WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-oxide ceramic nanotubules

  1. Environmental Effects on Non-oxide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1997-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are promising materials for a wide range of high temperature applications. These include such diverse applications as components for heat engines, high temperature electronics, and re-entry shields for space vehicles. Table I lists a number of selected applications. Most of the emphasis here will be on SiC and Si3N4. Where appropriate, other non-oxide materials such as aluminum nitride (AlN) and boron nitride (BN) will be discussed. Proposed materials include both monolithic ceramics and composites. Composites are treated in more detail elsewhere in this volume, however, many of the oxidation/corrosion reactions discussed here can be extended to composites. In application these materials will be exposed to a wide variety of environments. Table I also lists reactive components of these environments.It is well-known that SiC and Si3N4 retain their strength to high temperatures. Thus these materials have been proposed for a variety of hot-gas-path components in combustion applications. These include heat exchanger tubes, combustor liners, and porous filters for coal combustion products. All combustion gases contain CO2, CO, H2, H2O, O2, and N2. The exact gas composition is dependent on the fuel to air ratio or equivalence ratio. (Equivalence ratio (EQ) is a fuel-to-air ratio, with total hydrocarbon content normalized to the amount of O2 and defined by EQ=1 for complete combustion to CO2 and H2O). Figure 1 is a plot of equilibrium gas composition vs. equivalence ratio. Note that as a general rule, all combustion atmospheres are about 10% water vapor and 10% CO2. The amounts of CO, H2, and O2 are highly dependent on equivalence ratio.

  2. Interphase for ceramic matrix composites reinforced by non-oxide ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Bhatt, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Morscher, Gregory N. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A ceramic matrix composite material is disclosed having non-oxide ceramic fibers, which are formed in a complex fiber architecture by conventional textile processes; a thin mechanically weak interphase material, which is coated on the fibers; and a non-oxide or oxide ceramic matrix, which is formed within the interstices of the interphase-coated fiber architecture. During composite fabrication or post treatment, the interphase is allowed to debond from the matrix while still adhering to the fibers, thereby providing enhanced oxidative durability and damage tolerance to the fibers and the composite material.

  3. Effect of Prior Exposure at Elevated Temperatures on Tensile Properties and Stress-Strain Behavior of Four Non-Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    OF FOUR NON-OXIDE CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES THESIS JUNE 2015 Sarah M. Wallentine, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-MS-15-J-048 DEPARTMENT OF THE...TEMPERATURES ON TENSILE PROPERTIES AND STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF FOUR NON-OXIDE CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PRIOR EXPOSURE AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES ON TENSILE PROPERTIES AND STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF FOUR NON-OXIDE CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES Sarah M

  4. The physical chemistry of nucleation of sub-micrometer non-oxide ceramic powders via sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, A. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Technology

    1996-10-01

    Fine ceramic powders (< 500 nm) exhibit exceptional physical and mechanical properties in engineered structural ceramics. The production of fine powders, in particular the non-oxide ceramics, via a cheaper route than the organic solvent route has been rather elusive. This paper examines the physical chemistry of sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction for the nucleation of non-oxide ceramic phase. Well known vapor species eg SiO and BO in the production of technical ceramic powders (SiC, BN) are particularly discussed for understanding the nucleation process of SiC and BN ceramic phases respectively. The regimes of partial pressures and temperatures are particularly identified. The calculated nucleation rate as a function of the temperature is compared with the experimental results on powder morphology. The production of amorphous and nanocrystalline h-BN powders is discussed in the context of substrate structure and thermodynamic parameters.

  5. Laser beam joining of non-oxidic ceramics for ultra high temperature resistant joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, W.; Knorr, J.; Wolf, R.; Reinecke, A.M.; Rasper, R. [Univ. of Technology Dresden (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The excellent technical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics, such as resistance to extreme temperatures, oxidation, mechanical wear, aggressive chemical substances and radioactive radiation and also its high thermal conductivity and good temperature-shock resistance, make these ceramics ideally suited for use in the field of nuclear technology. However, their practical use has been limited so far because of the unavailability of effective joining techniques for these ceramics, especially for high temperature applications. A new joining technology (CERALINK {sup registered}) has been developed in a network project which allowed high temperature resistant and vacuum-tight joining of SiC or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. A power laser is used as heat source, which makes it possible to join ceramic components in free atmosphere in combination with a pure oxidic braze filler. As no furnace is necessary, there are no limitations on the component dimensions by the furnace-geometry. During the joining process, the heated area can be limited to the seam area so that this technology can also be used to encapsulate materials with a low melting point. The seam has a high mechanical strength, it is resistant to a wide range of chemicals and radiation and it is also vacuum-tight. The temperature resistance can be varied by variation of the braze filler composition - usually between 1,400 C and >1,600 C. Beside the optimum filler it is also important to select the suitable laser wavelength. The paper will demonstrate the influence of different wave lengths, i. e. various laser types, on the seam quality. Examples are chosen to illustrate the strengths and limitations of the new technology.

  6. Subcritical crack growth in oxide and non-oxide ceramics using the Constant Stress Rate Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wojteczko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture toughness is one of the most important parameters for ceramics description. In some cases, material failure occurs at lower stresses than described by KIc parameter. In these terms, determination of fracture toughness only, proves to be insufficient. This may be due to environmental factors, such as humidity, which might cause subcritical crack propagation in a material. Therefore, it is very important to estimate crack growth velocities to predict lifetime of ceramics used under specific conditions. Constant Stress Rate Test is an indirect method of subcritical crack growth parameters estimation. Calculations are made by using strength data, thus avoiding crack measurement. The expansion of flaws causes reduction of material strength. If subcritical crack growth phenomenon occurs, critical value of crack lengths increases with decreasing stress rate due to longer time for flaw to grow before the critical crack propagation at KIc takes place. Subcritical crack growth phenomenon is particularly dangerous for oxide ceramics due to chemical interactions occurring as a result of exposure to humidity. This paper presents results of Constant Stress Rate Test performed for alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide and silicon nitride in order to demonstrate the differences in subcritical crack propagation phenomenon course.

  7. Environmental Effects on the Time Dependent Failure of Non-Oxide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-03

    Ceramics, V2 ’, (Ed. by R. C. Bradt, D. P. R. Hasselman and F. F. Lange), Plenum Press, Hew York, 1974, 647. 13. Hong, J. D., Han, M. H., and Davis, R...dicates that the true fatigue limit should be |2E-, \\1142 at a level equal to 0.61 times the Griffith value _K V2 (8) if the reaction of the entire crack...sintered a-sdikon earbides. In general, the in reported kinectics have been attributed to the differences in oxidation rates of the polycrystaliline

  8. Highly sensitive methods for electroanalytical chemistry based on nanotubule membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Martin, C R

    1999-09-01

    Two new methods of electroanalysis are described. These methods are based on membranes containing monodisperse Au nanotubules with inside diameters approaching molecular dimensions. In one method, the analyte species is detected by measuring the change in trans-membrane current when the analyte is added to the nanotubule-based cell. The second method entails the use of a concentration cell based on the nanotubule membrane. In this case, the change in membrane potential is used to detect the analyte. Detection limits as low as 10(-11) M have been achieved. Hence, these methods compete with even the most sensitive of modern analytical methodologies. In addition, excellent molecular-sized-based selectivity is observed.

  9. Carbon Nanotubule Membranes for An Electrochemically-Driven Artificial Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new type of electrichemically-driven actuator is described. This actuator uses graphiticcarbon as the electroactive materical(as opposed to the polymeric films used in previous devices of thistype) ,and it is the first example of an actuator based on a nanostructured material. The actuator con-sists of branched carbon nanotubules embedded within the pores of a microporous alumina templatemenbrane. Electrochemical Li + intercalation causes this nanotubule-containing membrane to flex, andelectrochemical de-intercalation causes the membrane to relax to its original position. The characteris-tics of this new actuator are described here.

  10. Formic Acid Electrooxidation by a Platinum Nanotubule Array Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broaddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional metallic nanostructures such as nanowires, rods, and tubes have drawn much attention for electrocatalytic applications due to potential advantages that include fewer diffusion impeding interfaces with polymeric binders, more facile pathways for electron transfer, and more effective exposure of active surface sites. 1D nanostructured electrodes have been fabricated using a variety of methods, typically showing improved current response which has been attributed to improved CO tolerance, enhanced surface activity, and/or improved transport characteristics. A template wetting approach was used to fabricate an array of platinum nanotubules which were examined electrochemically with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid. Arrays of 100 and 200 nm nanotubules were compared to a traditional platinum black catalyst, all of which were found to have similar surface areas. Peak formic acid oxidation current was observed to be highest for the 100 nm nanotubule array, followed by the 200 nm array and the Pt black; however, CO tolerance of all electrodes was similar, as were the onset potentials of the oxidation and reduction peaks. The higher current response was attributed to enhanced mass transfer in the nanotubule electrodes, likely due to a combination of both the more open nanostructure as well as the lack of a polymeric binder in the catalyst layer.

  11. Separation of soy bean isoflavones based on gold nanotubule membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Dingyan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An electroless plating method was applied to deposit Au onto the walls of pores of polycarbonate membranes(PCMem.paminothiophenol was modified onto the walls of the PCMem by Selfassembly(PATPAuMem.The nanotubules were positively charged at lower pH because the amino of the PATP can be easily protonated, and the compound with the positive charge with nanotubules was excluded to transport through the membrane due to the electrostatic repulsion.Genistein reacts with Al+3to form a metal chelate with positively charge and is hard to pass through the PATPAuMem, while Daidzein can transport easily through this membrane.In the pH 4.5 medium, Genistein and Daidzein in soy isoflavone were successfully separated with a separate factor of 6.91 based on the PATP—Mem,

  12. Highly ordered zinc oxide nanotubules synthesized within the anodic aluminum oxide template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Li, H. L.

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanotubules were prepared by sol-gel synthesis within the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the morphology and crystalloid structures of the ZnO nanotubules. The results indicate that polycrystalline ZnO nanotubules are very uniformly assembled and parallel to each other in the membrane pores of the AAO template.

  13. 无水溶胶-凝胶法制备非氧化物陶瓷的研究进展%Research Progress in Fabrication of Non-Oxide Ceramics via Non-Aqueous Sol-Gel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书宏; 张宗波; 罗永明; 徐彩虹

    2012-01-01

    综述了基于氨解、胺解以及碳化二亚胺化三类反应的无水相溶胶-凝胶方法在制备SiCN、B(C)N、SiN、BN等非氧化物陶瓷材料方面的研究进展,并对其前景进行了展望.%This review mainly summarized recent progress on the fabrication of non-oxide ceramics, such as SiCN, BN, B ( C ) N, and SiN, by the non-aqueous sol-gel method, on the basis of ammonolysis reaction, aminolysis reaction, and the carbodiimide reaction. Future prospects of the method were also discussed.

  14. Surfactant-free fabrication of fullerene C{sub 60} nanotubules under shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Raston, Colin L. [Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science Technology (CNST) Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia); Shrestha, Rekha Goswami [International Centre for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zhang, Zhi; Zou, Jin [Materials Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Nakayama, Tomonobu [International Centre for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-07-10

    A method for controlling the self-assembly of fullerene C{sub 60} molecules into nanotubules in the fcc phase, devoid of entrapped solvent, has been established in a thin film microfluidic device. The micron length C{sub 60} nanotubules, with individual hollow diameters of 100 to 400 nm, are formed under continuous flow processing during high shear micromixing of water and a toluene solution of the fullerene, in the absence of surfactant, and without the need for further down-stream processing. TEM revealed pores on the surface of the nanotubes, and the isolated material has a much higher response to small molecule sensing than that for analogous material formed using multistep batch processing. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Highly Ordered Zinc Oxide Nanotubules Synthesized within the Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen; LI HuLin

    2001-01-01

    @@ Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor, which has a broad range of applications, e.g., in pigment, rubber additives, gas sensors, varistors and transducers1. It has recently been demonstrated that nanophase zinc oxide can be used in photocells of the Gatzel type2, which results in improved current generation efficiency. The properties of high aspect ratios and small sizes of zinc oxide nanotubules or nanowires are expected to improve the luminescence efficiency of the electro-optical devices and the sensitivity of the chemical sensors3.

  16. Highly Ordered Zinc Oxide Nanotubules Synthesized within the Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhen

    2001-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor, which has a broad range of applications, e.g., in pigment, rubber additives, gas sensors, varistors and transducers1. It has recently been demonstrated that nanophase zinc oxide can be used in photocells of the Gatzel type2, which results in improved current generation efficiency. The properties of high aspect ratios and small sizes of zinc oxide nanotubules or nanowires are expected to improve the luminescence efficiency of the electro-optical devices and the sensitivity of the chemical sensors3.  ……

  17. Micro- and nano-tubules built from loosely and tightly rolled up thin sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losensky, Luisa; Goldenbogen, Björn; Holland, Gudrun; Laue, Michael; Petran, Anca; Liebscher, Jürgen; Scheidt, Holger A; Vogel, Alexander; Huster, Daniel; Klipp, Edda; Arbuzova, Anna

    2016-01-14

    Tubular structures built from amphiphilic molecules are of interest for nano-sensing, drug delivery, and structuring of oils. In this study, we characterized the tubules built in aqueous suspensions of a cholesteryl nucleoside conjugate, cholesterylaminouridine (CholAU) and phosphatidylcholines (PCs). In mixtures with unsaturated PCs having chain lengths comparable to the length of CholAU, two different types of tubular structures were observed; nano- and micro-tubules had average diameters in the ranges 50-300 nm and 2-3 μm, respectively. Using cryo scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) we found that nano- and micro-tubules differed in their morphology: the nano-tubules were densely packed, whereas micro-tubules consisted of loosely rolled undulated lamellas. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the nano-tubules were built from 4 to 5 nm thick CholAU-rich bilayers, which were in the crystalline state. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy also confirmed that about 25% of the total CholAU, being about the fraction of CholAU composing the tubules, formed the rigid crystalline phase. We found that CholAU/PC tubules can be functionalized by molecules inserted into lipid bilayers and fluorescently labeled PCs and lipophilic nucleic acids inserted spontaneously into the outer layer of the tubules. The tubular structures could be loaded and cross-linked, e.g. by DNA hybrids, and, therefore, are of interest for further development, e.g. as a depot scaffold for tissue regeneration.

  18. Template Synthesis and Characterization of TiO2 Nanotubules%Tio2纳米管的模板法制备及表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 张校刚; 力虎林

    2001-01-01

    The template method for preparing nanostructures entails the synthesis of the desired material within the pores of a nanoporous membrane.In this work,TiO2 nanotubules of the anatase form have been synthesized by sol-gel chemical method using porous anodic alumina as the template.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the structure and morphology of the TiO2 nanotubules.The results showed that the diameter and length of the obtained nanotubules were determined by the pore size and length of the PAA template.It was founded that through control of immersion time,both tubules and fibrils can be prepared; in addition,the wall thickness of the nanotubules can be varied at will.The result indicated that the sol particles absorbed preferably to the pore walls of the PAA membrane due to the fact that the pore walls were negatively charged and the TiO2 particles were positively charged.

  19. Antiferroptotic activity of non-oxidative dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Peng, Yingpeng; Xie, Yangchun; Zhou, Borong; Sun, Xiaofang; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-11-25

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has many functions in the nervous and immune systems. Ferroptosis is a non-apoptotic form of regulated cell death that is involved in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of dopamine in ferroptosis remains unidentified. Here, we show that the non-oxidative form of dopamine is a strong inhibitor of ferroptotic cell death. Dopamine dose-dependently blocked ferroptosis in cancer (PANC1 and HEY) and non-cancer (MEF and HEK293) cells following treatment with erastin, a small molecule ferroptosis inducer. Notably, dopamine reduced erastin-induced ferrous iron accumulation, glutathione depletion, and malondialdehyde production. Mechanically, dopamine increased the protein stability of glutathione peroxidase 4, a phospholipid hydroperoxidase that protects cells against membrane lipid peroxidation. Moreover, dopamine suppressed dopamine receptor D4 protein degradation and promoted dopamine receptor D5 gene expression. Thus, our findings uncover a novel function of dopamine in cell death and provide new insight into the regulation of iron metabolism and lipid peroxidation by neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fiber Fabrication Facility for Non-Oxide and Specialty Glasses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Unique facility for the research, development, and fabrication of non-oxide and specialty glasses and fibers in support of Navy/DoD programs. DESCRIPTION:...

  1. Studies on the transportation of atrazine and paraoxon through functionalized gold nanotubules%阿特拉津和乙基对氧磷在功能化的金纳米通道中迁移特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓春模; 岳增连; 赵国庆; 黄杉生

    2011-01-01

    以金纳米通道膜为载体膜,采用戊二醛交联法在金通道内壁修饰阿特拉津抗体,基于阿特拉津与阿特拉津抗体之间的免疫反应,实现了阿特拉津与乙基对氧磷的分离.考察了金纳米通道孔径、底液pH值及缓冲液离子强度对阿特拉津与乙基对氧磷的分离的影响.在最佳实验条件下,乙基对氧磷及阿特拉津的分离度为1.68.%A capture antibody,atrazine-antibody,was modified onto the inner wall of Au nanotubules by glutaraldehyde interlinking method. Atrazine and paraoxon were separated by the nanotubule membrane based on the immunoreaction between atrazine-antibody and atrazine. The effects of nanotubule pore sizes, pH and ionic strength on the separation of atrazine and paraoxon were investigated. Under the optimum conditions,the separation efficiency was determined as 1.68.

  2. Crystal-free Formation of Non-Oxide Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have devised a method for the creation of crystal-free nonoxide optical fiber preforms. Non-oxide fiber optics are extensively used in infrared transmitting applications such as communication systems, chemical sensors, and laser fiber guides for cutting, welding and medical surgery. However, some of these glasses are very susceptible to crystallization. Even small crystals can lead to light scatter and a high attenuation coefficient, limiting their usefulness. NASA has developed a new method of non-oxide fiber formation that uses axial magnetic fields to suppress crystallization. The resulting non-oxide fibers are crystal free and have lower signal attenuation rates than silica based optical fibers.

  3. Preparation of nanosized non-oxide powders using diatomaceous earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šaponjić A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the nanosized non-oxide powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction and subsequent nitridation of diatomaceous earth which is a waste product from coal exploitation. Our scope was to investigate the potential use of diatomaceous earth as a main precursor for low-cost nanosized non-oxide powder preparation as well as to solve an environmental problem. The influence of carbon materials (carbonized sucrose, carbon cryogel and carbon black as a reducing agent on synthesis and properties of low-cost nanosized nonoxide powders was also studied. The powders were characterized by specific surface area, X-ray and SEM investigations. It was found that by using diatomaceous earth it is was possible to produce either a mixture of non-oxide powders (Si3N4/SiC or pure SiC powders depending on temperature.

  4. A review of non-oxidative dissolution of iron sulphides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsland, S.D.; Dawe, R.A.; Kelsall, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the non-oxidative dissolution of mineral sulphides as a possible source of reservoir souring. It investigates the factors affecting the rate of dissolution/H/sub 2/S evolution and the mechanisms by which the process takes to place. From the information presented it is apparent that no exhaustive kinetic or thermodynamic studies have been carried out in this area. The paper indicates that the non-oxidative dissolution of mineral sulphides, and in particular iron sulphides, is a probable source of hydrogen sulphide generation under reservoir conditions.

  5. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naslain, R, E-mail: naslain@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [University of Bordeaux 3, Allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2011-10-29

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  6. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  7. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  8. Thermodynamic Properties of Non-Oxide Composite Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Yanruo; WU Hongpeng; SUN Jialin

    2005-01-01

    For initiative application of non-oxides in refractories, it is essential to study thermodynamic properties of non-oxides. The stability and stable order of non-oxides under oxidized atmosphere are analyzed firstly and then a new process, "converse reaction sintering", is proposed. The results of study on oxidation mechanism of silicon and aluminum nitrides indicate that the gaseous suboxides can be produced observably when the oxygen partial pressure is lower than "conversion oxygen partial pressure". The suboxides can be deposited near the surface of composite to become a compact layer. This causes the material possessing a performance of "self-impedient oxidation". Metal Si and Al are the better additives for increasing the density and width of compact layer and increasing the ability of anti-oxidation and anti-corrosion. The study on Si3N4-Al2O3, Si3N4-MgO, Si3N4-SiC systems is also enumerated as examples in the paper. The experimental results show that the converse reaction sintering is able to make high performance composites and metal Si and Al not only can promote the sintering but also increase the density and width of compact layer.

  9. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  10. Development of ceramic based nanocomposites with high performance; Koseino ceramic kei nanocomposite no kaihatsu kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niihara, K.; Sekino, T.; Choa, Y. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). The Institute and Industrial Research; Nakahira, A.

    1997-10-15

    Various ceramic-based nanocomposite materials with nano-scale ceramic or metal grains diffused thereinto are introduced. Oxide-based ceramics/ceramics nanocomposite materials such as those based on Al2O3/SiC and on natural mullite/SiC have been successfully produced using the ordinary sintering technology. As intragrain nanocomposite materials of the non-oxide base, those based on Si3N4/granular TiC and on SiC with stacking faults have been developed, and it is disclosed that fracture toughness improves two times in a stacking-fault composite. By the application of the method for manufacturing ceramics/metal-based materials, finer texture control can be exercised than by the application of the ceramics/ceramics-based nanocomposite manufacturing technology. The nanocomposite materials obtained so far include those based on Al2O3/W and on Al2O3/Mo. In the future, various ceramic materials will be manufactured to satisfy versatile requests for different performance, and it is believed that a ceramic material so tough as to withstand the maximum temperature will be realized by combining microcomposite materials and nanocomposite materials. 33 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  13. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  14. Ceramic Methyltrioxorhenium

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, R; Eickerling, G; Helbig, C; Hauf, C; Miller, R; Mayr, F; Krug von Nidda, H A; Scheidt, E W; Scherer, W; Herrmann, Rudolf; Troester, Klaus; Eickerling, Georg; Helbig, Christian; Hauf, Christoph; Miller, Robert; Mayr, Franz; Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug von; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide polymeric methyltrioxorhenium [(CH3)xReO3] is an unique epresentative of a layered inherent conducting organometallic polymer which adopts the structural motifs of classical perovskites in two dimensions (2D) in form of methyl-deficient, corner-sharing ReO5(CH3) octahedra. In order to improve the characteristics of polymeric methyltrioxorhenium with respect to its physical properties and potential usage as an inherentconducting polymer we tried to optimise the synthetic routes of polymeric modifications of 1 to obtain a sintered ceramic material, denoted ceramic MTO. Ceramic MTO formed in a solvent-free synthesis via auto-polymerisation and subsequent sintering processing displays clearly different mechanical and physical properties from polymeric MTO synthesised in aqueous solution. Ceramic MTO is shown to display activated Re-C and Re=O bonds relative to MTO. These electronic and structural characteristics of ceramic MTO are also reflected by a different chemical reactivity compared with its...

  15. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  16. Ceramic fibers from Si-B-C polymer precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Hsu, M. S.; Chen, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and silicon borides (SiB4, SiB6) have thermal stability, oxidation resistance, hardness, and varied electrical properties. All these materials can be prepared in a fiber form from a suitable polymer precursor. The above mentioned fibers, when tested over a temperature range from 25 to 1400 C, experience degradation at elevated temperatures. Past work in ceramic materials has shown that the strength of ceramics containing both carbides and borides is sustained at elevated temperatures, with minimum oxidation. The work presented here describes the formation of ceramic fibers containing both elements, boron and silicon, prepared via the polymer precursor route previously reported by the authors, and discusses the fiber mechanical properties that are retained over the temperature range studied.

  17. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  18. Recent advances in the field of ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Progress achieved during the last decade in the field of ceramic fibers and related ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. Both SiC-based and alumina-based fine fibers have been improved in terms of thermal stability and creep resistance with temperature limit of about 1400 and 1200 ° C, respectively. Two concepts for achieving damage-tolerant ceramic matrix composites have been identified : (i) that of non-oxide composites with a dense matrix in which matrix cracks formed under load are deflected and arrested in a weak fiber coating referred to as the interphase and (ii) that of all-oxide composites with a highly porous matrix with no need of any fiber coating. The lifetime under load of non-oxide composites in oxidizing atmospheres, is improved through the use of multilayered self-healing interphases and matrices deposited from gaseous precursors by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Lifetime ranging from 1000 to 10,000 hours at 1200 ° C under cyclic loading in air are foreseen. Alumina-based composites although attractive for long term exposures in oxidizing atmospheres up to ≈1200 ° C, are still experimental materials.

  19. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  20. Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji Won; Rondinone, Adam J.; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

    2014-06-24

    The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component containing at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

  1. Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji-Won; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

    2017-09-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component comprising at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

  2. Thermal analysis study of polymer-to-ceramic conversion of organosilicon precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galusek D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The organosilicon precursors attract significant attention as substances, which upon heating in inert or reactive atmosphere convert directly to oxide or non-oxide ceramics, like nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides, boroncarbonitrides, oxycarbides, alons, etc. In characterisation, and in study of conversion of these polymers to ceramics thermal analysis plays an important role. The degree of cross-linking of the polymer vital for achievement of high ceramic yield is estimated with the use of thermal mechanical analysis (TMA. Decomposition of polymers and their conversion to ceramics is studied by the combination of differential thermal analysis (DTA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC thermogravimetry(TG, and mass spectrometry (MS. The use of these methods in study of the polymer-to-ceramic conversion is illustrated by case studies of a commercially available poly(allylcarbosilane as the precursor of SiC, and a poly(hydridomethylsilazane as the precursor of SiCN.

  3. Thermal non-oxidative aromatization of light alkanes catalyzed by gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Kong, Xianghua; Fan, Shizhao; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2014-12-15

    The thermal catalytic activity of GaN in non-oxidative alkane dehydroaromatization has been discovered for the first time. The origin of the catalytic activity was studied experimentally and theoretically. Commercially available GaN powders with a wurtzite crystal structure showed superior stability and reactivity for converting light alkanes, including methane, propane, n-butane, n-hexane and cyclohexane into benzene at an elevated temperature with high selectivity. The catalyst is highly robust and can be used repeatedly without noticeable deactivation.

  4. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  5. Ceramic Matrix Composites .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mukerji

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The present state of the knowledge of ceramic-matrix composites have been reviewed. The fracture toughness of present structural ceramics are not enough to permit design of high performance machines with ceramic parts. They also fail by catastrophic brittle fracture. It is generally believed that further improvement of fracture toughness is only possible by making composites of ceramics with ceramic fibre, particulate or platelets. Only ceramic-matrix composites capable of working above 1000 degree centigrade has been dealt with keeping reinforced plastics and metal-reinforced ceramics outside the purview. The author has discussed the basic mechanisms of toughening and fabrication of composites and the difficulties involved. Properties of available fibres and whiskers have been given. The best results obtained so far have been indicated. The limitations of improvement in properties of ceramic-matrix composites have been discussed.

  6. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  7. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  8. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  9. Ceramic to metal seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  10. Light element ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, KJ; Varma, KBR; Raju, AR

    1988-01-01

    An overview of a few structually important light element ceramics is presented. Included in the overview are silicon nitide, sialon, aluminium nitride, boron carbide and silicon carbide. Methods of preparation, characterization and industrial applications of these ceramics are summarized. Mechanical properties, industrial production techniques and principal uses of these ceramics are emphasized.

  11. [Refractory ceramic fibers, kinds, health effects after exposure, TLVs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic fibres are amorphous or crystalline synthetic mineral fibres which are characterised by refractory properties (i.c. stability in temperature above 1000 degrees C). In general, ceramic fibres are produced from aluminium oxide, silicon oxide and other metal oxides and less frequently from non-oxide materials such as silicon carbide, silicon nitride and boron nitride. In Poland, the production of ceramic fibres was begun in the Refractory Materials Plant, Skawina, during mid-eighties. The production capacity accounts for about 600 tons annually. It is estimated that approximately 3000 persons are exposed to the effect of ceramic fibres in Poland. During the production of ceramic fibres, concentrations of respiral fibres in the air at work places range from 0.07 to 0.27 f/cm3; during the manufacture of ceramic fibre products from 0.23 to 0.71 f/cm3 and during the application of ceramic fibre products from 0.07 to 1.67 f/cm3. As published data depict, fibres longer than 5 microns are most common in the work environment, and the proportion of fibres with diameters below 1 micron accounts for 40-50%. Bearing in mind the present situation in Poland, namely combined exposure to asbestos (during removal of worn out heat-insulating materials) and ceramic fibres (during installation of new insulation), as well as in view of own investigations and literature data which evidence a strong carcinogenic effect of certain fibres, the following MAC values have been adopted: Dusts of refractory ceramic fibres: total dust-2 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/cm3 (L > 5 microns; D fibres mixed with asbestos: total dust-1 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/m3. Dusts of refractory ceramic fibres mixed with other man-made mineral fibres (MMMF): total dust-2 mg/m3; respirable fibres-1 f/m3. According to the IARC, ceramic fibres have been included into group 2B-suspected human carcinogen.

  12. Eliminating Crystals in Non-Oxide Optical Fiber Preforms and Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; LaPointe, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Non ]oxide fiber optics such as heavy metal fluoride and chalcogenide glasses are extensively used in infrared transmitting applications such as communication systems, chemical sensors, and laser fiber guides for cutting, welding and medical surgery. The addition of rare earths such as erbium, enable these materials to be used as fiber laser and amplifiers. Some of these glasses however are very susceptible to crystallization. Even small crystals can lead to light scatter and a high attenuation coefficient, limiting their usefulness. Previously two research teams found that microgravity suppressed crystallization in heavy metal fluoride glasses. Looking for a less expensive method to suppress crystallization, ground based research was performed utilizing an axial magnetic field. The experiments revealed identical results to those obtained via microgravity processing. This research then led to a patented process for eliminating crystals in optical fiber preforms and the resulting optical fibers. In this paper, the microgravity results will be reviewed as well as patents and papers relating to the use of magnetic fields in various material and glass processing applications. Finally our patent to eliminate crystals in non ]oxide glasses utilizing a magnetic field will be detailed.

  13. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  14. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  15. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  16. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  17. Cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate consumption in humans driven by adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas S; Brassard, Patrice; Jørgensen, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    (1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist metroprolol. These observations suggest involvement of a beta(2)-adrenergic mechanism in non-oxidative metabolism for the brain. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of adrenaline (0.08 microg kg(-1) min(-1) i.v. for 15 min) and noradrenaline (0.5, 0.1 and 0.15 microg...... kg(-1) min(-1) i.v. for 20 min) on the arterial to internal jugular venous concentration differences (a-v diff) of O(2), glucose and lactate in healthy humans. Adrenaline (n = 10) increased the arterial concentrations of O(2), glucose and lactate (P ... from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 0.8 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/- s.d.; P adrenaline...

  18. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  19. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  20. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  1. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  3. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  4. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  5. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  6. Exposure to lead in water and cysteine non-oxidative metabolism in Pelophylax ridibundus tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczor, Marta [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Sura, Piotr [Department of Human Developmental Biology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland); Wrobel, Maria, E-mail: mbwrobel@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-02-15

    Chronic, low-level exposure to metals is an increasing global problem. Lead is an environmentally persistent toxin that causes many lead-related pathologies, directly affects tissues and cellular components or exerts an effect of the generation of reactive oxygen species causing a diminished level of available sulfhydryl antioxidant reserves. Cysteine is one of substrates in the synthesis of glutathione - the most important cellular antioxidant, and it may also undergo non-oxidative desulfuration that produces compounds containing sulfane sulfur atoms. The aim of the experiment was to examine changes of the non-oxidative metabolism of cysteine and the levels of cysteine and glutathione in the kidneys, heart, brain, liver and muscle of Marsh frogs (Pelophylax ridibundus) exposed to 28 mg/L Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 10 days. The activities of sulfurtransferases, enzymes related to the sulfane sulfur metabolism - 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransfearse, {gamma}-cystathionase and rhodanese - were detected in tissue homogenates. The activity of sulfurtransferases was much higher in the kidneys of frogs exposed to lead in comparison to control frogs, not exposed to lead. The level of sulfane sulfur remained unchanged. Similarly, the total level of cysteine did not change significantly. The total levels of glutathione and the cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG ratios were elevated. Thus, it seems that the exposure to lead intensified the metabolism of sulfane sulfur and glutathione synthesis in the kidneys. The results presented in this work not only confirm the participation of GSH in the detoxification of lead ions and/or products appearing in response to their presence, such as reactive oxygen species, but also indicate the involvement of sulfane sulfur and rhodanese in this process (e.g. brain). As long as the expression of enzymatic proteins (rhodanese, MPST and CST) is not examined, no answer will be provided to the question whether changes in their activity are due to

  7. An Overview on the Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Ceramics Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Silvestre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their prominent properties (mechanical, stiffness, strength, thermal stability, ceramic composite materials (CMC have been widely applied in automotive, industrial and aerospace engineering, as well as in biomedical and electronic devices. Because monolithic ceramics exhibit brittle behaviour and low electrical conductivity, CMCs have been greatly improved in the last decade. CMCs are produced from ceramic fibres embedded in a ceramic matrix, for which several ceramic materials (oxide or non-oxide are used for the fibres and the matrix. Due to the large diversity of available fibres, the properties of CMCs can be adapted to achieve structural targets. They are especially valuable for structural components with demanding mechanical and thermal requirements. However, with the advent of nanoparticles in this century, the research interests in CMCs are now changing from classical reinforcement (e.g., microscale fibres to new types of reinforcement at nanoscale. This review paper presents the current state of knowledge on processing and mechanical properties of a new generation of CMCs: Ceramics Nanocomposites (CNCs.

  8. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  9. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  10. Non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林胜; 徐奕德; 陶龙骧

    1997-01-01

    The non-oxidative dehydro-oligomerization of methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons such as aroma tics and C2 hydrocarbons in a low temperature range of 773-973 K with Mo/HZSM-5,Mo-Zr/HZSM-5 and Mo-W/HZSM-5 catalysts is studied.The means for enhancing the activity and stability of the Mo-containing catalysts under the reaction conditions is reported.Quite a stable methane conversion rate of over 10% with a high selectivity to the higher hydrocarbons has been obtained at a temperature of 973 K.Pure methane conversions of about 5.2% and 2.0% have been obtained at 923 and 873 K,respectively.In addition,accompanied by the C2-C3 mixture,tht- methane reaction can be initiated even at a lower temperature and the conversion rate of methane is enhanced by the presence of tne initiator of C2-C3 hydrocarbons.Compared with methane oxidative coupling to ethylene,the novel way for methane transformation is significant and reasonable for its lower reaction temperatures and high selectivity to the desired prod

  11. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  12. Radiation-disorder and aperiodicity in irradiated ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, L.W.

    1992-01-01

    This final technical report documents the accomplishments of the program of research entitled Radiation Disorder and Aperiodicity in Irradiated Ceramics'' for the period June 22, 1989--June 21, 1992. This research forms the latest part on an on-going program, begun at MIT in 1983 under DOE support, which has had as its objectives investigation of the responses in radiation environments of ceramics heavily-irradiated with electrons, neutrons and ions, with potential applications to fusion energy technology and high-level nuclear waste storage. Materials investigated have included SiO{sub 2}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 23}O{sub 27}N{sub 5}, SiC, BeO, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, CaTiO{sub 3}KTaO{sub 3} and Ca(Zr, Pu)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The program initially proposed for 1989 had as its major objectives two main thrusts: (1) research on defect aggregation in irradiated non-oxide ceramics, and (2) research on irradiation-induced amorphization of network silicas and phosphates.

  13. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  14. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  15. Alumina Matrix Composites with Non-Oxide Nanoparticle Addition and Enhanced Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Galusek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of SiC or TiC nanoparticles to polycrystalline alumina matrix has long been known as an efficient way of improving the mechanical properties of alumina-based ceramics, especially strength, creep, and wear resistance. Recently, new types of nano-additives, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, carbon nanofibers (CNF, and graphene sheets have been studied in order not only to improve the mechanical properties, but also to prepare materials with added functionalities, such as thermal and electrical conductivity. This paper provides a concise review of several types of alumina-based nanocomposites, evaluating the efficiency of various preparation methods and additives in terms of their influence on the properties of composites.

  16. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  17. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  18. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  19. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  20. Non-oxidative dehydroaromatization of methane:an effective reaction regeneration cyclic operation for catalyst life extension

    OpenAIRE

    Portilla Ovejero, Mª Teresa; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO; LLOPIS ALONSO, FRANCISCO JAVIER; Martínez, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane aromatization is an attractive direct route for producing higher hydrocarbons. It is highly selective to benzene despite the low conversion due to thermodynamic limitations, and Mo/H-ZSM-5, the first catalyst proposed for this reaction, is still considered as one of the most adequate. The major problem of this process is the severe catalyst deactivation due to the rapid build-up of carbonaceous deposits on the catalysts. Here we present an effective regeneration procedur...

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  2. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  3. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  4. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  5. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  7. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  8. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  9. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  10. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  11. Rolling contact fatigue of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hadfield, Mark

    1993-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/steel contacts under lubricated rolling conditions are studied. This work is of interest to ball bearing manufacturers as the use of ceramics in the design of these components has some advantages over traditional bearing-steel materials. Low density and increased stiffness are the mechanical properties which gas-turbine and machine tool manufacturers are most likel...

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  13. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  14. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  16. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  17. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  19. Method of joining ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Brimhall, John L.

    2000-01-01

    According to the method of the present invention, joining a first bi-element carbide to a second bi-element carbide, has the steps of: (a) forming a bond agent containing a metal carbide and silicon; (b) placing the bond agent between the first and second bi-element carbides to form a pre-assembly; and (c) pressing and heating the pre-assembly in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature effective to induce a displacement reaction creating a metal silicon phase bonding the first and second bi-element carbides.

  20. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  1. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  2. Modeling of Oxidized PTH (oxPTH) and Non-oxidized PTH (n-oxPTH) Receptor Binding and Relationship of Oxidized to Non-Oxidized PTH in Children with Chronic Renal Failure, Adult Patients on Hemodialysis and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hocher, Berthold; Oberthür, Dominik; Slowinski, Torsten;

    2013-01-01

    Background: The biological properties of oxidized and non-oxidized PTH are substantially different. Oxidized PTH (oxPTH) loses its PTH receptor-stimulating properties, whereas non-oxidized PTH (n-oxPTH) is a full agonist of the receptor. This was described in more than 20 well published studies i...

  3. Features of non-oxidative conversion of methane into aromatic hydrocarbons over Mo-containing zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. A.; Korobitsyna, L. L.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of study of methane conversion under non-oxidative conditions over molybdenum containing zeolite catalysts prepared by solid-phase synthesis using nanosized molybdenum powder are presented. The kinetic mechanisms of the process behavior under different conditions of methane dehydroaromatization are determined. It is shown that nonoxidative conversion of methane can occur both in the external diffusion and kinetic regions, depending on the methane flow rate. It is found out, that the optimum temperature of the methane conversion is 750 °C. It is shown that increased methane conversion is observed at the feed space velocity of methane decreasing from 1500 to 500 h-1.

  4. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  5. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    single cycle[21]. In zirconia , ferroelastic domains appeared during the cubic to tetragonal transformation at -2200’C, where [c] axes were elongated...Mechanism in Tetragonal Zirconia ( TZP ) Ceramics," Adv. in Ceramics 24 (1986) 653-662. 26. K. Mehta, J. F. Jue and A. V. Virkar, "Grinding-Liduced...barium copper oxide (YBa2Cu306+x) and dicalcium silicate (Ca 2 SiO4 ). The cubic to tetragonal transformation in PbTiO3 40 was proven to be

  6. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  7. Synthesis of ZrB{sub 2}-SiC ceramic composites from a single-source precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arish, Dasan, E-mail: arishd@rediffmail.com [Université of Limoges, SPCTS-CNRS, UMR 7315, Centre Européen de la Céramique (CEC), 12 Rue Atlantis, F-87068, Limoges Cedex (France); Shiju, Chellan [Synthetic Products Division, Corporate R & D Center (CRDC), HLL Lifecare Limited, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); Joseyphus, Raphael Selwin, E-mail: rsjoseyphus@gmail.com [PG & Research, Department of Chemistry, Mar Ivanios College (Autonomous), Thiruvananthapuram, 695015, Kerala (India); Pushparajan, Joseph [Travancore Titanium Products Ltd., Kochuveli, Thiruvananthapuram, 695021, Kerala (India)

    2017-06-15

    Preceramic polymer zirconoborosiloxane was synthesized from the reaction with boric acid, diphenyldiethoxysilane and zirconium (IV) propoxide via solventless process. The thermogravimetric analysis of the polymer showed that ceramic yield as decomposition product at 900 °C was 71%. The pyrolysis of zirconoborosiloxane in an argon gas environment was investigated as standard pyrolytic process up to 1650 °C. Microstructure evolution of ceramic phases was made by means of Fourier transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis. The results clearly demonstrated the pyrolysis products at 1650 °C consist of totally non-oxide ceramic phases of β-SiC, ZrB{sub 2} and free carbon. - Highlights: • Preceramic polymer zirconoborosiloxane was synthesized by non-aqueous solventless process. • Non-oxide ZrB{sub 2}-SiC composites could be obtained from the pyrolysed products at 1650 °C. • Free carbon content was identified by Raman spectroscopy.

  8. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  9. Nanocrystalline and Nanoporous Ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Henk

    1996-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanoporous ceramics, renowned for their special transport properties, have typical applications in the fields of energy, the environment, and separation technology. One example is a solid oxide fuel cell, where an anode with improved characteristics was obtained by an optimized n

  10. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    chanical twing of ualaneeting Ceramica at High Temperatures. ILondo, Patigue-crack growth in overaged and partially stabi- U.K., 198.""IS. Itoribe... Ceramica " Chapter 18 In Mechanical Prop- ŗR. M. !AcMeeding and A. 0. Evans, ’Mechanics of Transformation ertles of Engineering Ceramics. Edited by W.W

  11. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  12. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  13. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  14. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  15. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  16. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  17. Sol-gel derived ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ceramic raw materials has become an important factor in ceramic technologies. The increasing demands to the performance of ceramic compounds has caused increased activities for the preparation of tailor-made raw materials. Amongst a variety of new syntheses like flame pyrolysis, reactive spray drying, plasma or laser assisted techniques, the sol-gel process plays an important and increasing role. The process describes the building up of an inorganic (in general an oxide) netw...

  18. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  19. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sint...

  20. Ceramics for High Power Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ICP-MS) on 25 elements ranging from transition metals, rare earths , alkali, alkaline earths and silicon on a set of selected YAG ceramics and...our knowledge of the origin of optical losses in ceramic laser host materials while initiating a program of research on 2-micron, thulium- doped fiber...During Year 1 of this program, we produced and characterized laser grade Nd:YAG and low optical loss Gd3+ doped YAG and Tm:YAG ceramics . Laser

  1. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  2. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  3. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  4. Non-Oxidative Aromatization of CH4-C3H8 over La-Promoted Zn/HZSM-5 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The non-oxidative aromatization of mixed CH4 with C3H8 over La-promoted Zn/HZSM-5 catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor at 823 K with space velocity 600 h-1 and CH4/C3H8 (mol ratio)=5:1. The propane conversion and the aromatic selectivities were up to 99% and 60% over the catalyst respectively, while methane conversion had an induction period with the highest conversion of 30%. The structure and surface acidity of the catalysts were characterized by XRD, NH3-TPD and TG-DTA. The influences of reaction and regenerative conditions on the activity and selectivity were also investigated.

  5. Intrinsic kinetics of methane aromatization under non-oxidative conditions over modified Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benzhen Yao; Jin Chen; Dianhua Liu; Dingye Fang

    2008-01-01

    The intrinsic reaction kinetics of methane aromatization under non-oxidative conditions over modified Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts was studied in the quartz pipe-reactor under ordinary pressure with the temperature ranging from 913.15 to 973.15 K and the space velocity from 700 to 2100 ml/(g-h). The Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was chosen to describe the intrinsic kinetics while Levenberg-Marquardt method was selected to determine the parameters in the kinetic model. Statistical test and residual error distribution diagrams showed that experimental data were in good agreement with calculated data, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was suitable for the description of the intrinsic kinetics of methane aromatization under the reaction conditions discussed in this article.

  6. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  7. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  8. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  9. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  10. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  11. Lower energy costs in the ceramics industry - via ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, H.P.

    1983-04-01

    Ceramic fibres, due to their high thermal and chemical resistance, receive increasing attention as insulating material for industrial purposes. After a short characterisation, examples of furnace wall lining are given, and a tunnel-kiln car for baking of sanitation ceramics is investigated with a view to possibilities of supplementary insulation.

  12. Ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty: update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, William N; D'Antonio, James A; Feinberg, Judy R; Manley, Michael T; Naughton, Marybeth

    2008-10-01

    This prospective, randomized, multicenter study of alumina ceramic-on-alumina ceramic bearing couples includes 452 patients (475 hips). Their average age was 53 years with approximately two thirds men and 82% with osteoarthritis. At an average 8-year follow-up, clinical results were excellent and cortical erosions significantly less than in the conventional polyethylene-on-metal bearing group. Nine hips have undergone revision of one or both components for any reason. Of the 380 ceramic liners, 2 (0.5%) have fractured requiring reoperation, and 3 (0.8%) ceramic patients reported a transient squeaking sound, one of which had a head and liner change due to groin pain secondary to psoas tendinitis at 5 years. With no revisions for aseptic loosening and minimal cortical erosions, alumina-ceramic bearing couples are performing in a manner superior to the polyethylene-on-metal bearing in this young, active patient population.

  13. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  14. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  15. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  16. Preparation of Bauxite Ceramic Microsphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiaosu; LIU Pingan; LI Xiuyan; SHUI Anze; ZENG Lingke

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic microspheres were prepared by using Chinese bauxite as raw materials through the centrifugal spray drying method. The control technology of microsphere size, degree of sphericity was researched. The ceramic microspheres were sintered by a double sintering process. The microstructure and composition of ceramic microsphere were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy spectroscopy. The results show that the degree of sphericity of the ceramic microsphere was good and the particle size was 10-100 μm. The XRD analysis reveals that the main crystalline phase of the ceramic microsphere was α- Al2O3 and mullite (3Al2O3·2SiO2). The product can be used as reinforced material for composite material, especially for antiskid and hard wearing aluminum alloy coating.

  17. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  18. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  19. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  20. Modeling Strength Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Subjected to Cyclic Loading at Elevated Temperatures in Oxidative Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the strength degradation of non-oxide and oxide/oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) subjected to cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments has been investigated. Considering damage mechanisms of matrix cracking, interface debonding, interface wear, interface oxidation and fibers fracture, the composite residual strength model has been established by combining the micro stress field of the damaged composites, the damage models, and the fracture criterion. The relationships between the composite residual strength, fatigue peak stress, interface debonding, fibers failure and cycle number have been established. The effects of peak stress level, initial and steady-state interface shear stress, fiber Weibull modulus and fiber strength, and testing temperature on the degradation of composite strength and fibers failure have been investigated. The evolution of residual strength versus cycle number curves of non-oxide and oxide/oxide CMCs under cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments have been predicted.

  1. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  2. Simultaneous determination of ethanol's four types of non-oxidative metabolites in human whole blood by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zheng, Feng; Lin, Zebin

    2017-01-01

    , but it was difficult to achieve because of their wide range of polarity. This work describes development and validation of a simple liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for 4 types of ethanol non-oxidative metabolites (ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, fatty acid ethyl esters...

  3. Integral Textile Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David B.; Cox, Brian N.

    2008-08-01

    A new paradigm for ceramic composite structural components enables functionality in heat exchange, transpiration, detailed shape, and thermal strain management that significantly exceeds the prior art. The paradigm is based on the use of three-dimensional fiber reinforcement that is tailored to the specific shape, stress, and thermal requirements of a structural application and therefore generally requires innovative textile methods for each realization. Key features include the attainment of thin skins (less than 1 mm) that are nevertheless structurally robust, transpiration holes formed without cutting fibers, double curvature, compliant integral attachment to other structures that avoids thermal stress buildup, and microcomposite ceramic matrices that minimize spalling and allow the formation of smooth surfaces. All these features can be combined into structures of very varied gross shape and function, using a wide range of materials such as all-oxide systems and SiC and carbon fibers in SiC matrices. Illustrations are drawn from rocket nozzles, thermal protection systems, and gas turbine engines. The new design challenges that arise for such material/structure systems are being met by specialized computational modeling that departs significantly in the representation of materials behavior from that used in conventional finite element methods.

  4. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  5. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    34 microplasticity " stage in crack initiation from the flaw’ " for alumina ceramics has been carried out. Results of (from literal adaptations of the original...us to identify frontal-zone microcracking or even microplasticity . However. bridge degradation as a cause of the fatigue process. "Wear" direct...Ceramics", J. Aust. Ceram. Soc. 16 4-9. [24] A.W. Ruff and S.M. Wiederhorn (1979) "Erosion by Solid Particle Impact ", in Treatise on Materials Science and

  6. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  7. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  8. Bringing Ceramic Parts to Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    履之

    1995-01-01

    The benefits of using ceramic engine components are well known:They are tougher than metal parts, weigh less, and can withstand hotter operating temperatures.So why aren’t they being used now? High cost.

  9. Recent progress in ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Both fundamental and practical aspects of ceramic joining are understood well enough for many, if not most, applications requiring moderate strengths at room temperature. This paper argues that the two greatest needs in ceramic joining are for techniques to join buried interfaces by selective heating, and methods for joining ceramics for use at temperatures of 800 to 1,200 C. Heating with microwave radiation or with high-energy electron beams has been used to join buried ceramic interfaces, for example SiC to SiC. Joints with varying levels of strength at temperatures of 600 to 1,000 C have been made using four techniques: (1) transient liquid phase bonding; (2) joining with refractory braze alloys; (3) joining with refractory glass compositions; and (4) joining using preceramic polymers. Joint strengths as high as 550 MPa at 1,000 C have been reported for silicon nitride-silicon nitride bonds tested in four-point flexure.

  10. Ceramic Forum International yearbook 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reh, H. (ed.)

    2004-12-01

    This is the second English-language edition of our 'ceramic forum international Yearbook'. In this year's 'Ceramics World', the perpetually updated textbook section, you will find papers surveying the already in technical ceramics established fields of 'bioceramics' and 'ceramic armouring'. From the traditional ceramics sector, from which news of more and more innovations have been reaching us in recent months, we have picked out 'decorating processes for ceramic tiles' as these are currently enjoying an undreamt-of boom thanks to the development of completely new shaping processes. A soundly researched study on 'rheology in ceramics' completes this section of the yearbook. Interested ceramists will again find everything they need for their day-to-day work - the index will help them to find the information they need fast. This information is available under the following headings: (A) Product News: Short notes on outstanding new machines, kilns, plants and equipment as well as new raw materials on the market, supplied by both European and overseas suppliers. (B) Abstracts: A compilation of abridged articles, all of which published during the last 12 months, discussing interesting processes and products or new directions in research. (C) ESD - European Suppliers Directory: Who supplies what? In English, German, Spanish, Italian and French with about 220 company entries. (D) Appendix: Listing ceramics laboratories in Europe; the periodic system; the most important physical units and the conversion of older ones to SI units (and vice versa); essential formulas for use in the ceramist's daily practice. (orig.)

  11. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  12. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  13. Ceramic materials and growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgushi, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Okumura, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Noshi, T.; Ikeuchi, M. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Recently, many types of growth factors have been purified and used for promoting cell differentiation cascade. The activity of growth factors can be detected in vitro such as culture condition. However, the activity is difficult to detect when these factors are locally administered in vivo, because these dissipate soon after the administration. In order to retain growth factors in local milieu, these can be incorporated with biocompatible porous ceramic materials. Such ceramic/factors composites when implanted in vivo, can trigger certain types of cell differentiation cascade resulted in new tissue formation and tissue regeneration. The paper describes the ceramic / growth factors composites especially hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) / bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) composite to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The HA/BMP composite supported the osteoblastic differentiation on the HA surface and finally resulted in bone bonding to the HA. When the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were impregnated in pore areas of HA ceramics, the composites showed more and rapid bone formation than the HA/BMP and HA/MSCs composite, indicating the synergistic effect of BMP and MSCs. These findings indicate the importance of ceramic surface to evoke osteoblastic differentiation as well as to capture the molecules of growth factors for the cell differentiation. (orig.)

  14. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  15. Boron-bearing species in ceramic matrix composites for long-term aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.; Guette, A.; Rebillat, F.; Pailler, R.; Langlais, F.; Bourrat, X.

    2004-02-01

    Boron-bearing refractory species are introduced in non-oxide ceramic matrix fibrous composites (such as SiC/SiC composites) to improve their oxidation resistance under load at high temperatures with a view to applications in the aerospace field. B-doped pyrocarbon and hex-BN have been successfully used as interphase (instead of pure pyrocarbon) either as homogeneous or multilayered fiber coatings, to arrest and deflect matrix cracks formed under load (mechanical fuse function) and to give toughness to the materials. A self-healing multilayered matrix is designed and used in a model composite, which combines B-doped pyrocarbon mechanical fuse layers and B- and Si-bearing compound (namely B 4C and SiC) layers forming B 2O 3-based fluid healing phases when exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere. All the materials are deposited by chemical vapor infiltration. Lifetimes under tensile loading of several hundreds hours at high temperatures are reported.

  16. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  17. Storing Waste in Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W L; Sickafus, K

    2004-07-20

    Not all the nuclear waste destined for Yucca Mountain is in the form of spent fuel. Some of it will be radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons. This so-called defense waste exists mainly as corrosive liquids and sludge in underground tanks. An essential task of the U.S. high-level radioactive waste program is to process these defense wastes into a solid material--called a waste form. An ideal waste form would be extremely durable and unreactive with other repository materials. It would be simple to fabricate remotely so that it could be safely transported to a repository for permanent storage. What's more, the material should be able to tolerate exposure to intense radiation without degradation. And to minimize waste volume, the material must be able to contain high concentrations of radionuclides. The material most likely to be used for immobilization of radioactive waste is glass. Glasses are produced by rapid cooling of high-temperature liquids such that the liquid-like non-periodic structure is preserved at lower temperatures. This rapid cooling does not allow enough time for thermodynamically stable crystalline phases (mineral species) to form. In spite of their thermodynamic instability, glasses can persist for millions of years. An alternate to glass is a ceramic waste form--an assemblage of mineral-like crystalline solids that incorporate radionuclides into their structures. The crystalline phases are thermodynamically stable at the temperature of their synthesis; ceramics therefore tend to be more durable than glasses. Ceramic waste forms are fabricated at temperatures below their melting points and so avoid the danger of handling molten radioactive liquid--a danger that exists with incorporation of waste in glasses. The waste form provides a repository's first line of defense against release of radionuclides. It, along with the canister, is the barrier in the repository over which we have the most control. When a waste

  18. Performance of Ceramics in Severe Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Deliacorte, Christopher; Lee, Kang N.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are generally stable to higher temperatures than most metals and alloys. Thus the development of high temperature structural ceramics has been an area of active research for many years. While the dream of a ceramic heat engine still faces many challenges, niche markets are developing for these materials at high temperatures. In these applications, ceramics are exposed not only to high temperatures but also aggressive gases and deposits. In this chapter we review the response of ceramic materials to these environments. We discuss corrosion mechanisms, the relative importance of a particular corrodent, and, where available, corrosion rates. Most of the available corrosion information is on silicon carbide (SIC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) monolithic ceramics. These materials form a stable film of silica (SO2) in an oxidizing environment. We begin with a discussion of oxidation of these materials and proceed to the effects of other corrodents such as water vapor and salt deposits. We also discuss oxidation and corrosion of other ceramics: precurser derived ceramics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), ceramics which form oxide scales other than silica, and oxide ceramics. Many of the corrosion issues discussed can be mitigated with refractory oxide coatings and we discuss the current status of this active area of research. Ultimately, the concern of corrosion is loss of load bearing capability. We discuss the effects of corrosive environments on the strength of ceramics, both monolithic and composite. We conclude with a discussion of high temperature wear of ceramics, another important form of degradation at high temperatures.

  19. Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides as highly active alternative-type catalysts for non-oxidative isobutane dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Radnik, Jörg; Schneider, Matthias; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2016-06-21

    Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides efficiently catalyse non-oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane to isobutylene. Their activity strongly depends on the kind of second metal oxide. So designed CrZrOx showed superior activity to industrially relevant catalysts with supported Pt or CrOx species. It was also stable under alternating dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles over ca. 110 h under different reaction conditions between 550 and 600 °C.

  20. Non-oxidative coupling reaction of methane to ethane and hydrogen catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride: ([triple bond]SiO)2Ta-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulivong, Daravong; Norsic, Sébastien; Taoufik, Mostafa; Copéret, Christophe; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Chakka, Sudhakar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2008-04-16

    Silica-supported tantalum hydride, (SiO)2Ta-H (1), proves to be the first single-site catalyst for the direct non-oxidative coupling transformation of methane into ethane and hydrogen at moderate temperatures, with a high selectivity (>98%). The reaction likely involves the tantalum-methyl-methylidene species as a key intermediate, where the methyl ligand can migrate onto the tantalum-methylidene affording the tantalum-ethyl.

  1. High incidence of squeaking in THAs with alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, J.C.; Kuipers, R.M.; Wever, D.J.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in THA are a popular alternative to overcome wear concerns in traditional metal-polyethylene bearings. However, squeaking is a potentially worrisome phenomenon in ceramic-on-ceramic THAs which we observed in some of our patients. We reviewed all 42 patients who underwent

  2. Membrane Protrusion Coarsening and Nanotubulation within Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    KAUST Repository

    Węgrzyn, Ilona

    2011-11-16

    Hydrophobic side groups on a stimuli-responsive polymer, encapsulated within a single giant unilamellar vesicle, enable membrane attachment during compartment formation at elevated temperatures. We thermally modulated the vesicle through implementation of an IR laser via an optical fiber, enabling localized directed heating. Polymer-membrane interactions were monitored using confocal imaging techniques as subsequent membrane protrusions occurred and lipid nanotubes formed in response to the polymer hydrogel contraction. These nanotubes, bridging the vesicle membrane to the contracting hydrogel, were retained on the surface of the polymer compartment, where they were transformed into smaller vesicles in a process reminiscent of cellular endocytosis. This development of a synthetic vesicle system containing a stimuli-responsive polymer could lead to a new platform for studying inter/intramembrane transport through lipid nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  4. Origin and Development of Chinese Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    CERAMICS is animportant partof traditionalChinese culture and re-flects the wisdomand creativity of theCinese people.Kilnsfrom many differentdynasties have fired anumber of ceramic arti-cles of high artistic val-

  5. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  6. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  8. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  9. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  10. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  11. Incorporation of Waste Ceramic Blocks in Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Orley Magalhães; das Graças da Silva-Valenzuela, Maria; Andrade, Christiano Gianesi Bastos; Junior, Antonio Hortêncio Munhoz; Valenzuela-Díaz, Francisco Rolando

    In Brazil, Ceramics Industries produce bricks and ceramic tiles in practically all the country. In the southwestern region of Bahia are located some of these industries. A considerable proportion of the material produced do not pass the quality control for not having a uniform visual appearance or have cracks. These burned pieces are generally discarded, resulting in a big quantity of waste. The objective of this work is the characterization of this industrial waste and thus consign them to other industrial applications. Our results demonstrate that the burned waste have potential to be used for incorporation in common clay for structural ceramics, thereby avoiding its disposal in nature and reducing this environmental liability. Experimental bodies were tested with different quantities of waste. The common clay and the burned waste were characterized by XRD, TG/DTA, and SEM. The burned specimens were tested for mechanical strength, water absorption, bulk density, and apparent porosity. An incorporation of 10% of waste furnished the best results.

  12. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  13. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  14. Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Materials Sciences Corporation AD-A236 756 M.hM. 9 1 0513 IEIN HIfINU IIl- DTIC JUN 06 1991 MICROMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF S 0 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES C...Classification) \\() Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites ) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C-F. Yen, Z. Hashin, C. Laird, B.W. Rosen, Z. Wang 13a. TYPE...and strengthen the ceramic composites. In this task, various possibilities of crack propagation in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under

  15. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  16. Patches for Repairing Ceramics and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenson, Peter A.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Adam, Steven; Tompkins, James V.

    2006-01-01

    Patches consisting mostly of ceramic fabrics impregnated with partially cured polymers and ceramic particles are being developed as means of repairing ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) that must withstand temperatures above the melting points of refractory metal alloys. These patches were conceived for use by space-suited, space-walking astronauts in repairing damaged space-shuttle leading edges: as such, these patches could be applied in the field, in relatively simple procedures, and with minimal requirements for specialized tools. These design characteristics also make the patches useful for repairing ceramics and CMCs in terrestrial settings. In a typical patch as supplied to an astronaut or repair technician, the polymer would be in a tacky condition, denoted as an A stage, produced by partial polymerization of a monomeric liquid. The patch would be pressed against the ceramic or CMC object to be repaired, relying on the tackiness for temporary adhesion. The patch would then be bonded to the workpiece and cured by using a portable device to heat the polymer to a curing temperature above ambient temperature but well below the maximum operating temperature to which the workpiece is expected to be exposed. The patch would subsequently become pyrolized to a ceramic/glass condition upon initial exposure to the high operating temperature. In the original space-shuttle application, this exposure would be Earth-atmosphere-reentry heating to about 3,000 F (about 1,600 C). Patch formulations for space-shuttle applications include SiC and ZrO2 fabrics, a commercial SiC-based pre-ceramic polymer, and suitable proportions of both SiC and ZrO2 particles having sizes of the order of 1 m. These formulations have been tailored for the space-shuttle leading-edge material, atmospheric composition, and reentry temperature profile so as to enable repairs to survive re-entry heating with expected margin. Other formulations could be tailored for specific terrestrial

  17. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  18. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  19. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  20. Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    ISSN 2095-7645CN 10-1189/TQAims and Scope The Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society is a premier archival journal devoted to publishing top quality original research that advances the fundamental and applied science of ceramic materials.Today’s ceramic science is an interdisciplinary field that has expanded beyond its

  1. Recent developments in restorative dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1993-02-01

    Since the introduction of porcelain jacket crowns in the early 1900s, dental ceramics have been praised for their esthetic appearance. But there's more to consider: other benefits, longevity, limitations. This review addresses major developments in modern dental ceramics and metal-ceramics.

  2. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development of industrial science technologies. Research and development on synergy ceramics (research and development of ultra-high temperature gas turbines for electric power generation); 1998 nendo shinaji ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu. Hatsuden'yo koon gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes development of synergy ceramics. In developing a technology to design property fusion processes, studies were made on control of nano-structures by using a high-order nano-structure process, and on evaluation of micro region properties. Such nanocomposite bodies were selected for the object as piezoelectric ceramics PZT group (which increases mechanical characteristics and durability without impeding electric characteristics) and alumina-group YAG (which enhances high-temperature strength). Three-dimensional analyses were performed on particle morphology and crack structures by using focusing ion beams as a study on destruction behavior by means of microscopic and macroscopic particle morphology control. This paper reports the achievements of research and development on control of continuous small pore morphology (uni-directionally pierced pores on a new-type low expansion material used as matrix), intra-particle interface (discusses methods to micronize silicon nitride ceramics tissues), intra-layer interface (oxide-based ceramics are laminated on surface to improve oxidation and heat resistance without impeding high-temperature mechanical properties of non-oxide-based ceramics), intra-layer boundary (Pb-based double composition piezoelectric body having stable layer interface), and boundaries between inorganic and organic matters. (NEDO)

  3. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Impact Physics Dept.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  4. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    Certain refractory ceramics (notably oxides) have desirable properties suitable for the construction of ceramic waste containers for long term use in nuclear waste disposal applications. In particular, they are far less prone to environmental corrosion than metals under realistic repository conditions. The aqueous corrosion rates of oxides such as magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and alumina (Al{sub 2}0{sub 4}) fall in the range of a few millimeters per million years. Oxide ceramics are also not likely to be subject to microbiologically influenced corrosion, which apparently can attack most, if not all, of the available engineering metals. Ceramics have a reputation for poor mechanical performance and large, impermeable objects are not easily fabricated by most current fabrication methods. As a result, the most promising approach for incorporating ceramics in large waste packages appears to be to apply a high density ceramic coating to a supporting metallic structure. Ceramic coatings 2048 applied by a thermal spray technique can be made effectively seamless and provide a method for final closure of the waste package while maintaining low average temperatures for the entire assembly. The corrosion resistance of the ceramic should prevent or delay water penetration to the underlying metal, which will in turn provide most of the mechanical strength and toughness required by the application. In this way, the major concerns regarding the ceramic coating become ensuring it is impervious to moisture, its adherence and its resistance to mechanical stresses during handling or resulting from rock fall in the repository. Without water, electrochemical corrosion and microbiologically influenced corrosion processes are considered impossible, so a complete coating should protect the metal vessels for far longer than the current design requirements. Even an imperfect coating should extend the life of the package, delaying the onset and reducing the severity of

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  6. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  7. Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Ellerby, Donald T.; Beckman, Sarah E.; Irby, Edward; Gasch, Matthew J.; Gusman, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs) are a class of materials that include the diborides of metals such as hafnium and zirconium. The materials are of interest to NASA for their potential utility as sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. Such an application requires that the materials be capable of operating at temperatures, often in excess of 2,000 C. UHTCs are highly refractory and have high thermal conductivity, an advantage for this application. UHTCs are potentially applicable for other high-temperature processing applications, such as crucibles for molten-metal processing and high-temperature electrodes. UHTCs were first studied in the 1960 s by the U.S. Air Force. NASA s Ames Research Center concentrated on developing materials in the HfB2/SiC family for a leading-edge application. The work focused on developing a process to make uniform monolithic (2-phase) materials, and on the testing and design of these materials. Figure 1 shows arc-jet models made from UHTC materials fabricated at Ames. Figure 2 shows a cone being tested in the arc-jet. Other variations of these materials being investigated elsewhere include zirconium based materials and fiber-reinforced composites. Current UHTC work at Ames covers four broad topics: monoliths, coatings, composites, and processing. The goals include improving the fracture toughness, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance of monolithic UHTCs and developing oxidation-resistant UHTC coatings for thermal-protection-system substrates through novel coating methods. As part of this effort, researchers are exploring compositions and processing changes that have yielded improvements in properties. Computational materials science and nanotechnology are being explored as approaches to reduce materials development time and improve and tailor properties.

  8. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  9. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  10. Ceramics in fission and fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The role of ceramic components in fission and fusion reactors is described. Almost all of the functions normally performed by ceramics, except mechanical, are required of nuclear ceramics. The oxides of uranium and plutonium are of predominant importance in nuclear applications, but a number of other ceramics play peripheral roles. The unique service conditions under which nuclear ceramics must operate include intense radiation fields, high temperatures and large temperature gradients, and aggressive chemical environments. Examples of laboratory research designed to broaden understanding of the behavior of uranium dioxide in such conditions are given. The programs described include high temperature vaporization, diffusional processes, and interaction with hydrogen.

  11. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  12. Ceramic susceptor for induction bonding of metals, ceramics, and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert L.; Buckley, John D.

    1991-01-01

    A thin (.005) flexible ceramic susceptor (carbon) was discovered. It was developed to join ceramics, plastics, metals, and combinations of these materials using a unique induction heating process. Bonding times for laboratory specimens comparing state of the art technology to induction bonding were cut by a factor of 10 to 100 times. This novel type of carbon susceptor allows for applying heat directly and only to the bondline without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The ceramic (carbon film) susceptor produces molten adhesive or matrix material at the bond interface. This molten material flows through the perforated susceptor producing a fusion between the two parts to be joined, which in many instances has proven to be stronger than the parent material. Bonding can be accomplished in 2 minutes on areas submitted to the inductive heating. Because a carbon susceptor is used in bonding carbon fiber reinforced plastics and ceramics, there is no radar signature or return making it an ideal process for joining advanced aerospace composite structures.

  13. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  14. Radiation-disorder and aperiodicity in irradiated ceramics. Final technical report, 22 June 1989--21 June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, L.W.

    1992-07-01

    This final technical report documents the accomplishments of the program of research entitled ``Radiation Disorder and Aperiodicity in Irradiated Ceramics`` for the period June 22, 1989--June 21, 1992. This research forms the latest part on an on-going program, begun at MIT in 1983 under DOE support, which has had as its objectives investigation of the responses in radiation environments of ceramics heavily-irradiated with electrons, neutrons and ions, with potential applications to fusion energy technology and high-level nuclear waste storage. Materials investigated have included SiO{sub 2}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 23}O{sub 27}N{sub 5}, SiC, BeO, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, CaTiO{sub 3}KTaO{sub 3} and Ca(Zr, Pu)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The program initially proposed for 1989 had as its major objectives two main thrusts: (1) research on defect aggregation in irradiated non-oxide ceramics, and (2) research on irradiation-induced amorphization of network silicas and phosphates.

  15. The effect of a homogenizing optic on residual stresses and shear strength of laser brazed ceramic/steel-joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Südmeyer, I.; Rohde, M.; Besser, H.; Grein, M.; Liesching, B.; Schneider, J.

    2011-03-01

    Oxide and non oxide ceramics (Al2O3, SiC) were brazed to commercial steel with active filler alloys using a CO2-laser (l = 10.64 μm). Two different laser intensity profiles were used for heating up the compound: A laser output beam presenting a Gaussian profile and a homogenized, nearly top head profile were applied for joining the compounds in an Argon stream. The temperature distribution with and without the homogenizing optic was measured during the process and compared to the results of a finite element model simulating the brazing process with the different laser intensity profiles. Polished microsections were prepared for characterization of the different joints by scanning electron micrographs and EDXanalysis. In order to evaluate the effects of the different laser intensity profiles on the compound, the shear strengths of the braze-joints were determined. Additionally residual stresses which were caused by the gradient of thermal expansion between ceramic and metal were determined by finite element modeling. The microsections did not exhibit differences between the joints, which were brazed with different laser profiles. However the shear tests proved, that an explicit increase of compound strength up to 34 MPa of the ceramic/metal joints can be achieved with the top head profile, whereas the joints brazed with the Gaussian profile achieved only shear strength values of 24 MPa. Finally tribological pin-on-disc tests proved the capability of the laser brazed joints with regard to the application conditions.

  16. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  17. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  18. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  19. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  20. Direct foaming porous alumina ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvini, V.R.; Sandurkov, B.A.; Klein-Gunnewiek, R.F.; Pandolfelli, V.C. [Federal Univ. of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Dept., FIRE Associate Lab., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the work carried out in order to improve the properties of these porous alumina ceramics, concerning their application as thermal insulating. Changes in solid content of ceramic suspension, variations of pore forming agents and other additives were carried out and their effects on the green and the sintered mechanical strength are also shown. According to the literature, several starch types seem to be attractive pore forming agents as well as binders for porous ceramics. Most of them consist of a mixture of two polysaccharide types, amylose (linear) and amylopectin (highly branched). Corn, potato and rice starches were used in the present study because of their difference in size and shape. In order to increase the mechanical strength of the sintered porous ceramics a part of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composition was replaced by Al(OH){sub 3}. Due to the changes of the composition and additives, porosities up to 81% and a mechanical strength of 15 MPa were obtained. (orig.)

  1. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  2. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  3. Art Education: Creative Ceramic Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Nora; Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery is presented. Upon completion of the course, the student will be expected to be familiar with all terms and characteristics connected with pottery and ceramics, and he will be expected to be able to properly handle and form clay. Course content includes the history of clay handling,…

  4. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  5. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  6. Ceramic tape fabrication: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-04-01

    The production flow for green tapes can be roughly divided into the production of slip and the tape casting/tape calendering process. A slip usually consists of ceramic powder, solvents, binders, plasticizers and dispersants. The preparation of the slip is a critical step in the fabrication of ceramic tapes. To obtain a homogeneous slip, the organic additives must first be weighed and dissolved in the solvent. The ceramic powder is then dispersed and existing agglomerates destroyed. A dispersant is added to prevent the reformation of agglomerates. If necessary, the viscosity is then adjusted, and the slip filtered. The exact sequence depends on the type of slip and the equipment used. To destroy the agglomerates, a wide range of mills is employed, from ball mills through attritor mills to ultrasonic devices (mainly on laboratory scale). A wide variety of grinding media, with different sizes, geometries and materials, is also used. The selection depends largely on the characteristics of the slip (e.g.: viscosity, wettability, drying behaviour), the required properties of the ceramic tapes (permitted content of impurities, sintering behaviour) and the quantities to be processed. In most cases, an actual grinding effect, i.e. size reduction of the particles, is avoided. Some of the most commonly used devices are described. At present, tapes with a thickness of 5 {mu}m can be fabricated - in the next years, thicknesses of around 1{mu}m must be reached. To enable this, slip preparation must be further improved and production performed in an absolutely clean environment (for specific products clean rooms are already standard, but even higher clean room standards will be needed in the future). Moreover, new, finer ceramic powders are necessary with particle sizes on the nanometer scale (nanopowders). (orig.)

  7. Preparation and Microstructure of Glass-ceramics and Ceramic Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; XIE Junlin; HAN Da

    2008-01-01

    The technology and microstructure of glass-ceramics and ceramic composite materials were studied.A suitable ceramic body was chosen on the basis of the sintering temperature of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics.According to the expansion coefficient of the ceramic body,that of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics was adjusted.a-wollastonite was found present as the major crystalline phase in glass-ceramic.The CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body could be sintered together by adjusting the sintering period.The compositions of glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body diffuse mutually at 1100℃.resulting in an interface between them.To achieve good sintered properties of glass-ceramics and the chosen ceramic body,at least a four-hour sintering time is used.

  8. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (Pceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients

  10. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  11. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  12. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  13. Build up the Ceramics Platform, Enhance the Brand Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ To promote the export trade of China ceramics industry, to develop the overseas marking channel for domestic architecture sanitary ceramics industry ,China Ceramics City ,jointly with China's Foreign Trade magazine,start to publicize on the overseas market.

  14. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  15. Superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1994-05-01

    Recent advances in the basic understanding of superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics are reviewed. Deformation mechanisms as well as microstructural requirements for superplastic ceramics are discussed. Microstructural effects, such as grain size, dynamic grain growth, and the presence of grain-boundary liquid phases, on the superplastic properties and deformation behavior of ceramics are addressed. Superplastic forming, and particularly biaxial gas-pressure forming, of several ceramics, including YTZP and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/YTZP, is also presented. The forming behavior of these ceramics is correlated with that obtained from conventional uniaxial tests. Examples of concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) of metal-ceramic hybrids are given.

  16. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  17. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  18. Evaluation of bond strength of various margin ceramics to a zirconia ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comlekoglu, M. Erhan; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, M. Ali; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the bond strengths of four different margin ceramics based on fluoroapatite and feldspath to a zirconia ceramic. Methods: Zirconia cores (Zirconzahn) (N = 28, n = 7/margin ceramic group) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (diameter: 4 mm; thi

  19. Properties of Ceramic Fiber and Ceramic Shot in Wet-laid Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Long-di

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the different sinking properties of ceramic fiber and the ceramic shot in wetlaid nonwoven processes. The difference between the sinking properties of the fiber and the shot is very great according to theory analysis and the test. From results of calculating and practical testing, the method of removing ceramic shots during manufacturing is put forward.

  20. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  1. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  2. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  3. Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    ISSN 2095-7645CN 10-1189/TQ Aims and Scope The Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society is a premier archival journal devoted to publishing top quality original research that advances the fundamental and applied science of ceramic materials.Today’S ceramic science is an interdisciplinary field that has expanded beyond its traditional core to areas as diverse as electronics and energy materials,and bio-and

  4. Study on Ceramic Cutting by Plasma Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are typical difficult-to-machine materials because of high hardness and brittleness. PAC (Plasma Arc Cutting) is a very important thermal cutting process and has been successfully used in cutting stainless steel and other difficult-to-machine alloys. PAC's application in cutting ceramics, however, is still limited because the most ceramics are not good electronic conducts, and transferred plasma arc cannot be produced between cathode and work-piece. So we presented a method of plasma ...

  5. Reticulated porous silicon nitride-based ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzocchi, Mauro; Medri, Valentina; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The interest towards the production of porous silicon nitride originates from the unique combination of light weight, of mechanical and physical properties typical of this class of ceramics that make them attractive for many engineering applications. Although pores are generally believed to deteriorate the mechanical properties of ceramics (the strength of porous ceramics decreases exponentially with an increase of porosity), the recent literature reports that porous silicon nitride can exhib...

  6. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  7. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  8. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  9. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, W. R. (William R.)

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  10. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  11. Ceramics for High Power Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    positions between the ceramics and undoped crystal grown by the Czochralski method (Fig. 3) confirm the intrinsic nature of these traps (not due to...boundary diffusion using optical methods to determine what dopant profile shapes can be fabricated II. Technical Report 1. Proposed research program...microscopy confirms the values obtained through our fitting method (Fig. 6). While agglomerated Al2O3 precipitates are easily identified in Al2O3

  12. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; de CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative t...

  13. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  14. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  15. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  16. REVIEW OF STATUS OF CERAMIC TOOLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CERAMIC MATERIALS, CUTTING TOOLS , ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, FAILURE(MECHANICS), FRICTION, TEMPERATURE, SURFACE PROPERTIES, CUTTING FLUIDS, MACHINING, LATHE TOOLS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING).

  17. Performances of multi-channel ceramic photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comby, G.; Karolak, M.; Piret, Y.; Mouly, J.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Kuzmin, E. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    Ceramic electron multipliers with real metal dynodes and independent channels ware constructed using multilayer ceramic technology. Tests of these prototypes show their capability to form sensitive detectors such as photomultipliers or light intensifiers. Here, we present results for the photocathode sensitivity, dynode activation, gain, linearity range and dynamic characteristics as well as the effect of 3-year aging of the main operational functions. The advantages provided by the ceramic components are discussed. These results motivate the development of a compact 256 pixel ceramic photomultiplier. (author).

  18. The future of bioactive ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hench, Larry L

    2015-02-01

    Two important worldwide needs must be satisfied in the future; (1) treatment of the deteriorating health of an aging population and, (2) decreasing healthcare costs to meet the needs of an increased population. The ethical and economic dilemma is how to achieve equality in quality of care while at the same time decreasing cost of care for an ever-expanding number of people. The limited lifetime of prosthetic devices made from first-generation nearly inert biomaterials requires new approaches to meet these two large needs. This paper advises an expanded emphasis on: (1) regeneration of tissues and (2) prevention of tissue deterioration to meet this growing need. Innovative use of bioactive ceramics with genetic control of in situ tissue responses offers the potential to achieve both tissue regeneration and prevention. Clinical success of use of bioactive glass for bone regeneration is evidence that this concept works. Likewise the use of micron sized bioactive glass powders in a dentifrice for re-mineralization of teeth provides evidence that prevention of tissue deterioration is also possible. This opinion paper outlines clinical needs that could be met by innovative use of bioactive glasses and ceramics in the near future; including: regeneration of skeletal tissues that is patient specific and genetic based, load-bearing bioactive glass-ceramics for skeletal and ligament and tendon repair, repair and regeneration of soft tissues, and rapid low-cost analysis of human cell-biomaterial interactions leading to patient specific diagnoses and treatments using molecularly tailored bioceramics.

  19. A comparison of the abrasiveness of six ceramic surfaces and gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, R; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G

    1991-09-01

    A type III gold alloy and six different ceramic surfaces were secured in an abrasion machine opposing extracted teeth to determine their relative abrasiveness and resistance to wear. The rankings of restorative materials from least abrasive to most abrasive were: gold alloy, polished; cast ceramic, polished; porcelain, polished; cast ceramic, polished and shaded; porcelain, polished and glazed; cast ceramic, cerammed skin shaded; and cast ceramic, cerammed skin unshaded. The ranking of materials from most wear-resistant to least wear-resistant was: gold alloy, cast ceramic cerammed, cast ceramic cerammed and shaded, porcelain polished, porcelain glazed, cast ceramic polished and shaded, and cast ceramic polished.

  20. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y P

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion ...

  1. Effect of combining the metals of group VI supported on H-ZSM-5 zeolite as catalysts for non-oxidative conversion of natural gas to petrochemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Aboul-Gheit; A.E.Awadallah

    2009-01-01

    The most prestigious catalyst applied in natural gas (methane) non-oxidative conversion to petrochemicals is 6%Mo/H-ZSM-5.Chromium,molybdenum and tungsten are the group VI metals.Hence,in this work,6%Mo/H-ZSM-5 was correlated with 3%Cr+3%Mo/H-ZSM-5 and 3%W+3%Mo/H-ZSM-5 as catalysts to examine their promoting or inhibiting effects on the various reactions taking place during methane conversion.The catalytic activities of these catalysts were tested in a continuous flow fixed bed reactor at 700℃ and a GHSV of 1500 ml·g-1 ·h-1. Characterization of the catalysts using XRD,TGA and TPD were investigated.XRD and NH3-TPD showed greater interaction between the W-phase and the Bronsted acid sites in the channels of the zeolite than between Cr-phase and the acid sites in the zeolite.

  2. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  3. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  4. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700 °C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor,

  5. Progress in Joining Ceramics to Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The research and development of joining methods of ceramics to metals, especially brazing, diffusion bonding and partial transition liquid phase bonding, were introduced. Some opinions were put forward. For new composites emerging, it is necessary to develop new joining methods, particularly in the field of high temperature technique for joining ceramics to superalloys.

  6. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti (

  7. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  8. Marginal adaptation of ceramic inserts after cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Pfeiffer, P; Nergiz, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The advantage of using ceramic inserts is to prevent major drawbacks of composite resins such as polymerization shrinkage, wear and microleakage. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of two approximal ceramic insert systems after cementation to the cavities opened with ultrasonic ti

  9. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  10. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compre

  11. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  12. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  13. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    Functional ceramics find use in many different applications of great interest, e.g. thermal barrier coatings, piezoactuators, capacitors, solid oxide fuel cells and electrolysis cells, membranes, and filters. It is often the case that the performance of a ceramic component can be increased markedly...... if it is possible to vary the relevant properties (e.g. electrical, electrochemical, or magnetic) in a controlled manner along the extent of the component. Such composites in which ceramic layers of different composition and/or microstructure are combined provide a new and intriguing dimension to the field...... of functional ceramics research. Advances in ceramic forming have enabled low cost shaping techniques such as tape casting and extrusion to be used in some of the most challenging technologies. These advances allow the design of complex components adapted to desired specific properties and applications. However...

  14. Low Voltage Power Supply Incorporating Ceramic Transformer

    CERN Document Server

    Imori, M

    2007-01-01

    A low voltage power supply provides the regulated output voltage of 1 V from the supply voltage around 48 V. The low voltage power supply incorporates a ceramic transformer which utilizes piezoelectric effect to convert voltage. The ceramic transformer isolates the secondary from the primary, thus providing the ground isolation between the supply and the output voltages. The ceramic transformer takes the place of the conventional magnetic transformer. The ceramic transformer is constructed from a ceramic bar and does not include any magnetic material. So the low voltage power supply can operate under a magnetic field. The output voltage is stabilized by feedback. A feedback loop consists of an error amplifier, a voltage controlled oscillator and a driver circuit. The amplitude ratio of the transformer has dependence on the frequency, which is utilized to stabilize the output voltage. The low voltage power supply is investigated on the analogy of the high voltage power supply similarly incorporating the cerami...

  15. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Knitter; W Bauer

    2003-02-01

    Fabrication of micropatterned ceramics or ceramic microparts make high demands on the precision and resolution of the moulding process. As finishing of miniaturised or micropatterned ceramic components is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacturing by low-pressure injection moulding. Besides proper feedstock preparation and sufficient small grain size, the quality of the final components is mainly influenced by the quality of the master model. Hence, the rapid prototyping method must be carefully selected to meet the requirements of the component to be fabricated.

  16. Novel glass-ceramics for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollington, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    There are many different ceramic systems available on the market for dental restorations. Glass-ceramics are a popular choice due to their excellent esthetics and ability to bond to tooth structure allowing a more conservative approach. However, at present, these materials have insufficient strength to be used reliably in posterior regions of the mouth. The aim of this review article is to discuss the types of novel glass-ceramic currently be investigated including composition, microstructure and properties. Current research in glass-ceramics focuses on the quest for a highly esthetic material along with sufficient strength to enable crowns and bridgework to be reliably placed in these areas. There is a gap in the market for a machinable resin bonded glass-ceramic with sufficient strength as well as excellent esthetics.

  17. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  18. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  19. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F; Nield, Kathryn M; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600?nm and emitted above 700?nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  20. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  1. High Technology Ceramics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-14

    of evolutionary charoge T’LE i a Markt She of tlh-T o Japan. 1m (in 4min t4 dolkla)" Japaman Percer""g Sector Appkhi DoamiC Sale" of Total Etcvo... segments populated by buyers willing to acquire products embodying the new technology, even though the cost ma, he somewhat grcmterthan that of...looking for new ways to segment the market in order ,o rekindle consumer interest. New technology like ceramics may well be onewa, to do this. for there is

  2. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  3. Building ceramic based on sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöke, A.-M.; Muntean, M.; Dumitrescu, O.; Bartalis, I.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century.

  4. Educational Construction for Training Ceramic Experts Needs to be optimized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Higher education is a very critical link in cultivating ceramic experts.What is the current situation with the ceramic discipline in the institutions of higher education? Is the arrangement of the ceramic discipline in line with the demand for talent? What are the difficulties facing ceramic talent cultivation? Let's take a closer look at these issues.

  5. [Key points in anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoping; Qian, Dongdong; Yuan, Yu; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduced the key points in fabricating anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic materials, including pre-operative smile design, standard tooth preparation, provisional restoration fabrication, all ceramic materials selection, all ceramic restoration bonding, ceramic crack and fracture prevention. And then, the authors summarized and reviewed the clinical common problems in anterior esthetic restorations.

  6. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia–ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal–ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Methods Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia–ceramic and 6 metal–ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3 ± 2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Results Among the 12 zirconia–ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal–ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Significance Zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia–ceramic FDPs relative to their metal–ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia–ceramic FDPs. PMID:26233469

  7. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  8. Ceramic-on-ceramic versus ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongcai; Yang, Xiao; Tan, Yang; Alaidaros, Mohammed; Chen, Liaobin

    2015-04-01

    The choice between ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (COP) in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and durability of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in THA. Based on published randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) identified in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the authors performed a meta-analysis comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes of COC with those of COP. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The methodological quality of each RCT was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals from each trial were pooled using random-effects or fixed-effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nine RCTs involving 1575 patients (1747 hips) met the predetermined inclusion criteria. Eight of 9 included RCTs had high methodological quality. The heterogeneity was not significant, and all the results were pooled using a fixed-effects model. The results demonstrated that COC significantly increased the risks of squeaking and total implant fracture compared with COP. No significant differences with respect to revision, osteolysis and radiolucent lines, loosening, dislocation, and deep infection were observed between the COC and COP bearing surfaces. This meta-analysis resulted in no sufficient evidence to identify any clinical or radiographic advantage of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in the short- to mid-term follow-up period. Long-term follow-up is required for further evaluation.

  9. Randomized, controlled clinical trial of bilayer ceramic and metal-ceramic crown performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher's exact test. There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns, possibly caused by dissolution and

  10. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  11. Ceramic restoration repair: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced.

  12. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyakova, S., E-mail: sbuyakova@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, S. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation); Sablina, T. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  13. Review of micromachining of ceramics by etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.TING; K.A.ABOU-EL-HOSSEIN; H.B.CHUA

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been an enormous surge in interest in ceramic materials and, as a result, there have been significant advances in their development and applications. Their inherent properties, such as capability of operating at temperatures far above metals, high level of hardness and toughness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity rendered ceramics to be one of the leading engineering materials. Many research works have been conducted in the past few years on machining of advanced ceramics using different processing methods in order to obtain a better surface roughness, higher material removal rate and improved tool life. Micromachining using chemical etching is one of those methods that do not involve the problem of tool life and direct tool-work piece contact. However, only a few research works have been done on micromachining of ceramics using chemical etching. Hence, study of chemical machining of advanced ceramics is still needed as the process has found wide application in the industry because of its relative low operating costs. In this work, we summarize the recent progresses in machining of different types of advanced ceramics, material processing methods such as wet etching and dry etching, and finally the prospects for control of material removal rate and surface quality in the process of ceramic micromachining.

  14. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  15. Tribology of ceramics: Report of the Committee on Tribology of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of ceramic surface structures, composition, and reactivity is reviewed. The tribological requirements of advanced mechanical systems now being deployed (in particular, heat engines) exceed the capabilities of traditional metallic-based materials because of the high temperatures encountered. Advanced ceramic materials for such applications are receiving intense scrutiny, but there is a lack of understanding of the properties and behavior of ceramic surfaces and the influence of processing on the properties of ceramics is described. The adequacy of models, ranging form atomic to macro, to describe and to predict ceramic friction and wear are discussed, as well as what is known about lubrication at elevated temperatures. From this analysis, recommendations are made for coordination, research, and development that will lead to better performance of ceramic materials in tribological systems.

  16. [Preparation of porous ceramics based on waste ceramics and its Ni2+ adsorption characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Ce; Shang, Ling-Ling; Ma, Rui; Dong, Wan-Li

    2013-07-01

    The preparation conditions of porous ceramics were determined by SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterizations as well as the nickel removal ability of porous ceramics to be: the mass fraction w of sesbania powder doped was 4%, and the calcination temperature was 800 degrees C. SEM and pore structure characterization illustrated that calcination caused changes in the structure and morphology of waste ceramics. With the increase of calcination temperature, the specific surface area and pore volume decreased, while the aperture increased. EDS analyses showed that the main elements of both the original waste porcelain powder and the porous ceramics were Si, Al and O. The SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterization of porous ceramics illustrated that the structure of porous ceramics was stable before and after adsorption. The series of experiments of Ni2+ adsorption using these porous ceramics showed that when the dosage of porous ceramics was 10 g x L(-1), the adsorption time was 60 min, the pH value was 6.32, and the concentration of nickel-containing wastewater was below 100 mg x L(-1), the Ni2+ removal of wastewater reached 89.7%. Besides, the porous ceramics showed higher removal efficiency on nickel in the wastewater. The Ni(2+)-containing wastewater was processed by the porous ceramics prepared, and the adsorption dynamics and adsorption isotherms of Ni2+ in wastewater by porous ceramics were investigated. The research results showed that the Ni2+ adsorption process of porous ceramics was in accordance with the quasi second-order kinetic model (R2 = 0.999 9), with Q(e) of 9.09 mg x g(-1). The adsorption process can be described by the Freundlich equation and Langmuir equation, and when the temperature increased from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C, the maximum adsorption capacity Q(m) increased from 14.49 mg x g(-1) to 15.38 mg x g(-1).

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  18. Properties of oxide-hydroxide sintered ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkov, R. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  19. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  20. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  1. Simple Creep Test For Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    Simple bend-stress-relaxation test yields information on creep-related properties of polycrystalline ceramic fibers. Determination of these properties important part of efforts to develop ceramic composite materials that retain mechanical strength and resistance to creep at high temperatures. Present test measures effects of time, temperature, and applied strain on creep-related relaxation of bend stress in ceramic fiber of almost any diameter in almost any environment, without need for contact sensors. Degree of relaxation of bend stress determined from radii of curvature.

  2. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudnos, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C.

  3. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  4. Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvey, Gregg

    2010-05-01

    For more than 30 years, Compendium has provided its readers with university-based continuing education and editorial, demonstrating the latest advances in clinical procedures and techniques. Using the same peer-reviewed format and influence/direction from Compendium's distinguished editorial board, Special Report provides insight on the latest advances in product technologies and the resulting benefits to both you and your patients. A discussion by the author on new clinical/laboratory research and product development strategies, as well as what the results could mean for dental treatment, also is included. Focusing on one product category per issue provides a detailed review of the category and a comprehensive resource to help guide your treatment planning process.

  5. Standardisation of ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardisation on ceramic matrix composite (CMCs test methods occurred in the 1980's as these materials began to display interesting properties for aeronautical applications. Since the French Office of standardisation B43C has participated in establishing more than 40 standards and guides dealing with their thermal mechanical properties, their reinforcement and their fibre/matrix interface. As their maturity has been demonstrated through several technological development programmes (plugs, flaps, blades …, the air framers and engine manufacturers are now thinking of develop industrial parts which require a certification from airworthiness authorities. Now the standardisation of CMCs has to turn toward documents completing the certification requirement for civil and military applications. The news standards will allow being more confident with CMCs in taking into account their specificity.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of structural ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno, S.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of ceramic materials in structural applications is limited by the lack of reliability associated with brittle fracture behaviour. In order to extend the structural use of ceramics, the design of microstructures which exhibit flaw tolerance due to toughening mechanisms which produce an increase in crack growth resistance during crack propagation has been proposed. This work is a review of the mechanical behaviour of structural ceramic materials and its characterisation. Firstly, the basic brittle fracture parameters and the statistical criteria to determine the probability of exceeding the safety factors demanded for a particular application are analysed. Then, the toughening mechanisms which can be developed in the materials through microstructural design as well as the mechanical characterisation of toughened ceramics are discussed. The experimental values of linear elastic fracture toughness parameters (critical stress intensity factor, KIC, and critical energy release rate, GIC are not intrinsic properties for toughened materials and depend on crack length and the loading system. In this work, the different mechanical parameters proposed to characterise such materials are reviewed. The following fracture parameters are analysed: work of fracture (γWOF, critical J-integral value (JIC and R-curve. For the determination, stable fracture tests are proposed in order to ensure that the energy provided during the test is no more than the necessary one for crack propagation.

    El uso de los materiales cerámicos en aplicaciones estructurales está limitado por la falta de fiabilidad asociada a su comportamiento frágil durante la fractura. Para extender su aplicación se ha propuesto el diseño de microestructuras que presenten tolerancia a los defectos debido a la actuación de mecanismos de refuerzo. Este trabajo es una puesta al día sobre el estudio del comportamiento mecánico de los materiales cerámicos estructurales y su

  7. Nanocrystalline magnetic alloys and ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Pal; D Chakravorty

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic properties of materials in their nanocrystalline state have assumed significance in recent years because of their potential applications. A number of techniques have been used to prepare nanocrystalline magnetic phases. Melt spinning, high energy ball milling, sputtering, glassceramization and molecular beam epitaxy are some of the physical methods used so far. Among the chemical methods, sol-gel and co-precipitation routes have been found to be convenient. Ultrafine particles of both ferro- and ferrimagnetic systems show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Coercivity $(H_c)$ and maximum energy product $(BH)_{\\text{max}}$ of the magnetic particles can be changed by controlling their sizes. The present paper reviews all these aspects in the case of nanocrystalline magnetic systems — both metallic and ceramics.

  8. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  9. Actively Cooled Ceramic Composite Nozzle Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I Project demonstrated the capability of the Pyrowave? manufacturing process to produce fiber-reinforced ceramics (FRCs) with integral metal features, such...

  10. Heritage and development of China ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解振宇

    2012-01-01

    China is a country with a glorious history of pottery, it is completely different from Europe and America compared with their ceramic history. The inheritance and the development, combining the national culture are the criteria that we should keep to.

  11. Ceramic materials purified by experimental method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Crystalline ceramic materials are purified for use as high-temperature electrical insulators. Any impurities migrate to the cathode when a dc voltage is applied across the material while it is heated in an inert gas atmosphere.

  12. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Thermoluminescence properties of AlN ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Christensen, P.; Agersnap Larsen, N.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes thermoluminescence (TL) properties of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics irradiated with ionising radiation. A high TL sensitivity of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics to radiation encouraged a study of the AlN ceramics for application as a dosimetric material. The paper presents experimental data on: glow...... curve, emission spectrum, dose response, energy dependence, influence of heating rate and fading rate. The measured TL characteristics were compared with those of well-known, widely used TLDs, i.e. LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al2O3:C. It is concluded that AlN:Y2O3 ceramics showing a radiation sensitivity...

  14. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  15. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  16. Preparation and properties of dental zirconia ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Y2O3-stabilized tetragonal zireonia polyerystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics with high-performance were prepared for dental application by use of the micro-emulsion and two-step sintering method.The crystal phase,morphology,and microstructure of the reaction products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).XRD results show that the ceramics mainly consist of tetragonal zirconia.Physical and mechanical properties test results show that the bending strength,fracture toughness,and the density of full sintered Y-TZP ceramics are llS0 MPa,5.53 crown machined with this material by CAD/CAM system exhibits a verisimilitude configuration and the material's expansion coefficient well matches that of the glaze.These results further indicate that the product can be used as a promising new ceramic material

  17. Bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramic composites, including the in vitro behavior in simulated body fluid and the histological appearance of the interface between the mica/apatite glass ceramics and the rabbit mandible defect in vivo under a dynamic condition. The results show that biological apatite layer forms on the surface of the mica/apatite glass ceramics after 1 d of immersion in the simulated body fluid, and becomes dense after 14 d. In vivo tests indicate that bone formation occurs after implantation for 14 d, and strong bonding of bone to the implant occurs after 42 d. No aseptic loosening occurs during 42 d of implantation. The finding shows that mica/apatite glass ceramics have good bioactivity and osteoconductivity for constructing bone graft, and can be promising for biomedical application.

  18. CNT-reinforced ceramics and metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Curtin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on the incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs into ceramic and metal matrices to form composite structures is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on processing methods, mechanical performance, and prospects for successful applications.

  19. Testing Consent Order on Refractory Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces that EPA has signed signed an enforceable testing consent order under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), 15 U.S.C. section 2601 at seq., with three of the primary producers of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF).

  20. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  1. Lightweight ceramic filter components: Evaluation and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggerstedt, P.M.

    1995-11-01

    Ceramic candle filtration is an attractive technology for particulate removal at high temperatures. The primary objective of this SBIR research program is to increase the performance, durability, and corrosion resistance of lightweight filter candles and filter tubesheet components (Fibrosic{trademark}), fabricated from vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCCF), for use in advanced coal utilization applications. Phase 1 results proved that significant gains in material strength and particle retentivity are possible by treatment of VFCCF materials with colloidal ceramic oxides. Phase 2 effort will show how these treated materials tolerate high temperature and vapor-phase alkali species, on a long-term basis. With good durability and corrosion resistance, high temperature capability, and a low installed and replacement cost, these novel materials will help promote commercial acceptance of ceramic candle filter technology, as well as increase the efficiency and reliability of coal utilization processes in general.

  2. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  3. The Golden Horde Ceramics of Pulzhai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipov Sadulla T.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the ceramics assemblage of the Golden Horde period from the 2004-2005 and 2012 excavations on the Pulzhai (Puljai medieval settlement (Republic of Karakalpakstan. The settlement was located in the northern peripheral area of the Khwarezm State on the Ustyurt plateau. The initial stage of its existence refers to the pre-Mongolian time (the 9th through to the 11th centuries, and the second to the Golden Horde period. Various types of the Golden Horde period ceramics and their analogies are described. Unglazed ceramics comprises early three-quarters of the pottery assemblage. Glazed pottery is also encountered, as well as imported samples of red-clay glazed pottery, luster and celadon. The author makes a conclusion about the development of Pulzhai ceramics, and material culture as a whole, under the influence of Khwarezm in the 13–14th centuries.

  4. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  5. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorbunov, G. I; Rasulov, O. R

    2014-01-01

    In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through...

  6. Synthesis and ceramization of polycarbosilane containing beryllium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小忠; 周珊; 程勇; 杜作娟; 段曦东; 王超英

    2014-01-01

    Polycarbosilane containing beryllium (BPCS) precursors was prepared by the reaction of polycarbosilane (PCS) with beryllium acetylacetone (Be (acac)2). The analysis of structures and components of BPCS demonstrates that their main structures are basically the same as PCS. Ceramization of BPCS precursors shows that BPCS precursors are organic below 600 °C and inorganic at 800 °C. At 1400 °C, BPCS precursors convert into silicon carbide ceramics. The ceramization of different beryllium content precursors were studied, which show that beryllium plays an important role in the inhibition of crystalline grain growth ofβ-SiC at high temperature and it can adjust the dielectric constant of silicon carbide ceramics.

  7. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  8. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  9. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  10. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  11. Compact Ceramic Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, Charles [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The objective of the proposed work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a step change in power plant efficiency at a commercially viable cost, by obtaining performance data for prototype, compact, ceramic microchannel heat exchangers. By performing the tasks described in the initial proposal, all of the milestones were met. The work performed will advance the technology from Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3) to Technology Readiness Level 4 (TRL 4) and validate the potential of using these heat exchangers for enabling high efficiency solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or high-temperature turbine-based power plants. The attached report will describe how this objective was met. In collaboration with The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), specifications were developed for a high temperature heat exchanger for three commercial microturbines. Microturbines were selected because they are a more mature commercial technology than SOFC, they are a low-volume and high-value target for market entry of high-temperature heat exchangers, and they are essentially scaled-down versions of turbines used in utility-scale power plants. Using these specifications, microchannel dimensions were selected to meet the performance requirements. Ceramic plates were fabricated with microchannels of these dimensions. The plates were tested at room temperature and elevated temperature. Plates were joined together to make modular, heat exchanger stacks that were tested at a variety of temperatures and flow rates. Although gas flow rates equivalent to those in microturbines could not be achieved in the laboratory environment, the results showed expected efficiencies, robust operation under significant temperature gradients at high temperature, and the ability to cycle the stacks. Details of the methods and results are presented in this final report.

  12. Thermal expansion of ceramics around room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    橋本, 忍; 安達, 信泰; 太田, 敏孝; 宮崎, 英敏; ハシモト, シノブ; アダチ, ノブヤス; オオタ, トシタカ; Hashimoto, Shinobu; Adachi, Nobuyasu; Ota, Toshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Thermal expansion of some ceramics, polymers and metals was measured by dilatometer around room temperature (from -140℃to +200℃), and compared with thermal expansion in the high temperature region. The CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion)of almost ceramics changed drastically between room temperature and high temperature region. On the other hand, the CTE ofmetals did not change between room temperature and high temperature region. The difference on thermal expansion betweenceramics and met...

  13. Ceramics for Dental Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Holloway

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past forty years, the technological evolution of ceramics for dental applications has been remarkable, as new materials and processing techniques are steadily being introduced. The improvement in both strength and toughness has made it possible to expand the range of indications to long-span fixed partial prostheses, implant abutments and implants. The present review provides a state of the art of ceramics for dental applications.

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  15. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  16. Low temperature synthesis of porous silicate ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez Enríquez Y.; Vlasova M.; Leon I.; Kakazey M.G.; Dominguez-Patiño M.; Isaeva L.; Tomila T.

    2007-01-01

    Impregnation of a polyurethane sponge with kaolin, feldspar, silica, fusible glass slurry followed by temperature treatment in air in the temperature range 800-1000 0 C leads to the formation of aluminosilicate ceramics with a set pore size. The low-temperature synthesis of porous ceramics is based on the stage-by-stage formation of low-temperature eutectics and thermodestruction of polyurethane sponge.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of porous silicate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méndez Enríquez Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of a polyurethane sponge with kaolin, feldspar, silica, fusible glass slurry followed by temperature treatment in air in the temperature range 800-1000 0 C leads to the formation of aluminosilicate ceramics with a set pore size. The low-temperature synthesis of porous ceramics is based on the stage-by-stage formation of low-temperature eutectics and thermodestruction of polyurethane sponge.

  18. Flash Sintering of Alumina-based Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Biesuz, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Flash sintering is an electrical field-assisted consolidation technology and represents a very novel technique for producing ceramic materials, which allows to decrease sensibly both processing temperature and time. Starting from 2010, when flash sintering was discovered, different ceramic materials with a wide range of electrical properties have been successfully densified. Up to date, the research on flash sintering has been mainly focused on ionic and electronic conductors and on semicondu...

  19. A new ceramics approach for contact lens

    OpenAIRE

    Carpena DDS, MS, PhD, Guilherme; Ballarin DDS, Andressa; Aguiar, José

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the field of dentistry is focusing into a new aesthetic area in the light of an minimal invasive dentistry approach. Aesthetic treatments with dental porcelain veneers without any preparation (ceramic contact lenses) have gained popularity in recent years. Thus, the need for constant improvement and knowledge of innovative techniques and ceramics is fundamental.   This article point out about the essential criteria to promote a clinical succeed of the technique over the years.   A...

  20. Literature search for ceramic vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, W.

    1977-01-12

    The NTIS and Engineering Index files were searched for citations relating to Ceramic and/or Metal Electron Tubes and High Temperature Electronics. A total of 24 citations were found relating directly to ceramic tubes and 24 to high temperature electronics. A search for electron tubes in general was examined for high temperature applications and 39 were obtained. Computer printouts of the abstracts are included in appendices. (MHR)

  1. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  2. The coupling of glycolysis and the Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to achieve low carbon dioxide emission fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Han; Ou-Yang, Fan-Yu; Yang, Cheng-Han; Li, Si-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Rubisco-based engineered Escherichia coli, containing two heterologous enzymes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PrkA), has been shown to be capable of the in situ recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) during glycolysis. Two alternative approaches have been proposed to further enhance the carbon flow from glycolysis to a Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (NOPPP). The first is achieved by elevating the expression of transketolase I (TktA) and the second by blocking the native oxidation-decarboxylation reaction of E. coli by deleting the zwf gene from the chromosome (designated as JB/pTA and MZB, respectively). Decreases in the CO2 yield and the CO2 evolution per unit mole of ethanol production by at least 81% and 40% are observed. It is demonstrated in this study that the production of one mole of ethanol using E. coli strain MZB, the upper limit of CO2 emission is 0.052mol.

  3. Highly Efficient Electronic Sensitization of Non-oxidized Graphene Flakes on Controlled Pore-loaded WO3 Nanofibers for Selective Detection of H2S Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon–Jin; Choi, Chanyong; Kim, Sang-Joon; Cho, Hee-Jin; Hakim, Meggie; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Il–Doo

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring of semiconducting metal oxide nanostructures, which possess controlled pore size and concentration, is of great value to accurately detect various volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, which act as potential biomarkers for many health conditions. In this work, we have developed a very simple and robust route for controlling both the size and distribution of spherical pores in electrospun WO3 nanofibers (NFs) via a sacrificial templating route using polystyrene colloids with different diameters (200 nm and 500 nm). A tentacle-like structure with randomly distributed pores on the surface of electrospun WO3 NFs were achieved, which exhibited improved surface area as well as porosity. Porous WO3 NFs with enhanced surface area exhibited high gas response (Rair/Rgas = 43.1 at 5 ppm) towards small and light H2S molecules. In contrast, porous WO3 NFs with maximized pore diameter showed a high response (Rair/Rgas = 2.8 at 5 ppm) towards large and heavy acetone molecules. Further enhanced sensing performance (Rair/Rgas = 65.6 at 5 ppm H2S) was achieved by functionalizing porous WO3 NFs with 0.1 wt% non-oxidized graphene (NOGR) flakes by forming a Schottky barrier (ΔΦ = 0.11) at the junction between the WO3 NFs (Φ = 4.56 eV) and NOGR flakes (Φ = 4.67 eV), which showed high potential for the diagnosis of halitosis.

  4. Hydrogen-Permeable Tubular Membrane Reactor: Promoting Conversion and Product Selectivity for Non-Oxidative Activation of Methane over an Fe©SiO2 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakbodin, Mann; Wu, Yiqing; Oh, Su Cheun; Wachsman, Eric D; Liu, Dongxia

    2016-12-23

    Non-oxidative methane conversion over Fe©SiO2 catalyst was studied for the first time in a hydrogen (H2 ) permeable tubular membrane reactor. The membrane reactor is composed of a mixed ionic-electronic SrCe0.7 Zr0.2 Eu0.1 O3-δ thin film (≈20 μm) supported on the outer surface of a one-end capped porous SrCe0.8 Zr0.2 O3-δ tube. Significant improvement in CH4 conversion was achieved upon H2 removal from the membrane reactor compared to that in a fixed-bed reactor. The Fe©SiO2 catalyst in the H2 permeable membrane reactor demonstrated a stable ≈30 % C2+ single-pass yield, with up to 30 % CH4 conversion and 99 % selectivity to C2 (ethylene and acetylene) and aromatic (benzene and naphthalene) products, at the tested conditions. The selectivity towards C2 or aromatics was manipulated purposely by adding H2 into or removing H2 from the membrane reactor feed and permeate gas streams. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Linkages between the life-history evolution of tropical and temperate birds and the resistance of cultured skin fibroblasts to oxidative and non-oxidative chemical injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Harper, James M; Queenborough, Simon A; Williams, Joseph B

    2013-04-15

    A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is to understand how variation in life history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Thus, because tropical birds have higher annual survival and lower rates of metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would have greater cellular resistance to chemical injury than cells from temperate species. We cultured dermal fibroblasts from 26 tropical and 26 temperate species of birds and examined cellular resistance to cadmium, H(2)O(2), paraquat, thapsigargin, tunicamycium, methane methylsulfonate (MMS) and UV light. Using ANCOVA, we found that the values for the dose that killed 50% of cells (LD(50)) from tropical birds were significantly higher for H(2)O(2) and MMS. When we tested for significance using a generalized least squares approach accounting for phylogenetic relationships among species to model LD(50), we found that cells from tropical birds had greater tolerance for Cd, H(2)O(2), paraquat, tunicamycin and MMS than cells from temperate birds. In contrast, tropical birds showed either lower or no difference in tolerance to thapsigargin and UV light in comparison with temperate birds. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to be more resistant to forms of oxidative and non-oxidative stress than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  6. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (Pceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (Pceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TEM Investigations on Layered Ternary Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun LIN; Meishuan LI; Yanchun ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Layered ternary ceramics represent a new class of solids that combine the merits of both metals and ceramics.These unique properties are strongly related to their layered crystal structures and microstructures. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) represents a powerful method to link microstructures of materials to macroscopic properties, allowing layered ternary ceramics to be investigated in an unprecedented detail. Vicrostructural information obtained using TEM is useful in understanding the formation mechanism, layered stacking characteristics, and defect structures for layered ternary ceramics down to atomic-scale level; and thus provides insight into understanding the "Processing-Structure-Property" relationship of layered ternary ceramics. Transmission electron microscopic characterizations of layered ternary ceramics in Ti-Si-C, Ti-Al-C, Cr-Al-C, Zr-Al-C, Ta-Al-C and Ti-Al-N systems are reviewed.

  8. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  9. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  10. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  11. Residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskonak, Burak; Mecholsky, John J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2005-06-01

    It is clinically observed that lithia-disilicate-based all-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPD) can fail because of the fragmentation of the veneering material. The hypothesis of this study is that the global residual stresses within the surface of those veneered FPDs may be responsible for partial fragmentation of the veneering ceramic. Bilayer and monolithic ceramic composites were prepared using a lithia disilicate based (Li2OSiO2) glass-ceramic core and a glass veneer. A four-step fracture mechanics approach was used to analyze residual stress in bilayered all-ceramic FPDs. We found a statistically significant increase in the mean flexural strengths of bilayer specimens compared with monolithic glass specimens (p < or = 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the mean longitudinal and transverse indentation-induced crack sizes in bilayer specimens (p < or = 0.05), which indicates the existence of residual stress. Global residual stresses in the veneer layer, calculated using a fracture mechanics equation, were determined to be responsible for the increased strength and observed chipping, i.e., spallation in bilayer ceramic composites.

  12. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  13. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  14. Ceramic-ceramic shell tile thermal protection system and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Smith, Marnell (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Zimmerman, Norman B. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A ceramic reusable, externally applied composite thermal protection system (TPS) is proposed. The system functions by utilizing a ceramic/ceramic upper shell structure which effectively separates its primary functions as a thermal insulator and as a load carrier to transmit loads to the cold structure. The composite tile system also prevents impact damage to the atmospheric entry vehicle thermal protection system. The composite tile comprises a structurally strong upper ceramic/ceramic shell manufactured from ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix meeting the thermal and structural requirements of a tile used on a re-entry aerospace vehicle. In addition, a lightweight high temperature ceramic lower temperature base tile is used. The upper shell and lower tile are attached by means effective to withstand the extreme temperatures (3000 to 3200F) and stress conditions. The composite tile may include one or more layers of variable density rigid or flexible thermal insulation. The assembly of the overall tile is facilitated by two or more locking mechanisms on opposing sides of the overall tile assembly. The assembly may occur subsequent to the installation of the lower shell tile on the spacecraft structural skin.

  15. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  16. Characterization of ceramic powders used in the inCeram systems to fixed dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Almeida Diego

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available InCeram (Vita Zahnfabrik- Germany is known as a high strength ceramic being used for core crowns and for fixed partial denture frameworks. InCeram system consists of slip-casting technique which is used for to build the framework, which is then pre-sintered obtaining an open-pore microstructure. The material gains its strength by infiltration of the lanthanum glass into the porous microstructure. In this work, commercial alumina (Al2O3, alumina-zirconia (Al2O3-ZrO2 and glasses lanthanum oxide-rich powders, used in InCeram system, were characterized, using x ray diffraction, dilatometry and scanning electron microscopy. The characteristics of these powders were related aiming to consider their substitution for new ceramic materials.

  17. Transmission of Er:YAG laser through different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Tugrul; Tuncel, Ilkin; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser transmission ratio through different dental ceramics with different thicknesses. Laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the transmission of laser energy through the ceramic and the ablation of resin cement, because of the transmitted laser energy. Five different dental ceramics were evaluated in this study: sintered zirconium-oxide core ceramic, monolithic zirconium-oxide ceramic, feldspathic ceramic, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, and lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic. Two ceramic discs with different thicknesses (0.5 and 1 mm) were fabricated for each group. Ceramic discs were placed between the sensor membrane of the laser power meter and the tip of the contact handpiece of an Er:YAG laser device with the aid of a custom- made acrylic holder. The transmission ratio of Er:YAG laser energy (500 mJ, 2 Hz, 1 W, 1000 μs) through different ceramic discs was measured with the power meter. Ten measurements were made for each group and the results were analyzed with two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. The highest transmission ratio was determined for lithium disilicate-reinforced ceramic with 0.5 mm thickness (88%) and the lowest was determined for feldspathic ceramic with 1 mm thickness (44%). The differences among the different ceramics and between the different thicknesses were significant (pCeramic type and thickness should be taken into consideration to adjust the laser irradiation parameters during laser debonding of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations.

  18. Electron beam joining of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Feasibility of ceramic joining using a high energy (10 MeV) electron beam. The experiments used refractory metals as bonding materials in buried interfaces between Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pieces. Because the heat capacity of the metal bonding layer is much lower than the ceramic, the metal reaches much higher temperatures than the adjoining ceramic. Using the right combination of beam parameters allows the metal to be melted without causing the adjoining ceramics to melt or decompose. Beam energy deposition and thermal simulations were performed to guide the experiments. Joints were shear tested and interfaces between the metal and the ceramic were examined to identify the bonding mechanism. Specimens joined by electron beams were compared to specimens produced by hot-pressing. Similar reactions occurred using both processes. Reactions between the metal and ceramic produced silicides that bond the metal to the ceramic. The molybdenum silicide reaction products appeared to be more brittle than the platinum silicides. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was also joined to Si{sub 3} N{sub 4} directly. The bonding appears to have been produced by the flow of intergranular glass into the interface. Shear strength was similar to the metal bonded specimens. Bend specimens Of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to electron beams with similar parameters to those used in joining experiments to determine how beam exposure degrades the strength. Damage was macroscopic in nature with craters being tonned by material ablation, and cracking occurring due to excessive thermal stresses. Si was also observed on the surface indicating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposing. Bend strength after exposure was 62% of the asreceived strength. No obvious microstructural differences were observed in the material close to the damaged region compared to material in regions far away from the damage.

  19. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  20. Interdisciplinary research concerning the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The nature and properties of ceramic materials as they relate to solid state physics and metallurgy are studied. Special attention was given to the applications of ceramics to NASA programs and national needs.

  1. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  2. Effect of acidic agents on surface roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonlert Kukiattrakoon

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acidic agents used in this study negatively affected the surface of ceramic materials. This should be considered when restoring the eroded tooth with ceramic restorations in patients who have a high risk of erosive conditions.

  3. Proton-conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Coffey, G.W.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Single-cell solid oxide fuel cells were constructed using strontium cerate as the electrolyte and their performance tested. Like certain zirconates, hafnates, and tantalates, the cerate perovskites are among a class of solid electrolytes that conduct protons at elevated temperatures. Depending on the temperature and chemical environment, these ceramics also support electronic and oxygen ion currents. A maximum power output of {approx}100 mW per cm{sup 2} electrolyte surface area was obtained at 900{degrees}C using 4% hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. A series of rare earth/ceria/zirconia were prepared and their electrical properties characterized. Rare earth dopants included ytterbia, yttria, terbia, and europia. Ionic conductivities were highest for rare earth/ceria and rare earth zirconia compositions; a minimum in ionic conductivity for all series were found for equimolar mixtures of ceria and zirconia. Cerium oxysulfide is of interest in fossil energy applications because of its high chemical stability and refractory nature. An alternative synthesis route to preparing cerium oxysulfide powders has been developed using combustion techniques.

  4. Moisture in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Daniel Noel

    When both precious metal electrode and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors were subjected to autoclave (120°C/100% RH) testing, it was found that the precious metal capacitors aged according to a well known aging mechanism (less than 3% from their starting values), but the BME capacitors degraded to below the -30% criterion at 500 hours of exposure. The reasons for this new failure mechanism are complex, and there were two theories that were hypothesized. The first was that there could be oxidation or corrosion of the nickel plates. The other hypothesis was that the loss of capacitance was due to molecular changes in the barium titanate. This thesis presents the evaluation of these hypotheses and the physics of the degradation mechanism. It is concluded by proof by elimination that there are molecular changes in the barium titanate. Furthermore, the continuous reduction in capacitor size makes the newer base metal electrode capacitors more vulnerable to moisture degradation than the older generation precious metal capacitors. In addition, standard humidity life testing, such as JESD-22 THB and HAST, will likely not uncover this problem. Therefore, poor reliability due to degradation of base metal electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors may catch manufacturers and consumers by surprise.

  5. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  6. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  7. Crystallization Kinetics in Fluorochloroziroconate Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carlos J.

    Annealing fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates BaCl2 nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical X-ray imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the BaCl¬2 nanocrystal nucleation, growth and phase transformation processes proceed is critical to controlling the optical behavior. However, there is a very limited amount of information about the formation, morphology, and distribution of the nanocrystalline particles in FCZ glass-ceramics. In this thesis, the correlation between the microstructure and the crystallization kinetics of FCZ glass-ceramics, are studied in detail. In situ X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments are used to analyze the crystal structure, size and distribution of BaCl 2 nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics as a function of annealing rate and temperature. Microstructural analysis of the early stages on nucleation identified the formation of both BaCl2 and BaF2 nanocrystals. Annealing FCZ glass-ceramics above 280°C can cause the formation of additional glass matrix phase crystals, their microstructure and the annealing parameters required for their growth are identified. As the crystalline phases grow directly from the glass, small variations in processing of the glass can have a profound influence on the crystallization process. The information obtained from these experiments improves the understanding of the nucleation, growth and phase transformation process of the BaCl¬2 nanocrystals and additional crystalline phases that form in FCZ glass-ceramics, and may help expedite the implementation of FCZ glass-ceramics as next-generation X-ray detectors. Lastly, as these glass-ceramics may one day be commercialized, an investigation into their degradation in different environmental conditions was also performed. The effects of direct contact with water or prolonged exposure to humid environments on the

  8. Studies and Properties of Ceramics with High Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sintering technology of the AlN ceramics power were discussed. It is discussed that the compound sintering aids is consistent with the enhancement of the the thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics, and sintering technics is helped to the improvement of density. It is analyzed how to sinter machinable AlN ceramics with high thermal conductivity. And the microstructure of compound ceramics based on AlN was studied.

  9. Gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated by freeze casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kai-hui; zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Dongliang; Zeng, Yu-Ping

    2011-04-01

    By controlling the cooling rates and the composition of slurries, the gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics are fabricated by the freeze casting method. According to the different cooling rate, the pores of HAP ceramics fabricated by gradient freeze casting are divided into three parts: one is lamellar pores, another is column pore and the last one is fine round pores. The laminated freeze casting is in favour of obtaining the gradient porous ceramics composed of different materials and the ceramics have unclear interfaces.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Yb - doped YAG Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Rare-earth doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics are among the most widely produced transparent ceramics for laser applications. Yb:YAG ceramics are an interesting IR laser material [1], which allows significantly higher doping compared to the generally more used Nd:YAG [2,3]. This work presents the preparation of polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramics with dopant concentration from 0 up to 20 at.% via solid state reactive sintering. Samples were prepared via cold isostatic pressing of spray ...

  11. Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Ceramics with Hierarchical Porous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkov, S.; Shutilova, E.; Buyakova, S.

    2016-07-01

    The work studies porous ceramics produced from ultra-fine powders. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The ceramic materials had cellular structure. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations, which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of cellular elements in a ceramic frame.

  12. Bioactive glass-ceramics coatings on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale Brovarone, C.; Verne, E.; Lupo, F. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Materials Science and Chemical Eng. Dept.; Moisescu, C. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Otto-Schott-Inst. fuer Glaschemie; Zanardi, L.; Bosetti, M.; Cannas, M. [Eastern Piemont Univ., Novara (Italy). Medical Science Dept.

    2001-07-01

    In this work, aiming to combine the mechanical performances of alumina with the surface properties of a bioactive material, we coated full density alumina substrates by a bioactive glass-ceramic GC. This latter was specially tailored, in term of costituents and specific quantity to have a thermal expansion coefficient close to that of alumina (8.5-9{sup *}10{sup -6}/ C) which is lower than most of the bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics already in use. In this way, we sought to avoid, as much as possible, the crack formation and propagation due to residual stresses generated by the thermal expansion coefficients mismatch. Furthermore, the high reactivity of alumina toward the glass-ceramic was carefully controlled to avoid deep compositional modification of the GC that will negatively affect its bioactivity. At this purpose, an intermediate layer of an appropriate glass G was coated prior to coat the bioactive glass-ceramic. On the materials obtained, preliminary biological tests have been done to evaluate glass-ceramic biocompatibility respect to alumina. (orig.)

  13. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargardi, Fabio L.; Le Ferrand, Hortense; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.

    2016-12-01

    Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material's microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment. Such microstructural design is achieved by magnetically aligning functionalized ceramic platelets in a liquid ceramic suspension, subsequently consolidated through an established enzyme-catalysed reaction. By fabricating alumina compacts exhibiting bio-inspired bilayer architectures, we achieve deliberate control over shape change during the sintering step. Bending, twisting or combinations of these two basic movements can be successfully programmed to obtain a myriad of complex shapes. The simplicity and the universality of such a bottom-up shaping method makes it attractive for applications that would benefit from low-waste ceramic fabrication, temperature-resistant interlocking structures or unusual geometries not accessible using conventional top-down manufacturing.

  14. Preparation and Structure of Rainbow Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xing

    2003-01-01

    Rainbow piezoelectric ceramics are a new type of stress-biased, oxide-reduced composite ferroelectric ceramics, which have a special dome structure. The have shown excellent properties such as ultra-high displacement under an applied electric field and enhanced load-bearing capability. In this article, their manufacture,structures and properties were discussed in detail by combining experiments and theory analysis. The resuts show that the optimal conditions for producing Rainbow samples from PLZT ceramics were determined to be 900℃ for 1 to 1.5 hours. A number of different phases have been found in the reduced layer of Rainbow ceramics by XRD analyses . The phases found include metallic lead and other oxide phases , such cs PbO , ZrO2 and TiO2 . The original PLZT phase was not observed. The reduced layer was transgranularly fractured while the unreduced ceramic was intergranularly fractured. Two kinds of fracture types can be seen at the interface , which denotes the different degrees of reduction. It is shown that the Pb grains ( about 0.2 μm ) constitute a continuous phase in the reduced layer, which accounts for the good electrical condnctivity.

  15. Performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures by using the 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6*104 and 1.5*104 at Ne+CH4 = 95:5 and Ar+i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. The good gain stability was obtained during more than 100 hour continuous test at Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using the 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of ceramic THGEM were measured.

  16. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargardi, Fabio L.; Le Ferrand, Hortense; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.

    2016-01-01

    Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material's microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment. Such microstructural design is achieved by magnetically aligning functionalized ceramic platelets in a liquid ceramic suspension, subsequently consolidated through an established enzyme-catalysed reaction. By fabricating alumina compacts exhibiting bio-inspired bilayer architectures, we achieve deliberate control over shape change during the sintering step. Bending, twisting or combinations of these two basic movements can be successfully programmed to obtain a myriad of complex shapes. The simplicity and the universality of such a bottom-up shaping method makes it attractive for applications that would benefit from low-waste ceramic fabrication, temperature-resistant interlocking structures or unusual geometries not accessible using conventional top–down manufacturing. PMID:28008930

  17. Smart Energy Materials of PZT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the material properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics, the domain-switching characteristics and electric power generation characteristics have been investigated during loading and unloading by using various experimental techniques. Furthermore, the influence of oscillation condition on the electrical power generation properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT piezoelectric ceramics has been investigated. It is found that the power generation is directly attributed to the applied load and wave mode. The voltage rises instantly to the maximum level under square-wave mode, although the voltage increases gradually under triangular-wave mode. After this initial increase, there is a rapid fall to zero, followed by generation of increasingly negative voltage as the applied load is removed for all wave modes. Variation of the electric voltage is reflected by the cyclic loading at higher loading frequencies. On the basis of the obtained experimental results for the wave modes, the electrical power generation characteristics of PZT ceramics are proposed, and the voltages generated during loading and unloading are accurately estimated. The electric generation value is decrease with increasing the cyclic number due to the material failure, e.g., domain switching and crack. The influence of domain switching on the mechanical properties PZT piezoelectric ceramics is clarified, and 90 degree domain switching occurs after the load is applied to the PZT ceramic directly. Note that, in this paper, our experimental results obtained in our previous works were introduced

  18. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  19. Influence of galvano-ceramic and metal-ceramic crowns on magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dong-ping; WU Guang-yao; WANG Yi-ning

    2010-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is prone to be deformed by artifacts caused by the presence of metallic materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the artifacts from galvano-ceramic and metal-ceramic crowns in MRI, in order to analyze their influences on diagnostic interpretation of MRI.Methods Galvano-ceramic and metal-ceramic crowns (Bio98, Wiron99, SP-78, BioKC97) were fabricated with the same model. All materials were imaged by means of 1.5T MRI apparatus with three different sequences, T1-weighted spin-echo (T1-weighted SE), T2-weighted spin-echo (T2-weighted SE) and Gradient echo (GE). Mean and standard deviation of distilled water signal intensity (SI) around the sample in the region of interest (500 mm~2) enclosing the whole artifacts were determined, and compared for evaluation of the homogeneity of signal intensity. Images around the sample were acquired and evaluated.Results There were statistically significant differences in the values of signal intensity between acrylic resin control and BioKC97, Wiron99 in the three sequences (P0.05). Images showed that the greatest artifact was a 25 mm ring with distortion in Wiron99 in GE sequence.Conclusions This in vitro study suggested that galvano-ceramic crown had no influence on the MRI, while metal-ceramic crowns caused moderate artifacts in the MRI. Therefore, galvano-ceramic restoration is a valuable alternative in dentistry.

  20. Effect of various intermediate ceramic layers on the interfacial stability of zirconia core and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Yeo, In-Sung; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of intermediate ceramics on the adhesion between the zirconia core and veneer ceramics. The polished surfaces of fully sintered Y-TZP blocks received three different treatments: (1) connector (C), (2) liner (L) or (3) wash layer (W). All the treated zirconia blocks were veneered with either (a) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (E) or (b) feldspathic porcelain (V) and divided into four groups (CE, CV, LE and WV). For the control group, the testing surfaces of metal blocks were veneered with feldspathic porcelain (VM). A half of the samples in each group (n = 21) were exposed to thermocycling, while the other half of the specimens were stored at room temperature under dry conditions. All specimens were subjected to the shear test and the failed surfaces were microscopically examined. The elemental distribution at the zirconia core/veneer interface was analyzed. The specimens in Groups CE and CV exhibited significantly greater mean bond strength values than those in Groups LE and WV, respectively (p ceramic substances into the zirconia surface. A glass-ceramic based connector is significantly more favorable to core/veneer adhesion than the other intermediate ceramics evaluated in the study. However, thermal cycling affected the bond strength at the core/veneer interface differently according to the intermediate ceramics.

  1. Soaring Voices: Recent Ceramics by Women from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    Japanese ceramics enjoy a long and distinguished history, and the Japanese aesthetic of elegant simplicity, along with their approach to materials, has influenced ceramic artists around the world for centuries. Women in Japan have been involved in the production of ceramics for thousands of years, but with few exceptions, their names have remained…

  2. Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7263 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics ...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics by Tyrone L Jones Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tyrone L

  3. Ceramics Art Education and Contemporary Challenges in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashim, Isah Bolaji; Adelabu, Oluwafemi Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Formal ceramics art education is becoming a fundamental requirement for professional practice in ceramics in Nigeria. Considering the ample resources available for ceramic practices in the country with a teeming population of over 140 million people, there is a promising future for the art, in spite of the effects of globalization and…

  4. Multi-Scale Porous Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 28-Mar-2013 - 27-Sep-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multi-Scale Porous Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ...report summarizes the main outcomes of research to develop multi-scale porosity Ultra High Temperature Ceramic materials. Processing conditions were...flights. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultra High Temperature Ceramics , Colloidal Powder Processing, Multi-scale Porous Materials, Lattice Monte

  5. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  6. Ceramic hot plate and method for its manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, M.J.; Van den Heuvel, R.C.; Kelder, E.M.; Schoonman, J.

    2000-01-01

    The subject is a hot plate comprising at least one cooking zone of ceramic material to be located above a heat source of a cooking range. The cooking zone consists of a ceramic material exhibiting a Mott transition. The material exhibiting a Mott transition may consist of a primary ceramic material,

  7. Microporous calcium phosphate ceramics driving osteogenesis through surface architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; Barbieri, D.; Hoopen, ten H.W.M.; Bruijn, de J.D.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Yuan, H.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of micropores in calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics has shown its important role in initiating inductive bone formation in ectopic sites. To investigate how microporous CaP ceramics trigger osteoinduction, we optimized two biphasic CaP ceramics (i.e., BCP-R and BCP-S) to have the same che

  8. Ceramic design concepts based on stress distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, J F; Anusavice, K J

    2000-08-01

    This article discusses general design concepts involved in fabricating ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations based on scientific stress distribution data. These include the effects of ceramic layer thickness, modulus of elasticity of supporting substrates, direction of applied loads, intraoral stress, and crown geometry on the susceptibility of certain restoration designs to fracture.

  9. Randomized clinical trial of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F; Clark, Arthur E; Shuster, Jonathan J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52-75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD, and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher's exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure (p = 0.68), and connector height (p = 0

  10. Randomized Clinical Trial of Implant-Supported Ceramic-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Clark, Arthur E.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52–75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. Material: ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Results Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher’s exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure

  11. Ceramic-in-polymer versus polymer-in-ceramic polymeric electrolytes - A novel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syzdek, Jaroslaw [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, ul. Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warszawa (Poland); Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Reactivite et de Chimie des Solides, 33 Rue Saint-Leu, F-80039 Amiens Cedex (France); Armand, Michel [Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Reactivite et de Chimie des Solides, 33 Rue Saint-Leu, F-80039 Amiens Cedex (France); Gizowska, Magdalena; Marcinek, Marek; Sasim, Elzbieta; Szafran, Mikolaj; Wieczorek, Wladyslaw [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, ul. Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warszawa (Poland)

    2009-10-20

    A new type of composites, i.e. polymer-in-ceramic (as opposed to the ''classical'' ceramic-in-polymer approach) was introduced into the field of composite polymeric electrolytes. In this work the preparation of porous ceramic samples based on alumina is designed and their properties are characterised by XRD, porosimetry and SEM. Special setup was developed for the preparation of electrolytes in vacuum/controlled atmosphere conditions and it was used for preparing the composites. The studied systems exhibited excellent mechanical properties, high conductivities and good stability vs. Li metal electrodes under prolonged storage. (author)

  12. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics): An Eco-Friendly Route to Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). This technology provides an eco-friendly route to advanced ceramic materials. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches. Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented.

  13. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  14. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  15. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, S [South Jordan, UT; Nair, Balakrishnan G [Sandy, UT; Small, Troy [Midvale, UT; Heck, Brian [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  16. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede Hansen, Flemming; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. This project is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. The project presents...... SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...... to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice....

  17. Ceramic tile glazes: design, trends and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredini, T. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to describe the state of the art of glazes for applications in ceramic tile industry. A glaze for application in ceramic tile industry must satisfy certain requirements, which may be divided into two large groups, one in relation to its preparation and industrial utilisation and the other specific of the product utilisation. In order to design glaze compositions certain aspects must be taken into account. Viscosity and surface tension of the melt matching the body requirements, linear thermal expansion, nucleation and crystal growth processes occurring during firing, durability and optical properties must be designed and adjusted in the industrial practice. Glass-ceramic systems are the more suitable compositions for innovative glazes for fast firing of wall and floor tiles. (orig.)

  18. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  19. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  20. Ceramic design methodology and the AGT-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.L.; Carruthers, W.D.; Evershed, R.J.; Kidwell, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The Garrett/Ford Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT101) technology project has made significant progress in the areas of ceramic component design, analysis, and test evaluation using an iterative approach. Design stress limits are being defined for state-of-the-art fine ceramics with good correlation between analytical predictions and empirical results. Recent tests in both rigs and engines are demonstrating the feasibility of high temperature/strength ceramic materials in the gas turbine environment. Component transient stress fields are being defined providing the data base for lower stress/longer life component design. Thermally induced transient stresses to 220 MPa (32 ksi) in reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN), 310 Mpa (45 ksi) in sintered alpha silicon carbide (SASC), and 345 MPa (50 ksi) in sintered silicon nitride (SSN) have been successfully demonstrated in AGT101 component screening and qualification test rigs.

  1. Microstructural and thermal characterization of neolithic ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Paola; Ischia, Gloria; Di Maggio, Rosa; Pedrotti, Annaluisa; Zanoni, Eleonora; Gialanella, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to characterize some Neolithic ceramic finds collected during an excavation carried out at Lugo di Grezzana (Verona, Italy). Pottery shards with different paste and tempers were analyzed to better understand the manufacturing and firing technologies used for their production. Another task of the study was to determine whether highly refined artefacts, found in the site and resembling figulina-type ceramics, were of local production or imported from other places in the north of Italy, where the production of this sort of product has already been unambiguously assessed. Several results emerged from this investigation, providing indications on the finds from this Neolithic settlement and, therefore, on the technological expertise achieved by the primitive community. Moreover, a comparative study carried out on refined ceramic products found in Lugo and genuine figulina items from other northern Italian sites suggests that no trading exchange and commercial routes existed among those primitive communities.

  2. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding ma....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....... material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. SoundShaping is based on a generic audio feature extraction system and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used. Moreover, 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules...

  3. Fabrication of lanthanum doped yttria transparent ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG YiHua; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    Yttria nanocrystalline powder doped with 9% lanthanum was synthesized by co-precipitation method using ammonia for pH adjusting. After calcinations, finer particles with narrow distribution and large surface area were obtained. After dry pressing, samples were sintered at 1500℃-1700℃ for 4 h in vacuum to produce transparent polycrystalline ceramics with uniform grains. Samples with 9 mol%lanthanum were transparent in visible light after being sintered at 1500℃ for 4 h. The grain sizes increased with lanthanum doping compared with those of pure yttria transparent ceramic sintered at the same conditions. Relative density of the transparent ceramic was 99.7%. The in-line transmittance was 73% at 580 nm wavelength after milling and polishing.

  4. Rapid prototyping of complex ceramic parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, T.; Chaput, C.; Doreau, F.; Loiseau, M. [SPCTS, ENSCI, Limoges (France); CTTC, Ester Technopole, Limoges (France)

    2002-07-01

    A cost-effective method of complex ceramic parts manufacturing using stereolithography has been developed. The process consists in fabricating ceramic pieces by laser polymerization of an UV curable monomeric system, subsequent removal of organic components and sintering. Highly concentrated suspensions of well dispersed ceramic particles (up to 60 vol%) in a reactive acrylic monomer, with a suitable rheological behaviour for the spreading of thin layers (down to 25 {mu}m) were defined. Adequate cured depth (higher than 200 {mu}m) is obtained even at high scanning speeds. Nevertheless, a compromise has to be found between the cured depth and the cured width to improve the dimensional resolution. The dimensional resolution reached on alumina partterns is about 200 {mu}m with an energy density of 0.05 J.cm{sup -2}. (orig.)

  5. LAMP Joining between Ceramic and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Nishimoto, Kouji; Katayama, Seiji

    Joining of dissimilar materials is necessary and important from a manufacturing viewpoint. Therefore, the authors have developed a new laser direct joining method between a metal and a plastic which is named Laser Assisted Metal and Plastic (LAMP) joining method. In this research, LAMP joining was applied to join silicon nitride Si3N4 ceramic and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) engineering plastic, although metal was replaced by ceramic. The tensile shear strength of obtained joints was 3100 N at the maximum, which was strong enough to elongate a PET base plate of 2 mm in thickness and 30 mm in width. Moreover, transmission electron microscopes (TEM) observation demonstrates that the ceramic and the plastic are tightly bonded on atomic or molecular sized level.

  6. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were thereafter subjected to a shear force. The initial mean shear bond strength values in MPa ± S.D were 28.02 ± 3.04 for White Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 27.54 ± 2.20 for Yellow Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 28.43 ± 2.13for White Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 27.36 ± 2.25 for Yellow Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 47.10 ± 3.77 for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram and 30.11 ± 2.15 for metal ceramic control. The highest shear strength was recorded for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram before and after thermocycling. The mean shear bond strength values of five other combinations were not significantly different (P < 0.05. Lithium-disilicate based combinations produced the highest core-veneer bonds that overwhelmed the metal ceramic combinations. Thermocycling had no effect on the core-veneer bonds. The core-veneer bonds of zirconia based combinations were not weakened by the addition of coloring pigments.

  7. Ceramic Adhesive and Methods for On-Orbit Repair of Re-Entry Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A.; Easler, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    ), and confirmed that the microstructure of the resulting repair leads to durability and resistance to melting or flow. Its processability and working life in a vacuum was demonstrated by NASA astronauts in glovebox processing studies, as well as on-orbit in the open space shuttle bay. All of these advantages increase the working life of NASA vehicles, as well as improve safety for any crew on a manned vehicle. The adhesive, trademarked NOAX(TM). or Non-Oxide Adhesive Experimental, flew on all space shuttle missions from Return To Flight (STS-114) until the final flight (STS- 135) as a crack repair material for the leading edges and nose cap of the vehicle. NOAX(TM) was patented under U.S. Patents 7,628,878 and 7,888,277.

  8. Radiation damage in multiphase ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Danju [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Patel, Maulik K.; Usov, Igor O. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Toiammou, Moidi; Monnet, Isabelle [CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Pivin, Jean Claude [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Porter, John R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States); Mecartney, Martha L., E-mail: martham@uci.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: Four-phase ceramic composites containing 3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (3Y-TZP), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and LaPO{sub 4} were synthesized as model materials representing inert matrix fuel with enhanced thermal conductivity and decreased radiation-induced microstructural damage with respect to single-phase UO{sub 2}. This multi-phase concept, if successful, could be applied to design advanced nuclear fuels which could then be irradiated to higher burn-ups. 3Y-TZP in the composite represents a host (fuel) phase with the lowest thermal conductivity and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the high thermal conductivity phase. The role of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LaPO{sub 4} was to stabilize the structure under irradiation. The radiation response was evaluated by ion irradiation at 500 °C with 10 MeV Au ions and at 800 °C with 92 MeV Xe ions, to simulate damage due to primary knock-on atoms and fission fragments, respectively. Radiation damage and microstructural changes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and computational modeling. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilized ZrO{sub 2} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases exhibit high amorphization resistance and remain stable when irradiated with both Au and Xe ions. A monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, however, is promoted by Xe and Au ion irradiation in 3Y-TZP. The LaPO{sub 4} monazite phase appears to melt, dewet the other phases, and recrystallize under Au irradiation, but does not change under Xe irradiation.

  9. Plant hallucinogens, shamanism and Nazca ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin de Rios, M; Cardenas, M

    1980-09-01

    The ceramics of the ancient Nazca, an extinct people that lived on the south coast of Peru from 100 to 800 AD, are examined. It is suggested that plant hallucinogens and stimulants including Trichocereus pachanoi, Erythroxylon coca, Datura spp., and Anadenanthera peregrina were utilized in religious ritualism connected with shamanism, stressing personal ecstasy as a means of contact with the supernatural on the part of regional religious-political leaders. Shamanic themes linked to world-wide plant hallucinogenic ingestion are identified and summarized, and their representation in Nazca ceramic art delineated.

  10. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  11. Applications of sol gel ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, D. [Datec Coating Corp., Kingston, Ont. (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The sol gel method is a chemical technique in which polycrystalline ceramic films are fabricated from a solution of organometallic precursors. The technique is attractive for many industrial applications because it is a simple (films are processed in air), flexible (can be used to coat complex geometries) and cost effective (does not require expensive equipment) process. In addition, dense, high quality coatings can be achieved at much lower temperatures than is generally required for sintering bulk ceramics. In this paper the conventional sol gel method and the new datec process are reviewed and potential applications of sol gel coatings in automotive, aerospace, petrochemical, nuclear and electronic industries are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Sothi-Siswal Ceramic Assemblage: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Garge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Harappan evidences in Chautan valley has a unique ceramic tradition. In the light of recent plethora of knowledge as well as against the background of the studies conducted by A. Ghosh, J.S. Nigam, Katy Frenchman, Suraj Bhan & Madhu Bala, we will have to not only reclassify the Sothi-Siswal ceramic assemblage but also alter basic nomenclatures and concepts involve in it. It will give us deep insight in to the process of evolution of Early Harappan cultures vis-à-vis the dynamic of regional cultural complexes.

  13. How Do You Measure That Ceramic Property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    By using the dozens of consensus test standards and practices developed by the Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, the measurement of mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties can be properly performed. The what, how, how not, and why are clearly illustrated for beginning as well as experienced testers. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, and producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986.

  14. Absorbable-susceptor joining of ceramic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J. E.; Shlichta, P. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An assembly of ceramic surfaces particularly refractory metal oxides and carbides, abutting a thin sheet of metal susceptor material are placed in a chamber of an enclosure containing inert gas. An RF coil is activated by power supply to melt the susceptor and adjacent zones of the ceramic. Reactive gas such as oxygen or a carbonizing gas is then fed to the chamber and reacts with the susceptor to form compounds which disperse and dissolve in the zones. On cooling, a strong joint is formed. The susceptor may contain inner perforations and outer perforations to aid in distribution of heat.

  15. High temperature metal and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Materials Division at NASA Lewis is engaged in research and development efforts on behalf of fiber-reinforced composite materials that are lighter, stiffer, and more structurally reliable than conventional monolithic alloys and ceramics in applications that range from the cryogenic to the refractory. Attention is presently given to metal matrix composites, in which high performance depends on stiff, strong and thermally stable large diameter fibers, with chemically stable interfacial bonding and good coefficient of thermal expansion matching between fibers and matrices, and to ceramic matrix composites, in which intermediate strength interfacial bonds must allow cracks to propagate through the matrix only, while retaining good load transfer characteristics between fiber and matrix.

  16. Aging of nickel manganite NTC ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Dao-lai; Zheng, Cui-hong; Chen, Chu-sheng; Winnubst, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of thermal history and chemical composition on aging of Ni x Mn3 − x O4 +  δ (0.56 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) ceramics was investigated. It was found that all the Ni x Mn3 − x O4 +  δ ceramic samples metallized by co-firing at 1050°C showed significant electrical stability with an aging coefficient less than

  17. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  18. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium......, and copper oxides is inserted into a silver tube and reduced by multi-step drawing. These single-filaments are packed in a new silver tube thus forming a multi-filament containing e.g. 37 single-filaments, which is subsequently reduced by drawing and rolling to tapes approximately 0.2 mm thick by 3 mm wide...

  19. Electronic structure of nanograin barium titanate ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiangyun; WANG Xiaohui; LI Dejun; LI Longtu

    2007-01-01

    The density of states and band structure of 20 nm barium titanate(BaTiO3,BT)ceramics are investigated by first-principles calculation.The full potential linearized augmented plane wave(FLAPW)method is used and the exchange correlation effects are treated by the generalized gradient approximation(GGA).The results show that there is substantial hybridization between the Ti 3d and O 2p states in 20 nm BT ceramics and the interaction between barium and oxygen is typically ionic.

  20. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium...... and current leading properties of the final superconducting fibres. The present work describes studies on alternative packing geometries and process parameters in the flat rolling operations. The aim is to obtain homogenous filaments with advantageous geometry and good texture while avoiding potential defects...

  1. Phase composition of yttrium-doped zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Christoph; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures; Weiss, Stephan [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements; Gumeniuk, R. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik

    2017-06-01

    Ceramic material might be an alternative to borosilicate glass for the immobilization of nuclear waste. The crystallinity of ceramic material increases the corrosion resistance over several magnitudes in relation to amorphous glasses. The stability of such ceramics depend on several parameters, among them the crystal phase composition. A reliable quantitative phase analysis is necessary to correlate the macroscopic material properties with structure parameters. We performed a feasibility study based on yttrium-doped zirconia ceramics as analogue for trivalent actinides to ascertain that the nanosized crystal phases in zirconia ceramics can be reliably determined.

  2. Compressive properties of open-cell ceramic foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-yan; FU Yi-ming; ZENG Xiao-ming

    2006-01-01

    The compressive experiments of two kinds of ceramic foams were completed. The results show that the behavior of ceramic foams made by organic filling method is anisotropic. The stress-strain responses of ceramic foams made by sponge-replication show isotropy and strain rate dependence. The struts brittle breaking of net structure of this ceramic foam arises at the weakest defects of framework or at the part of framework,which causes the initiation and expanding of cracks. The compressive strength of ceramic foam is dependent on the strut size and relative density of foams.

  3. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  4. Application of Ceramic Preforms to the Manufacturing of Ceramic - Metal Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K. Jach; K. Pietrzak; A. Wajler; A. Sidorowicz; U. Brykała

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of the presented paper is to study the effect of the volume content of the ceramic phase on the microstructure and selected physical and thermal properties of copper - alumina composites. Artykuł...

  5. Micro-separation in vitro produces clinically relevant wear of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevelos, J.; Fisher, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering; Ingham, E. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Div. of Microbiology; Doyle, C. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Newbury (United Kingdom); Streicher, R. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kilchberg (Switzerland); Nevelos, A. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Typical clinical wear rates for well-positioned first generation ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were of the order of 1-5 mm{sup 3}/year. This wear took the form of a 'stripe' of worn area on the heads with an Ra of approximately 0.1 {mu}m. As-manufactured unworn areas have an average Ra of 0.005 {mu}m Ra. This wear pattern has not been recorded following standard simulator testing with typical wear rates of less than 0.1 mm{sup 3} per million cycles. Therefore new material combinations for ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasty cannot be validated using standard hip simulator testing methods. However, recent fluoroscopy studies have shown that the head and cup of total hip replacements can separate during normal gait. This separation would lead to rim contact upon heel strike as shown in Figure 1. (orig.)

  6. Spectroscopic investigations on glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics developed for nuclear waste immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caurant, D.

    2014-05-01

    Highly radioactive nuclear waste must be immobilized in very durable matrices such as glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics in order to avoid their dispersion in the biosphere during their radioactivity decay. In this paper, we present various examples of spectroscopic investigations (optical absorption, Raman, NMR, EPR) performed to study the local structure of different kinds of such matrices used or envisaged to immobilize different kinds of radioactive wastes. A particular attention has been paid on the incorporation and the structural role of rare earths—both as fission products and actinide surrogates—in silicate glasses and glass-ceramics. An example of structural study by EPR of a ceramic (hollandite) irradiated by electrons (to simulate the effect of the β-irradiation of radioactive cesium) is also presented.

  7. Tailoring of unipolar strain in lead-free piezoelectrics using the ceramic/ceramic composite approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Daniels, John E. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Groh, Claudia; Jo, Wook; Webber, Kyle G. [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, Christina [Diamond Light Source, Beamline I12 JEEP, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kimpton, Justin A. [The Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    The electric-field-induced strain response mechanism in a polycrystalline ceramic/ceramic composite of relaxor and ferroelectric materials has been studied using in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction. The addition of ferroelectric phase material in the relaxor matrix has produced a system where a small volume fraction behaves independently of the bulk under an applied electric field. Inter- and intra-grain models of the strain mechanism in the composite material consistent with the diffraction data have been proposed. The results show that such ceramic/ceramic composite microstructure has the potential for tailoring properties of future piezoelectric materials over a wider range than is possible in uniform compositions.

  8. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  9. A Novel Conservation Method of Historical Outdoor Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aivaras Kareiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel conservation method was developed for the protection of historical outdoor ceramics. The historical ceramics from monastery of “San Filippo di Fragalà” (Sicily, Italy were chosen for this study. Polymeric films on the surface of ceramics specimens were formed using Silres BS 16 as a precursor. For the comparison, the material Paraloid B-82, which is already known in the conservation practice, was also used for the formation of protective coatings on historical ceramics. The investigated samples were characterized by SEM, TG, EDX, XRD methods and contact angle measurements. The results obtained showed that ceramic samples were successfully preserved and saturated by Silres BS 16 with forming effective polymeric coatings on ancient ceramics surfaces. Keywords: Ancient ceramics, conservation, Silres BS 16, SEM, TG, contact angle.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.6823

  10. Nature of ceramic materials: needs and opportunities for ceramic science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingery, W D

    1976-01-01

    Ceramic materials are inherently strong but brittle; many are stable and corrosion-resistant in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres to high temperatures, and they have a variety of useful optical, thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties. Because of their strength, brittleness, and high-temperature stability, they are inherently difficult to fabricate in a way that allows full use of their intrinsic properties. The needs and opportunities for new and improved ceramic science and technology are mostly related to the critical importance of ceramics in determining the feasibility or effectiveness of large complex systems. One example of a past success is the development of square-loop ferrites for computer memory systems. Many other systems now under development--magnetohydrodynamic power generation, solar energy systems, high-temperature gas turbines, nuclear waste management, optical communications systems, and many others--will become practical only if the fabrication of essential ceramic components with reliably controlled properties is achieved. Development of the science of ceramic characteristics and properties, development of technology for reliably producing desired characteristics and properties, and the training of ceramic scientists are currently progressing at a rate wholly inadequate for meeting the evident requirements.

  11. Ceramic on ceramic arthroplasty of the hip: new materials confirm appropriate use in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentuerk, U; von Roth, P; Perka, C

    2016-01-01

    The leading indication for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains aseptic loosening owing to wear. The younger, more active patients currently undergoing THA present unprecedented demands on the bearings. Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings have consistently shown the lowest rates of wear. The recent advances, especially involving alumina/zirconia composite ceramic, have led to substantial improvements and good results in vitro. Alumina/zirconia composite ceramics are extremely hard, scratch resistant and biocompatible. They offer a low co-efficient of friction and superior lubrication and lower rates of wear compared with other bearings. The major disadvantage is the risk of fracture of the ceramic. The new composite ceramic has reduced the risk of fracture of the femoral head to 0.002%. The risk of fracture of the liner is slightly higher (0.02%). Assuming that the components are introduced without impingement, CoC bearings have major advantages over other bearings. Owing to the superior hardness, they produce less third body wear and are less vulnerable to intra-operative damage. The improved tribology means that CoC bearings are an excellent choice for young, active patients requiring THA. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  13. Reliability and strength of all-ceramic dental restorations fabricated by direct ceramic machining (DCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, F; Kocher, P; Weibel, F; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P; Gauckler, L J

    2001-04-01

    All-ceramic dental bridges for the molar region are not yet available at reasonable costs. The novel direct ceramic machining (DCM) process allows an easy, reliable and rapid fabrication for all-ceramic dental restorations with high mechanical strength and good biocompatibility. In DCM, an enlarged framework is easily milled out of a pre-fabricated porous ceramic blank made of zirconia. After sintering to full density, no further time-consuming hard machining with diamond tools is needed. For individual esthetical requirements, the framework is coated with a veneer porcelain. Compared to the commercially available In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2 restorations, the mechanical strength of zirconia frameworks is twice as high, allowing the restorations to bear the high mastication forces in the molar region. In terms of reliability, zirconia bridges fabricated by the DCM process are also superior to In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2. A clinical study of three-unit dental bridges in the molar region found no problems after the first year of observation.

  14. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  15. MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF HIGHLY POROUS CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, IC; SANTEN, A; HOEKSTRA, HD; DEHOSSON, JTM; Born, I.C. van den

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical strength of highly porous ceramics in terms of the Weibull and Duxbury-Leath distributions. More than 1000 side-crushing strength tests on silica-catalyst carriers of various particle sizes have been performed in series. Within a series, preparation conditions we

  16. Nano-ceramics and method thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard (Livermore, CA); Reibold, Robert A. (Salida, CA)

    2006-08-08

    Disclosed herein is a method to produce ceramic materials utilizing the sol-gel process. The methods enable the preparation of intimate homogeneous dispersions of materials while offering the ability to control the size of one component within another. The method also enables the preparation of materials that will densify at reduced temperature.

  17. Laser ceramics with disordered crystalline structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Osipov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Shitov, V. A.; Maksimov, R. N.; Orlov, A. N.; Petrov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    New ceramic materials based on yttrium oxide Y2O3 with isovalent (Yb2O3, Nd2 O3, and Lu2O3) and heterovalent (ZrO2 and HfO2) components are synthesized, and their spectroscopic properties are investigated. Possible channels of losses in the gain of stimulated radiation in the radiative transitions of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions in ceramics with heterovalent additives are studied. The results of measurements of Y2O3 ceramics doped with zirconium and hafnium ions, the emission bandwidth and the lifetimes of the 4F3/2 and 2F5/2 levels of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions, respectively, are presented. It is shown that the nonradiative population of the 4F3/2 levels of neodymium ions is due to their dipole-dipole interaction with Zr3+ and Hf3+ ions. Laser generation in [(Yb0.01Lu0.24Y0.75)2O3]0.88(ZrO2)0.12 ceramics with disordered crystalline structure was achieved at a wavelength of 1034 nm with a differential efficiency of 29%.

  18. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  19. Moessbauer Spectra of Clays and Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, F. E.; Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical aspects of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in studies of clay-based ceramics are described. Moessbauer spectra of pottery clays fired under oxidising, reducing and changing conditions are explained, and the possibilities of using Moessbauer spectra to derive information on the firing temperatures and the kiln atmosphere during firing in antiquity are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  20. Anisotropic and Hierarchical Porosity in Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Aaron Zev

    The performance of multifunctional porous ceramics is often hindered by the seemingly contradictory effects of porosity on both mechanical and non-structural properties and yet a sufficient body of knowledge linking microstructure to these properties does not exist. Using a combination of tailored anisotropic and hierarchical materials, these disparate effects may be reconciled. In this project, a systematic investigation of the processing, characterization and properties of anisotropic and isotropic hierarchically porous ceramics was conducted. The system chosen was a composite ceramic intended as the cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Comprehensive processing investigations led to the development of approaches to make hierarchical, anisotropic porous microstructures using directional freeze-casting of well dispersed slurries. The effect of all the important processing parameters was investigated. This resulted in an ability to tailor and control the important microstructural features including the scale of the microstructure, the macropore size and total porosity. Comparable isotropic porous ceramics were also processed using fugitive pore formers. A suite of characterization techniques including x-ray tomography and 3-D sectional scanning electron micrographs (FIB-SEM) was used to characterize and quantify the green and partially sintered microstructures. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure was quantified and discrete element simulations (DEM) were used to explain the experimental observations. Finally, the comprehensive mechanical properties, at room temperature, were investigated, experimentally and using DEM, for the different microstructures.

  1. Three-dimensionally Perforated Calcium Phosphate Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics were produced by compression molding using a special mold followed by sintering. The porous calcium phosphate ceramics have three-dimensional and penetrated open pores380-400μm in diameter spaced at intervals of 200μm. The layers of the linear penetration pores alternately lay perpendicular to pore direction. The porosity was 59%-65% . The Ca/P molar ratios of the porous calcium phosphate ceramics range from 1.5 to 1.85. A binder containing methyl cellulose was most effective for preparing the powder compact among vinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, stearic acid, methyl cellulose and their mixtures. Stainless steel, polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies for the penetrated open pores. When polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies, the dies were burned out during the sintering process. Using stainless steel as the male dies with the removal of the dies before heat treatment resulted in a higher level of densification of the calcium phosphate ceramic.

  2. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  3. Probabilistic Prediction of Lifetimes of Ceramic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Powers, Lynn; Reh, Stefan; Baker, Eric H.

    2006-01-01

    ANSYS/CARES/PDS is a software system that combines the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) software with a modified version of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) Version 6.0 software. [A prior version of CARES/Life was reported in Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts (LEW-16018), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 20, No. 3 (March 1996), page 28.] CARES/Life models effects of stochastic strength, slow crack growth, and stress distribution on the overall reliability of a ceramic component. The essence of the enhancement in CARES/Life 6.0 is the capability to predict the probability of failure using results from transient finite-element analysis. ANSYS PDS models the effects of uncertainty in material properties, dimensions, and loading on the stress distribution and deformation. ANSYS/CARES/PDS accounts for the effects of probabilistic strength, probabilistic loads, probabilistic material properties, and probabilistic tolerances on the lifetime and reliability of the component. Even failure probability becomes a stochastic quantity that can be tracked as a response variable. ANSYS/CARES/PDS enables tracking of all stochastic quantities in the design space, thereby enabling more precise probabilistic prediction of lifetimes of ceramic components.

  4. Multiphase Nanocrystalline Ceramic Concept for Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mecartnery, Martha [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Graeve, Olivia [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-25

    The goal of this research is to help develop new fuels for higher efficiency, longer lifetimes (higher burn-up) and increased accident tolerance in future nuclear reactors. Multiphase nanocrystalline ceramics will be used in the design of simulated advanced inert matrix nuclear fuel to provide for enhanced plasticity, better radiation tolerance, and improved thermal conductivity

  5. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  6. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiubianu, George, E-mail: george.stiubianu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Ignat, Mircea [National R& D Institute for Electrical Engineering ICPE-CA Bucharest, Splaiul Unirii 313, District 3, Bucharest 030138 (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  7. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  8. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  9. PREPARATION OF HIGH PURITY MULLITE CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo, P.; Boch, P.

    1986-01-01

    Preparation of mullite ceramics by reaction-sintering of alumina silica shows the necessity of favoring densification over mullitisation. Different Al2O3/SiO2 ratios have been studied. The influence of additives, iron oxide and zirconium oxide, has been examined.

  10. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  11. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  12. Ceramic Wetlaid Nonwoven and Its Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Long-di; HUANG Xiu-bao; YU Xiu-ye

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the properties of wetlaid nonwovens and their composites in two different blended fibers (polyester and aromatic fiber pulp) and ceramic fiber pulp mainly. The conclusion is that high blending ratio of blended fiber will lead to the worse properties of the products.

  13. High energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clifford, J.R. [Titan Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide layer.

  14. Robotic milling for rapid ceramic pototyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guang-chao; ZHANG Hai-ou; WANG Gui-lan

    2005-01-01

    Robotic milling is a developing method for rapidly producing prototypes and parts, but the application is limited for materials such as wax, wood, plastic and light metal, etc. The reason for this is because of the robotic weak rigidity. In this paper, a method of robotic milling for ceramic prototyping is developed, one that has been successfully applied in a new rapid hard tooling technology-Direct Prototype Spray Tooling[1]. At first, the appropriate ceramic materials mixed with metal powder are confirmed for the robotic milling and the following plasma spraying process. Then the 6 - DOF robotic milling paths are extracted from the NC code and transformed into the robotic JBI type file, the NC code generated through the general CAD/CAM software such as UG -NX.Finally, the robotic milling characteristics such as moving path accuracy and milling force are tested to find the best milling parameters and to ensure the executable, accurate and efficient ceramic prototype milling technology.The development of this method not only broadens the robotic milling material range but also extends the rapid prototyping fields. It can also be used for producing ceramic parts that are difficult to machine.

  15. SEGMENTATION AND GRAIN SIZE OF CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Arnould

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some methods to automatically extract the grain boundaries of materials in order to develop an automatic method to determine the grain size and morphological parameters of ceramic materials. Results are presented in the case of sintered cerine (CeO2 materials.

  16. Samanid ceramics and neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarpay, G.; Frierman, J.D.; Asaro, F.

    1977-08-29

    Glazed pottery known as ''Afrasiyab'' and ''Nishapur'' wares (early Islamic ceramics) are generally attributed to the Samanid dynasty (819-1005). The clay composition of Samanid wares and discarded kiln items found in situ were analyzed by NAA and the elemental composition compared with that of other sherds. 7 figures, 1 table. (DLC)

  17. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja;

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...

  18. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...

  19. Chemical Composition of Ceramic Tile Glazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufrik, S. S.; Kurian, N. N.; Zhukova, I. I.; Znosko, K. F.; Belkov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out laser emission and x-ray fluorescence spectral analysis of glaze before and after its application to ceramic tile produced by Keramin JSC (Belarus). We have studied the internal microstructure of the ceramic samples. It was established that on the surface and within the bulk interior of all the samples, there are micropores of sizes ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers and microcracks as long as several hundred micrometers. The presence of micropores on the surface of the ceramic tile leads to an increase in the water absorption level and a decrease in frost resistance. It was found that a decrease in the surface tension of ceramic tile coatings is promoted by substitution of sodium by potassium, silica by boric anhydride, magnesium and barium by calcium, CaO by sodium oxide, and SiO2 by chromium oxide. We carried out a comparative analysis of the chemical composition of glaze samples using S4 Pioneer and ElvaX x-ray fluorescence spectrometers and also an LIBS laser emission analyzer.

  20. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  1. Shaving Ceramic Tiles To Final Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ernest

    1992-01-01

    Combination of template and routing tool cuts ceramic tiles to final dimensions. Template guides router along precisely defined planes to accurately and uniformly shave chamfers on edge of tiles. Legs of template temporarily bonded to workpiece by double-backed adhesive tape. Adaptable to in-situ final machining of other nominally flat, narrow surfaces.

  2. Pox Pottery: Earliest Identified Mexican Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, C F

    1965-07-09

    The earliest known ceramics from Mexico, termed "Pox Pottery," may mark the transition from a nomadic to a settled way of life. The presence of "Pox Pottery" in both coastal Guerrero and the Tehuacan Valley might provide evidence as to the type of environment in which this change first occurred.

  3. Studies on the heat shield structure of ceramic gas turbine components, first report: heat shield properties of the ceramic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, K.; Hisamatsu, T.; Yuri, I. (CRIEPI, Yokosuka-shi (Japan). Yokosuka Research Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    The ceramic gas turbine for power generation consists of ceramic parts and metal parts. In order to improve the performance and reliability of the ceramic gas turbine, it is important to develop a heat shield structure between ceramics and metal. CRIEPI proposed a heat shield structure for the ceramic combustor wall in which a small amount of air is introduced in a ceramic fibre layer in the ceramic combustor wall. It was confirmed that the heat shield structure has excellent performance in a high pressure combustion test. This report describes the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure in the ceramic combustor wall by numerical analysis. As a result of analysis, it was clarified that the ceramic fibre temperature changes rapidly near the ceramic tiles, and that the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure is as follows: heat shield performance is maintained by introducing a small amount of air; metal wall temperature is little affected by combustion gas temperature, thermophysical property of ceramic fibres and so on. 9 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzberger, Christian; Apel, Elke; Höland, Wolfram; Peschke, Arnd; Rheinberger, Volker M.

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  5. Titanium - ceramic restoration: How to improve the binding between titanium and ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Laksono

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Titanium alloys has been used as an alternative to nickel-chromium alloys for metal-ceramic restorations because of its good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. This indicated that it was possible to design coping according to standards established for metal-ceramics. However, titanium is chemically reacting strongly with gaseous elements which causes problems when ceramics are fused to titanium. Purpose: To provide information about improving the bonding between titanium and ceramic. Review: Titanium has two crystal modifications, the close-packed hexagonal (α structure, up to 880° C, and above this temperature the bodycentered cubic (β structure. The principal problems is the extensive dissolution of oxygen resulting in thick, oxygen-rich titanium layers called α-case that harms the bonding of ceramic to titanium and the great mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion of conventional ultra-low fusing ceramic. Methods have been developed for fusing ceramic to titanium like processing methods, the used of ultra-low fusing titanium ceramic, bonding agent, and protocol for ceramic bonding to titanium. Conclusion: Titanium and titanium alloys, based on their physical and chemical properties suitable for titanium-ceramic restorations, but careful selection of processing methods, ceramic materials, laboratory skill and strict protocol for ceramic bonding to titanium are necessary to improve the bonding between titanium and ceramic.Latar Belakang: Logam campur titanium telah dipakai sebagai salah satu bahan alternatif untuk logam nikel-krom pada pembuatan restorasi keramik taut logam karena mempunyai biokompatibilitas dan sifat mekanik yang baik. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa logam titanium dapat dipakai untuk pembuatan koping logam berdasarkan standar yang dipakai untuk pembuatan restorasi keramik taut logam. Meskipun, secara kimiawi logam titanium bereaksi dengan elemen-elemen gas yang menyebabkan masalah pada perlekatan

  6. An experimental bioactive dental ceramic for metal-ceramic restorations: Textural characteristics and investigation of the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Manda, Marianthi; Kavouras, Panagiotis; Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos S; Stefanidou, Maria; Koidis, Petros; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the textural characteristics of an experimental sol-gel derived feldspathic dental ceramic, which has already been proven bioactive and the investigation of its flexural strength through Weibull Statistical Analysis. The null hypothesis was that the flexural strength of the experimental and the commercial dental ceramic would be of the same order, resulting in a dental ceramic with apatite forming ability and adequate mechanical integrity. Although the flexural strength of the experimental ceramics was not statistically significant different compared to the commercial one, the amount of blind pores due to processing was greater. The textural characteristics of the experimental ceramic were in accordance with the standard low porosity levels reported for dental ceramics used for fixed prosthetic restorations. Feldspathic dental ceramics with typical textural characteristics and advanced mechanical properties as well as enhanced apatite forming ability can be synthesized through the sol-gel method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  8. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    built to simulate the Kellogg entrained-bed gasifier in use at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville facility, but at 1/10 of the firing rate. At the exit of the unit is a large candle filter vessel typically operated at approximately 1000 F (540 C) in which coupons of materials can be inserted to test their resistance to gasifier ash and gas corrosion. The system also has ports for testing of hydrogen separation membranes that are suitably contained in a pressure housing. In addition, NETL is operating the combustion and environmental research facility (CERF). In recent years, the 0.5 MMBtu/hr (0.5 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) CERF has served as a host for exposure of over 60 ceramic and alloy samples at ambient pressure as well as at 200 psig (for tubes). Samples have been inserted in five locations covering 1700-2600 F (930-1430 C), with exposures exceeding 1000 hours. In the present program, the higher priority metals are to be tested at 1500-1600 F (820-870 C) in one CERF location and near 1800-2000 F (980-1090 C) at other locations to compare results with those from the EERC tests.

  9. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  10. Mid-term results of the BIOLOX delta ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y K; Ha, Y C; Yoo, J-I; Jo, W L; Kim, K-C; Koo, K H

    2017-06-01

    We conducted a prospective study of a delta ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA) to determine the rate of ceramic fracture, to characterise post-operative noise, and to evaluate the mid-term results and survivorship. Between March 2009 and March 2011, 274 patients (310 hips) underwent cementless THA using a delta ceramic femoral head and liner. At each follow-up, clinical and radiological outcomes were recorded. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was undertaken to estimate survival. Four patients (four hips) died and 18 patients (20 hips) were lost to follow-up within five years. The remaining 252 patients (286 hips) were followed for a mean of 66.5 months (60 to 84). There were 144 men (166 hips) and 108 women (120 hips) with a mean age of 49.7 years (16 to 83) at surgery. The mean pre-operative Harris Hip Score of 47.1 points improved to 93.8 points at final follow-up. Six patients reported squeaking in seven hips; however, none were audible. Radiolucent lines involving Gruen zones one and/or seven were seen in 52 hips (18.2%). No hip had detectable wear, focal osteolysis or signs of loosening. One hip was revised because of fracture of the ceramic liner, which occurred due to an undetected malseating of the ceramic liner at the time of surgery. One hip was revised for a periprosthetic fracture of the femur, and one hip was treated for periprosthetic joint infection. The six-year survivorship with re-operation for any reason as the endpoint was 99.0% (95% confidence interval 97.8% to 100%). The rate of delta ceramic fracture was 0.3% (one of 286). While ceramic head fracture was dominant in previous ceramic-on-ceramic THA, fracture of the delta ceramic liner due to malseating is a concern. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:741-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. Outcome of bonded vs all-ceramic and metal- ceramic fixed prostheses for single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The conventional treatment of a single missing tooth is most frequently based on the provision of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDPs). A variety of designs and restorative materials are available which have an impact on the treatment outcome. Consequently, it was the aim of this review to compare resin-bonded, all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs based on existing evidence. An electronic literature search using "metal-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, all-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, resin-bonded" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, fiber reinforced composite" AND "clinical, monolithic" AND "zirconia" AND "clinical" was conducted and supplemented by the manual searching of bibliographies from articles already included. A total of 258 relevant articles were identified. Metal-ceramic FDPs still show the highest survival rates of all tooth-supported restorations. Depending on the ceramic system used, all-ceramic restorations may reach comparable survival rates while the technical complications, i.e. chipping fractures of veneering materials in particular, are more frequent. Resin-bonded FDPs can be seen as long-term provisional restorations with the survival rate being higher in anterior locations and when a cantilever design is applied. Inlay-retained FDPs and the use of fiber-reinforced composites overall results in a compromised long-term prognosis. Recently advocated monolithic zirconia restorations bear the risk of low temperature degradation. Several variables affect treatment planning for a given patient situation, with survival and success rates of different restorative options representing only one factor. The broad variety of designs and materials available for conventional tooth-supported restorations should still be considered as a viable treatment option for single tooth replacement.

  12. KROME Ceramics: color management system for the ceramics industry; KROME: Ceramics Sistema de gestion del color para la industra ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luque, J.; Pla, O.; Selvi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Digital Decoration Systems, SL (DIGIT-S) with Unicer, SL, has implemented a system to improve and optimize the process of decorating by inkjet printing for ceramic industry. It provides a comprehensive solution, KROME Ceramics, to improve the cost effectiveness of product and process through the implementation of a working system based on the control of digital decoration process and the synchronization of all elements that make up the decorative modules, including the creation of a work flow, management of files that are generated during the process, a correct color management system, and of course, optimizing and evaluating ink jet inks integrating all elements involved: Lighting, Computer, Software, Monitor, Plotter, Paper, Ink, Ink jet, Body's, Enamels and Oven. (Author)

  13. Effect of intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Yoshinari, Masao; Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of the intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) and its intermediate ceramics. Two types of intermediate ceramics, defined as a ceramics placed between the TZP and its veneering ceramics, were used; one including high-strength lithium-disilicate (EP) or feldspathic liner porcelain (SB). The firing temperature of the intermediate ceramics was set at 930°C, 945°C or 960°C. Shear bond strength showed values of 35.8 MPa in SB and 54.9 MPa in EP at a firing temperature of 960°C. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that components of the intermediate ceramics remained on the TZP surface after debonding, indicating that fractures occurred in the intermediate ceramics near the TZP. These results indicate that the bond strength between and a TZP framework and its veneering ceramics could be improved by using a high-strength intermediate ceramics and a comparatively high firing temperature.

  14. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  15. Occupational ceramic fibres dermatitis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Wojtczak, J

    2000-07-01

    Recently, the use of asbestos has been considerably limited in Poland, with the simultaneous increase in the manufacture, processing and application of man-made mineral fibres, which includes ceramic fibres. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the type and frequency of dermal changes caused by the irritant activity of ceramic fibres among workers at the plants that manufacture packing and insulation products; and (2) to compare the irritant activity of Polish-made L-2 and L-3 ceramic fibres with that of the Thermowool ceramic fibres made in England. Workers (n = 226) who were exposed to ceramic fibres underwent dermatological examination. Patch tests with the standard allergen set, together with samples of the fibres L-2, L-3, and Thermowool fibres, were applied to all the workers. It has been shown that the Polish-made L-2 and L-3 fibres differed from Thermowool fibres in that the L-2 and L-3 fibres contained zirconium and were coarser. The proportion of filaments with diameters above 3 microns was 11.1% in the L-3 fibre and 6.3% in the L-2 fibre samples. The Thermowool fibre did not contain filaments thicker than 3 microns. Evident dermal changes, resulting from strong irritant activity of the fibres, were detected in 109 (48.2%) of the workers examined. Irritant contact dermatitis acuta (maculae, sometimes papulae and small crusts on the upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities), disappearing after 2-3 days, was found in 50 (22.1%) workers. Irritant contact dermatitis chronica (diffuse permanent erythema with numerous telangiectasiae on the lateral portions of the face and neck, on the trunk, behind the auricles) was detected in 40 (17.7%) workers. The remaining 19 (8.4%) workers had both types of dermal change. All examined workers complained of very strong itching. The results of the patch tests confirmed the irritant activity of the ceramic fibres. Erythema without oedema, persisting for up to 96 h, appeared at the places where the fibres had

  16. Comparison of fracture toughness of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic cement retained implant crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S; Chowdhary, R

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the fracture toughness of cement-retained implant-supported metal-ceramic molar crown with that of all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using IPS Empress 2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia copings. An dental implant and abutment was embedded in a clear polymethyl methacrylate model. A wax pattern reproducing the anatomy and dimension of a mandibular molar was made using inlay wax. Copings were made from the manufacturers guidelines for zirconia, metal ceramic and empress crown, in total of 21 copings, which were built for the crowns with metal layering ceramics specified by the manufacturers. The polymethylmethacrylate block-implant abutment complex was mounted on universal testing machine, and a static continuos vertical compressive load with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min was applied. The breaking load and the peak load (in kilo Newtons) were recorded. The fractures for group I (zirconia-ceramic) and group II (metal-ceramic) occurred on the mesio-buccal aspect of the crowns involving the veneered ceramic layer while the catastrophic/bulk fracture was not observed. The mean value of breaking load for zirconia-ceramic, metal-ceramic and IPS-empress 2 was 3.4335, 3.071 and 1.0673 kN respectively. The mean value of peak load for zirconia-ceramic, metal-ceramic and IPS-empress 2 was 4.7365, 3.2757 and 1.566 kN respectively. It can be concluded that the zirconia-ceramic crown with the fracture toughness of 4.7365 ± 2.2676 kN has sufficient strength to allow clinical testing of these crowns as an alternative for metal-ceramic crowns (3.2757 ± 0.4681 kN).

  17. A comparison between the effect of All-Ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations on the plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezatollah Jalalian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tooth crowning often leads to changes in periodontal index through changes in emergence profile zone. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of metal-ceramic with that ofAll-Ceramic restorations on the plaque a accumulation.   Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, we used 102 teeth covered with metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. Before and after crowning, plaque index (PI and gingival indexes (MGl were measured. Data were analyzed using covariance (ANCOVA test.   Results: Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in PFM Group prior to crowning were (1.96±0.38 and (1.45±0.48, respectively. In metal-ceramic restorations group, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (1.22±0.49 and (1.82±0.61, respectively. Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in All-Ceramic Group prior to crowning were (1.22±0.52 and (1.25±0.29, respectively. In All-Ceramic, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (0.88±0.51 and (1.43±0.50, respectively. ANOVA test showed statistical significance difference between metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic Groups in Indexes (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic crowns were associated with inflammatory changes in gingival. Metal-ceramic restorations were associated with higher inflammatory indexes compared with All-Ceramic crowns.

  18. Creep Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of a SiC/SiC Ceramic Composite with a Self-healing Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.; Pope, M. T.

    2014-02-01

    Creep behavior in interlaminar shear of a non-oxide ceramic composite with a multilayered matrix was investigated at 1,200 °C in laboratory air and in steam environment. The composite was produced via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The composite had an oxidation inhibited matrix, which consisted of alternating layers of silicon carbide and boron carbide and was reinforced with laminated Hi-Nicalon™ fibers woven in a five-harness-satin weave. Fiber preforms had pyrolytic carbon fiber coating with boron carbide overlay applied. The interlaminar shear properties were measured. The creep behavior was examined for interlaminar shear stresses in the 16-22 MPa range. Primary and secondary creep regimes were observed in all tests conducted in air and in steam. In air and in steam, creep run-out defined as 100 h at creep stress was achieved at 16 MPa. Larger creep strains were accumulated in steam. However, creep strain rates and creep lifetimes were only moderately affected by the presence of steam. The retained properties of all specimens that achieved run-out were characterized. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  19. Identification of a Critical Time with Acoustic Emission Monitoring during Static Fatigue Tests on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Towards Lifetime Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Godin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites are promising candidates for some aeronautic applications that require good thermomechanical behavior over long periods of time. This study focuses on the behavior of a SiCf/[Si-B-C] composite with a self-healing matrix at intermediate temperature under air. Static fatigue experiments were performed below 600 °C and a lifetime diagram is presented. Damage is monitored both by strain measurement and acoustic emission during the static fatigue experiments. Two methods of real-time analysis of associated energy release have been developed. They allow for the identification of a characteristic time that was found to be close to 55% of the measured rupture time. This critical time reflects a critical local energy release assessed by the applicability of the Benioff law. This critical aspect is linked to a damage phase where slow crack growth in fibers is prevailing leading to ultimate fracture of the composite.

  20. 80 FR 65469 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    ... Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal...; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. All major sources in these categories must meet...

  1. Theoretical analysis of thermal shock resistance of ceramic foam coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic foams have a high resistance to corrosion and wear. They also have a good thermal insulation performance because of their high melting point and low thermal conductivity. The thermal shock resistance of a ceramic foam coating with an edge crack under a sudden temperature variation is investigated. The dynamic thermal stress fields in the ceramic foam coating are obtained. Using the superposition principle, the crack problem of the ceramic foam coating is reduced to the solution of a set of singular integral equations. Propagation of the edge crack is analyzed. Effects of the relative density and thermal properties of the ceramic foam and of crack length on the thermal shock resistance are identified. The results obtained can be useful in designing thermal protective ceramic materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  2. Method for non-destructive evaluation of ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Kristen A.; Rosen, Elias P.; Jordan, Eric H.; Shahbazmohamadi, Sina; Vakhtin, Andrei B.

    2016-11-08

    A method for evaluating the condition of a ceramic coating deposited on a substrate comprising illuminating the ceramic coating with light, measuring the intensity of light returned from the ceramic coating as function of depth in the coating and transverse position on the coating, and analyzing the measured light intensities to obtain one or more of intensity of the light returned from the exposed coating surface relative to the intensity of light returned from the coating/substrate interface, intensity of the light returned from the coating/substrate interface relative to the intensity of light returned from the bulk of the ceramic coating, determination of roughness at the exposed surface of the ceramic coating, and determination of roughness of the interface between the ceramic coating and underlying bond coat or substrate.

  3. Method for non-destructive evaluation of ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristen A.; Rosen, Elias P.; Jordan, Eric H.; Shahbazmohamadi, Sina; Vakhtin, Andrei B.

    2016-11-08

    A method for evaluating the condition of a ceramic coating deposited on a substrate comprising illuminating the ceramic coating with light, measuring the intensity of light returned from the ceramic coating as function of depth in the coating and transverse position on the coating, and analyzing the measured light intensities to obtain one or more of intensity of the light returned from the exposed coating surface relative to the intensity of light returned from the coating/substrate interface, intensity of the light returned from the coating/substrate interface relative to the intensity of light returned from the bulk of the ceramic coating, determination of roughness at the exposed surface of the ceramic coating, and determination of roughness of the interface between the ceramic coating and underlying bond coat or substrate.

  4. Mullite glass-ceramic glazes synthesized through a sol-gel and ceramic mixed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, I.; Hohemberger, J.M.; Carda, J.B. [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain). Dept. Quimica Inorganica y Organica; Jovani, M.A.; Nebot, A. [Colorobbia Espana S.A. Villafames, Castellon (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of the present work is the development of a glass-ceramic glaze with similar properties to the mullite crystalline phase. We have developed new glass-ceramic materials, which are formed through devitrification of mullite. The synthesis process combines the traditional ceramic method and the more innovative sol-gel methodologies. Amorphous precursors for the glass-ceramic glazes were obtained through precalcination of previously synthesized gels. These amorphous materials served as crystallization nuclei when introduced in the enamel composition. Gels were synthesized by the polymeric sol-gel method using AlCl{sub 3}, t-BuOH and TEOS as precursors. Composition of frit was optimized in such a way that a frit rich in aluminum and silicon would have the adequate physical and chemical characteristics for the desired application. Microstructure and structure of all the obtained materials were characterized. DTA-TG profiles and mechanical, chemical and optical properties were evaluated. On the other hand, the glass-ceramic glazes were compared first to glass-crystalline mullite glazes, which were obtained by addition of mullite crystals to the frit and then, to the glaze derived of just the frit. (orig.)

  5. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  6. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  7. Manufacturing conditioned roughness and wear of biomedical oxide ceramics for all-ceramic knee implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turger, Anke; Köhler, Jens; Denkena, Berend; Correa, Tomas A; Becher, Christoph; Hurschler, Christof

    2013-08-29

    Ceramic materials are used in a growing proportion of hip joint prostheses due to their wear resistance and biocompatibility properties. However, ceramics have not been applied successfully in total knee joint endoprostheses to date. One reason for this is that with strict surface quality requirements, there are significant challenges with regard to machining. High-toughness bioceramics can only be machined by grinding and polishing processes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated process chain for the manufacturing of an all-ceramic knee implant. A five-axis machining process was developed for all-ceramic implant components. These components were used in an investigation of the influence of surface conformity on wear behavior under simplified knee joint motion. The implant components showed considerably reduced wear compared to conventional material combinations. Contact area resulting from a variety of component surface shapes, with a variety of levels of surface conformity, greatly influenced wear rate. It is possible to realize an all-ceramic knee endoprosthesis device, with a precise and affordable manufacturing process. The shape accuracy of the component surfaces, as specified by the design and achieved during the manufacturing process, has a substantial influence on the wear behavior of the prosthesis. This result, if corroborated by results with a greater sample size, is likely to influence the design parameters of such devices.

  8. Foshan ceramics - One Thousand-Year-Old City of Ceramic Arts%佛山陶瓷千年陶韵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏国恩; 张江年

    2006-01-01

    @@ Foshan is a famous city with culture and history.Among the civilizations of Foshan, ceramic culutre is the most well-konwn and outstanding. Shi Wan Ceramics in Foshan is a name card of Foshan. It wins the reputation as the "the ceramic capital in South China" for Foshan city and develops the regional economic concept of "greater Foshan ceramics".

  9. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...... for the topology of multicomponent melts, before accurate prediction of phase relations within boron-containing glass ceramics can be obtained....

  10. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard Lee; Hollingsworth, Joel P.

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  11. End-Pumped Tm:YAG Ceramic Slab Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao-Jin; XU Jian-Qiu; ZHANG Wen-Xin; JIANG Sen-Xue; PAN Yu-Bai

    2009-01-01

    Lasers from a Tm:YAG ceramic aare reported for the first time to our best knowledge. The Tm:YAG ceramic slab is end-pumped by a laser diode with central wavelength 792nm. At room temperature, the maximum continuous-wave output power is 4.5 W, and the sloping efficiency is obtained to be 20.5%. The laser spectrum of the Tm: YAG ceramic is centered at 2015 nm.

  12. Simulation and performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jia-qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability ...

  13. Transparent Ceramics for High-Energy Laser Systems (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    s t r a c t We demonstrate that transparent magnesium aluminate spinel ceramic possesses excellent thermo-opti- cal properties, a record low...are required. We have developed transparent magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) ceramic as a rugged win- dow and dome material for protecting EO/IR...public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We demonstrate that transparent magnesium aluminate spinel ceramic

  14. Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Ceramics Using an Asymmetric Wedge Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    moisture durability of adhesive bonding of ceramics is dental applications (12–14). The adhesive bonding of ceramic orthodontic inserts presents unique...sample sets. Environmental exposure is often limited to mechanical testing on the millimeter scale of bonded ceramic blocks or extracted human...Dressler, K. B.; Grenadier, M. R. Direct Bonding of Orthodontic Brackets to Esthetic Restorative Materials Using a Silane. Am. J. Orthodontics and

  15. Analysis of Material Removal in Alumina Ceramic Honing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The removal mechanism is of importance to the grinding of hard and brittle ceramic materials. It is more suitable to analyze the material removal during ceramics honing processes by means of indention fracture approach. There are two honing characteristics different from grinding, the honing incidental tensile stresses and the crosshatch pattern. The stresses may influence material removal of brittle ceramics with lower tensile strength. In addition, the criss-cross cutting pattern on a bore known as cros...

  16. Ceramic Electrolyte Membrane Technology: Enabling Revolutionary Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Sakamoto group is one of the first groups to investigate a new ceramic electrolyte based on cubic garnet-structured lithium lanthanum zirconium oxide ( LLZO ...technology to fabricate larger LLZO ceramic membranes. The goal of this work is to develop ceramic processing technology to fabricate LLZO membranes that...zirconium oxide ( LLZO ) exhibiting the unprecedented combination of fast ion conductivity, stability against Li, air and moisture. While the initial

  17. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CERAMICS MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    F.T. Owoeye; A.P. Azodo; S.B. Udo

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic membranes are especially suitable for processes with high temperatures and harsh chemical environments or for processes where sterilizability of the membrane is important. The main objective of this work is to determine the evaluation of four different ceramic membranes with different material compositions. Ceramic disc type microfiltration membranes were fabricated by the mould and press method from different percentage compositions of clay, kaolin, sawdust and wood charcoal. The fab...

  18. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, Sergey Nikolaevich

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by...

  19. Tribology of selected ceramics at temperatures to 900 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Deadmore, D.; Miyoshi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Results of fundamental and focused research on the tribological properties of ceramics are discussed. The basic friction and wear characteristics are given for ceramics of interest for use in gas turbine, adiabatic diesel, and Stirling engine applications. The importance of metal oxides in ceramic/metal sliding combinations is illustrated. The formulation and tribological additives are described. Friction and wear data are given for carbide and oxide-based composite coatings for temperatures to at least 900 C.

  20. Dielectric and electrical design consideration of ceramics for fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, H.

    1991-03-01

    The research and development of high performance ceramics for nuclear applications are increasing their importance. Especially in nuclear development, innovative and application of ceramics are needed in fusion reactors. Summarized are the development of new materials such as silicon nitride with good mechanical and electrical properties and the application of zirconia-based ceramics for high temperature electrolysis of tritiated water in a tritium recycling system.

  1. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  2. Development on Laser Cladding Ceramic Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The latest progress and research status of laser cladding ceramic coating was summarized. Technique characteristics and influence factors of laser cladding technique were introduced. Laser cladding technique includes the mixing method and laser irradiation. The mixing method can be classified as pre-coating method and synchronization method. The technique parameters include size of facula, scanning speed, cladding sector and times, adding quantity of powder, thickness of coating and quantity of joint coating. The results show that proper technique parameters can be controlled in order to acquire high quality laser cladding coating. Strengthened effect mechanism of rare earth additive is concluded, and the main effects of rare earth additive are micro-alloying, purifying boundary, fining crystal grains, improving crystal boundary, restraining columnar crystal growing. The development of laser cladding ceramic coating research was discussed.

  3. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscolo, I. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan, (Italy); Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy); Giannessi, L. [ENEA, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Centro Ricerche Elettronica

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are presented. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm{sup 2}, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10{sup -4} mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way.

  4. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  5. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Over the past forty years, a wealth of information on the behavior of ceramic materials in heat engine environments has been obtained. In the first part of the talk we summarize the behavior of monolithic SiC and Si3N4. These materials show excellent baseline behavior in clean, oxygen environments. However the aggressive components in a heat engine environment such as water vapor and salt deposits can be quite degrading. In the second part of the talk we discuss SiC-based composites. The critical issue with these materials is oxidation of the fiber coating. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions in ceramic corrosion research.

  6. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  7. Microstructure -- property studies of bicuvox ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, T.P.; Dunn, B.; Fuqua, P.D. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The bismuth vanadate composition, Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11}, is the parent compound for a new family of oxygen ion conductors. The substitution of various metallic ions for vanadium stabilizes the high temperature y-phase and leads to a series of compounds which possess the highest oxygen ion conductivities observed for temperatures below 400{degrees}C. This paper reports the first studies on the processing, densification and transport properties of copper-doped bismuth vanadate ceramics. Phase-pure materials with densities above 95% of theoretical were obtained using standard ceramic processing approaches. Ionic conductivities in the range of 1 x 10{sup -2} S/cm at 400{degrees}C were observed for a variety of sintered samples.

  8. CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  9. Active Optical Fibers Doped with Ceramic Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mrazek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped active optical fiber was successfully prepared by incorporation of ceramic nanocrystals inside a core of optical fiber. Modified chemical vapor deposition was combined with solution-doping approach to preparing preform. Instead of inorganic salts erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium garnet nanocrystals were used in the solution-doping process. Prepared preform was drawn into single-mode optical fiber with a numerical aperture 0.167. Optical and luminescence properties of the fiber were analyzed. Lasing ability of prepared fiber was proofed in a fiber-ring set-up. Optimal laser properties were achieved for a fiber length of 20~m. The slope efficiency of the fiber-laser was about 15%. Presented method can be simply extended to the deposition of other ceramic nanomaterials.

  10. Shock experiments in metals and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III.

    1990-01-01

    Shock recovery and spallation experiments, in which material structure/property effects are systematically varied and characterized quantitatively, offer two important experimental techniques to probe the physical mechanisms controlling shock processes and dynamic fracture. This paper highlights the current state of knowledge and principal challenges of the structure/property effects of shock-wave deformation on metals and ceramics. Recent shock-recovery and spallation experimental results on post-mortem material properties and fracture behavior in metals and ceramics are reviewed. Finally, the influence of shock-wave deformation on several intermetallics and a recent experiment examining the Bauschinger effect in Al-4% Cu during shock loading are presented. 65 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Over the past forty years, a wealth of information on the behavior of ceramic materials in heat engine environments has been obtained. In the first part of the talk we summarize the behavior of monolithic SiC and Si3N4. These materials show excellent baseline behavior in clean, oxygen environments. However the aggressive components in a heat engine environment such as water vapor and salt deposits can be quite degrading. In the second part of the talk we discuss SiC-based composites. The critical issue with these materials is oxidation of the fiber coating. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions in ceramic corrosion research.

  12. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    allow capturing spatial hand gestures and body movement in real-time. Where technology often seems to take us away from material this approach enables the designers body to be once again involved in the making. This approach builds on McCullough’s (1998) idea about a close connection between digital...... investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to do with a digital interactive system that responds on the movement of the hands; at a certain distance the user’s hands appear on a monitor screen...... and Aesthetics in the conference. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows to bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors...

  13. Translucency of Dental Ceramic, Post and Bracket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Translucency of dental ceramics, esthetic posts and orthodontic brackets was reviewed. Translucency parameter (TP and contrast ratio (CR are generally used for translucency evaluation. For the evaluation of translucency, two criteria such as the translucency of human teeth (TP = 15–19, 1 mm thick and the visual perceptibility threshold for the translucency difference (∆CR > 0.07 or ∆TP > 2 were used. In ceramics, translucency differences were in the perceptible range depending on the type of material and the thickness. However, variations caused by the difference in the required thickness for each layer by the material and also by the measurement protocols should be considered. As to the translucency of esthetic posts, a significant difference was found among the post systems. Translucency was influenced by the bracket composition and brand, and the differences by the brand were visually perceptible.

  14. Laser processing of ceramics for microelectronics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposili, Robert S.; Bovatsek, James; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in the microelectronics, semiconductor, and LED lighting industries because of their electrically insulating and thermally conductive properties, as well as for their high-temperature-service capabilities. However, their brittleness presents significant challenges for conventional machining processes. In this paper we report on a series of experiments that demonstrate and characterize the efficacy of pulsed nanosecond UV and green lasers in machining ceramics commonly used in microelectronics manufacturing, such as aluminum oxide (alumina) and aluminum nitride. With a series of laser pocket milling experiments, fundamental volume ablation rate and ablation efficiency data were generated. In addition, techniques for various industrial machining processes, such as shallow scribing and deep scribing, were developed and demonstrated. We demonstrate that lasers with higher average powers offer higher processing rates with the one exception of deep scribes in aluminum nitride, where a lower average power but higher pulse energy source outperformed a higher average power laser.

  15. Development of Ceramics with Highly Organized Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    rolling, cold rolling, and wire drawing. These techniques, however, are not applicable to less compliant systems such as brittle ceramics; thus new...primary grain size effects have been identified for properties such as fracture toughness, compressive and tensile strength, hardness, wear resistance... isostatically laminated at 70’C and 200 MPa for 30 minutes. Sample thicknesses after lamination were approximately 1.0 - 1.5 mm. The samples were then

  16. Proton conducting ceramics in membrane separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Kyle S; Korinko, Paul S; Fox, Elise B; Chen, Frank

    2015-04-14

    Perovskite materials of the general formula SrCeO.sub.3 and BaCeO.sub.3 are provided having improved conductivity while maintaining an original ratio of chemical constituents, by altering the microstructure of the material. A process of making Pervoskite materials is also provided in which wet chemical techniques are used to fabricate nanocrystalline ceramic materials which have improved grain size and allow lower temperature densification than is obtainable with conventional solid-state reaction processing.

  17. Literature Review of Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Reuben James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs), also known as preceramic polymers, are valuable coating agents that are used to produce surface barriers on substrates such as stainless steel. These barriers protect against a multitude of environmental threats, and have been used since their research and development in 19772. This paper seeks to review and demonstrate the remarkable properties and versatility that PDCs have to offer, while also giving a brief overview of the processing techniques used today.

  18. Joining of ultra-high temperature ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestroni, Laura; Sciti, Diletta; Esposito, Laura; Glaeser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, ultra-high temperature ceramics raised renewed interest after the first studies in the 60's. Thanks to their high melting point, superior to any group of materials, and to their set of interesting physical and engineering properties, they find application in aerospace industry, propulsion field, as cladding materials in generation IV nuclear reactors and solar absorbers in novel HT CSP systems. Recent efforts were devoted to the achievement of high strength and toughness m...

  19. Cr-Free Metallic-Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Cr -FREE METALLIC-CERAMIC COATINGS ASETS Defense 2014 Fort Myer, VA, November 18-20, 2014 Bruce McMordie Coatings for Industry 319...SNECMA Alseal® 5K Aluminum-Silicate Al-Silicate Coating System Now Available That Can Eliminate Hazards of Carcinogenic Cr +6 in Al...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cr -Free Metallic

  20. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.