digestibility of maize silages in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo-Uzal, Esther; Taboada, Alfredo; Rivera, Antonio; Flores, Gonzalo; Barceló, Alfonso Ros; Masa, Antón; Pomar, Federico

    2011-04-01

    Cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamic acids and the composition of lignin were studied in relation to the digestibility of a collection of 91 maize silages in wethers. Total lignin and guaiacyl content showed the highest correlation coefficients with digestibility. Using the above-mentioned chemical parameters, eight equations were also developed to predict digestibility. The prediction of organic matter digestibility produced a high adjusted R2 value (0.487) using total lignin, guaiacyl, esterified ferulic acid and esterified p-coumaric acid content as predictors. The prediction of in vivo dry matter digestibility produced a higher adjusted R2 value (0.516) using the same variables as predictors. Cell wall digestibility depends on a multiplicity of factors and it is not possible to attribute a causal effect on in vivo digestibility to any single factor. However, total lignin, guaiacyl and p-coumaric acid content emerge as good predictors of digestibility.

  9. Lignin plays a negative role in the biochemical process for producing lignocellulosic biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Yang, Shihui; Ding, Shi-You

    2014-06-01

    A biochemical platform holds the most promising route toward lignocellulosic biofuels, in which polysaccharides are hydrolyzed by cellulase enzymes into simple sugars and fermented to ethanol by microbes. However, these polysaccharides are cross-linked in the plant cell walls with the hydrophobic network of lignin that physically impedes enzymatic deconstruction. A thermochemical pretreatment process is often required to remove or delocalize lignin, which may also generate inhibitors that hamper enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. Here we review recent advances in understanding lignin structure in the plant cell walls and the negative roles of lignin in the processes of converting biomass to biofuels. Perspectives and future directions to improve the biomass conversion process are also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The effects of hemicelluloses and lignin removal on water uptake behavior of hemp fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejic, Biljana M; Kostic, Mirjana M; Skundric, Petar D; Praskalo, Jovana Z

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the individual influences of hemicelluloses and lignin removal on the water uptake behavior of hemp fibers. Hemp fibers with different content of either hemicelluloses or lignin were obtained by chemical treatment with 17.5% sodium hydroxide or 0.7% sodium chlorite. Various tests (capillary rise method, moisture sorption, water retention power) were applied to evaluate the change in water uptake of modified hemp fibers. The obtained results show that when the content of either hemicelluloses or lignin is reduced progressively by chemical treatment, the capillary properties of hemp fibers are improved, i.e. capillary rise height of modified fibers is increased up to 2.7 times in relation to unmodified fibers. Furthermore, hemicelluloses removal increases the moisture sorption and decreases the water retention values of hemp fibers, while lignin removal decreases the moisture sorption and increases the water retention ability of hemp fibers.

  11. Extraction of phenols from lignin microwave-pyrolysis oil using a switchable hydrophilicity solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dongbao; Farag, Sherif; Chaouki, Jamal; Jessop, Philip G

    2014-02-01

    Microwave pyrolysis of lignin, an aromatic polymer byproduct from paper-pulping industry, produces char, gases, and lignin pyrolysis oil. Within the oil are valuable phenolic compounds such as phenol, guaiacol and catechol. In this work, we describe a method using switchable hydrophilicity solvents (SHS) to extract phenols as a mixture from lignin microwave-pyrolysis oil at the scale of 10 g of bio-oil. Even at this small scale, losses are small; 96% of the bio-oil was recovered in its three fractions, 72% of guaiacol and 70% of 4-methylguaiacol, the most abundant phenols in the bio-oil, were extracted and 91% of the solvent SHS was recovered after extraction. The starting material (lignin microwave-pyrolysis oil) and the three fractions resulted from SHS extraction were characterized by GC-MS and quantitative (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lignin extraction--reassessment of the severity factor with respect to hydroxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roland A; Berberi, Veronique; Labranche, Joey; Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Steam processes have often been associated with a severity factor, correlating the cooking temperature, time and catalyst used in the process. Although equations for treatments with and without acid catalyst have been suggested, there is so far no simple equation allowing a precise estimation of the amount of lignin extracted from lignocellulosic biomass. In this work, a new version of the severity factor equation is proposed. This has been shown to correlate effectively to the amount of lignin extracted from various types of lignocellulosic materials and different extraction methods. The resulting severity factor is robust with potential to be utilized both for acid and base-catalyzed extraction of lignin. Finally, the proposed correlation between the severity factor and extracted lignin under base conditions has been correlated with empirical data to validate the entire model and especially under mild condition where lesser information was available from open literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorpsi Ion Logam Cu(II Menggunakan Lignin dari Limbah Serbuk Kayu Gergaji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelifajri Lelifajri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of heavy metal ion Cu(II onto modified lignin from sawdust waste have been presented. The ability of lignin from sawdust waste to adsorb the copper ion has been evaluated by varying adsorption time, pH of solution, and adsorption capacity. The concentration of copper ion was measured by atomic adsorption spectrometer. The result showed that the optimum condition of ion Cu(II by lignin were achieved at adsorption time of 15 minutes, pH of solution of 6, and copper concentration of 20 mg/L with adsorption efficiency of 99,3 %. In this study, the maximum capacity of 15,43 mg/g and equilibrium constant of 754,96 were achieved. Keywords: adsorpsi, ion tembaga, lignin, limbah serbuk kayu gergaji

  14. Ammoxidized Fenton-Activated Pine Kraft Lignin Accelerates Synthesis and Curing of Resole Resins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghorbani, Masoumeh; Konnerth, Johannes; Budjav, Enkhjargal; Silva, Ana; Zinovyev, Grigory; van Herwijnen, Hendrikus; Edler, Matthias; Griesser, Thomas; Liebner, Falk

    2017-01-01

      Ammoxidation of pine kraft lignin in aqueous 5 wt % ammonia affords a novel type of phenol substitute that significantly accelerates resole synthesis and curing as demonstrated for 40 wt % phenol replacement...

  15. Deciphering the Enigma of Lignification:Precursor Transport, Oxidation, and the Topochemistry of Lignin Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Jun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Plant lignification is a tightly regulated complex cellular process that occurs via three sequential steps:the synthesis of monolignols within the cytosol; the transport of monomeric precursors across plasma membrane; and the oxidative polymerization of monolignols to form lignin macromolecules within the cell wall.Although we have a reasonable understanding of monolignol biosynthesis,many aspects of lignin assembly remain elusive.These include the precursors'transport and oxidation,and the initiation of lignin polymerization.This review describes our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol transport and oxidation,discusses the intriguing yet least-understood aspects of lignin assembly,and highlights the technologies potentially aiding in clarifying the enigma of plant lignification.

  16. G-lignin and hemicellulosic monosaccharides distinctively affect biomass digestibility in rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yanjie; Li, Yuyang; Zhang, Youbing; Yu, Changbing; Fu, Tingdong; Zou, Jun; Tu, Yuanyuan; Peng, Liangcai; Chen, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In this study, total 19 straw samples from four Brassica species were determined with a diverse cell wall composition and varied biomass enzymatic digestibility under sulfuric acid or lime pretreatment. Correlation analysis was then performed to detect effects of cell wall compositions and wall polymer features (cellulose crystallinity, hemicellulosic monosaccharides and lignin monomers) on rapeseeds biomass digestibility. As a result, coniferyl alcohol (G-lignin) showed a strongly negative effect on biomass saccharification, whereas hemicellulosic monosaccharides (fucose, galactose, arabinose and rhamnose) were positive factors on lignocellulose digestions. Notably, chemical analyses of four typical pairs of samples indicated that hemicellulosic monosaccharides and G-lignin may coordinately influence biomass digestibility in rapeseeds. In addition, Brassica napus with lower lignin content exhibited more efficiency on both biomass enzymatic saccharification and ethanol production, compared with Brassica junjea. Hence, this study has at first time provided a genetic strategy on cell wall modification towards bioenergy rapeseed breeding.

  17. Making lignin accessible for anaerobic digestion by wet-explosion pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Biswas, Rajib; Ahamed, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a major part of the recalcitrant fraction of lignocellulose and in nature its degradation occurs through oxidative enzymes along with microbes mediated oxidative chemical actions. Oxygen assisted wet-explosion pretreatment promotes lignin solubility and leads to an increase biodegradation...... of lignin during anaerobic digestion processes. The pretreatment of feedlot manure was performed in a 10 L reactor at 170 C for 25 min using 4 bars oxygen and the material was fed to a continuous stirred tank reactor operated at 55 C for anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of untreated and pretreated...... material was 70 ± 27 and 320 ± 36 L/kg-VS/day, respectively, or 4.5 times higher yield as a result of the pretreatment. Aliphatic acids formed during the pretreatment were utilized by microbes. 44.4% lignin in pretreated material was actually converted in the anaerobic digestion process compared to 12...

  18. Mechanochemical production of lignin-containing powder fuels from biotechnical industry waste: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomovsky Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In biotechnological processing of plant raw materials, carbohydrates that are soluble and accessible for microorganisms are the only usable components. The lignin-rich part of the plant raw materials usually ends up in the waste. Lignin transferred into water suspensions cannot be used efficiently as a fuel. In this review, a new processing scheme of plant raw materials is presented, which includes mechanochemical treatment of the plant raw materials and separation of the powder product into particles of lignified and non-lignified tissues rich in lignin and cellulose, respectively. The cellulose-rich powders can then be used in biotechnological processes. Lignin-rich powder aerodynamically separated using cyclone-type apparatus can be used as a powder fuel to satisfy the needs of the main biotechnological plant in heat and steam.

  19. Porous core-shell carbon fibers derived from lignin and cellulose nanofibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports a method to produce lignin and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) based porous core-shell carbon fibers via co-electrospinning followed by controlled carbonization. Lignin formed the shell of the fiber while CNF network formed the porous core. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was added to the lignin solution to increase its electrospinability. CNFs were surface acetylated and dispersed in silicon oil to obtain a homogenous dispersion for electrospinning the porous core. Hollow lignin fibers were also electrospun using glycerin as the core material. FT-IR measurements confirmed the CNF acetylation. SEM micrographs showed the core-shell and hollow fiber nanostructures before and after carbonization. The novel carbon fibers synthesized in this study exhibited increased surface area and porosity that are promising for many advanced applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. EFFECTS OF COMPATIBILIZERS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF LOW DENSITY POLYETHYLENE/LIGNIN BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Luo; Nan-ying Ning; Long Chen; Run Su; Jing Cao; Qin Zhang; Qiang Fu; Shu-gao Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE)/lignin blends were prepared using melt blending. Two kinds of compatibilizers, ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) which is softer than LDPE and polyethylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PE-g-MA) which is harder than LDPE were used to improve the interfacial adhesion. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the dispersion of lignin in LDPE matrix. The results showed that both of the compatibilizers could improve the interaction between the low density polyethylene and lignin. However, the effects of the two compatibilizers on the mechanical properties of LDPE/lignin blends were different. The elongation at break of the blends was obviously increased by adding EVA, while significant improvement of tensile strength was observed by adding PE-g-MA. Several theoretical models have been used to further analyze the experimental data, combined with the morphological observation of tensile fractured surfaces by SEM.